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Sample records for water freezing point

  1. Reproducing Black's experiments: freezing point depression and supercooling of water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Güémez, J.; Fiolhais, C.; Fiolhais, M.

    2002-01-01

    We carried out two historical experiments referred to by Joseph Black, one on freezing mixtures of salted water with ice and another on freezing supercooled pure water by a small disturbance. The results confirm thermodynamical predictions for the depression of the freezing point of salted water and for the latent heat of freezing of supercooled water respectively, which came after Black. The depression of the freezing point can hardly be fitted in the framework of the caloric theory of heat, which was taken for granted by Black, and the instantaneous freezing of supercooled water also poses some difficulties for that theory.

  2. Cavitation in water under tension near the freezing point

    SciTech Connect

    Sosikov, V. A. Utkin, A. V.; Fortov, V. E.

    2008-05-15

    Experiments are reported on cavitation in water at an initial temperature of 0.7 deg. C under the dynamic tension created when a compression wave interacts with a free liquid surface. It is found that the tensile strength of water increases from 20 to 50 MPa as the strain rate is varied from 1.8 x 10{sup 4} to 5.2 x 10{sup 4} s{sup -1}. It is shown that the phase state of water obtained in experiments is in a double metastable region.

  3. Freezing Point Depression of Water in Phospholipid Membranes — A Solid-State NMR Study

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dong-Kuk; Kwon, ByungSoo; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2009-01-01

    Lipid-water interaction plays an important role in the properties of lipid bilayers, cryoprotectants, and membrane-associated peptides and proteins. The temperature at which water bound to lipid bilayers freezes is lower than that of free water. Here, we report a solid-state NMR investigation on the freezing point depression of water in phospholipid bilayers in the presence and absence of cholesterol. Deuterium NMR spectra at different temperatures ranging from -75 to +10°C were obtained from fully 2H2O-hydrated POPC (1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-phosphatidylcholine) multilamellar vesicles (MLVs), prepared with and without cholesterol, to determine the freezing temperature of water and the effect of cholesterol on the freezing temperature of water in POPC bilayers. Our 2H NMR experiments reveal the motional behavior of unfrozen water molecules in POPC bilayers even at temperatures significantly below 0°C and show that the presence of cholesterol further lowered the freezing temperature of water in POPC bilayers. These results suggest that in the presence of cholesterol the fluidity and dynamics of lipid bilayers can be retained even at very low temperatures as exist in the liquid crystalline phase of the lipid. Therefore, bilayer samples prepared with a cryoprotectant like cholesterol should enable the performance of multidimensional solid-state NMR experiments to investigate the structure, dynamics, and topology of membrane proteins at a very low temperature with enhanced sample stability and possibly a better sensitivity. Phosphorus-31 NMR data suggest that lipid bilayers can be aligned at low temperatures, while 15N NMR experiments demonstrate that such aligned samples can be used to enhance the signal-to-noise ratio of 15N chemical shift spectra of a 37-residue human antimicrobial peptide, LL-37. PMID:18991419

  4. Graphene confinement effects on melting/freezing point and structure and dynamics behavior of water.

    PubMed

    Foroutan, Masumeh; Fatemi, S Mahmood; Shokouh, F

    2016-05-01

    In this work, the melting/freezing point of confined water between two graphene sheets was calculated from the direct coexistence of the solid-liquid interface. Also, molecular dynamics simulation of confined liquid water-ice between two graphene sheets was applied. The phase transition temperature of the confined ice-water mixture was calculated as 240K that was 29K less than the non-confined ice-water system. In order to study the behavior of water molecules at different distances from the graphene sheets, 5 regions were provided using some imaginary planes, located between two graphene sheets. The obtained simulation results showed that water molecules located in the region near each graphene sheet with the thickness of 2nm had a different behavior from other water molecules located in other regions. The results demonstrated that water molecules in the vicinity of graphene sheets had more mean square displacements than those in the middle regions. PMID:27041448

  5. When hot water freezes before cold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katz, J. I.

    2009-01-01

    I suggest that the origin of the Mpemba effect (the freezing of hot water before cold) is due to freezing-point depression by solutes, either gaseous or solid, whose solubility decreases with increasing temperature so that they are removed when water is heated. The solutes are concentrated ahead of the freezing front by zone refining in water that has not been heated, reducing the temperature of the freezing front, and thereby reducing the temperature gradient and heat flux, slowing the progress of the freezing front. I present a simple calculation of this effect, and suggest experiments to test this hypothesis.

  6. Poly(vinyl methyl ether) hydrogels at temperatures below the freezing point of water-molecular interactions and states of water.

    PubMed

    Pastorczak, Marcin; Dominguez-Espinosa, Gustavo; Okrasa, Lidia; Pyda, Marek; Kozanecki, Marcin; Kadlubowski, Slawomir; Rosiak, Janusz M; Ulanski, Jacek

    2014-01-01

    Water interacting with a polymer reveals a number of properties very different to bulk water. These interactions lead to the redistribution of hydrogen bonds in water. It results in modification of thermodynamic properties of water and the molecular dynamics of water. That kind of water is particularly well observable at temperatures below the freezing point of water, when the bulk water crystallizes. In this work, we determine the amount of water bound to the polymer and of the so-called pre-melting water in poly(vinyl methyl ether) hydrogels with the use of Raman spectroscopy, dielectric spectroscopy, and calorimetry. This analysis allows us to compare various physical properties of the bulk and the pre-melting water. We also postulate the molecular mechanism responsible for the pre-melting of part of water in poly(vinyl methyl ether) hydrogels. We suggest that above -60 °C, the first segmental motions of the polymer chain are activated, which trigger the process of the pre-melting. PMID:25100897

  7. Device and method for determining freezing points

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mathiprakasam, Balakrishnan (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    A freezing point method and device (10) are disclosed. The method and device pertain to an inflection point technique for determining the freezing points of mixtures. In both the method and device (10), the mixture is cooled to a point below its anticipated freezing point and then warmed at a substantially linear rate. During the warming process, the rate of increase of temperature of the mixture is monitored by, for example, thermocouple (28) with the thermocouple output signal being amplified and differentiated by a differentiator (42). The rate of increase of temperature data are analyzed and a peak rate of increase of temperature is identified. In the preferred device (10) a computer (22) is utilized to analyze the rate of increase of temperature data following the warming process. Once the maximum rate of increase of temperature is identified, the corresponding temperature of the mixture is located and earmarked as being substantially equal to the freezing point of the mixture. In a preferred device (10), the computer (22), in addition to collecting the temperature and rate of change of temperature data, controls a programmable power supply (14) to provide a predetermined amount of cooling and warming current to thermoelectric modules (56).

  8. Water freezing and ice melting

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Malolepsza, Edyta; Keyes, Tom

    2015-10-12

    The generalized replica exchange method (gREM) is designed to sample states with coexisting phases and thereby to describe strong first order phase transitions. The isobaric MD version of the gREM is presented and applied to freezing of liquid water, and melting of hexagonal and cubic ice. It is confirmed that coexisting states are well sampled. The statistical temperature as a function of enthalpy, TS(H), is obtained. Hysteresis between freezing and melting is observed and discussed. The entropic analysis of phase transitions is applied and equilibrium transition temperatures, latent heats, and surface tensions are obtained for hexagonal ice↔liquid and cubic ice↔liquid,more » with excellent agreement with published values. A new method is given to assign water molecules among various symmetry types. As a result, pathways for water freezing, ultimately leading to hexagonal ice, are found to contain intermediate layered structures built from hexagonal and cubic ice.« less

  9. Water freezing and ice melting

    SciTech Connect

    Malolepsza, Edyta; Keyes, Tom

    2015-10-12

    The generalized replica exchange method (gREM) is designed to sample states with coexisting phases and thereby to describe strong first order phase transitions. The isobaric MD version of the gREM is presented and applied to freezing of liquid water, and melting of hexagonal and cubic ice. It is confirmed that coexisting states are well sampled. The statistical temperature as a function of enthalpy, TS(H), is obtained. Hysteresis between freezing and melting is observed and discussed. The entropic analysis of phase transitions is applied and equilibrium transition temperatures, latent heats, and surface tensions are obtained for hexagonal ice↔liquid and cubic ice↔liquid, with excellent agreement with published values. A new method is given to assign water molecules among various symmetry types. As a result, pathways for water freezing, ultimately leading to hexagonal ice, are found to contain intermediate layered structures built from hexagonal and cubic ice.

  10. Water Freezing and Ice Melting.

    PubMed

    Małolepsza, Edyta; Keyes, Tom

    2015-12-01

    The generalized replica exchange method (gREM) is designed to sample states with coexisting phases and thereby to describe strong first order phase transitions. The isobaric MD version of the gREM is presented and applied to the freezing of liquid water and the melting of hexagonal and cubic ice. It is confirmed that coexisting states are well-sampled. The statistical temperature as a function of enthalpy, TS(H), is obtained. Hysteresis between freezing and melting is observed and discussed. The entropic analysis of phase transitions is applied and equilibrium transition temperatures, latent heats, and surface tensions are obtained for hexagonal ice ↔ liquid and cubic ice ↔ liquid with excellent agreement with published values. A new method is given to assign water molecules among various symmetry types. Pathways for water freezing, ultimately leading to hexagonal ice, are found to contain intermediate layered structures built from hexagonal and cubic ice. PMID:26642983

  11. Cold Heat Storage Characteristics of O/W-type Latent Heat Emulsion Including Continuum Phase of Water Treated with a Freezing Point Depression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inaba, Hideo; Morita, Shin-Ichi

    This paper deals with flow and cold heat storage characteristics of the oil (tetradecane, C14H30, freezing point 278.9 K, Latent heat 229 kJ/kg)/water emulsion as a latent heat storage material having a low melting point. The test emulsion includes a water-urea solution as a continuum phase. The freezing point depression of the continuum phase permits enhancement of the heat transfer rate of the emulison, due to the large temperature difference between the latent heat storage material and water-urea solution. The velocity of emulsion flow and the inlet temperature of coolant in a coiled double tube heat exchanger are chosen as the experimental parameters. The pressure drop, the heat transfer coefficient of the emulsion in the coiled tube are measured in the temperture region over solid and liquid phase of the latent heat storage material. The finishing time of the cold heat storage is defined experimentally in the range of sensible and latent heat storage. It is clarified that the flow behavior of the emulsion as a non-Newtonian fluid has an important role in cold heat storage. The useful nondimentional correlation equations for the additional pressure loss coefficient, the heat transfer coefficient and the finishing time of the cold heat storage are derived in terms of Dean number and heat capacity ratio.

  12. Magneto-caloric effect of a Gd50Co50 amorphous alloy near the freezing point of water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, L.; Wu, C.; Chen, S. H.; Chan, K. C.

    2015-09-01

    In the present work, we report the magneto-caloric effect (MCE) of a binary Gd50Co50 amorphous alloy near the freezing temperature of water. The Curie temperature of Gd50Co50 amorphous ribbons is about 267.5 K, which is very close to room temperature. The peak value of the magnetic entropy change (-ΔSmpeak) and the resulting adiabatic temperature rise (ΔTad.) of the Gd50Co50 amorphous ribbons is much higher than that of any other amorphous alloys previously reported with a Tc near room temperature. On the other hand, although the -ΔSmpeak of Gd50Co50 amorphous ribbons is not as high as those of crystalline alloys near room temperature, its refrigeration capacity (RC) is still much larger than the RC values of these crystalline alloys. The binary Gd50Co50 amorphous alloy provides a basic alloy for developing high performance multi-component amorphous alloys near room temperature.

  13. Measurement of Freezing Point Depression of Selected Food Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murata, Satoshi; Tanaka, Fumihiko; Matsuoka, Takahisa

    Freezing point depression of selected food solutions were measured at various concentrations in order to reveal the characteristics of solid-liquid phase equilibrium. The measurement were carried out on a hand made apparatus that was calibrated before the measurement by some of selected reagents (acid and sugar) with known thermal properties. The results revealed that the freezing point depression of selected food solutions deviated from the behavior of the ideal solution with increasing solute concentration, so the water activity for non-ideal solution were introduced to the freezing point depression equation. Further, assuming that the heat of fusion was a equation of temperature, thus the following new equation was led, ln {(1-Xs)/(l-Xs+α·Xs + β·Xs2)} = A(1/To - 1/Tf) - Bln(To/Tf) The goodness of fit of the equation showed the best results. Futhermore, by using the parameters a formula of freezing ratio and the relative water activities, which showed deviation from the ideal solution, were derived.

  14. Study of freezing-point depression of selected food extracts

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Fumihiko; Murata, Satoshi; Habara, Kazuhiro; Amaratunga, K.S.P.

    1996-12-31

    The phenomenon of freezing-point depression that accompanies the solute concentration of selected food extracts was investigated to reveal the characteristics of solid-liquid phase equilibrium. The freezing curves of various food extracts did not exhibit ideal solution behavior in the higher concentration range. The experimental data were fitted to new freezing-point depression equations by the method of nonlinear least squares, and the results clearly indicated that the calculated freezing points at various concentrations were in good agreement with the experimental data. Furthermore, by using the determined parameters, the freezing ratio and the activation coefficient were derived.

  15. On laboratory simulation and the effect of small temperature oscillations about the freezing point and ice formation on the evaporation rate of water on Mars.

    PubMed

    Moore, Shauntae R; Sears, Derek W G

    2006-08-01

    We report measurements of the evaporation rate of water under Mars-like conditions (CO2 atmosphere at 7 mbar and approximately 0 degrees C) in which small temperature oscillations about the freezing point repeatedly formed and removed a thin layer of ice. We found that the average evaporation at 2.7 +/- 0.5 degrees C without an ice layer (corrected for the difference in gravity on Earth and on Mars) was 1.24 +/- 0.12 mm/h, while at -2.1 +/- 0.3 degrees C with an ice layer the average evaporation rate was 0.84 +/- 0.08 mm/h. These values are in good agreement with those calculated for the evaporation of liquid water and ice when it is assumed that evaporation only depends on diffusion and buoyancy. Our findings suggest that such differences in evaporation rates are entirely due to the temperature difference and that the ice layer has little effect on evaporation rate. We infer that the formation of thin layers of ice on pools of water on Mars does not significantly increase the stability of water on the surface of Mars. PMID:16916288

  16. Vapor Pressure Plus: An Experiment for Studying Phase Equilibria in Water, with Observation of Supercooling, Spontaneous Freezing, and the Triple Point

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tellinghuisen, Joel

    2010-01-01

    Liquid-vapor, solid-vapor, and solid-liquid-vapor equilibria are studied for the pure substance water, using modern equipment that includes specially fabricated glass cells. Samples are evaporatively frozen initially, during which they typically supercool to -5 to -10 [degrees]C before spontaneously freezing. Vacuum pumping lowers the temperature…

  17. Vapor Pressure Plus: An Experiment for Studying Phase Equilibria in Water, with Observation of Supercooling, Spontaneous Freezing, and the Triple Point

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tellinghuisen, Joel

    2010-01-01

    Liquid-vapor, solid-vapor, and solid-liquid-vapor equilibria are studied for the pure substance water, using modern equipment that includes specially fabricated glass cells. Samples are evaporatively frozen initially, during which they typically supercool to -5 to -10 [degrees]C before spontaneously freezing. Vacuum pumping lowers the temperature

  18. The Siberian timberman Acanthocinus aedilis: a freeze-tolerant beetle with low supercooling points.

    PubMed

    Kristiansen, E; Li, N G; Averensky, A I; Laugsand, A E; Zachariassen, K E

    2009-07-01

    Larvae of the Siberian timberman beetle Acanthocinus aedilis display a number of unique features, which may have important implications for the field of cold hardiness in general. Their supercooling points are scattered over a wide temperature range, and some individuals have supercooling points in the low range of other longhorn beetles. However, they differ from other longhorn beetles in being tolerant to freezing, and in the frozen state they tolerate cooling to below -37 degrees C. In this respect they also differ from the European timberman beetles, which have moderate supercooling capacity and die if they freeze. The combination of freezing tolerance and low supercooling points is unusual and shows that freezing at a high subzero temperature is not an absolute requirement for freezing tolerance. Like other longhorn beetles, but in contrast to other freeze-tolerant insects, the larvae of the Siberian timberman have a low cuticular water permeability and can thus stay supercooled for long periods without a great water loss. This suggests that a major function of the extracellular ice nucleators of some freeze-tolerant insects may be to prevent intolerable water loss in insects with high cuticular water permeability, rather than to create a protective extracellular freezing as has generally been assumed. The freezing tolerance of the Siberian timberman larvae is likely to be an adaptation to the extreme winter cold of Siberia. PMID:19153749

  19. Inherent freeze protection for solar water heaters

    SciTech Connect

    Jeter, S.M.; Leonaitis, L.L.; Leonaitis, L.L.

    1981-05-01

    Research and development of a method for protection of a solar collector from freezing is described. The method is shown to be technically and economically feasible. A prototype water heating system using the inherent freeze protection method was successfully operated during the winter of 1980 to 1981.

  20. Freezing Behavior of Water in Small Pores and the Possible Role in the Freezing of Plant Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Ashworth, Edward N.; Abeles, Fred B.

    1984-01-01

    Two model systems were used to study the freezing of water in small diameter pores. Water in pores having a diameter of less than 100 nanometers froze at lower temperatures than bulk water. Data obtained with a range of pore sizes were consistent with predicted values based on equations developed by Mazur (1965 Ann NY Acad Sci 125: 658-676), and Homshaw (1980 J Soil Sci 31: 399-414). The addition of solutes lowered the freezing point of water in small pores. We propose that the freezing behavior of water in small pores may account for some of the freezing patterns observed in plant tissues. In tissues where cells are tightly packed, share common walls, and lack intercellular spaces, the presence of water in cell wall microcapillaries would alter the freezing temperature of tissue water, impede the spread of ice, and facilitate supercooling. PMID:16663798

  1. Realization of the Temperature Scale in the Range from 234.3 K (Hg Triple Point) to 1084.62°C (Cu Freezing Point) in Croatia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zvizdic, Davor; Veliki, Tomislav; Grgec Bermanec, Lovorka

    2008-06-01

    This article describes the realization of the International Temperature Scale in the range from 234.3 K (mercury triple point) to 1084.62°C (copper freezing point) at the Laboratory for Process Measurement (LPM), Faculty of Mechanical Engineering and Naval Architecture (FSB), University of Zagreb. The system for the realization of the ITS-90 consists of the sealed fixed-point cells (mercury triple point, water triple point and gallium melting point) and the apparatus designed for the optimal realization of open fixed-point cells which include the gallium melting point, tin freezing point, zinc freezing point, aluminum freezing point, and copper freezing point. The maintenance of the open fixed-point cells is described, including the system for filling the cells with pure argon and for maintaining the pressure during the realization.

  2. High-freezing-point fuels used for aviation turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedman, R.

    1979-01-01

    Broadened-specification aviation fuels could be produced from a greater fraction of crude source material with improvements in fuel supply and price. These fuels, particularly those with increased final boiling temperatures, would have higher freezing temperatures than current aviation turbine fuels. The higher-freezing-point fuels can be substituted in the majority of present commercial flights, since temperature data indicate that in-flight fuel temperatures are relatively mild. For the small but significant fraction of commercial flights where low fuel temperatures make higher freezing-point fuel use unacceptable, adaptations to the fuel or fuel system may be made to accommodate this fuel. Several techniques are discussed. Fuel heating is the most promising concept. One simple system design uses existing heat rejection from the fuel-lubricating oil cooler, another uses an engine-driven generator for electrical heating. Both systems offer advantages that outweigh the obvious penalties.

  3. Freezing and melting water in lamellar structures.

    PubMed Central

    Gleeson, J T; Erramilli, S; Gruner, S M

    1994-01-01

    The manner in which ice forms in lamellar suspensions of dielaidoylphosphatidylethanolamine, dielaidoylphosphatidylcholine, and dioleoylphosphatidylcholine in water depends strongly on the water fraction. For weight fractions between 15 and 9%, the freezing and melting temperatures are significantly depressed below 0 degree C. The ice exhibits a continuous melting transition spanning as much as 20 degrees C. When the water weight fraction is below 9%, ice never forms at temperatures as low as -40 degrees C. We show that when water contained in a lamellar lipid suspension freezes, the ice is not found between the bilayers; it exists as pools of crystalline ice in equilibrium with the bound water associated with the polar lipid headgroups. We have used this effect, together with the known chemical potential of ice, to measure hydration forces between lipid bilayers. We find exponentially decaying hydration repulsion when the bilayers are less than about 7 A apart. For larger separations, we find significant deviations from single exponential decay. PMID:7948683

  4. The Freezing Point Depression Law in Physical Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franzen, Hugo F.

    1988-01-01

    Suggests a change in physical chemistry courses to use a slightly more complicated but significantly more useful generalization of the simple freezing point depression law. Lists reasons for the change and presents the treatment of solid-liquid equilibria where solid-solution is allowed. Provides a mathematical treatment. (MVL)

  5. High freezing point fuels used for aviation turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedman, R.

    1979-01-01

    Broadened-specification aviation fuels could be produced from a greater fraction of crude source material with improvements in fuel supply and price. These fuels, particularly those with increased final boiling temperatures, would have higher freezing temperatures than current aviation turbine fuels. For the small but significant fraction of commercial flights where low fuel temperatures make higher freezing-point fuel use unacceptable, adaptations to the fuel or fuel system may be made to accommodate this fuel. Several techniques are discussed. Fuel heating is the most promising concept. One simple design uses existing heat rejection from the fuel-lubricating oil cooler, another uses an engine-driven generator for electrical heating.

  6. Nano materials for efficiently lowering the freezing point of heat transfer nanofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Haiping; Roy, Walter

    2007-09-01

    In this paper, we report, for the first time, the effect of the lowered freezing point in a 50% water / 50% antifreeze coolant (PAC) or 50% water / 50% ethylene glycol (EG) solution by the addition of carbon nanotubes and other particles. The experimental results indicated that the nano materials are much more efficient (hundreds fold) in lowering the freezing point than the regular ionic materials (e.g. NaCl). The possible explanation for this interesting phenomenon is the colligative property of fluid and relative small size of nano material. It is quite certain that the carbon nanotubes and metal oxide nano particles could be a wonderful candidate for the nano coolant application because they could not only increase the thermal conductivity, but also efficiently lower the freezing point of traditional coolants.

  7. An Equipment to Measure the Freezing Point of Soils under Higher Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dayan; Guan, Hui; Wen, Zhi; Ma, Wei

    2014-05-01

    Soil freezing point is the highest temperature at which ice can be presented in the system and soil can be referred to as frozen. The freezing temperature of soil is an important parameter for solving many practical problems in civil engineering, such as evaluation of soil freezing depth, prediction of soil heaving, force of soil suction, etc. However, as the freezing temperature is always affected by many factors like soil particle size, mineral composition, water content and the external pressure endured by soils, to measure soil freezing point is a rather difficult task until now, not to mention the soil suffering higher pressure. But recently, with the artificial freezing technology widely used in the excavation of deep underground space, the frozen wall thickness is a key factor to impact the security and stability of deep frozen wall. To determine the freeze wall thickness, the location of the freezing front must be determined firstly, which will deal with the determination of the soil freezing temperature. So how to measure the freezing temperature of soil suffering higher pressure is an important problem to be solved. This paper will introduce an equipment which was developed lately by State Key Laboratory of Frozen Soil Engineering to measure the freezing-point of soils under higher pressure. The equipment is consisted of cooling and keeping temperature system, temperature sensor and data collection system. By cooling and keeping temperature system, not only can we make the higher pressure soil sample's temperature drop to a discretionary minus temperature, but also keep it and reduce the heat exchange of soil sample with the outside. The temperature sensor is the key part to our measurement, which is featured by high precision and high sensitivity, what is more important is that the temperature sensor can work in a higher pressure condition. Moreover, the major benefit of this equipment is that the soil specimen's loads can be loaded by any microcomputer control electron universal testing machines. All of above mentioned advantages of this equipment ensures one to catch up the moment soil turns from the thawed state into ice and enable one to determine the freezing point experimentally by recording the temperature-time history (cooling curve) at particular points within the sample used for analysis. Therefore, this equipment has excellent characteristics such as compact construction, convenient operation, high reliability and the measuring accuracy. The authors would like to thank the following agents for their financial supports: the National Natural Science Foundation (No.41071048),Hundred Talent Young Scientists program of the Chinese Academy of Sciences granted to Dr. Zhi Wen.

  8. Tunable shape transformation of freezing liquid water marbles.

    PubMed

    Zang, Duyang; Lin, Kejun; Wang, Wenkai; Gu, Yaxi; Zhang, Yongjian; Geng, Xingguo; Binks, Bernard P

    2014-03-01

    Liquid water marbles coated with fumed silica nanoparticles exhibit various shape transformations upon freezing which are dependent on the hydrophobicity of the nanoparticles. The shape can be recovered during re-melting. For marbles coated with the most hydrophobic particles, a vertically prolonged morphology with a pointed protrusion on the top is formed on freezing. For marbles coated with less hydrophobic particles, a lateral expanded flying saucer-shaped morphology is formed. The different responses to freezing result from the different heterogeneous nucleation sites owing to the different positions of the particles at the air-water interface. If the particles are more immersed in water, ice embryos tend to form in the concave cavities between the particles. The volume expansion of water caused by freezing and continuous nucleation lead to continuous lateral stretching of the particle network coating the droplet surface and ultimately to the horizontally inflated shape of the marble. If the particles are more exposed to air, nucleation occurs on the convex surface of the particles, similar to that of a bare water droplet on a hydrophobic substrate. PMID:24651262

  9. Experimental results for the rapid determination of the freezing point of fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mathiprakasam, B.

    1984-01-01

    Two methods for the rapid determination of the freezing point of fuels were investigated: an optical method, which detected the change in light transmission from the disappearance of solid particles in the melted fuel; and a differential thermal analysis (DTA) method, which sensed the latent heat of fusion. A laboratory apparatus was fabricated to test the two methods. Cooling was done by thermoelectric modules using an ice-water bath as a heat sink. The DTA method was later modified to eliminate the reference fuel. The data from the sample were digitized and a point of inflection, which corresponds to the ASTM D-2386 freezing point (final melting point), was identified from the derivative. The apparatus was modifified to cool the fuel to -60 C and controls were added for maintaining constant cooling rate, rewarming rate, and hold time at minimum temperature. A parametric series of tests were run for twelve fuels with freezing points from -10 C to -50 C, varying cooling rate, rewarming rate, and hold time. Based on the results, an optimum test procedure was established. The results showed good agreement with ASTM D-2386 freezing point and differential scanning calorimetry results.

  10. Immersion freezing of birch pollen washing water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Augustin, S.; Wex, H.; Niedermeier, D.; Pummer, B.; Grothe, H.; Hartmann, S.; Tomsche, L.; Clauss, T.; Voigtländer, J.; Ignatius, K.; Stratmann, F.

    2013-11-01

    Birch pollen grains are known to be ice nucleating active biological particles. The ice nucleating activity has previously been tracked down to biological macromolecules that can be easily extracted from the pollen grains in water. In the present study, we investigated the immersion freezing behavior of these ice nucleating active (INA) macromolecules. Therefore we measured the frozen fractions of particles generated from birch pollen washing water as a function of temperature at the Leipzig Aerosol Cloud Interaction Simulator (LACIS). Two different birch pollen samples were considered, with one originating from Sweden and one from the Czech Republic. For the Czech and Swedish birch pollen samples, freezing was observed to start at -19 and -17 °C, respectively. The fraction of frozen droplets increased for both samples down to -24 °C. Further cooling did not increase the frozen fractions any more. Instead, a plateau formed at frozen fractions below 1. This fact could be used to determine the amount of INA macromolecules in the droplets examined here, which in turn allowed for the determination of nucleation rates for single INA macromolecules. The main differences between the Swedish birch pollen and the Czech birch pollen were obvious in the temperature range between -17 and -24 °C. In this range, a second plateau region could be seen for Swedish birch pollen. As we assume INA macromolecules to be the reason for the ice nucleation, we concluded that birch pollen is able to produce at least two different types of INA macromolecules. We were able to derive parameterizations for the heterogeneous nucleation rates for both INA macromolecule types, using two different methods: a simple exponential fit and the Soccer ball model. With these parameterization methods we were able to describe the ice nucleation behavior of single INA macromolecules from both the Czech and the Swedish birch pollen.

  11. Relationship of amino acid composition and molecular weight of antifreeze glycopeptides to non-colligative freezing point depression.

    PubMed

    Schrag, J D; O'Grady, S M; DeVries, A L

    1982-08-01

    Many polar fishes synthesize a group of eight glycopeptides that exhibit a non-colligative lowering of the freezing point of water. These glycopeptides range in molecular weight between 2600 and 33 700. The largest glycopeptides [1-5] lower the freezing point more than the small ones on a weight basis and contain only two amino acids, alanine and threonine, with the disaccharide galactose-N-acetyl-galactosamine attached to threonine. The small glycopeptides, 6, 7, and 8, also lower the freezing point and contain proline, which periodically substitutes for alanine. Glycopeptides with similar antifreeze properties isolated from the saffron cod and the Atlantic tomcod contain an additional amino acid, arginine, which substitutes for threonine in glycopeptide 6. In this study we address the question of whether differences in amino acid composition or molecular weight between large and small glycopeptides are responsible for the reduced freezing point depressing capability of the low molecular weight glycopeptides. The results indicate that the degree of amino acid substitutions that occur in glycopeptides 6-8 do not have a significant effect on the unusual freezing point lowering and that the observed decrease in freezing point depression with smaller glycopeptides can be accounted for on the basis of molecular weight. PMID:7115772

  12. Water Relations of Pachysandra Leaves during Freezing and Thawing 1

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jian-Jun; Beck, Erwin

    1991-01-01

    The evergreen herb Pachysandra terminalis becomes moderately frost-hardy in winter. The water relations of its frost-hardy leaves were studied during a freeze-thaw cycle. Leaf water potentials, measured by psychrometry at subfreezing temperatures, were identical with those of ice, indicating equilibrium freezing. Microscopic observations showed extracellular freezing of tissue water. As evidenced by thermal analysis, the freezing process starts with the crystallization of a minor volume which was identified as apoplasmic water. The following long-lasting exotherm indicated slow export of water from the protoplasts driven by extracellular crystallization. In partially frozen leaves, the fractions of liquid water were measured at several subfreezing temperatures by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. They were consistently greater than those calculated from the osmotic potentials of cellular fluid, and the differences increased with decreasing temperature. About 50% of the differences could be abolished by freeze-killing of the leaf and was thus ascribed to the effect of a (negative) pressure reinforcing the osmotic potential. The persistent part of the differences may have reflected a matric component. At ?7C, the absolute values of both potentials were ?1.7 megapascals each. The water relations of Pachysandra leaves clearly indicate nonideal equilibrium freezing where negative pressures and matric potentials contribute to the leaf water potential and thus alleviate freeze-dehydration of the tissue. ImagesFigure 1Figure 5 PMID:16668501

  13. Freezing water in no-man's land.

    PubMed

    Manka, Alexandra; Pathak, Harshad; Tanimura, Shinobu; Wölk, Judith; Strey, Reinhard; Wyslouzil, Barbara E

    2012-04-01

    We report homogeneous ice nucleation rates between 202 K and 215 K, thereby reducing the measurement gap that previously existed between 203 K and 228 K. These temperatures are significantly below the homogenous freezing limit, T(H)≈ 235 K for bulk water, and well within no-man's land. The ice nucleation rates are determined by characterizing nanodroplets with radii between 3.2 and 5.8 nm produced in a supersonic nozzle using three techniques: (1) pressure trace measurements to determine the properties of the flow as well as the temperature and velocity of the droplets, (2) small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) to measure the size and number density of the droplets, and (3) Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy to follow the liquid to solid phase transition. Assuming that nucleation occurs throughout the droplet volume, the measured ice nucleation rates J(ice,V) are on the order of 10(23) cm(-3) s(-1), and agree well with published values near 203 K. PMID:22354018

  14. Understanding freeze stress in biological tissues: thermodynamics of interfacial water

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A thermodynamic approach to distinguish forms of freeze energy that injure plants as the temperature decreases is developed. The pattern resulting from this analysis dictated the sequence of thermal requirements for water to exist as an independent state. Improvement of freezing tolerance in biolo...

  15. Photomicrographic Investigation of Spontaneous Freezing Temperatures of Supercooled Water Droplets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorsch, R. G.; Hacker, P. T.

    1950-01-01

    A photomicrographic technique for investigating eupercooled. water droplets has been devised and. used. to determine the spontaneous freezing temperatures of eupercooled. water droplets of the size ordinarily found. in the atmosphere. The freezing temperatures of 4527 droplets ranging from 8.75 to 1000 microns in diameter supported on a platinum surface and 571 droplets supported on copper were obtained. The average spontaneous freezing temperature decreased with decrease in the size of the droplets. The effect of size on the spontaneous freezing temperature was particularly marked below 60 microns. Frequency-distribution curves of the spontaneous freezing temperatures observed for droplets of a given size were obtained. Although no droplet froze at a temperature above 20 0 F, all droplets melted at 32 F. Results obtained with a copper support did not differ essentially from those obtained with a platinum surface.

  16. Freezing Point of Milk: A Natural Way to Understand Colligative Properties

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Novo, Mercedes; Reija, Belen; Al-Soufi, Wajih

    2007-01-01

    A laboratory experiment is presented in which the freezing point depression is analyzed using milk as solution. The nature of milk as a mixture of different solutes makes it a suitable probe to learn about colligative properties. The first part of the experiment illustrates the analytical use of freezing point measurements to control milk quality,

  17. Freezing Point of Milk: A Natural Way to Understand Colligative Properties

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Novo, Mercedes; Reija, Belen; Al-Soufi, Wajih

    2007-01-01

    A laboratory experiment is presented in which the freezing point depression is analyzed using milk as solution. The nature of milk as a mixture of different solutes makes it a suitable probe to learn about colligative properties. The first part of the experiment illustrates the analytical use of freezing point measurements to control milk quality,…

  18. Response of New zealand mudsnails Potamopyrgus antipodarum to freezing and near freezing fluctuating water temperatures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moffitt, Christine M.; James, Christopher A.

    2012-01-01

    We explored the resilience of the invasive New Zealand mudsnail Potamopyrgus antipodarum to fluctuating winter freezing and near-freezing temperature cycles in laboratory tests. Our goal was to provide data to confirm field observations of mortality and presumed mortality in stream habitats with fluctuating freezing to near-freezing temperatures. We tested individuals from 2 locations with distinctly different thermal regimes and population densities. One location had low snail densities and water temperatures with strong diel and seasonal water variation. The other location had high snail densities and nearly constant water temperatures. Groups of individuals from both locations were tested in each of 3 laboratory-created diel thermal cycles around nominal temperatures of 0, 2, or 4°C. Mortality occurred in cycles around 0°C in both populations, and little to no mortality occurred at temperatures >0°C. Individuals from both sources held in diel 0°C cycles for 72 h showed 100% mortality. Our findings support observations from published field studies that survival was limited in infested habitats subject to freezing temperatures.

  19. Oxygen demand of aircraft and airfield pavement deicers and alternative freezing point depressants

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Corsi, Steven R.; Mericas, Dean; Bowman, George

    2012-01-01

    Aircraft and pavement deicing formulations and other potential freezing point depressants were tested for biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) and chemical oxygen demand (COD). Propylene glycol-based aircraft deicers exhibited greater BOD5 than ethylene glycol-based aircraft deicers, and ethylene glycol-based products had lower degradation rates than propylene glycol-based products. Sodium formate pavement deicers had lower COD than acetate-based pavement deicers. The BOD and COD results for acetate-based pavement deicers (PDMs) were consistently lower than those for aircraft deicers, but degradation rates were greater in the acetate-based PDM than in aircraft deicers. In a 40-day testing of aircraft and pavement deicers, BOD results at 20°C (standard) were consistently greater than the results from 5°C (low) tests. The degree of difference between standard and low temperature BOD results varied among tested products. Freshwater BOD test results were not substantially different from marine water tests at 20°C, but glycols degraded slower in marine water than in fresh water for low temperature tests. Acetate-based products had greater percentage degradation than glycols at both temperatures. An additive component of the sodium formate pavement deicer exhibited toxicity to the microorganisms, so BOD testing did not work properly for this formulation. BOD testing of alternative freezing point depressants worked well for some, there was little response for some, and for others there was a lag in response while microorganisms acclimated to the freezing point depressant as a food source. Where the traditional BOD5 test performed adequately, values ranged from 251 to 1,580 g/kg. Where the modified test performed adequately, values of BOD28 ranged from 242 to 1,540 g/kg.

  20. An approximation for homogeneous freezing temperature of water droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O, K.-T.; Wood, R.

    2015-11-01

    In this work, based on the well-known formulae of classical nucleation theory (CNT), the temperature TNc = 1 at which the mean number of critical embryos inside a droplet is unity is derived and proposed as a new approximation for homogeneous freezing temperature of water droplets. Without consideration of time dependence and stochastic nature of the ice nucleation process, the approximation TNc = 1 is able to reproduce the dependence of homogeneous freezing temperature on drop size and water activity of aqueous drops observed in a wide range of experimental studies. We use the TNc = 1 approximation to argue that the distribution of homogeneous freezing temperatures observed in the experiments may largely be explained by the spread in the size distribution of droplets used in the particular experiment. It thus appears that this approximation is useful for predicting homogeneous freezing temperatures of water droplets in the atmosphere.

  1. Universality of tip singularity formation in freezing water drops.

    PubMed

    Marín, A G; Enríquez, O R; Brunet, P; Colinet, P; Snoeijer, J H

    2014-08-01

    A drop of water deposited on a cold plate freezes into an ice drop with a pointy tip. While this phenomenon clearly finds its origin in the expansion of water upon freezing, a quantitative description of the tip singularity has remained elusive. Here we demonstrate how the geometry of the freezing front, determined by heat transfer considerations, is crucial for the tip formation. We perform systematic measurements of the angles of the conical tip, and reveal the dynamics of the solidification front in a Hele-Shaw geometry. It is found that the cone angle is independent of substrate temperature and wetting angle, suggesting a universal, self-similar mechanism that does not depend on the rate of solidification. We propose a model for the freezing front and derive resulting tip angles analytically, in good agreement with the experiments. PMID:25126922

  2. Design and evaluation of aircraft heat source systems for use with high-freezing point fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pasion, A. J.

    1979-01-01

    The objectives were the design, performance and economic analyses of practical aircraft fuel heating systems that would permit the use of high freezing-point fuels on long-range aircraft. Two hypothetical hydrocarbon fuels with freezing points of -29 C and -18 C were used to represent the variation from current day jet fuels. A Boeing 747-200 with JT9D-7/7A engines was used as the baseline aircraft. A 9300 Km mission was used as the mission length from which the heat requirements to maintain the fuel above its freezing point was based.

  3. What determines the homogeneous freezing temperature of water?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molinero, Valeria

    2013-05-01

    One of water's puzzles is what determines the lowest temperature at which liquid water and aqueous solutions can be cooled before freezing to ice. The increase of ice nucleation rates as water is supercooled correlates with a dramatic increase in the heat capacity and compressibility of supercooled water, raising the question of whether a structural transformation occurring within the liquid phase controls the rate of nucleation of ice. We used molecular simulations to elucidate the mechanism and compute the rates of water freezing and their relation to the thermodynamics and structure of supercooled water. A main finding of our study is that the kinetics of water freezing is controlled by a structural transformation in supercooled liquid water that steeply increases the fraction of four-coordinated water molecules in the liquid, blurring the boundary between the liquid and crystal states. The results of the molecular simulations and of calculations using classical nucleation theory with available experimental data, indicate that the crystallization rate of bulk water reaches a maximum at ˜224 K, a few degrees below the experimental temperature of homogeneous nucleation of ice. We predict that below this temperature supercooled bulk liquid water crystallizes at a rate faster than it can equilibrate, therefore is beyond its limit of metastability. Our results provide a microscopic foundation to the known correlation between nonequilibrium freezing temperatures and the thermodynamics of supercooled liquid water. We will discuss the effect of confinement of water in nanopores and as nanodroplets on the mechanisms and temperatures of crystallization of ice as well as on the structure of the ice formed at temperature close to the limit of supercooling.

  4. Fracture of Pipes Due to Freezing of Water Enclosed Inside

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oiwake, Shigeyoshi; Inaba, Hideo; Saito, Hakaru; Tokura, Ikuo

    Pressure rise due to freezing of water enclosed in metal pipes has been simulated for the case of various ambient temperatures, -10 to -30°C and heat transfer conditions, taking drop in freezing temperature due to the pressure rise and the change in volume caused by freezing into account. For three kinds of different materials, the pressure change occurring in pipes have been analyzed under the relation of the tangential stresses on the inner surface of the pipes. The dimensionless parameters have been proposed to correlate the calculated results and it has found that the criterion for the fracture of pipes can be expressed as a function mainly of the modified Fourier and Biot numbers and the ratio of the wall thickness and the inner diameter of the pipes. It has also shown that the fracture Fourier number can be increased and the dimensionless maximum pressures in pipes can be reduced by introducing voids inside pipes.

  5. Evaluation of methods for rapid determination of freezing point of aviation fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mathiprakasam, B.

    1982-01-01

    Methods for identification of the more promising concepts for the development of a portable instrument to rapidly determine the freezing point of aviation fuels are described. The evaluation process consisted of: (1) collection of information on techniques previously used for the determination of the freezing point, (2) screening and selection of these techniques for further evaluation of their suitability in a portable unit for rapid measurement, and (3) an extensive experimental evaluation of the selected techniques and a final selection of the most promising technique. Test apparatuses employing differential thermal analysis and the change in optical transparency during phase change were evaluated and tested. A technique similar to differential thermal analysis using no reference fuel was investigated. In this method, the freezing point was obtained by digitizing the data and locating the point of inflection. Results obtained using this technique compare well with those obtained elsewhere using different techniques. A conceptual design of a portable instrument incorporating this technique is presented.

  6. Experimental research of "microcable in a microconduct" system stability to effect of freezing water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreev, Vladimir A.; Burdin, Vladimir A.; Nikulina, Tatiana G.; Alekhin, Ivan N.; Gavryushin, Sergey A.; Nikulin, Aleksey G.; Praporshchikov, Denis E.

    2011-12-01

    Results of experimental researches of "optical microcable in a microduct" system stability to effect of freezing water are presented. It is shown this system is steadier to water freezing in comparison to lighten optical cable in protective polymer tube.

  7. Note: equation of state and the freezing point in the hard-sphere model.

    PubMed

    Robles, Miguel; López de Haro, Mariano; Santos, Andrés

    2014-04-01

    The merits of different analytical equations of state for the hard-sphere system with respect to the recently computed high-accuracy value of the freezing-point packing fraction are assessed. It is found that the Carnahan-Starling-Kolafa and the branch-point approximant equations of state yield the best performance. PMID:24712819

  8. Freeze Dried Zn-DNA: Magnetism Dominated by Water Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumeta, Tsubasa; Sakamoto, Hirokazu; Mizoguchi, Kenji

    2014-08-01

    Magnetic behaviors in freeze dried DNA complexes with Zn ions (FD-Zn-DNA) are reported. Dehydrated Zn-DNA was prepared from pure Zn-DNA by a freeze drying procedure. Complete dehydration of Zn-DNA by the freeze drying induces an irreversible structural change and produces one ? electron spin at each base pair of FD-Zn-DNA. Magnetic behaviors essential to the ? electron spins are markedly changed by introducing water molecules in FD-Zn-DNA. In the dehydrated FD-Zn-DNA, the paramagnetism of the ? spin system is totally suppressed because of the spin singlet ground state caused by the strong off-site Coulomb repulsion V, which is larger than the on-site Coulomb repulsion U. In contrast, the hydrated FD-Zn-DNA carries large Pauli-like temperature-independent paramagnetism, whose magnitude corresponds to the ?-band width of ?0.24 eV. A possible mechanism of the ? electron spin creation is proposed. As a subsidiary effect of the freeze drying procedure, the nonlinear paramagnetism saturating below 0.1 T is observed in both DNA and Zn-DNA. The nonlinear paramagnetism disappears after the hydration of the sample. On the basis of the magnitude of the saturation magnetization, it is suggested that the origin of the nonlinear paramagnetism is the magnetic impurities in DNA.

  9. When does hot water freeze faster then cold water? A search for the Mpemba effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brownridge, James D.

    2011-01-01

    It is possible to consistently observe hot water freezing faster than cold water under certain conditions. All conditions except the initial temperature of water specimens must be the same and remain so during cooling, and the cold water must supercool to a temperature significantly lower than the temperature to which the hot water supercools. For hot water at an initial temperature of >≈80 °C and cold water at <≈20 °C, the cold water must supercool to a temperature of at least ≈5.5 °C, lower than the temperature to which hot water supercools. With these conditions satisfied, we observed initially hot water freezing before the initially cold water 28 times in 28 attempts. If the cold water does not supercool, it will freeze before the hot water because it always cools to 0 °C first regardless of the initial temperatures.

  10. Investigating Freezing Point Depression and Cirrus Cloud Nucleation Mechanisms Using a Differential Scanning Calorimeter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bodzewski, Kentaro Y.; Caylor, Ryan L.; Comstock, Ashley M.; Hadley, Austin T.; Imholt, Felisha M.; Kirwan, Kory D.; Oyama, Kira S.; Wise, Matthew E.

    2016-01-01

    A differential scanning calorimeter was used to study homogeneous nucleation of ice from micron-sized aqueous ammonium sulfate aerosol particles. It is important to understand the conditions at which these particles nucleate ice because of their connection to cirrus cloud formation. Additionally, the concept of freezing point depression, a topic…

  11. Dissemination of thermodynamic temperature above the freezing point of silver.

    PubMed

    Sadli, M; Machin, G; Anhalt, K; Bourson, F; Briaudeau, S; del Campo, D; Diril, A; Kozlova, O; Lowe, D H; Mantilla Amor, J M; Martin, M J; McEvoy, H C; Ojanen-Saloranta, M; Pehlivan, Ö; Rougié, B; Salim, S G R

    2016-03-28

    The mise-en-pratique for the definition of the kelvin at high temperatures will formally allow dissemination of thermodynamic temperature either directly or mediated through high-temperature fixed points (HTFPs). In this paper, these two distinct dissemination methods are evaluated, namely source-based and detector-based. This was achieved by performing two distinct dissemination trials: one based on HTFPs, the other based on absolutely calibrated radiation thermometers or filter radiometers. These trials involved six national metrology institutes in Europe in the frame of the European Metrology Research Programme joint project 'Implementing the new kelvin' (InK). The results have shown that both dissemination routes are possible, with similar standard uncertainties of 1-2 K, over the range 1273-2773 K, showing that, depending on the facilities available in the laboratory, it will soon be possible to disseminate thermodynamic temperatures above 1273 K to users by either of the two methods with uncertainties comparable to the current temperature scale. PMID:26903097

  12. Promising freeze protection alternatives in solar domestic hot water systems

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, D.E.

    1997-12-31

    Since the gains associated with solar thermal energy technologies are comparatively small in relation to the required capital investment, it is vital to maximize conversion efficiency. While providing the necessary function of freeze protection, the heat exchanger commonly included in solar domestic water heating systems represents a system inefficiency. This thesis explores two alternate methods of providing freeze protection without resorting to a heat exchanger. Commonly, collectors are made of rigid copper tubes separated by copper or aluminum fins. Cracking damage can occur when water is allowed to freeze and expand inside the non compliant tubes. The possibility of making collectors out of an elastic material was investigated and shown to be effective. Since unlike copper, elastomers typically have low thermal conductivities, the standard collector performance prediction equations do not apply. Modified thermal performance prediction equations were developed which can be used for both low and high thermal conductivity materials to provide accurate predictions within a limited range of plate geometries. An elastomeric collector plate was then designed and shown to have comparable performance to a copper plate collector whose aperture area is approximately 33% smaller. Another options for providing freeze protection to an SDHW system is to turn it off during the winter. Choosing a three-season operating period means two things. First, the system will have different optimums such as slope and collector area. Second, the wintertime solar energy incident on the collector is unavailable for meeting a heating load. However, the system`s heat exchanger becomes unnecessary and removing it increases the amount of energy that arrives at the storage tank during those periods in which the system is operating.

  13. Metabolic activity of permafrost bacteria below the freezing point

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rivkina, E. M.; Friedmann, E. I.; McKay, C. P.; Gilichinsky, D. A.

    2000-01-01

    Metabolic activity was measured in the laboratory at temperatures between 5 and -20 degrees C on the basis of incorporation of (14)C-labeled acetate into lipids by samples of a natural population of bacteria from Siberian permafrost (permanently frozen soil). Incorporation followed a sigmoidal pattern similar to growth curves. At all temperatures, the log phase was followed, within 200 to 350 days, by a stationary phase, which was monitored until the 550th day of activity. The minimum doubling times ranged from 1 day (5 degrees C) to 20 days (-10 degrees C) to ca. 160 days (-20 degrees C). The curves reached the stationary phase at different levels, depending on the incubation temperature. We suggest that the stationary phase, which is generally considered to be reached when the availability of nutrients becomes limiting, was brought on under our conditions by the formation of diffusion barriers in the thin layers of unfrozen water known to be present in permafrost soils, the thickness of which depends on temperature.

  14. Metabolic Activity of Permafrost Bacteria below the Freezing Point

    PubMed Central

    Rivkina, E. M.; Friedmann, E. I.; McKay, C. P.; Gilichinsky, D. A.

    2000-01-01

    Metabolic activity was measured in the laboratory at temperatures between 5 and −20°C on the basis of incorporation of 14C-labeled acetate into lipids by samples of a natural population of bacteria from Siberian permafrost (permanently frozen soil). Incorporation followed a sigmoidal pattern similar to growth curves. At all temperatures, the log phase was followed, within 200 to 350 days, by a stationary phase, which was monitored until the 550th day of activity. The minimum doubling times ranged from 1 day (5°C) to 20 days (−10°C) to ca. 160 days (−20°C). The curves reached the stationary phase at different levels, depending on the incubation temperature. We suggest that the stationary phase, which is generally considered to be reached when the availability of nutrients becomes limiting, was brought on under our conditions by the formation of diffusion barriers in the thin layers of unfrozen water known to be present in permafrost soils, the thickness of which depends on temperature. PMID:10919774

  15. Freeze-thaw stability of water-in-oil emulsions.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, S; Rousseau, D

    2009-11-01

    Factors influencing water-in-oil emulsion stability during freeze/thaw-cycling, namely interfacial crystallization vs. network crystallization and the sequence of crystallization events (i.e., dispersed vs. continuous phase or vice versa), are assessed. We show that destabilization is most apparent with a liquid-state emulsifier and a continuous oil phase that solidifies prior to the dispersed phase. Emulsions stable to F/T-cycling are obtained when the emulsifier crystallizes at the oil-water interface or in emulsions where the continuous phase crystallizes after the dispersed aqueous phase. The materials used are two food-grade oil-soluble emulsifiers - polyglycerol polyricinoleate (PGPR) and glycerol monostearin (GMS) and two continuous oil phases with differing crystallization temperatures - canola oil and coconut oil. Emulsion stability is assessed with pulsed field gradient NMR droplet size analysis, sedimentation, microscopy and differential scanning calorimetry. This study demonstrates the sequence of crystallization events and the physical state of the surfactant at the oil-water interface strongly impact the freeze-thaw stability of water-in-oil emulsions. PMID:19683718

  16. A water activity based model of heterogeneous ice nucleation kinetics for freezing of water and aqueous solution droplets.

    PubMed

    Knopf, Daniel A; Alpert, Peter A

    2013-01-01

    Immersion freezing of water and aqueous solutions by particles acting as ice nuclei (IN) is a common process of heterogeneous ice nucleation which occurs in many environments, especially in the atmosphere where it results in the glaciation of clouds. Here we experimentally show, using a variety of IN types suspended in various aqueous solutions, that immersion freezing temperatures and kinetics can be described solely by temperature, T, and solution water activity, a(w), which is the ratio of the vapour pressure of the solution and the saturation water vapour pressure under the same conditions and, in equilibrium, equivalent to relative humidity (RH). This allows the freezing point and corresponding heterogeneous ice nucleation rate coefficient, J(het), to be uniquely expressed by T and a(w), a result we term the a(w) based immersion freezing model (ABIFM). This method is independent of the nature of the solute and accounts for several varying parameters, including cooling rate and IN surface area, while providing a holistic description of immersion freezing and allowing prediction of freezing temperatures, J(het), frozen fractions, ice particle production rates and numbers. Our findings are based on experimental freezing data collected for various IN surface areas, A, and cooling rates, r, of droplets variously containing marine biogenic material, two soil humic acids, four mineral dusts, and one organic monolayer acting as IN. For all investigated IN types we demonstrate that droplet freezing temperatures increase as A increases. Similarly, droplet freezing temperatures increase as the cooling rate decreases. The log10(J(het)) values for the various IN types derived exclusively by Tand a(w), provide a complete description of the heterogeneous ice nucleation kinetics. Thus, the ABIFM can be applied over the entire range of T, RH, total particulate surface area, and cloud activation timescales typical of atmospheric conditions. Lastly, we demonstrate that ABIFM can be used to derive frozen fractions of droplets and ice particle production for atmospheric models of cirrus and mixed phase cloud conditions. PMID:24601020

  17. Metastable states of water and ice during pressure-supported freezing of potato tissue.

    PubMed

    Schlüter, O; Benet, G Urrutia; Heinz, V; Knorr, D

    2004-01-01

    Different ice modifications were obtained during freezing processes at several pressure levels from atmospheric pressure up to 300 MPa. In the pressure range between 210 and 240 MPa, a metastable ice I modification area was observed, as the nucleation of ice I crystals in the thermodynamically stable region of ice III was reached. A significant degree of supercooling was obtained before freezing the tissue water to ice III, which has to be considered when designing pressure-supported freezing processes. The effect of supercooling phenomenon on the phase transition time is discussed using a mathematical model based on the solution of the heat transfer governing differential equations. Phase transition and freezing times for the different freezing paths experimented are compared for the processes: freezing at atmospheric pressure, pressure-assisted freezing, and pressure-shift freezing. Different metastable states of liquid water are defined according to their process-dependent stability. PMID:15176885

  18. Freeze-protection loop for direct solar-water-heating systems. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-11-04

    Even a one-time freeze condition can do destructive damage to a direct solar water heating system. The project funded under grant DE-FG4480R4, 1-1-80 to 8-1-81, proposed to demonstrate a simple installation procedure whereby thermosiphoning warm water from storage would prevent solar collectors from freezing. Installing the freeze protection loop in owner maintained solar systems was inconclusive. Owners were not attentive to freeze warnings or did not understand the simple instructions. A controlled situation was established using a refrigerator to produce below freezing temperatures. Experiments conducted with this equipment showed that the thermosiphoning principle could not be relied on to prevent freezing. Thermosiphoning cannot be relied on to prevent freezing in a direct solar water heating system. The direct system is an effective means of heating water in north Florida, but the system must be drained, either manually or automatically, to provide reliable system protection.

  19. Keeping gallium metal to liquid state under the freezing point by using silica nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Lingfei; Park, Hyunseo; Dodbiba, Gjergj; Ono, Kenji; Tokoro, Chiharu; Fujita, Toyohisa

    2011-10-01

    Gallium metal under the freezing point was observed to maintain its liquid state by dispersing silica nanoparticles of a given particle size and concentration. Though the freezing point of pure gallium is 302.9 K, the liquid gallium maintained its supercooling state at 276-277 K for more than 400 days by dispersing 1.0 wt. % of silica nanoparticles (10 nm in size). Extended x-ray absorption fine structure analysis shows that the supercooled gallium liquid has a β-Ga-like feature, and the nearest neighboring atom distance is 0.1 Å larger than that of pure liquid gallium. This method opens the way to use liquid gallium as a promising fluid carrier in energy conversion devices.

  20. Multiple Freezing Points as a Test for Viability of Plant Stems in the Determination of Frost Hardiness 1

    PubMed Central

    McLeester, R. C.; Weiser, C. J.; Hall, T. C.

    1969-01-01

    A technique is presented for a simple, rapid, and reliable means of determining the viability of plant tissue subjected to freezing temperatures. Freezing curves of excised stems of Cornus stolonifera Michx., and several other genera were studied. Tissue temperature was recorded during freezing of plant stem sections. The heat of crystallization deflected the resultant freezing curves at points where tissue froze. Living stem sections of all genera studied revealed 2 freezing points, while dead tissue exhibited only 1. The influence of variables such as moisture content, sample size, thermocouple placement, and cooling rate on freezing curves was analyzed. Stem samples wrapped in moisture-proof film with a thermocouple inserted into the pith were frozen to a predetermined test temperature, thawed, and subjected to a second freezing cycle. The presence or absence of 2 freezing points in the second freezing cycle was used as a criterion for establishing viability. The results were immediately available and identical to results from regrowth tests which took about 20 days. PMID:16657031

  1. Freezing of heavy water (D2O) nanodroplets.

    PubMed

    Bhabhe, Ashutosh; Pathak, Harshad; Wyslouzil, Barbara E

    2013-07-01

    We follow the freezing of heavy water (D2O) nanodroplets formed in a supersonic nozzle apparatus using position resolved pressure trace measurements, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and small-angle X-ray scattering. For these 3-9 nm radii droplets, freezing starts between 223 and 225 K, at volume based ice nucleation rates Jice,V on the order of 10(23) cm(-3) s(-1) or surface based ice nucleation rates Jice,S on the order of 10(16) cm(-2) s(-1). The temperatures corresponding to the onset of D2O ice nucleation are higher than those reported for H2O by Manka et al. [Manka, A.; Pathak, H.; Tanimura, S.; Wölk, J.; Strey, R.; Wyslouzil, B. E. Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys.2012, 14, 4505]. Although the values of Jice,S scale somewhat better with droplet size than values of Jice,V, the data are not accurate enough to state that nucleation is surface initiated. Finally, using current estimates of the thermophysical properties of D2O and the theoretical framework presented by Murray et al. [Murray, B. J.; Broadley, S. L.; Wilson, T. W.; Bull, S. J.; Wills, R. H.; Christenson, H. K.; Murray, E. J. Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys.2010, 12, 10380], we find that the theoretical ice nucleation rates are within 3 orders of magnitude of the measured rates over an ∼15 K temperature range. PMID:23763363

  2. Thermodynamical effects accompanied freezing of two water layers separated by sea ice sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogorodsky, Petr; Marchenko, Aleksey

    2014-05-01

    The process of melt pond freezing is very important for generation of sea ice cover thermodynamic and mass balance during winterperiod. However, due to significant difficulties of field measurements the available data of model estimations still have no instrumental confirmation. In May 2009 the authors carried out laboratory experiment on freezing of limited water volume in the University Centre in Svalbard ice tank. In the course of experiment fresh water layer of 27.5 cm thickness at freezing point poured on the 24 cm sea ice layer was cooled during 50 hours at the temperature -10º C and then once again during 60 hours at -20º C. For revealing process typical characteristics the data of continuous measurements of temperature and salinity in different phases were compared with data of numerical computations obtained with thermodynamic model which was formulated in the frames of 1-D equation system (infinite extension of water freezing layer) and adapted to laboratory conditions. The known surprise of the experiment became proximity of calculated and measured estimates of process dynamics that confirmed the adequacy of the problem mathematical statement (excluding probably process finale stage). This effect can be explained by formation of cracks on the upper layer of ice at sharp decreases of air temperature, which temporary compensated hydrostatic pressure growth during freezing of closed water volume. Another compensated mechanism can be migration of brine through the lower layer of ice under influence of vertical pressure gradient and also rejection of gas dissolved in water which increased its compressibility. During 110 hours cooling thickness of water layer between ice layers reduced approximately to 2 cm. According to computations this layer is not chilled completely but keeps as thin brine interlayer within ice body whose thickness (about units of mm) is determined by temperature fluctuations of cooled surface. Nevertheless, despite good coincidence of experimental and model estimates the question of existence of liquid phase under actual conditions is still open and can be clarified in a continuous laboratory experiment. This work was supported by Russian Foundation for Basic Research (Project # 14-05-00677).

  3. Practical limitations of ITS-90 from the mercury triple point to the silver freeze point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavener, J. P.; Tavener, S. J.; Tavener, I. F.; Davies, N.

    2013-09-01

    The NPL published a forward to the ITS-90 text as follows:- "The purpose of the ITS is to define procedures by which certain specified practical thermometers of the required quality can be calibrated in such a way that the values of temperature obtained from them can be precise and reproducible, while at the same time closely approximating the corresponding thermodynamic values." [1]. The paper investigates the properties of thirty four lots of 6N pure metal used to make cells conforming to ITS-90 from mercury through silver over a period of twenty years. Three hundred individual cells are analysed by the impurities listed and supplied with each lot, melt and freeze curve slopes are also summarised for each lot and depressions calculated. These are then compared to the slopes and depressions suggested in the Supplementary Information for the ITS-90 and in CCT/2000-13 "Optimal Realizations". Results are summarised, tabulated and discussed. Three lots of the thirty four were found to produce cells outside 6N expectations; however the remaining thirty one lots no matter how well or badly the accompanying certification was presented produced cells that conformed to 6N expectations as suggested in Supplementary Information to ITS-90 and CCT/2000-13.

  4. Realization of tin freezing point using a loop heat pipe-based hydraulic temperature control technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joung, Wukchul; Gam, Kee Sool; Kim, Yong-Gyoo

    2015-10-01

    In this work, the freezing point of tin (Sn FP) was realized by inside nucleation where the supercooling of tin and the reheating of the sample after the nucleation were achieved without extracting the cell from an isothermal apparatus. To this end, a novel hydraulic temperature control technique, which was based on the thermo-hydraulic characteristics of a pressure-controlled loop heat pipe (LHP), was employed to provide a slow cooling of the sample for deep supercooling and fast reheating after nucleation to minimize the amount of initial freeze of the sample. The required temperature controls were achieved by the active pressure control of a control gas inside the compensation chamber of the pressure-controlled LHP, and slow cooling at  -0.05 K min-1 for the deep supercooling of tin and fast heating at 2 K min-1 for reheating the sample after nucleation was attained. Based on this hydraulic temperature control technique, the nucleation of tin was realized at supercooling of around 19 K, and a satisfactorily fast reheating of the sample to the plateau-producing temperature (i.e. 0.5 K below the Sn FP) was achieved without any temperature overshoots of the isothermal region. The inside-nucleated Sn FP showed many desirable features compared to the Sn FP realized by the conventional outside nucleation method. The longer freezing plateaus and the better immersion characteristics of the Sn FP were obtained by inside nucleation, and the measured freezing temperature of the inside-nucleated Sn FP was as much as 0.37 mK higher than the outside-nucleated Sn FP with an expanded uncertainty of 0.19 mK. Details on the experiment are provided and explanations for the observed differences are discussed.

  5. Development of modulated optical transmission system to determinate the cloud and freezing points in biofuels.

    PubMed

    Jaramillo-Ochoa, Liliana; Ramirez-Gutierrez, Cristian F; Sánchez-Moguel, Alonso; Acosta-Osorio, Andrés; Rodriguez-Garcia, Mario E

    2015-01-01

    This work is focused in the development of a modulated optical transmission system with temperature control to determine the thermal properties of biodiesels such as the cloud and freezing points. This system is able to determine these properties in real time without relying on the operator skills as indicated in the American Society for Testing Materials (ASTM) norms. Thanks to the modulation of the incident laser, the noise of the signal is reduced and two information channels are generated: amplitude and phase. Lasers with different wavelengths can be used in this system but the sample under study must have optical absorption at the wavelength of the laser. PMID:25638112

  6. Development of modulated optical transmission system to determinate the cloud and freezing points in biofuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaramillo-Ochoa, Liliana; Ramirez-Gutierrez, Cristian F.; Sánchez-Moguel, Alonso; Acosta-Osorio, Andrés; Rodriguez-Garcia, Mario E.

    2015-01-01

    This work is focused in the development of a modulated optical transmission system with temperature control to determine the thermal properties of biodiesels such as the cloud and freezing points. This system is able to determine these properties in real time without relying on the operator skills as indicated in the American Society for Testing Materials (ASTM) norms. Thanks to the modulation of the incident laser, the noise of the signal is reduced and two information channels are generated: amplitude and phase. Lasers with different wavelengths can be used in this system but the sample under study must have optical absorption at the wavelength of the laser.

  7. Improvements in the realization of the ITS-90 over the temperature range from the melting point of gallium to the freezing point of silver at NIM

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, J.; Zhang, J. T.; Ping, Q.

    2013-09-11

    The temperature primary standard over the range from the melting point of gallium to the freezing point of silver in National institute of Metrology (NIM), China, was established in the early 1990s. The performance of all of fixed-point furnaces degraded and needs to be updated due to many years of use. Nowadays, the satisfactory fixed point materials can be available with the development of the modern purification techniques. NIM plans to use a group of three cells for each defining fixed point temperature. In this way the eventual drift of individual cells can be evidenced by periodic intercomparison and this will increase the reliability in disseminating the ITS-90 in China. This article describes the recent improvements in realization of ITS-90 over temperature range from the melting point of gallium to the freezing point of silver at NIM. Taking advantages of the technological advances in the design and manufacture of furnaces, the new three-zone furnaces and the open-type fixed points were developed from the freezing point of indium to the freezing point of silver, and a furnace with the three-zone semiconductor cooling was designed to automatically realize the melting point of gallium. The reproducibility of the new melting point of gallium and the new open-type freezing points of In, Sn, Zn. Al and Ag is improved, especially the freezing points of Al and Ag with the reproducibility of 0.2mK and 0.5mK respectively. The expanded uncertainty in the realization of these defining fixed point temperatures is 0.34mK, 0.44mK, 0.54mK, 0.60mK, 1.30mK and 1.88mK respectively.

  8. Improvements in the realization of the ITS-90 over the temperature range from the melting point of gallium to the freezing point of silver at NIM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, J.; Zhang, J. T.; Ping, Q.

    2013-09-01

    The temperature primary standard over the range from the melting point of gallium to the freezing point of silver in National institute of Metrology (NIM), China, was established in the early 1990s. The performance of all of fixed-point furnaces degraded and needs to be updated due to many years of use. Nowadays, the satisfactory fixed point materials can be available with the development of the modern purification techniques. NIM plans to use a group of three cells for each defining fixed point temperature. In this way the eventual drift of individual cells can be evidenced by periodic intercomparison and this will increase the reliability in disseminating the ITS-90 in China. This article describes the recent improvements in realization of ITS-90 over temperature range from the melting point of gallium to the freezing point of silver at NIM. Taking advantages of the technological advances in the design and manufacture of furnaces, the new three-zone furnaces and the open-type fixed points were developed from the freezing point of indium to the freezing point of silver, and a furnace with the three-zone semiconductor cooling was designed to automatically realize the melting point of gallium. The reproducibility of the new melting point of gallium and the new open-type freezing points of In, Sn, Zn. Al and Ag is improved, especially the freezing points of Al and Ag with the reproducibility of 0.2mK and 0.5mK respectively. The expanded uncertainty in the realization of these defining fixed point temperatures is 0.34mK, 0.44mK, 0.54mK, 0.60mK, 1.30mK and 1.88mK respectively.

  9. Delayed freezing of water droplet on silver nanocolumnar thin film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Dhruv P.; Singh, Jitendra P.

    2013-06-01

    Silver nanocolumns were grown on Si substrate using glancing angle deposition method. Interestingly, the cold nanocolumnar surface was observed to make a delay of more than 62 s in freezing compared to the conventional silver thin film. The observed delay in freezing on silver nanocolumns is explainable in terms of reduction in effective liquid-solid interface area within the framework of Cassie-Baxter model. This study shows the possibility of using silver nanocolumnar films in ice free coatings and surfaces with tunable freezing properties.

  10. Investigating the Mpemba Effect: When Hot Water Freezes Faster than Cold Water

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ibekwe, R. T.; Cullerne, J. P.

    2016-01-01

    Under certain conditions a body of hot liquid may cool faster and freeze before a body of colder liquid, a phenomenon known as the Mpemba Effect. An initial difference in temperature of 3.2 °C enabled warmer water to reach 0 °C in 14% less time than colder water. Convection currents in the liquid generate a temperature gradient that causes more…

  11. A Numerical Analysis on Freezing Behavior of Flowing Water inside a Pipe Cooled from Surroundings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiba, Ryoichi; Izumi, Masaaki

    A freezing phenomenon in forced convectional flow inside a pipe is investigated numerically in this paper .The numerical analysis is carried out to assess the transient freezing behavior of flowing water inside a pipe cooled from surroundings in consideration of pressure drop caused by the freezing. The finite element technique is applied to solve the equations of motion and energy transport for laminar flow. The numerical model attempts to capture the solid-fluid interface on a fixed computational grid. The correlations among cooling conditions of pipe, velocity and temperature of water at the inlet, and location at which the freezing starts are examined to show the critical velocity to avoid freezing. In addition, under the condition that pressure remains constant at the inlet, the period in which the pipe is not blockaded by ice is calculated. The period is illustrated with some dimensionless parameters to predict the conditions under which blockage occurs within a given time.

  12. Early Mars was wet but not warm: Erosion, fluvial features, liquid water habitats, and life below freezing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckay, C. P.; Davis, W. L.

    1993-01-01

    There is considerable evidence that Mars had liquid water early in its history and possibly at recurrent interval. It has generally been assumed that this implied that the climate was warmer as a result of a thicker CO2 atmosphere than at the present. However, recent models suggest that Mars may have had a thick atmosphere but may not have experienced mean annual temperatures above freezing. In this paper we report on models of liquid water formation and maintenance under temperatures well below freezing. Our studies are based on work in the north and south polar regions of Earth. Our results suggest that early Mars did have a thick atmosphere but precipitation and hence erosion was rare. Transient liquid water, formed under temperature extremes and maintained under thick ice covers, could account for the observed fluvial features. The main difference between the present climate and the early climate was that the total surface pressure was well above the triple point of water.

  13. The freezing process of continuously sprayed water droplets on the superhydrophobic silicone acrylate resin coating surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Jianlin; Xu, Ke; Wu, Yao; Lan, Binhuan; Jiang, Xingliang; Shu, Lichun

    2014-10-01

    This study conducted experiments on freezing process of water droplets on glass slides covered with superhydrophobic coatings under the continuous water spray condition in the artificial climatic chamber which could simulate low temperature and high humidity environments. The freezing mechanism and freezing time of water droplets under the condition of continuous spray were observed by the microscope and were compared with those of the single static droplet. Then, differences of freezing process between continuously sprayed droplets and single static droplet were analyzed. Furthermore, the effects of static contact angle (CA), contact angle hysteresis (CAH) and roughness of the superhydrophobic coating surface on the freezing time of continuously sprayed droplets were explored. Results show that the freezing process of the continuously sprayed droplets on the superhydrophobic coating started with the homogeneous nucleation at gas-liquid interfaces. In addition, the temperature difference between the location near the solid-liquid interface and the location near the gas-liquid interface was the key factor that influenced the ice crystallization mechanism of water droplets. Moreover, with the larger CA, the smaller CAH and the greater roughness of the surface, droplets were more likely to roll down the surface and the freezing duration on the surface was delayed. Based on the findings, continuous water spray is suggested in the anti-icing superhydrophobic coatings research.

  14. An evaluation of osmolality measurement by freezing point depression using micro-amounts of sample

    PubMed Central

    Koumantakis, G.; Wyndham, L. E.

    1989-01-01

    An evaluation of the Advanced micro-osmometer is presented. This instrument has been shown to have an excellent analytical precision (within-run CV = 0.59%, between-day CV = 0.58%). It is accurate over an analytical range of 0-2000 mmol/kg of osmolality shown by linearity studies and split sample correlations against vapour pressure osmometry, freezing point osmometry and an external quality assurance programme. Analytical errors due to operator technique are almost eliminated because of good instrument design. Preliminary results on whole-blood osmolality are included. The required sample size of 20 ?l permits osmolality measurements on most clinical samples. It is concluded that the Advanced micro-osmometer satisfies laboratory requirements. PMID:18925239

  15. New expressions to describe solution nonideal osmotic pressure, freezing point depression, and vapor pressure.

    PubMed

    Fullerton, G D; Zimmerman, R J; Cantu, C; Cameron, I L

    1992-12-01

    New empirical expressions for osmotic pressure, freezing point depression, and vapor pressure are proposed based on the concepts of volume occupancy and (or) hydration force. These expressions are in general inverse relationships in comparison to the standard ideal expressions for the same properties. The slopes of the new equations are determined by the molecular weight of the solute and known constants. The accuracy and precision of the molecular weights calculated from the slope are identical and approximately 1% for the experiments reported here. The nonideality of all three colligative expressions is described by a dimensionless constant called the solute-solvent interaction parameter I. The results on sucrose have the same I = 0.26 for all three solution properties. The nonideality parameter I increased from 0.26 on sucrose to 1.7 on hemoglobin to successfully describe the well-known nonideal response of macromolecules. PMID:1299270

  16. Critical Radius of Supercooled Water Droplets: On the Transition toward Dendritic Freezing.

    PubMed

    Buttersack, Tillmann; Bauerecker, Sigurd

    2016-01-28

    The freezing of freely suspended supercooled water droplets with a diameter of bigger than a few micrometers splits into two rather different freezing stages. Within the first very fast dendritic freezing stage a spongy network ice with an ice portion of less than one-third forms and more than two-thirds of liquid water remain. In the present work the distribution of the ice portion in the droplet directly after the dendritic freezing phase as well as the evolution of the ice and temperature distribution has been investigated in dependence of the most relevant parameters as droplet diameter, dendritic freezing velocity (which correlates with the supercooling) and heat transfer coefficient to the surroundings (which correlates with the relative droplet velocity compared to the ambient air and with the droplet size). For this purpose on the experimental side acoustically levitated droplets in climate chambers have been investigated in combination with high-speed cameras. The obtained results have been used for finite element method (FEM) simulations of the dendritic freezing phase under consideration of the beginning second, much slower heat-transfer dominated freezing phase. A theoretical model covering 30 layers and 5 shells of the droplet has been developed which allows one to describe the evolution of both freezing phases at the same time. The simulated results are in good agreement with experimental as well as with calculated results exploiting the heat balance equation. The most striking result of this work is the critical radius of the droplet which describes the transition of one-stage freezing of the supercooled water droplet toward the thermodynamically forced dendritical two-stage freezing in which the droplet cannot sufficiently get rid of the formation heat anymore. Depending on the parameters named above this critical radius was found to be in the range of 0.1 to 1 μm by FEM simulation. PMID:26727582

  17. Investigating the Mpemba Effect: when hot water freezes faster than cold water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibekwe, R. T.; Cullerne, J. P.

    2016-03-01

    Under certain conditions a body of hot liquid may cool faster and freeze before a body of colder liquid, a phenomenon known as the Mpemba Effect. An initial difference in temperature of 3.2 °C enabled warmer water to reach 0 °C in 14% less time than colder water. Convection currents in the liquid generate a temperature gradient that causes more rapid heat loss by surface radiation and evaporation than obtains for uniform temperature. This more rapid cooling enables the initially warmer liquid to overtake the cooler liquid, reaching 0 °C earlier and freezing first. Liquid cooling under natural convection follows a five-fourths power law (temperature of liquid T , temperature of surroundings {{T}a} , cooling constant k ): \\frac{\\text{d}T}{\\text{d}t}=k{{≤ft(T-{{T}a}\\right)}\\frac{5{4}}} . In this investigation we found that with evaporation this becomes a four-thirds power law:

  18. How Circulation of Water Affects Freezing in Ponds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moreau, Theresa; Lamontagne, Robert; Letzring, Daniel

    2007-01-01

    One means of preventing the top of a pond from freezing involves running a circulating pump near the bottom to agitate the surface and expose it to air throughout the winter months. This phenomenon is similar to that of the flowing of streams in subzero temperatures and to the running of taps to prevent pipe bursts in winter. All of these cases…

  19. How Circulation of Water Affects Freezing in Ponds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moreau, Theresa; Lamontagne, Robert; Letzring, Daniel

    2007-01-01

    One means of preventing the top of a pond from freezing involves running a circulating pump near the bottom to agitate the surface and expose it to air throughout the winter months. This phenomenon is similar to that of the flowing of streams in subzero temperatures and to the running of taps to prevent pipe bursts in winter. All of these cases

  20. Effects of freezing in and out of water on length and weight of Lake Michigan bloaters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sayers, Richard E.

    1987-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if freezing significantly alters the length or weight of bloaters Coregonus hoyi. Bloaters were collected from southern Lake Michigan and were frozen for periods of 2-200 d. Freezing in water caused a significant decrease in length and a significant increase in weight. These changes did not vary predictably with time. The mean change in weight was greater for adults than for juveniles, but the mean change in length was not significantly different between juveniles and adults. Regressions for weight or length after freezing versus weight or length before freezing were highly significant and can be used as correction equations for estimating the original lengths and weights of fresh specimens after fish have been frozen. Test fish that were subsequently refrozen in air shrank more than those refrozen in water.

  1. Droplet freezing experiments in stearic acid-water emulsions, role of the droplet-medium interface

    SciTech Connect

    Cordiez, J.P.; Grange, G.; Mutaftschiev, B.

    1982-02-01

    Droplets of stearic acid emulsions in water, stabilized with cationic or anionic emulsifiers, undergoing freezing-melting cycles with constant temperature scanning rate, freeze as monocrystals and independently from one another, even when visible clustering takes place. The study of the nucleation kinetics by differential scanning calorimetry shows that nucleation threshold (critical undercooling) depends on the nature of the emulsifier, adsorbed at the droplet-medium interface. 30 references.

  2. Supercooling and the Mpemba effect: When hot water freezes quicker than cold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auerbach, David

    1995-10-01

    Temperature measurements taken near vessel walls show that initially hot water may well begin to freeze quicker than cold. This is not, as previously surmised, due to the cooling history of the water (e.g., air expulsion during heating). Rather, supercooling virtually always takes place. On those occasions where the cold water supercools sufficiently more than the hot the Mpemba scenario is the following: The hot water supercools, but only slightly, before spontaneously freezing. Superficially it looks completely frozen. The cold water (in larger volume than that of the hot sample) supercools to a lower local temperature than the hot before it spontaneously freezes. This scenario can occur more often for ambient cooling temperatures between -6 °C and -12 °C.

  3. Optimization of thermophysical properties of Pacific white shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei) previously treated with freezing-point regulators using response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Wang, Liang; Liu, Zunying; Zhao, Yuanhui; Dong, Shiyuan; Zeng, Mingyong; Yang, Huicheng

    2015-08-01

    Three freezing-point regulators (glycine, sodium chloride and D-sorbitol) were employed to optimize thermophysical properties of Pacific white shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei) using response surface methodology (RSM). The independent variables were glycine content (0.250-1.250 %), sodium chloride content (0.500-2.500 %) and D-sorbitol content (0.125-0.625 %) and analysis of variance showed that the effects of glycine, sodium chloride and D-sorbitol on the thermophysical properties were statistically significant (P < 0.05). The coefficient of determination, R (2) values for initial freezing point (T i ), unfreezable water mass fraction (W u ), apparent specific heat (C app ) and Enthalpy (H) were 0.896 ~ 0.999. The combined effects of these independent variables on T i , W u , C app and H were investigated. The results indicated that T i , C app and H varied curvilinearly with increasing of glycine, sodium chloride and D-sorbitol content whereas W u increased nearly linearly. Based on response plots and desirability functions, the optimum combination of process variables for Pacific white shrimp previously treated with freezing-point regulators were 0.876 % for glycine content, 2.298 % for sodium chloride content and 0.589 % for D-sorbitol content, correspondently the optimized thermophysical properties were T i , - 5.086 °C; W u , 17.222 %; C app , 41.038 J/g °C and H, 155.942 J/g, respectively. Briefly, the application of freezing-point regulators depressed T i and obtained the optimum W u , C app and H, which would be obviously beneficial for the exploitation of various thermal processing and food storage. PMID:26243904

  4. Freezing tolerance and water relations of Opuntia fragilis from Canada and the United States

    SciTech Connect

    Loik, M.E.; Nobel, P.S. )

    1993-09-01

    To investigate the influence of winter climate on freezing tolerance at the population level, minimum January air temperatures in the field and cold acclimation determined in the laboratory were compared for Opuntia fragilis. Populations occurred at 20 locations as far north as 56[degrees]46' N latitude and at elevations up to 3029 m in Canada and the United States, most of which experience extreme freezing temperatures each winter. Low-temperature responses and water relations of stems were examined in the laboratory at day/night air temperatures of 25[degrees]/15[degrees]C and 14 d after the plants were shifted to a 5[degrees]/[minus]5[degrees]C temperature cycle. Cold acclimation averaged 17[degrees]C and freezing tolerance averaged [minus]29[degrees]C for the 20 populations following a shift to low day/night air temperatures, indicating that O. fragilis has the greatest cold acclimation ability and the greatest freezing tolerance reported for any cactus. Moreover, freezing tolerance and cold acclimation were both positively correlated (r[sup 2] [congruent] 0.7) with the minimum temperatures at the 20 locations. Plants lost water during low-temperature acclimation, leading to 30% decreases in cladode and chlorenchyma thickness; the decrease in water content was greater for the five warmest populations than for the five coldest ones. Over the same period, the average osmotic pressure of the chlorenchyma increased from 1.42 to 1.64 MPa, and the relative water content (RWC) decreased from 0.58 to 0.49, but the average osmotic pressure of saturated chlorenchyma was unchanged, indicating no net change in solute content during acclimation. Although the role of water relations in freezing tolerance is unclear, the substantial freezing tolerance and cold acclimation ability of O. fragilis leads to its distribution into regions of Canada and the United States that experience minimum temperatures below [minus]40[degrees]C during the winter. 47 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs.

  5. Cavitation and water fluxes driven by ice water potential in Juglans regia during freeze-thaw cycles.

    PubMed

    Charra-Vaskou, Katline; Badel, Eric; Charrier, Guillaume; Ponomarenko, Alexandre; Bonhomme, Marc; Foucat, Loïc; Mayr, Stefan; Améglio, Thierry

    2016-02-01

    Freeze-thaw cycles induce major hydraulic changes due to liquid-to-ice transition within tree stems. The very low water potential at the ice-liquid interface is crucial as it may cause lysis of living cells as well as water fluxes and embolism in sap conduits, which impacts whole tree-water relations. We investigated water fluxes induced by ice formation during freeze-thaw cycles in Juglans regia L. stems using four non-invasive and complementary approaches: a microdendrometer, magnetic resonance imaging, X-ray microtomography, and ultrasonic acoustic emissions analysis. When the temperature dropped, ice nucleation occurred, probably in the cambium or pith areas, inducing high water potential gradients within the stem. The water was therefore redistributed within the stem toward the ice front. We could thus observe dehydration of the bark's living cells leading to drastic shrinkage of this tissue, as well as high tension within wood conduits reaching the cavitation threshold in sap vessels. Ultrasonic emissions, which were strictly emitted only during freezing, indicated cavitation events (i.e. bubble formation) following ice formation in the xylem sap. However, embolism formation (i.e. bubble expansion) in stems was observed only on thawing via X-ray microtomography for the first time on the same sample. Ultrasonic emissions were detected during freezing and were not directly related to embolism formation. These results provide new insights into the complex process and dynamics of water movements and ice formation during freeze-thaw cycles in tree stems. PMID:26585223

  6. Ice slurry cooling research: Microscale study of ice particles characteristics, role of freezing point depressant, and influence on slurry fluidity

    SciTech Connect

    Hayashi, K.; Kasza, K.

    2000-05-03

    The influences of freezing-point-depressants on ice slurry characteristics in the form of ice slurry fluidity and on the microscale ice particle features are studied. The results identify microscale features of ice particles such as surface roughness that greatly influence slurry fluidity that are altered favorably by the use of a freezing point depressant. The engineering of a workable and efficient ice slurry cooling system depends very strongly on the characteristics of the individual ice particles in the slurry and, in turn, on the method of ice production. Findings from this study provide guidance on the fluidity and handleability of slurry produced by several methods currently under development and already many achieved.

  7. High-speed Imaging of Freezing Drops: Investigating the Role of Point-like Contact in Heterogeneous Ice Nucleation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurganus, C.; Charnawskas, J.; Shaw, R. A.; Kostinski, A. B.

    2013-12-01

    Formation of ice by contact nucleation remains enigmatic and the possible role of the three-phase boundary (i.e., liquid water-ice-aerosol contact line) is still undetermined. Because aerosol size, surface area, composition and exact region of contact remain difficult to measure, we examine a simpler geometry with a spherical cap droplet resting on a substrate. In this configuration, the droplet simultaneously experiences a two-phase immersion region and a three phase contact region around the perimeter of the droplet. Utilizing high speed imaging of the droplet-substrate plane, we are able to identify nucleation sites in individual droplets. This technique allows for a spatial distribution of freezing sites in addition to a freezing temperature distribution. Our initial study indicated no preference for nucleation originating at the three phase boundary for an atomically smooth homogenous substrate [1]. The nucleation site distribution agreed well with the stochastic view in that the germ sites are distributed uniformly over the surface area. In that study we minimized the thermal variation (?T) across a droplet during cooling to prevent biased observations. We also compared ?T for several experiments in literature using a simple formulation of droplet size (r) and cooling rate (?). Large variations in some experiments could possibly explain observed 'contact nucleation' events in the laboratory as artifacts of radial thermal variations during droplet cooling. As a continuation of this study, we redesigned our system to enable much greater substrate cooling rates, but these experiments too revealed no preference for nucleation in the contact mode. Thermal modeling of the new system confirmed that while a vertical thermal gradient does develop within the droplet, no horizontal gradient is induced in the drop near the substrate. This result argues against a thermodynamic bias toward contact nucleation in substrate cooled geometries. Another possible explanation for this contact phenomenon comes in a lowering of the energy barrier for nucleation due to the existence of a line tension at the point of contact. A scale analysis of the line and surface energy values available in the literature suggests that line tension may become dominant below length scales of ~10 nm [1]. From this simple result we postulate that 'point-like' surface features might play an important role at the three phase boundary. To mimic these features on substrates we introduce chemical and mechanical processes to enhance substrate surface roughness. Using these new substrates we repeat our experimental procedure to compare effectiveness of the immersion (two phase) and contact (three phase) regions for a variety of surface topologies. Here we report the initial findings from this work. 1. Gurganus, C.; Kostinski, A. B.; Shaw, R. A., Fast Imaging of Freezing Drops: No Preference for Nucleation at the Contact Line. J Phys Chem Lett 2011, 2 (12) Identifying nucleation sites with two high speed cameras.

  8. Sea water desalination by dynamic layer melt crystallization: Parametric study of the freezing and sweating steps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rich, Anouar; Mandri, Youssef; Mangin, Denis; Rivoire, Alain; Abderafi, Souad; Bebon, Christine; Semlali, Naoual; Klein, Jean-Paul; Bounahmidi, Tijani; Bouhaouss, Ahmed; Veesler, Stéphane

    2012-03-01

    This work aims at developing a dynamic layer crystallizer operated batchwise, for freezing desalination of sea water. The experiments were performed with water/NaCl solutions and with samples of sea water from Nice, Rabat and Marseille. The pilot crystallizer consists of a cooled tube immersed in a cylindrical double jacketed tank. The solution is poured into the tank and the crystallization takes place on the external surface of the tube, by applying a cooling ramp in the tube. The solution is agitated by air bubbling. The whole process involves the freezing step, leading to the crystallization of the ice layer and the sweating step, which consists of purifying in depth the ice layer by melting the impure zones. A parametric study on the effect of the operating parameters has allowed quantifying the role of the different key parameters of the freezing and sweating steps. Three experiments allowed reaching salinities lower than 0.5 g/kg, satisfying the standards of drinking water. The duration of the whole process dropped to only 8 h (5 h for freezing and 3 h for sweating), with a yield of sweating equal to about 50%, provided severe conditions were applied for sweating. Higher yields required longer times. Overall, the results show the feasibility of the technique.

  9. Effect of nucleation agents on the freezing probability of supercooled water inside capsules

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, S.L.; Chen, C.L.

    2000-07-01

    The effect of nucleation agents on the freezing probability of supercooled water inside cylindrical capsules during a cold storage process was investigated. Different types of nucleation agents including silver iodide (AgI), lead iodide (PbI{sub 2}), river sand, and mud powder were used to achieve water nucleation under different coolant temperatures. The effect of the amount of nucleation agents on the freezing probability of cylindrical capsules was studied. The results indicate that the nucleation probability and nucleation temperature of supercooled water inside capsules adding nucleation agents are higher than those of capsules containing pure water only, which suggests that nucleation agents are effective in reducing supercooling of water. Of the nucleation agents used, silver iodide showed the best results in facilitating the nucleation. However, river sand is recommended as the nucleation agent because it is the most inexpensive and effective for the type of encapsulated storage tank used in a cold storage air-conditioning system.

  10. Supercooling Point Plasticity During Cold Storage in the Freeze-tolerant Sugarbeet Root Maggot Tetanops myopaeformis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The sugarbeet root maggot, Tetanops myopaeformis (Röder), overwinters as a freeze-tolerant 3rd instar larva. While most larvae are thought to overwinter for only one year, some may exhibit prolonged diapause in the field. In the laboratory, they can live for over five years using a combination of ...

  11. A computational study of the impingement of water droplets onto freezing superhydrophobic surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Wen; Amirzadeh, Behrooz; Tootkaboni, Mazdak; Raessi, Mehdi; University of Massachusetts Dartmouth Team

    2015-11-01

    We present computational simulations of the impingement of micron-size water droplets onto freezing superhydrophobic surfaces at various Weber numbers, droplet initial temperatures, and surface temperatures. The simulation results are from an in-house volume-of-fluid based, free-surface flow solver with phase change. The objective is to investigate the conditions under which the droplets bounce off the surface or stick to the surface and freeze. The transition between the bouncing and sticking regimes is shown. Then, using a dimensional analysis of the timescales for droplet freezing and drop-surface contact, a theoretical model is proposed for predicting the above transition. Finally, the predictions of the theoretical model are compared to the transition conditions observed in the computational simulations. Funding from the National Science Foundation CBET-1336232 grant is gratefully acknowledged.

  12. Measurement and simulation of water transport during freezing in mammalian liver tissue.

    PubMed

    Pazhayannur, P V; Bischof, J C

    1997-08-01

    Optimization of cryosurgical procedures on deep tissues such as liver requires an increased understanding of the fundamental mechanisms of ice formation and water transport in tissues during freezing. In order to further investigate and quantify the amount of water transport that occurs during freezing in tissue, this study reports quantitative and dynamic experimental data and theoretical modeling of rat liver freezing under controlled conditions. The rat liver was frozen by one of four methods of cooling: Method 1-ultrarapid "slam cooling" (> or = 1000 degrees C/min) for control samples; Method 2-equilibrium freezing achieved by equilibrating tissue at different subzero temperatures (-4, -6, -8, -10 degrees C); Method 3-two-step freezing, which involves cooling at 5 degrees C/min. to -4, -6, -8, -10 or -20 degrees C followed immediately by slam cooling; or Method 4-constant and controlled freezing at rates from 5-400 degrees C/min. on a directional cooling stage. After freezing, the tissue was freeze substituted, embedded in resin, sectioned, stained, and imaged under a light microscope fitted with a digitizing system. Image analysis techniques were then used to determine the relative cellular to extracellular volumes of the tissue. The osmotically inactive cell volume was determined to be 0.35 by constructing a Boyle van't Hoff plot using cellular volumes from Method 2. The dynamic volume of the rat liver cells during cooling was obtained using cellular volumes from Method 3 (two-step freezing at 5 degrees C/min). A nonlinear regression fit of a Krogh cylinder model to the volumetric shrinkage data in Method 3 yielded the biophysical parameters of water transport in rat liver tissue of: Lpg = 3.1 x 10(-13) m3/Ns (1.86 microns/min-atm) and ELp = 290 kJ/mole (69.3 kcal/mole), with chi-squared variance of 0.00124. These parameters were then incorporated into the Krogh cylinder model and used to simulate water transport in rat liver tissue during constant cooling at rates between 5-100 degrees C/min. Reasonable agreement between these simulations and the constant cooling rate freezing experiments in Method 4 were obtained. The model predicts that the water transport ceases at a relatively high subzero temperature (-10 degrees C), such that the amount of intracellular ice forming in the tissue cells rises from almost none (= extensive dehydration and vascular expansion) at < or = 5 degrees C/min to over 88 percent of the original cellular water at > or = 50 degrees C/min. The theoretical simulations based on these experimental methods may be of use in visualizing and predicting freezing response, and thus can assist in the planning and implementing of cryosurgical protocols. PMID:9285340

  13. Improvement of dissolution property of poorly water-soluble drug by supercritical freeze granulation.

    PubMed

    Sonoda, Ryoichi; Hara, Yuko; Iwasaki, Tomohiro; Watano, Satoru

    2009-10-01

    The dissolution property of the poorly water-soluble drug, flurbiprofen (FP) was improved by a novel supercritical freeze granulation using supercritical carbon dioxide. Supercritical freeze granulation was defined as a production method of the granulated substances by using the dry ice to generate intentionally for the rapid atomization of the supercritical carbon dioxide to the atmospheric pressure. This process utilized a rapid expansion of supercritical solutions (RESS) process with the mixture of the drug and lactose. In the supercritical freeze granulation, needle-like FP fine particles were obtained which adhered to the surface of lactose particles, which did not dissolve in supercritical carbon dioxide. The number of FP particles that adhered to the surface of particles decreased with an increase in the ratio of lactose added, leading to markedly improve the dissolution rate. This improvement was caused not only by the increase in the specific surface area but also the improvement of the dispersibility of FP in water. It is thus concluded that the supercritical freeze granulation is a useful technique to improve the dissolution property of the poorly water-soluble flurbiprofen. PMID:19801855

  14. Molecular Dynamics Study of Freezing Point and Solid-Liquid Interfacial Free Energy of Stockmayer Fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J.; Apte, Pankaj; Morris, James R; Zeng, X.C.

    2013-01-01

    Freezing temperatures of Stockmayer fluids with different dipolar strength at zero pressure are estimated and computed using three independent molecular-dynamics (MD) simulation methods, namely, the superheating-undercooling method, the constant-pressure and constant-temperature (NPT) two phase coexistence method, and the constant-pressure and constant-enthalpy (NPH) coexistence method. The best estimate of the freezing temperature (in reduced unit) for the Stockmayer (SM) fluid with a reduced dipole moment is 0.656 0.001, 0.726 0.002 and 0.835 0.005, respectively. The freezing temperature increases with the dipolar strength. The solid-liquid interfacial free energies of the (111), (110) and (100) interface are calculated for the first time using two independent methods, namely, the cleaving-wall method and the interfacial fluctuation method. Both methods predict that the interfacial free energy increases with the dipole moment. Although the interfacial fluctuation method suggests a weaker interfacial anisotropy, particularly for strongly dipolar SM fluids, both methods predicted the same trend of interfacial anisotropy, that is, .

  15. Competition between ices Ih and Ic in homogeneous water freezing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaragoza, Alberto; Conde, Maria M.; Espinosa, Jorge R.; Valeriani, Chantal; Vega, Carlos; Sanz, Eduardo

    2015-10-01

    The role of cubic ice, ice Ic, in the nucleation of ice from supercooled water has been widely debated in the past decade. Computer simulations can provide insightful information about the mechanism of ice nucleation at a molecular scale. In this work, we use molecular dynamics to study the competition between ice Ic and hexagonal ice, ice Ih, in the process of ice nucleation. Using a seeding approach, in which classical nucleation theory is combined with simulations of ice clusters embedded in supercooled water, we estimate the nucleation rate of ice for a pathway in which the critical nucleus has an Ic structure. Comparing our results with those previously obtained for ice Ih [Sanz et al., J. Am. Chem. Soc. 135, 15008 (2013)], we conclude that within the accuracy of our calculations both nucleation pathways have the same rate for the studied water models (TIP4P/Ice and TIP4P/2005). We examine in detail the factors that contribute to the nucleation rate and find that the chemical potential difference with the fluid, the attachment rate of particles to the cluster, and the ice-water interfacial free energy are the same within the estimated margin of error for both ice polymorphs. Furthermore, we study the morphology of the ice clusters and conclude that they have a spherical shape.

  16. Investigation into the Mpemba Effect: Variation in the Freezing Time of Water Dependent on Initial Temperature and Purity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thvedt, Ingrid; Roseberry, Martha; Lehman, Susan

    2009-03-01

    The observation that hot water sometimes appears to freeze more quickly than cold water, known as the Mpemba effect, has generated vigorous debate. Prior research [1] into the Mpemba effect has resulted in conflicting results, due to a variety of observation techniques, multiple definitions of freezing, and different water treatments. To clarify the previous results, we have tested multiple types of water and improved the sample monitoring. During cooling and freezing, each 50 g water sample is continually monitored by three thermistors at different depths. Samples of tap, distilled, and nanopure water were heated, heated and cooled, or boiled before being frozen. We monitor the time to reach freezing, the duration of freezing, and the total time to reach -7^oC. We observe the Mpemba effect most consistently in the length of the freezing transition in tap water. Observations of temperature variation during freezing will also be presented. [1] See the review by M. Jeng, Am.J.Phys. 74 514 (2006).

  17. Freezing points and small-scale deicing tests for salts of levulinic acid made from grain sorghum.

    PubMed

    Ganjyal, G; Fang, Q; Hanna, M A

    2007-11-01

    Deicers from renewable resources are needed to overcome the disadvantages of using traditional deicers. Salts made from levulinic acid produced using grain sorghum as raw material were tested as road deicing agents. Freezing points of these salts viz., sodium levulinate, magnesium levulinate and calcium levulinate along with rock salt (sodium chloride) were determined according to American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) D 1177-94 standard at concentrations of 10, 20, 30 and 40 % w/w. There were significant differences among the freezing points of the salts. Freezing points for rock salt, sodium levulinate, calcium levulinate and magnesium levulinate, for different concentrations, were in the ranges of -6.6 to -20.5, -2.9 to -15.0, -2.1 to -7.8 and -1.5 to -6.5 degrees C, respectively. Deicing effectiveness of the salts of levulinic acid were investigated by conducting small-scale deicing tests with aqueous solutions of various salt concentrations (2%, 5% and 10%) in a laboratory freezer and by spraying the deicer on a graveled surface covered by ice and snow with the average temperature during the testing at -2.7 degrees C. Deicing capabilities of the three salts of levulinic acid differed. At -2.7 degrees C, all three salts caused melting of the ice. Among the different levulinates studied sodium levulinate was the most effective deicing agent. These salts of levulinates could be a viable replacement for traditional deicers and could help in reducing the disadvantages of traditional deicers. PMID:17416518

  18. Measurement of temperature and velocity fields of freezing water using liquid crystal tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalewski, Tomasz A.

    A new experimental technique based on a computational analysis of the colour and displacement of thermochromic liquid crystal tracers was applied to determine both the temperature and velocity fields of freezing water. The technique combines Digital Particle Image Thermometry and Digital Particle Image Velocimetry. Full 2-D temperature and velocity fields are determined from a pair or a longer sequence, of colour images taken for the selected cross-section of the flow.

  19. Design and evaluation of a freeze-dry apparatus for removing free water for tritium analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Hayes, D.W.

    1982-07-01

    A freeze-dry apparatus was constructed to remove free water from environmental samples for tritium analysis. The apparatus is self-contained, can process eight samples simultaneously, and, to avoid replenishment of the cold bath, uses a refrigeration system. Large samples (200 to 300 g) can be dried in about three days. To avoid fractionation of tritium during the distillation process, it was necessary to take the sample to dryness.

  20. Watershed water circle dynamics during long term farmland conversion in freeze-thawing area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouyang, Wei; Bing, Liu; Huang, Haobo; Hao, Fanghua; Hao, Zengchao

    2015-04-01

    Water resource is increasingly scarce in agricultural watershed under the pressure of socio-economic development. Long term land use conversion and freeze-thawing process posed additional characteristics to the water cycle. The semi-distributed hydrologic model Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) was employed for surface runoff, evaporation, and percolation simulations in freeze-thawing agricultural watershed. The interpreted five terms of land use data over three decades demonstrated that the percentage of the farmland area of the whole watershed increased from 23.5% to 62.1% and about half of dryland shifted to the paddy land in the recent ten years. The validated SWAT simulation showed that the spatial distribution of the surface runoff volume and the watershed averaged value increased 60 mm. The correlations of precipitation with surface runoff at monthly and yearly scales decreased from 0.8-0.9 to 0.6-0.7 respectively, which highlighted the impact of land use change over the surface runoff. The watershed evaporation was lower under the freeze-thawing condition, which increased from 363.7 mm to 418.5 mm over three decades. The field monitoring recorded the decreasing groundwater level, which was coincided with the expanding area of the paddy land. The watershed precipitation did not varied intensively in the whole simulation period (CV ⩽ 0.01), but the percolation varied as the result of the cultivation disturbance on soil properties. The analysis showed that the expanding paddy land decreased the groundwater level at 0.17 m/yr during 1997 and 2012, which posed new challenge on regional water management. The evapotranspiration in the extreme size of paddy land was relatively small and the groundwater level also decreased relatively slow. These characteristics demonstrated the impact of freeze-thawing on the water cycle. The proposed method can be used as an effective tool for quantitative prediction of irrigation water amount and identify the impact of land use change on the water cycle at freeze-thawing agricultural watershed.

  1. Water-Hydrogel Binding Affinity Modulates Freeze-Drying-Induced Micropore Architecture and Skeletal Myotube Formation.

    PubMed

    Rich, Max H; Lee, Min Kyung; Marshall, Nicholas; Clay, Nicholas; Chen, Jinrong; Mahmassani, Ziad; Boppart, Marni; Kong, Hyunjoon

    2015-08-10

    Freeze-dried hydrogels are increasingly used to create 3D interconnected micropores that facilitate biomolecular and cellular transports. However, freeze-drying is often plagued by variance in micropore architecture based on polymer choice. We hypothesized that water-polymer binding affinity plays a significant role in sizes and numbers of micropores formed through freeze-drying, influencing cell-derived tissue quality. Poly(ethylene glycol)diacrylate (PEGDA) hydrogels with alginate methacrylate (AM) were used due to AM's higher binding affinity for water than PEGDA. PEGDA-AM hydrogels with larger AM concentrations resulted in larger sizes and numbers of micropores than pure PEGDA hydrogels, attributed to the increased mass of water binding to the PEGDA-AM gel. Skeletal myoblasts loaded in microporous PEGDA-AM hydrogels were active to produce 3D muscle-like tissue, while those loaded in pure PEGDA gels were localized on the gel surface. We propose that this study will be broadly useful in designing and improving the performance of various microporous gels. PMID:26113238

  2. Kinetics of water loss and the likelihood of intracellular freezing in mouse ova

    SciTech Connect

    Mazur, P.; Rall, W.F.; Leibo, S.P.

    1984-01-01

    To avoid intracellular freezing and its usually lethal consequences, cells must lose their freezable water before reaching their ice-nucleation temperature. One major factor determining the rate of water loss is the temperature dependence of water permeability, L/sub p/ (hydraulic conductivity). Because of the paucity of water permeability measurements at subzero temperatures, that temperature dependence has usually been extrapolated from above-zero measurements. The extrapolation has often been based on an exponential dependence of L/sub p/ on temperature. This paper compares the kinetics of water loss based on that extrapolation with that based on an Arrhenius relation between L/sub p/ and temperature, and finds substantial differences below -20 to -25/sup 0/C. Since the ice-nucleation temperature of mouse ova in the cryoprotectants DMSO and glycerol is usually below -30/sup 0/C, the Arrhenius form of the water-loss equation was used to compute the extent of supercooling in ova cooled at rates between 1 and 8/sup 0/C/min and the consequent likelihood of intracellular freezing. The predicted likelihood agrees well with that previously observed. The water-loss equation was also used to compute the volumes of ova as a function of cooling rate and temperature. The computed cell volumes agree qualitatively with previously observed volumes, but differed quantitatively. 25 references, 5 figures, 3 tables.

  3. Evaluation of Characteristics of Surface which Influence the Initiation of Freezing of Supercooled Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okawa, Seiji; Saito, Akio

    It is essential to clarify the supercooling phenomenon, as it is one of the important problem for carrying out the ice storage system, effectively. In this report, the effect of the characteristics of the surface as a heterogeneous nucleation of water was investigated. Experiments on freezing of supercooled water were carried out using various kinds of heat transfer surfaces. The type of the surface used in the experiments were, electrolyticaly polished copper surface, buffed copper surface, gold-plated surface, nickel-plated, porous copper surface, silicone surface, Teflon surface and acrylic surface. The results indicate that the probability of freezing is highly dependent upon the characteristics of the surface. However, by considering the characteristics of the surface as a density of the spots having a high ability of nucleation, it was found that the distribution of the probability of freezing for each surface can be expressed using a parameter τ. A physical meaning of the parameter τ was discussed and suggested as a function of the surface energy and the surface roughness.

  4. The influence of residual water on the solid-state properties of freeze-dried fibrinogen.

    PubMed

    Wahl, Verena; Leitgeb, Stefan; Laggner, Peter; Pichler, Harald; Liebminger, Andreas; Khinast, Johannes

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of this work was to investigate the influence of residual water in freeze-dried protein powders on the dissolution behavior of the solid-state proteins. To that end, six freeze-dried fibrinogen powder lots were stored at four levels of relative humidity and analyzed with regard to the particle size and shape, the specific surface area, the solid state of protein and the inner surface. Furthermore, the dissolution behavior of the powders was investigated. We clearly identified differences in the specific surface area, specific inner surface area, crystallinity, particle size and shape, which we were able to correlate to the dissolution behavior. These differences were triggered due to the different levels of residual moisture during two weeks of storage. Thus, we were able to show that the storage conditions have significant impact on the processing of pharmaceutical protein materials. PMID:25617832

  5. Particular points of water-alcohol solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gotsulskiy, V. Ya.; Malomuzh, N. P.; Chechko, V. E.

    2015-02-01

    The paper discusses the physical nature of the nontrivial properties of aqueous alcohol solutions in a range of molar concentrations x ˜ 0.05. A particular point is determined based on analysis of the temperature and concentration dependences of contraction, which is the simplest thermodynamic characteristic of solutions. The occurrence of particular points in water-alcohol solutions is shown to be directly related to the structural features of water. The concentration-temperature dependence is plotted, where the contraction behavior of an aqueous ethanol solution demonstrates a structural feature of water. The formulas to find the concentration values at particular points are proposed.

  6. Volume crossover in deeply supercooled water adiabatically freezing under isobaric conditions.

    PubMed

    Aliotta, Francesco; Giaquinta, Paolo V; Pochylski, Mikolaj; Ponterio, Rosina C; Prestipino, Santi; Saija, Franz; Vasi, Cirino

    2013-05-14

    The irreversible return of a supercooled liquid to stable thermodynamic equilibrium often begins as a fast process which adiabatically drives the system to solid-liquid coexistence. Only at a later stage will solidification proceed with the expected exchange of thermal energy with the external bath. In this paper we discuss some aspects of the adiabatic freezing of metastable water at constant pressure. In particular, we investigated the thermal behavior of the isobaric gap between the molar volume of supercooled water and that of the warmer ice-water mixture which eventually forms at equilibrium. The available experimental data at ambient pressure, extrapolated into the metastable region within the scheme provided by the reference IAPWS-95 formulation, show that water ordinarily expands upon (partially) freezing under isenthalpic conditions. However, the same scheme also suggests that, for increasing undercoolings, the volume gap is gradually reduced and eventually vanishes at a temperature close to the currently estimated homogeneous ice nucleation temperature. This behavior is contrasted with that of substances which do not display a volumetric anomaly. The effect of increasing pressures on the alleged volume crossover from an expanded to a contracted ice-water mixture is also discussed. PMID:23676053

  7. Volume crossover in deeply supercooled water adiabatically freezing under isobaric conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aliotta, Francesco; Giaquinta, Paolo V.; Pochylski, Mikolaj; Ponterio, Rosina C.; Prestipino, Santi; Saija, Franz; Vasi, Cirino

    2013-05-01

    The irreversible return of a supercooled liquid to stable thermodynamic equilibrium often begins as a fast process which adiabatically drives the system to solid-liquid coexistence. Only at a later stage will solidification proceed with the expected exchange of thermal energy with the external bath. In this paper we discuss some aspects of the adiabatic freezing of metastable water at constant pressure. In particular, we investigated the thermal behavior of the isobaric gap between the molar volume of supercooled water and that of the warmer ice-water mixture which eventually forms at equilibrium. The available experimental data at ambient pressure, extrapolated into the metastable region within the scheme provided by the reference IAPWS-95 formulation, show that water ordinarily expands upon (partially) freezing under isenthalpic conditions. However, the same scheme also suggests that, for increasing undercoolings, the volume gap is gradually reduced and eventually vanishes at a temperature close to the currently estimated homogeneous ice nucleation temperature. This behavior is contrasted with that of substances which do not display a volumetric anomaly. The effect of increasing pressures on the alleged volume crossover from an expanded to a contracted ice-water mixture is also discussed.

  8. Formation of Martian Gullies by the Flow of Simultaneously Freezing and Boiling Liquid Water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heldmann, Jennifer L.; Mellon, Michael T.; Toon, Owen B.; Pollard, Wayne H.; Mellon, Michael T.; Pitlick, John; McKay, Christopher P.; Andersen, Dale T.

    2004-01-01

    Geomorphic evidence suggests that recent gullies on Mars were formed by fluvial activity. The Martian gully features are significant because their existence implies the presence of liquid water near the surface on Mars in geologically recent times. Irrespective of the ultimate source of the fluid carving the gullies, we seek to understand the behavior of this fluid after it reaches the Martian surface. We find that, contrary to popular belief, the fluvially-carved Martian gullies require formation conditions such as now occur on Mars, outside of the temperature-pressure stability regime of liquid water. Mars Global Surveyor observations of gully length and our modeling of water stability are consistent with gully formation from the action of pure liquid water that is simultaneously boiling and freezing.

  9. The Mpemba effect: When can hot water freeze faster than cold?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeng, Monwhea

    2006-06-01

    We review the Mpemba effect, where initially hot water freezes faster than initially cold water. Although the effect might appear impossible, it has been observed in numerous experiments and was discussed by Aristotle, Francis Bacon, Roger Bacon, and Descartes. It has a rich and fascinating history, including the story of the secondary school student, Erasto Mpemba, who reintroduced the effect to the twentieth century scientific community. The phenomenon is simple to describe and illustrates numerous important issues about the scientific method: the role of skepticism in scientific inquiry, the influence of theory on experiment and observation, the need for precision in the statement of a scientific hypothesis, and the nature of falsifiability. Proposed theoretical mechanisms for the Mpemba effect and the results of contemporary experiments on the phenomenon are surveyed. The observation that hot water pipes are more likely to burst than cold water pipes is also discussed.

  10. AgRISTARS: Early warning and crop condition assessment. Plant cover, soil temperature, freeze, water stress, and evapotranspiration conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiegand, C. L. (Principal Investigator); Nixon, P. R.; Gausman, H. W.; Namken, L. N.; Leamer, R. W.; Richardson, A. J.

    1981-01-01

    Emissive (10.5 to 12.5 microns) and reflective (0.55 to 1.1 microns) data for ten day scenes and infrared data for six night scenes of southern Texas were analyzed for plant cover, soil temperature, freeze, water stress, and evapotranspiration. Heat capacity mapping mission radiometric temperatures were: within 2 C of dewpoint temperatures, significantly correlated with variables important in evapotranspiration, and related to freeze severity and planting depth soil temperatures.

  11. FIELD DEPLOYMENT EVALUATION OF THE FREEZE-THAW/EVAPORATION (FTE) PROCESS TO TREAT OIL AND GAS PRODUCED WATERS. Task 45. Final topical report

    SciTech Connect

    Ames A. Grisanti; James A. Sorensen

    1999-05-01

    TASK 45 FIELD DEPLOYMENT EVALUATION OF THE FREEZE-THAW/ EVAPORATION (FTE ) PROCESS TO TREAT OIL AND GAS PRODUCED WATERS coupling evaporation with freezing. This offers operators a year- round method for treating produced water. Treating water with the FTE process reduces the volume of water to be disposed of as well as purifying the water to a level acceptable for watering livestock and agricultural lands. This process is currently used at two evaporation facilities, one in the San Juan Basin in New Mexico and one in the Green River Basin in Wyoming. the freezing point below that of pure water. When such a solution is cooled below 32EF, relatively pure ice crystals form, along with an unfrozen brine solution that contains elevated concentrations of salts. Because of the brine's high concentration of these constituents, its density is greater than that of the ice, and the purified ice and brine are easily separated. Coupling the natural processes of freezing and evaporation makes the FTE process a more cost- effective and efficient method for the treatment and disposal of produced water and allows for year-round operation of an FTE facility. drops below 32 F, produced water is automatically pumped from a holding pond and sprayed onto a freezing pad. The freezing pad consists of an elevated framework of piping with regularly placed, upright, extendable spray heads similar to those used to irrigate lawns. As the spray freezes, an ice pile forms over the elevated framework of pipes, and the brine, with an elevated constituent concentration, drains from the ice pile. The high-salinity brine, identified by its high electrical conductivity, is separated using automatic valves and pumped to a pond where it can subsequently be disposed of by conventional methods. As the ice pile increases in height, the sprayers are extended. When the ice on the freezing pad melts, the relatively pure water is pumped from the freezing pad and discharged or stored for later use . No new wastes are generated by the FTE process. and the U. S. Department of Energy has been conducted since 1992 to develop a commercial FTE purification process for produced waters. Numeric process and economic modeling, as well as the laboratory-scale process simulation that confirmed the technical and economic feasibility of the process, was performed by B. C. Technologies, Ltd., and the University of North Dakota Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) from 1992 to 1995. They then conducted a field evaluation from 1995 to 1997 in New Mexico's San Juan Basin at a conventional evaporation facility operated by Amoco Production Company. The results of this evaluation confirmed that the FTE process has significant commercial economic potential. A new facility was designed in 1998, and its construction is expected to begin in 1999.

  12. A comparative study of sodium dodecyl sulfate and freezing/thawing treatment on wheat starch: The role of water absorption.

    PubMed

    Tao, Han; Wang, Pei; Zhang, Bao; Wu, Fengfeng; Jin, Zhengyu; Xu, Xueming

    2016-06-01

    The effect of freezing on functionality of native and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)-treated wheat starches was investigated, with the aim of understanding the role of water absorption during freezing process. SDS is one of most efficient detergents to remove non-starch components (such as proteins and lipids) for starches but does not cause any apparent damage on granular structure. Slow swelling could be converted to rapid swelling by SDS washing, indicating higher water absorption. Freezing process induced slight roughness on starch granules but the non-starch components content was little affected. Combined SDS+freezing treatment significantly decreased both amylose and proteins non-starch components contents, which was accompanied with high gelatinization temperatures, melting enthalpy, and pasting viscosities. A smaller bread specific volume was obtained from SDS+freezing-treated starches while the crumb firmness significantly increased (p<0.05). SDS mainly extracted the surface components from starch granules, leading to high water absorption and making granules sensitive to the freezing treatment. PMID:27083354

  13. Methods and concepts in quantifying resistance to drought, salt and freezing, abiotic stresses that affect plant water status.

    PubMed

    Verslues, Paul E; Agarwal, Manu; Katiyar-Agarwal, Surekha; Zhu, Jianhua; Zhu, Jian-Kang

    2006-02-01

    The abiotic stresses of drought, salinity and freezing are linked by the fact that they all decrease the availability of water to plant cells. This decreased availability of water is quantified as a decrease in water potential. Plants resist low water potential and related stresses by modifying water uptake and loss to avoid low water potential, accumulating solutes and modifying the properties of cell walls to avoid the dehydration induced by low water potential and using protective proteins and mechanisms to tolerate reduced water content by preventing or repairing cell damage. Salt stress also alters plant ion homeostasis, and under many conditions this may be the predominant factor affecting plant performance. Our emphasis is on experiments that quantify resistance to realistic and reproducible low water potential (drought), salt and freezing stresses while being suitable for genetic studies where a large number of lines must be analyzed. Detailed protocols for the use of polyethylene glycol-infused agar plates to impose low water potential stress, assay of salt tolerance based on root elongation, quantification of freezing tolerance and the use of electrolyte leakage experiments to quantify cellular damage induced by freezing and low water potential are also presented. PMID:16441347

  14. Mpemba effect and phase transitions in the adiabatic cooling of water before freezing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, S.; De Risi, R.; Somma, L.

    2008-02-01

    In this paper, an accurate experimental investigation of the Mpemba effect (that is, of the fact that initially hot water freezes before the colder one) is carried out, showing that, in the adiabatic cooling of water, relevant roles are played by supercooling, and by phase transitions which take place at 6±1 ∘C,3.5±0.5 ∘C and 1.3±0.6 ∘C. The last transition, which occurs with the non-negligible probability of 0.21 with respect to the total number of runs performed, has not been detected earlier. On the basis of our experimental results, we can present a thorough theoretical analysis of supercooling and of such phase transitions, which are interpreted in terms of the different ordering of molecule clusters in water.

  15. Freeze-drying of enzymes in case of water-binding and non-water-binding substrates.

    PubMed

    Pisano, Roberto; Rasetto, Valeria; Barresi, Antonello A; Kuntz, Florent; Aoude-Werner, Dalal; Rey, Louis

    2013-11-01

    Enzymes typically have a critical instability, which dominates both formulation and process development. In this paper, the ability to preserve the enzyme activity during freeze-drying was investigated for both water-binding and non-water-binding substrates. For this purpose, acid phosphatase was used as model protein. In addition, a procedure for the fast development of a freeze-drying cycle is shown. For the secondary drying part, the effect of processing temperature and time on enzyme activity was investigated. The enzyme activity decreased continuously during secondary drying, with a dramatic drop associated with processing temperatures higher than 293 K. Besides product temperature, the residual moisture level and water mobility are also important. As the residual moisture level and water mobility depend on the product formulation, the stabilizing effect against the enzyme deactivation was studied for a number of formulations which contain different additives, that is, sucrose, lactose, mannitol, and poly-vinylpyrrolidone, with a dramatic activity loss associated with crystallizing excipients. This study also confirmed that not all water-binding substrates can successfully protect the enzyme against deactivation. In fact, water-binding substrates containing reducing sugars (lactose) showed the highest loss of activity. PMID:23500114

  16. Water Relations and Low-Temperature Acclimation for Cactus Species Varying in Freezing Tolerance.

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, G.; Nobel, P. S.

    1994-01-01

    Opuntia ficus-indica and Opuntia streptacantha are widely cultivated cacti that can tolerate temperatures no lower than -10[deg]C, whereas Opuntia humifusa, which is native to southern Canada and the eastern United States, can tolerate -24[deg]C. As day/night air temperatures were decreased from 30/20 to 10/0[deg]C, the osmotic pressure increased 0.10 MPa for O. ficus-indica and O. streptacantha but 0.38 MPa for O. humifusa. The increases in osmotic pressures were due mostly to the synthesis of fructose, glucose, and sucrose. In addition, O. humifusa produced a substantial amount of mannitol during exposure to low temperatures. Substantial accumulation of sugars and mannitol in cells of O. humifusa may help prevent intracellular freeze dehydration and ice formation as well as provide noncolligative protection to its membranes. Mucilage was slightly higher in all three species at the lower temperatures. Extracellular nucleation of ice occurred closer to the equilibrium freezing temperature for plants at 10/0[deg]C compared with 30/20[deg]C, which could make the cellular dehydration more gradual and, thus, less damaging. Results from nuclear magnetic resonance indicated a restricted mobility of intracellular water at the lower temperatures, especially for O. humifusa, which is consistent with its lower water content and higher levels of low molecular weight solutes. PMID:12232118

  17. Water Relations and Low-Temperature Acclimation for Cactus Species Varying in Freezing Tolerance.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, G.; Nobel, P. S.

    1994-02-01

    Opuntia ficus-indica and Opuntia streptacantha are widely cultivated cacti that can tolerate temperatures no lower than -10[deg]C, whereas Opuntia humifusa, which is native to southern Canada and the eastern United States, can tolerate -24[deg]C. As day/night air temperatures were decreased from 30/20 to 10/0[deg]C, the osmotic pressure increased 0.10 MPa for O. ficus-indica and O. streptacantha but 0.38 MPa for O. humifusa. The increases in osmotic pressures were due mostly to the synthesis of fructose, glucose, and sucrose. In addition, O. humifusa produced a substantial amount of mannitol during exposure to low temperatures. Substantial accumulation of sugars and mannitol in cells of O. humifusa may help prevent intracellular freeze dehydration and ice formation as well as provide noncolligative protection to its membranes. Mucilage was slightly higher in all three species at the lower temperatures. Extracellular nucleation of ice occurred closer to the equilibrium freezing temperature for plants at 10/0[deg]C compared with 30/20[deg]C, which could make the cellular dehydration more gradual and, thus, less damaging. Results from nuclear magnetic resonance indicated a restricted mobility of intracellular water at the lower temperatures, especially for O. humifusa, which is consistent with its lower water content and higher levels of low molecular weight solutes. PMID:12232118

  18. The stability against freezing of an internal liquid-water ocean in Callisto.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, J

    2001-07-26

    The discovery of the induced magnetic field of Callisto-one of Jupiter's moons-has been interpreted as evidence for a subsurface ocean, even though the presence of such an ocean is difficult to understand in the context of existing theoretical models. Tidal heating should not be significant for Callisto, and, in the absence of such heating, it is difficult to see how this internal ocean could have survived until today without freezing. Previous work indicated that an outer ice layer on the ocean would be unstable against solid-state convection, which once begun would lead to total freezing of liquid water in about 108 years. Here I show that when a methodology for more physically reasonable water ice viscosities (that is, stress-dependent non-newtonian viscosities, rather than the stress-independent newtonian viscosities considered previously) is adopted, the outer ice shell becomes stable against convection. This implies that a subsurface ocean could have survived up to the present, without the need for invoking antifreeze substances or other special conditions. PMID:11473308

  19. HybridICE® filter: ice separation in freeze desalination of mine waste waters.

    PubMed

    Adeniyi, A; Maree, J P; Mbaya, R K K; Popoola, A P I; Mtombeni, T; Zvinowanda, C M

    2014-01-01

    Freeze desalination is an alternative method for the treatment of mine waste waters. HybridICE(®) technology is a freeze desalination process which generates ice slurry in surface scraper heat exchangers that use R404a as the primary refrigerant. Ice separation from the slurry takes place in the HybridICE filter, a cylindrical unit with a centrally mounted filter element. Principally, the filter module achieves separation of the ice through buoyancy force in a continuous process. The HybridICE filter is a new and economical means of separating ice from the slurry and requires no washing of ice with water. The performance of the filter at a flow-rate of 25 L/min was evaluated over time and with varied evaporating temperature of the refrigerant. Behaviours of the ice fraction and residence time were also investigated. The objective was to find ways to improve the performance of the filter. Results showed that filter performance can be improved by controlling the refrigerant evaporating temperature and eliminating overflow. PMID:24804655

  20. Evaluation of the freeze-thaw/evaporation process for the treatment of produced waters. Quarterly technical progress report, October 1--December 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Boysen, J.; Morotti, J.

    1994-01-01

    The use of freeze-crystallization processes for the treatment of contaminated water is rapidly being acknowledged as a low cost and low energy consuming method for the purification of water contaminated by a wide variety of contaminants of highly variable concentrations. Water purification by using natural conditions to promote freezing appears to be an extremely attractive freeze-crystallization process for the treatment of contaminated water in many areas where natural climatic conditions will seasonally promote freezing. The natural freezing process can be coupled with natural evaporative processes to treat oil and gas produced waters year round in regions with favorable climatic conditions. The objectives of this research are related to development of a commercially-economic natural freeze-thaw/evaporation (FTE) process for the treatment and purification of water produced in conjunction with oil and gas.

  1. Evaluation of the freeze-thaw/evaporation process for the treatment of produced waters. Quarterly technical progress report, April 1, 1994--June 30, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Boysen, J.; Morotti, J.

    1994-07-01

    The use of freeze-crystallization is being increasingly acknowledged as a low-cost, energy-efficient method for purifying contaminated water. Freeze-crystallization has been shown to be effective in removing a wide variety of contaminants from water. Water purification by using natural conditions to promote freezing appears to be an extremely attractive process for the treatment of contaminated water in many areas where natural climatic conditions will seasonally promote freezing. The natural freezing process can be coupled with natural evaporative processes to treat oil and gas produced waters year-round in regions where subfreezing temperatures seasonally occur. The objectives of this research are related to development of a commercially-economic natural freeze-thaw/evaporation (FTE) process for the treatment and purification of water produced in conjunction with oil and gas.

  2. Exploration of Impinging Water Spray Heat Transfer at System Pressures Near the Triple Point

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golliher, Eric L.; Yao, Shi-Chune

    2013-01-01

    The heat transfer of a water spray impinging upon a surface in a very low pressure environment is of interest to cooling of space vehicles during launch and re-entry, and to industrial processes where flash evaporation occurs. At very low pressure, the process occurs near the triple point of water, and there exists a transient multiphase transport problem of ice, water and water vapor. At the impingement location, there are three heat transfer mechanisms: evaporation, freezing and sublimation. A preliminary heat transfer model was developed to explore the interaction of these mechanisms at the surface and within the spray.

  3. Device Maintains Water At The Triple Point

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    West, J. W.; Burkett, C. G.

    1988-01-01

    Inexpensive device maintains water at 0.01 degree C for 10 weeks or longer. New device consists of four basic assemblies; small, commercial chest freezer containing insulated water tank; insulated copper cell holder; "ice switch" for cycling freezer compressor and externally-mounted air pump for circulation. Access hole in freezer lid allows triple point measurements without opening lid. Modified freezer used to calibrate standard platinum resistance thermomenters.

  4. Field observations of slush ice generated during freeze-up in arctic coastal waters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reimnitz, E.; Kempema, E.W.

    1987-01-01

    In some years, large volumes of slush ice charged with sediment are generated from frazil crystals in the shallow Beaufort Sea during strong storms at the time of freeze-up. Such events terminate the navigation season, and because of accompanying hostile conditions, little is known about the processes acting. The water-saturated slush ice, which may reach a thickness of 4 m, exists for only a few days before freezing from the surface downward arrests further wave motion or pancake ice forms. Movements of small vessels and divers in the slush ice occurs only in phase with passing waves, producing compression and rarefaction, and internal pressure pulses. Where in contact with the seafloor, the agitated slush ice moves cobble-size material, generates large sediment ripples, and may possibly produce a flat rampart observed on the arctic shoreface in some years. Processes charging the slush ice with as much as 1000 m3 km-2 of sediment remain uncertain, but our field observations rule out previously proposed filtration from turbid waters as a likely mechanism. Sedimentary particles apparently are only trapped in the interstices of the slush ice rather than being held by adhesion, since wave-related internal pressure oscillations result in downward particle movement and cleansing of the slush ice. This loss of sediment explains the typical downward increase in sediment concentration in that part of the fast-ice canopy composed largely of frazil ice. The congealing slush ice in coastal water does not become fast ice until grounded ridges are formed in the stamukhi zone, one to two months after freeze-up begins. During this period of new-ice mobility, long-range sediment transport occurs. The sediment load held by the fast-ice canopy in the area between the Colville and Sagavanirktok River deltas in the winter of 1978-1979 was 16 times larger than the yearly river input to the same area. This sediment most likely was rafted from Canada, more than 400 km to the east, during a brief time period in the previous fall. Ocean turbulence is greatly reduced while the congealing slush ice drifts about. Therefore, new ice then forming in intervening open-water areas is clean. These events explain the patchy appearance of the fast ice after the summer snowmelt. More work on the important phenomena reported here is needed to close a major gap in the knowledge of the arctic marine environment. ?? 1987.

  5. Gas-phase ions produced by freezing water or methanol for analysis using mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Pagnotti, Vincent S; Chakrabarty, Shubhashis; Wang, Beixi; Trimpin, Sarah; McEwen, Charles N

    2014-08-01

    Introducing water or methanol containing a low concentration of volatile or nonvolatile analyte into an inlet tube cooled with dry ice linking atmospheric pressure and the first vacuum stage of a mass spectrometer produces gas-phase ions even of small proteins that can be detected by mass spectrometry. Collision-induced dissociation experiments conducted in the first vacuum region of the mass spectrometer suggest analyte ions being protected by a solvent cage. The charges may be produced by processes similar to those proposed for charge separation under freezing conditions in thunderclouds. By this process, the surface of an ice pellet is charged positive and the interior negative so that removal of surface results in charge separation. A reversal of surface charge is expected for a heated droplet surface, and this is observed by heating rather than cooling the inlet tube. These observations are consistent with charged supercooled droplets or ice particles as intermediates in the production of analyte ions under freezing conditions. PMID:25014489

  6. Neutron diffraction study of water freezing on aircraft engine combustor soot.

    PubMed

    Tishkova, V; Demirdjian, B; Ferry, D; Johnson, M

    2011-12-14

    The study of the formation of condensation trails and cirrus clouds on aircraft emitted soot particles is important because of its possible effects on climate. In the present work we studied the freezing of water on aircraft engine combustor (AEC) soot particles under conditions of pressure and temperature similar to the upper troposphere. The microstructure of the AEC soot was found to be heterogeneous containing both primary particles of soot and metallic impurities (Fe, Cu, and Al). We also observed various surface functional groups such as oxygen-containing groups, including sulfate ions, that can act as active sites for water adsorption. Here we studied the formation of ice on the AEC soot particles by using neutron diffraction. We found that for low amount of adsorbed water, cooling even up to 215 K did not lead to the formation of hexagonal ice. Whereas, larger amount of adsorbed water led to the coexistence of liquid water (or amorphous ice) and hexagonal ice (I(h)); 60% of the adsorbed water was in the form of ice I(h) at 255 K. Annealing of the system led to the improvement of the crystal quality of hexagonal ice crystals as demonstrated from neutron diffraction. PMID:21996755

  7. Lethal Freeze-Dehydration Injury of Dogwood Stem Tissue Does Not Change the Activation Energy of Water Permeability 1

    PubMed Central

    Carter, John V.; Braden, Margaret

    1980-01-01

    The Arrhenius activation energy for water permeability, (?Ea,H2O) through stem cortical tissue of red osier dogwood (Cornus sericea L.) was determined after treatments which cause membrane rupture as well as after a lethal slow freeze and subsequent slow rewarming. The latter value was higher than the former, but was indistinguishable from the ?Ea,H2O found for healthy tissue. It was concluded that membrane permeability to water is not altered during the first 24 to 48 hours after exposure of nonacclimated red osier dogwood to lethal freeze dehydration injury. PMID:16661222

  8. Activity coefficients and free energies of nonionic mixed surfactant solutions from vapor-pressure and freezing-point osmometry.

    PubMed

    MacNeil, Jennifer A; Ray, Gargi Basu; Leaist, Derek G

    2011-05-19

    The thermodynamic properties of mixed surfactant solutions are widely investigated, prompted by numerous practical applications of these systems and by interest in molecular association and self-organization. General techniques for measuring thermodynamic activities, such as isopiestic equilibration, are well-established for multicomponent solutions. Surprisingly, these techniques have not yet been applied to mixed surfactant solutions, despite the importance of the free energy for micelle stability. In this study, equations are developed for the osmotic coefficients of solutions of nonionic surfactant A + nonionic surfactant B. A mass-action model is used, with virial equations for the activity coefficients of the micelles and free surfactant monomer species. The equations are fitted to osmotic coefficients of aqueous decylsulfobetaine + dodecylsulfobetaine solutions measured by vapor-pressure and freezing-point osmometry. Equilibrium constants for mixed-micelle formation are calculated from the free monomer concentrations at the critical micelle concentrations. The derived activity coefficients of the micelles and free monomers indicate large departures from ideal solution behavior, even for dilute solutions of the surfactants. Stoichiometric activity coefficients of the total surfactant components are evaluated by Gibbs-Duhem integration of the osmotic coefficients. Relatively simple colligative property measurements hold considerable promise for free energy studies of multicomponent surfactant solutions. PMID:21504169

  9. Experimental investigation of freezing blowby in a copper/water heat pipe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ochterbeck, J. M.; Peterson, G. P.

    1992-01-01

    An experimental investigation designed to evaluate and better define the overall characteristics of freezing blowby in a copper/water heat pipe was conducted. The results from various rates of restart heat addition and channel blockage, indicate that upon breakthrough the depressurization of the evaporator may result in an effective heat transport capacity far in excess of the steady-state transport limit. The resulting transient conditions imposed on the heat pipe by the effective increased heat transport capacity can cause a loss of liquid in the evaporator and potential dryout. Evidence is presented which indicates that in order to prevent either temporary or permanent dryout, sufficient liquid inventory must be present in the evaporator wicking structure to accommodate the increased transient thermal load and allow sufficient time for the capillary wicking structure to reprime.

  10. An Investigation of the Cryogenic Freezing of Water in Non-Metallic Pipelines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, C. I.; Richardson, R. N.; Bowen, R. J.

    2004-06-01

    Pipe freezing is increasingly used in a range of industries to solve otherwise intractable pipe line maintenance and servicing problems. This paper presents the interim results from an experimental study on deliberate freezing of polymeric pipelines. Previous and contemporary works are reviewed. The object of the current research is to confirm the feasibility of ice plug formation within a polymeric pipe as a method of isolation. Tests have been conducted on a range of polymeric pipes of various sizes. The results reported here all relate to freezing of horizontal pipelines. In each case the process of plug formation was photographed, the frozen plug pressure tested and the pipe inspected for signs of damage resulting from the freeze procedure. The time to freeze was recorded and various temperatures logged. These tests have demonstrated that despite the poor thermal and mechanical properties of the polymers, freezing offers a viable alternative method of isolation in polymeric pipelines.

  11. Effect of Aluminum Substrate Surface Modification on Wettability and Freezing Delay of Water Droplet at Subzero Temperatures.

    PubMed

    Rahimi, Maral; Afshari, Alireza; Thormann, Esben

    2016-05-01

    In this study, we have investigated the freezing delay of a water droplet on precooled substrates of an aluminum alloy that is commonly used for heat-exchanger fins. The surfaces of the substrates were modified to obtain surfaces with different hydrophilicity/hydrophobicity and different surface chemistry but without significantly modifying the surface topography. The freezing delays and water contact angles were measured as a function of the substrate temperature and the results were compared to the predictions of the heterogeneous ice nucleation theory. Although the trends for each sample followed the trend in this theory, the differences in the extents of freezing delays were in apparent disagreement with the predictions. Concretely, a slightly hydrophilic substrate modified by (3-aminopropyl) triethoxysilane (APTES) showed longer freezing delays than both more hydrophilic and more hydrophobic substrates. We suggest that this is because this particular surface chemistry prevents ice formation at the interface of the substrate, prior to the deposition of the water droplet. On the basis of our results, we suggest that not only wettability and topography but also the concrete surface chemistry plays a significant role in the kinetics of the ice formation process when a water droplet is placed on a precooled substrate. PMID:27045573

  12. Water balance in the sugarbeet root maggot, Tetanops myopaeformis, during long-term low-temperature storage and after freezing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The sugarbeet root maggot, Tetanops myopaeformis (Röder), can be stored in moist sand at 4 - 6°C for up to five years and is freeze tolerant. The majority of the stored larvae are in post-diapause quiescence and the rest of the larvae are in a multi-year diapause. The percent body mass of water and ...

  13. Freezing in confined geometries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sokol, P. E.; Ma, W. J.; Herwig, K. W.; Snow, W. M.; Wang, Y.; Koplik, Joel; Banavar, Jayanth R.

    1992-01-01

    Results of detailed structural studies, using elastic neutron scattering, of the freezing of liquid O2 and D2 in porous vycor glass, are presented. The experimental studies have been complemented by computer simulations of the dynamics of freezing of a Lennard-Jones liquid in narrow channels bounded by molecular walls. Results point to a new simple physical interpretation of freezing in confined geometries.

  14. Poromechanics of freezing materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coussy, Olivier

    2005-08-01

    When subjected to a uniform cooling below the freezing point a water-infiltrated porous material undergoes a cryo-deformation resulting from various combined actions: (i) the difference of density between the liquid water and the ice crystal, which results in the initial build-up of an in-pore pressure at the onset of crystallization; (ii) the interfacial effects arising between the different constituents, which eventually govern the crystallization process in connection with the pore access radius distribution; (iii) the drainage of the liquid water expelled from the freezing sites towards the air voids; (iv) the cryo-suction process, which drives liquid water towards the already frozen pores as the temperature further decreases; (v) the thermomechanical coupling between the solid matrix, the liquid water and the ice crystal. We work out a comprehensive theory able to encompass this whole set of actions. A macroscopic approach first provides the constitutive equations of freezing poroelastic materials, including the interfacial energy effects. This approach reveals the existence of a thermodynamic state function—namely the liquid saturation degree as a function of the temperature only. The macroscopic ice-dependent poroelastic properties are then upscaled from the knowledge of the elastic properties of the solid matrix, of the pore access radius distribution, and of the capillary curve. The theory is finally illustrated by analysing quantitatively the effects of the cooling rate and of the pore radius distribution upon the cryo-deformation of water-infiltrated porous materials. The theory succeeds in accounting for the experimentally observed shrinkage of embedded air voids, while predicting the partial melting of the ice already formed when the cooling suddenly stops.

  15. Does Hot Water Freeze Faster than Cold? Investigation of the Reproducibility and Causes of the Mpemba Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Joseph; Lehman, Susan

    2008-03-01

    An investigation into the reproducibility and possible causes of the Mpemba effect has been performed. The Mpemba effect is the name given to the common observation by non-scientists that hot water appears to freeze faster than cold water.^1 Previous scientific studies of this effect have found conflicting results. These discrepancies appear to be due in part to inconsistent definitions of freezing based on visual observation. We have investigated the Mpemba effect by continuously monitoring the temperature of a container of water to determine the amount of time needed for the water to turn completely to ice, as indicated by the temperature falling below 0 ^oC. We have successfully observed the effect repeatedly and have found it to be dependent on the sample's temperature history rather than the sample temperature when placed into the freezer. Room temperature water which had been briefly heated to 100 ^oC then cooled froze approximately 50 % faster than room temperature water which had not been heated. The effect on the freezing time of increasing or decreasing the amount of dissolved gas in the water will also be discussed. 1. M. Jeng. Am. J. Phys. 74 514 (2006).

  16. Control of crystal growth in water purification by directional freeze crystallization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conlon, William M. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    A Directional Freeze Crystallization system employs an indirect contact heat exchanger to freeze a fraction of liquid to be purified. The unfrozen fraction is drained away and the purified frozen fraction is melted. The heat exchanger must be designed in accordance with a Growth Habit Index to achieve efficient separation of contaminants. If gases are dissolved in the liquid, the system must be pressurized.

  17. SOLERAS - Solar-Powered Water Desalination Project at Yanbu: Indirect freeze desalination system performance

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmerman, J.C.; Al-Abbadi, N.

    1987-05-01

    The desalination subsystem of the solar-powered desalination pilot project located at Yanbu, Saudi Arabia, was operated successfully for two years. Water production rates of 180 m/sup 3//day can be obtained for a period of 24 hours. In addition, once the proper procedures are followed, water production can continue for long periods of time at rates of 135 m/sup 3//day. Electrical energy costs to produce one m/sup 3/ of potable water is SR 1.66 in Saudi Arabia and $1.66 to $2.21 in the United States. As with any new process, a number of important details must be learned to obtain the most out of the system. Some of these details are: (1) product water production rate and efficiency are maximized for this system at 10% salinity and ..delta..Ts greater than 3/degree/C, (2) the anhydrous ammonia must be kept clean, (3) the ice in the freezer tubes must be melted without decreasing the salinity of the mixture in the slurry separator, (4) the salinity of the mixture going through each of the freezer tubes must be the same, and (5) the salinity of the slurry must be less than 11%. The authors believe that a subsequent design of an indirect-contact freeze desalination sub-system can be successful. Maintenance of the desalination subsystem has been nominal with only about 6/1/2/ person days required per month. Proper operating procedures and some redesign of the desalination subsystem should minimize the required maintenance. 4 refs., 7 figs., 4 tabs.

  18. Preliminary report on fluid inclusions from halites in the Castile and lower Salado formations of the Delaware Basin, southeastern New Mexico. [Freezing-point depression

    SciTech Connect

    Stein, C.L.

    1985-09-01

    A suite of samples composed primarily of halite from the upper Castile and lower Salado Formations of the Permian Basin was selected from Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) core for a reconnaissance study of fluid inclusions. Volume percent of these trapped fluids averaged 0.7% to 1%. Freezing-point depressions varied widely and appeared to be unrelated to fluid-inclusion type, to sedimentary facies, or to stratigraphic depth. However, because very low freezing points were usually associated with anhydrite, a relation may exist between freezing-point data and lithology. Dissolved sulfate values were constant through the Castile, then decreased markedly with lesser depth in the lower Salado. This trend correlates very well with observed mineralogy and is consistent with an interpretation of the occurrence of secondary polyhalite as a result of gypsum or anhydrite alteration with simultaneous consumption of dissolved sulfate from the coexisting fluids. Together with the abundance and distribution of fluid inclusions in primary or ''hopper'' crystal structures, this evidence suggests that inclusions seen in these halites did not migrate any significant geographical distance since their formation. 28 refs., 17 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Xylem Embolism in Response to Freeze-Thaw Cycles and Water Stress in Ring-Porous, Diffuse-Porous, and Conifer Species 1

    PubMed Central

    Sperry, John S.; Sullivan, June E. M.

    1992-01-01

    Vulnerability to xylem embolism by freeze-thaw cycles and water stress was quantified in ring-porous (Quercus gambelii Nutt.), diffuse-porous (Populus tremuloides Michx., Betula occidentalis Hook.), and conifer species (Abies lasiocarpa Nutt., Juniperus scopulorum Sarg.). Embolism was measured by its reduction of xylem hydraulic conductivity; it was induced by xylem tension (water-stress response) and by a tension plus a freeze-thaw cycle (freeze response). Conifers showed little (Juniperus) or no (Abies) freeze response even to repeated cycles. In contrast, Quercus embolized more than 90% by freezing at tensions below 0.2 MPa, whereas similar embolism without freezing required tensions above 4.5 MPa. Diffuse-porous trees (Betula, Populus) showed an intermediate freeze response. The magnitude of the freeze response was correlated with conduit volume but occurred at higher tensions than predicted from theory. Large early-wood vessels (2.8 10?9 m3) in oak were most vulnerable to embolism by freezing, small vessels in Populus and Betula were intermediate (approximately 7 10?11 m3), and tracheids in conifers (about 3 10?13 m3) were most resistant. The same trend was found within a stem: embolism by freeze-thawing occurred preferentially in wider conduits. The water-stress response was not correlated with conduit volume; previous work indicates it is a function of interconduit pit membrane structure. Native embolism levels during winter corroborated laboratory results on freezing: Quercus embolized 95% with the first fall freeze, Populus and Betula showed gradual increases to more than 90% embolism by winter's end, and Abies remained below 30%. PMID:16653035

  20. Visualization of Fuel Cell Water Transport and Performance Characterization under Freezing Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Kandlikar, S.G.; Lu, Z.; Rao, N.; Sergi, J.; Rath, C.; Dade, C.; Trabold, T.; Owejan, J.; Gagliardo, J.; Allen, J.; Yassar, R.S.; Medici, E.; Herescu, A.

    2010-05-30

    In this program, Rochester Institute of Technology (RIT), General Motors (GM) and Michigan Technological University (MTU) have focused on fundamental studies that address water transport, accumulation and mitigation processes in the gas diffusion layer and flow field channels of the bipolar plate. These studies have been conducted with a particular emphasis on understanding the key transport phenomena which control fuel cell operation under freezing conditions. Technical accomplishments are listed below: • Demonstrated that shutdown air purge is controlled predominantly by the water carrying capacity of the purge stream and the most practical means of reducing the purge time and energy is to reduce the volume of liquid water present in the fuel cell at shutdown. The GDL thermal conductivity has been identified as an important parameter to dictate water accumulation within a GDL. • Found that under the normal shutdown conditions most of the GDL-level water accumulation occurs on the anode side and that the mass transport resistance of the membrane electrode assembly (MEA) thus plays a critically important role in understanding and optimizing purge. • Identified two-phase flow patterns (slug, film and mist flow) in flow field channel, established the features of each pattern, and created a flow pattern map to characterize the two-phase flow in GDL/channel combination. • Implemented changes to the baseline channel surface energy and GDL materials and evaluated their performance with the ex situ multi-channel experiments. It was found that the hydrophilic channel (contact angle   10⁰) facilitates the removal of liquid water by capillary effects and by reducing water accumulation at the channel exit. It was also found that GDL without MPL promotes film flow and shifts the slug-to-film flow transition to lower air flow rates, compared with the case of GDL with MPL. • Identified a new mechanism of water transport through GDLs based on Haines jump mechanism. The breakdown and redevelopment of the water paths in GDLs lead to an intermittent water drainage behavior, which is characterized by dynamic capillary pressure and changing of breakthrough location. MPL was found to not only limit the number of water entry locations into the GDL (thus drastically reducing water saturation), but also stabilizes the water paths (or morphology). • Simultaneously visualized the water transport on cathode and anode channels of an operating fuel cell. It was found that under relatively dry hydrogen/air conditions at lower temperatures, the cathode channels display a similar flow pattern map to the ex-situ experiments under similar conditions. Liquid water on the anode side is more likely formed via condensation of water vapor which is transported through the anode GDL. • Investigated the water percolation through the GDL with pseudo-Hele-Shaw experiments and simulated the capillary-driven two-phase flow inside gas diffusion media, with the pore size distributions being modeled by using Weibull distribution functions. The effect of the inclusion of the microporous layer in the fuel cell assembly was explored numerically. • Developed and validated a simple, reliable computational tool for predicting liquid water transport in GDLs. • Developed a new method of determining the pore size distribution in GDL using scanning electron microscope (SEM) image processing, which allows for separate characterization of GDL wetting properties and pore size distribution. • Determined the effect of surface wettability and channel cross section and bend dihedral on liquid holdup in fuel cell flow channels. A major thrust of this research program has been the development of an optimal combination of materials, design features and cell operating conditions that achieve a water management strategy which facilitates fuel cell operation under freezing conditions. Based on our various findings, we have made the final recommendation relative to GDL materials, bipolar design and surface properties, and the combination of materials, design features and operating conditions: • GDL materials: use lower thermal conductivity cathode GDL and decrease the anode GDL thickness. • Bipolar plate design: use a channel geometry that can be produced using a high-speed manufacturing process, with a hydrophilic coating. • Shutdown and gas purge protocol: incorporate above findings in developing cost effective and energy efficient shutdown purge protocol. It should be noted that a comprehensive fuel cell operating strategy must consider the entire range of operating conditions under which the system needs to perform. Although the recommendations above will benefit fuel cell performance under conditions where liquid water is expected to be present, they must also be fully assessed to understand their impact under relatively dry conditions.

  1. Tropical anvil characteristics and water vapor of the tropical tropopause layer: Impact of heterogeneous and homogeneous freezing parameterizations

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, Jiwen; Comstock, Jennifer M.; Ovchinnikov, Mikhail; McFarlane, Sally A.; McFarquhar, Greg; Allen, Grant

    2010-06-16

    Abstract Two isolated deep convective clouds (DCCs) that developed in clean-humid and polluted-dry air masses, observed during the TWP-ICE and ACTIVE campaigns, are simulated using a 3-dimensional cloud-resolving model with size-resolved aerosol and cloud microphysics. We examine the impacts of different homogeneous and immersion freezing parameterizations on the anvil characteristics and the water vapor content (WVC) in the Tropical Tropopause Layer (TTL) for the two DCCs that developed in contrasting environments. The modeled cloud properties such as liquid/ice water path and precipitation generally agree with the available radar and satellite retrievals and in situ aircraft measurements. We find that anvil size and anvil microphysical properties such as ice number concentration and ice effective radius (rei) are much more sensitive to the homogeneous freezing parameterization (HomFP) under the polluted-dry condition, while the strength of anvil convection is more sensitive to HomFP under the clean-humid condition. Specifically, the cloud anvil with the Koop et al. (2000) (KOOP) relative humidity dependent scheme has up to 2 and 4 times lower ice number than those with other schemes (temperature dependent) for the clean humid and polluted-dry cases, respectively. Consequently, the rei is increased in both cases, with a larger increase in the polluted-dry case. As a result, extinction coefficient of cloud anvils is reduced by over 25% for the polluted-dry case. Anvil size and evolution are also much affected by HomFPs in the polluted-dry case. Higher immersion-freezing rates leads to a stronger convective cloud, with higher precipitation and ice water path under both humid and dry conditions. As a result, homogeneous freezing rates are enhanced by over 20%. Also, the higher immersion-freezing rate results in stronger convection in cloud anvils, much larger anvil size (up to 3 times) and longer lifetime. The moistening effect of deep convection on the WVC in the TTL is very significant with a increase of more than 2 times. Homogeneous freezing parameterizations do not significantly change the WVC in the TTL, but higher immersion freezing rate leads to an increase in TTL WVC by enhancing convection.

  2. Vacuum Freeze-Drying, a Method Used To Salvage Water-Damaged Archival and Library Materials: A RAMP Study with Guidelines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCleary, John M.

    This Records and Archives Management Programme (RAMP) study covers the conservation of archival documents and the application of freeze-drying to the salvage of documents damaged by flood. Following an introductory discussion of the hazards of water, the study presents a broad summary of data on freeze-drying, including the behavior of

  3. Vacuum Freeze-Drying, a Method Used To Salvage Water-Damaged Archival and Library Materials: A RAMP Study with Guidelines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCleary, John M.

    This Records and Archives Management Programme (RAMP) study covers the conservation of archival documents and the application of freeze-drying to the salvage of documents damaged by flood. Following an introductory discussion of the hazards of water, the study presents a broad summary of data on freeze-drying, including the behavior of…

  4. The Freezing Bomb

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mills, Allan

    2010-01-01

    The extreme pressures that are generated when water freezes were traditionally demonstrated by sealing a small volume in a massive cast iron "bomb" and then surrounding it with a freezing mixture of ice and salt. This vessel would dramatically fail by brittle fracture, but no quantitative measurement of bursting pressure was available. Calculation…

  5. Real-time Non-contact Millimeter Wave Characterization of Water-Freezing and Ice-Melting Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Sundaram, S. K.; Woskov, Paul P.

    2008-11-12

    We applied millimeter wave radiometry for the first time to monitor water-freezing and ice-melting dynamics in real-time non-contact. The measurements were completed at a frequency of 137 GHz. Small amounts (about 2 mL) of freshwater or saltwater were frozen over a Peltier cooler and the freezing and melting sequence was recorded. Saltwater was prepared in the laboratory that contained 3.5% of table salt to simulate the ocean water. The dynamics of freezing-melting was observed by measuring the millimeter wave temperature as well as the changes in the ice or water surface reflectivity and position. This was repeated using large amounts of freshwater and saltwater (800 mL) mimicking glaciers. Millimeter wave surface level fluctuations indicated as the top surface melted, the light ice below floated up indicating lower surface temperature until the ice completely melted. Our results are useful for remote sensing and tracking temperature for potentially large-scale environmental applications, e.g., global warming.

  6. The effect of water-soluble polymers on the microstructure and properties of freeze-cast alumina ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pekor, Christopher Michael

    Porous ceramics can be divided into three separate classes based on their pore size: microporous ceramics with pores less than 2 nm, mesoporous ceramics with pores in the range of 2--50 nm and macroporous ceramics with pores that are greater than 50 nm. In particular, macroporous ceramics are used in a variety of applications such as refractories, molten metal filtration, diesel particulate filters, heterogeneous catalyst supports and biomedical scaffolds. Freeze casting is a novel method used to create macroporous ceramics. In this method growing ice crystals act as a template for the pores and are solidified, often directionally, through a ceramic dispersion and removed from the green body through a freeze drying procedure. This method has attracted some attention over the past few years due to its relative simplicity, flexibility and environmental friendliness. On top of this freeze casting is capable of producing materials with high pore volume fractions, which is an advantage over processing by packing and necking of particles, where the pore volume fraction is typically less than 50%. Many of the basic processing variables that affect the freeze cast microstructure, such as the temperature gradient, interfacial velocity and solid loading of the dispersion have been well established in the literature. On the other hand, areas such as the effect of additives on the microstructure and mechanical properties have not been covered in great detail. In this study the concept of constitutional supercooling from basic solidification theory is used to explain the effects of two water-soluble polymers, polyethylene glycol and polyvinyl alcohol, on the microstructure of freeze cast alumina ceramics. In addition, changes in the observed microstructure will be related to experimentally determined values of permeability and compressive strength.

  7. Ripples in Rocks Point to Water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This image taken by the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity's panoramic camera shows the rock nicknamed 'Last Chance,' which lies within the outcrop near the rover's landing site at Meridiani Planum, Mars. The image provides evidence for a geologic feature known as ripple cross-stratification. At the base of the rock, layers can be seen dipping downward to the right. The bedding that contains these dipping layers is only one to two centimeters (0.4 to 0.8 inches) thick. In the upper right corner of the rock, layers also dip to the right, but exhibit a weak 'concave-up' geometry. These two features -- the thin, cross-stratified bedding combined with the possible concave geometry -- suggest small ripples with sinuous crest lines. Although wind can produce ripples, they rarely have sinuous crest lines and never form steep, dipping layers at this small scale. The most probable explanation for these ripples is that they were formed in the presence of moving water.

    Crossbedding Evidence for Underwater Origin Interpretations of cross-lamination patterns presented as clues to this martian rock's origin under flowing water are marked on images taken by the panoramic camera and microscopic imager on NASA's Opportunity.

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure 1Figure 2

    The red arrows (Figure 1) point to features suggesting cross-lamination within the rock called 'Last Chance' taken at a distance of 4.5 meters (15 feet) during Opportunity's 17th sol (February 10, 2004). The inferred sets of fine layers at angles to each other (cross-laminae) are up to 1.4 centimeters (half an inch) thick. For scale, the distance between two vertical cracks in the rock is about 7 centimeters (2.8 inches). The feature indicated by the middle red arrow suggests a pattern called trough cross-lamination, likely produced when flowing water shaped sinuous ripples in underwater sediment and pushed the ripples to migrate in one direction. The direction of the ancient flow would have been either toward or away from the line of sight from this perspective. The lower and upper red arrows point to cross-lamina sets that are consistent with underwater ripples in the sediment having moved in water that was flowing left to right from this perspective.

    The yellow arrows (Figure 2) indicate places in the panoramic camera view that correlate with places in the microscope's view of the same rock.

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure 3

    The microscopic view (Figure 3) is a mosaic of some of the 152 microscopic imager frames of 'Last Chance' that Opportunity took on sols 39 and 40 (March 3 and 4, 2004).

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure 4

    Figure 4 shows cross-lamination expressed by lines that trend downward from left to right, traced with black lines in the interpretive overlay. These cross-lamination lines are consistent with dipping planes that would have formed surfaces on the down-current side of migrating ripples. Interpretive blue lines indicate boundaries between possible sets of cross-laminae.

  8. Martian Post-Impact Hydrothermal Systems: Effects of Permeability and Freezing on Surface Discharge and Water:Rock Ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnhart, C. J.; Nimmo, F.; Travis, B. J.

    2008-12-01

    A km-scale bolide delivers enough energy to heat subsurface water, and drive hydrothermal circulation (Abramov and Kring, 2005). This post-impact hydrothermal (PIH) circulation can lead to surface discharge of water, and chemical alteration - both are potentially detectable. We present the effects that permeability and freezing have on discharge and water:rock (W/R) ratios. We simulate the evolution of PIH systems using MAGHNUM (detailed in Travis et al., 2003). MAGHNUM solves the time-dependent transport of water and heat through a porous medium, incorporating phase transitions between ice (applicable to Mars), vapor and water. PIH evolution depends on heat sources and permeability (k); these, in turn, control discharge and chemical alteration which depends on both the peak temperatures and the W/R ratio (Schwenzer and Kring, 2008). Recently, CRISM detected phyllosilicate-rich material within ~45 km craters (Mustard et al., 2008) and the HiRISE camera imaged gullies, some emanating from central peaks, within many high latitude craters. We model a 45 km crater created by a 3.9 km dia., 7 km/s impactor. Simulations run for 100,000 yrs in a 2D axisymmetric domain with a heat flux of 32.5 mW m-2. Thus far we have tested systems with a range of surface k's (10-4 to 1 darcys) that decay exponentially with depth and are exposed to two surface temperatures (5°C and -53°C). In general W/R ratios increase with increased k. Focusing in on the upper 200 m at the center of the crater, fluid temperatures remain > 100°C for 9000 yrs and flow yields W/R ratios of 10 when exposed to a surface temperature of 5°C. Dropping the surface temperature below freezing to a Mars-like - 53°C maintains upper 200 m temperatures > 100°C for only 600 yrs and W/R ratios are reduced to 1. Higher permeabilities yield higher W/R ratios but reduced time exposure to high temperatures. When surface temperatures are below freezing total system discharge is roughly independent of k for modest permeabilities but the time until the surface freezes increases with lower k. Freezing reduces both W/R ratios and discharge because ice closes pores and restricts flow.

  9. Freezing avoidance by supercooling in Olea europaea cultivars: the role of apoplastic water, solute content and cell wall rigidity.

    PubMed

    Arias, Nadia S; Bucci, Sandra J; Scholz, Fabian G; Goldstein, Guillermo

    2015-10-01

    Plants can avoid freezing damage by preventing extracellular ice formation below the equilibrium freezing temperature (supercooling). We used Olea europaea cultivars to assess which traits contribute to avoid ice nucleation at sub-zero temperatures. Seasonal leaf water relations, non-structural carbohydrates, nitrogen and tissue damage and ice nucleation temperatures in different plant parts were determined in five cultivars growing in the Patagonian cold desert. Ice seeding in roots occurred at higher temperatures than in stems and leaves. Leaves of cold acclimated cultivars supercooled down to -13 °C, substantially lower than the minimum air temperatures observed in the study site. During winter, leaf ice nucleation and leaf freezing damage (LT50 ) occurred at similar temperatures, typical of plant tissues that supercool. Higher leaf density and cell wall rigidity were observed during winter, consistent with a substantial acclimation to sub-zero temperatures. Larger supercooling capacity and lower LT50 were observed in cold-acclimated cultivars with higher osmotically active solute content, higher tissue elastic adjustments and lower apoplastic water. Irreversible leaf damage was only observed in laboratory experiments at very low temperatures, but not in the field. A comparative analysis of closely related plants avoids phylogenetic independence bias in a comparative study of adaptations to survive low temperatures. PMID:25737264

  10. Evaluation of the freeze-thaw/evaporation process for the treatment of produced waters. Final report, August 1992--August 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Boysen, J.E.; Walker, K.L.; Mefford, J.L.; Kirsch, J.R.; Harju, J.A.

    1996-06-01

    The use of freeze-crystallization is becoming increasingly acknowledged as a low-cost, energy-efficient method for purifying contaminated water. The natural freezing process can be coupled with natural evaporative processes to treat oil and gas produced waters year round in regions where subfreezing temperatures seasonally occur. The climates typical of Colorado`s San Juan Basin and eastern slope, as well as the oil and gas producing regions of Wyoming, are well suited for application of these processes in combination. Specifically, the objectives of this research are related to the development of a commercially-economic FTE (freeze-thaw/evaporation) process for the treatment and purification of water produced in conjunction with oil and natural gas. The research required for development of this process consists of three tasks: (1) a literature survey and process modeling and economic analysis; (2) laboratory-scale process evaluation; and (3) field demonstration of the process. Results of research conducted for the completion of these three tasks indicate that produced water treatment and disposal costs for commercial application of the process, would be in the range of $0.20 to $0.30/bbl in the Rocky Mountain region. FTE field demonstration results from northwestern New Mexico during the winter of 1995--96 indicate significant and simultaneous removal of salts, metals, and organics from produced water. Despite the unusually warm winter, process yields demonstrate disposal volume reductions on the order of 80% and confirm the potential for economic production of water suitable for various beneficial uses. The total dissolved solids concentrations of the FTE demonstration streams were 11,600 mg/L (feed), 56,900 mg/L (brine), and 940 mg/L (ice melt).

  11. Freezing Models For Heterogeneous Drop Freezing In Immersion and Contact Modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diehl, K.; Wurzler, S.

    Field measurements showed that supercooled liquid water drops and frozen drops can coexist in tropospheric clouds at temperatures down to -40 C with an incidence of ice particles already at -4 C. The freezing behaviour of water drops depends on their sizes, on their content of soluble particles (freezing point depression) and of insoluble particles (potential immersion ice nuclei) as well as on the collision with dry particles (potential contact ice nuclei). In the present model studies, the influence of soluble and insoluble particles on drop freezing in immersion and contact modes are considered. Using a two dimensional field of drop and aerosol particle sizes the numerical simula- tion of the coexistence of similar sized drops with different compositions is possible, also the combination of different collision partners. The freezing point depression of salt solution drops was calculated according to physical chemistry equations. The median freezing temperatures of particles in the immersion and contact modes were derived from laboratory results for typical atmospheric ice nuclei. The collision effi- ciency was calculated based on experimental results and numerical estimations. The results obtained with the freezing models are consistent with experimental results. They show that in the whole temperature range relevant for the troposphere the com- position of the drops has an important influence on their freezing in the immersion mode. The smaller the drop sizes, the more effecting are the soluble particles. A sig- nificant influence of insoluble immersion ice nuclei on atmospheric drop f reezing can be expected at temperatures of -20 C and lower, in the contact freezing mode already at temperatures around -10 C, with the different insoluble particles not showing large deviations. However, the freezing efficiency of contact ice nuclei is restricted by the collision efficiency which is dependant on both, the drop and aerosol particle size.

  12. Combined impacts of freeze-thaw processes on paddy land and dry land in Northeast China.

    PubMed

    Chen, Siyang; Ouyang, Wei; Hao, Fanghua; Zhao, Xuchen

    2013-07-01

    The quantity of spring snowmelt infiltration and runoff, which affects the hydrology of the freeze zone, depends on the antecedent soil water content (SWC) conditions at the time of the soil's freezing. An understanding of the characteristics of frozen soil is essential for spring sowing in the agricultural freeze zones. The main goal of this study was to evaluate the differences in the freeze-thaw process and the freeze-thaw-induced water redistribution between the paddy and dry lands in a freeze zone. For this purpose, a field study was conducted in the winter of 2011-2012 for two types of farmlands in Northeast China. To illustrate the soil's frost dynamics over time, the measured SWCs at different depths (15, 30, 60, and 90 cm) were transformed into different expressions including the SWC dynamic, the frozen soil's profile, and the freezing and thawing front trace. The freezing characteristics in the paddy land, in contrast to that in the dry land, had a higher freezing point temperature, a larger amount of water movement to the upper layer, and a 2.76 mm larger accumulation of water in the upper layer. However, the increase of SWC (which is equivalent to thawing) was evidently faster than the decrease of SWC (which is equivalent to freezing). The water in the frozen soil's profile was most likely redistributed towards the freezing front before soil temperature (ST) falls below the freezing point. The findings may partially explain the soil's freeze-thaw characteristics for the different stages as well as the combined impact of these characteristics with farmland use types on soil hydrology; the findings may also provide a foundation for forecasting the hydrologic response of the freeze-thaw process and provide guidance for management strategies dealing with seasonally frozen agricultural soils. PMID:23584030

  13. Compression of foods during freeze-drying: water plasticization at the ice-dry layer interface.

    PubMed

    Emami, C; Flink, J M

    1991-01-01

    The compressive mechanical properties of freeze-dried green beans show a pronounced decrease in rigidity when moisture content and/or temperature are increased. There exist several temperature and moisture combinations which give common values for mechanical properties. These combinations also give a common compressive behavior. Using this information on mechanical properties, it is possible to predict a stress-strain relationship, if given either a temperature, a moisture content, or the value of a pertinent mechanical property. It is shown that the moisture contents and temperatures that exist in the dry layer during freeze-drying result in mechanical properties that are suitable for compression of the dry layer. From studies on compression behavior during freeze-drying, it is shown that applied compressive pressure is the main determinant of final degree of compression. Increasing the compressive pressure gave a higher compression effect and gave a more rapid drying, presumably due to improved heat transfer in the compressed dry layer. From the above information, a simple method to predict compression behavior during freeze-drying was developed. PMID:1746360

  14. Freezing Transitions of Nanoconfined Coarse-Grained Water Show Subtle Dependence on Confining Environment.

    PubMed

    Lu, Qing; Straub, John E

    2016-03-10

    The solid-to-liquid phase transition in water nanofilms confined between plates, with varying separations and water-plate interactions ranging from strongly hydrophobic to strongly hydrophilic, was simulated using a coarse-grained monatomic water model (mW) and the generalized replica exchange method (gREM). Extensive gREM simulations combined with the statistical temperature weighted histogram analysis method (ST-WHAM) provide a detailed description of the thermodynamic properties intrinsic to the phase transition, including the transition temperature, isobaric heat capacity, phase change enthalpy, entropy, and their dependence on the interplate distance and the plate-water interaction. The ice structure of water nanofilms was characterized at various conditions using the transverse density profile and the distribution of angles formed by hydrogen-bonded neighboring molecules. Flat bilayer ice was observed to be the dominant solid phase at close interplate distance, while puckered bilayer ice, similar to a slab of ice Ih, is the predominant structure at larger interplates. Stable puckered bilayer ice, previously observed to have a low melting point, is observed to have enhanced stability with high melting temperature when confined between hydrophilic plates. These results demonstrate the strong dependence of phase stability and coexistence in nanoconfined systems on the geometry and physical properties of the confining environment. PMID:26906259

  15. Homogeneous ice nucleation from aqueous inorganic/organic particles representative of biomass burning: water activity, freezing temperatures, nucleation rates.

    PubMed

    Knopf, Daniel A; Rigg, Yannick J

    2011-02-10

    Homogeneous ice nucleation plays an important role in the formation of cirrus clouds with subsequent effects on the global radiative budget. Here we report on homogeneous ice nucleation temperatures and corresponding nucleation rate coefficients of aqueous droplets serving as surrogates of biomass burning aerosol. Micrometer-sized (NH(4))(2)SO(4)/levoglucosan droplets with mass ratios of 10:1, 1:1, 1:5, and 1:10 and aqueous multicomponent organic droplets with and without (NH(4))(2)SO(4) under typical tropospheric temperatures and relative humidities are investigated experimentally using a droplet conditioning and ice nucleation apparatus coupled to an optical microscope with image analysis. Homogeneous freezing was determined as a function of temperature and water activity, a(w), which was set at droplet preparation conditions. The ice nucleation data indicate that minor addition of (NH(4))(2)SO(4) to the aqueous organic droplets renders the temperature dependency of water activity negligible in contrast to the case of aqueous organic solution droplets. The mean homogeneous ice nucleation rate coefficient derived from 8 different aqueous droplet compositions with average diameters of ?60 ?m for temperatures as low as 195 K and a(w) of 0.82-1 is 2.18 10(6) cm(-3) s(-1). The experimentally derived freezing temperatures and homogeneous ice nucleation rate coefficients are in agreement with predictions of the water activity-based homogeneous ice nucleation theory when taking predictive uncertainties into account. However, the presented ice nucleation data indicate that the water activity-based homogeneous ice nucleation theory overpredicts the freezing temperatures by up to 3 K and corresponding ice nucleation rate coefficients by up to ?2 orders of magnitude. A shift of 0.01 in a(w), which is well within the uncertainty of typical field and laboratory relative humidity measurements, brings experimental and predicted freezing temperatures and homogeneous ice nucleation rate coefficients into agreement. The experimentally derived ice nucleation data are applied to constrain the water activity-based homogeneous ice nucleation theory to smaller than 1 order of magnitude compared to the predictive uncertainty of larger than 6 orders of magnitude. The atmospheric implications of these findings are discussed. PMID:21235213

  16. MANAGEMENT OF POINT-OF-USE DRINKING WATER TREATMENT SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    One alternative solution to drinking water contamination problems which has received more attention in recent years is treatment of contaminated water at the home, or point-of-use. While point-of-use treatment may provide a cost effective solution to drinking water contamination,...

  17. Microautoradiography of water-soluble compounds in plant tissue after freeze-drying and pressure infiltration with epoxy resin

    SciTech Connect

    Vogelmann, T.C.; Dickson, R.E.

    1982-08-01

    It is difficult to retain and localize radioactive, water-soluble compounds within plant cells. Existing techniques retain water-soluble compounds with varying rates of efficiency and are limited to processing only a few samples at one time. We developed a modified pressure infiltration technique for the preparation of microautoradiographs of /sup 14/C-labeled, water-soluble compounds in plant tissue. Samples from cottonwood (Populus deltoides Bartr. ex Marsh.) labeled with /sup 14/C were excised, quick frozen in liquid N/sub 2/, freeze-dried at -50/sup 0/C, and pressure-infiltrated with epoxy resin without intermediate solvents or prolonged incubation times. The technique facilitates the mass processing of samples for microautoradiography, gives good cellular retention of labeled water-soluble compounds, and is highly reproducible.

  18. Inhibited ethylene and propylene glycols for corrosion and freeze protection in water-based HVAC systems

    SciTech Connect

    Roo, A.M. de; Lee, B.W.

    1997-12-31

    Industrially inhibited ethylene and propylene glycols are used extensively to provide protection against equipment damage due to corrosion and freezing. This paper will describe the proper use of these glycols, including system preparation, fluid installation, and fluid maintenance. The impact of the use of these glycols on the operation of the system is discussed along with methods for overcoming any declines in heat transfer. From this discussion, it will become clear why automotive antifreeze formulations should not be used in heating, ventilating, and airconditioning (HVAC) systems. Also included are data on the physical properties of aqueous solutions of ethylene and propylene glycol, the concept of burst vs. freeze protection, typical results of corrosion tests, and methods to use to monitor the fluid for each application.

  19. Novel Real-Time Diagnosis of the Freezing Process Using an Ultrasonic Transducer

    PubMed Central

    Tseng, Yen-Hsiang; Cheng, Chin-Chi; Cheng, Hong-Ping; Lee, Dasheng

    2015-01-01

    The freezing stage governs several critical parameters of the freeze drying process and the quality of the resulting lyophilized products. This paper presents an integrated ultrasonic transducer (UT) in a stainless steel bottle and its application to real-time diagnostics of the water freezing process. The sensor was directly deposited onto the stainless steel bottle using a sol-gel spray technique. It could operate at temperature range from −100 to 400 °C and uses an ultrasonic pulse-echo technique. The progression of the freezing process, including water-in, freezing point and final phase change of water, were all clearly observed using ultrasound. The ultrasonic signals could indicate the three stages of the freezing process and evaluate the cooling and freezing periods under various processing conditions. The temperature was also adopted for evaluating the cooling and freezing periods. These periods increased with water volume and decreased with shelf temperature (i.e., speed of freezing). This study demonstrates the effectiveness of the ultrasonic sensor and technology for diagnosing and optimizing the process of water freezing to save energy. PMID:25946629

  20. Novel real-time diagnosis of the freezing process using an ultrasonic transducer.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Yen-Hsiang; Cheng, Chin-Chi; Cheng, Hong-Ping; Lee, Dasheng

    2015-01-01

    The freezing stage governs several critical parameters of the freeze drying process and the quality of the resulting lyophilized products. This paper presents an integrated ultrasonic transducer (UT) in a stainless steel bottle and its application to real-time diagnostics of the water freezing process. The sensor was directly deposited onto the stainless steel bottle using a sol-gel spray technique. It could operate at temperature range from -100 to 400 °C and uses an ultrasonic pulse-echo technique. The progression of the freezing process, including water-in, freezing point and final phase change of water, were all clearly observed using ultrasound. The ultrasonic signals could indicate the three stages of the freezing process and evaluate the cooling and freezing periods under various processing conditions. The temperature was also adopted for evaluating the cooling and freezing periods. These periods increased with water volume and decreased with shelf temperature (i.e., speed of freezing). This study demonstrates the effectiveness of the ultrasonic sensor and technology for diagnosing and optimizing the process of water freezing to save energy. PMID:25946629

  1. Rehydration of freeze-dried food from non-potable water: An application for advanced polymer membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Schimmel, K.A.; Wurie, A.; Ilias, S.; Pegram, J.E.

    1995-06-01

    Considerable progress has been made in recent years in the development of polymer membranes with physical and chemical properties that make them useful for specialty separations. The potential use of polymer membranes for rehydrating freeze-dried food using non-potable water sources is a noble concept that may be possible using commercially available membranes. To use any of the commercially available membranes, the candidate membrane needs to meet the following requirements: (1) permeable to water, but impermeable to salts and microorganisms, (2) reasonable membrane flux at low pressure (760 mm Hg or less) and (3) comply with Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulations for food contact. To determine the feasibility of using polymer membranes for a self-hydrating packaging system to reconstitute freeze-dried foods, several commercially available membranes were screened according to (1) hydration rate of membrane, (2) water flux through membrane, (3) passage of microorganisms through membrane, and (4) salt rejectivity of membrane. From these screening tests, several membranes were identified as candidate membranes for this application. These membranes were used in developing self-hydrating prototype packaging systems. The sensitivity of the systems to food composition and temperature was studied.

  2. Ice nucleation of Snomax® particles below water vapor saturation: immersion freezing in concentrated solution droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wex, Heike; Kanji, Zamin A.; Boose, Yvonne; Beyer, Alexander; Henning, Silvia; Augustin-Bauditz, Stefanie

    2015-04-01

    Heterogeneous ice nucleation has received an increasing amount of interest in the past years, as it initiates the ice phase in mixed phase clouds (MPCs) and, to some extent, also in cirrus clouds. The presence of ice influences cloud radiative properties and, for mixed phase clouds, also the formation of precipitation. Immersion freezing is thought to be the most important mechanism through which ice formation could take place in MPCs. Here, we examine the ice nucleation activity of biological ice nucleating particles (INP) derived from bacteria, namely, particles generated from Snomax® suspensions, both above and below water vapor saturation. During a measurement campaign in Leipzig, ice nucleation measurements were conducted with PINC (Portable Ice Nucleus Counter, Chou et al., 2011) and LACIS (Leipzig Aerosol Cloud Interaction Simulator, see e.g. Wex et al., 2014a). Immersion freezing measurements from PINC and LACIS were in agreement in the temperature regime for which both instruments operate reliably. Here, we will show that measurements done below water vapour saturation and above the deliquescence relative humidity of the Snomax® particles follow what would be expected for immersion freezing in concentrated solutions, similar to what was suggested for coated kaolinite particles in Wex et al. (2014b). Additionally, some measurements reported in the literature that were done in the water vapour sub-saturated regime will be evaluated based on the assumption made above, showing that at least some of the ice nucleation which previously was ascribed to deposition ice nucleation rather follows the behavior of immersion freezing in concentrated solutions. Literature: Chou, C., O. Stetzer, E. Weingartner, Z. Juranyi, Z. A. Kanji, and U. Lohmann (2011), Ice nuclei properties within a Saharan dust event at the Jungfraujoch in the Swiss Alps, Atmos. Chem. Phys., 11(10), 4725-4738, doi:10.5194/acp-11-4725-2011. Wex, H. et al. (2014a) Intercomparing different devices for the investigation of ice nucleating particles using Snomax as test substance, Atmos. Chem. Phys. Discuss. (accepted for ACP), 14, 22321-22384, 2014. Wex, H., P. J. DeMott, Y. Tobo, S. Hartmann, M. Rösch, T. Clauss, L. Tomsche, D. Niedermeier, and F. Stratmann (2014b), Kaolinite particles as ice nuclei: learning from the use of different kaolinite samples and different coatings, Atmos. Chem. Phys., 14, doi:10.5194/acp-14-5529-2014.

  3. Ice Nucleation of Snomax® Particles below Water Vapor Saturation: Immersion Freezing in Concentrated Solution Droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanji, Z. A.; Boose, Y.; Augustin, S.; Wex, H.

    2014-12-01

    Heterogeneous ice nucleation in the atmosphere is important and has received an increasing amount of interest in the past years, as it initiates the ice phase in mixed phase clouds and, to some extent, also in cirrus clouds. The presence of ice influences cloud radiative properties and, for mixed phase clouds, also the formation of precipitation and cloud lifetime. Immersion freezing has been in the focus of ice nucleation research in recent years. Here, we examine ice nucleation activity of biological ice nuclei (IN) derived from bacteria, namely of particles generated from a suspensions of Snomax®, both above and below water vapor saturation. Measurements were done with PINC (Portable Ice Nucleus Counter, Chou et al., 2011) during a measurement campaign at LACIS (Leipzig Aerosol Cloud Interaction Simulator, see e.g. Wex et al., 2014) in Leipzig. Immersion freezing measurements from PINC and LACIS were in agreement in the temperature regime for which both instruments operate reliably. Here, we will show that measurements done below water vapor saturation follow what would be expected for immersion freezing in concentrated solutions, similar to what was suggested for coated kaolinite particles in Wex et al. (2014). Chou, C., O. Stetzer, E. Weingartner, Z. Juranyi, Z. A. Kanji, and U. Lohmann (2011), Ice nuclei properties within a Saharan dust event at the Jungfraujoch in the Swiss Alps, Atmos. Chem. Phys., 11(10), 4725-4738, doi:10.5194/acp-11-4725-2011. Wex, H., P. J. DeMott, Y. Tobo, S. Hartmann, M. Rösch, T. Clauss, L. Tomsche, D. Niedermeier, and F. Stratmann (2014), Kaolinite particles as ice nuclei: learning from the use of different kaolinite samples and different coatings, Atmos. Chem. Phys., 14, doi:10.5194/acp-14-5529-2014.

  4. Experimental investigation of molten metal freezing on to a structure

    SciTech Connect

    Mizanur Rahman, M.; Hino, Tomohiko; Morita, Koji; Matsumoto, Tatsuya; Nakagawa, Kiyoshi; Fukuda, Kenji; Maschek, Werner

    2007-10-15

    During core disruptive accidents (CDAs) of Liquid Metal Reactors (LMRs), it is important to understand the freezing phenomena of molten metal, which may prevent fuel dispersal and subsequent shutdown. The present paper describes the freezing behavior of molten metal during interaction with a structure with a view to the safety of LMRs. In this study, Wood's metal (melting point 78.8 C) was used as a simulant melt, while stainless steel and copper were used as freezing structures. A series of simulation experiments was conducted to study the freezing behavior of Wood's metal during pouring on to the freezing structures immersed in a coolant. In the experiments, simulant melt was poured into a stainless steel tube and finally ejected into a coolant through a nozzle so as to observe the freezing behavior of the molten metal. The penetration length and width were measured in the air cooled experiments, whereas penetration length and the proportion of adhering frozen metal were measured in water coolant experiment. The melt flow and distribution were observed in both types of experiment using a high-speed video camera. Distinct freezing modes were observed in the water coolant experiments, whereas only one freezing mode with a longer melt penetration was found in air coolant experiments. The present result will be utilized to create a relevant database for the verification of reactor safety analysis codes. (author)

  5. Final report on COOMET.T-S1. Comparison of type S thermocouples at the freezing points of zinc, aluminium and copper 2014—2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pokhodun, A. I.; Ivanova, A. G.; Duysebayeva, K. K.; Ivanova, K. P.

    2015-01-01

    Regional comparison of type S thermocouples at the freezing points of zinc, aluminium and copper was initiated by COOMET TC1.1-10 (the technical committee of COOMET `Thermometry and thermal physics'). Three NMI take part in COOMET regional comparison: D I Mendeleev Institute for Metrology (VNIIM) (Russian Federation), National Scientific Centre (Institute of Metrology) (NSC IM, Ukraine), Republic State Enterprise (Kazakhstan Institute of Metrology) (KazInMetr, Republic of Kazakhstan). VNIIM (Russia) was chosen as the coordinator-pilot of the regional comparison. A star type comparison was used. The participants: KazInMetr and NSC IM constructed the type S thermocouples and calibrated them in three fixed points: zinc, aluminum and copper points, using methods of ITS-90 fixed point realizations. The thermocouples have been sent to VNIIM together with the results of the calibration at three fixed points, with the values of the inhomogeneity at temperature 200 °C and the uncertainty evaluations of the results. For calibration of thermocouples the same VNIIM fixed points cells were used. Participating laboratories repeated the calibration of thermocouples after its returning in zinc, aluminum and copper points to determine the stability of its results. In result of the comparison was to evaluate the equivalence of the type S thermocouples calibration in fixed points by NMIs to confirm corresponding lines of international website for NMI's Calibration and Measurement Capabilities (CMC). This paper is the final report of the comparison including analysis of the uncertainty of measurement results. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCT WG-KC, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  6. Plant cover, soil temperature, freeze, water stress, and evapotranspiration conditions. [south Texas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiegand, C. L.; Nixon, P. R.; Gausman, H. W.; Namken, L. N.; Leamer, R. W.; Richardson, A. J. (Principal Investigator)

    1981-01-01

    Emissive and reflective data for 10 days, and IR data for 6 nights in south Texas scenes were analyzed after procedures were developed for removing cloud-affected data. HCMM radiometric temperatures were: within 2 C of dewpoint temperatures on nights when air temperature approached dewpoint temperatures; significantly correlated with variables important in evapotranspiration; and, related to freeze severity and planting depth soil temperatures. Vegetation greenness indexes calculated from visible and reflective IR bands of NOAA-6 to -9 meteorological satellites will be useful in the AgRISTARS program for seasonal crop development, crop condition, and drought applications.

  7. Effect of alkane chain length and counterion on the freezing transition of cationic surfactant adsorbed film at alkane mixture - water interfaces.

    PubMed

    Tokiwa, Yuhei; Sakamoto, Hiroyasu; Takiue, Takanori; Aratono, Makoto; Matsubara, Hiroki

    2015-05-21

    Penetration of alkane molecules into the adsorbed film gives rise to a surface freezing transition of cationic surfactant at the alkane-water interface. To examine the effect of the alkane chain length and counterion on the surface freezing, we employed interfacial tensiometry and ellipsometry to study the interface of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide and cetyltrimethylammonium chloride aqueous solutions against dodecane, tetradecane, hexadecane, and their mixtures. Applying theoretical equations to the experimental results obtained, we found that the alkane molecules that have the same chain length as the surfactant adsorb preferentially into the surface freezing film. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the freezing transition temperature of cationic surfactant adsorbed film was independent of the kind of counterion. PMID:25932500

  8. 40 CFR 142.57 - Bottled water, point-of-use, and point-of-entry devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Bottled water, point-of-use, and point... Issued by the Administrator § 142.57 Bottled water, point-of-use, and point-of-entry devices. (a) A State may require a public water system to use bottled water, point-of-use devices, or...

  9. 40 CFR 142.57 - Bottled water, point-of-use, and point-of-entry devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Bottled water, point-of-use, and point... Issued by the Administrator § 142.57 Bottled water, point-of-use, and point-of-entry devices. (a) A State may require a public water system to use bottled water, point-of-use devices, or...

  10. 40 CFR 142.57 - Bottled water, point-of-use, and point-of-entry devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Bottled water, point-of-use, and point... Issued by the Administrator § 142.57 Bottled water, point-of-use, and point-of-entry devices. (a) A State may require a public water system to use bottled water, point-of-use devices, or...

  11. 40 CFR 142.57 - Bottled water, point-of-use, and point-of-entry devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Bottled water, point-of-use, and point... Issued by the Administrator § 142.57 Bottled water, point-of-use, and point-of-entry devices. (a) A State may require a public water system to use bottled water, point-of-use devices, or...

  12. 40 CFR 142.57 - Bottled water, point-of-use, and point-of-entry devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Bottled water, point-of-use, and point... Issued by the Administrator § 142.57 Bottled water, point-of-use, and point-of-entry devices. (a) A State may require a public water system to use bottled water, point-of-use devices, or...

  13. A novel particle engineering technology to enhance dissolution of poorly water soluble drugs: spray-freezing into liquid.

    PubMed

    Rogers, True L; Nelsen, Andrew C; Hu, Jiahui; Brown, Judith N; Sarkari, Marazban; Young, Timothy J; Johnston, Keith P; Williams, Robert O

    2002-11-01

    A novel cryogenic spray-freezing into liquid (SFL) process was developed to produce microparticulate powders consisting of an active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) molecularly embedded within a pharmaceutical excipient matrix. In the SFL process, a feed solution containing the API was atomized beneath the surface of a cryogenic liquid such that the liquid-liquid impingement between the feed and cryogenic liquids resulted in intense atomization into microdroplets, which were frozen instantaneously into microparticles. The SFL micronized powder was obtained following lyophilization of the frozen microparticles. The objective of this study was to develop a particle engineering technology to produce micronized powders of the hydrophobic drug, danazol, complexed with hydroxypropyl-beta-cyclodextrin (HPbetaCD) and to compare these SFL micronized powders to inclusion complex powders produced from other techniques, such as co-grinding of dry powder mixtures and lyophilization of bulk solutions. Danazol and HPbetaCD were dissolved in a water/tetrahydrofuran cosolvent mixture prior to SFL processing or slow freezing. Identical quantities of the API and HPbetaCD used in the solutions were co-ground in a mortar and pestle and blended to produce a co-ground physical mixture for comparison. The powder samples were characterized by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectrometry (FTIR), scanning electron microscopy, surface area analysis, and dissolution testing. The results provided by DSC, XRD, and FTIR suggested the formation of inclusion complexes by both slow-freezing and SFL. However, the specific surface area was significantly higher for the latter. Dissolution results suggested that equilibration of the danazol/HPbetaCD solution prior to SFL processing was required to produce the most soluble conformation of the resulting inclusion complex following SFL. SFL micronized powders exhibited better dissolution profiles than the slowly frozen aggregate powder. Results indicated that micronized SFL inclusion complex powders dissolved faster in aqueous dissolution media than inclusion complexes formed by conventional techniques due to higher surface areas and stabilized inclusion complexes obtained by ultra-rapid freezing. PMID:12445556

  14. Non-equilibrium freezing of water-ice in sandy basaltic regoliths and implications for fluidized debris flows on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gooding, J. L.

    1987-01-01

    Many geomorphic features on Mars were attributed to Earth-analogous, cold-climate processes involving movement of water or ice lubricated debris. Clearly, knowledge of the behavior of water in regolith materials under Martian conditions is essential to understanding the postulated geomorphic processes. Experiments were performed with sand-sized samples of natural basaltic regoliths in order to further elucidate how water/regolith interactions depend upon grain size and mineralogy. The data reveal important contrasts with data for clay-mineral substrates and suggest that the microphysics of water/mineral interactions might affect Martian geomorphic processes in ways that are not fully appreciated. Sand and silt sized fractions of two soils from the summit of Mauna Kea were used as Mars-analogous regolith materials. Temperatures were measured for water/ice phase transitions as wet slurries of individual soil fractions which were cooled or heated at controlled rates under a carbon dioxide atmosphere. Freezing and melting of ice was studied as a function of water/soil mass ratio, soil particle size, and thermal-cycle rate. Comparison tests were done under the same conditions with U.S. Geological Survey standard rock powders.

  15. Evaluation of the freeze-thaw/evaporation process for the treatment of produced waters. Quarterly technical progress report, January 1--March 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Boysen, J.; Morotti, J.

    1994-04-01

    The use of freeze-crystallization is being increasingly acknowledged as a low-cost, energy-efficient method for purifying contaminated water. Freeze-crystallization has been shown to be effective in removing a wide variety of contaminants from water. Water purification by using natural conditions to promote freezing appears to be an extremely attractive process for the treatment of contaminated water in many areas where natural climatic conditions will seasonally promote freezing. The natural freezing process can be coupled with natural evaporative processes to treat oil and gas produced waters year round in regions where subfreezing temperatures seasonally occur. The objectives of this research are related to development of a commercially-economic natural freeze-thaw/evaporation (FTE) process for the treatment and purification of water produced in conjunction with oil and gas. During the reporting period of 1/1/94 to 3/31/94, project research concentrated on Subtasks 2.0 (Task 2 Project Reporting) and 2.1 (Laboratory-scale FTE Simulations) . The objectives of Task 2 are to conduct laboratory- and bench-scale simulations for optimizing the design of the FTE process. Task 2 requires completion of six subtasks: Subtask 2.0 - Task 2 Project Reporting (initiated 3/1/93), Subtask 2.1 - Laboratory-scale FTE Simulations, Subtask 2.2 Re-evaluation of Process Economics Based on Laboratory-scale Process Simulation Results, Subtask 2.3 - Bench-scale FTE Simulations, Subtask 2.4 - Economic Assessment of Bench-scale Simulations, and Subtask 2.5 - Technical Report of Task 2. The construction, shakedown, and operation of the laboratory-scale process simulations planned were planned for this quarter (Subtask 2.1).

  16. Protein crowding in solution, frozen and freeze-dried states: small-angle neutron and X-ray scattering study of lysozyme/sorbitol/water systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krueger, Susan; Khodadadi, Sheila; Clark, Nicholas; McAuley, Arnold; Cristiglio, Viviana; Theyencheri, Narayanan; Curtis, Joseph; Shalaev, Evgenyi

    2015-03-01

    For effective preservation, proteins are often stored as frozen solutions or in glassy states using a freeze-drying process. However, aggregation is often observed after freeze-thaw or reconstitution of freeze-dried powder and the stability of the protein is no longer assured. In this study, small-angle neutron and X-ray scattering (SANS and SAXS) have been used to investigate changes in protein-protein interaction distances of a model protein/cryoprotectant system of lysozyme/sorbitol/water, under representative pharmaceutical processing conditions. The results demonstrate the utility of SAXS and SANS methods to monitor protein crowding at different stages of freezing and drying. The SANS measurements of solution samples showed at least one protein interaction peak corresponding to an interaction distance of ~ 90 . In the frozen state, two protein interaction peaks were observed by SANS with corresponding interaction distances at 40 as well as 90 . On the other hand, both SAXS and SANS data for freeze-dried samples showed three peaks, suggesting interaction distances ranging from ~ 15 to 170 . Possible interpretations of these interaction peaks will be discussed, as well as the role of sorbitol as a cryoprotectant during the freezing and drying process.

  17. Effects of temperatures near the freezing point on N2O emissions, denitrification and on the abundance and structure of nitrifying and denitrifying soil communities.

    PubMed

    Wertz, Sophie; Goyer, Claudia; Zebarth, Bernie J; Burton, David L; Tatti, Enrico; Chantigny, Martin H; Filion, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Climate warming in temperate regions may lead to decreased soil temperatures over winter as a result of reduced snow cover. We examined the effects of temperatures near the freezing point on N(2)O emissions, denitrification, and on the abundance and structure of soil nitrifiers and denitrifiers. Soil microcosms supplemented with NO3 - and/or NO3 - plus red clover residues were incubated for 120 days at -4 °C, -1 °C, +2 °C or +5 °C. Among microcosms amended with residues, N(2)O emission and/or denitrification increased with increasing temperature on Days 2 and 14. Interestingly, N(2)O emission and/or denitrification after Day 14 were the greatest at -1 °C. Substantial N(2) O emissions were only observed on Day 2 at +2 °C and +5 °C, while at -1 °C, N(2)O emissions were consistently detected over the duration of the experiment. Abundances of ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and archaea (AOA), Nitrospira-like bacteria and nirK denitrifiers were the lowest in soils at -4 °C, while abundances of Nitrobacter-like bacteria and nirS denitrifiers did not vary among temperatures. Community structures of nirK and nirS denitrifiers and Nitrobacter-like bacteria shifted between below-zero and above-zero temperatures. Structure of AOA and AOB communities also changed but not systematically among frozen and unfrozen temperatures. Results indicated shifts in some nitrifier and denitrifier communities with freezing and a surprising stimulation of N(2)O emissions at -1 °C when NO3 - and C are present. PMID:22882277

  18. Summer Freezing Resistance: A Critical Filter for Plant Community Assemblies in Mediterranean High Mountains

    PubMed Central

    Pescador, David S.; Sierra-Almeida, Ángela; Torres, Pablo J.; Escudero, Adrián

    2016-01-01

    Assessing freezing community response and whether freezing resistance is related to other functional traits is essential for understanding alpine community assemblages, particularly in Mediterranean environments where plants are exposed to freezing temperatures and summer droughts. Thus, we characterized the leaf freezing resistance of 42 plant species in 38 plots at Sierra de Guadarrama (Spain) by measuring their ice nucleation temperature, freezing point (FP), and low-temperature damage (LT50), as well as determining their freezing resistance mechanisms (i.e., tolerance or avoidance). The community response to freezing was estimated for each plot as community weighted means (CWMs) and functional diversity (FD), and we assessed their relative importance with altitude. We established the relationships between freezing resistance, growth forms, and four key plant functional traits (i.e., plant height, specific leaf area, leaf dry matter content (LDMC), and seed mass). There was a wide range of freezing resistance responses and more than in other alpine habitats. At the community level, the CWMs of FP and LT50 responded negatively to altitude, whereas the FD of both traits increased with altitude. The proportion of freezing-tolerant species also increased with altitude. The ranges of FP and LT50 varied among growth forms, and only leaf dry matter content was negatively correlated with freezing-resistance traits. Summer freezing events represent important abiotic filters for assemblies of Mediterranean high mountain communities, as suggested by the CWMs. However, a concomitant summer drought constraint may also explain the high freezing resistance of species that thrive in these areas and the lower FD of freezing resistance traits at lower altitudes. Leaves with high dry matter contents may maintain turgor at lower water potential and enhance drought tolerance in parallel to freezing resistance. This adaptation to drought seems to be a general prerequisite for plants found in xeric mountains. PMID:26941761

  19. Summer Freezing Resistance: A Critical Filter for Plant Community Assemblies in Mediterranean High Mountains.

    PubMed

    Pescador, David S; Sierra-Almeida, Ángela; Torres, Pablo J; Escudero, Adrián

    2016-01-01

    Assessing freezing community response and whether freezing resistance is related to other functional traits is essential for understanding alpine community assemblages, particularly in Mediterranean environments where plants are exposed to freezing temperatures and summer droughts. Thus, we characterized the leaf freezing resistance of 42 plant species in 38 plots at Sierra de Guadarrama (Spain) by measuring their ice nucleation temperature, freezing point (FP), and low-temperature damage (LT50), as well as determining their freezing resistance mechanisms (i.e., tolerance or avoidance). The community response to freezing was estimated for each plot as community weighted means (CWMs) and functional diversity (FD), and we assessed their relative importance with altitude. We established the relationships between freezing resistance, growth forms, and four key plant functional traits (i.e., plant height, specific leaf area, leaf dry matter content (LDMC), and seed mass). There was a wide range of freezing resistance responses and more than in other alpine habitats. At the community level, the CWMs of FP and LT50 responded negatively to altitude, whereas the FD of both traits increased with altitude. The proportion of freezing-tolerant species also increased with altitude. The ranges of FP and LT50 varied among growth forms, and only leaf dry matter content was negatively correlated with freezing-resistance traits. Summer freezing events represent important abiotic filters for assemblies of Mediterranean high mountain communities, as suggested by the CWMs. However, a concomitant summer drought constraint may also explain the high freezing resistance of species that thrive in these areas and the lower FD of freezing resistance traits at lower altitudes. Leaves with high dry matter contents may maintain turgor at lower water potential and enhance drought tolerance in parallel to freezing resistance. This adaptation to drought seems to be a general prerequisite for plants found in xeric mountains. PMID:26941761

  20. Freeze-fracture cytochemistry: replicas of critical point-dried cells and tissues after fracture-label.

    PubMed

    da Silva, P P; Kachar, B; Torrisi, M R; Brown, C; Parkison, C

    1981-07-10

    Applications of the new fracture-labeling techniques for the observation of cytochemical labels on platinum-carbon replicas are described. Frozen cells, embedded in a cross-linked protein matrix, and frozen tissues are fractured with a scalpel under liquid nitrogen, thawed, labeled, dehydrated by the critical point drying method, and replicated. This method allows direct, high-resolution, two-dimensional chemical and immunological characterization of the cellular membranes in situ, as well as detection of sites within cross-fractured cytoplasm and extracellular matrix. PMID:7244630

  1. Passively operated spool valve for drain-down freeze protection of thermosyphon water heaters. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    1982-04-30

    The work done to extend the existing drain-down valve technology to provide passive drain-down freeze protection for thermosyphon-based solar water heaters is described. The basic design of the existing valve model is that of a spool valve, employing a cylindrical spool which moves axially in a mating cartridge to open and close o-rings at the two operating extremes (drain and operate) to perform the valving function. Three passive actuators to drive the basic valving mechanism were designed, fabricated, and tested. Two piping configurations used to integrate the spool valve with the thermosyphon system are described, as are the passive actuators. The three actuator designs are: photovoltaic driven, refrigerant-based bellows, and heat motor cable-drive designs. Costs are compared for the alternative actuator designs, and operating characteristics were examined for the thermosyphon system, including field tests. The market for the valve for thermosyphon systems is then assessed. (LEW)

  2. Alterations in Water Status, Endogenous Abscisic Acid Content, and Expression of rab18 Gene during the Development of Freezing Tolerance in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed Central

    Lang, V.; Mantyla, E.; Welin, B.; Sundberg, B.; Palva, E. T.

    1994-01-01

    Treatments as diverse as exposure to low temperature (LT), exogenous abscisic acid (ABA), or drought resulted in a 4 to 5[deg]C increase in freezing tolerance of the annual herbaceous plant Arabidopsis thaliana. To correlate the increase in freezing tolerance with the physiological changes that occur in response to these treatments, we studied the alterations in water status, endogenous ABA levels, and accumulation of rab18 (V. Lang and E.T. Palva [1992] Plant Mol Biol 20: 951-962) mRNA. Exposure to LT and exogenous ABA caused only a minor decline in total water potential ([psi]w), in contrast to a dramatic decrease in [psi]w during drought stress. Similarly, the endogenous ABA levels were only slightly and transiently increased in LT-treated plants in contrast to a massive increase in ABA levels in drought-stressed plants. The expression of the ABA-responsive rab18 gene was low during the LT treatment but could be induced to high levels by exogenous ABA and drought stress. Taken together, these results suggest that the moderate increases in freezing tolerance of A. thaliana might be achieved by different mechanisms. However, ABA-deficient and ABA-insensitive mutants of A. thaliana have impaired freezing tolerance, suggesting that ABA is, at least indirectly, required for the development of full freezing tolerance. PMID:12232173

  3. Experimental and analytical investigation of a freezing point depressant fluid ice protection system. M.S. Thesis. Final Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albright, A. E.

    1984-01-01

    A glycol-exuding porous leading edge ice protection system was tested in the NASA Icing Research Tunnel. Stainless steel mesh, laser drilled titanium, and composite panels were tested on two general aviation wing sections. Two different glycol-water solutions were evaluated. Minimum glycol flow rates required for anti-icing were obtained as a function of angle of attack, liquid water content, volume median drop diameter, temperature, and velocity. Ice accretions formed after five minutes of icing were shed in three minutes or less using a glycol fluid flow equal to the anti-ice flow rate. Two methods of predicting anti-ice flow rates are presented and compared with a large experimental data base of anti-ice flow rates over a wide range of icing conditions. The first method presented in the ADS-4 document typically predicts flow rates lower than the experimental flow rates. The second method, originally published in 1983, typically predicts flow rates up to 25 percent higher than the experimental flow rates. This method proved to be more consistent between wing-panel configurations. Significant correlation coefficients between the predicted flow rates and the experimental flow rates ranged from .867 to .947.

  4. Measurement of water-holding capacity in raw and freeze-dried broiler breast meat with visible and near-infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Bowker, B; Hawkins, S; Zhuang, H

    2014-07-01

    The feasibility of using visible/near-infrared spectroscopy (vis/NIR) to segregate broiler breast fillets by water-holding capacity (WHC) was determined. Broiler breast fillets (n = 72) were selected from a commercial deboning line based on visual color assessment. Meat color (L*a*b*), pH (2 and 24 h), drip loss, and salt-induced water uptake were measured. Reflectance measurements were recorded from 400 to 2,500 nm in both raw and freeze-dried breast meat samples. Raw and freeze-dried samples had similar spectra in the visible region (400-750 nm), but the freeze-dried samples exhibited numerous bands in the NIR region (750-2,500 nm) corresponding to muscle proteins and lipids that were not observed in the NIR spectra of the raw samples. Linear discriminate analyses were used to classify fillets as high-WHC or low-WHC according to predicted meat quality characteristics. Using the visible spectra (400-750 nm), fillets could be correctly classified into high-WHC and low-WHC groups based on drip loss and salt-induced water uptake with 88 to 92% accuracy in raw samples and 79 to 86% accuracy in freeze-dried samples. Using the NIR spectra (750-2,500 nm), fillets could be correctly classified into high-WHC and low-WHC groups with 74 to 76% accuracy in raw samples and 85 to 86% accuracy in freeze-dried samples. Thus, freeze-drying enhanced the accuracy of WHC classification using the NIR portion of the spectra. Data from this study demonstrate the potential for utilizing vis/NIR spectroscopy as a method for classifying broiler breast meat according to WHC. PMID:24864280

  5. 21 CFR 1240.83 - Approval of watering points.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ....83 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... prescribed in the Environmental Protection Agency's Primary Drinking Water Regulations as set forth in 40 CFR... watering point upon investigations made by representatives of State departments of health or of the...

  6. 21 CFR 1240.83 - Approval of watering points.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... prescribed in the Environmental Protection Agency's Primary Drinking Water Regulations as set forth in 40 CFR... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Approval of watering points. 1240.83 Section 1240.83 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES...

  7. 21 CFR 1240.83 - Approval of watering points.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... prescribed in the Environmental Protection Agency's Primary Drinking Water Regulations as set forth in 40 CFR... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Approval of watering points. 1240.83 Section 1240.83 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES...

  8. Tetrameric assembly of CHIP28 water channels in liposomes and cell membranes: a freeze-fracture study.

    PubMed

    Verbavatz, J M; Brown, D; Saboli?, I; Valenti, G; Ausiello, D A; Van Hoek, A N; Ma, T; Verkman, A S

    1993-11-01

    Channel forming integral protein of 28 kD (CHIP28) functions as a water channel in erythrocytes, kidney proximal tubule and thin descending limb of Henle. CHIP28 morphology was examined by freeze-fracture EM in proteoliposomes reconstituted with purified CHIP28, CHO cells stably transfected with CHIP28k cDNA, and rat kidney tubules. Liposomes reconstituted with HPLC-purified CHIP28 from human erythrocytes had a high osmotic water permeability (Pf0.04 cm/s) that was inhibited by HgCl2. Freeze-fracture replicas showed a fairly uniform set of intramembrane particles (IMPs); no IMPs were observed in liposomes without incorporated protein. By rotary shadowing, the IMPs had a diameter of 8.5 +/- 1.3 nm (mean +/- SD); many IMPs consisted of a distinct arrangement of four smaller subunits surrounding a central depression. IMPs of similar size and appearance were seen on the P-face of plasma membranes from CHIP28k-transfected (but not mock-transfected) CHO cells, rat thin descending limb (TDL) of Henle, and S3 segment of proximal straight tubules. A distinctive network of complementary IMP imprints was observed on the E-face of CHIP28-containing plasma membranes. The densities of IMPs in the size range of CHIP28 IMPs, determined by non-linear regression, were (in IMPs/microns 2): 2,494 in CHO cells, 5,785 in TDL, and 1,928 in proximal straight tubules; predicted Pf, based on the CHIP28 single channel water permeability of 3.6 x 10(-14) cm3/S (10 degrees C), was in good agreement with measured Pf of 0.027 cm/S, 0.075 cm/S, and 0.031 cm/S, respectively, in these cell types. Assuming that each CHIP28 monomer is a right cylindrical pore of length 5 nm and density 1.3 g/cm3, the monomer diameter would be 3.2 nm; a symmetrical arrangement of four cylinders would have a greatest diameter of 7.2 nm, which after correction for the thickness of platinum deposit, is similar to the measured IMP diameter of approximately 8.5 nm. These results provide a morphological signature for CHIP28 water channels and evidence for a tetrameric assembly of CHIP28 monomers in reconstituted proteoliposomes and cell membranes. PMID:7693713

  9. When water does not boil at the boiling point.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hasok

    2007-03-01

    Every schoolchild learns that, under standard pressure, pure water always boils at 100 degrees C. Except that it does not. By the late 18th century, pioneering scientists had already discovered great variations in the boiling temperature of water under fixed pressure. So, why have most of us been taught that the boiling point of water is constant? And, if it is not constant, how can it be used as a 'fixed point' for the calibration of thermometers? History of science has the answers. PMID:17336380

  10. Modelling Water Flow, Heat Transport, Soil Freezing and Thawing, and Snow Processes in a Clayey, Subsurface Drained Agricultural Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warsta, L.; Turunen, M.; Koivusalo, H. J.; Paasonen-Kivekäs, M.; Karvonen, T.; Taskinen, A.

    2012-12-01

    Simulation of hydrological processes for the purposes of agricultural water management and protection in boreal environment requires description of winter time processes, including heat transport, soil freezing and thawing, and snow accumulation and melt. Finland is located north of the latitude of 60 degrees and has one third to one fourth of the total agricultural land area (2.3 milj. ha) on clay soils (> 30% of clay). Most of the clayey fields are subsurface drained to provide efficient drainage and to enable heavy machines to operate on the fields as soon as possible after the spring snowmelt. Generation of drainflow and surface runoff in cultivated fields leads to nutrient and sediment load, which forms the major share of the total load reaching surface waters at the national level. Water, suspended sediment, and soluble nutrients on clayey field surface are conveyed through the soil profile to the subsurface drains via macropore pathways as the clayey soil matrix is almost impermeable. The objective of the study was to develop the missing winter related processes into the FLUSH model, including soil heat transport, snow pack simulation and the effects of soil freezing and thawing on the soil hydraulic conductivity. FLUSH is an open source (MIT license), distributed, process-based model designed to simulate surface runoff and drainflow in clayey, subsurface drained agricultural fields. 2-D overland flow is described with the diffuse wave approximation of the Saint Venant equations and 3-D subsurface flow with a dual-permeability model. Both macropores and soil matrix are simulated with the Richards equation. Soil heat transport is described with a modified 3-D convection-diffusion equation. Runoff and groundwater data was available from different periods from January 1994 to April 1999 measured in a clayey, subsurface drained field section (3.6 ha) in southern Finland. Soil temperature data was collected in two locations (to a depth of 0.8 m) next to the experimental field section while snow and frost depths were recorded within the experimental field section. The model was calibrated with 1994 data and validated with soil temperature and snow and frost depth data from the years 1995-1999. The main advantage of the new model was the 3-D distributed nature of the system which made it possible to simulate lateral water and heat fluxes in soil and overland flow on the field surface. Also, the possibility to simulate hydrological conditions in the experimental field continuously from 1994 to 1998 was essential because the main sediment loads in Nordic fields usually occur after snow melt and during autumn rains and the resulting runoff depends on the antecedent moisture conditions in the field. The simulation results revealed differences in soil temperatures within the field area due to the topography of the undulating field. The low lying areas were colder (up to 1 °C) during winter and also remained colder longer in the spring due to the higher water content compared to the drier, upper parts of the slopes. Repeated freezing and thawing cycles during the winter and early spring caused an ice layer to form on the soil surface which promoted generation of surface runoff. The snow cover over the field and the organic matter in the tillage layer had an insulating effect on the soil temperatures.

  11. Non-Toxic, Low-Freezing, Drop-In Replacement Heat Transfer Fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cutbirth, J. Michael

    2012-01-01

    A non-toxic, non-flammable, low-freezing heat transfer fluid is being developed for drop-in replacement within current and future heat transfer loops currently using water or alcohol-based coolants. Numerous water-soluble compounds were down-selected and screened for toxicological, physical, chemical, compatibility, thermodynamic, and heat transfer properties. Two fluids were developed, one with a freezing point near 0 C, and one with a suppressed freezing point. Both fluids contain an additive package to improve material compatibility and microbial resistance. The optimized sub-zero solution had a freezing point of 30 C, and a freezing volume expansion of 10-percent of water. The toxicity of the solutions was experimentally determined as LD(50) greater than 5g/kg. The solutions were found to produce minimal corrosion with materials identified by NASA as potentially existing in secondary cooling loops. Thermal/hydrodynamic performance exceeded that of glycol-based fluids with comparable freezing points for temperatures Tf greater than 20 C. The additive package was demonstrated as a buffering agent to compensate for CO2 absorption, and to prevent microbial growth. The optimized solutions were determined to have physically/chemically stable shelf lives for freeze/thaw cycles and longterm test loop tests.

  12. Freezing of Water in Dormant Vegetative Apple Buds in Relation to Cryopreservation 1

    PubMed Central

    Tyler, Nancy; Stushnoff, Cecil; Gusta, Larry V.

    1988-01-01

    Various empirical prefreezing protocols have been used to facilitate cryopreservation of dormant buds from woody plants. The objective of this research was to determine the quantity of water remaining in liquid phase, under different prefreezing conditions using pulsed nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of dormant apple (Malus domestica Mill.) buds from three cultivars. During prefreezing, the quantity of water remaining in the liquid phase was less at ?40Cwater than the duration of prefreezing. Prefreezing to ?40C for 24 hours was optimal for `Patterson' and `McIntosh,' the hardiest cultivars, compared to ?30C for 24 hours with `Red Delicious.' Cryopreservation of dormant apple buds depends upon the quantity of liquid water during prefreezing, prior to immersion in liquid nitrogen, and upon the cultivar. PMID:16666103

  13. Coil freezing: What a relief!

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobs, T.L.

    1995-12-01

    This article describes why a coil freezes, what happens during the freezing, and what is required to alleviate the damage. Water and steam have been used to cool and heat air in finned-tube heat exchanger coils almost since the inception of heating and air conditioning. Freezing of the fluid and the resultant coil damage have also been around for the same length of time. It is a systematic problem that many times is preventable, but one knows that this is not a perfect world. Nor are the HVAC and process systems that have been in service for decades. It is fairly simple to understand the basics of a liquid phase freeze. The ambient conditions must be at or below 32 F, and that can, in turn cause the water inside the coil to fall below 32 F as well. If kept below the freezing temperature of fluid long enough, the coil may be damaged by this condition.

  14. New methods of subcooled water recognition in dew point hygrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weremczuk, Jerzy; Jachowicz, Ryszard

    2001-08-01

    Two new methods of sub-cooled water recognition in dew point hygrometers are presented in this paper. The first one- impedance method use a new semiconductor mirror in which the dew point detector, the thermometer and the heaters were integrated all together. The second one an optical method based on a multi-section optical detector is discussed in the report. Experimental results of both methods are shown. New types of dew pont hydrometers of ability to recognized sub-cooled water were proposed.

  15. The Soil Moisture Active/Passive (SMAP) Freeze/Thaw Product: Providing a Crucial Linkage between Earth's Water and Carbon Cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, K. C.; Kimball, J. S.; Kim, Y.

    2010-12-01

    Landscape transitions between seasonally frozen and thawed conditions occur each year over roughly 50 million square kilometers of Earth’s Northern Hemisphere, affecting surface meteorological conditions, ecological trace gas dynamics, energy exchange and hydrologic activity profoundly. NASA’s Soil Moisture Active-Pasiive (SMAP) mission, currently planned for launch in 2014, will employ a combined radiometer and high-resolution radar to measure surface soil moisture and freeze/thaw state, thus providing new opportunities for scientific advances and societal benefits. Major science objectives of SMAP support the understanding of processes linking terrestrial water, energy and carbon cycles, the quantification of net carbon flux and the extension of capabilities for weather and climate prediction models. The SMAP suite of data products will include global maps of landscape freeze/thaw state derived from L-band radar at 1-3 km spatial resolution with a 2-day refresh rate for the high northern latitudes (i.e. latitudes above 50 degrees north). The algorithm employed in derivation of the freeze/thaw product employs a temporal change detection scheme to delineate freeze/thaw state changes associated with temporal variations in landscape microwave dielectric constant properties. Development of the algorithm follows from application of legacy data sets provided by satellite radars, both scatterometers and Synthetic Aperture Radars (SARs), and radiometers. This presentation reviews algorithm development, product derivation and validation, product applications and associated SMAP science objectives addressed through the derived freeze/thaw data products. We review efforts in which contemporary and legacy active and passive microwave remote sensing data sets have been applied in prototyping the freeze/thaw product and its applications. This work was performed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, and at the University of Montana under contract to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  16. Homogeneous condensation - Freezing nucleation rate measurements for small water droplets in an expansion cloud chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagen, D. E.; Anderson, R. J.; Kassner, J. L., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Experimental data on ice nucleation, presented in an earlier paper, are analyzed to yield information about the homogeneous nucleation rate of ice from supercooled liquid and the heights of energy barriers to that nucleation. The experiment consisted of using an expansion cloud chamber to nucleate from the vapor a cloud of supercooled pure water drops and the observation of the fraction of drops which subsequently froze. The analysis employed standard classical homogeneous nucleation theory. The data are used to extract the first experimental measurement (albeit indirect) of the activation energy for the transfer of a water molecule across the liquid-ice interface at temperatures near -40 C. The results provide further evidence that the local liquid structure becomes more icelike as the temperature is lowered.

  17. State of Water in Confinement near Hydrophilic Surfaces Below the Freezing Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenbaum (Gutina), A.; Puzenko, Alexander A.; Vasilyeva, M.; Feldman, Yu.

    The main goal of the research is to find a relationship between the dynamic and the structural properties of water in hydrated heterogeneous systems. The results of dielectric spectroscopy studies of hydrated matrixes of porous glasses, clays and hydrated powder of Lysozyme are presented in wide frequency and temperature intervals. It is shown that for all systems studied the low temperature relaxation process demonstrates Arrhenius kinetics and exhibits a Cole-Cole (CC) behavior. A new phenomenological approach has been recently presented (see Puzenko A, Ben Ishai P, Feldman Yu, Phys Rev Lett 105:037601, 2010) that clarifies the physical mechanism of the dipole-matrix interaction in complex systems (CS) underlying the CC behaviour. A comparison porous glass with clays helps one to understand the specific adsorbed water dynamics due to the variety in the distribution of hydration centers.

  18. Improvement of Freezing Quality of Food by Pre-dehydration with Microwave-Vacuum Drying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamidi, Nurkholis; Tsuruta, Takaharu

    Partial dehydration by microwave vacuum drying has been applied to tuna, oyster and mackerel prior to freezing in order to reduce quality damages due to freezing and thawing. Samples were dehydrated at pressure of 4kPa and temperature lower than 25°C. Two cooling conditions were tested in the experiment by using the freezing chamber of temperatures -20°C and -80°C. The experimental results showed that decreasing the water content in tuna could lower the freezing point temperature and made the freezing time shorter. It was also found that removing some water was effective to reduce the size of ice crystal and the drip loss in mackerel. After thawing, the pre-dehydrated mackerel showed better microstructure than that frozen without pre-treatment. Furthermore, the sensory tests have been done by a group of panelist for the evaluation on aroma, flavor, and general acceptability of mackerels.

  19. A novel bacterial Water Hypersensitivity-like protein shows in vivo protection against cold and freeze damage.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Dominique; Ferreras, Eloy; Trindade, Marla; Cowan, Don

    2015-08-01

    Metagenomic library screening, by functional or sequence analysis, has become an established method for the identification of novel genes and gene products, including genetic elements implicated in microbial stress response and adaptation. We have identified, using a sequence-based approach, a fosmid clone from an Antarctic desert soil metagenome library containing a novel gene which codes for a protein homologous to a Water Hypersensitivity domain (WHy). The WHy domain is typically found as a component of specific LEA (Late Embryogenesis Abundant) proteins, particularly the LEA-14 (LEA-8) variants, which occur widely in plants, nematodes, bacteria and archaea and which are typically induced by exposure to stress conditions. The novel WHy-like protein (165 amino acid, 18.6 kDa) exhibits a largely invariant NPN motif at the N-terminus and has high sequence identity to genes identified in Pseudomonas genomes. Expression of this protein in Escherichia coli significantly protected the recombinant host against cold and freeze stress. PMID:26187747

  20. Stratospheric water inferred from Lagrangian Cold Point characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ploeger, F.; Konopka, P.; Schiller, C.

    2009-04-01

    Total water was recently measured onboard the Geophysica high-altitude aircraft using the Jülich fluorescence hygrometer FISH during the three tropical campaigns TroCCiNOx (January-February 2005), SCOUT-O3 (November-December 2005) and AMMA (August 2006) over Southern Brazil, Northern Australia and West Africa. Trajectories are initialized at the flight locations, calculated backwards for ten days and the Lagrangian Cold Point (LCP) characteristics determined along the paths. To test whether stratospheric water values can be deduced from the temperature history of air, minimum saturation water vapor is derived from the LCP-temperature and compared to the measurements.

  1. Recent Advances in Point-of-Access Water Quality Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korostynska, O.; Arshak, K.; Velusamy, V.; Arshak, A.; Vaseashta, Ashok

    Clean water is one of our most valuable natural resources. In addition to providing safe drinking water it assures functional ecosystems that support fisheries and recreation. Human population growth and its associated increased demands on water pose risks to maintaining acceptable water quality. It is vital to assess source waters and the aquatic systems that receive inputs from industrial waste and sewage treatment plants, storm water systems, and runoff from urban and agricultural lands. Rapid and confident assessments of aquatic resources form the basis for sound environmental management. Current methods engaged in tracing the presence of various bacteria in water employ bulky laboratory equipment and are time consuming. Thus, real-time water quality monitoring is essential for National and International Health and Safety. Environmental water monitoring includes measurements of physical characteristics (e.g. pH, temperature, conductivity), chemical parameters (e.g. oxygen, alkalinity, nitrogen and phosphorus compounds), and abundance of certain biological taxa. Monitoring could also include assays of biological activity such as alkaline phosphatase, tests for toxins such as microcystins and direct measurements of pollutants such as heavy metals or hydrocarbons. Real time detection can significantly reduce the level of damage and also the cost to remedy the problem. This paper presents overview of state-of-the-art methods and devices used for point-of-access water quality monitoring and suggest further developments in this area.

  2. Satellite freeze forecast system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martsolf, J. D. (Principal Investigator)

    1983-01-01

    Provisions for back-up operations for the satellite freeze forecast system are discussed including software and hardware maintenance and DS/1000-1V linkage; troubleshooting; and digitized radar usage. The documentation developed; dissemination of data products via television and the IFAS computer network; data base management; predictive models; the installation of and progress towards the operational status of key stations; and digital data acquisition are also considered. The d addition of dew point temperature into the P-model is outlined.

  3. Lidar point density analysis: implications for identifying water bodies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Worstell, Bruce B.; Poppenga, Sandra; Evans, Gayla A.; Prince, Sandra

    2014-01-01

    Most airborne topographic light detection and ranging (lidar) systems operate within the near-infrared spectrum. Laser pulses from these systems frequently are absorbed by water and therefore do not generate reflected returns on water bodies in the resulting void regions within the lidar point cloud. Thus, an analysis of lidar voids has implications for identifying water bodies. Data analysis techniques to detect reduced lidar return densities were evaluated for test sites in Blackhawk County, Iowa, and Beltrami County, Minnesota, to delineate contiguous areas that have few or no lidar returns. Results from this study indicated a 5-meter radius moving window with fewer than 23 returns (28 percent of the moving window) was sufficient for delineating void regions. Techniques to provide elevation values for void regions to flatten water features and to force channel flow in the downstream direction also are presented.

  4. Enzyme stability of microencapsulated Bifidobacterium animalis ssp. lactis Bb12 after freeze drying and during storage in low water activity at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Dianawati, Dianawati; Shah, Nagendra P

    2011-08-01

    Stability of enzymes such as β-galactosidase (β-gal), β-glucosidase (β-glu), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), pyruvate kinase (PK), hexokinase (HK), and ATPase of microencapsulated Bifidobacterium animalis ssp. lactis Bb12 after freeze-drying and after 10 wk of storage at low water activity (a(w)) at room temperature was studied. Bacteria were microencapsulated using alginate formulation with or without mannitol fortification (sodium alginate and mannitol [SAM] and sodium alginate [SA], respectively) by creating gel beads followed by freeze drying. Two types of dried gel beads were then stored at low a(w), such as 0.07, 0.1, and 0.2; storage in an aluminum foil was used as control. All storage was carried out at room temperature of 25 °C for 10 wk. Measurement of β-gal, β-glu, LDH, PK, HK, and ATPase (with or without exposure to pH 2.0 for 2 h) activities was carried out before freeze drying, after freeze drying, and after 10 wk of storage. There was a significant decrease in almost all enzyme activities, except that of PK. SAM and SA showed no different effect on maintaining enzyme activities during freeze drying. Storage for 10 wk at room temperature at various low a(w) using SAM and SA system had a significant effect on retention of most enzymes studied, except that of PK and LDH. Storage at a(w) of 0.07 and 0.1 was more effective in maintaining enzyme activities than storage at a(w) of 0.2 and in an aluminum foil. However, mannitol fortification into alginate system did not significantly improve retention of enzymes during 10 wk of storage. PMID:21696390

  5. The freezing bomb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, Allan

    2010-03-01

    The extreme pressures that are generated when water freezes were traditionally demonstrated by sealing a small volume in a massive cast iron 'bomb' and then surrounding it with a freezing mixture of ice and salt. This vessel would dramatically fail by brittle fracture, but no quantitative measurement of bursting pressure was available. Calculation suggests a maximum of about 55 MPa (8000 psi) might have been achieved, with some 2.3% of the water frozen into a hollow shell around the interior of the vessel. In a sufficiently strong alloy steel container the pressure might rise to a maximum of 210 MPa (30 460 psi), this limiting figure being due to the collapse of ordinary ice (ice I) to the denser forms ice II or ice III.

  6. Bayesian Change Point Analysis for Water Pressure Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, A.; Huzurbazar, S. V.; Humphrey, N. F.; Tschetter, T. J.

    2007-12-01

    We use wavelets in a Bayesian context to identify changes in the pattern of data collected over time, when missing observations are present. Our work is motivated by the interest in identifying and modeling change points in the measurements of sub-glacial water pressure during melt season along the length of the Bench glacier in Alaska. This modeling will provide insights into the sub-glacial hydrology including the discharge mechanism during the melt season. A Bayesian analysis based on the empirical wavelet coefficients is used to find the change point (Oden and Lynch,1998) in 18 water pressure data sets available.We compare this method with wavelet based method suggested byWang (1995), which examines the empirical wavelet coefficients of the data at the fine scale levels. The above methods have to be adapted for accommodating missing observations, which are present in our data sets.

  7. Entropy, Disorder, and Freezing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laird, Brian B.

    1999-10-01

    It is argued that the usual view that entropy is a measure of "disorder" is problematic and that there exist systems at high density, for which packing considerations dominate, where a spatially ordered state has a higher entropy than a disordered one. A classic example is a system of hard-sphere atoms, for which freezing is known to be purely entropy driven. Such a model has relevance to the real world, since it provides a good qualitative (and nearly quantitative) description of solid-liquid coexistence in simple systems such as argon. An analogy based on the packing of suitcases is given to illustrate the main point. A simple classroom demonstration is also described in which an analog simulation of the freezing of hard particles is performed.

  8. Freeze Technology for Nuclear Applications - 13590

    SciTech Connect

    Rostmark, Susanne C.; Knutsson, Sven; Lindberg, Maria

    2013-07-01

    Freezing of soil materials is a complicated process of a number of physical processes: - freezing of pore water in a thermal gradient, - cryogenic suction causing water migration and - ice formation expanding pores inducing frost heave. Structural changes due to increase of effective stress during freezing also take place. The over consolidation gives a powerful dewatering/drying effect and the freeze process causes separation of contaminates. Artificial ground freezing (AGF is a well established technique first practiced in south Wales, as early as 1862. AGF is mostly used to stabilize tunnels and excavations. During the last ten years underwater applications of freeze technologies based on the AGF have been explored in Sweden. The technology can, and has been, used in many different steps in a remediation action. Freeze Sampling where undisturbed samples are removed in both soft and hard sediment/sludge, Freeze Dredging; retrieval of sediment with good precision and minimal redistribution, and Freeze Drying; volume reduction of contaminated sludge/sediment. The application of these technologies in a nuclear or radioactive environment provides several advantages. Sampling by freezing gives for example an advantage of an undisturbed sample taken at a specified depth, salvaging objects by freezing or removal of sludges is other applications of this, for the nuclear industry, novel technology. (authors)

  9. New freeze pipe systems for nitrogen freezing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rephan, D.

    A number of field and laboratory experiments have been carried out using new kinds of freezing pipe systems. These systems particularly enable freezing to be performed in stages. They further enable liquid gas consumption to be minimized. One system is particularly suitable for shaft freezing while another lends itself to tunnelling.

  10. Particle-size dependence of immersion freezing: Investigation of INUIT test aerosol particles with freely suspended water drops.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diehl, Karoline; Debertshäuser, Michael; Eppers, Oliver; Jantsch, Evelyn; Mitra, Subir K.

    2014-05-01

    One goal of the research group INUIT (Ice Nuclei research UnIT) is to investigate the efficiencies of several test ice nuclei under comparable conditions but with different experimental techniques. In the present studies, two methods are used: the Mainz vertical wind tunnel and an acoustic levitator placed inside a cold chamber. In both cases drops are freely levitated, either at their terminal velocity in the wind tunnel updraft or around the nodes of a standing ultrasonic wave in the acoustic levitator. Thus, heat transfer conditions are well approximated, and wall contact effects on freezing as well as electrical charges of the drops are avoided. Drop radii are 370 μm and 1 mm, respectively. In the wind tunnel, drops are investigated at constant temperatures within a certain time period and the onset of freezing is observed directly. In the acoustic levitator, the drop temperature decreases during the experiments and is measured by an in-situ calibrated Infrared thermometer. The onset of freezing is indicated by a rapid rise of the drop surface temperature because of the release of latent heat. Investigated test ice nuclei are Snomax® as a proxy of biological particles and illite NX as well as K-feldspar as represents of mineral dust. The particle concentrations are 1 × 10-12 to 3 × 10-6 g Snomax® per drop and 5 × 10-9 to 5 × 10-5 g mineral dust per drop. Freezing temperatures are between -2 and -18° C in case of Snomax® and between -14 and -26° C in case of mineral dust. The lower the particle masses per drop the lower are the freezing temperatures. For similar particle concentrations in the drops, the median freezing temperatures determined by the two techniques agree well within the measurement errors. With the knowledge of the specific particle surface area of the mineral dusts, the results are interpreted also in terms of particle surface area per drop. Results from the wind tunnel experiments which are performed at constant temperatures indicate that the freezing times are shorter the lower the temperatures are. For evaluation and comparisons of the data, two models of heterogeneous freezing are applied, the stochastic and the time-independent singular description. The nucleation rate coefficients J(T) as well as the surface densities of active sites ns(T) or the numbers of active sites nm(T) are determined from the experimental data. It is shown that both models are suited to describe the present heterogeneous freezing results for the range of investigated particle masses or surface areas per drop. The comparison of the results from the two experimental techniques evaluated with the time-independent singular model indicates an excellent agreement within the measurement errors.

  11. POINT-OF-CONTACT/EXPERTISE LIST (WATER SUPPLY AND WATER RESOURCES DIVISION, NRMRL)

    EPA Science Inventory

    NRMRL's Water Supply and Water Resources Division's (WSWRD's)Expertise/Point-of-Contact page lists research areas in the Division along with the names and telephone numbers for responsible individuals and their expertise.WSWRD conducts research to help prepare the primary and s...

  12. Preservation of flavor in freeze dried green beans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huber, C. S.; Heidelbaugh, N. D.; Davis, D.

    1973-01-01

    Before freeze drying, green beans are heated to point at which their cell structure is altered. Beans freeze dried with altered cell structure have improved rehydration properties and retain color, flavor, and texture.

  13. Benchmarking numerical freeze/thaw models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rühaak, Wolfram; Anbergen, Hauke; Molson, John; Grenier, Christophe; Sass, Ingo

    2015-04-01

    The modeling of freezing and thawing of water in porous media is of increasing interest, and for which very different application areas exist. For instance, the modeling of permafrost regression with respect to climate change issues is one area, while others include geotechnical applications in tunneling and for borehole heat exchangers which operate at temperatures below the freezing point. The modeling of these processes requires the solution of a coupled non-linear system of partial differential equations for flow and heat transport in space and time. Different code implementations have been developed in the past. Analytical solutions exist only for simple cases. Consequently, an interest has arisen in benchmarking different codes with analytical solutions, experiments and purely numerical results, similar to the long-standing DECOVALEX and the more recent "Geothermal Code Comparison" activities. The name for this freezing/ thawing benchmark consortium is INTERFROST. In addition to the well-known so-called Lunardini solution for a 1D case (case T1), two different 2D problems will be presented, one which represents melting of a frozen inclusion (case TH2) and another which represents the growth or thaw of permafrost around a talik (case TH3). These talik regions are important for controlling groundwater movement within a mainly frozen ground. First results of the different benchmark results will be shown and discussed.

  14. Modeling elephant-mediated cascading effects of water point closure.

    PubMed

    Hilbers, Jelle P; Van Langevelde, Frank; Prins, Herbert H T; Grant, C C; Peel, Mike J S; Coughenour, Michael B; De Knegt, Henrik J; Slotow, Rob; Smit, Izak P J; Kiker, Greg A; De Boer, Willem F

    2015-03-01

    Wildlife management to reduce the impact of wildlife on their habitat can be done in several ways, among which removing animals (by either culling or translocation) is most often used. There are, however, alternative ways to control wildlife densities, such as opening or closing water points. The effects of these alternatives are poorly studied. In this paper, we focus on manipulating large herbivores through the closure of water points (WPs). Removal of artificial WPs has been suggested in order to change the distribution of African elephants, which occur in high densities in national parks in Southern Africa and are thought to have a destructive effect on the vegetation. Here, we modeled the long-term effects of different scenarios of WP closure on the spatial distribution of elephants, and consequential effects on the vegetation and other herbivores in Kruger National Park, South Africa. Using a dynamic ecosystem model, SAVANNA, scenarios were evaluated that varied in availability of artificial WPs; levels of natural water; and elephant densities. Our modeling results showed that elephants can indirectly negatively affect the distributions of meso-mixed feeders, meso-browsers, and some meso-grazers under wet conditions. The closure of artificial WPs hardly had any effect during these natural wet conditions. Under dry conditions, the spatial distribution of both elephant bulls and cows changed when the availability of artificial water was severely reduced in the model. These changes in spatial distribution triggered changes in the spatial availability of woody biomass over the simulation period of 80 years, and this led to changes in the rest of the herbivore community, resulting in increased densities of all herbivores, except for giraffe and steenbok, in areas close to rivers. The spatial distributions of elephant bulls and cows showed to be less affected by the closure of WPs than most of the other herbivore species. Our study contributes to ecologically informed decisions in wildlife management. The results from this modeling exercise imply that long-term effects of this intervention strategy should always be investigated at an ecosystem scale. PMID:26263663

  15. Water Triple-Point Comparisons: Plateau Averaging or Peak Value?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steur, P. P. M.; Dematteis, R.

    2014-04-01

    With a certain regularity, national metrology institutes conduct comparisons of water triple-point (WTP) cells. The WTP is the most important fixed point for the International Temperature Scale of 1990 (ITS-90). In such comparisons, it is common practice to simply average all the single measured temperature points obtained on a single ice mantle. This practice is quite reasonable whenever the measurements show no time dependence in the results. Ever since the first Supplementary Information for the International Temperature Scale of 1990, published by the Bureau International des Poids et Mesures in Sèvres, it was strongly suggested to wait at least 1 day before taking measurements (now up to 10 days), in order for a newly created ice mantle to stabilize. This stabilization is accompanied by a change in temperature with time. A recent improvement in the sensitivity of resistance measurement enabled the Istituto Nazionale di Ricerca Metrologica to detect more clearly the (possible) change in temperature with time of the WTP on a single ice mantle, as for old borosilicate cells. A limited investigation was performed where the temperature of two cells was monitored day-by-day, from the moment of mantle creation, where it was found that with (old) borosilicate cells it may be counterproductive to wait the usual week before starting measurements. The results are presented and discussed, and it is suggested to adapt the standard procedure for comparisons of WTP cells allowing for a different data treatment with (old) borosilicate cells, because taking the temperature dependence into account will surely reduce the reported differences between cells.

  16. Ground-water movement and water quality in Lake Point, Tooele County, Utah, 1999-2003

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kenney, T.A.; Wright, S.J.; Stolp, B.J.

    2006-01-01

    Water-level and water-quality data in Lake Point, Tooele County, Utah, were collected during August 1999 through August 2003. Water levels in Lake Point generally declined about 1 to 2 feet from July 2001 to July 2003, likely because of less-than-average precipitation. Ground water generally flows in two directions from the Oquirrh Mountains. One component flows north toward the regional topographic low, Great Salt Lake. The other component generally flows southwest toward a substantial spring complex, Factory/Dunne's Pond. This southwest component flows through a coarse gravel deposit believed to be a shoreline feature of historic Lake Bonneville. The dominant water-quality trend in Lake Point is an increase in dissolved-solids concentration with proximity to Great Salt Lake. The water type changes from calcium-bicarbonate adjacent to the Oquirrh Mountains to sodium-chloride with proximity to Great Salt Lake. Evaluation of chloride-bromide weight ratios indicates a mixture of fresher recharge waters with a brine similar to what currently exists in Great Salt Lake.

  17. Modification of physical properties of freeze-dried rice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huber, C. S.

    1971-01-01

    Freeze cycling process consists of alternately freezing and thawing precooked rice for two cycles, rice is then frozen and freeze-dehydrated in vacuum sufficient to remove water from rice by sublimitation. Process modifies rice grain structure and porosity, enabling complete rehydration in one minute in hot water.

  18. Droplet coalescence and freezing on hydrophilic, hydrophobic, and biphilic surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Dyke, Alexander S.; Collard, Diane; Derby, Melanie M.; Betz, Amy Rachel

    2015-10-01

    Frost and ice formation can have severe negative consequences, such as aircraft safety and reliability. At atmospheric pressure, water heterogeneously condenses and then freezes at low temperatures. To alter this freezing process, this research examines the effects of biphilic surfaces (surfaces which combine hydrophilic and hydrophobic regions) on heterogeneous water nucleation, growth, and freezing. Silicon wafers were coated with a self-assembled monolayer and patterned to create biphilic surfaces. Samples were placed on a freezing stage in an environmental chamber at atmospheric pressure, at a temperature of 295 K, and relative humidities of 30%, 60%, and 75%. Biphilic surfaces had a significant effect on droplet dynamics and freezing behavior. The addition of biphilic patterns decreased the temperature required for freezing by 6 K. Biphilic surfaces also changed the size and number of droplets on a surface at freezing and delayed the time required for a surface to freeze. The main mechanism affecting freezing characteristics was the coalescence behavior.

  19. Pore structure of hydrating cement paste by magnetic resonance relaxation analysis and freezing.

    PubMed

    Jehng, J Y; Sprague, D T; Halperin, W P

    1996-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation analysis has been applied to interpret the evolution of microstructure in a cement paste during hydration. A basic understanding of the wet-dry and freeze-thaw processes of cement pastes has been developed. The pore structure evolution has been studied by the suppression of the freezing temperature of water and compared with spin-spin relaxation analysis performed at room temperature. Both methods consistently show that hydrating cement pastes have two principal components in their size distribution. The NMR relaxation times provide a measure of the characteristic pore sizes. Their interpretation is made in the context of a fast exchange model. Supercooling and thawing point depression of confined water has been studied systematically. The depression of the freezing point of liquid water confined within a pore was found to be dependent on the pore size, with capillary pore water freezing at 240 K and the remaining gel pore water freezing over a temperature range extending to as low as 160 K.A modified Gibbs-Thompson analysis was used to determine pore volume distributions from the distribution of thawing temperatures. PMID:8970082

  20. Freezing of a liquid marble.

    PubMed

    Hashmi, Ali; Strauss, Adam; Xu, Jie

    2012-07-17

    In this study, we present for the first time the observations of a freezing liquid marble. In the experiment, liquid marbles are gently placed on the cold side of a thermo-electric cooler (TEC), and the morphological changes are recorded and characterized thereafter. These liquid marbles are noticed to undergo a shape transition from a spherical to a flying-saucer-shaped morphology. The freezing dynamics of liquid marbles is observed to be very different from that of a freezing water droplet on a superhydrophobic surface. For example, the pointy tip appearing on a frozen water drop could not be observed for a frozen liquid marble. In the end, we highlight a possible explanation of the observed morphology. PMID:22746403

  1. Hydraulic modeling of clay ceramic water filters for point-of-use water treatment.

    PubMed

    Schweitzer, Ryan W; Cunningham, Jeffrey A; Mihelcic, James R

    2013-01-01

    The acceptability of ceramic filters for point-of-use water treatment depends not only on the quality of the filtered water, but also on the quantity of water the filters can produce. This paper presents two mathematical models for the hydraulic performance of ceramic water filters under typical usage. A model is developed for two common filter geometries: paraboloid- and frustum-shaped. Both models are calibrated and evaluated by comparison to experimental data. The hydraulic models are able to predict the following parameters as functions of time: water level in the filter (h), instantaneous volumetric flow rate of filtrate (Q), and cumulative volume of water produced (V). The models' utility is demonstrated by applying them to estimate how the volume of water produced depends on factors such as the filter shape and the frequency of filling. Both models predict that the volume of water produced can be increased by about 45% if users refill the filter three times per day versus only once per day. Also, the models predict that filter geometry affects the volume of water produced: for two filters with equal volume, equal wall thickness, and equal hydraulic conductivity, a filter that is tall and thin will produce as much as 25% more water than one which is shallow and wide. We suggest that the models can be used as tools to help optimize filter performance. PMID:23210424

  2. Entropy Budgets in Oscillating and Freezing Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenz, R. D.

    2005-12-01

    An interesting spontaneously oscillating system was demonstrated some decades ago by Welander : an open-topped water tank supplied with a continuous supply of heat is exposed to chilled air. A layer of ice forms, as one might expect. However, the ice retards the loss of heat to the air, and the water temperature rises until eventually the ice melts. The enhanced heat loss allows the system to cool again to the point where ice can form, and the cycle repeats. The oscillating behaviour is counterintuitive (like another freezing phenomenon, the Mpemba effect, wherein a warm liquid will begin freezing before a cool one), but is in full accord with the laws of thermodynamics and can be demonstrated in the laboratory and with numerical models. Oscillations occur in specific regions of parameter space (heating rate, heat transfer coefficients etc) - smooth variation, e.g. of the ice:air heat transfer coefficient yields a smooth variation of entropy production, except for a jump to increased entropy production when oscillations begin. A geophysical system where similar oscillations may occur is the icy Jovian satellite Europa, which appears to have a young crust. More generally, where a system is subject to a varying excitation (such as diurnal or seasonal forcing of the climate of Earth or Mars) the presence of phase changes such as melting of water or the condensation of carbon dioxide as frost have an important impact on the entropy budget of the system.

  3. An extended-X-ray-absorption-fine-structure study of freeze-dried and solution ovotransferrin. Evidence for water co-ordination at the metal-binding sites.

    PubMed Central

    Hasnain, S S; Evans, R W; Garratt, R C; Lindley, P F

    1987-01-01

    Our previous extended-X-ray-absorption-fine-structure (e.x.a.f.s.) study has shown that the probable iron environment in chicken ovotransferrin involves two low-Z ligands (consistent with phenolate linkages) at 0.185(1) nm and four low-Z ligands at 0.204(1) nm [Garratt, Evans, Hasnain & Lindley (1986) Biochem. J. 233, 479-484]. Herein we provide additional information from the e.x.a.f.s. and near-edge structure suggestive of a decrease in the co-ordination number of ovotransferrin-bound iron upon freeze-drying. These effects are reversible, and exposure of the freeze-dried material to a humid atmosphere results in reversion to the solution spectra. Progressive rehydration was monitored by using e.p.r. spectroscopy and was confirmed by recording the high-resolution X-ray-absorption near-edge structure (x.a.n.e.s.). The results suggest the presence of a labile water molecule at the iron-binding sites of ovotransferrin in solution. PMID:2827627

  4. Colloid-facilitated mobilization of metals by freeze-thaw cycles.

    PubMed

    Mohanty, Sanjay K; Saiers, James E; Ryan, Joseph N

    2014-01-21

    The potential of freeze-thaw cycles to release colloids and colloid-associated contaminants into water is unknown. We examined the effect of freeze-thaw cycles on the mobilization of cesium and strontium in association with colloids in intact cores of a fractured soil, where preferential flow paths are prevalent. Two intact cores were contaminated with cesium and strontium. To mobilize colloids and metal cations sequestered in the soil cores, each core was subjected to 10 intermittent wetting events separated by 66 h pauses. During the first five pauses, the cores were dried at room temperature, and during last five pauses, the cores were subjected to 42 h of freezing followed by 24 h of thawing. In comparison to drying, freeze-thaw cycles created additional preferential flow paths through which colloids, cesium, and strontium were mobilized. The wetting events following freeze-thaw intervals mobilized about twice as many colloids as wetting events following drying at room temperature. Successive wetting events following 66 h of drying mobilized similar amounts of colloids; in contrast, successive wetting events after 66 h of freeze-thaw intervals mobilized greater amounts of colloids than the previous one. Drying and freeze-thaw treatments, respectively, increased and decreased the dissolved cesium and strontium, but both treatments increased the colloidal cesium and strontium. Overall, the freeze-thaw cycles increased the mobilization of metal contaminants primarily in association with colloids through preferential flow paths. These findings suggest that the mobilization of colloid and colloid-associated contaminants could increase when temperature variations occur around the freezing point of water. Thus, climate extremes have the potential to mobilize contaminants that have been sequestered in the vadose zone for decades. PMID:24377325

  5. Freezing and Food Safety

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Forms FSIS United States Department of Agriculture Food Safety and Inspection Service About FSIS District Offices Careers ... JSR 286) Actions ${title} Loading... Freezing and Food Safety What Can You Freeze? Is Frozen Food Safe? ...

  6. Basic concepts in freezing cells

    SciTech Connect

    Mazur, P.

    1985-01-01

    Freezing involves the lowering of temperature and the formation of ice. Most cells have not been found to be sensitive to the former; rather injury is a consequence of the removal of water from the system in the form of ice. Some cells such as boar sperm and those of many tropical crops are susceptible to even short-term lowering of temperature to near O/sup 0/C. This susceptiblity, which is independent of the rate of temperature drop, is defined as chilling injury. Other cells are injured by chilling only if the rate of cooling is high, a phenomenon referred to as thermal shock. This paper discusses the physical-chemical events during freezing and on freezing injury will assume that lowered temperature per se is not injurious.

  7. Elimination of bicarbonate interference in the binding of U(VI) in mill-waters to freeze-dried Chlorella vulgaris

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, B.; Henzl, M.T.; Hosea, J.M.; Darnall, D.W.

    1986-01-01

    Freeze-dried preparations of Chlorella vulgaris will accumulate U(Vl) from alkaline, bicarbonate-containing waters collected from uranium mill process streams, provided that the pH is pre-adjusted to between 4.0 and 6.0. Bicarbonate ion complexes the uranyl ion in these waters and seriously interferes with the binding of U(Vl) to the algal cells at pH values above 6.0. No binding of U(Vl) to the algae occurred at the natural pH of 8.0 when Chlorella vulgaris was suspended in untreated mull-waters containing up to 2.5 x 10/sup -4/M U(Vl). However, when the pH of these waters was lowered from 8.0 to near 5.0, with nitric acid, nearly quantitative binding of U(Vl) to the alga was achieved. Binding is rapid and largely unaffected by ions including Na/sup +/, Cl/sup -/, NO/sub 3//sup -/, /sup -/OAc, and SO/sub 4//sup 2 -/. Our results indicate that provided steps are taken to eliminate bicarbonate interference, such as adjustment of the pH to near 5.0, dried algal biomass could prove useful for the removal and recovery of U(Vl) from high carbonate-containing waters.

  8. JV TASK 7-FIELD APPLICATION OF THE FREEZE-THAW/EVAPORATION (FTE) PROCESS FOR THE TREATMENT OF NATURAL GAS PRODUCED WATER IN WYOMING

    SciTech Connect

    James A. Sorensen; John Boysen; Deidre Boysen; Tim Larson

    2002-10-01

    The freeze-thaw/evaporation (FTE{reg_sign}) process treats oil and gas produced water so that the water can be beneficially used. The FTE{reg_sign} process is the coupling of evaporation and freeze-crystallization, and in climates where subfreezing temperatures seasonally occur, this coupling improves process economics compared to evaporation alone. An added benefit of the process is that water of a quality suited for a variety of beneficial uses is produced. The evolution, from concept to successful commercial deployment, of the FTE{reg_sign} process for the treatment of natural gas produced water has now been completed. In this document, the histories of two individual commercial deployments of the FTE{reg_sign} process are discussed. In Wyoming, as in many other states, the permitting and regulation of oil and gas produced water disposal and/or treatment facilities depend upon the legal relationship between owners of the facility and the owners of wells from which the water is produced. An ''owner-operated'' facility is regulated by the Wyoming Oil and Gas Conservation Commission (WOGCC) and is defined as an entity which only processes water which comes from the wells in fields of which they have an equity interest. However, if a facility processes water from wells in which the owners of the facility have no equity interest, the facility is considered a ''commercial'' facility and is permitted and regulated by the Wyoming Department of Environmental Quality. For this reason, of the two commercial FTE{reg_sign} process deployments discussed in this document, one is related to an ''owner-operated'' facility, and the other relates to a ''commercial'' facility. Case 1 summarizes the permitting, design, construction, operation, and performance of the FTE{reg_sign} process at an ''owner-operated'' facility located in the Jonah Field of southwestern Wyoming. This facility was originally owned by the McMurry Oil Company and was later purchased by the Alberta Energy Company (now EnCana). Case 2 summarizes the permitting, design, construction, operation, and performance at a ''commercial'' FTE{reg_sign} facility located in the Great Divide Basin of south central Wyoming. Permits required for the construction and operation of each facility are described in detail. The respective qualities of each feed water, treated water, and concentrate stream are presented along with the relative yields of treated water and concentrate at each facility. Treated water from the owner-operated facility has been beneficially used in drilling and dust abatement, and treated water from the commercial facility has been used for dust abatement, construction, and land application. The permitting requirements and evaluation of beneficial use of the water at each facility are discussed. The results of this research confirm that the FTE{reg_sign} process is economic at a commercial-scale for the treatment and disposal of natural gas produced water in Wyoming. Further, the treated water produced from the process is of a quality suitable for beneficial uses such as irrigation, drilling mix, wildlife or livestock watering, and/or dust abatement on local roads.

  9. Effects of In Vitro Zinc Sulphate Additive to The Semen Extender on Water Buffalo (Bubalusbubalis) Spermatozoa before and after Freezing

    PubMed Central

    Dorostkar, Kamran; Alavi Shoushtari, Sayed Mortaza; Khaki, Amir

    2014-01-01

    Background The objective of the study was to investigate the effects of in vitro zinc sulphate additive to semen extender on sperm parameters (progressive motility, viability, membrane integrity and DNA stability) after cryopreservation. Materials and Methods In this Prospective longitudinal laboratory study, semen samples of 5 buffalo bulls of 3-5 years old were collected at 5 different occasions from Iran, Urmia during summer and autumn 2011, 25 samples were used in each treatment. Sperm progressive motility, viability and abnormal morphology were measured before and at 0.5 (T0), 1(T1) and 2(T2) hours after diluting semen(1:10 v/v) in Tris-citric acid based extender (without egg yolk and glycerol) at 37˚C containing none (control group), 0.072, 0.144, 0.288, 0.576 and 1.152 mg/L zinc sulphate to investigate dose and time effects. Next, a Tris-citric acid-egg yolk-glycerol extender (20% egg yolk and 7% glycerol) containing the same amount of zinc sulphate was prepared, diluted semen (1:10 v/v) was cooled and kept into a refrigerated chamber (4˚C) for 4 hours to equilibrate. Sperm progressive motility, viability, abnormal morphology, membrane integrity and DNA damage were estimated.The equilibrated semen was loaded in 0.5 ml French straws and frozen in liquid nitrogen. Later, the frozen semen was thawed and the same parameters as well as total antioxidant capacity (TAC) of the frozen-thawed semen were determined. Results The results showed that zinc sulphate additive at the rate of 0.288 mg/L gave a higher protection of sperm progressive motility (53.7 ± 1.8% vs. 40.5 ± 1.7%), viability (70.8 ± 1.8% vs. 60.1 ± 1.5%), membrane integrity (67.3 ± 1.6% vs. 56.6 ± 1.7%), DNA stability (10.1 ± 0.47% vs. 11.8 ± 0.33% damaged DNA) through the process of dilution, equilibration and freeze-thawing and caused a higher TAC level (81 ± 3.3% vs. 63 ± 3.2 µmol/L) after freez-thawing compared to the control group. Adding 0.576 and 1.152 mg/L zinc sulphate, however, was deleterious to the sperm and significantly reduced the studied sperm parameters. Conclusion Adding 0.288 mg/L zinc sulphate to the extender, compared to the control group, gives a better sperm preservation upon freezing processes which in turn, may results in higher semen fertility. But, addition of higher zinc sulphate concentrations (0.576 and 1.152 mg/L) are detrimental to buffalo spermatozoa. PMID:25379162

  10. Interspecific analysis of xylem freezing responses in Acer and Betula

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Temperate woody plants have evolved two methods for coping with seasonal exposure to sub-zero temperatures. Supercooling is a freeze-avoidance strategy where cells are able to resist the freezing of intracellular water below sub-zero temperatures. Non-supercooling is a freeze-tolerance strategy wh...

  11. Fundamentals of freeze-drying.

    PubMed

    Nail, Steven L; Jiang, Shan; Chongprasert, Suchart; Knopp, Shawn A

    2002-01-01

    Given the increasing importance of reducing development time for new pharmaceutical products, formulation and process development scientists must continually look for ways to "work smarter, not harder." Within the product development arena, this means reducing the amount of trial and error empiricism in arriving at a formulation and identification of processing conditions which will result in a quality final dosage form. Characterization of the freezing behavior of the intended formulation is necessary for developing processing conditions which will result in the shortest drying time while maintaining all critical quality attributes of the freeze-dried product. Analysis of frozen systems was discussed in detail, particularly with respect to the glass transition as the physical event underlying collapse during freeze-drying, eutectic mixture formation, and crystallization events upon warming of frozen systems. Experiments to determine how freezing and freeze-drying behavior is affected by changes in the composition of the formulation are often useful in establishing the "robustness" of a formulation. It is not uncommon for seemingly subtle changes in composition of the formulation, such as a change in formulation pH, buffer salt, drug concentration, or an additional excipient, to result in striking differences in freezing and freeze-drying behavior. With regard to selecting a formulation, it is wise to keep the formulation as simple as possible. If a buffer is needed, a minimum concentration should be used. The same principle applies to added salts: If used at all, the concentration should be kept to a minimum. For many proteins a combination of an amorphous excipient, such as a disaccharide, and a crystallizing excipient, such as glycine, will result in a suitable combination of chemical stability and physical stability of the freeze-dried solid. Concepts of heat and mass transfer are valuable in rational design of processing conditions. Heat transfer by conduction--the dominant mechanism of heat transfer in freeze-drying--is inefficient at the pressures used in freeze-drying. Steps should be taken to improve the thermal contact between the product and the shelf of the freeze dryer, such as eliminating metal trays from the drying process. Quantitation of the heat transfer coefficient for the geometry used is a useful way of assessing the impact of changes in the system such as elimination of product trays and changes in the vial. Because heat transfer by conduction through the vapor increases with increasing pressure, the commonly held point of view that "the lower the pressure, the better" is not true with respect to process efficiency. The optimum pressure for a given product is a function of the temperature at which freeze-drying is carried out, and lower pressures are needed at low product temperatures. The controlling resistance to mass transfer is almost always the resistance of the partially dried solids above the submination interface. This resistance can be minimized by avoiding fill volumes of more than about half the volume of the container. The development scientist should also recognize that very high concentrations of solute may not be appropriate for optimum freeze-drying, particularly if the resistance of the dried product layer increases sharply with concentration. Although the last 10 years has seen the publication of a significant body of literature of great value in allowing development scientists and engineers to "work smarter," there is still much work needed in both the science and the technology of freeze-drying. Scientific development is needed for improving analytical methodology for characterization of frozen systems and freeze-dried solids. A better understanding of the relationship between molecular mobility and reactivity is needed to allow accurate prediction of product stability at the intended storage temperature based on accelerated stability at higher temperatures. This requires that the temperature dependence of glass transition-associated mobility, particularly at temperatures below the glass transition, be studied in greater depth. The relevance of the concept of strong and fragile glasses to frozen systems and freeze-dried solids has only begun to be explored. The list of pharmaceutically acceptable protective solutes is very short, and more imagination--and work--is needed in order to develop pharmaceutically acceptable alternative stabilizers. There is a need for technology development in process monitoring, particularly in developing a way to measure the status of the product during freezing and freeze-drying without placing temperature measurement probes in individual vials of product. The current practice of placing thermocouples in vials is uncertain with respect to reliability of the data, inconsistent with elimination of personnel in close proximity to open vials of product in an aseptic environment, and incompatible with technology for automatic material handling in freeze-drying. In addition, a method for controlling the degree of supercooling during freezing would allow better control of freezing rate and would, in many cases, result in more consistent product quality. PMID:12189727

  12. On the nature of pre-freeze mortality in insects: water balance, ion homeostasis and energy charge in the adults of Pyrrhocoris apterus.

    PubMed

    Kostál, V; Vambera, J; Bastl, J

    2004-04-01

    Three acclimation groups [i.e. non-diapause (LD), diapause (SD) and diapause, cold-acclimated (SDA)] of the adult bugs Pyrrhocoris apterus differed markedly in their levels of chill tolerance. Survival time at a sub-zero, but non-freezing, temperature of -5 degrees C (Lt50) extended from 7.6 days, through 35.6 days, to >60 days in the LD, SD and SDA insects, respectively. The time necessary for recovery after chill-coma increased linearly with the increasing time of exposure to -5 degrees C, and the steepness of the slope of linear regression decreased in the order LD>SD>SDA. The capacity to prevent/counteract leakage of Na(+) down the electrochemical gradient (from haemolymph to tissues) during the exposure to -5 degrees C increased in the order LDwater loss. Most of the water was lost from the haemolymph compartment. The ability to regulate a certain fraction of ion pools into the hindgut fluid was the highest in the SDA group, medium in the SD group and missing in the LD group. The adenylate energy charge in the fat body cells was constant in all three groups. The total pools of ATP, ADP and AMP, however, decreased in the SD and SDA groups but remained constant in the LD group. The inability of insects to maintain ion gradients at sub-zero temperature is discussed as an important cause of pre-freeze mortality. PMID:15037645

  13. Effect of Shrimp Chitin and Shrimp Chitin Hydrolysate on the Freeze-Induced Denaturation, and on the Amount of Unfreezable Water of Wanieso Lizardfish Myofibrillar Protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somjit, Kingduean; Kongpun, Orawan; Osatomi, Kiyoshi; Hara, Kenji; Nozaki, Yukinori

    In view of potential utilization of shrimp waste, shrimp chitin (SC) and shrimp chitin hydrolysate (SCH) were prepared from 3 kinds of shrimp species, namely: black tiger shrimp Penaeus monodon, endeavour shrimp Metapenaeus endeavouri and giant freshwater shrimp Macrobrachium rosenbergii. The effects of 5% SC and SCH (dry weight) on the state of water and on the denaturation of wanieso lizardfish Saurida wanieso myofibrillar protein (Mf) were evaluated based on changes in Mf Ca-ATPase activity and the amount of unfreezable water during frozen storage. Each effect was compared with those of Mf without additives (control) and Mf with glucose. The changes in Ca-ATPase activity of control and Mf with SC during frozen storage were exhibited biphasic pattern while those of SCH and glucose exhibited monophasic pattern. The amount of unfreezable water of Mf with SC was lower than that of control while those of Mf with SCH and glucose were higher than that of control. Present findings suggested that the preventive effect of SCH on freeze-induced denaturation of Mf is caused by the stabilizing the hydrated water molecule surrounding the Mf.

  14. Freezing of living cells

    SciTech Connect

    Mazur, P.

    1985-01-01

    It can be calculated that a living cell will survive more than 5000 years at -196/sup 0/C. This ability to essentially stop biological time has important implications in medicine and agriculture, and in biological research. In medicine the chief implications are in the banking of transplantable tissues and organs and in in vitro fertilization. In agriculture the applications stem in part from the role of frozen embryos in amplifying the number of calves produced by high quanlity cows. The problem is how can cells survive both the cooling to such very low temperatures and the return to normal temperatures. The answers involve fundamental characteristics of cells such as the permeability of their surface membranes to water and solutes. These characteristics determine whether or not cells undergo lethal internal ice formation and other response during freezing and thawing. 27 refs., 12 figs.

  15. 21 CFR 1240.83 - Approval of watering points.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... prescribed in the Environmental Protection Agency's Primary Drinking Water Regulations as set forth in 40 CFR... sanitary conditions surrounding such delivery prevent the introduction, transmission, or spread...

  16. Modeling aqueous solutions near the critical point of water

    SciTech Connect

    Morrison, G.

    1988-09-01

    The author reviews the thermodynamic properties of a dilute solution near the critical point of the solvent. Two examples are discussed, a solution of a nonelectrolyte and a solution of an electrolyte. The limiting behavior of the electrolyte solutions is modeled with a Debye-Huckel term in the Helmholtz free energy. The partial molar properties, in particular the volume and isobaric thermal expansion are examined in detail. The derivation of these properties is introduced by considering the geometry of the thermodynamic surfaces near to and far from the critical point of the solvent. The author concludes that the properties of solutions near the solvent critical point are dominated by that feature; solution properties cannot be adequately modeled without including the functional forms associated with the critical point.

  17. Homogeneous freezing nucleation of stratospheric solution droplets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jensen, Eric J.; Toon, Owen B.; Hamill, Patrick

    1991-01-01

    The classical theory of homogeneous nucleation was used to calculate the freezing rate of sulfuric acid solution aerosols under stratospheric conditions. The freezing of stratospheric aerosols would be important for the nucleation of nitric acid trihydrate particles in the Arctic and Antarctic stratospheres. In addition, the rate of heterogeneous chemical reactions on stratospheric aerosols may be very sensitive to their state. The calculations indicate that homogeneous freezing nucleation of pure water ice in the stratospheric solution droplets would occur at temperatures below about 192 K. However, the physical properties of H2SO4 solution at such low temperatures are not well known, and it is possible that sulfuric acid aerosols will freeze out at temperatures ranging from about 180 to 195 K. It is also shown that the temperature at which the aerosols freeze is nearly independent of their size.

  18. Monte Carlo simulation of the OCP freezing transition

    SciTech Connect

    DeWitt, H.E.; Slattery, W.L.; Yang, Juxing

    1992-09-01

    The One Component Plasma (OCP) in three dimensions is a system of classical point charges moving in a fixed uniform neutralizing background. In nature the OCP is a rough approximation of the conditions in a white dwarf star in which one has fully ionized nuclei such as carbon, oxygen, and smaller amounts of heavier elements up to iron all moving in a nearly uniform background provided by relativistically degenerate electrons. The OCP is also a mathematical limiting model for a non-neutral plasma of ions in a Penning trap and cooled to strongly coupled conditions. Similarly, a collection of charge colloidal suspensions in water can exhibit the Coulomb freezing behavior of the OCP. A single dimensionless parameter, {Gamma} is sufficient to describe the system. For very weak coupling, {Gamma} {much_lt} 1, the thermodynamic properties of the OCP are given rigorously by the Debye-Huckel theory. This paper reports on Monte Carlo simulation of the freezing of the OCP from a random start for particle numbers ranging from 500 to 2000. In one case the authors obtained a perfect bcc lattice, but in most cases the final state would be an imperfect crystal or two different microcrystals, fcc and bcc, growing into each other. With a cluster analysis program the authors looked at the formation of nucleating clusters, and followed the actual freezing process. Roughly 80 particles are needed in a cluster before it starts to grow rapidly and freeze.

  19. Monte Carlo simulation of the OCP freezing transition

    SciTech Connect

    DeWitt, H.E. ); Slattery, W.L. ); Yang, J. . Dept. of Biological Chemistry and Molecular Pharmacology)

    1992-09-01

    The One Component Plasma (OCP) in three dimensions is a system of classical point charges moving in a fixed uniform neutralizing background. In nature the OCP is a rough approximation of the conditions in a white dwarf star in which one has fully ionized nuclei such as carbon, oxygen, and smaller amounts of heavier elements up to iron all moving in a nearly uniform background provided by relativistically degenerate electrons. The OCP is also a mathematical limiting model for a non-neutral plasma of ions in a Penning trap and cooled to strongly coupled conditions. Similarly, a collection of charge colloidal suspensions in water can exhibit the Coulomb freezing behaviour of the OCP. A single dimensionless parameter, [Gamma] is sufficient to describe the system. For very weak coupling, [Gamma][much lt]1, the thermodynamic properties of the OCP are given rigorously by the Debye-Huckel theory. This paper reports on Monte Carlo simulation of the freezing of the OCP from a random start for particle numbers ranging from 500 to 2000. In one case the authors obtained a perfect bcc lattice, but in most cases the final state would be an imperfect crystal or two different microcrystals, fcc and bcc, growing into each other. With a cluster analysis program the authors looked at the formation of nucleating clusters, and followed the actual freezing process. Roughly 80 particles are needed in a cluster before it starts to grow rapidly and freeze.

  20. Investigation of the effect of power ultrasound on the nucleation of water during freezing of agar gel samples in tubing vials.

    PubMed

    Kiani, Hossein; Sun, Da-Wen; Delgado, Adriana; Zhang, Zhihang

    2012-05-01

    Nucleation, as an important stage of freezing process, can be induced by the irradiation of power ultrasound. In this study, the effect of irradiation temperature (-2 °C, -3 °C, -4 °C and -5 °C), irradiation duration (0s, 1s, 3s, 5s, 10s or 15s) and ultrasound intensity (0.07 W cm(-2), 0.14 W cm(-2), 0.25 W cm(-2), 0.35 W cm(-2) and 0.42 W cm(-2)) on the dynamic nucleation of ice in agar gel samples was studied. The samples were frozen in an ethylene glycol-water mixture (-20 °C) in an ultrasonic bath system after putting them into tubing vials. Results indicated that ultrasound irradiation is able to initiate nucleation at different supercooled temperatures (from -5 °C to -2 °C) in agar gel if optimum intensity and duration of ultrasound were chosen. Evaluation of the effect of 0.25 W cm(-2) ultrasound intensity and different durations of ultrasound application on agar gels showed that 1s was not long enough to induce nucleation, 3s induced the nucleation repeatedly but longer irradiation durations resulted in the generation of heat and therefore nucleation was postponed. Investigation of the effect of ultrasound intensity revealed that higher intensities of ultrasound were effective when a shorter period of irradiation was used, while lower intensities only resulted in nucleation when a longer irradiation time was applied. In addition to this, higher intensities were not effective at longer irradiation times due to the heat generated in the samples by the heating effect of ultrasound. In conclusion, the use of ultrasound as a means to control the crystallization process offers promising application in freezing of solid foods, however, optimum conditions should be selected. PMID:22070859

  1. The high water solubility of inclusion complex of taxifolin-γ-CD prepared and characterized by the emulsion solvent evaporation and the freeze drying combination method.

    PubMed

    Zu, Yuangang; Wu, Weiwei; Zhao, Xiuhua; Li, Yong; Zhong, Chen; Zhang, Yin

    2014-12-30

    This study selected γ-cyclodextrin (γ-CD) as the inclusion material and prepared inclusion complex of taxifolin-γ-CD by the emulsion solvent evaporation and the freeze drying combination method to achieve the improvement of the solubility and oral bioavailability of taxifolin. We selected ethyl acetate as the oil phase, deionized water as the water phase. The taxifolin emulsion was prepared using adjustable speed homogenate machine in the process of this experiment, whose particle size was related to the concentration of taxifolin solution, the volume ratio of water phase to oil phase, the speed and time of homogenate. We knew through the single-factor test that, the optimum conditions were: the concentration of taxifolin solution was 40 mg/ml, the volume ratio of water phase to oil phase was 1.5, the speed of homogenate was 5,000 rpm, the homogenate time was 11 min. Taxifolin emulsion with a MPS of 142.5 nm was obtained under the optimum conditions, then the high-concentration taxifolin solution (3mg/ml) was obtained by the rotary evaporation process. Finally, the inclusion complex of taxifolin-γ-CD was prepared by vacuum freeze-dry. The characteristics of the inclusion complex of taxifolin-γ-CD were analyzed using SEM, FTIR, XRD, DSC, and TG. The FTIR results analyzed the interaction of taxifolin and γ-CD and determined the molecular structure of the inclusion complex of taxifolin-γ-CD. The analysis results of XRD, DSC and TG indicated that the inclusion complex of taxifolin-γ-CD was obtained and showed significantly different characteristics with taxifolin. In addition, dissolving capability test, antioxidant capacity test, solvent residue test were also carried out. The experimental datas showed that the solubility of inclusion complex of taxifolin-γ-CD at 25°C and 37°C were about 18.5 times and 19.8 times of raw taxifolin, the dissolution rate of inclusion complex of taxifolin-γ-CD were about 2.84 times of raw taxifolin, the bioavailability of inclusion complex of taxifolin-γ-CD increased 3.72 times compared with raw taxifolin, and the antioxidant capacity of inclusion complex of taxifolin-γ-CD was also superior to raw taxifolin. Furthermore, the amounts of residual solvent of the inclusion complex of taxifolin-γ-CD were suitable for pharmaceutical use. These results suggested that inclusion complex of taxifolin-γ-CD may have potential value to become a new oral taxifolin formulation with high solubility. PMID:25455767

  2. Metabolomics for in situ environmental monitoring of surface waters impacted by contaminants from both point and non-point sources

    EPA Science Inventory

    We investigated the efficacy of metabolomics for field-monitoring of fish exposed to waste water treatment plant (WWTP) effluents and non-point sources of chemical contamination. Lab-reared male fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas, FHM) were held in mobile monitoring units and e...

  3. California State Waters Map Series: offshore of Salt Point, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, Samuel Y.; Dartnell, Peter; Golden, Nadine E.; Hartwell, Stephen R.; Erdey, Mercedes D.; Greene, H. Gary; Cochrane, Guy R.; Kvitek, Rikk G.; Manson, Michael W.; Endris, Charles A.; Dieter, Bryan E.; Watt, Janet T.; Krigsman, Lisa M.; Sliter, Ray W.; Lowe, Erik N.; Chinn, John L.

    2015-01-01

    Potential marine benthic habitats in the Offshore of Salt Point map area include unconsolidated continental shelf sediments, mixed continental shelf substrate, and hard continental shelf substrate. Rocky-shelf outcrops and rubble are considered to be promising potential habitats for rockfish and lingcod, both of which are recreationally and commercially important species.

  4. Freezing temperatures of aqueous iron(III) sulfate solutions and crystallization of a new acidic water-rich sulfate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hennings, E.; Zürner, P.; Schmidt, H.; Voigt, W.

    2013-09-01

    An important question concerning the possibility of life under martian conditions is the existence of liquid water at low temperatures. On the martian surface, the existence of iron(III) sulfate is expected. The influence of iron(III) sulfate salt on ice deposits in respect to the formation of liquid salt brines was not investigated in the past. In this contribution, the investigation of the phase diagram of the system iron(III) sulfate-water and the influence of sulfuric acid to this system are presented. A new crystalline acidic iron(III) sulfate hydrate has been found in the ternary system iron(III) sulfate-water-sulfuric acid, which represents the most water-rich iron salt phase ever detected.

  5. Anomalous Freezing of Nano-Confined Water in Room-Temperature Ionic Liquid 1-Butyl-3-Methylimidazolium Nitrate.

    PubMed

    Abe, Hiroshi; Takekiyo, Takahiro; Yoshimura, Yukihiro; Saihara, Koji; Shimizu, Akio

    2016-04-18

    Non-crystal formation of ice is investigated by simultaneous X-ray diffraction and differential scanning calorimetry measurements upon cooling to -100 °C. At room temperature, size-tunable water confinement (≈20 Å size) in a room-temperature ionic liquid (RTIL, 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium nitrate, [C4 mim][NO3 ]) exists in a water-rich region (70-90 mol % D2 O). The confined water (water pocket) is characterized by almost monodispersive size distribution. In [C4 mim][NO3 ]-x mol % D2 O (70

  6. Groundwater flow with energy transport and water-ice phase change: Numerical simulations, benchmarks, and application to freezing in peat bogs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McKenzie, J.M.; Voss, C.I.; Siegel, D.I.

    2007-01-01

    In northern peatlands, subsurface ice formation is an important process that can control heat transport, groundwater flow, and biological activity. Temperature was measured over one and a half years in a vertical profile in the Red Lake Bog, Minnesota. To successfully simulate the transport of heat within the peat profile, the U.S. Geological Survey's SUTRA computer code was modified. The modified code simulates fully saturated, coupled porewater-energy transport, with freezing and melting porewater, and includes proportional heat capacity and thermal conductivity of water and ice, decreasing matrix permeability due to ice formation, and latent heat. The model is verified by correctly simulating the Lunardini analytical solution for ice formation in a porous medium with a mixed ice-water zone. The modified SUTRA model correctly simulates the temperature and ice distributions in the peat bog. Two possible benchmark problems for groundwater and energy transport with ice formation and melting are proposed that may be used by other researchers for code comparison. ?? 2006 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. GEOtop: Simulating the combined energy and water balance at and below the land surface accounting for soil freezing, snow cover and terrain effects (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endrizzi, S.; Dall'Amico, M.; Gruber, S.; Rigon, R.

    2013-12-01

    One of the most interesting characteristics of the GEOtop distributed model is the way that it treats soil freezing. The theory behind soil freezing in GEOtop is here reviewed by means of a neat thermodynamical treatment that includes a discussion of the Clausius-Clapeyron relation. Effects of soil freezing on the production of subsurface fluxes and surface runoff are presented through some simple "virtual" case study, which constitutes a possible benchmark for comparing soil freezing models. Effects of freezing and thawing is also presented in a real case study. Effects of snow-cover on the thermal evolution of soil is also presented and discussed. Eventually ways to improve GEOtop are presented and discussed.

  8. New particle dependant parameterizations of heterogeneous freezing processes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diehl, Karoline; Mitra, Subir K.

    2014-05-01

    For detailed investigations of cloud microphysical processes an adiabatic air parcel model with entrainment is used. It represents a spectral bin model which explicitly solves the microphysical equations. The initiation of the ice phase is parameterized and describes the effects of different types of ice nuclei (mineral dust, soot, biological particles) in immersion, contact, and deposition modes. As part of the research group INUIT (Ice Nuclei research UnIT), existing parameterizations have been modified for the present studies and new parameterizations have been developed mainly on the basis of the outcome of INUIT experiments. Deposition freezing in the model is dependant on the presence of dry particles and on ice supersaturation. The description of contact freezing combines the collision kernel of dry particles with the fraction of frozen drops as function of temperature and particle size. A new parameterization of immersion freezing has been coupled to the mass of insoluble particles contained in the drops using measured numbers of ice active sites per unit mass. Sensitivity studies have been performed with a convective temperature and dew point profile and with two dry aerosol particle number size distributions. Single and coupled freezing processes are studied with different types of ice nuclei (e.g., bacteria, illite, kaolinite, feldspar). The strength of convection is varied so that the simulated cloud reaches different levels of temperature. As a parameter to evaluate the results the ice water fraction is selected which is defined as the relation of the ice water content to the total water content. Ice water fractions between 0.1 and 0.9 represent mixed-phase clouds, larger than 0.9 ice clouds. The results indicate the sensitive parameters for the formation of mixed-phase and ice clouds are: 1. broad particle number size distribution with high number of small particles, 2. temperatures below -25°C, 3. specific mineral dust particles as ice nuclei such as illite or montmorillonite. Coupled cases of deposition and contact freezing show that they are hardly in competition because of differences in the preferred particle sizes. In the contact mode, small particles are less efficient for collisions as well as less efficient as ice nuclei so that these are available for deposition freezing. On the other hand, immersion freezing is the dominant process when it is coupled with deposition freezing. As it is initiated earlier the formed ice particles consume water vapor for growing. The competition of combined contact and immersion freezing leads to lower ice water contents because more ice particles are formed via the immersion mode. In general, ice clouds and mixed-phase clouds with high ice water fractions are not directly the result of primary ice formation but of secondary ice formation and growth of ice particles at the expense of liquid drops.

  9. Relationship between heat transfer parameters and the characteristic damage variables for the freezing of beef.

    PubMed

    Mascheroni, R H; Calvelo, A

    1980-08-01

    One of the most suitable parameters for relating the freezing rate to the volume of drip produced during the thawing of meat is the characteristic time, defined as the time necessary to reduce the temperature of the sample from -1·1°C (initial freezing point in beef) to -7°C (80% of the water frozen). However, as the freezing of beef in factories takes place with important temperature gradients, distributions of these characteristic times must be expected along the pieces of frozen meat. In order to relate these characteristic time distributions to heat transfer parameters under industrial freezing conditions, a mathematical model which simulates the freezing of beef is developed in this paper. The model establishes the heat transfer equations with simultaneous change of phase, taking into account the dependence of the thermal properties with the ice content and considering the anisotropy of the thermal conductivity according to the direction of the fibres. Boundary conditions include the possibility of thermal resistances in the refrigerated interphase. The model developed was compared with laboratory experiments performed under factory freezing conditions and showed a satisfactory agreement between theory and experiment. PMID:22055769

  10. Monitoring the freeze-thaw process of soil with different moisture contents using piezoceramic transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ruolin; Zhu, Daopei; Liu, Xiaoyan; Sima, Jun

    2015-05-01

    Water content plays an active and important role in the performance of the soil freeze-thaw cycle to form frozen soil mechanical properties. Monitoring the freeze-thaw cycle of soil with various types of soil with varied moisture content will provide a direct observation of the properties of soil in cold regions. This paper presents new findings from monitoring the freeze-thaw process of soil using a piezoceramic-based smart aggregate (SA). For comparison, clay soil and medium sand with different moisture contents were used to study the behavior of the soil under the freeze-thaw process. Two SAs were embedded in the soil specimens with a pre-determined distance between them, one as an actuator to generate a stress wave and the other as a sensor to detect the propagated wave. As the propagation of the emitted wave is sensitive to soil status and properties, it is possible to monitor the soil freeze-thaw process by interpreting the SA sensor signal. Based on the attenuation of the energy, a freeze-thaw status indicator was established to describe the freezing-thawing condition. Indicator values of soil specimens with different types and different levels of moisture in freeze-thaw cycles were studied. The test results indicate that the freezing duration in the freezing-thawing process varied for different types of soil and different initial moisture content of the soil. Soil with different particle sizes and moisture content will determine the frozen soil microstructure and its corresponding mechanical properties. Our results illustrate that if soil particle size is bigger, then the signal indicator is stronger; if the moisture content is higher for the same soil, then the signal indicator is stronger. The research presents an innovative method to investigate the freezing-thawing performance of soil and potentially points to a new method to study the variation of soil mechanical properties during the freezing-thawing process, which is a critical problem for infrastructure in cold regions.

  11. RADON REMOVAL USING POINT-OF-ENTRY WATER TREATMENT TECHNIQUES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of the EPA Cooperative Agreement was to evaluate the performance of POE granular activated carbon (GAC), and diffused bubble and bubble place aeration systems treating a ground water supply containing radon (35,620 ±6,717 pCi/L). The pattern of loading to the uni...

  12. RADON REMOVAL USING POINT-OF-ENTRY WATER TREATMENT TECHNIQUES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this EPA Cooperative Agreement was to evaluate the performance of POE granular activated carbon (GAG), and diffused bubble and bubble place aeration systems treating a ground water supply containing radon (35,620 + or - 6,717 pCi/L. he pattern of loading to the uni...

  13. California State Waters Map Series: offshore of Tomales Point, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, Samuel Y.; Dartnell, Peter; Golden, Nadine E.; Hartwell, Stephen R.; Greene, H. Gary; Erdey, Mercedes D.; Cochrane, Guy R.; Watt, Janet Tilden; Kvitek, Rikk G.; Manson, Michael W.; Endris, Charles A.; Dieter, Bryan E.; Krigsman, Lisa M.; Sliter, Ray W.; Lowe, Erik N.; Chinn, John L.

    2015-01-01

    Potential marine benthic habitats in the Offshore of Tomales Point map area range from unconsolidated continental-shelf sediment, to rocky continental-shelf substrate, to unconsolidated estuary sediments. Rocky-shelf outcrops and rubble are considered to be promising potential habitats for rockfish and lingcod, both of which are recreationally and commercially important species. Dynamic bedforms, such as the sand waves at the mouth of Tomales Bay, are considered potential foraging habitat for juvenile lingcod and possibly migratory fishes, as well as for forage fish such as Pacific sand lance.

  14. Ion induced hypercritical point in tetrahydrofuran/water solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balevicius, Vytautas; Fuess, Hartmut

    2003-08-01

    We report on preliminary data of the new coexisting phases in the tetrahydrofuran/H 2O/KCl solution after a certain threshold value of concentration of ions is trespassed (˜4 × 10 -4 mole fraction of KCl in H 2O). Composition of the discovered phases has been determined by FTIR spectroscopy using Beer-law procedure on H 2O bending mode ( δOH at 1647 cm -1). The results are interpreted in terms of ions induced hypercritical point.

  15. Soil water repellency of Antarctic soils (Elephant Point). First results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, Paulo; Oliva, Marc; Ruiz Fernández, Jesus

    2015-04-01

    Hydrophobicity it is a natural properties of many soils around the world. Despite the large body of research about soil water hydrophobicity (SWR) in many environments, little information it is available about Antarctic soils and their hydro-geomorphological consequences. According to our knowledge, no previous work was carried out on this environment. Soil samples were collected in the top-soil (0-5 cm) and SWR was analysed according to the water drop penetration test. The preliminary results showed that all the soils collected were hydrophilic, however further research should be carried out in order to understand if SWR changes with soil depth and if have implications on soil infiltration during the summer season.

  16. 3 CFR - Pay Freeze

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 3 The President 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Pay Freeze Presidential Documents Other Presidential Documents Memorandum of January 21, 2009 Pay Freeze Memorandum for the Assistant to the President and Chief... many more feel uncertain about the future. In these circumstances, Government must act forcefully...

  17. Freeze drying method

    DOEpatents

    Coppa, Nicholas V.; Stewart, Paul; Renzi, Ernesto

    1999-01-01

    The present invention provides methods and apparatus for freeze drying in which a solution, which can be a radioactive salt dissolved within an acid, is frozen into a solid on vertical plates provided within a freeze drying chamber. The solid is sublimated into vapor and condensed in a cold condenser positioned above the freeze drying chamber and connected thereto by a conduit. The vertical positioning of the cold condenser relative to the freeze dryer helps to help prevent substances such as radioactive materials separated from the solution from contaminating the cold condenser. Additionally, the system can be charged with an inert gas to produce a down rush of gas into the freeze drying chamber to also help prevent such substances from contaminating the cold condenser.

  18. Freeze drying apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Coppa, Nicholas V.; Stewart, Paul; Renzi, Ernesto

    2001-01-01

    The present invention provides methods and apparatus for freeze drying in which a solution, which can be a radioactive salt dissolved within an acid, is frozen into a solid on vertical plates provided within a freeze drying chamber. The solid is sublimated into vapor and condensed in a cold condenser positioned above the freeze drying chamber and connected thereto by a conduit. The vertical positioning of the cold condenser relative to the freeze dryer helps to help prevent substances such as radioactive materials separated from the solution from contaminating the cold condenser. Additionally, the system can be charged with an inert gas to produce a down rush of gas into the freeze drying chamber to also help prevent such substances from contaminating the cold condenser.

  19. Freeze drying method

    SciTech Connect

    Coppa, N.V.; Stewart, P.; Renzi, E.

    1999-12-07

    The present invention provides methods and apparatus for freeze drying in which a solution, which can be a radioactive salt dissolved within an acid, is frozen into a solid on vertical plates provided within a freeze drying chamber. The solid is sublimated into vapor and condensed in a cold condenser positioned above the freeze drying chamber and connected thereto by a conduit. The vertical positioning of the cold condenser relative to the freeze dryer helps to help prevent substances such as radioactive materials separated from the solution from contaminating the cold condenser. Additionally, the system can be charged with an inert gas to produce a down rush of gas into the freeze drying chamber to also help prevent such substances from contaminating the cold condenser.

  20. Angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory activity and structural properties of oven- and freeze-dried protein hydrolysate from fresh water fish (Cirrhinus mrigala).

    PubMed

    Elavarasan, K; Shamasundar, B A; Badii, Faraha; Howell, Nazlin

    2016-09-01

    The angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory activity and structural properties of oven-dried (OD-FPH) and freeze-dried (FD-FPH) protein hydrolysates derived from fresh water fish (Cirrhinus mrigala) muscle, using papain, were investigated. Amino acid profiles indicated a higher proportion of hydrophobic residues in OD-FPH and hydrophilic residues in FD-FPH samples. Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectra revealed random coil structure in OD-FPH and β-sheet in FD-FPH samples. The approximate molecular weight of peptides in OD-FPH and FD-FPH was in the range of 7030-339Da. The IC50 values for ACE inhibition by OD-FPH and FD-FPH samples were found to be 1.15 and 1.53mg of proteinml(-1), respectively. The ACE-inhibitory activity of OD-FPH was more stable (during sequential digestion, using pepsin and pancreatin) than that of FD-FPH sample. The study suggested that the ACE inhibitory activity of protein hydrolysate was not affected by oven-drying. PMID:27041318

  1. The effects of sulfur mustard exposure and freezing on transdermal penetration of tritiated water through ex vivo pig skin.

    PubMed

    Payne, O J; Graham, S J; Dalton, C H; Spencer, P M; Mansson, R; Jenner, J; Azeke, J; Braue, E

    2013-02-01

    The percutaneous absorption of tritiated water ((3)H(2)O) through sulfur mustard (SM) exposed abdominal pig skin was measured using in vitro Franz-type static diffusion cells. The barrier function to water permeation following exposure to liquid SM for 8 min and excision 3h later did not change significantly. A small, but statistically significant difference (P<0.05) in steady state penetration (Jss), permeability coefficient (Kp) and lag time (t(L)) of (3)H(2)O was observed between fresh skin and skin stored frozen (-20 C) for up to two weeks. Steady-state penetration and Kp values were significantly higher (P < 0.05) in skin stored frozen compared with fresh skin. Fresh nave skin had an average Kp of 1.65 10(-3) cm h(-1), whereas frozen nave skin was 2.04 10(-3) cm h(-1). Fresh SM exposed skin had a mean Kp of 1.72 10(-3) cm h(-1), whereas frozen SM exposed skin was 2.31 10(-3) cm h(-1). Lag times were also shorter (P<0.05) in skin that had been stored frozen. Frozen, SM-exposed porcine abdominal skin may be used for in vitro penetration studies, but effects of treatment and storage on the barrier layer should be taken into account. PMID:23041075

  2. EVALUATING POINT-NONPOINT SOURCE WATER QUALITY TRADING IN A RARITAN RIVER BASIN SUB-WATERSHED

    EPA Science Inventory

    This project addresses water quality issues in the Raritan River Basin of New Jersey. It will build upon an existing study that determined the technical feasibility of implementing a point-nonpoint source water quality trading program in the Basin. Water quality trading is ...

  3. Irrigation scheduling as affected by field capacity and wilting point water content from different data sources

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil water content at field capacity and wilting point water content is critical information for irrigation scheduling, regardless of soil water sensor-based method (SM) or evapotranspiration (ET)-based method. Both methods require knowledge on site-specific and soil-specific Management Allowable De...

  4. Aquaporin expression correlates with freeze tolerance in baker's yeast, and overexpression improves freeze tolerance in industrial strains.

    PubMed

    Tanghe, An; Van Dijck, Patrick; Dumortier, Françoise; Teunissen, Aloys; Hohmann, Stefan; Thevelein, Johan M

    2002-12-01

    Little information is available about the precise mechanisms and determinants of freeze resistance in baker's yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Genomewide gene expression analysis and Northern analysis of different freeze-resistant and freeze-sensitive strains have now revealed a correlation between freeze resistance and the aquaporin genes AQY1 and AQY2. Deletion of these genes in a laboratory strain rendered yeast cells more sensitive to freezing, while overexpression of the respective genes, as well as heterologous expression of the human aquaporin gene hAQP1, improved freeze tolerance. These findings support a role for plasma membrane water transport activity in determination of freeze tolerance in yeast. This appears to be the first clear physiological function identified for microbial aquaporins. We suggest that a rapid, osmotically driven efflux of water during the freezing process reduces intracellular ice crystal formation and resulting cell damage. Aquaporin overexpression also improved maintenance of the viability of industrial yeast strains, both in cell suspensions and in small doughs stored frozen or submitted to freeze-thaw cycles. Furthermore, an aquaporin overexpression transformant could be selected based on its improved freeze-thaw resistance without the need for a selectable marker gene. Since aquaporin overexpression does not seem to affect the growth and fermentation characteristics of yeast, these results open new perspectives for the successful development of freeze-resistant baker's yeast strains for use in frozen dough applications. PMID:12450819

  5. Soil salinity increases survival of freezing in the enchytraeid Enchytraeus albidus.

    PubMed

    Silva, A L Patrcio; Holmstrup, M; Kostal, V; Amorim, M J B

    2013-07-15

    Enchytraeus albidus is a freeze-tolerant enchytraeid found in diverse habitats, ranging from supralittoral to terrestrial and spanning temperate to arctic regions. Its freeze tolerance is well known but the effect of salinity in this strategy is still poorly understood. We therefore studied the combined effect of salinity (0, 15, 35, 50 NaCl) and sub-zero temperatures (-5, -14, -20C) on the freeze tolerance of E. albidus collected from two distinct geographical regions (Greenland and Germany). A full factorial design was used to study survival, and physiological and biochemical end points. The effect of salinity on the reproduction of German E. albidus was also assessed. Exposure for 48 h to saline soils prior to cold exposure triggered an increase in osmolality and decrease in water content. Worms exposed to saline soils had an improved survival of freezing compared to worms frozen in non-saline soils, particularly at -20C (survival more than doubled). Differential scanning calorimetry measurements showed that the fraction of water frozen at -5 and -14C was lower in worms exposed to 35 NaCl than in control worms. The lowering of ice content by exposure to saline soils was probably the main explanation for the better freeze survival in saline-exposed worms. Glucose increased with decreasing temperature, but was lower in saline than in non-saline soils. Thus, glucose accumulation patterns did not explain differences in freeze survival. Overall, the physiological responses to freezing of E. albidus from Greenland and Germany were similar after exposure to saline soils. Soil salinity up to 30 improved reproduction by a factor of ca. 10. PMID:23531829

  6. Exploring the Nature of Contact Freezing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiselev, A. A.; Hoffmann, N.; Duft, D.; Leisner, T.

    2012-12-01

    The freezing of supercooled water droplets upon contact with aerosol particles (contact nucleation of ice) is the least understood mechanism of ice formation in atmospheric clouds. Although experimental evidences suggest that some aerosols can be better IN in the contact than in the immersion mode (that is, triggering ice nucleation at higher temperature), no final explanation of this phenomena currently exists. On the other hand, the contact freezing is believed to be responsible for the enhanced rate of secondary ice formation occasionally observed in LIDAR measurements in the cold mixed phase clouds. Recently we have been able to show that the freezing of supercooled droplets electrodynamically levitated in the laminar flow containing mineral dust particles (kaolinite) is a process solely governed by a rate of collisions between the supercooled droplet and the aerosol particles. We have shown that the probability of droplet freezing on a single contact with aerosol particle may differ over an order of magnitude for kaolinite particles having different genesis and morphology. In this presentation we extend the study of contact nucleation of ice and compare the IN efficiency measured for DMA-selected kaolinite, illite and hematite particles. We show that the freezing probability increases towards unity as the temperature decreases and discuss the functional form of this temperature dependence. We explore the size dependence of the contact freezing probability and show that it scales with the surface area of the particles, thus resembling the immersion freezing behavior. However, for all minerals investigated so far, the contact freezing has been shown to dominate over immersion freezing on the short experimental time scales. Finally, based on the combined ESEM and electron microprobe analysis, we discuss the significance of particle morphology and variability of chemical composition on its IN efficiency in contact mode.

  7. Freezing tolerance of conifer seeds and germinants.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, B J; Guest, H J; Kolotelo, D

    2003-12-01

    Survival after freezing was measured for seeds and germinants of four seedlots each of interior spruce (Picea glauca x engelmannii complex), lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta Dougl. ex Loud.), Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.) Franco) and western red cedar (Thuja plicata Donn ex D. Donn). Effects of eight seed treatments on post-freezing survival of seeds and germinants were tested: dry, imbibed and stratified seed, and seed placed in a growth chamber for 2, 5, 10, 15, 20 or 30 days in a 16-h photoperiod and a 22/17 degrees C thermoperiod. Survival was related to the water content of seeds and germinants, germination rate and seedlot origin. After freezing for 3 h at -196 degrees C, dry seed of most seedlots of interior spruce, Douglas-fir and western red cedar had 84-96% germination, whereas lodgepole pine seedlots had 53-82% germination. Freezing tolerance declined significantly after imbibition in lodgepole pine, Douglas-fir and interior spruce seed (western red cedar was not tested), and mean LT50 of imbibed seed of these species was -30, -24.5 and -20 degrees C, respectively. Freezing tolerance continued to decline to a minimum LT50 of -4 to -7 degrees C after 10 days in a growth chamber for interior spruce, Douglas-fir and lodgepole pine, or after 15 days for western red cedar. Minimum freezing tolerance was reached at the stage of rapid hypocotyl elongation. In all species, a slight increase in freezing tolerance of germinants was observed once cotyledons emerged from the seed coat. The decrease in freezing tolerance during the transition from dry to germinating seed correlated with increases in seed water content. Changes in freezing tolerance between 10 and 30 days in the growth chamber were not correlated with seedling water content. Within a species, seedlots differed significantly in freezing tolerance after 2 or 5 days in the growth chamber. Because all seedlots of interior spruce and lodgepole pine germinated quickly, there was no correlation between seedlot hardiness and rate of germination. Germination rate and freezing tolerance of Douglas-fir and western red cedar seedlots was negatively correlated. There was a significant correlation between LT50 after 10 days in the growth chamber and minimum spring temperature at the location of seedlot origin for interior spruce and three seedlots of western red cedar, but no relationship was apparent for lodgepole pine and Douglas-fir. PMID:14652223

  8. Freezing of living cells: mechanisms and implications

    SciTech Connect

    Mazur, P.

    1984-01-01

    Cells can endure storage at low temperatures such as -196/sup 0/C for centuries. The challenge is to determine how they can survive both the cooling to such temperatures and the subsequent return to physiological conditions. A major factor is whether they freeze intracellularly. They do so if cooling is too rapid, because with rapid cooling insufficient cell water is removed osmotically to eliminate supercooling. Equations have been developed that describe the kinetics of this water loss and permit one to predict the likelihood of intracellular freezing as a function of cooling rate. Such predictions agree well with observations. Although the avoidance of intracellular freezing is usually necessary for survival, it is not sufficient. Slow freezing itself can be injurious. As ice forms outside the cell, the residual unfrozen medium forms channels of decreasing size and increasing solute concentration. The cells lie in the channels and shrink in osmotic response to the rising solute concentration. Prior theories have ascribed slow freezing injury to the concentration of solutes or the cell shrinkage. Recent experiments, however, indicate that the damage is due more to the decrease in the size of the unfrozen channels. This new view of the mechanism of slow freezing injury ought to facilitate the development of procedures for the preservation of complex assemblages of cells of biological, medical, and agricultural significance. 126 references, 18 figures, 2 tables.

  9. Glycerol loss to water exceeds glycerol catabolism via glycerol kinase in freeze-resistant rainbow smelt (Osmerus mordax).

    PubMed

    Ditlecadet, Delphine; Short, Connie E; Driedzic, William R

    2011-03-01

    Rainbow smelt accumulate high amounts of glycerol in winter. In smelt, there is a predictable profile of plasma glycerol levels that starts to increase in November (<5 μmol/ml), peaks in mid-February (>200 μmol/ml), and thereafter decreases to reach the initial levels in the beginning of May. The aim of this study was to investigate the respective role of the two main mechanisms that might be involved in glycerol clearance from mid-February: 1) breakdown of glycerol to glycerol-3-phosphate through the action of the glycerol kinase (GK) and 2) direct loss toward the environment. Over the entire glycerol cycle, loss to water represents a daily loss of ∼10% of the total glycerol content of fish. GK activities were very low in all tissues investigated and likely have a minor quantitative role in the glycerol cycle. These results suggest that glycerol levels are dictated by the rate of glycerol synthesis (accelerated and deactivated during the accumulation and decrease stages, respectively). Although not important in glycerol clearance, GK in liver might have an important metabolic function for other purposes, such as gluconeogenesis, as evidenced by the significant increase of activity at the end of the cycle. PMID:21178128

  10. Inhibition of heavy metal ion corrosion on aluminum in fresh water cooling systems using propylene glycol anti-freeze

    SciTech Connect

    Hack, H.P.; Corbett, R.; Krantz, B.

    1998-12-31

    Electronics cooling and environmental control systems are required in enclosed manned spaces such as the inside of spacecraft or submersibles. Because egress from such spaces may not be possible in a short time frame, coolant leaks must have minimum toxicity. For this reason, propylene glycol coolants are preferred over the traditional ethylene glycol coolants. Corrosion inhibitor formulations are well developed for ethylene glycol coolants, but there is concern that the inhibitor suite for propylene glycol systems may not be as mature. In particular, coolant systems with a mixture of aluminum and copper can develop heavy metal ion corrosion of the aluminum due to precipitation of copper ions from solution onto the aluminum. This type of accelerated corrosion of aluminum does not require electrical contact with copper, as is the case for galvanic corrosion, nor is significant coolant conductivity required for corrosion to occur. This paper presents a study of the ability of a commercial inhibited propylene glycol coolant to prevent heavy metal ion corrosion of aluminum when copper is also present in the coolant system. The inhibited propylene glycol`s performance is compared to that of reagent propylene glycol without inhibitors, a mature ethylene glycol inhibited coolant, and to tap water. The inhibitor suite in the inhibited propylene glycol was found to be as effective in controlling heavy metal ion corrosion as that of the inhibited ethylene glycol coolant, while uninhibited reagent propylene glycol was ineffective in controlling heavy metal ion corrosion.

  11. Prospective Primary School Teachers' Perceptions on Boiling and Freezing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Senocak, Erdal

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the perceptions of prospective primary school teachers on the physical state of water during the processes of boiling and freezing. There were three stages in the investigation: First, open-ended questions concerning the boiling and freezing of water were given to two groups of prospective primary school…

  12. Freezing-thawing action in the deterioration of the stones of Chambord Castle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alomari, Asaad; Brunetaud, Xavier; Beck, Kevin; Al-Mukhtar, Muzahim

    2013-04-01

    Limestone is very common in architecture (monuments and cultural heritage buildings) and used in the sculptures. The soft and porous limestone soaks up water and show weathering patterns and forms: alveolar weathering, granular disintegration, efflorescences. Freezing-thawing actions can be considered as one of the processes that contribute in the deterioration of stones located in the "cold regions" characterized with air temperatures below freezing point temperature. The amount of water within the pore space of the stones is a crucial factor of the decay. The experimental work presented in this paper is a part of a research program that aims to study the mechanisms that lead to the degradation of stone building materials due to the variation of climatic conditions. The analysis of the meteorological data of the field around the castle of Chambord shows the magnitude of temperature variations and the frequency of freezing-thawing cycles. The critical degrees of saturation at which the stone start to deteriorate after treatment with freezing-thawing cycles were examined in the tests conducted. The study concerns two porous limestone used in the construction and conservation of Chambord castle; highly porous Tuffeau stone having a total porosity of about 48 %, and medium porous Richemont stone with a total porosity of 27 %. Richemont stone has been used as a substitute stone of the degraded Tuffeau stone on the castle. The main physical properties, total porosity, apparent dry density and skeleton density and sound velocity for mechanical properties were measured for the stone samples before and during freezing-thawing cycles. ASTM (D5312-04) procedure was applied in the freezing-thawing tests. Tuffeau and Richmond samples were prepared at nine different degrees of saturations; 0, 20, 40, 70, 80, 85, 90, 95 and 100%, and properties were measured after different freezing-thawing cycles conditions; 2, 4, 8, 12, 16, 20, 30 and 50 cycles. The results of these tests show that when the degree of saturation exceeds 80-85%, freeze-thaw damage is inevitable even for a very few freeze-thaw cycles. Moreover, results indicate that the two studied stones have similar critical degree of saturation of about 85 %. This can be attributed to the similar percentage of macro-pores in the two tested stones. Finally, the critical degree of saturation was not changed after increasing the number of freezing-thawing cycles, thus the critical degree of saturation can be considered as a stone property.

  13. High-freezing-point fuel studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tolle, F. F.

    1980-01-01

    Considerable progress in developing the experimental and analytical techniques needed to design airplanes to accommodate fuels with less stringent low temperature specifications is reported. A computer technique for calculating fuel temperature profiles in full tanks was developed. The computer program is being extended to include the case of partially empty tanks. Ultimately, the completed package is to be incorporated into an aircraft fuel tank thermal analyser code to permit the designer to fly various thermal exposure patterns, study fuel temperatures versus time, and determine holdup.

  14. Study on Freezing of a Single Droplet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fumoto, Koji; Yamagishi, Hideaki; Ikegawa, Masahiro

    The freezing characteristics of a single water droplet placed on the column edge were visually investigated using a video camera. The temperatures of the edge face and the environment air were independently controlled. The solidification process of the water droplet was discussed based on the many pictures obtained. The experimental results indicated that the freezing time of droplet was strongly affected by the edge temperature. Furthermore, we found that the water dispersion thermosensitivity slurry was effective for the observation of the temperature of the droplet. Consequently, it was indicated that the heat transfer characteristics of the droplet under freezing condition were mainly affected by both temperature of the air and surface of the flat plate.

  15. Periodic ice banding in freezing colloidal dispersions.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Anthony M; Worster, M Grae

    2012-12-01

    Concentrated colloidal alumina dispersions were frozen in a directional solidification apparatus that provides independent control of the freezing rate and temperature gradient. Two distinct steady-state modes of periodic ice banding were observed in the range of freezing rates examined. For each mode, the wavelength between successive bands of segregated ice decreases with increasing freezing rate. At low freezing rates (0.25-3 ?m s(-1)), the ice segregates from the suspension into ice lenses, which are cracklike in appearance, and there is visible structure in the layer of rejected particles in the unfrozen region ahead of the ice lenses. In this regime, we argue that compressive cryosuction forces lead to the irreversible aggregation of the rejected particles into a close-packed cohesive layer. The temperature in the aggregated layer is depressed below the bulk freezing point by more than 2 C before the ice lenses are encountered; moreover, this undercooled region appears as a light-colored layer. The magnitude of the undercooling and the color change in this region both suggest the presence of pore ice and the formation of a frozen fringe. The possibility of a frozen fringe is supported by a quantitative model of the freezing behavior. At intermediate freezing rates, around 4 ?m s(-1), the pattern of ice segregation is disordered, coinciding with the disappearance of the dark- and light-colored layers. Finally, at high freezing rates (5-10 ?m s(-1)), there is a new mode of periodic ice banding that is no longer cracklike and is absent of any visible structure in the suspension ahead of the ice bands. We discuss the implications of our experimental findings for theories of ice lensing. PMID:23110707

  16. The relationship between technology and functionality of rural water points: evidence from Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Jiménez, A; Pérez-Foguet, A

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents an analysis of the relationships between technology of water point, management related practices and functionality over time through an extensive water point mapping study made in 15 rural districts of Tanzania, which covered 15% of the total rural population of the country. Results show irregular functionality rates at district level by technology, but reveal statistical dependence between functionality and technology at regional level. Management-related questions show that reported expenditure is the indicator most related to functionality. All categories of water points show very low performance over time. In the first five years of operation, about 30% of water points become non-functional. Only between 35% and 47% of water points are working 15 years after installation, depending on the technology. By categories, hand pumps are the less durable of the technologies studied. We suggest that more emphasis has to be placed on the creation of community capacities to manage the services during and after the installation of water points. At the same time, the role of decentralised government has to be strengthened to provide support to community services in the long term. PMID:21411945

  17. HACCP (Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Points) to guarantee safe water reuse and drinking water production--a case study.

    PubMed

    Dewettinck, T; Van Houtte, E; Geenens, D; Van Hege, K; Verstraete, W

    2001-01-01

    To obtain a sustainable water catchment in the dune area of the Flemish west coast, the integration of treated domestic wastewater in the existing potable water production process is planned. The hygienic hazards associated with the introduction of treated domestic wastewater into the water cycle are well recognised. Therefore, the concept of HACCP (Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Points) was used to guarantee hygienically safe drinking water production. Taking into account the literature data on the removal efficiencies of the proposed advanced treatment steps with regard to enteric viruses and protozoa and after setting high quality limits based on the recent progress in quantitative risk assessment, the critical control points (CCPs) and points of attention (POAs) were identified. Based on the HACCP analysis a specific monitoring strategy was developed which focused on the control of these CCPs and POAs. PMID:11464766

  18. Assessing arsenic exposure in households using bottled water or point-of-use treatment systems to mitigate well water contamination.

    PubMed

    Smith, Andrew E; Lincoln, Rebecca A; Paulu, Chris; Simones, Thomas L; Caldwell, Kathleen L; Jones, Robert L; Backer, Lorraine C

    2016-02-15

    There is little published literature on the efficacy of strategies to reduce exposure to residential well water arsenic. The objectives of our study were to: 1) determine if water arsenic remained a significant exposure source in households using bottled water or point-of-use treatment systems; and 2) evaluate the major sources and routes of any remaining arsenic exposure. We conducted a cross-sectional study of 167 households in Maine using one of these two strategies to prevent exposure to arsenic. Most households included one adult and at least one child. Untreated well water arsenic concentrations ranged from <10μg/L to 640μg/L. Urine samples, water samples, daily diet and bathing diaries, and household dietary and water use habit surveys were collected. Generalized estimating equations were used to model the relationship between urinary arsenic and untreated well water arsenic concentration, while accounting for documented consumption of untreated water and dietary sources. If mitigation strategies were fully effective, there should be no relationship between urinary arsenic and well water arsenic. To the contrary, we found that untreated arsenic water concentration remained a significant (p≤0.001) predictor of urinary arsenic levels. When untreated water arsenic concentrations were <40μg/L, untreated water arsenic was no longer a significant predictor of urinary arsenic. Time spent bathing (alone or in combination with water arsenic concentration) was not associated with urinary arsenic. A predictive analysis of the average study participant suggested that when untreated water arsenic ranged from 100 to 500μg/L, elimination of any untreated water use would result in an 8%-32% reduction in urinary arsenic for young children, and a 14%-59% reduction for adults. These results demonstrate the importance of complying with a point-of-use or bottled water exposure reduction strategy. However, there remained unexplained, water-related routes of exposure. PMID:26674699

  19. Hydrology and Simulation of Ground-Water Flow, Lake Point, Tooele County, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brooks, Lynette E.

    2006-01-01

    Water for new residential development in Lake Point, Utah may be supplied by public-supply wells completed in consolidated rock on the east side of Lake Point. Ground-water flow models were developed to help understand the effect the proposed withdrawal will have on water levels, flowing-well discharge, spring discharge, and ground-water quality in the study area. This report documents the conceptual and numerical ground-water flow models for the Lake Point area. The ground-water system in the Lake Point area receives recharge from local precipitation and irrigation, and from ground-water inflow from southwest of the area. Ground water discharges mostly to springs. Discharge also occurs to evapotranspiration, wells, and Great Salt Lake. Even though ground water discharges to Great Salt Lake, dense salt water from the lake intrudes under the less-dense ground water and forms a salt-water wedge under the valley. This salt water is responsible for some of the high dissolved-solids concentrations measured in ground water in Lake Point. A steady-state MODFLOW-2000 ground-water model of Tooele Valley adequately simulates water levels, ground-water discharge, and ground-water flow direction observed in Lake Point in 1969 and 2002. Simulating an additional 1,650 acre-feet per year withdrawal from wells causes a maximum projected drawdown of about 550 feet in consolidated rock near the simulated wells and drawdown exceeding 80 feet in an area encompassing most of the Oquirrh Mountains east of Lake Point. Drawdown in most of Lake Point ranges from 2 to 10 ft, but increases to more than 40 feet in the areas proposed for residential development. Discharge to Factory Springs, flowing wells, evapotranspiration, and Great Salt Lake is decreased by about 1,100 acre-feet per year (23 percent). The U.S. Geological Survey SUTRA variable-density ground-water-flow model generates a reasonable approximation of 2002 dissolved-solids concentration when simulating 2002 withdrawals. At most locations with measured dissolved-solids concentration in excess of 1,000 milligrams per liter, the model simulates salt-water intrusion with similar concentrations. Simulating an additional 1,650 acre-feet per year withdrawal increased simulated dissolved-solids concentration by 200 to 1,000 milligrams per liter throughout much of Lake Point and near Fac-tory Springs at a depth of about 250 to 300 feet below land surface. The increase in dissolved-solids concentration with increased withdrawals is greater at a depth of about 700 to 800 feet and exceeds 1,000 milligrams per liter throughout most of Lake Point. At the north end of Lake Point, increases exceed 10,000 milligrams per liter.

  20. Savanna Tree Seedlings are Physiologically Tolerant to Nighttime Freeze Events.

    PubMed

    O'Keefe, Kimberly; Nippert, Jesse B; Swemmer, Anthony M

    2016-01-01

    Freeze events can be important disturbances in savanna ecosystems, yet the interactive effect of freezing with other environmental drivers on plant functioning is unknown. Here, we investigated physiological responses of South African tree seedlings to interactions of water availability and freezing temperatures. We grew widely distributed South African tree species (Colophospermum mopane, Combretum apiculatum, Acacia nigrescens, and Cassia abbreviata) under well-watered and water-limited conditions and exposed individuals to nighttime freeze events. Of the four species studied here, C. mopane was the most tolerant of lower water availability. However, all species were similarly tolerant to nighttime freezing and recovered within one week following the last freezing event. We also show that water limitation somewhat increased freezing tolerance in one of the species (C. mopane). Therefore, water limitation, but not freezing temperatures, may restrict the distribution of these species, although the interactions of these stressors may have species-specific impacts on plant physiology. Ultimately, we show that unique physiologies can exist among dominant species within communities and that combined stresses may play a currently unidentified role in driving the function of certain species within southern Africa. PMID:26870065

  1. Savanna Tree Seedlings are Physiologically Tolerant to Nighttime Freeze Events

    PubMed Central

    O’Keefe, Kimberly; Nippert, Jesse B.; Swemmer, Anthony M.

    2016-01-01

    Freeze events can be important disturbances in savanna ecosystems, yet the interactive effect of freezing with other environmental drivers on plant functioning is unknown. Here, we investigated physiological responses of South African tree seedlings to interactions of water availability and freezing temperatures. We grew widely distributed South African tree species (Colophospermum mopane, Combretum apiculatum, Acacia nigrescens, and Cassia abbreviata) under well-watered and water-limited conditions and exposed individuals to nighttime freeze events. Of the four species studied here, C. mopane was the most tolerant of lower water availability. However, all species were similarly tolerant to nighttime freezing and recovered within one week following the last freezing event. We also show that water limitation somewhat increased freezing tolerance in one of the species (C. mopane). Therefore, water limitation, but not freezing temperatures, may restrict the distribution of these species, although the interactions of these stressors may have species-specific impacts on plant physiology. Ultimately, we show that unique physiologies can exist among dominant species within communities and that combined stresses may play a currently unidentified role in driving the function of certain species within southern Africa. PMID:26870065

  2. Effect of chlorine, blanching, freezing, and microwave heating on Cryptosporidium parvum viability inoculated on green peppers.

    PubMed

    Duhain, G L M C; Minnaar, A; Buys, E M

    2012-05-01

    Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts have been found on the surface of vegetables in both developed and developing countries. C. parvum can contaminate vegetables via various routes, including irrigation water. This study investigated the effect of individual treatments of chlorine, blanching, blast freezing, and microwave heating, as well as combined treatments of chlorine and freezing, and chlorine and microwave heating on the viability of C. parvum oocysts inoculated on green peppers. The viability of the oocysts after the treatments was assessed using propidium iodide and a flow cytometer. Based on the propidium iodide staining, the chlorine treatments did not affect the viability of the oocysts. Blast freezing significantly inactivated 20% of the oocysts. Microwave heating and blanching significantly inactivated 93% of oocysts. Treatment with chlorine followed by blast freezing did not affect the viability of the oocysts significantly. Treatment with chlorine and microwave heating was significantly more effective than microwave heating alone and inactivated 98% of the oocysts. The study indicates that C. parvum oocysts are sensitive to heat and, to some extent, to blast freezing, but are resistant to chlorine. Therefore, the use of chlorine during vegetable processing is not a critical control point for C. parvum oocysts, and the consumption of raw or minimally processed vegetables may constitute a health risk as C. parvum oocysts can still be found viable on ready-to-eat, minimally processed vegetables. PMID:22564944

  3. Two-dimensional freezing criteria for crystallizing colloidal monolayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ziren; Alsayed, Ahmed M.; Yodh, Arjun G.; Han, Yilong

    2010-04-01

    Video microscopy was employed to explore crystallization of colloidal monolayers composed of diameter-tunable microgel spheres. Two-dimensional (2D) colloidal liquids were frozen homogenously into polycrystalline solids, and four 2D criteria for freezing were experimentally tested in thermal systems for the first time: the Hansen-Verlet freezing rule, the Löwen-Palberg-Simon dynamical freezing criterion, and two other rules based, respectively, on the split shoulder of the radial distribution function and on the distribution of the shape factor of Voronoi polygons. Importantly, these freezing criteria, usually applied in the context of single crystals, were demonstrated to apply to the formation of polycrystalline solids. At the freezing point, we also observed a peak in the fluctuations of the orientational order parameter and a percolation transition associated with caged particles. Speculation about these percolated clusters of caged particles casts light on solidification mechanisms and dynamic heterogeneity in freezing.

  4. Two-dimensional freezing criteria for crystallizing colloidal monolayers

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Ziren; Han Yilong; Alsayed, Ahmed M.

    2010-04-21

    Video microscopy was employed to explore crystallization of colloidal monolayers composed of diameter-tunable microgel spheres. Two-dimensional (2D) colloidal liquids were frozen homogenously into polycrystalline solids, and four 2D criteria for freezing were experimentally tested in thermal systems for the first time: the Hansen-Verlet freezing rule, the Loewen-Palberg-Simon dynamical freezing criterion, and two other rules based, respectively, on the split shoulder of the radial distribution function and on the distribution of the shape factor of Voronoi polygons. Importantly, these freezing criteria, usually applied in the context of single crystals, were demonstrated to apply to the formation of polycrystalline solids. At the freezing point, we also observed a peak in the fluctuations of the orientational order parameter and a percolation transition associated with caged particles. Speculation about these percolated clusters of caged particles casts light on solidification mechanisms and dynamic heterogeneity in freezing.

  5. High-presssure shift freezing. Part 2. Modeling of freezing times for a finite cylindrical model.

    PubMed

    Sanz, P D; Otero, L

    2000-01-01

    A comprehensive vision of the heat transfer process involved in high-pressure shift freezing (HPSF) is shown in comparison to the process at atmospheric pressure. In addition, a mathematical model to predict the freezing times is presented. This model takes into consideration the dependence of the thermophysical properties relating to temperature and pressure and the supercooling reached by liquid water at atmospheric pressure after adiabatic expansion in the HPSF process. Experimental and theoretical data appear to agree. PMID:11101332

  6. A novel point-of-use water treatment method by antimicrobial nanosilver textile material.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hongjun; Tang, Xiaosheng; Liu, Qishan

    2014-12-01

    Pathogenic bacteria are one of the main reasons for worldwide water-borne disease causing a big threat to public health, hence there is an urgent need to develop cost-effective water treatment technologies. Nano-materials in point-of-use systems have recently attracted considerable research and commercial interests as they can overcome the drawbacks of traditional water treatment techniques. We have developed a new point-of-use water disinfection kit with nanosilver textile material. The silver nanoparticles were in-situ generated and immobilized onto cotton textile, followed by fixing to a plastic tube to make a water disinfection kit. By soaking and stirring the kit in water, pathogenic bacteria have been killed within minutes. The silver leaching from the kit was insignificant, with values <100 ppb - the current US EPA and WHO limit for silver level in drinking water. Herein, the nanosilver textile water disinfection kit could be a new, efficient and cost-effective point-of-use water treatment method for rural areas and emergency preparedness. PMID:25473975

  7. Transmembrane ion distribution during recovery from freezing in the woolly bear caterpillar Pyrrharctia isabella (Lepidoptera: Arctiidae).

    PubMed

    Boardman, Leigh; Terblanche, John S; Sinclair, Brent J

    2011-08-01

    During extracellular freezing, solutes in the haemolymph are concentrated, resulting in osmotic dehydration of the cells, which must be reversed upon thawing. Here, we used freeze tolerant Pyrrharctia isabella (Lepidoptera: Arctiidae) larvae to examine the processes of ion redistribution after thawing. To investigate the effect of the intensity of cold exposure on ion redistribution after thawing, we exposed caterpillars to -14°C, -20°C or -30°C for 35h. To investigate the effect of duration of cold exposure on ion redistribution after thawing, we exposed the caterpillars to -14°C for up to 6 weeks while sampling several time points. The concentrations of Na(+), K(+), Mg(2+) and Ca(2+) were measured after thawing in the haemolymph, fat body, muscle, midgut tissue and hindgut tissue. Being frozen for long durations (>3 weeks) or at low temperatures (-30°C) both result in 100% mortality, although different ions and tissues appear to be affected by each treatment. Both water distribution and ion content changes were detected after thawing, with the largest effects seen in the fat body and midgut tissue. Magnesium homeostasis appears to be vital for post-freeze survival in these larvae. The movement of ions during thawing lagged behind the movement of water, and ion homeostasis was not restored within the same time frame as water homeostasis. Failure to regain ion homeostasis after thawing is therefore implicated in mortality of freeze tolerant insects. PMID:21575641

  8. Ultrasound-Assisted Freezing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delgado, A. E.; Sun, Da-Wen

    Freezing is a well-known preservation method widely used in the food industry. The advantages of freezing are to a certain degree counterbalanced by the risk of damage caused by the formation and size of ice crystals. Over recent years new approaches have been developed to improve and control the crystallization process, and among these approaches sonocrystallization has proved to be very useful, since it can enhance both the nucleation rate and the crystal growth rate. Although ultrasound has been successfully used for many years in the evaluation of various aspects of foods and in medical applications, the use of power ultrasound to directly improve processes and products is less popular in food manufacturing. Foodstuffs are very complex materials, and research is needed in order to define the specific sound parameters that aid the freezing process and that can later be used for the scale-up and production of commercial frozen food products.

  9. Whole-house arsenic water treatment provided more effective arsenic exposure reduction than point-of-use water treatment at New Jersey homes with arsenic in well water

    PubMed Central

    Spayd, Steven E.; Robson, Mark G.; Buckley, Brian T.

    2014-01-01

    A comparison of the effectiveness of whole house (point-of-entry) and point-of-use arsenic water treatment systems in reducing arsenic exposure from well water was conducted. The non-randomized observational study recruited 49 subjects having elevated arsenic in their residential home well water in New Jersey. The subjects obtained either point-of-entry or point-of-use arsenic water treatment. Prior ingestion exposure to arsenic in well water was calculated by measuring arsenic concentrations in the well water and obtaining water-use histories for each subject, including years of residence with the current well and amount of water consumed from the well per day. A series of urine samples were collected from the subjects, some starting before water treatment was installed and continuing for at least nine months after treatment had begun. Urine samples were analyzed and speciated for inorganic-related arsenic concentrations. A two-phase clearance of inorganic-related arsenic from urine and the likelihood of a significant body burden from chronic exposure to arsenic in drinking water were identified. After nine months of water treatment the adjusted mean of the urinary inorganic-related arsenic concentrations were significantly lower (p < 0.0005) in the point-of-entry treatment group (2.5 ?g/g creatinine) than in the point-of-use treatment group (7.2 ?g/g creatinine). The results suggest that whole house arsenic water treatment systems provide a more effective reduction of arsenic exposure from well water than that obtained by point-of-use treatment. PMID:24975493

  10. Freeze-drying of lactic acid bacteria.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, Fernanda; Cenard, Stéphanie; Passot, Stéphanie

    2015-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria are of great importance for the food and biotechnology industry. They are widely used as starters for manufacturing food (e.g., yogurt, cheese, fermented meats, and vegetables) and probiotic products, as well as for green chemistry applications. Freeze-drying or lyophilization is a convenient method for preservation of bacteria. By reducing water activity to values below 0.2, it allows long-term storage and low-cost distribution at suprazero temperatures, while minimizing losses in viability and functionality. Stabilization of bacteria via freeze-drying starts with the addition of a protectant solution to the bacterial suspension. Freeze-drying includes three steps, namely, (1) freezing of the concentrated and protected cell suspension, (2) primary drying to remove ice by sublimation, and (3) secondary drying to remove unfrozen water by desorption. In this chapter we describe a method for freeze-drying of lactic acid bacteria at a pilot scale, thus allowing control of the process parameters for maximal survival and functionality recovery. PMID:25428024

  11. Pharmaceutical spray freeze drying.

    PubMed

    Wanning, Stefan; Süverkrüp, Richard; Lamprecht, Alf

    2015-07-01

    Pharmaceutical spray-freeze drying (SFD) includes a heterogeneous set of technologies with primary applications in apparent solubility enhancement, pulmonary drug delivery, intradermal ballistic administration and delivery of vaccines to the nasal mucosa. The methods comprise of three steps: droplet generation, freezing and sublimation drying, which can be matched to the requirements given by the dosage form and route of administration. The objectives, various methods and physicochemical and pharmacological outcomes have been reviewed with a scope including related fields of science and technology. PMID:25900097

  12. Freezing of Lennard-Jones-type fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Khrapak, Sergey A.; Chaudhuri, Manis; Morfill, Gregor E.

    2011-02-07

    We put forward an approximate method to locate the fluid-solid (freezing) phase transition in systems of classical particles interacting via a wide range of Lennard-Jones-type potentials. This method is based on the constancy of the properly normalized second derivative of the interaction potential (freezing indicator) along the freezing curve. As demonstrated recently it yields remarkably good agreement with previous numerical simulation studies of the conventional 12-6 Lennard-Jones (LJ) fluid [S.A.Khrapak, M.Chaudhuri, G.E.Morfill, Phys. Rev. B 134, 052101 (2010)]. In this paper, we test this approach using a wide range of the LJ-type potentials, including LJ n-6 and exp-6 models, and find that it remains sufficiently accurate and reliable in reproducing the corresponding freezing curves, down to the triple-point temperatures. One of the possible application of the method--estimation of the freezing conditions in complex (dusty) plasmas with ''tunable'' interactions--is briefly discussed.

  13. Freezing and thawing processes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Seasonally frozen soil strongly influences runoff and erosion on large areas of land around the world. In many areas, rain or snowmelt on seasonally frozen soil is the single leading cause of severe runoff and erosion events. As soils freeze, ice blocks the soil pores, greatly diminishing the permea...

  14. Modeling soil freezing dynamics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Seasonally frozen soil strongly influences runoff and erosion on large areas of land around the world. In many areas, rain or snowmelt on seasonally frozen soil is the single leading cause of severe runoff and erosion events. As soils freeze, ice blocks the soil pores, greatly diminishing the permea...

  15. Freeze resistance in rainbow smelt (Osmerus mordax): seasonal pattern of glycerol and antifreeze protein levels and liver enzyme activity associated with glycerol production.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Johanne M; Ewart, K Vanya; Driedzic, William R

    2004-01-01

    Rainbow smelt (Osmerus mordax) inhabit inshore waters along the North American Atlantic coast. During the winter, these waters are frequently ice covered and can reach temperatures as low as -1.9 degrees C. To prevent freezing, smelt accumulate high levels of glycerol, which lower the freezing point via colligative means, and antifreeze proteins (AFP). The up-regulation of the antifreeze response (both glycerol and AFP) occurs in early fall, when water temperatures are 5 degrees -6 degrees C. The accumulation of glycerol appears to be the main mechanism of freeze resistance in smelt because it contributes more to the lowering of the body's freezing point than the activity of the AFP (0.5 degrees C vs. 0.25 degrees C for glycerol and AFP, respectively) at a water temperature of -1.5 degrees C. Moreover, AFP in smelt appears to be a safeguard mechanism to prevent freezing when glycerol levels are low. Significant increases in activities of the liver enzymes glycerol 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GPDH), alanine aminotransferase (AlaAT), and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) during the initiation of glycerol production and significant correlations between enzyme activities and plasma glycerol levels suggest that these enzymes are closely associated with the synthesis and maintenance of elevated glycerol levels for use as an antifreeze. These findings add further support to the concept that carbon for glycerol is derived from amino acids. PMID:15286915

  16. KEY COMPARISON: Final Report on CCT-K7: Key comparison of water triple point cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stock, M.; Solve, S.; del Campo, D.; Chimenti, V.; Méndez-Lango, E.; Liedberg, H.; Steur, P. P. M.; Marcarino, P.; Dematteis, R.; Filipe, E.; Lobo, I.; Kang, K. H.; Gam, K. S.; Kim, Y.-G.; Renaot, E.; Bonnier, G.; Valin, M.; White, R.; Dransfield, T. D.; Duan, Y.; Xiaoke, Y.; Strouse, G.; Ballico, M.; Sukkar, D.; Arai, M.; Mans, A.; de Groot, M.; Kerkhof, O.; Rusby, R.; Gray, J.; Head, D.; Hill, K.; Tegeler, E.; Noatsch, U.; Duris, S.; Kho, H. Y.; Ugur, S.; Pokhodun, A.; Gerasimov, S. F.

    2006-01-01

    The triple point of water serves to define the kelvin, the unit of thermodynamic temperature, in the International System of Units (SI). Furthermore, it is the most important fixed point of the International Temperature Scale of 1990 (ITS-90). Any uncertainty in the realization of the triple point of water contributes directly to the measurement uncertainty over the wide temperature range from 13.8033 K to 1234.93 K. The Consultative Committee for Thermometry (CCT) decided at its 21st meeting in 2001 to carry out a comparison of water triple point cells and charged the BIPM with its organization. Water triple point cells from 20 national metrology institutes were carried to the BIPM and were compared with highest accuracy with two reference cells. The small day-to-day changes of the reference cells were determined by a least-squares technique. Prior to the measurements at the BIPM, the transfer cells were compared with the corresponding national references and therefore also allow comparison of the national references of the water triple point. This report presents the results of this comparison and gives detailed information about the measurements made at the BIPM and in the participating laboratories. It was found that the transfer cells show a standard deviation of 50 µK the difference between the extremes is 160 µK. The same spread is observed between the national references. The most important result of this work is that a correlation between the isotopic composition of the cell water and the triple point temperature was observed. To reduce the spread between different realizations, it is therefore proposed that the definition of the kelvin should refer to water of a specified isotopic composition. The CCT recommended to the International Committee of Weights and Measures (CIPM) to clarify the definition of the kelvin in the SI brochure by explicitly referring to water with the isotopic composition of Vienna Standard Mean Ocean Water (VSMOW). The CIPM accepted this recommendation and the next edition of the SI brochure will include this specification. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCT, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (MRA).

  17. Quality of Drinking Water Treated at Point of Use in Residential Healthcare Facilities for the Elderly

    PubMed Central

    Sacchetti, Rossella; De Luca, Giovanna; Guberti, Emilia; Zanetti, Franca

    2015-01-01

    Municipal tap water is increasingly treated at the point of use (POU) to improve the acceptability and palatability of its taste. The aim of this study was to assess the bacteriologic and nutritional characteristics of tap water treated at the point of use in residential healthcare facilities for the elderly. Two types of POU devices were used: microfiltered water dispensers (MWDs) and reverse-osmosis water dispensers (ROWDs). All samples of water entering the devices and leaving them were tested for the bacteriological parameters set by Italian regulations for drinking water and for opportunistic pathogens associated with various infections in healthcare settings; in addition, the degree of mineralization of the water was assessed. The results revealed widespread bacterial contamination in the POU treatment devices, particularly from potentially pathogenic species. As expected, the use of ROWDs led to a decrease in the saline content of the water. In conclusion, the use of POU treatment in healthcare facilities for the elderly can be considered advisable only if the devices are constantly and carefully maintained. PMID:26371025

  18. Quality of Drinking Water Treated at Point of Use in Residential Healthcare Facilities for the Elderly.

    PubMed

    Sacchetti, Rossella; De Luca, Giovanna; Guberti, Emilia; Zanetti, Franca

    2015-09-01

    Municipal tap water is increasingly treated at the point of use (POU) to improve the acceptability and palatability of its taste. The aim of this study was to assess the bacteriologic and nutritional characteristics of tap water treated at the point of use in residential healthcare facilities for the elderly. Two types of POU devices were used: microfiltered water dispensers (MWDs) and reverse-osmosis water dispensers (ROWDs). All samples of water entering the devices and leaving them were tested for the bacteriological parameters set by Italian regulations for drinking water and for opportunistic pathogens associated with various infections in healthcare settings; in addition, the degree of mineralization of the water was assessed. The results revealed widespread bacterial contamination in the POU treatment devices, particularly from potentially pathogenic species. As expected, the use of ROWDs led to a decrease in the saline content of the water. In conclusion, the use of POU treatment in healthcare facilities for the elderly can be considered advisable only if the devices are constantly and carefully maintained. PMID:26371025

  19. Polymorphism of Ganglioside-Water Systems: a New Class of Micellar Cubic Phases. Freeze-Fracture Electron Microscopy and X-Ray Scattering Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulik, Annette; Delacroix, Hervé; Kirschner, Günther; Luzzati, Vittorio

    1995-03-01

    The (T, c)-dependent phase diagrams of two gangliosides, GM1 and GM1(acetyl), have been explored, in spite of the frequent occurrence of metastable states. In GM1 two lamellar, one hexagonal and two cubic (aspects sharp 5 and 13) phases were identified, in addition to the isotropic micellar solution. In GM1(acetyl) two of the phases are cubic (aspects sharp 8 and 13), one is the fluid isotropic solution. The structure of the lamellar and the hexagonal phases are trivial. The structure of the cubic phases was determined using a combination of freeze-fracture electron microscope and X-ray scattering experiments. The three cubic phases consist of lipid micelles of type I (oil-in-water); in two of the phases (Q^{225} and Q^{229}) the micelles are all identical and of quasi-spherical shape. Phase Q^{223} was previously known to contain two types of micelles, one quasi-spherical, the other slightly flattened. The radii of the micelles determined from the dimensions of the electron density troughs were consistent with the chemical data. In keeping with what is known of the micellar solutions, the size of the micelles of the cubic phases of GM1(acetyl) is compatible with a spherical shape, whereas the micelles of GM1 seem to be somewhat too large to be compatible with the length of the molecules and with a spherical shape. Such a wealth of micellar cubic phases is unusual in lipid-water systems. Le diagramme de phases de deux gangliosides, GM1 et GM1(acétyl), a été exploré malgré la présence d'états métastables. On a identifié les phases suivantes : dans GM1 deux phases lamellaires, une hexagonale, deux cubiques (aspects sharp 5 et 13), une solution micellaire ; dans GM1(acetyl) deux phases cubiques (aspects sharp 8 et 13) et une solution micellaire. La structure des phases lamellaires et hexagonale est triviale. La structure des phases cubiques a été déterminée par l'usage combiné de microscopie électronique et de diffraction des rayons X. Les trois phases cubiques sont formées de micelles de type I (huile dans l'eau) ; dans deux de ces phases (Q^{225} et Q^{229}) les micelles sont toutes identiques et de forme presque sphérique. La phase Q^{223} est connue ; elle est formée par deux types de micelles, les unes presque sphériques, les autres légèrement aplaties. Les rayons des micelles déterminés sur les cartes de densité électronique sont en excellent accord avec les données chimiques. Dans les deux phases cubiques la taille des micelles de GM1(acétyl) est compatible avec une forme sphérique, tandis que les micelles de GM1 semblent être un peu trop grandes par rapport à la longueur des molécules : ces observations sont en excellent accord avec ce que l'on sait sur les solutions micellaires de ces deux lipides. Cette richesse de phases cubiques micellaires est inhabituelle dans les systèmes lipide-eau.

  20. Hysteresis of Soil Point Water Retention Functions Determined by Neutron Radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perfect, E.; Kang, M.; Bilheux, H.; Willis, K. J.; Horita, J.; Warren, J.; Cheng, C.

    2010-12-01

    Soil point water retention functions are needed for modeling flow and transport in partially-saturated porous media. Such functions are usually determined by inverse modeling of average water retention data measured experimentally on columns of finite length. However, the resulting functions are subject to the appropriateness of the chosen model, as well as the initial and boundary condition assumptions employed. Soil point water retention functions are rarely measured directly and when they are the focus is invariably on the main drying branch. Previous direct measurement methods include time domain reflectometry and gamma beam attenuation. Here we report direct measurements of the main wetting and drying branches of the point water retention function using neutron radiography. The measurements were performed on a coarse sand (Flint #13) packed into 2.6 cm diameter x 4 cm long aluminum cylinders at the NIST BT-2 (50 μm resolution) and ORNL-HFIR CG1D (70 μm resolution) imaging beamlines. The sand columns were saturated with water and then drained and rewetted under quasi-equilibrium conditions using a hanging water column setup. 2048 x 2048 pixel images of the transmitted flux of neutrons through the column were acquired at each imposed suction (~10-15 suction values per experiment). Volumetric water contents were calculated on a pixel by pixel basis using Beer-Lambert’s law in conjunction with beam hardening and geometric corrections. The pixel rows were averaged and combined with information on the known distribution of suctions within the column to give 2048 point drying and wetting functions for each experiment. The point functions exhibited pronounced hysteresis and varied with column height, possibly due to differences in porosity caused by the packing procedure employed. Predicted point functions, extracted from the hanging water column volumetric data using the TrueCell inverse modeling procedure, showed very good agreement with the range of point functions measured within the column using neutron radiography. Extension of these experiments to 3-dimensions using neutron tomography is planned.

  1. A point focusing collector for an integrated water/power complex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zewen, H.; Schmidt, G.; Moustafa, S.

    1982-01-01

    The utilization potential of the point focusing parabolic dish is identified. Its main design parameters are summarized. Performance tests and the utilization of the collector as primary energy source in a food-water-power complex are described. Process heat, heat storage, heat transfer, and cogeneration are discussed.

  2. POINT-OF-USE TREATMENT OF DRINKING WATER IN SAN YSIDRO, NM

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study was conducted to determine whether point-of-use (POU) reverse osmosis (RO) units could satisfactorily function in lieu of central treatment to remove arsenic and fluoride from the drinking water supply of San Ysidro, NM. POU treatment was evaluated for removal efficien...

  3. Plant responses, climate pivot points, and trade-offs in water-limited ecosystems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Munson, Seth M.

    2013-01-01

    Plant species in dryland ecosystems are limited by water availability and may be vulnerable to increases in aridity. Methods are needed to monitor and assess the rate of change in plant abundance and composition in relation to climate, understand the potential for degradation in dryland ecosystems, and forecast future changes in plant species assemblages. I employ nearly a century of vegetation monitoring data from three North American deserts to demonstrate an approach to determine plant species responses to climate and critical points over a range of climatic conditions at which plant species shift from increases to decreases in abundance (climate pivot points). I assess these metrics from a site to regional scale and highlight how these indicators of plant performance can be modified by the physical and biotic environment. For example, shrubs were more responsive to drought and high temperatures on shallow soils with limited capacity to store water and fine-textured soils with slow percolation rates, whereas perennial grasses were more responsive to precipitation in sparse shrublands than in relatively dense grasslands and shrublands, where competition for water is likely more intense. The responses and associated climate pivot points of plant species aligned with their lifespan and structural characteristics, and the relationship between responses and climate pivot points provides evidence of the trade-off between the capacity of a plant species to increase in abundance when water is available and its drought resistance.

  4. Effect of long-term freezing and freeze-thaw cycles on indigenous and inoculated microorganisms in dewatered blackwater.

    PubMed

    Gunnarsdóttir, Ragnhildur; Müller, Karoline; Jensen, Pernille Erland; Jenssen, Petter Deinboll; Villumsen, Arne

    2012-11-20

    Wastewater treatment in many Arctic regions is inadequate, even nonexisting. Natural freezing of wastewater in those areas may be beneficial for reduction of microorganisms. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of long-term freezing, and repeated freezing and thawing, on indigenous coliforms, fecal streptococci, and antibiotic-resistant (AR) bacteria, and inoculated Salmonella Enteriditis and E. coli bacteriophage ΦX174 in dewatered blackwater. At the end of the long-term freezing experiment (10 months), an MPN recovery study was done, including the microbial groups that had shown the largest reduction, using tryptone soy broth at incubation temperatures of 10 and 20 °C overnight for the coliforms and AR bacteria, and buffered peptone water at incubation temperature of 37 °C for 18-20 h for Salmonella. Fecal streptococci were more resistant to long-term freezing than the coliform group. Total number of AR bacteria decreased slowly but constantly over the 10-month freezing period. Salmonella rapidly decreased and were nondetectable within a week but exhibited some recovery after 10 months of freezing, whereas limited or no recovery of coliforms and AR-bacteria was detected. Bacteriophages showed limited reduction during the long-term freezing. Repeated freezing and thawing increased the reduction of all tested microbial groups markedly. PMID:23113759

  5. Freezing survival, body ice content and blood composition of the freeze-tolerant European common lizard, Lacerta vivipara.

    PubMed

    Voituron, Y; Storey, J M; Grenot, C; Storey, K B

    2002-01-01

    To investigate the freeze tolerance of the European common lizard, Lacerta vivipara, we froze 17 individuals to body temperatures as low as -4 degrees C under controlled laboratory conditions. The data show that this species tolerates the freezing of 50% of total body water and can survive freezing exposures of at least 24-h duration. Currently, this represents the best known development of freeze tolerance among squamate reptiles. Freezing stimulated a significant increase in blood glucose levels (16.15+/- 1.73 micromol x ml(-1) for controls versus 25.06 +/- 2.92 micromol x ml(-1) after thawing) but this increase had no significant effect on serum osmolality which was unchanged between control and freeze-exposed lizards (506.0 +/- 23.8 mosmol x l(-1) versus 501.0 +/- 25.3 mosmol x l(-1), respectively). Tests that assessed the possible presence of antifreeze proteins in lizard blood were negative. Recovery at 5 degrees C after freezing was assessed by measurements of the mean time for the return of breathing (5.9 +/- 0.5 h) and of the righting reflex (44.8 +/- 4.5 h). Because this species hibernates in wet substrates inoculative freezing may frequently occur in nature and the substantial freeze tolerance of this lizard should play a key role in its winter survival. PMID:11824405

  6. Langevin Poisson-Boltzmann equation: point-like ions and water dipoles near a charged surface.

    PubMed

    Gongadze, Ekaterina; van Rienen, Ursula; Kralj-Iglič, Veronika; Iglič, Aleš

    2011-06-01

    Water ordering near a charged membrane surface is important for many biological processes such as binding of ligands to a membrane or transport of ions across it. In this work, the mean-field Poisson-Boltzmann theory for point-like ions, describing an electrolyte solution in contact with a planar charged surface, is modified by including the orientational ordering of water. Water molecules are considered as Langevin dipoles, while the number density of water is assumed to be constant everywhere in the electrolyte solution. It is shown that the dielectric permittivity of an electrolyte close to a charged surface is decreased due to the increased orientational ordering of water dipoles. The dielectric permittivity close to the charged surface is additionally decreased due to the finite size of ions and dipoles. PMID:21613667

  7. Aquaporin-mediated improvement of freeze tolerance of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is restricted to rapid freezing conditions.

    PubMed

    Tanghe, An; Van Dijck, Patrick; Colavizza, Didier; Thevelein, Johan M

    2004-06-01

    Previous observations that aquaporin overexpression increases the freeze tolerance of baker's yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) without negatively affecting the growth or fermentation characteristics held promise for the development of commercial baker's yeast strains used in frozen dough applications. In this study we found that overexpression of the aquaporin-encoding genes AQY1-1 and AQY2-1 improves the freeze tolerance of industrial strain AT25, but only in small doughs under laboratory conditions and not in large doughs under industrial conditions. We found that the difference in the freezing rate is apparently responsible for the difference in the results. We tested six different cooling rates and found that at high cooling rates aquaporin overexpression significantly improved the survival of yeast cells, while at low cooling rates there was no significant effect. Differences in the cultivation conditions and in the thawing rate did not influence the freeze tolerance under the conditions tested. Survival after freezing is determined mainly by two factors, cellular dehydration and intracellular ice crystal formation, which depend in an inverse manner on the cooling velocity. In accordance with this so-called two-factor hypothesis of freezing injury, we suggest that water permeability is limiting, and therefore that aquaporin function is advantageous, only under rapid freezing conditions. If this hypothesis is correct, then aquaporin overexpression is not expected to affect the leavening capacity of yeast cells in large, industrial frozen doughs, which do not freeze rapidly. Our results imply that aquaporin-overexpressing strains have less potential for use in frozen doughs than originally thought. PMID:15184134

  8. Evaluation of Point of Use Water Treatment Devices for Removal of Mine Wastes from Well Water

    EPA Science Inventory

    U.S. EPA Region VII and the Office of Research and Development (ORD) are conducting a large-scale study to identify the prevalence of lead (Pb) and other contaminants in drinking water at four mine waste areas in Washington County, Missouri. Numerous households in Potosi, Richwoo...

  9. Deliquesence and freezing of stratospheric aerosol observed by balloonborne backscattersondes

    SciTech Connect

    Larsen, N.; Knudsen, B.; Rosen, J.M.

    1995-05-15

    Stratospheric sulfate aerosols, originating from the Mt. Pinatubo volcanic eruption, have been observed during three winters in the Arctic by balloonborne backscattersondes. A measured color index, defined as the quotient between the aerosol backscatter ratios at wavelengths 940 and 480 nm, provides information of the size of the observed particles. The effects of liquid particle growth, by water vapor uptake, clearly show up as changes in the color index, whereas measurements on other days indicate the particles to be frozen. Air parcel trajectories have been calculated, providing the temperature history of the observed particles. Evidences appear of a temperature hysteresis in the freezing and melting cycle of the aerosol, indicating melting temperatures around 215-220 K in good agreement with laboratory measurements, and freezing of the particles within less than 5 K above the ice frost point. The changes in color index of the liquid particles are in good agreement with predictions from theoretical model calculations of growth by water vapor uptake. 13 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Bacterial treatment effectiveness of point-of-use ceramic water filters.

    PubMed

    Bielefeldt, Angela R; Kowalski, Kate; Summers, R Scott

    2009-08-01

    Laboratory experiments were conducted on six point-of-use (POU) ceramic water filters that were manufactured in Nicaragua; two filters were used by families for ca. 4 years and the other filters had limited prior use in our lab. Water spiked with ca. 10(6)CFU/mL of Escherichia coli was dosed to the filters. Initial disinfection efficiencies ranged from 3 - 4.5 log, but the treatment efficiency decreased with subsequent batches of spiked water. Silver concentrations in the effluent water ranged from 0.04 - 1.75 ppb. Subsequent experiments that utilized feed water without a bacterial spike yielded 10(3)-10(5)CFU/mL bacteria in the effluent. Immediately after recoating four of the filters with a colloidal silver solution, the effluent silver concentrations increased to 36 - 45 ppb and bacterial disinfection efficiencies were 3.8-4.5 log. The treatment effectiveness decreased to 0.2 - 2.5 log after loading multiple batches of highly contaminated water. In subsequent loading of clean water, the effluent water contained <20-41 CFU/mL in two of the filters. This indicates that the silver had some benefit to reducing bacterial contamination by the filter. In general these POU filters were found to be effective, but showed loss of effectiveness with time and indicated a release of microbes into subsequent volumes of water passed through the system. PMID:19500815

  11. Atmospheric science: Sea-spray particles cause freezing in clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, Lynn M.

    2015-09-01

    Ice clouds in marine regions at high latitudes might form in warmer and drier air than was previously believed because of freezing induced by airborne particles that contain organic materials from ocean surface waters. See Letter p.234

  12. Inactivation of Kudoa septempunctata in olive flounder meat by liquid freezing.

    PubMed

    Ohnishi, Takahiro; Akuzawa, Sayuri; Furusawa, Hiroko; Yoshinari, Tomoya; Kamata, Yoichi; Sugita-Konishi, Yoshiko

    2014-01-01

    Kudoa septempunctata in olive flounder meat was inactivated using 3 distinct freezing methods:liquid freezing for 5 min, air blast freezing at -30℃ for 5 h, and -80℃ for 1 h. The fracture curve of olive flounder meat subjected to liquid freezing resembled that of meat stored at 4℃, indicating that the structure of olive flounder muscle was well preserved. In contrast, air blast freezing induced the disappearance of the fracture point in the fracture curve, indicating that there was deterioration in the meat quality. Liquid freezing preserved the transparency of olive flounder meat to the same degree as that of meat stored at 4°C. However, air blast freezing induced meat cloudiness. These results indicate that liquid freezing can be used for K. septempunctata inactivation without affecting the meat quality. PMID:25252645

  13. Water at the ice point: a useful quasi-blackbody infrared calibration source.

    PubMed

    Horwitz, J W

    1999-07-01

    Water at the ice point makes a good calibration source in the 4- to 13-microm spectral region because of its high emissivity, small skin depth, and the ease with which an ice-point bath may be prepared and used. In a simple ice bath the emissivity is slightly less than unity, and we have calculated corrections that allow one to predict the apparent radiation temperature of the equivalent blackbody. We propose an alternate configuration that uses an auxiliary mirror. This configuration should provide an emissivity extremely close to unity. PMID:18323882

  14. Mechanisms of Freezing lnjuly in Cellular Leve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujikawa, Seizo

    The mechanisms of freezing injury in living cells were reviewed. The freezing injury takes place by at least two different factors depending upon cooling rate, those are intracellular freezing and extracellular freezing. The freezing injury caused by extracellular freezing also takes place by two different factors, those are direct and indirect effects by the formation of extracellular ice. These different stresses by freezing cause different damages on the plasma membranes in the same cell. Furthermore, freezing of different cell results in different form of membrane damage. Thus, the occurrence of freezing injury takes place by diverse mechanisms depending upon not only different freezing stresses but also difference of cell type.

  15. Monitoring coastal marine waters for spore-forming bacteria of faecal and soil origin to determine point from non-point source pollution.

    PubMed

    Fujioka, R S

    2001-01-01

    The US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) and the World Health Organization (WHO) have established recreational water quality standards limiting the concentrations of faecal indicator bacteria (faecal coliform, E. coli, enterococci) to ensure that these waters are safe for swimming. In the application of these hygienic water quality standards, it is assumed that there are no significant environmental sources of these faecal indicator bacteria which are unrelated to direct faecal contamination. However, we previously reported that these faecal indicator bacteria are able to grow in the soil environment of humid tropical island environments such as Hawaii and Guam and are transported at high concentrations into streams and storm drains by rain. Thus, streams and storm drains in Hawaii contain consistently high concentrations of faecal indicator bacteria which routinely exceed the EPA and WHO recreational water quality standards. Since, streams and storm drains eventually flow out to coastal marine waters, we hypothesize that all the coastal beaches which receive run-off from streams and storm drains will contain elevated concentrations of faecal indicator bacteria. To test this hypothesis, we monitored the coastal waters at four beaches known to receive water from stream or storm drains for salinity, turbidity, and used the two faecal indicator bacteria (E. coli, enterococci) to establish recreational water quality standards. To determine if these coastal waters are contaminated with non-point source pollution (streams) or with point source pollution (sewage effluent), these same water samples were also assayed for spore-forming bacteria of faecal origin (Cl. perfringens) and of soil origin (Bacillus species). Using this monitoring strategy it was possible to determine when coastal marine waters were contaminated with non-point source pollution and when coastal waters were contaminated with point source pollution. The results of this study are most likely applicable to all countries in the warm and humid region of the world. PMID:11724486

  16. Freeze-cast alumina pore networks: Effects of freezing conditions and dispersion medium

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, S. M.; Xiao, X.; Faber, K. T.

    2015-11-01

    Alumina ceramics were freeze-cast from water- and camphene-based slurries under varying freezing conditions and examined using X-ray computed tomography (XCT). Pore network characteristics, i.e., porosity, pore size, geometric surface area, and tortuosity, were measured from XCT reconstructions and the data were used to develop a model to predict feature size from processing conditions. Classical solidification theory was used to examine relationships between pore size, temperature gradients, and freezing front velocity. Freezing front velocity was subsequently predicted from casting conditions via the two-phase Stefan problem. Resulting models for water-based samples agreed with solidification-based theories predicting lamellar spacing of binary eutectic alloys, and models for camphene-based samples concurred with those for dendritic growth. Relationships between freezing conditions and geometric surface area were also modeled by considering the inverse relationship between pore size and surface area. Tortuosity was determined to be dependent primarily on the type of dispersion medium. (C) 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Freeze plug proves safe, economical in riser repair

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, M.J.

    1995-05-01

    In October 1992, Exxon Pipeline Co., Houston, performed in the Gulf of Mexico what the company believes to have been the first underwater freeze-plug procedure. To form a plug, water in a small section of the pipe is frozen with liquid nitrogen. In partially replacing a 10-in. riser at South Marsh Island Block 6A, Exxon Pipeline worked closely with a freeze-plug service company to minimize environmental and personnel exposure and to avoid the chance of an oil spill. The freeze plug reduced the time the pipe was open-ended during the repair, and hydrotesting the freeze plug area and repair section ensured integrity. The paper describes onshore testing of the procedures, pre-work surface cleaning, and the freeze-plug procedure.

  18. Wall sticking of high water-cut crude oil transported at temperatures below the gel point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Haimin; Huang, Qiyu; Wang, Changhui

    2015-12-01

    Some high water-cut crude oils can flow in the temperature below the oil gel point, while oil particles may adhere to the pipe wall as paste; this process is known as ‘wall sticking’. This can cause partial or even total blocking of the transportation pipe. Several experiments using a laboratory flow loop were conducted to study the wall sticking characteristics of high water-cut crude oils. The experimental results indicated that the predominant influencing factors of wall sticking included shear stress, water-cut and differences between gel point and wall temperature. The wall sticking rate and occurrence temperature decrease with the increase of water-cut and shear stress. The criterion for the wall sticking occurrence temperature (WSOT), and the regression formula of the wall sticking thickness for high water-cut crude oil were then established. Typical case studies indicated that the prediction results obtained from the WSOT criterion and the wall sticking thickness regression formula were in accordance with the measured values. The wall sticking rate and WSOT vary widely under different conditions and it is necessary to consider its non-uniformity in production.

  19. POINT-OF-USE/POINT-OF-ENTRY SYSTEMS FOR REMOVING VOCS (VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS) FROM DRINKING WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Where available, centralized treatment is the recommended method for producing potable water. Many homes, however, can not connect to a centralized water treatment system leaving them with no other alternative but to treat their own water. POU/POE systems are effective for removi...

  20. A new approach for freezing of aqueous solutions under active control of the nucleation temperature.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Ansgar; Schneider, Hendrik; Rau, Guenter; Glasmacher, Birgit

    2006-10-01

    An experimental setup for controlled freezing of aqueous solutions is introduced. The special feature is a mechanism to actively control the nucleation temperature via electrofreezing: an ice nucleus generated at a platinum electrode by the application of an electric high voltage pulse initiates the crystallization of the sample. Using electrofreezing, the nucleation temperature in pure water can be precisely adjusted to a desired value over the whole temperature range between a maximum temperature Tn(max) close to the melting point and the temperature of spontaneous nucleation. However, the presence of additives can inhibit the nucleus formation. The influence of hydroxyethylstarch (HES), glucose, glycerol, additives commonly used in cryobiology, and NaCl on Tn(max) were investigated. While the decrease showed to be moderate for the non-ionic additives, the hindrance of nucleation by ionic NaCl makes the direct application of electrofreezing in solutions with physiological salt concentrations impossible. Therefore, in the multi-sample freezing device presented in this paper, the ice nucleus is produced in a separate volume of pure water inside an electrode cap. This way, the nucleus formation becomes independent of the sample composition. Using electrofreezing rather than conventional seeding methods allows automated freezing of many samples under equal conditions. Experiments performed with model solutions show the reliability and repeatability of this method to start crystallization in the test samples at different specified temperatures. The setup was designed to freeze samples of small volume for basic investigations in the field of cryopreservation and freeze-drying, but the mode of operation might be interesting for many other applications where a controlled nucleation of aqueous solutions is of importance. PMID:16887112

  1. The effect of water contamination on the dew-point temperature scale realization with humidity generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilbaste, M.; Heinonen, M.; Saks, O.; Leito, I.

    2013-08-01

    The purpose of this paper is to study the effect of contaminated water in the context of humidity generators. Investigation of different methods to determine the drop in dew-point temperature due to contamination and experiments on actual contamination rates are reported. Different methods for calculating the dew-point temperature effect from electrical conductivity and density measurements are studied with high-purity water and aqueous solutions of NaCl and LiCl. The outcomes of the calculation methods are compared with the results of direct humidity measurements. The results show that the often applied Raoult's law based calculation method is in good agreement with other methods. For studying actual contamination, water samples were kept in glass, plastic, copper and stainless-steel vessels for up to 13 months to investigate natural ionic and organic contamination in vessels with different wall materials. The amount of ionic contamination was found to be higher in copper and glass vessels than in stainless-steel and plastic vessels. The amount of organic contamination was found to be highest in the plastic vessel. In all the cases, however, the corresponding drop in dew-point temperature due to natural contamination was found to be below 0.1 mK. The largest rate of change of dew-point temperature was 26 µK/month. Thus, if proper cleanness is maintained in a humidity generator the effect of contamination of water in the saturator is insignificant compared with the major uncertainty components even in the most accurate generators today.

  2. Evaluation and Validation of the Messinger Freezing Fraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, David N.; Tsao, Jen-Ching

    2005-01-01

    One of the most important non-dimensional parameters used in ice-accretion modeling and scaling studies is the freezing fraction defined by the heat-balance analysis of Messinger. For fifty years this parameter has been used to indicate how rapidly freezing takes place when super-cooled water strikes a solid body. The value ranges from 0 (no freezing) to 1 (water freezes immediately on impact), and the magnitude has been shown to play a major role in determining the physical appearance of the accreted ice. Because of its importance to ice shape, this parameter and the physics underlying the expressions used to calculate it have been questioned from time to time. Until now, there has been no strong evidence either validating or casting doubt on the current expressions. This paper presents experimental measurements of the leading-edge thickness of a number of ice shapes for a variety of test conditions with nominal freezing fractions from 0.3 to 1.0. From these thickness measurements, experimental freezing fractions were calculated and compared with values found from the Messinger analysis as applied by Ruff. Within the experimental uncertainty of measuring the leading-edge thickness, agreement of the experimental and analytical freezing fraction was very good. It is also shown that values of analytical freezing fraction were entirely consistent with observed ice shapes at and near rime conditions: At an analytical freezing fraction of unity, experimental ice shapes displayed the classic rime shape, while for conditions producing analytical freezing fractions slightly lower than unity, glaze features started to appear.

  3. Condensation and freezing of droplets on superhydrophobic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Oberli, Linda; Caruso, Dean; Hall, Colin; Fabretto, Manrico; Murphy, Peter J; Evans, Drew

    2014-08-01

    Superhydrophobic coatings are reported as promising candidates for anti-icing applications. Various studies have shown that as well as having ultra water repellency the surfaces have reduced ice adhesion and can delay water freezing. However, the structure or texture (roughness) of the superhydrophobic surface is subject to degradation during the thermocycling or wetting process. This degradation can impair the superhydrophobicity and the icephobicity of those coatings. In this review, a brief overview of the process of droplet freezing on superhydrophobic coatings is presented with respect to their potential in anti-icing applications. To support this discussion, new data is presented about the condensation of water onto physically decorated substrates, and the associated freezing process which impacts on the freezing of macroscopic droplets on the surface. PMID:24200089

  4. Effects of industrial pre-freezing processing and freezing handling on glucosinolates and antioxidant attributes in broccoli florets.

    PubMed

    Cai, Congxi; Miao, Huiying; Qian, Hongmei; Yao, Leishuan; Wang, Bingliang; Wang, Qiaomei

    2016-11-01

    The effects of industrial pre-freezing processing and freezing handling on the contents of glucosinolates and antioxidants (vitamin C, polyphenols, carotenoid and chlorophyll), as well as the antioxidant capacity in broccoli (Brassica oleracea L. var. italica) florets were investigated in the present study. Our results showed that the glucosinolate accumulations were significantly decreased after pre-freezing processing, whereas elevated levels of phenols, carotenoids, chlorophyll, and also antioxidant capacity were observed in frozen broccoli florets. The contents of vitamin C remained constant during above mentioned processing. In conclusion, the current industrial freezing processing method is a good practice for the preservation of main antioxidant nutrients in broccoli florets, although some improvements in pre-freezing processing, such as steam blanching and ice-water cooling, are needed to attenuate the decrease in glucosinolate content. PMID:27211670

  5. Freeze-Tolerant Condensers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crowley, Christopher J.; Elkouhk, Nabil

    2004-01-01

    Two condensers designed for use in dissipating heat carried by working fluids feature two-phase, self-adjusting configurations such that their working lengths automatically vary to suit their input power levels and/or heat-sink temperatures. A key advantage of these condensers is that they can function even if the temperatures of their heat sinks fall below the freezing temperatures of their working fluids and the fluids freeze. The condensers can even be restarted from the frozen condition. The top part of the figure depicts the layout of the first condenser. A two-phase (liquid and vapor) condenser/vapor tube is thermally connected to a heat sink typically, a radiatively or convectively cooled metal panel. A single-phase (liquid) condensate-return tube (return artery) is also thermally connected to the heat sink. At intervals along their lengths, the condenser/vapor tube and the return artery are interconnected through porous plugs. This condenser configuration affords tolerance of freezing, variable effective thermal conductance (such that the return temperature remains nearly constant, independently of the ultimate sink temperature), and overall pressure drop smaller than it would be without the porous interconnections. An additional benefit of this configuration is that the condenser can be made to recover from the completely frozen condition either without using heaters, or else with the help of heaters much smaller than would otherwise be needed. The second condenser affords the same advantages and is based on a similar principle, but it has a different configuration that affords improved flow of working fluid, simplified construction, reduced weight, and faster recovery from a frozen condition.

  6. 40 CFR 141.100 - Criteria and procedures for public water systems using point-of-entry devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... REGULATIONS Use of Non-Centralized Treatment Devices § 141.100 Criteria and procedures for public water... responsibility of the public water system to operate and maintain the point-of-entry treatment system. (c) The... provide health protection equivalent to central water treatment. “Equivalent” means that the water...

  7. 40 CFR 141.100 - Criteria and procedures for public water systems using point-of-entry devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... REGULATIONS Use of Non-Centralized Treatment Devices § 141.100 Criteria and procedures for public water... responsibility of the public water system to operate and maintain the point-of-entry treatment system. (c) The... provide health protection equivalent to central water treatment. “Equivalent” means that the water...

  8. 40 CFR 141.100 - Criteria and procedures for public water systems using point-of-entry devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... REGULATIONS Use of Non-Centralized Treatment Devices § 141.100 Criteria and procedures for public water... responsibility of the public water system to operate and maintain the point-of-entry treatment system. (c) The... provide health protection equivalent to central water treatment. “Equivalent” means that the water...

  9. 40 CFR 141.100 - Criteria and procedures for public water systems using point-of-entry devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... REGULATIONS Use of Non-Centralized Treatment Devices § 141.100 Criteria and procedures for public water... responsibility of the public water system to operate and maintain the point-of-entry treatment system. (c) The... provide health protection equivalent to central water treatment. “Equivalent” means that the water...

  10. Hibernation physiology, freezing adaptation and extreme freeze tolerance in a northern population of the wood frog.

    PubMed

    Costanzo, Jon P; do Amaral, M Clara F; Rosendale, Andrew J; Lee, Richard E

    2013-09-15

    We investigated hibernation physiology and freeze tolerance in a population of the wood frog, Rana sylvatica, indigenous to Interior Alaska, USA, near the northernmost limit of the species' range. Winter acclimatization responses included a 233% increase in the hepatic glycogen depot that was subsidized by fat body and skeletal muscle catabolism, and a rise in plasma osmolality that reflected accrual of urea (to 106±10 μmol ml(-1)) and an unidentified solute (to ~73 μmol ml(-1)). In contrast, frogs from a cool-temperate population (southern Ohio, USA) amassed much less glycogen, had a lower uremia (28±5 μmol ml(-1)) and apparently lacked the unidentified solute. Alaskan frogs survived freezing at temperatures as low as -16°C, some 10-13°C below those tolerated by southern conspecifics, and endured a 2-month bout of freezing at -4°C. The profound freeze tolerance is presumably due to their high levels of organic osmolytes and bound water, which limits ice formation. Adaptive responses to freezing (-2.5°C for 48 h) and subsequent thawing (4°C) included synthesis of the cryoprotectants urea and glucose, and dehydration of certain tissues. Alaskan frogs differed from Ohioan frogs in retaining a substantial reserve capacity for glucose synthesis, accumulating high levels of cryoprotectants in brain tissue, and remaining hyperglycemic long after thawing. The northern phenotype also incurred less stress during freezing/thawing, as indicated by limited cryohemolysis and lactate accumulation. Post-glacial colonization of high latitudes by R. sylvatica required a substantial increase in freeze tolerance that was at least partly achieved by enhancing their cryoprotectant system. PMID:23966588

  11. Artificial Water Point for Livestock Influences Spatial Ecology of a Native Lizard Species.

    PubMed

    Leu, Stephan T; Bull, C Michael

    2016-01-01

    Pastoralism is a major agricultural activity in drier environments, and can directly and indirectly impact native species in those areas. We investigated how the supply of an artificial watering point to support grazing livestock affected movement and activity patterns of the Australian sleepy lizard (Tiliqua rugosa) during a drought year. We observed 23 adult lizards; six had access to a dam, whereas 17 lizards did not. Lizards with access to the dam had larger home ranges, were substantially active on more days (days with >100 steps), and moved more steps per day compared to lizards that did not have access to the dam, both during the early and late period of our observation. Furthermore, while the two groups of lizards had similar body condition early in the season, they differed later in the season. Lizards with dam access retained, whereas lizards without access lost body condition. Local heterogeneity in access to an artificial water resource resulted in spatially dependent behavioural variation among sleepy lizard individuals. This suggests that sleepy lizards have flexible responses to changing climatic conditions, depending on the availability of water. Furthermore, while reducing activity appears a suitable short term strategy, if harsh conditions persist, then access to dams could be of substantial benefit and could support sustained lizard activity and movement and allow maintenance of body condition. Hence, artificial watering points, such as the dams constructed by pastoralists, may provide local higher quality refugia for sleepy lizards and other species during drought conditions. PMID:26800274

  12. Assessment of ground-water contamination in the alluvial aquifer near West Point, Kentucky

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lyverse, M.A.; Unthank, M.D.

    1988-01-01

    Well inventories, water level measurements, groundwater quality samples, surface geophysical techniques (specifically, electromagnetic techniques), and test drilling were used to investigate the extent and sources of groundwater contamination in the alluvial aquifer near West Point, Kentucky. This aquifer serves as the principal source of drinking water for over 50,000 people. Groundwater flow in the alluvial aquifer is generally unconfined and moves in a northerly direction toward the Ohio River. Two large public supply well fields and numerous domestic wells are located in this natural flow path. High concentrations of chloride in groundwater have resulted in the abandonment of several public supply wells in the West Point areas. Chloride concentrations in water samples collected for this study were as high as 11,000 mg/L. Electromagnetic techniques indicated and test drilling later confirmed that the source of chloride in well waters was probably improperly plugged or unplugged, abandoned oil and gas exploration wells. The potential for chloride contamination of wells exists in the study area and is related to proximity to improperly abandoned oil and gas exploration wells and to gradients established by drawdowns associated with pumped wells. Periodic use of surface geophysical methods, in combination with added observation wells , could be used to monitor significant changes in groundwater quality related to chloride contamination. (USGS)

  13. Artificial Water Point for Livestock Influences Spatial Ecology of a Native Lizard Species

    PubMed Central

    Leu, Stephan T.; Bull, C. Michael

    2016-01-01

    Pastoralism is a major agricultural activity in drier environments, and can directly and indirectly impact native species in those areas. We investigated how the supply of an artificial watering point to support grazing livestock affected movement and activity patterns of the Australian sleepy lizard (Tiliqua rugosa) during a drought year. We observed 23 adult lizards; six had access to a dam, whereas 17 lizards did not. Lizards with access to the dam had larger home ranges, were substantially active on more days (days with >100 steps), and moved more steps per day compared to lizards that did not have access to the dam, both during the early and late period of our observation. Furthermore, while the two groups of lizards had similar body condition early in the season, they differed later in the season. Lizards with dam access retained, whereas lizards without access lost body condition. Local heterogeneity in access to an artificial water resource resulted in spatially dependent behavioural variation among sleepy lizard individuals. This suggests that sleepy lizards have flexible responses to changing climatic conditions, depending on the availability of water. Furthermore, while reducing activity appears a suitable short term strategy, if harsh conditions persist, then access to dams could be of substantial benefit and could support sustained lizard activity and movement and allow maintenance of body condition. Hence, artificial watering points, such as the dams constructed by pastoralists, may provide local higher quality refugia for sleepy lizards and other species during drought conditions. PMID:26800274

  14. Damage Evaluation on Freeze-Thawing Process of Food by Using NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andou, Hiroko; Fukuoka, Mika; Miyawaki, Osato; Suzuki, Toru

    Freeze-thawing process gives significant damages for food structure. Several new techniques have been attempted for quantitative evaluation of the damages. In this study, using NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance) with a stimulated echo method, restricted diffusion phenomena of water molecules was measured for damaged food (onion and tuna) tissues that were subjected to the repeat of freeze-thawing, Through experiments, water permeability of tissue membrane was calculated. The water permeability of fresh tissues for onion showed clearly restricted diffusion, but after freeze-thawing, it disappeared. On the other hand, the water permeability of fresh tuna tissue was small significantly, even though it was a little higher after freeze-thawing. After all, the damage level after freeze-thawing showed a significant difference between onion and tuna. These results support the view that plant tissue is very sensitive to freeze-thawing and that the water permeability of plant is much lower than that of animal.

  15. Collaboration, cholera, and cyclones: a project to improve point-of-use water quality in Madagascar.

    PubMed

    Dunston, C; McAfee, D; Kaiser, R; Rakotoarison, D; Rambeloson, L; Hoang, A T; Quick, R E

    2001-10-01

    In November 1999, CARE Madagascar, Population Services International (PSI), and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) selected 30 poor communities in urban Antananarivo as the target population for launch of the Safe Water System. The system consists of behavior change techniques along with point-of-use treatment and safe storage of water. The project was launched in March 2000, ahead of schedule, because a cholera epidemic struck Madagascar in January. Because of the enormous demand created by the cholera epidemic and by 3 cyclones that followed in the next 3 months, the project grew to national scale in less than a year. The combination of community mobilization and social marketing resulted in increased demand for and use of the Safe Water System. PMID:11574309

  16. Evaluating the sustainability of ceramic filters for point-of-use drinking water treatment.

    PubMed

    Ren, Dianjun; Colosi, Lisa M; Smith, James A

    2013-10-01

    This study evaluates the social, economic, and environmental sustainability of ceramic filters impregnated with silver nanoparticles for point-of-use (POU) drinking water treatment in developing countries. The functional unit for this analysis was the amount of water consumed by a typical household over ten years (37,960 L), as delivered by either the POU technology or a centralized water treatment and distribution system. Results indicate that the ceramic filters are 3-6 times more cost-effective than the centralized water system for reduction of waterborne diarrheal illness among the general population and children under five. The ceramic filters also exhibit better environmental performance for four of five evaluated life cycle impacts: energy use, water use, global warming potential, and particulate matter emissions (PM10). For smog formation potential, the centralized system is preferable to the ceramic filter POU technology. This convergence of social, economic, and environmental criteria offers clear indication that the ceramic filter POU technology is a more sustainable choice for drinking water treatment in developing countries than the centralized treatment systems that have been widely adopted in industrialized countries. PMID:23991752

  17. Biomaterials by freeze casting.

    PubMed

    Wegst, Ulrike G K; Schecter, Matthew; Donius, Amalie E; Hunger, Philipp M

    2010-04-28

    The functional requirements for synthetic tissue substitutes appear deceptively simple: they should provide a porous matrix with interconnecting porosity and surface properties that promote rapid tissue ingrowth; at the same time, they should possess sufficient stiffness, strength and toughness to prevent crushing under physiological loads until full integration and healing are reached. Despite extensive efforts and first encouraging results, current biomaterials for tissue regeneration tend to suffer common limitations: insufficient tissue-material interaction and an inherent lack of strength and toughness associated with porosity. The challenge persists to synthesize materials that mimic both structure and mechanical performance of the natural tissue and permit strong tissue-implant interfaces to be formed. In the case of bone substitute materials, for example, the goal is to engineer high-performance composites with effective properties that, similar to natural mineralized tissue, exceed by orders of magnitude the properties of its constituents. It is still difficult with current technology to emulate in synthetic biomaterials multi-level hierarchical composite structures that are thought to be the origin of the observed mechanical property amplification in biological materials. Freeze casting permits to manufacture such complex, hybrid materials through excellent control of structural and mechanical properties. As a processing technique for the manufacture of biomaterials, freeze casting therefore has great promise. PMID:20308117

  18. TESTING & EVALUATION OF POINT-OF-USE (POU) AND POINT-OF-ENTRY (POE) TECHNOLOGIES FOR DRINKING WATER TREATMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Centralized water treatment and distribution are still the recommended methods for producing safe drinking water. But in reality this approach cannot and will not meet the needs of millions of homes in both the U.S. and around the world, which do not have the option of connectin...

  19. Effect of wettability on sessile drop freezing: when superhydrophobicity stimulates an extreme freezing delay.

    PubMed

    Boinovich, Ludmila; Emelyanenko, Alexandre M; Korolev, Vadim V; Pashinin, Andrei S

    2014-02-18

    An increasing number of studies directed at supercooling water droplets on surfaces with different wettabilities have appeared in recent years. This activity has been stimulated by the recognition that water supercooling phenomena can be effectively used to develop methods for protecting outdoor equipment and infrastructure elements against icing and snow accretion. In this article, we discuss the nucleation kinetics of supercooled sessile water droplets on hydrophilic, hydrophobic, and superhydrophobic surfaces under isothermal conditions at temperatures of -8, -10, and -15 °C and a saturated water vapor atmosphere. The statistics of nucleation events for the ensembles of freezing sessile droplets is completed by the detailed analysis of the contact angle temperature dependence and freezing of individual droplets in a saturated vapor atmosphere. We have demonstrated that the most essential freezing delay is characteristic of the superhydrophobic coating on aluminum, with the texture resistant to contact with ice and water. This delay can reach many hours at T = -8 °C and a few minutes at -23 °C. The observed behavior is analyzed on the basis of different nucleation mechanisms. The dissimilarity in the total nucleation rate, detected for two superhydrophobic substrates having the same apparent contact angle of the water drop but different resistivities of surface texture to the contact with water/ice, is associated with the contribution of heterogeneous nucleation on external centers located at the water droplet/air interface. PMID:24491217

  20. Polarizable six-point water models from computational and empirical optimization.

    PubMed

    Tröster, Philipp; Lorenzen, Konstantin; Tavan, Paul

    2014-02-13

    Tröster et al. (J. Phys. Chem B 2013, 117, 9486-9500) recently suggested a mixed computational and empirical approach to the optimization of polarizable molecular mechanics (PMM) water models. In the empirical part the parameters of Buckingham potentials are optimized by PMM molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The computational part applies hybrid calculations, which combine the quantum mechanical description of a H2O molecule by density functional theory (DFT) with a PMM model of its liquid phase environment generated by MD. While the static dipole moments and polarizabilities of the PMM water models are fixed at the experimental gas phase values, the DFT/PMM calculations are employed to optimize the remaining electrostatic properties. These properties cover the width of a Gaussian inducible dipole positioned at the oxygen and the locations of massless negative charge points within the molecule (the positive charges are attached to the hydrogens). The authors considered the cases of one and two negative charges rendering the PMM four- and five-point models TL4P and TL5P. Here we extend their approach to three negative charges, thus suggesting the PMM six-point model TL6P. As compared to the predecessors and to other PMM models, which also exhibit partial charges at fixed positions, TL6P turned out to predict all studied properties of liquid water at p0 = 1 bar and T0 = 300 K with a remarkable accuracy. These properties cover, for instance, the diffusion constant, viscosity, isobaric heat capacity, isothermal compressibility, dielectric constant, density, and the isobaric thermal expansion coefficient. This success concurrently provides a microscopic physical explanation of corresponding shortcomings of previous models. It uniquely assigns the failures of previous models to substantial inaccuracies in the description of the higher electrostatic multipole moments of liquid phase water molecules. Resulting favorable properties concerning the transferability to other temperatures and conditions like the melting of ice are also discussed. PMID:24437570

  1. Ice/Water Interface: Zeta Potential, Point of Zero Charge, and Hydrophobicity.

    PubMed

    Drzymala; Sadowski; Holysz; Chibowski

    1999-12-15

    The ice/water interface is a common and important part of many biological, environmental, and technological systems. In contrast to its importance, the system has not been extensively studied and is not well understood. Therefore, in this paper the properties of the H(2)O ice/water and D(2)O ice/water interfaces were investigated. Although the zeta potential vs pH data points were significantly scattered, it was determined that the isoelectric point (iep) of D(2)O ice particles in water at 3.5 degrees C containing 10(-3) M NaCl occurs at about pH 3.0. The negative values of the zeta potential, calculated from the electrophoretic mobility, seem to decrease with decreasing content of NaCl, while the iep shifts to a higher pH. The point of zero charge (pzc) of D(2)O ice and H(2)O ice, determined by changes in pH of 10(-4) M NaCl aqueous solution at 0.5 degrees C after the ice particle addition, was found to be very different from the iep and equal to pH 7.0 +/- 0.5. The shift of the iep with NaCl concentration and the difference in the positions of the iep and pzc on the pH scale point to complex specific adsorption of ions at the interface. Interestingly, similar values of iep and pzc were found for very different systems, such as hydrophilic ice and highly hydrophobic hexadecane droplets in water. A comparison of the zeta potential vs pH curves for hydrophilic ice and hydrophobic materials that do not possess dissociative functional groups at the interface (diamond, air bubbles, bacteria, and hexadecane) indicated that all of them have an iep near pH 3.5. These results indicate that the zeta potential and surface charge data alone cannot be used to delineate the electrochemical properties of a given water/moiety interface because similar electrical properties do not necessary mean a similar structure of the interfacial region. A good example is the aliphatic hydrocarbon/water interface in comparison to the ice/water interface. Although the experiments were carried out with care, both the zeta potential, measured with a precise ZetaPlus meter, and DeltapH values (a measure of surface charge) vs pH were significantly scattered, and the origin of dissemination of the data points was not established. Differently charged ice particles and not fully equilibrium conditions at the ice/water interface may have been responsible for the dissemination of the data. Copyright 1999 Academic Press. PMID:10607438

  2. Performance Characteristics of an Isothermal Freeze Valve

    SciTech Connect

    Hailey, A.E.

    2001-08-22

    This document discusses performance characteristics of an isothermal freeze valve. A freeze valve has been specified for draining the DWPF melter at the end of its lifetime. Two freeze valve designs have been evaluated on the Small Cylindrical Melter-2 (SCM-2). In order to size the DWPF freeze valve, the basic principles governing freeze valve behavior need to be identified and understood.

  3. 9 CFR 590.534 - Freezing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Freezing facilities. 590.534 Section..., and Facility Requirements § 590.534 Freezing facilities. (a) Freezing rooms, either on or off the premises, shall be capable of freezing all liquid egg products in accordance with the freezing...

  4. 9 CFR 590.534 - Freezing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Freezing facilities. 590.534 Section..., and Facility Requirements § 590.534 Freezing facilities. (a) Freezing rooms, either on or off the premises, shall be capable of freezing all liquid egg products in accordance with the freezing...

  5. 9 CFR 590.534 - Freezing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Freezing facilities. 590.534 Section..., and Facility Requirements § 590.534 Freezing facilities. (a) Freezing rooms, either on or off the premises, shall be capable of freezing all liquid egg products in accordance with the freezing...

  6. Quality Evaluation of Pork with Various Freezing and Thawing Methods

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the physicochemical and sensory quality characteristics due to the influence of various thawing methods on electro-magnetic and air blast frozen pork were examined. The packaged pork samples, which were frozen by air blast freezing at ?45? or electro-magnetic freezing at ?55?, were thawed using 4 different methods: refrigeration (41?), room temperature (RT, 25?), cold water (15?), and microwave (2450 MHz). Analyses were carried out to determine the drip and cooking loss, water holding capacity (WHC), moisture content and sensory evaluation. Frozen pork thawed in a microwave indicated relatively less thawing loss (0.63-1.24%) than the other thawing methods (0.68-1.38%). The cooking loss after electro-magnetic freezing indicated 37.4% by microwave thawing, compared with 32.9% by refrigeration, 36.5% by RT, and 37.2% by cold water in ham. The thawing of samples frozen by electro-magnetic freezing showed no significant differences between the methods used, while the moisture content was higher in belly thawed by microwave (62.0%) after electro-magnetic freezing than refrigeration (54.8%), RT (61.3%), and cold water (61.1%). The highest overall acceptability was shown for microwave thawing after electro-magnetic freezing but there were no significant differences compared to that of the other samples. PMID:26761493

  7. Quality Evaluation of Pork with Various Freezing and Thawing Methods.

    PubMed

    Ku, Su Kyung; Jeong, Ji Yun; Park, Jong Dae; Jeon, Ki Hong; Kim, Eun Mi; Kim, Young Boong

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the physicochemical and sensory quality characteristics due to the influence of various thawing methods on electro-magnetic and air blast frozen pork were examined. The packaged pork samples, which were frozen by air blast freezing at -45℃ or electro-magnetic freezing at -55℃, were thawed using 4 different methods: refrigeration (4±1℃), room temperature (RT, 25℃), cold water (15℃), and microwave (2450 MHz). Analyses were carried out to determine the drip and cooking loss, water holding capacity (WHC), moisture content and sensory evaluation. Frozen pork thawed in a microwave indicated relatively less thawing loss (0.63-1.24%) than the other thawing methods (0.68-1.38%). The cooking loss after electro-magnetic freezing indicated 37.4% by microwave thawing, compared with 32.9% by refrigeration, 36.5% by RT, and 37.2% by cold water in ham. The thawing of samples frozen by electro-magnetic freezing showed no significant differences between the methods used, while the moisture content was higher in belly thawed by microwave (62.0%) after electro-magnetic freezing than refrigeration (54.8%), RT (61.3%), and cold water (61.1%). The highest overall acceptability was shown for microwave thawing after electro-magnetic freezing but there were no significant differences compared to that of the other samples. PMID:26761493

  8. Effects of Pressure-shift Freezing on the Structural and Physical Properties of Gelatin Hydrogel Matrices

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Byeongsoo; Gil, Hyung Bae; Min, Sang-Gi; Lee, Si-Kyung; Choi, Mi-Jung

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates the effects of the gelatin concentration (10-40%, w/v), freezing temperatures (from -20? to -50?) and freezing methods on the structural and physical properties of gelatin matrices. To freeze gelatin, the pressure-shift freezing (PSF) is being applied at 0.1 (under atmospheric control), 50 and 100 MPa, respectively. The freezing point of gelatin solutions decrease with increasing gelatin concentrations, from -0.2? (10% gelatin) to -6.7? (40% gelatin), while the extent of supercooling did not show any specific trends. The rheological properties of the gelatin indicate that both the storage (G') and loss (G") moduli were steady in the strain amplitude range of 0.1-10%. To characterize gelatin matrices formed by the various freezing methods, the ice crystal sizes which were being determined by the scanning electron microscopy (SEM) are affected by the gelatin concentrations. The ice crystal sizes are affected by gelatin concentrations and freezing temperature, while the size distributions of ice crystals depend on the freezing methods. Smaller ice crystals are being formed with PSF rather than under the atmospheric control where the freezing temperature is above -40?. Thus, the results of this study indicate that the PSF processing at a very low freezing temperature (-50?) offers a potential advantage over commercial atmospheric freezing points for the formation of small ice crystals. PMID:26760743

  9. Studies on Freezing RAM Semen in Absence of Glycerol.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelnaby, Abdelhady Abdelhakeam

    1988-12-01

    Glycerol is widely used as a major cryoprotective agent for freezing spermatozoa of almost all species. However, it reduces fertility of sheep inseminated cervically compared with intrauterine insemination. Studies were conducted to develop a method and procedure for freezing ram semen in the absence of glycerol. Post -thaw survival of ram spermatozoa frozen in the absence of glycerol was affected by time and temperature after collection and before dilution and time after dilution and before freezing. Increase in time at 5^ circC before or after dilution and before freezing increased both post-thaw motility and number of cells passing through Sephadex filter. A cold dilution method was developed. Slow cooling of fresh ram semen and diluting at 5^circ C 2-3 hr. after collection, then freezing 1 hr. after dilution improved both post-thaw motility and number of cells passing through Sephadex filter compared with immediate dilution at 30-37^circC after collection and freezing 3-4 hr. later (P < 0.05). An extender was developed to freeze ram semen in the absence of glycerol. An increase in post-thaw motility was obtained when semen was extended in TES titrated with Tris to pH 7.0 (TEST) and osmotic pressure of 375-400 mOsm/kg, containing 25-30% (v/v) egg yolk and 10% (v/v) maltose. A special device (boat) for freezing was constructed to insure the same height of the sample above LN _2 and thus the same freezing rate from freeze to freeze. Freezing of semen in 0.25cc straws at 5-10 cm above LN_2 (73.8 to 49.5 ^circC/min) yielded higher post-thaw motility than the rates resulted from freezing at 15 cm above LN_2 or 1 cm above LN _2. Faster Thawing in 37^ circC water for 30 sec. (7.8^ circC/sec.) increased post-thaw motility compared with slower thawing in 5 or 20^circ C water (P < 0.05). A lambing rate of 52.2% was obtained in one fertility trial conducted with ram semen frozen without glycerol and 17.1% in a second trial. One injection (IM) of 15 mg PGF_{2alpha}/ewe for estrus synchronization during breeding season resulted in higher heat response and lambing rate than two injections given 10 days apart.

  10. Determination of estrogens in water by HPLC-UV using cloud point extraction.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ling; Cai, Ya-Qi; He, Bin; Yuan, Chun-Gang; Shen, Da-Zhong; Shao, Jing; Jiang, Gui-Bin

    2006-08-15

    A method based on cloud point extraction was developed to determine four kinds of estrogens: estriol (E3), estradiol (E2), estrone (E1), and progesterone (P) in water by high performance liquid chromatography separation and ultraviolet detection (HPLC-UV). The non-ionic surfactant Triton X-114 was chosen as extractant solvent. The parameters affecting extraction efficiency, such as concentrations of Triton X-114 and Na(2)SO(4), equilibration temperature, equilibration time and centrifugation time were evaluated and optimized. Under the optimum conditions, preconcentration factors of 99 for E3, 73 for E2, 152 for E1 and 86 for P were obtained for 10mL water sample. The detection of limitation was 0.23ngmL(-1) for E3, 0.32ngmL(-1) for E2, 0.25ngmL(-1) for E1 and 5.0ngmL(-1) for P. The proposed method was successfully applied to the determination of trace amount of estrogens in wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) effluent water and exposure water with 10ngmL(-1) E2 for toxicological study in our lab. For the case of WWTP effluent water samples, no estrogen was found. The accuracy of the proposed method was tested by recovery measurements of spiked samples and good recoveries of 81.2-99.5% were obtained. PMID:18970727

  11. Long-term evaluation of the performance of four point-of-use water filters.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Vidal, Andrea; Diaz-Gómez, Jaime; Castellanos-Rozo, Jose; Usaquen-Perilla, Olga Lucía

    2016-07-01

    Despite technological advances water supply quality and poor access to safe water remain a major problem in developing countries, especially in rural areas. Point-of-use (POU) water treatment has been shown to be a viable option to produce safe drinking water quality. The aim of this study was to evaluate, under laboratory conditions over 14 months, the performance of four household filtration systems: membrane filter (MF), one-candle ceramic filter (1CCF), two-candle ceramic filter (2CCF) and pot ceramic filter (PCF). The evaluation was made using spiked water having the required concentrations of turbidity, Escherichia coli and Total Dissolved Solids (TDS). The results show that all systems have high removal efficiencies for turbidity (98-99%), and E. coli 4-5 Log Reduction Value (LRV). The poorest efficiency was for TDS (9-18%). The MF and the CCF displayed no significant difference in efficiencies for these parameters. The PCF had less significant differences for turbidity removal than the other systems. The average filtration rate for all systems decreased during the operation time. The CPF showed the major potential to be used in rural communities mainly for its low operational level and maintenance requirements as well as its local craftsmanship. It was observed that the efficiency of the systems is highly sensitive to cleaning and maintenance activities and therefore, the system sustainability will depend considerably on the training and education of the potential users. PMID:27105031

  12. Supercooling in overwintering azalea flower buds: additional freezing parameters.

    PubMed

    George, M F; Burke, M J

    1977-02-01

    Results of calorimetric, nuclear magnetic resonance, and low temperature light microscopic studies on supercooled azalea (Rhododendron kosterianum, Schneid.) floral primordia are reported. Heat release during freezing of the supercooled floral primordia is in the range predicted for supercooled pure water. Spin-lattice and spin-spin relaxation times measured by pulsed nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy decreased after freezing, suggesting that a redistribution of tissue water is associated with injury to the floral primordium. The calorimetric and low temperature microscopy studies showed no detectable ice formation in floral primordia until the major freezing event at low temperature. No resistance to ice growth is found to exist in the primordium tissues, indicating that a freezing barrier or thermodynamic equilibrium exists between the unfrozen primordium and other flower bud parts which contain ice at subfreezing temperatures. PMID:16659842

  13. Convective heat transfer near the entrance region of a tube for water near the critical point

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.H.; Howell, J.R.

    1997-07-01

    Numerical modeling is carried out to investigate the characteristics of convective heat transfer for the turbulent developing flow of water near the critical point in a tube with or without buoyancy force for constant wall temperature. The modeling includes the effects of the thermodynamic and transport property variations. The effects of proximity to the critical point and wall temperature variation on the buoyancy force are considered as well as varying properties near the pseudocritical temperature. For turbulent diffusivity, a modified mixing length model including density fluctuation is used. Emphasis is on effects very close to the inlet (z/D < 10). The results show heat transfer and fluid flow characteristics which include velocity profiles, heat transfer coefficient and friction factor distribution along the tube. Effects of gravity force on turbulent eddy viscosity distribution inside the tube are also studied. Results using several models for turbulent Prandtl number are compared.

  14. Point-Source Contributions to the Water Quality of an Urban Stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Little, S. F. B.; Young, M.; Lowry, C.

    2014-12-01

    Scajaquada Creek, which runs through the heart of the city of Buffalo, is a prime example of the ways in which human intervention and local geomorphology can impact water quality and urban hydrology. Beginning in the 1920's, the Creek has been partially channelized and connected to Buffalo's combined sewer system (CSS). At Forest Lawn Cemetery, where this study takes place, Scajaquada Creek emerges from a 3.5-mile tunnel built to route stream flow under the city. Collocated with the tunnel outlet is a discharge point for Buffalo's CSS, combined sewer outlet (CSO) #53. It is at this point that runoff and sanitary sewage discharge regularly during rain events. Initially, this study endeavored to create a spatial and temporal picture for this portion of the Creek, monitoring such parameters as conductivity, dissolved oxygen, pH, temperature, and turbidity, in addition to measuring Escherichia coli (E. coli) concentrations. As expected, these factors responded directly to seasonality, local geomorphology, and distance from the point source (CSO #53), displaying a overall, linear response. However, the addition of nitrate and phosphate testing to the study revealed an entirely separate signal from that previously observed. Concentrations of these parameters did not respond to location in the same manner as E. coli. Instead of decreasing with distance from the CSO, a distinct periodicity was observed, correlating with a series of outflow pipes lining the stream banks. It is hypothesized that nitrate and phosphate occurring in this stretch of Scajaquada Creek originate not from the CSO, but from fertilizers used to maintain the lawns within the subwatershed. These results provide evidence of the complexity related to water quality issues in urban streams as a result of point- and nonpoint-source hydrologic inputs.

  15. Phase behaviors of supercooled water: Reconciling a critical point of amorphous ices with spinodal instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Hideki

    1996-09-01

    The anomalies of supercooled water in thermodynamic response functions at atmospheric pressure, the phase transition between low and high density amorphous ices (LDA and HDA), and a predicted fragile-strong transition are accounted for in a unified manner by reconciling an idea due to Stanley and co-workers introducing a second critical point separating LDA and HDA ices with a conjecture proposed by Speedy that LDA is a different phase from a normal water, called water II. The reconciliation is made on the basis of results from extensive molecular dynamics simulations at constant pressure and temperature. It is found that there exist large gaps around temperature 213 K in thermodynamic, structural, and dynamic properties at atmospheric pressure, suggesting liquid-liquid phase transition. This transition is identified with an extension of the experimentally observed LDA-HDA transition in high pressure to atmospheric pressure. Thus, we propose a new phase diagram where the locus of the second critical point is moved into negative pressure region. With this simple modification, it becomes possible to account for the divergence of the thermodynamic response functions at atmospheric pressure in terms of the critical point and the spinodal-like instability of HDA. The unstable HDA undergoes a transition to LDA phase in lower temperature. The transition is also observed in high pressure region such as 200 MPa while it disappears at negative pressure, -200 MPa. This reinforces our proposed phase diagram in which there is no continuous path from a supercooled state to LDA at atmospheric pressure. It is argued that the HDA-LDA transition is accompanied by a fragile-strong transition. A possible mechanism of avoiding crystallization of aqueous solutions is also discussed in terms of a difference in hydrogen bond number distribution between LDA and HDA.

  16. Point source pollution and variability of nitrate concentrations in water from shallow aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemčić-Jurec, Jasna; Jazbec, Anamarija

    2016-01-01

    Agriculture is one of the several major sources of nitrate pollution, and therefore the EU Nitrate Directive, designed to decrease pollution, has been implemented. Point sources like septic systems and broken sewage systems also contribute to water pollution. Pollution of groundwater by nitrate from 19 shallow wells was studied in a typical agricultural region, middle Podravina, in northwest Croatia. The concentration of nitrate ranged from <0.1 to 367 mg/l in water from wells, and 29.8 % of 253 total samples were above maximum acceptable value of 50 mg/l (MAV). Among regions R1-R6, there was no statistically significant difference in nitrate concentrations (F = 1.98; p = 0.15) during the years 2002-2007. Average concentrations of nitrate in all 19 wells for all the analyzed years were between recommended limit value of 25 mg/l (RLV) and MAV except in 2002 (concentration was under RLV). The results of the repeated measures ANOVA showed statistically significant differences between the wells at the point source distance (proximity) of <10 m, compared to the wells at the point source distance of >20 m (F = 10.6; p < 0.001). Average annual concentrations of nitrate during the years studied are not statistically different, but interaction between proximity and years is statistically significant (F = 2.07; p = 0.04). Results of k-means clustering confirmed division into four clusters according to the pollution. Principal component analysis showed that there is only one significant factor, proximity, which explains 91.6 % of the total variability of nitrate. Differences in water quality were found as a result of different environmental factors. These results will contribute to the implementation of the Nitrate Directive in Croatia and the EU.

  17. Understanding Slag Freeze Linings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fallah-Mehrjardi, Ata; Hayes, Peter C.; Jak, Evgueni

    2014-09-01

    Slag freeze linings, the formation of protective deposit layers on the inner walls of furnaces and reactors, are increasingly used in industrial pyrometallurgical processes to ensure that furnace integrity is maintained in these aggressive, high-temperature environments. Most previous studies of freeze-linings have analyzed the formation of slag deposits based solely on heat transfer considerations. These thermal models have assumed that the interface between the stationary frozen layer and the agitated molten bath at steady-state deposit thickness consists of the primary phase, which stays in contact with the bulk liquid at the liquidus temperature. Recent experimental studies, however, have clearly demonstrated that the temperature of the deposit/liquid bath interface can be lower than the liquidus temperature of the bulk liquid. A conceptual framework has been proposed to explain the observations and the factors influencing the microstructure and the temperature of the interface at steady-state conditions. The observations are consistent with a dynamic steady state that is a balance between (I) the rate of nucleation and growth of solids on detached crystals in a subliquidus layer as this fluid material moves toward the stagnant deposit interface and (II) the dissolution of these detached crystals as they are transported away from the interface by turbulent eddies. It is argued that the assumption that the interface temperature is the liquidus of the bulk material represents only a limiting condition, and that the interface temperature can be between T liquidus and T solidus depending on the process conditions and bath chemistry. These findings have implications for the modeling approach and boundary conditions required to accurately describe these systems. They also indicate the opportunity to integrate considerations of heat and mass flows with the selection of melt chemistries in the design of future high temperature industrial reactors.

  18. Freezing-induced deformation of biomaterials in cryomedicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozcelikkale, Altug

    Cryomedicine utilizes low temperature treatments of biological proteins, cells and tissues for cryopreservation, materials processing and cryotherapy. Lack of proper understanding of cryodamage that occurs during these applications remains to be the primary bottleneck for development of successful tissue cryopreservation and cryosurgery procedures. An engineering approach based on a view of biological systems as functional biomaterials can help identify, predict and control the primary cryodamage mechanisms by developing an understanding of underlying freezing-induced biophysical processes. In particular, freezing constitutes the main structural/mechanical origin of cryodamage and results in significant deformation of biomaterials at multiple length scales. Understanding of these freezing-induced deformation processes and their effects on post-thaw biomaterial functionality is currently lacking but will be critical to engineer improved cryomedicine procedures. This dissertation addresses this problem by presenting three separate but related studies of freezing-induced deformation at multiple length scales including nanometer-scale protein fibrils, single cells and whole tissues. A combination of rigorous experimentation and computational modeling is used to characterize post-thaw biomaterial structure and properties, predict biomaterial behavior and assess its post-thaw biological functionality. Firstly, freezing-induced damage on hierarchical extracellular matrix structure of collagen is investigated at molecular, fibril and matrix levels. Results indicate to a specific kind of fibril damage due to freezing-induced expansion of intrafibrillar fluid. This is followed by a study of freezing-induced cell and tissue deformation coupled to osmotically driven cellular water transport. Computational and semi empirical modeling of these processes indicate that intracellular deformation of the cell during freezing is heterogeneous and can interfere with cellular water transport, thereby leading to previously unconsidered mechanisms of cell freezing response. In addition, cellular water transport is identified as the critical limiting factor on the amount of freezing-induced tissue deformation, particularly in native tissues with high cell densities. Finally, effects of cryopreservation on post-thaw biological functionality of collagen engineered tissue constructs is investigated where cell-matrix interactions during fibroblast migration are considered as the functional response. Simultaneous cell migration and extracellular matrix deformation are characterized. Results show diminished cell-matrix coupling by freeze/thaw accompanied by a subtle decrease in cell migration. A connection between these results and freezing-induced collagen fibril damage is also suggested. Overall, this dissertation provides new fundamental knowledge on cryodamage mechanisms and a collection of novel multi-purpose engineering tools that will open the way for rational design of cryomedicine technologies.

  19. Impacts by point and diffuse micropollutant sources on the stream water quality at catchment scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petersen, M. F.; Eriksson, E.; Binning, P. J.; Bjerg, P. L.

    2012-04-01

    The water quality of surface waters is threatened by multiple anthropogenic pollutants and the large variety of pollutants challenges the monitoring and assessment of the water quality. The aim of this study was to characterize and quantify both point and diffuse sources of micropollutants impacting the water quality of a stream at catchment scale. Grindsted stream in western Jutland, Denmark was used as a study site. The stream passes both urban and agricultural areas and is impacted by severe groundwater contamination in Grindsted city. Along a 12 km reach of Grindsted stream, the potential pollution sources were identified including a pharmaceutical factory site with a contaminated old drainage ditch, two waste deposits, a wastewater treatment plant, overflow structures, fish farms, industrial discharges and diffuse agricultural and urban sources. Six water samples were collected along the stream and analyzed for general water quality parameters, inorganic constituents, pesticides, sulfonamides, chlorinated solvents, BTEXs, and paracetamol and ibuprofen. The latter two groups were not detected. The general water quality showed typical conditions for a stream in western Jutland. Minor impacts by releases of organic matter and nutrients were found after the fish farms and the waste water treatment plant. Nickel was found at concentrations 5.8 - 8.8 μg/l. Nine pesticides and metabolites of both agricultural and urban use were detected along the stream; among these were the two most frequently detected and some rarely detected pesticides in Danish water courses. The concentrations were generally consistent with other findings in Danish streams and in the range 0.01 - 0.09 μg/l; except for metribuzin-diketo that showed high concentrations up to 0.74 μg/l. The groundwater contamination at the pharmaceutical factory site, the drainage ditch and the waste deposits is similar in composition containing among others sulfonamides and chlorinated solvents (including vinyl chloride). Vinyl chloride concentrations surpassed Danish stream water quality criteria with a factor 10. The largest chemical impact occurs at the reach downstream Grindsted city revealing that the main contaminant groundwater discharge zones are found here. The contaminant plume from the factory site north of the stream is known to impact the stream whereas the impact by the old landfill south of the stream remains to be assessed. A conceptual model of the chemical impacts by the identified sources was made, and high impact was assigned to the contaminant plume from the factory site and to the diffuse sources of urban-use and agricultural pesticides. The next step will be a quantification of the sources, which will be presented at the conference.

  20. California State Waters Map Series—Offshore of Pigeon Point, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cochrane, Guy R.; Watt, Janet T.; Dartnell, Peter; Greene, H. Gary; Erdey, Mercedes D.; Dieter, Bryan E.; Golden, Nadine E.; Johnson, Samuel Y.; Endris, Charles A.; Hartwell, Stephen R.; Kvitek, Rikk G.; Davenport, Clifton W.; Krigsman, Lisa M.; Ritchie, Andrew C.; Sliter, Ray W.; Finlayson, David P.; Maier, Katherine L.

    2015-01-01

    Seafloor habitats in the Offshore of Pigeon Point map area lie within the Shelf (continental shelf) megahabitat. Significant rocky outcrops, which support kelp-forest communities in the nearshore and rocky-reef communities in deeper water, dominate the inner shelf waters. Biological productivity resulting from coastal upwelling supports populations of Sooty Shearwater, Western Gull, Common Murre, Cassin’s Auklet, and many other less populous bird species. In addition, an observable recovery of Humpback and Blue Whales has occurred in the area; both species are dependent on coastal upwelling to provide nutrients. The large extent of exposed inner shelf bedrock supports large forests of “bull kelp,” which is well adapted for high-wave-energy environments. Common fish species found in the kelp beds and rocky reefs include lingcod and various species of rockfish and greenling.

  1. Control of glycerol production by rainbow smelt (Osmerus mordax) to provide freeze resistance and allow foraging at low winter temperatures.

    PubMed

    Driedzic, William R; Ewart, K Vanya

    2004-11-01

    The rainbow smelt (Osmerus mordax) is a small anadromous fish that actively feeds under the ice at temperatures as low as the freeze point of seawater. Freezing is avoided through the production of both non-colligative antifreeze protein (AFP) and glycerol that acts in a colligative manner. Glycerol is constantly lost across the gills and skin, thus glycerol production must continue on a sustained basis at low winter temperatures. AFP begins to accumulate in early fall while water temperatures are still high. Glycerol production is triggered when water temperatures decrease to about 5 degrees C. Glycerol levels rapidly increase with carbon flow from dihydroxyacetone phosphate (DHAP) to glycerol 3-phosphate (G3P) to glycerol. Glucose/glycogen serves as the initial carbon source for glycerol accumulation with amino acids contributing thereafter. The period of glycerol accumulation is associated with increases in GPDH mRNA and PEPCK mRNA followed by elevations in protein synthesis and enzyme activities. Plasma glycerol levels may reach in excess of 500 mM in winter. The high freeze resistance allows rainbow smelt to invade water of low temperature and forage for food. The lower the temperature, the higher the glycerol must be, and the higher the glycerol the greater the loss to the environment through diffusion. During the winter, rainbow smelt feed upon protein rich invertebrates with glycerol production being fueled in part by dietary amino acids via the gluconeogenic pathway. At winter temperatures, glycerol is quantitatively more important than AFP in providing freeze resistance of blood; however, the importance of AFPs to other tissues is yet to be assessed. Glycerol levels rapidly plummet in the spring when water temperature is still close to 0 degrees C. During this period, freeze resistance must be provided by AFP alone. Overall, the phenomenon of glycerol production by rainbow smelt reveals an elegant connection of biochemistry to ecology that allows this species to exploit an otherwise unavailable food resource. PMID:15544960

  2. Did Water Leave Its Mark on Mars?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Secosky, James J.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses the missing water on Mars. Describes five experiments simulating conditions on Mars: (1) behavior of dry ice; (2) low-pressure vacuum; (3) freezing point depression; (4) water in hydrated minerals and clay; and (5) properties of carbon dioxide. (YP)

  3. 33 CFR 149.575 - How must objects protruding from the water, other than platforms and single point moorings, be...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false How must objects protruding from the water, other than platforms and single point moorings, be marked? 149.575 Section 149.575 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) DEEPWATER PORTS DEEPWATER PORTS: DESIGN, CONSTRUCTION,...

  4. 40 CFR 141.100 - Criteria and procedures for public water systems using point-of-entry devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Criteria and procedures for public water systems using point-of-entry devices. 141.100 Section 141.100 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS Use of Non-Centralized Treatment Devices...

  5. 33 CFR 149.575 - How must objects protruding from the water, other than platforms and single point moorings, be...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false How must objects protruding from the water, other than platforms and single point moorings, be marked? 149.575 Section 149.575 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) DEEPWATER PORTS DEEPWATER PORTS: DESIGN, CONSTRUCTION,...

  6. 33 CFR 149.575 - How must objects protruding from the water, other than platforms and single point moorings, be...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false How must objects protruding from the water, other than platforms and single point moorings, be marked? 149.575 Section 149.575 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) DEEPWATER PORTS DEEPWATER PORTS: DESIGN, CONSTRUCTION,...

  7. Atmospheric Pressure Glow Discharge for Point-of-Use Water Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindsay, Alexander; Byrns, Brandon; Shannon, Steven; Knappe, Detlef

    2012-10-01

    Treatment of biological and chemical contaminants is an area of growing global interest where atmospheric pressure plasmas can make a significant contribution. Addressing key challenges of volume processing and operational cost, a large volume 162 MHz coaxial air-plasma source has been developed.footnotetextByrns (2012) J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 45 (2012) 195204 Because of VHF ballasting effects, the electric discharge is maintained at a steady glow, allowing formation of critical non-equilibrium chemistry. High densities, ne = 10^11-10^12, have been recorded. The atmospheric nature of the device permits straightforward and efficient treatment of water samples. [H^+] concentrations in 150 milliliter tap water samples have been shown to increase by 10^5 after five minutes of discharge exposure. Recent literature has demonstrated that increasing acidity is strongly correlated with a solution's ability to deactivate microbial contaminants.footnotetextTraylor (2011) J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 44 (2011) 472001 The work presented here will explore the impact of treatment gas, system configuration, and power density on water disinfection and PFC abatement. An array of plasma diagnostics, including OES and electrical measurements, are combined with post-process water analysis, including GC-MS and QT analysis of coliform and E.coli bacteria. Development of volume processing atmospheric plasma disinfection methods offers promise for point-of-use treatments in developing areas of the world, potentially supplementing or replacing supply and weather-dependent disinfection methods.

  8. Assessment of a low-cost, point-of-use, ultraviolet water disinfection technology.

    PubMed

    Brownell, Sarah A; Chakrabarti, Alicia R; Kaser, Forest M; Connelly, Lloyd G; Peletz, Rachel L; Reygadas, Fermin; Lang, Micah J; Kammen, Daniel M; Nelson, Kara L

    2008-03-01

    We describe a point-of-use (POU) ultraviolet (UV) disinfection technology, the UV Tube, which can be made with locally available resources around the world for under $50 US. Laboratory and field studies were conducted to characterize the UV Tube's performance when treating a flowrate of 5 L/min. Based on biological assays with MS2 coliphage, the UV Tube delivered an average fluence of 900+/-80 J/m(2) (95% CI) in water with an absorption coefficient of 0.01 cm(-1). The residence time distribution in the UV Tube was characterized as plug flow with dispersion (Peclet Number = 19.7) and a mean hydraulic residence time of 36 s. Undesirable compounds were leached or produced from UV Tubes constructed with unlined ABS, PVC, or a galvanized steel liner. Lining the PVC pipe with stainless steel, however, prevented production of regulated halogenated organics. A small field study in two rural communities in Baja California Sur demonstrated that the UV Tube reduced E. coli concentrations to less than 1/100 ml in 65 out of 70 samples. Based on these results, we conclude that the UV Tube is a promising technology for treating household drinking water at the point of use. PMID:17998607

  9. Flexible simple point-charge water model with improved liquid-state properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yujie; Tepper, Harald L.; Voth, Gregory A.

    2006-01-01

    In order to introduce flexibility into the simple point-charge (SPC) water model, the impact of the intramolecular degrees of freedom on liquid properties was systematically studied in this work as a function of many possible parameter sets. It was found that the diffusion constant is extremely sensitive to the equilibrium bond length and that this effect is mainly due to the strength of intermolecular hydrogen bonds. The static dielectric constant was found to be very sensitive to the equilibrium bond angle via the distribution of intermolecular angles in the liquid: A larger bond angle will increase the angle formed by two molecular dipoles, which is particularly significant for the first solvation shell. This result is in agreement with the work of Höchtl et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 109, 4927 (1998)]. A new flexible simple point-charge water model was derived by optimizing bulk diffusion and dielectric constants to the experimental values via the equilibrium bond length and angle. Due to the large sensitivities, the parametrization only slightly perturbs the molecular geometry of the base SPC model. Extensive comparisons of thermodynamic, structural, and kinetic properties indicate that the new model is much improved over the standard SPC model and its overall performance is comparable to or even better than the extended SPC model.

  10. Demonstration and evaluation of germicidal UV-LEDs for point-of-use water disinfection.

    PubMed

    Chatterley, Christie; Linden, Karl

    2010-09-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) irradiation is a common disinfection option for water treatment in the developed world. There are a few systems installed in developing countries for point-of-use treatment, but the low-pressure mercury lamps currently used as the UV irradiation source have a number of sustainability issues including a fragile envelope, a lifetime of approximately one year, and they contain mercury. UV light emitting diodes (LEDs) may offer solutions to many of the sustainability issues presented by current UV systems. LEDs are small, efficient, have long lifetimes, and do not contain mercury. Germicidal UV LEDs emitting at 265 nm were evaluated for inactivation of E. coli in water and compared to conventional low-pressure UV lamps. Both systems provided an equivalent level of treatment. A UV-LED prototype was developed and evaluated as a proof-of-concept of this technology for a point-of-use disinfection option, and the economics of UV-LEDs were evaluated. PMID:20375477

  11. The Long-Term Drift of Triple-Point-of-Water Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, X. K.; Ma, C. F.; Zhang, Z.; Wu, H. L.; Qiu, P.; Feng, Y. L.; Zhang, J. T.; Duan, Y. N.

    2008-06-01

    As the triple point of water is of great importance for the International Temperature Scale of 1990 (ITS-90) and for the definition of the unit of thermodynamic temperature, its long-term stability has attracted a great deal of attention. In a study of long-term stability, a mystery has been uncovered. Some triple-point-of-water cells remain stable for many decades, while others decrease with increasing age of the cells, which is called long-term drift. To investigate this mystery, we used cells with different manufacture dates ranging from 1974 to 2002 and compared their analyses, which were done in 1984 and 2003. Using the same model of long-term drift as that used by Hill, the long-term drift rates of the two data sets are 4.7 μK·year-1 and 9.2 μK·year-1, respectively. One is consistent with the observed depression of about 4 μK·year-1 measured by Hill, whereas the other differs greatly from Hill’s result. In addition, corresponding factors influencing long-term drift are discussed in this paper.

  12. Deposition nucleation viewed as homogeneous or immersion freezing in pores and cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcolli, C.

    2013-06-01

    Heterogeneous ice nucleation is an important mechanism for the glaciation of mixed phase clouds and may also be relevant for cloud formation and dehydration at the cirrus cloud level. It is thought to proceed through different mechanisms, namely contact, condensation, immersion and deposition nucleation. Supposedly, deposition nucleation is the only pathway which does not involve liquid water but occurs by direct water vapor deposition on a surface. This study challenges this classical view by putting forward the hypothesis that what is called deposition nucleation is in fact homogeneous or immersion nucleation occurring in pores and cavities that may form between aggregated primary particles and fill with water at relative humidity RHw < 100% because of the inverse Kelvin effect. Evidence for this hypothesis of pore condensation and freezing (PCF) originates from a number of only loosely connected scientific areas. The prime example for PCF is ice nucleation in clay minerals and mineral dusts, for which the data base is best. Studies on freezing in confinement carried out on mesoporous silica materials such as SBA-15, SBA-16, MCM-41, zeolites and KIT have shown that homogeneous ice nucleation occurs abruptly at T=230-235 K in pores with diameters (D) of 3.5-4 nm or larger but only gradually at T=210-230 K in pores with D=2.5-3.5 nm. Melting temperatures in pores are depressed by an amount that can be described by the Gibbs-Thomson equation. Water adsorption isotherms of MCM-41 show that pores with D=3.5-4 nm fill with water at RHw = 56-60% in accordance with an inverse Kelvin effect. Water in such pores should freeze homogeneously for T < 235 K even before relative humidity with respect to ice (RHi) reaches ice saturation. Ice crystal growth by water vapor deposition from the gas phase is therefore expected to set in as soon as RHw > 100%. Pores with D > 7.5 nm fill with water at RHi > 100% for T < 235 K and are likely to freeze homogeneously as soon as they are filled with water. Water in pores can freeze in immersion mode at T > 235 K if the pore walls contain an active site. Pore analysis of clay minerals shows that kaolinites exhibit pore structures with pore diameters of 20-50 nm. The mesoporosity of illites and montmorillonites is characterized by pores with T = 2-5 nm. The number and size of pores is distinctly increased in acid treated montmorillonites like K10. Many clay minerals and mineral dusts show a strong increase in ice nucleation efficiency when temperature is decreased below 235 K. Such an increase is difficult to explain when ice nucleation is supposed to occur by a deposition mechanism, but evident when assuming freezing in pores, because for homogeneous ice nucleation only small pore volumes are needed, while heterogeneous ice nucleation requires larger pore structures to contain at least one active site for immersion nucleation. Together, these pieces of evidence strongly suggest that ice nucleation within pores should be the prevailing freezing mechanism of clay minerals for RHw below water saturation. Extending the analysis to other types of ice nuclei shows that freezing in pores and cracks is probably the prevailing ice nucleation mechanism for glassy and volcanic ash aerosols at RHw below water saturation. Freezing of water in carbon nanotubes might be of significance for ice nucleation by soot aerosols. No case could be identified that gives clear evidence of ice nucleation by water vapor deposition on a solid surface. Inspection of ice nuclei with a close lattice match to ice, such as silver iodide or SnomaxTM, show that for high ice nucleation efficiency below water saturation the presence of impurities or cracks on the surface may be essential. Soluble impurities promote the formation of a liquid phase below water saturation in patches on the surface or as a complete surface layer that offers an environment for immersion freezing. If porous aerosol particles come in contact with semivolatile vapors, these will condense preferentially in pores before a coating on the surface of the particles is formed. A pore partially filled with condensed species attracts water at lower RHw than an empty pore, but the aqueous solution that forms in the pore will freeze at a higher RHi than pure water. The ice nucleation ability of pores completely filled with condensed organic species might be totally impeded. Pores might also be important for preactivation, the capability of a particle to nucleate ice at lower RHi in subsequent experiments when compared to the first initial ice nucleation event. Preactivation has often been explained by persistence of ice embryos at specific sites like dislocations, steps, kinks or pores. However, it is not clear how such features can preserve an ice embryo at RHi < 100%. Rather, ice embryos could be preserved when embedded in water. To keep liquid water at RHw well below 100%, narrow pores are needed but to avoid a strong melting point depression large pores are favorable. A narrow pore opening and a large inner volume are combined in "ink bottle" pores. Such "ink bottle" pores would be suited to preserve ice at RHi < 100% and can arise e.g. in spaces between aggregated particles.

  13. Biomimetic Materials by Freeze Casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porter, Michael M.; Mckittrick, Joanna; Meyers, Marc A.

    2013-06-01

    Natural materials, such as bone and abalone nacre, exhibit exceptional mechanical properties, a product of their intricate microstructural organization. Freeze casting is a relatively simple, inexpensive, and adaptable materials processing method to form porous ceramic scaffolds with controllable microstructural features. After infiltration of a second polymeric phase, hybrid ceramic-polymer composites can be fabricated that closely resemble the architecture and mechanical performance of natural bone and nacre. Inspired by the narwhal tusk, magnetic fields applied during freeze casting can be used to further control architectural alignment, resulting in freeze-cast materials with enhanced mechanical properties.

  14. Assessing point-of-use ultraviolet disinfection for safe water in urban developing communities.

    PubMed

    Barstow, Christina K; Dotson, Aaron D; Linden, Karl G

    2014-12-01

    Residents of urban developing communities often have a tap in their home providing treated and sometimes filtered water but its microbial quality cannot be guaranteed. Point-of-use (POU) disinfection systems can provide safe drinking water to the millions who lack access to clean water in urban communities. While many POU systems exist, there are several concerns that can lead to low user acceptability, including low flow rate, taste and odor issues, high cost, recontamination, and ineffectiveness at treating common pathogens. An ultraviolet (UV) POU system was constructed utilizing developing community-appropriate materials and simple construction techniques based around an inexpensive low-wattage, low pressure UV bulb. The system was tested at the bench scale to characterize its hydrodynamic properties and microbial disinfection efficacy. Hydraulically the system most closely resembled a plug flow reactor with minor short-circuiting. The system was challenge tested and validated for a UV fluence of 50 mJ/cm(2) and greater, over varying flow rates and UV transmittances, corresponding to a greater than 4 log reduction of most pathogenic bacteria, viruses, and protozoa of public health concern. This study presents the designed system and testing results to demonstrate the potential architecture of a low-cost, open-source UV system for further prototyping and field-testing. PMID:25473974

  15. Incorporation of copper nanoparticles into paper for point-of-use water purification

    PubMed Central

    Smith, James A.

    2014-01-01

    As a cost-effective alternative to silver nanoparticles, we have investigated the use of copper nanoparticles in paper filters for point-of-use water purification. This work reports an environmentally benign method for the direct in situ preparation of copper nanoparticles (CuNPs) in paper by reducing sorbed copper ions with ascorbic acid. Copper nanoparticles were quickly formed in less than 10 minutes and were well distributed on the paper fiber surfaces. Paper sheets were characterized by x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, and atomic absorption spectroscopy. Antibacterial activity of the CuNP sheets was assessed for by passing Escherichia coli bacteria suspensions through the papers. The effluent was analyzed for viable bacteria and copper release. The CuNP papers with higher copper content showed a high bacteria reduction of log 8.8 for E. coli. The paper sheets containing copper nanoparticles were effective in inactivating the test bacteria as they passed through the paper. The copper levels released in the effluent water were below the recommended limit for copper in drinking water (1 ppm). PMID:25014431

  16. Incorporation of copper nanoparticles into paper for point-of-use water purification.

    PubMed

    Dankovich, Theresa A; Smith, James A

    2014-10-15

    As a cost-effective alternative to silver nanoparticles, we have investigated the use of copper nanoparticles in paper filters for point-of-use water purification. This work reports an environmentally benign method for the direct in situ preparation of copper nanoparticles (CuNPs) in paper by reducing sorbed copper ions with ascorbic acid. Copper nanoparticles were quickly formed in less than 10 min and were well distributed on the paper fiber surfaces. Paper sheets were characterized by x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, and atomic absorption spectroscopy. Antibacterial activity of the CuNP sheets was assessed for by passing Escherichia coli bacteria suspensions through the papers. The effluent was analyzed for viable bacteria and copper release. The CuNP papers with higher copper content showed a high bacteria reduction of log 8.8 for E. coli. The paper sheets containing copper nanoparticles were effective in inactivating the test bacteria as they passed through the paper. The copper levels released in the effluent water were below the recommended limit for copper in drinking water (1 ppm). PMID:25014431

  17. Freezing of Barley Studied by Infrared Video Thermography1

    PubMed Central

    Pearce, Roger S.; Fuller, Michael P.

    2001-01-01

    Freezing of barley (Hordeum vulgare), Hordeum murinum, and Holcus lanatus was studied using infrared video thermography. In the field, ice could enter H. lanatus leaves through hydathodes. In laboratory tests with barley, initially 0.4% of the leaf water froze, spreading in alternate strips of high and low freezing intensity longitudinally at 1 to 4 cm s−1, and simultaneously spreading laterally at 0.3 cm s−1. Similar results were obtained in the field with H. lanatus. A distinct second, more intense, freezing event spread slowly from the margins of the leaves toward the midrib. Organs of uprooted barley tested in the laboratory froze in this order: nucleated leaf, roots, older leaves, younger leaves, and secondary tillers. When ice spread from one leaf to the rest of the plant the crown delayed spread to the roots and other leaves. There was a longer delay above than below −2°C, helping to protect the crown from freezing during mild frosts. Initial spread of freezing was not damaging. However, the initial spread is a prerequisite for the second freezing event, which can cause damage. The route of the initial spread of ice may be extracellular, drawing water from more gel-like parts of the cell wall. PMID:11154332

  18. The role of time in heterogeneous freezing nucleation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, Timothy P.; Petters, Markus D.

    2013-05-01

    A small fraction of particles in the atmosphere can catalyze ice formation in cloud water drops through heterogeneous freezing nucleation at temperatures warmer than the homogeneous freezing temperature of approximately -38C. The rate for heterogeneous freezing nucleation is dependent on several factors, including the type and surface area of dust that is immersed inside the drop. Although nucleation is an inherently stochastic process resulting from size fluctuations of the incipient ice germ, there is a growing body of literature that suggests that quasi-deterministic models of ice nucleation can describe laboratory experiments. Here we present new experiments and simulations that aim to better constrain theoretical models fitted to laboratory data. We collected ice nucleation data for Arizona Test Dust aerosol immersed in water using a droplet freezing assay setup that allows for the cooling rates to be changed between 10 and 0.01 K min-1. Discrete event simulations based on a variant of the multiple-component stochastic model of heterogeneous freezing nucleation were used to simulate different experimental procedures. The nucleation properties of the dust are specified by four material-dependent parameters that accurately describe the time dependence of the freezing process. We anticipate that the combination of discrete event simulations and a spectrum of experimental procedures described here can be used to design more meaningful laboratory experiments probing ice nucleation and will aid the development of better parameterizations for use in models.

  19. Freeze-drying wet digital prints: An option for salvage?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jürgens, M. C.; Schempp, N.

    2010-06-01

    On the occasion of the collapse of the Historical Archive of the City of Cologne in March 2009 and the ensuing salvage effort, questions were raised about the use of freeze-drying for soaked digital prints, a technique that has not yet been evaluated for these materials. This study examines the effects of immersion, air-drying, drying in a blotter stack, freezing and freeze-drying on 35 samples of major digital printing processes. The samples were examined visually before, during and after testing; evaluation of the results was qualitative. Results show that some prints were already damaged by immersion alone (e.g. bleeding inks and soluble coatings) to the extent that the subsequent choice of drying method made no significant difference any more. For those samples that did survive immersion, air-drying proved to be crucial for water-sensitive prints, since any contact with the wet surface caused serious damage. Less water-sensitive prints showed no damage throughout the entire procedure, regardless of drying method. Some prints on coated media suffered from minor surface disruption up to total delamination of the surface coating due to the formation of ice crystals during shock-freezing. With few exceptions, freeze-drying did not cause additional damage to any of the prints that hadn't already been damaged by freezing. It became clear that an understanding of the process and materials is important for choosing an appropriate drying method.

  20. Freeze Tolerant Radiator for an Advanced EMU

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Copeland, Robert J.; Elliott, Jeannine; Weislogel, Mark

    2004-01-01

    During an Extravehicular Activity (EVA), the astronaut s metabolic heat and the heat produced by the Portable Life Support Unit (PLSS) must be rejected. This heat load is currently rejected by a sublimator, which vents up to eight pounds of water each EVA. However, for advanced space missions of the future, water venting to space needs to be minimized because resupply impacts from earth will be prohibitive. If this heat load could be radiated to space from the PLSS, which has enough surface area to radiate most of the heat, the amount of water now vented could be greatly reduced. Unfortunately, a radiator rejects heat at a relatively constant rate, but the astronauts generate a variable heat load depending on how hard they are working. Without a way to vary the heat removal rate, the astronaut would experience cold discomfort or even frostbite. A proven method allowing a radiator to be turned-down is to sequentially allow tubes that carry the heat transfer fluid to the radiator to freeze. A drawback of current freezable radiators using this method is that they are far to heavy for use on a PLSS, because they use heavy construction to prevent the tubes from bursting as they freeze and thaw. This creates the need for a large radiator to reject most of the heat but with a lightweight tube that doesn t burst as it freezes and thaws. The new freezable radiator for the Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) has features to accommodate the expansion of the radiator fluid when it freezes, and still have the high tube to fin conductance needed to minimize the number and weight of the tubes. Radiator fluid candidates are water and a propylene glycol-water mixture. This design maintains all materials within their elastic limits so that large volume changes can be achieved without breaking the tube. This concept couples this elastic expansion with an extremely lightweight, extremely high conductivity carbon fiber fin that can carry the heat needed to thaw a frozen tube. By using most of the exposed surface area of the PLSS as a radiator, the system can reject about 75% of the highest heat load, and reduce the loss of water through sublimation by a factor of four. The proposed radiator and a small water tank can be no heavier than the current system.

  1. Cloud point extraction, preconcentration and simultaneous spectrophotometric determination of nickel and cobalt in water samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safavi, A.; Abdollahi, H.; Hormozi Nezhad, M. R.; Kamali, R.

    2004-10-01

    Cloud point extraction has been used for the preconcentration and simultaneous spectrophotometric determination of nickel and cobalt after the formation of a complex with 2-amino-cyclopentene-1-dithiocarboxylic acid (ACDA), and latter analysis by spectrophotometer using Triton X-114 as surfactant. The parameters affecting the separation phase and detection process were optimized. Under the optimum experimental conditions (i.e. pH=5, 0.07 mM ACDA, Triton X-114 = 0.25% (w/v)), calibration graphs were linear in the range of 20-500 and 20-200 ?g l -1 with detection limits of 10 and 7.5 ?g l -1 for Ni and Co, respectively. The method was applied to the determination of Ni and Co in natural and waste water samples with satisfactory results.

  2. Cloud point extraction, preconcentration and simultaneous spectrophotometric determination of nickel and cobalt in water samples.

    PubMed

    Safavi, A; Abdollahi, H; Hormozi Nezhad, M R; Kamali, R

    2004-10-01

    Cloud point extraction has been used for the preconcentration and simultaneous spectrophotometric determination of nickel and cobalt after the formation of a complex with 2-amino-cyclopentene-1-dithiocarboxylic acid (ACDA), and latter analysis by spectrophotometer using Triton X-114 as surfactant. The parameters affecting the separation phase and detection process were optimized. Under the optimum experimental conditions (i.e. pH=5, 0.07 mM ACDA, Triton X-114=0.25% (w/v)), calibration graphs were linear in the range of 20-500 and 20-200 microg l(-1) with detection limits of 10 and 7.5 microg l(-1) for Ni and Co, respectively. The method was applied to the determination of Ni and Co in natural and waste water samples with satisfactory results. PMID:15350927

  3. Calculation of electron Dose Point Kernel in water with GEANT4 for medical application

    SciTech Connect

    Guimaraes, C. C.; Sene, F. F.; Martinelli, J. R.

    2009-06-03

    The rapid insertion of new technologies in medical physics in the last years, especially in nuclear medicine, has been followed by a great development of faster Monte Carlo algorithms. GEANT4 is a Monte Carlo toolkit that contains the tools to simulate the problems of particle transport through matter. In this work, GEANT4 was used to calculate the dose-point-kernel (DPK) for monoenergetic electrons in water, which is an important reference medium for nuclear medicine. The three different physical models of electromagnetic interactions provided by GEANT4 - Low Energy, Penelope and Standard - were employed. To verify the adequacy of these models, the results were compared with references from the literature. For all energies and physical models, the agreement between calculated DPKs and reported values is satisfactory.

  4. Semi-Lagrangian integration of a grid-point shallow water model on the sphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdonald, A.; Bates, J. R.

    1988-01-01

    This paper describes a semi-Lagrangian technique for integrating the equations of motion on the global domain. The technique uses an auxiliary spherical coordinate system at each near-polar gridpoint of the latitude-longitude grid; the auxiliary system is obtained by a rotation such that the new equator passes through the gridpoint in question and the new coordinate directions coincide with those of the original system at that point. The technique was applied to the shallow water equations, incorporating a semiimplicit treatment of the adjustment terms on a C-grid, with two-time levels. A five day integration was successfully carried out for a situation involving strong cross-polar flow. No filtering or diffusion was required to maintain stability over a five day period.

  5. Dynamics of protein hydration water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, M.; Emmert, S.; Gulich, R.; Lunkenheimer, P.; Loidl, A.

    2015-09-01

    We present the frequency- and temperature-dependent dielectric properties of lysozyme solutions in a broad concentration regime, measured at subzero temperatures, and compare the results with measurements above the freezing point of water and on hydrated lysozyme powder. Our experiments allow examining the dynamics of unfreezable hydration water in a broad temperature range. The obtained results prove the bimodality of the hydration shell dynamics. In addition, we find indications of a fragile-to-strong transition of hydration water.

  6. Sinkholes in West-central Florida, Freeze Event of 2010

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    More than 110 sinkholes formed in the Dover area of Florida during a freeze event in January 2010.Ground water levels dropped to record-setting lowsas farmers pumped water to irrigate their plants for protection from the cold temperatures. The sinkholes destroyed homes,roads and se...

  7. Sinkholes in West-central Florida, Freeze Event of 2010

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Sinkholes damage roadways and require constant maintenance for road safety. More than 110 sinkholes formed in the Dover area of Florida during a freeze event in January 2010.Ground water levels dropped to record-setting lowsas farmers pumped water to irrigate their plants for protection ...

  8. Sinkholes in West-central Florida, Freeze Event of 2010

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    More than 110 sinkholes formed in the Dover area of Florida during a freeze event in January 2010. Ground water levels dropped to record-setting lows as farmers pumped water to irrigate their plants for protection from the cold temperatures. The sinkholes destroyed homes, roads and se...

  9. Sinkholes in West-central Florida, Freeze Event of 2010

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Sinkholes damage roadways and require constant maintenance for road safety. More than 110 sinkholes formed in the Dover area of Florida during a freeze event in January 2010. Ground water levels dropped to record-setting lows as farmers pumped water to irrigate their plants for protection ...

  10. Sinkholes in West-central Florida, Freeze Event of 2010

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    The entire root perimeter of this tree collapsed in response to subsidence activity. More than 110 sinkholes formed in the Dover area of Florida during a freeze event in January 2010. Ground water levels dropped to record-setting lows as farmers pumped water to irrigate their plants for pr...

  11. Sinkholes in West-central Florida, Freeze Event of 2010

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Sinkholes affect roadway safety and require constant maintenance and monitoring. More than 110 sinkholes formed in the Dover area of Florida during a freeze event in January 2010. Ground water levels dropped to record-setting lows as farmers pumped water to irrigate their plants for p...

  12. Sinkholes in West-central Florida, Freeze Event of 2010

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    A sinkhole formed in a roadway caused traffic to detour around it while it is filled in, stabilized and repaved. More than 110 sinkholes formed in the Dover area of Florida during a freeze event in January 2010. Ground water levels dropped to record-setting lows as farmers pumped water to...

  13. High-pressure freezing and freeze substitution of Arabidopsis for electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Austin, Jotham R

    2014-01-01

    The objectives of electron microscopy ultrastructural studies are to examine cellular architecture and relate the cell's structural machinery to dynamic functional roles. This aspiration is difficult to achieve if specimens have not been adequately preserved in a "living state"; hence specimen preparation is of the utmost importance for the success of any electron micrographic study. High-pressure freezing (HPF)/freeze substitution (FS) has long been recognized as the primer technique for the preservation of ultrastructure in biological samples. In most cases a basic HPF/freeze substitution protocol is sufficient to obtain superior ultrastructural preservation and structural contrast, which allows one to use more advanced microscopy techniques such as 3D electron tomography. However, for plant tissues, which have a thick cell wall, large water-filled vacuoles, and air spaces (all of which are detrimental to cryopreservation), these basic HPF/FS protocols often yield undesirable results. In particular, ice crystal artifacts and the staining of membrane systems are often poorly or negatively stained, which make 3D segmentation of a tomogram difficult. To overcome these problems, various aspects of the HPF/FS protocol can be altered, including the cryo-filler(s) used, freeze substitution cocktail, and the resin infiltration process. This chapter will describe these modifications for the preparation of plant tissues for routine electron microscopic studies, immunocytochemistry, and 3D tomographic electron imaging. PMID:24057382

  14. Including non-point sfources in a water quality trading permit program.

    PubMed

    Collentine, D

    2005-01-01

    There has been overwhelming interest in addressing water quality issues through the use of economic instruments. Much of this attention has focused on the cost efficiencies offered by Transferable Discharge Permit (TDP) systems. Unfortunately, the attempts to start up permit markets which are able to exploit abatement cost differences between sources have not met with the success expected. Two of the reasons for the lack of success that have been taken up in analysis of these programs have been the problem of transaction costs and in the case of non-point sources (NPS), undefined property rights. The composite market design is a proposal for a TDP system which specifically includes agricultural non-point source (NPS) dischargers and addresses both property rights and transaction cost problems. The composite market consists of three interrelated markets each serving a particular function. When the composite market is mature, the total number of permits issued represents the cap on discharges allowed in the catchment. The structure of the composite market allows this system to be phased in over time with existing institutions and limited demands on financing. PMID:15850173

  15. Freeze shoe sampler for the collection of hyporheic zone sediments and porewater.

    PubMed

    Bianchin, M; Smith, L; Beckie, R

    2015-01-01

    The Starr and Ingleton (1992) drive point piston sampler (DPPS) design was modified by fitting it with a Murphy and Herkelrath (1996) type sample-freezing drive shoe (SFDS), which uses liquid carbon dioxide as a cryogen. Liquid carbon dioxide was used to freeze sediments in the lower 0.1 m of the core and the drive-point piston sealed the core at the top preserving the reductive-oxidation (redox) sensitive sediments from the atmosphere and maintaining natural stratigraphy. The use of nitrogen gas to provide positive pressure on the gas system blocked the ingress of water which froze on contact with the cryogen thus blocking the gas lines with ice. With this adaptation to the gas system cores could be collected at greater depths beneath the static water level. This tool was used to collect intact saturated sediment cores from the hyporheic zone of the tidally influenced Fraser River in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada where steep geochemical and microbial gradients develop within the interface between discharging anaerobic groundwater and recharging aerobic river water. In total, 25 cores driven through a 1.5 m sampling interval were collected from the river bed with a mean core recovery of 75%. The ability to deploy this method from a fishing vessel makes the tool more cost effective than traditional marine-based drilling operations which often use barges, tug boats, and drilling rigs. PMID:24825508

  16. 7 CFR 58.621 - Freezing tunnels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Freezing tunnels. 58.621 Section 58.621 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards....621 Freezing tunnels. Freezing tunnels for quick freezing at extremely low temperatures shall...

  17. 7 CFR 58.621 - Freezing tunnels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Freezing tunnels. 58.621 Section 58.621 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards....621 Freezing tunnels. Freezing tunnels for quick freezing at extremely low temperatures shall...

  18. 9 CFR 590.536 - Freezing operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Freezing operations. 590.536 Section..., and Facility Requirements § 590.536 Freezing operations. (a) Freezing rooms shall be kept clean and... products shall be examined by organoleptic examination after freezing to determine their fitness for...

  19. 7 CFR 58.621 - Freezing tunnels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Freezing tunnels. 58.621 Section 58.621 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards....621 Freezing tunnels. Freezing tunnels for quick freezing at extremely low temperatures shall...

  20. 7 CFR 58.621 - Freezing tunnels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Freezing tunnels. 58.621 Section 58.621 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards....621 Freezing tunnels. Freezing tunnels for quick freezing at extremely low temperatures shall...

  1. 7 CFR 58.621 - Freezing tunnels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Freezing tunnels. 58.621 Section 58.621 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards....621 Freezing tunnels. Freezing tunnels for quick freezing at extremely low temperatures shall...

  2. 9 CFR 590.536 - Freezing operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Freezing operations. 590.536 Section..., and Facility Requirements § 590.536 Freezing operations. (a) Freezing rooms shall be kept clean and... products shall be examined by organoleptic examination after freezing to determine their fitness for...

  3. 9 CFR 590.536 - Freezing operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Freezing operations. 590.536 Section..., and Facility Requirements § 590.536 Freezing operations. (a) Freezing rooms shall be kept clean and... products shall be examined by organoleptic examination after freezing to determine their fitness for...

  4. 9 CFR 590.536 - Freezing operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Freezing operations. 590.536 Section..., and Facility Requirements § 590.536 Freezing operations. (a) Freezing rooms shall be kept clean and... products shall be examined by organoleptic examination after freezing to determine their fitness for...

  5. 9 CFR 590.536 - Freezing operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Freezing operations. 590.536 Section..., and Facility Requirements § 590.536 Freezing operations. (a) Freezing rooms shall be kept clean and... products shall be examined by organoleptic examination after freezing to determine their fitness for...

  6. California State Waters Map Series: offshore of Coal Oil Point, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, Samuel Y.; Dartnell, Peter; Cochrane, Guy R.; Golden, Nadine E.; Phillips, Eleyne L.; Ritchie, Andrew C.; Kvitek, Rikk G.; Dieter, Bryan E.; Conrad, James E.; Lorenson, T.D.; Krigsman, Lisa M.; Greene, H. Gary; Endris, Charles A.; Seitz, Gordon G.; Finlayson, David P.; Sliter, Ray W.; Wong, Florence L.; Erdey, Mercedes D.; Gutierrez, Carlos I.; Leifer, Ira; Yoklavich, Mary M.; Draut, Amy E.; Hart, Patrick E.; Hostettler, Frances D.; Peters, Kenneth E.; Kvenvolden, Keith A.; Rosenbauer, Robert J.; Fong, Grace

    2014-01-01

    In 2007, the California Ocean Protection Council initiated the California Seafloor Mapping Program (CSMP), designed to create a comprehensive seafloor map of high-resolution bathymetry, marine benthic habitats, and geology within the 3-nautical-mile limit of California’s State Waters. The CSMP approach is to create highly detailed seafloor maps through collection, integration, interpretation, and visualization of swath sonar data, acoustic backscatter, seafloor video, seafloor photography, high-resolution seismic-reflection profiles, and bottom-sediment sampling data. The map products display seafloor morphology and character, identify potential marine benthic habitats, and illustrate both the surficial seafloor geology and shallow (to about 100 m) subsurface geology. The Offshore of Coal Oil Point map area lies within the central Santa Barbara Channel region of the Southern California Bight. This geologically complex region forms a major biogeographic transition zone, separating the cold-temperate Oregonian province north of Point Conception from the warm-temperate California province to the south. The map area is in the southern part of the Western Transverse Ranges geologic province, which is north of the California Continental Borderland. Significant clockwise rotation—at least 90°—since the early Miocene has been proposed for the Western Transverse Ranges province, and geodetic studies indicate that the region is presently undergoing north-south shortening. Uplift rates (as much as 2.0 mm/yr) that are based on studies of onland marine terraces provide further evidence of significant shortening. The cities of Goleta and Isla Vista, the main population centers in the map area, are in the western part of a contiguous urban area that extends eastward through Santa Barbara to Carpinteria. This urban area is on the south flank of the east-west-trending Santa Ynez Mountains, on coalescing alluvial fans and uplifted marine terraces underlain by folded and faulted Miocene bedrock. In the map area, the relatively low-relief, elevated coastal bajada narrows from about 2.5 km wide in the east to less than 500 m wide in the west. Several beaches line the actively utilized coastal zone, including Isla Vista County Park beach, Coal Oil Point Reserve, and Goleta Beach County Park. The beaches are subject to erosion each winter during storm-wave attack, and then they undergo gradual recovery or accretion during the more gentle wave climate of the late spring, summer, and fall months. The Offshore of Coal Oil Point map area lies in the central part of the Santa Barbara littoral cell, which is characterized by littoral drift to the east-southeast. Longshore drift rates have been reported to range from about 160,000 to 800,000 tons/yr, averaging 400,000 tons/yr. Sediment supply to the western and central parts of the littoral cell, including the map area, is largely from relatively small transverse coastal watersheds. Within the map area, these coastal watersheds include (from east to west) Las Llagas Canyon, Gato Canyon, Las Varas Canyon, Dos Pueblos Canyon, Eagle Canyon, Tecolote Canyon, Winchester Canyon, Ellwood Canyon, Glen Annie Canyon, and San Jose Creek. The Santa Ynez and Santa Maria Rivers, the mouths of which are about 100 to 140 km northwest of the map area, are not significant sediment sources because Point Conception and Point Arguello provide obstacles to downcoast sediment transport and also because much of their sediment load is trapped in dams. The Ventura and Santa Clara Rivers, the mouths of which are about 45 to 55 km southeast of the map area, are much larger sediment sources. Still farther east, eastward-moving sediment in the littoral cell is trapped by Hueneme and Mugu Canyons and then transported to the deep-water Santa Monica Basin. The offshore part of the map area consists of a relatively flat and shallow continental shelf, which dips gently seaward (about 0.8° to 1.0°) so that water depths at the shelf break, roughly coincident with the California’s State Waters limit, are about 90 m. This part of the Santa Barbara Channel is relatively well protected from large Pacific swells from the north and northwest by Point Conception and from the south and southwest by offshore islands and banks. The shelf is underlain by variable amounts of upper Quaternary marine and fluvial sediments deposited as sea level fluctuated in the late Pleistocene. The large (130 km2) Goleta landslide complex lies along the shelf break in the southern part of the map area. This compound slump complex may have been initiated more than 200,000 years ago, but it also includes three recent failures that may have been generated between 8,000 to 10,000 years ago. A local, 5- to 10-m-high tsunami may have been generated from these failure events. The map area has had a long history of hydrocarbon development, which began in 1928 with discovery of the Ellwood oil field. Subsequent discoveries in the offshore include South Ellwood offshore oil field, Coal Oil Point oil field, and Naples oil and gas field. Development of South Ellwood offshore field began in 1966 from platform “Holly,” the last platform to be installed in California’s State Waters. The area also is known for “the world’s most spectacular marine hydrocarbon seeps,” and large tar seeps are exposed on beaches east of the mouth of Goleta Slough. Offshore seeps adjacent to South Ellwood oil field release about 40 tons per day of methane and about 19 tons per day of ethane, propane, butane, and higher hydrocarbons. Seafloor habitats in the broad Santa Barbara Channel region consist of significant amounts of soft sediment and isolated areas of rocky habitat that support kelp-forest communities nearshore and rocky-reef communities in deep water. The potential marine benthic habitat types mapped in the Offshore of Coal Oil Point map area are directly related to its Quaternary geologic history, geomorphology, and active sedimentary processes. These potential habitats, which lie primarily within the Shelf (continental shelf) but also partly within the Flank (basin flank or continental slope) megahabitats, range from soft, unconsolidated sediment to hard sedimentary bedrock. This heterogeneous seafloor provides promising habitat for rockfish, groundfish, crabs, shrimp, and other marine benthic organisms.

  7. Measuring Total Column Water Vapor by Pointing an Infrared Thermometer at the Sky

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mims, Forrest M., III; Chambers, Lin H.; Brooks, David R.

    2011-01-01

    A 2-year study affirms that the temperature (Tz) indicated by an inexpensive ($20 to $60) IR thermometer pointed at the cloud-free zenith sky provides an approximate indication of the total column water vapor (precipitable water or PW). PW was measured by a MICROTOPS II sun photometer. The coefficient of correlation (r2) of the PW and Tz was 0.90, and the rms difference was 3.2 mm. A comparison of the Tz data with the PW provided by a GPS site 31 km NNE yielded an r2 of 0.79, and an rms difference of 5.8 mm. An expanded study compared Tz from eight IR thermometers with PW at various times during the day and night from 17 May to 18 October 2010, mainly at the Texas site and 10 days at Hawaii's Mauna Loa Observatory (MLO). The best results of this comparison were provided by two IR thermometers models that yielded an r2 of 0.96 and an rms difference with the PW of 2.7 mm. The results of both the ongoing 2-year study and the 5-month instrument comparison show that IR thermometers can measure PW with an accuracy (rms difference/mean PW) approaching 10%, the accuracy typically ascribed to sun photometers.

  8. Pollution of surface waters by metalaxyl and nitrate from non-point sources.

    PubMed

    Bermúdez-Couso, Alipio; Fernández-Calviño, David; Álvarez-Enjo, Manuel Ali; Simal-Gándara, Jesús; Nóvoa-Muñoz, Juan Carlos; Arias-Estévez, Manuel

    2013-09-01

    The mobility of contaminants in soil is highly dependent upon the characteristics of the contaminant chemical and the properties of the soil. In order to explore these relationships, the district of A Limia (Galicia, NW Spain) was selected as the study area--a cropland devoted to growing potatoes, where the soil had been managed intensively over the last 50 years. The soil was characterised by low slopes with the water table located very close to the soil surface. Our aim was to study the influence of high and intensive crop production on the water bodies and non-point source contamination, with a particular focus on metalaxyl and nitrate. The highest concentrations of metalaxyl occurred when rainfalls were low and in zones of the study area where natural hydrology was significantly altered by numerous drainage canals. The spatial and temporal distributions of the nitrate also showed a high variability, with the interaction between seasons and sampling area being the most significant factor in explaining the levels found. PMID:23738984

  9. Instantaneous normal mode analysis for intermolecular and intramolecular vibrations of water from atomic point of view

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Yu-Chun; Tang, Ping-Han; Wu, Ten-Ming; National Center for Theoretical Sciences, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan

    2013-11-28

    By exploiting the instantaneous normal mode (INM) analysis for models of flexible molecules, we investigate intermolecular and intramolecular vibrations of water from the atomic point of view. With two flexible SPC/E models, our investigations include three aspects about their INM spectra, which are separated into the unstable, intermolecular, bending, and stretching bands. First, the O- and H-atom contributions in the four INM bands are calculated and their stable INM spectra are compared with the power spectra of the atomic velocity autocorrelation functions. The unstable and intermolecular bands of the flexible models are also compared with those of the SPC/E model of rigid molecules. Second, we formulate the inverse participation ratio (IPR) of the INMs, respectively, for the O- and H-atom and molecule. With the IPRs, the numbers of the three species participated in the INMs are estimated so that the localization characters of the INMs in each band are studied. Further, by the ratio of the IPR of the H atom to that of the O atom, we explore the number of involved OH bond per molecule participated in the INMs. Third, by classifying simulated molecules into subensembles according to the geometry of their local environments or their H-bond configurations, we examine the local-structure effects on the bending and stretching INM bands. All of our results are verified to be insensible to the definition of H-bond. Our conclusions about the intermolecular and intramolecular vibrations in water are given.

  10. 33 CFR 334.412 - Albemarle Sound, Pamlico Sound, Harvey Point and adjacent waters, NC; restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Albemarle Sound, Pamlico Sound... REGULATIONS § 334.412 Albemarle Sound, Pamlico Sound, Harvey Point and adjacent waters, NC; restricted area. (a) The area. Beginning on the north shore of Albemarle Sound and the easternmost tip of Harvey...

  11. 33 CFR 334.412 - Albemarle Sound, Pamlico Sound, Harvey Point and adjacent waters, NC; restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Albemarle Sound, Pamlico Sound... REGULATIONS § 334.412 Albemarle Sound, Pamlico Sound, Harvey Point and adjacent waters, NC; restricted area. (a) The area. Beginning on the north shore of Albemarle Sound and the easternmost tip of Harvey...

  12. 33 CFR 334.412 - Albemarle Sound, Pamlico Sound, Harvey Point and adjacent waters, NC; restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Albemarle Sound, Pamlico Sound... REGULATIONS § 334.412 Albemarle Sound, Pamlico Sound, Harvey Point and adjacent waters, NC; restricted area. (a) The area. Beginning on the north shore of Albemarle Sound and the easternmost tip of Harvey...

  13. 33 CFR 334.412 - Albemarle Sound, Pamlico Sound, Harvey Point and adjacent waters, NC; restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Albemarle Sound, Pamlico Sound... REGULATIONS § 334.412 Albemarle Sound, Pamlico Sound, Harvey Point and adjacent waters, NC; restricted area. (a) The area. Beginning on the north shore of Albemarle Sound and the easternmost tip of Harvey...

  14. 33 CFR 334.412 - Albemarle Sound, Pamlico Sound, Harvey Point and adjacent waters, NC; restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Albemarle Sound, Pamlico Sound... REGULATIONS § 334.412 Albemarle Sound, Pamlico Sound, Harvey Point and adjacent waters, NC; restricted area. (a) The area. Beginning on the north shore of Albemarle Sound and the easternmost tip of Harvey...

  15. Noninvasive Determination of Anaerobic Threshold Based on the Heart Rate Deflection Point in Water Cycling.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Stephanie S; Brasil, Roxana M; Alberton, Cristine L; Ferreira, Hector K; Bagatini, Natália C; Calatayud, Joaquin; Colado, Juan C

    2016-02-01

    Pinto, SS, Brasil, RM, Alberton, CL, Ferreira, HK, Bagatini, NC, Calatayud, J, and Colado, JC. Noninvasive determination of anaerobic threshold based on the heart rate deflection point in water cycling. J Strength Cond Res 30(2): 518-524, 2016-This study compared heart rate (HR), oxygen uptake (V[Combining Dot Above]O2), percentage of maximal HR (%HRmax), percentage of maximal V[Combining Dot Above]O2, and cadence (Cad) related to the anaerobic threshold (AT) during a water cycling maximal test between heart rate deflection point (HRDP) and ventilatory (VT) methods. In addition, the correlations between both methods were assessed for all variables. The test was performed by 27 men in a cycle ergometer in an aquatic environment. The protocol started at a Cad of 100 b·min for 3 minutes with subsequent increments of 15 b·min every 2 minutes until exhaustion. A paired two-tailed Student's t-test was used to compare the variables between the HRDP and VT methods. The Pearson product-moment correlation test was used to correlate the same variables determined by the 2 methods. There was no difference in HR (166 ± 13 vs. 166 ± 13 b·min), V[Combining Dot Above]O2 (38.56 ± 6.26 vs. 39.18 ± 6.13 ml·kg·min), %HRmax (89.24 ± 3.84 vs. 89.52 ± 4.29%), V[Combining Dot Above]O2max (70.44 ± 7.99 vs. 71.64 ± 8.32%), and Cad (174 ± 14 b·min vs. 171 ± 8 b·min) related to AT between the HRDP and VT methods. Moreover, significant relationships were found between the methods to determine the AT for all variables analyzed (r = 0.57-0.97). The estimation of the HRDP may be a noninvasive and easy method to determine the AT, which could be used to adapt individualized training intensities to practitioners during water cycling classes. PMID:26200195

  16. Coastal water circulation patterns around the Northern Channel Islands and Point Conception, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fewings, Melanie R.; Washburn, Libe; Ohlmann, J. Carter

    2015-11-01

    The Northern Channel Islands in California host multiple Marine Protected Areas containing kelp forest ecosystems. Little is known about the water circulation onshore of the 20-m isobath. We use water velocity recorded at 21 sites near the 15-m isobath at the Islands and mainland during 1999-2012 to describe the water circulation on time scales of days to months. The mean circulation is eastward or weak at the Islands but poleward along the mainland (speeds 0-10 cm s-1). The subinertial-frequency along-shelf flow is surface-intensified and reverses direction on time scales of days. In summer, the flow becomes more poleward throughout the region. The mean cross-shelf flow profiles are strikingly similar at most sites, with flow speeds 1-2 cm s-1. The mean flow near bottom in the vicinity of the kelp forests is offshore. The time-varying, two-layered response to wind is stronger, up to 6 cm s-1. The flushing time of the shelf onshore of the 15-m isobath is short, at most ∼2 dy. At a few sites exposed to the prevailing wind, up to 60% of the velocity variance is predictable from wind measured in the Santa Barbara Channel. In the lee of Point Conception or at the Islands, however, regional wind explains little of the velocity variance. During weak winds, the velocity at some mainland, but not Island, sites responds to pressure gradients measured along the mainland coast. These pressure gradients are associated with local wind relaxations at Pt. Conception, not with remotely-generated coastal-trapped waves.

  17. White Spruce Biochar for Point-of-Use Drinking Water Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cliggett, M. S.; Murdoch, L.; Soria, J. A.; Dotson, A.

    2014-12-01

    Small systems regularly struggle to produce treated drinking water compliant with the health standards established by the USEPA thus prompting an obvious need for appropriate innovative treatment solutions. Of these potential solutions, point-of-use treatment devices designed to effectively reduce chemical contaminants in residences using inexpensive, replaceable sorbent materials may be best suited. Our current USEPA-funded project focuses on the production, performance and introduced application of a locally produced Alaskan biochar intended for use as an alternative sorbent media in point-of-use filtration technology. Conducted through the University of Alaska Anchorage, this research effort attempts to develop our value-added biochar product into a sustainable, single-media sorbent capable of removing multiple contaminants from groundwater sources. In this study, the sorptive efficiencies of White Spruce biochar for regulated organic (TOC) and inorganic (As, Cl2, F-) contaminants are experimentally evaluated using dynamic, small scale column testing. To achieve optimal understanding of White Spruce biochar sorption and identify the most effective type of sorbent material, a wide array of production technologies and processing conditions were conducted. Lower conversion temperatures (450-550 oC) were achieved in the laboratory in the absence of oxygen using a manufactured pyrolysis unit while higher temperature ranges (800-1000oC) were achieved in field environments using a custom-built, low oxygen gasification system. Differences in production technologies and corresponding temperature ranges may impact biochar compositions and subsequent surface areas and possibly influence each material's ability to effectively sorb targeted contaminants. Small scale column testing was chosen for this project due to its convenience as a bench-scale technology and scalability to point-of-use devices. The results of this project will reveal the practicality of using this low-cost, sustainable sorbent in small-scale, point-of-use applications and ultimately establish any evidence for this product's undiscovered placement in innovative treatment solutions. This poster will present our biochar production and characterization methodology and treatment efficacy results.

  18. Size control in production and freeze-drying of poly-ε-caprolactone nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Zelenková, Tereza; Fissore, Davide; Marchisio, Daniele L; Barresi, Antonello A

    2014-06-01

    This work is focused on the control of poly-ε-caprolactone nanoparticle characteristics, notably size and size distribution, in both the production and preservation (by using freeze-drying) stages. Nanoparticles were obtained by employing the solvent displacement method in a confined impinging jets mixer. The effect of several operating conditions, namely, initial polymer concentration and solvent-to-antisolvent flow rate ratio, and the influence of postprocessing conditions, such as final dilution and solvent evaporation, on nanoparticle characteristics was investigated. Further addition of antisolvent (water) after preparation was demonstrated to be effective in obtaining stable nanoparticles, that is, avoiding aggregation that would result in larger particles. On the contrary, solvent (acetone) evaporation was shown to have a small effect on the final nanoparticle characteristics. Eventually, freeze-drying of the solutions containing nanoparticles, after solvent evaporation, was also investigated. To ensure maximum nanoparticles stability, lyoprotectants (e.g., sucrose and mannitol) and steric stabilizers (e.g., Cremophor EL and Poloxamer 388) had to be added to the suspensions. The efficacy of the selected lyoprotectants, in the presence (or absence) of steric stabilizers, and in various concentrations, to avoid particle aggregation during the freeze-drying process was investigated, thus pointing to the optimal formulation. PMID:24737658

  19. Freezing potentials arising on solidification of dilute aqueous solutions of electrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bronshteyn, Viktor L.; Chernov, Alexander A.

    1991-05-01

    A theory of the Workman-Reynolds effect [E.J. Workman and S.E. Reynolds, Phys. Rev. 78 (1950) 254] - the difference in electric potentials between dilute aqueous solution (water with impurities) and an ice crystal growing from the solution - is developed. The effect arises from inequality between distribution coefficients for solute cations and anions. At the beginning of solidification, the predominantly trapped ions from in ice a space charge layer parallel to the ice-water interface. An excess of counterions accumulates in the water next to the interface. The impurity cations and anions in ice then are neutralized by highly mobile OH - and H 3O + groups (ionization defects) supplied by thermal dissociation of H 2O molecules in ice. Uncompensated ionization defects remaining after neutralization are moved by the electric field to the growing interface, encountering and neutralizing ions of solute. Thus the space charge layer of impurity follows the growth front. At the same time the oppositely charged layer of counterions is pushed ahead of the interface. The potential difference between the two layers - here considered as "capacitor plates" - is the freezing potential. It is calculated taking into account a current of OH - and H 3O + ions from water to ice. Our theory predicts that the freezing potential arises only when the product of growth rate and impurity concentration at the front exceeds a critical value that depends on pH, at which point the potential increases with the growth rate up to tens and hundreds of volts. The calculations presented in this paper qualitatively explain the experimental dependence of the transient potential difference on crystal thickness, rate of crystal growth, initial solute concentration, and the pH of water. In the case of instability of the ice crystallization front the theory predicts a rapid neutralization of the electrical charge in ice, a decrease of the crystallization potential, and a substantial change in acidity of the water remaining unfrozen. This change in pH is proportional to the logarithm of the ratio of the total ice-water interface area and the unfrozen water volume. Chemical reactions caused by this change in pH are called freezing (crystallization) hydrolysis. The experiments described demonstrate freezing hydrolysis of potassium ferricyanide (a reduction of K 3Fe(CN) 6 to K 4Fe(CN) 6) in a frozen NaCl-K 3Fe(CN) 6-H 2O solution.

  20. Facing freeze: social threat induces bodily freeze in humans.

    PubMed

    Roelofs, Karin; Hagenaars, Muriel A; Stins, John

    2010-11-01

    Freezing is a common defensive response in animals threatened by predators. It is characterized by reduced body motion and decreased heart rate (bradycardia). However, despite the relevance of animal defense models in human stress research, studies have not shown whether social threat cues elicit similar freeze-like responses in humans. We investigated body sway and heart rate in 50 female participants while they were standing on a stabilometric force platform and viewing cues that were socially threatening, socially neutral, and socially affiliative (angry, neutral, and happy faces, respectively). Posturographic analyses showed that angry faces (compared with neutral faces and happy faces) induced significant reductions in body sway. In addition, the reduced body sway for angry faces was accompanied by bradycardia and correlated significantly with subjective anxiety. Together, these findings indicate that spontaneous body responses to social threat cues involve freeze-like behavior in humans that mimics animal freeze responses. These findings open avenues for studying human freeze responses in relation to various sociobiological markers and social-affective disorders. PMID:20876881

  1. Non-Equilibrium Plasma Applications for Water Purification Supporting Human Spaceflight and Terrestrial Point-of-Use

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blankson, Isaiah M.; Foster, John E.; Adamovsky, Grigory

    2016-01-01

    2016 NASA Glenn Technology Day Panel Presentation on May 24, 2016. The panel description is: Environmental Impact: NASA Glenn Water Capabilities Both global water scarcity and water treatment concerns are two of the most predominant environmental issues of our time. Glenn researchers share insights on a snow sensing technique, hyper spectral imaging of Lake Erie algal blooms, and a discussion on non-equilibrium plasma applications for water purification supporting human spaceflight and terrestrial point-of-use. The panel moderator will be Bryan Stubbs, Executive Director of the Cleveland Water Alliance.

  2. Recent changes in the frequency of freezing precipitation in North America and Northern Eurasia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groisman, Pavel Ya; Bulygina, Olga N.; Yin, Xungang; Vose, Russell S.; Gulev, Sergey K.; Hanssen-Bauer, Inger; Førland, Eirik

    2016-04-01

    Freezing rain and freezing drizzle events represent a critical feature of many regions of the world. Even at low intensities, these events often result in natural hazards that cause damage to housing, communication lines, and other man-made infrastructure. These events usually occur near the 0 °C isotherm. In a changing climate, this isotherm will not disappear, but its position in space and time will likely change as will the geography of freezing precipitation. A larger influx of water vapor into the continents from the oceans may also increase the amount and frequency of freezing precipitation events. This paper assesses our current understanding of recent changes in freezing precipitation for the United States, Canada, Norway, and Russia. The research is part of a larger GEWEX Cross-Cut Project addressing ‘cold/shoulder season precipitation near 0 °C’. Using an archive of 874 long-term time series (40 years of data) of synoptic observations for these four countries, we document the climatology of daily freezing rain and freezing drizzle occurrences as well as trends therein. The regions with the highest frequency of freezing rains (from 3 to 8 days per year) reside in the northeastern quadrant of the conterminous United States and adjacent areas of southeastern Canada south of 50 °N and over the south and southwest parts of the Great East European Plain. The frequency of freezing drizzle exceeds the frequency of freezing rain occurrence in all areas. During the past decade, the frequency of freezing rain events somewhat decreased over the southeastern US. In North America north of the Arctic Circle, it increased by about 1 day yr‑1. Over Norway, freezing rain occurrences increased substantially, especially in the Norwegian Arctic. In European Russia and western Siberia, the frequency of freezing rain somewhat increased (except the southernmost steppe regions and the Arctic regions) while freezing drizzle frequency decreased over entire Russia.

  3. Freezing of Martian streams under climatic conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carr, M. H.

    1984-01-01

    The valley networks of Mars are widely believed to have formed at a time when climatic conditions on the planet were significantly different from those that currently prevail. This view arises from the following observations: (1) the valleys form integrated branching networks which suggests fluid drainage, and water is the most plausible fluid, (2) the present atmosphere contains only minute amounts of water, (3) the networks appear to be more akin to terrestrial valleys that are eroded by streams of modest discharges than features that form by catastrophic floods, and (4) small streams of water will rapidly freeze under present climatic conditions. Climatic conditions at the time of formation of the valleys are studied based on the assumption that they were cut by running water.

  4. The Freezing Conditions of Planets: Effect of Obliquity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, Y.; Abe-Ouchi, A.

    2002-12-01

    Condition for the occurrence of the completely frozen state (a "snow-ball" state) might be a critical measure related to the habitability of the planet. It is investigated with a particular reference to the obliquity for both a land planet case and an aqua planet case. Obliquity change may cause freezing and unfreezing of planet if the freezing condition depends on the obliquity. Effect of obliquity on the freezing is also an important issue for the investigation of the paleo-Mars. Here we investigated the freezing condition by a general circulation model, CCSR/NIES AGCM 5.4g. We applied the Earth condition, but assumed no topography and applied a bucket model with the saturation depth of 10 cm for ground water calculation for the land planet case and 50m slab ocean for the aqua planet case. The results are summarized as follows: 1. A land planet shows stronger resistance to the complete freezing than an aqua planet. 2. A land planet in an oblique regime falls in the completely frozen state at a smaller solar constant than an upright regime. 3. On a land planet in an oblique regime, low latitude area is more susceptible to freezing than the mid latitude area. Implication for the paleo-Mars will be discussed in the presentation.

  5. Review: freeze concentration technology applied to dairy products.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, J; Hernández, E; Auleda, J M; Raventós, M

    2011-02-01

    Freeze concentration is a process of concentrating liquid products by freezing the water content and subsequently removing the so-formed ice crystals from the food system. In dairy processing, this technology offers the advantage of minimizing the heat abuse of sensitive milk components, such as proteins and flavors. It thus provides an opportunity for producing dairy ingredients with enhanced functional and organoleptic qualities. By freeze concentration, skim milk has been concentrated up to 40 wt% total solids (TS) and whole milk up to 44 wt% TS. Lactose and lipids are more concentrated in the ice fraction than in the concentrated fraction. Proteins (casein and whey protein) decrease the ice growth rate and the high viscosity is a limiting factor for the freeze concentration of both skim milk and whole milk. In this study, the most important studies relating to the suspension, block and layer freeze concentration of milk are summarized, analyzing results and indicating how freeze concentration process efficiency of dairy products can be improved. PMID:21364040

  6. A critical evaluation of two point-of-use water treatment technologies: can they provide water that meets WHO drinking water guidelines?

    PubMed

    Murphy, Heather M; McBean, Edward A; Farahbakhsh, Khosrow

    2010-12-01

    Point-of-use (POU) technologies have been proposed as solutions for meeting the Millennium Development Goal (MDG) for safe water. They reduce the risk of contamination between the water source and the home, by providing treatment at the household level. This study examined two POU technologies commonly used around the world: BioSand and ceramic filters. While the health benefits in terms of diarrhoeal disease reduction have been fairly well documented for both technologies, little research has focused on the ability of these technologies to treat other contaminants that pose health concerns, including the potential for formation of contaminants as a result of POU treatment. These technologies have not been rigorously tested to see if they meet World Health Organization (WHO) drinking water guidelines. A study was developed to evaluate POU BioSand and ceramic filters in terms of microbiological and chemical quality of the treated water. The following parameters were monitored on filters in rural Cambodia over a six-month period: iron, manganese, fluoride, nitrate, nitrite and Escherichia coli. The results revealed that these technologies are not capable of consistently meeting all of the WHO drinking water guidelines for these parameters. PMID:20705976

  7. Comparative Freezing Patterns in Stems of Cherry and Azalea 1

    PubMed Central

    Dennis, Frank G.; Lumis, Glen P.; Olien, C. Robert

    1972-01-01

    Ice formation in stems, as determined by means of an electrophoretic mobility technique, occurs much more rapidly in azalea than in sour cherry. The difference is more marked in the bark than in the wood. Disrupting the structure of the tissues completely eliminates differences in freezing patterns, although gross anatomical differences do not appear to account for differences in species response. Microscopic examination of frozen stems indicated that little redistribution of water occurred during freezing in azalea, and the tissues were disrupted as these crystals developed. In cherry, on the other hand, water diffused to nucleating centers where crystal growth was not opposed, giving rise to “glaciers.” PMID:16658210

  8. Comparative freezing patterns in stems of cherry and azalea.

    PubMed

    Dennis, F G; Lumis, G P; Olien, C R

    1972-11-01

    Ice formation in stems, as determined by means of an electrophoretic mobility technique, occurs much more rapidly in azalea than in sour cherry. The difference is more marked in the bark than in the wood. Disrupting the structure of the tissues completely eliminates differences in freezing patterns, although gross anatomical differences do not appear to account for differences in species response. Microscopic examination of frozen stems indicated that little redistribution of water occurred during freezing in azalea, and the tissues were disrupted as these crystals developed. In cherry, on the other hand, water diffused to nucleating centers where crystal growth was not opposed, giving rise to "glaciers." PMID:16658210

  9. Cirrus crystal nucleation by homogeneous freezing of solution droplets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heymsfield, Andrew J.; Sabin, Robert M.

    1989-01-01

    A numerical model consisting of a system of differential equations is used to study cirrus crystal nucleation in a rising parcel containing a distribution of cloud condensation nuclei. The evolution of the particle population and the thermodynamic variables in the parcel are examined. The results suggest that, if homogeneous freezing is not considered, liquid water should be detected below -40 C. If homogeneous freezing is considered, the rapid growth of ice crystals and vapor depletion prevent water saturation from being reached. It is shown that the likelihood of a droplet being frozen is increased by lower temperatures, larger droplet diameter, or lower solution density.

  10. Freezing efficiency of Silver Iodide, ATD and Kaolinite in the contact freezing mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagare, Baban; Marcolli, Claudia; Stetzer, Olaf; Lohmann, Ulrike

    2014-05-01

    The importance of heterogeneous ice nucleation via contact freezing is one of the open questions in the atmospheric science community. In our laboratory, we built the Collision Nucleation CHamber (CLINCH) (Ladino et al. 2011) in which falling cloud droplets can collide with aerosol particles. In this study, contact freezing experiments are conducted to investigate the ice nucleation ability of silver iodide (AgI), kaolinite and Arizona Test Dust (ATD). Silver iodide has been known for its ice nucleation ability since 1940s (Vonnegut 1947) while kaolinite is a clay mineral and known to be a moderate ice nucleus. ATD is a commercial dust sample used by many groups to compare different setups. In CLINCH, size selected aerosol particles collide with water droplets of 80 m diameter. With the extension in chamber length it is possible to vary the interaction time of ice nuclei and the droplets. Our experiments are performed between -10 to -36 C for various concentrations of ice nuclei and different interaction times. The frozen fraction of the droplets is determined using the custom-made depolarization detector IODE (Nicolet et al., 2010). Depolarization of linearly polarized incident laser light is used to determine the ratio of frozen droplets to all droplets. Frozen fractions of the three particle types with different residence times from CLINCH will be presented in this study. The number of collisions between a single droplet and several aerosol particles can be calculated by accounting for the theoretical collision efficiency at the experimental conditions in order to obtain the freezing efficiency (frozen fraction/number of collisions). Nucleation efficiency is compared with other contact freezing studies and with immersion freezing

  11. Hepatitis B vaccine freezing in the Indonesian cold chain: evidence and solutions.

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Carib M.; Wibisono, Hariadi; Purwanto, Hary; Mansyur, Isa; Moniaga, Vanda; Widjaya, Anton

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To document and characterize freezing temperatures in the Indonesian vaccine cold chain and to evaluate the feasibility of changes designed to reduce the occurrence of freezing. METHODS: Data loggers were used to measure temperatures of shipments of hepatitis B vaccine from manufacturer to point of use. Baseline conditions and three intervention phases were monitored. During each of the intervention phases, vaccines were removed progressively from the standard 2-8 degrees C cold chain. FINDINGS: Freezing temperatures were recorded in 75% of baseline shipments. The highest rates of freezing occurred during transport from province to district, storage in district-level ice-lined refrigerators, and storage in refrigerators in health centres. Interventions reduced freezing, without excessive heat exposure. CONCLUSIONS: Inadvertent freezing of freeze-sensitive vaccines is widespread in Indonesia. Simple strategies exist to reduce freezing - for example, selective transport and storage of vaccines at ambient temperatures. The use of vaccine vial monitors reduces the risk associated with heat-damaged vaccines in these scenarios. Policy changes that allow limited storage of freeze-sensitive vaccines at temperatures >2-8 degrees C would enable flexible vaccine distribution strategies that could reduce vaccine freezing, reduce costs, and increase capacity. PMID:15042231

  12. Measurement of water-holding capacity in raw and freeze-dried broiler breast meat with visible and near-infrared spectroscopy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The feasibility of using visible/near-infrared spectroscopy (vis/NIR) to segregate broiler breast fillets by water-holding capacity (WHC) was determined. Broiler breast fillets (n = 72) were selected from a commercial deboning line based on visual color assessment. Meat color (L*a*b*), pH (2 and 2...

  13. Postmortem aging and freezing and thawing storage enhance ability of early deboned chicken pectoralis major muscle to hold added salt water

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effects of postdeboning aging and frozen storage on water-holding capacity (WHC) of chicken breast pectoralis major muscle were investigated. Broiler breast muscle was removed from carcasses either early postmortem (2 h) or later postmortem (24 h). Treatments included: no postdeboning aging; 1-...

  14. Chemical stability of amorphous materials: specific and general media effects in the role of water in the degradation of freeze-dried zoniporide.

    PubMed

    Luthra, Suman A; Shalaev, Evgenyi Y; Medek, Ales; Hong, Jinyang; Pikal, Michael J

    2012-09-01

    The objective of the present work was to determine whether hydrolysis in a model lyophile was influenced by general media effects with water-changing properties of the medium or via a specific mechanism of water as a reactant. Four formulations of zoniporide and sucrose (1:10) were prepared with variable amounts of sorbitol [0%-25% (w/v) of total solids). These formulations were then equilibrated at 6% and 11% relative humidity using saturated salt solutions. The lyophile cakes were analyzed by differential scanning calorimetery (DSC), (isothermal microcalorimetry (IMC), solid- state nuclear magnetic resonance (ssNMR) spectroscopy, and ultraviolet-visible diffuse reflectance (DFR) spectroscopy. DSC and IMC were used to assess the global molecular mobility. ssNMR relaxation times were measured to access local mobility. The DFR was used to determine the solid-state acidity expressed as the Hammett acidity function. Stability of samples was evaluated at 40°C by monitoring potency and purity by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Results were interpreted in terms of the various roles of water: media effect, plasticization, polarity, and reactant. The kinetics of hydrolysis was observed to be correlated with either/both specific "chemical" effects, that is, water reactant as well as media effect, specifically global molecular mobility of the matrix. Increase in reaction rate with increase in water content is not linear and is a weaker dependence than in some hydrolytic reactions in organic solvents. A moderate amount of an inert plasticizer, sorbitol, conferred additional stabilization, possibly by restricting the amplitude and frequency of fast motions that are on a small length scale. PMID:22461087

  15. An Ecological Paradox: The African Wild Dog (Lycaon Pictus) Is Not Attracted to Water Points When Water Is Scarce in Hwange National Park, Zimbabwe

    PubMed Central

    Ndaimani, Henry; Tagwireyi, Paradzayi; Sebele, Lovelater; Madzikanda, Hillary

    2016-01-01

    In dry biomes, spatio-temporal variation in surface water resource stocks is pervasive, with unknown effects on the ranging behaviour of large predators. This study assessed the effect of spatial variation in surface water resources on the ranging behaviour of the African wild dog (Lycaon pictus). We analyzed data for 1992 (dry year with 20 water points) and 2000 (wet year with 30 water points) against presence-only data for five packs of L. pictus in a part of Hwange National Park and adjacent smallholder communal farming areas in western Zimbabwe. Modelling the potential habitat for L. pictus using Maxent with distance from water points (Dw) and Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) as predictor variables was successful for 2000 (AUC = 0.793) but not successful for 1992 (AUC = 0.423), with L. pictus probability of occurrence near water points being more for year 2000 than for year 1992. The predicted L. pictus range was wider in 1992 (~13888.1 km2) than in 2000 (~958.4 km2) (Test of Proportions, χ2 = 124.52, df = 1, P = 0.00). Using the 2nd order Multitype Nearest Neighbour Distance Function (Gcross), we also observed significant attraction between L. pictus and water points within only ~1km radius for 1992 but up to ~8km radius for 2000. Our study reinforced the notion that surface water resources attract wild dogs in the savannahs but paradoxically less so when water resources are scarce. In particular, our study furthers current understanding of the effects of changing water availability regimes on the endangered L. pictus, providing evidence that the endangered predator’s home range encroaches into potential ecological traps (i.e., smallholder communal farming areas) when water resources are scarce. PMID:26816321

  16. An Ecological Paradox: The African Wild Dog (Lycaon Pictus) Is Not Attracted to Water Points When Water Is Scarce in Hwange National Park, Zimbabwe.

    PubMed

    Ndaimani, Henry; Tagwireyi, Paradzayi; Sebele, Lovelater; Madzikanda, Hillary

    2016-01-01

    In dry biomes, spatio-temporal variation in surface water resource stocks is pervasive, with unknown effects on the ranging behaviour of large predators. This study assessed the effect of spatial variation in surface water resources on the ranging behaviour of the African wild dog (Lycaon pictus). We analyzed data for 1992 (dry year with 20 water points) and 2000 (wet year with 30 water points) against presence-only data for five packs of L. pictus in a part of Hwange National Park and adjacent smallholder communal farming areas in western Zimbabwe. Modelling the potential habitat for L. pictus using Maxent with distance from water points (Dw) and Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) as predictor variables was successful for 2000 (AUC = 0.793) but not successful for 1992 (AUC = 0.423), with L. pictus probability of occurrence near water points being more for year 2000 than for year 1992. The predicted L. pictus range was wider in 1992 (~13888.1 km2) than in 2000 (~958.4 km2) (Test of Proportions, χ2 = 124.52, df = 1, P = 0.00). Using the 2nd order Multitype Nearest Neighbour Distance Function (Gcross), we also observed significant attraction between L. pictus and water points within only ~1km radius for 1992 but up to ~8km radius for 2000. Our study reinforced the notion that surface water resources attract wild dogs in the savannahs but paradoxically less so when water resources are scarce. In particular, our study furthers current understanding of the effects of changing water availability regimes on the endangered L. pictus, providing evidence that the endangered predator's home range encroaches into potential ecological traps (i.e., smallholder communal farming areas) when water resources are scarce. PMID:26816321

  17. How to freeze drop oscillations with powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marston, Jeremy; Zhu, Ying; Vakarelski, Ivan; Thoroddsen, Sigurdur

    2012-11-01

    We present experiments that show when a water drop impacts onto a bed of fine, hydrophobic powder, the final form of the drop can be very different from the spherical form with which it impacts. For all drop impact speeds, the drop rebounds due to the hydrophobic nature of the powder. However, we observe that above a critical impact speed, the drop undergoes a permanent deformation to a highly non-spherical shape with a complete coverage of powder, thus creating a deformed liquid marble. This powder coating acts to freeze the drop oscillations during rebound.

  18. Alcohol Brine Freezing of Japanese Horse Mackerel (Trachurus japonicus) for Raw Consumption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maeda, Toshimichi; Yuki, Atsuhiko; Sakurai, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Koichiro; Itoh, Nobuo; Inui, Etsuro; Seike, Kazunori; Mizukami, Yoichi; Fukuda, Yutaka; Harada, Kazuki

    In order to test the possible application of alcohol brine freezing to Japanese horse mackerel (Trachurus japonicus) for raw consumption, the quality and taste of fish frozen by direct immersion in 60% ethanol brine at -20, -25 and -30°C was compared with those by air freezing and fresh fish without freezing. Cracks were not found during the freezing. Smell of ethanol did not remain. K value, an indicator of freshness, of fish frozen in alcohol brine was less than 8.3%, which was at the same level as those by air freezing and fresh fish. Oxidation of lipid was at the same level as air freezing does, and lower than that of fresh fish. The pH of fish frozen in alcohol brine at -25 and -30°C was 6.5 and 6.6, respectively, which were higher than that by air freezing and that of fresh fish. Fish frozen in alcohol brine was better than that by air and at the same level as fresh fish in total evaluation of sensory tests. These results show that the alcohol brine freezing is superior to air freezing, and fish frozen in alcohol brine can be a material for raw consumption. The methods of thawing in tap water, cold water, refrigerator, and at room temperature were compared. Thawing in tap water is considered to be convenient due to the short thaw time and the quality of thawed fish that was best among the methods.

  19. Freeze-fracture cytochemistry: partition of glycophorin in freeze- fractured human erythrocyte membranes

    PubMed Central

    1982-01-01

    Thin-section and critical-point-dried fracture-labeled preparations are used to determine the distribution and partition of glycophorin- associated wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) binding sites over protoplasmic and exoplasmic faces of freeze-fractured human erythrocyte membranes. Most wheat germ agglutinin binding sites are found over exoplasmic faces. Label is sparse over the protoplasmic faces. These results contrast with previous observations of the partition of band 3 component where biochemical analysis and fracture-label of concanavalin A (Con A) binding sites show preferential partition of this transmembrane protein with the protoplasmic face. Presence of characteristic proportions of WGA and Con A binding sites over each fracture face is interpreted to indicate the operation of a stochastic process during freeze-fracture. This process appears modulated by the relative expression of each transmembrane protein at either surface as well as by their association to components of the erythrocyte membrane skeleton. PMID:7096449

  20. An improved microscope stage for direct observation of freezing and freeze drying.

    PubMed

    Nail, S L; Her, L M; Proffitt, C P; Nail, L L

    1994-08-01

    A microscope stage for observation of freezing and freeze drying is described. The stage uses thermoelectric (Peltier) heaters configured in two stages, with circulating fluid as a heat sink on the high temperature side. Lowest attainable sample temperature is about -47 degrees C. Principal advantages of this system are closed-loop control of stage temperature, rapid response to changes in temperature set point, and improved documentation of experiments by use of a video recorder system with a character generator which allows display of sample identity and temperature. Accuracy of measuring the sample temperature in the field of view was validated by comparing observed values of eutectic melting with published values for a series of solutes with eutectic temperatures in the range from -2 degrees C to -32 degrees C. Good agreement was obtained throughout this range. PMID:7971708

  1. Sub-ice Stream Till Properties: Changes Induced By Basal Freeze-on and The Influence of Subglacial Hydrogeology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christoffersen, P.; Tulaczyk, S.

    The physical properties of weak and porous sub-ice stream till are changed character- istically when the thermal regimen changes from melting to freezing. These property changes influence the dynamics of ice streams and may control the location of shear margins and inter-stream ridges. Basal freeze-on can be a trigger of ice stream stop- page or it can occur due to the decrease in basal shear heating that accompanies the stoppage. In a high resolution (ca. 0.01 m) numerical model, we investigate the re- sponse of subglacial sediments to basal freeze-on. In-situ freezing of pore water is prevented in fine-grained sub-ice stream till due to the surface tension (ca. 100 kPa) that are associated with a small characteristic particles size (ca. 10^-6 m). The till be- comes super-cooled, and the response to freezing is a characteristic flow of pore water towards the ice base where clean ice accretes. The basal temperature is depressed by several tens of a degree below the pressure-melting point and discrete lenses of segregation ice develop within the till. Till with a low surface tension (ca. 25 kPa) is associated with development of thin ice lenses (ca. 0.02 m) that are closely spaced (ca. 0.30 m). A higher value of surface tension (ca. 100 kPa) is associated with thicker ice lenses (ca. 0.25 m) with a wider spacing (ca. 0.85 m). Complete freeze-up will eventu- ally create a uniquely layered basal zone consisting of uniform bands of debris-filled ice and clean segregation ice. Basal freeze-on beneath West Antarctic ice streams may increase the shear strength of initially weak and porous till (ca. 2 kPa), not only to a level that prevents fast ice streaming (ca. 13 kPa), but also to level that produces a high degree of consolidation (>100 kPa). Significant property changes take place mainly after ice stream shutdown due to the continuous extraction of pore water. The grain size distribution of the till and the hydrogeological setting control the property changes that succeed shut-down. Despite freezing bed conditions, the bed may remain unfrozen and highly porous (> 30 %) if the sub-till sediment can supply water to the freeze-on process. However, if the till is fine-grained and if the sub-till sediment is im- permeable, pore water may be extracted to a degree that causes significant reduction of porosity (<20 %) and high basal shear strengths (>100 kPa). Our model predictions compare favourably with the thermal setting of the now stagnant Ice Stream C where the freeze-on rate is 4 mm/y.

  2. Ultrasonic emissions from conifer xylem exposed to repeated freezing.

    PubMed

    Mayr, Stefan; Zublasing, Verena

    2010-01-01

    Ultrasonic emission measurements enable the analysis of xylem cavitation induced by drought and freeze-thaw events. Several studies have indicated that ultrasonic acoustic emissions (UAE) in conifers occur upon freezing and not upon thawing, although classical theory has postulated gas bubble formation during freezing and cavitation during thawing. We analyzed the pattern and quality of freeze-thaw-induced UAE in seven conifers (Abies alba, Larix decidua, Juniperus communis, Picea abies, Pinus cembra, Pinus mugo, Pinus sylvestris). Axes samples dehydrated to different water potentials were exposed to repeated frost cycles. The number, amplitude and energy of UAE signals were registered and related to water potential, temperature course and wood characteristics (wood density, tracheid diameter). For P. abies, ultrasonic emission analysis was also performed on bark samples, xylem samples without bark, as well as on stems of young potted trees. In all conifers, UAE were registered in water-stressed samples but not in saturated or dehydrated samples. No signals were emitted by the bark of P. abies. Ultrasonic activity occurred only upon freezing, and identical patterns were observed in axes samples and stems of potted P. abies trees. A weak positive relationship between tracheid diameter and UAE energy was observed, indicating wide tracheids to emit signals with higher energy. The classical bubble formation hypothesis cannot sufficiently explain the occurrence of UAE during freezing and upon repeated temperature cycles, as demonstrated in this study. We suggest that the low water potential of ice induces air-seeding near the ice-water interface, and consequently, causes UAE. PMID:19692146

  3. Water-quality, water-level, and lake-bottom-sediment data collected from the defense fuel supply point and adjacent properties, Hanahan, South Carolina, 1990-96

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Petkewich, M.D.; Vroblesky, D.A.; Robertson, J.F.; Bradley, P.M.

    1997-01-01

    A 9-year scientific investigation to determine the potential for biore-mediation of ground-water contamination and to monitor the effectiveness of an engineered bioremediation system located at the Defense Fuel Supply Point and adjacent properties in Hanahan, S.C., has culminated in the collection of abundant water-quality and water-level data.This report presents the analytical results of the study that monitored the changes in surface- and ground-water quality and water-table elevations in the study area from December 1990 to January 1996. This report also presents analytical results of lake-bottom sediments collected in the study area.

  4. Aqueous Chemistry in the Diamond Anvil Cell up to and Beyond the Critical Point of Water

    SciTech Connect

    Bassett, William A.; Chou, I-Ming; Anderson, Alan J.; Mayanovic, Robert

    2008-08-28

    The hydrothermal diamond anvil cell (HDAC) has been developed for the study of fluids and their interactions with other phases. It is capable of pressures up to 10 GPa and temperatures from -190 C to 1200 C. It has found application in studies of equations of state of fluids, reactions between fluids and solids as well as fluids and melts, hydration and dehydration of hydrous solids under P{sub H2O}, fractionation of species between fluids and solids as well as fluids and melts, the effect of P{sub H2O} on melting of silicates, structures of ions and clathrates in solution, preservation of hosts of fluid inclusions at high temperatures, and reactions in clathrates and other organic materials. Visual, spectroscopic, and X-ray methods are used to analyze samples by taking advantage of the exceptional transparency of the diamond anvils. Examples of successful apphcations of the HDAC include the equation of state (EOS) of water, stability of the various stages of hydration of montmorillonite and calcium carbonate, leaching of elements from zircon, the effect of P{sub H2O} on the melting of albite, speciation and structures of Sc, Fe, Cu, Zn, Y, La, Yb, and Br in solution, stability of methane hydrates and Ca(OH){sub 2}, identifying a new H{sub 2}O ice form and sll of methane hydrate. The description of diamond cell configuration, analytical methods, and examples of applications provide evidence of the utility of the technique for many studies of fluids at temperatures and pressures up to and beyond the critical point of water.

  5. Critical Watersheds: Climate Change, Tipping Points, and Energy-Water Impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Middleton, R. S.; Brown, M.; Coon, E.; Linn, R.; McDowell, N. G.; Painter, S. L.; Xu, C.

    2014-12-01

    Climate change, extreme climate events, and climate-induced disturbances will have a substantial and detrimental impact on terrestrial ecosystems. How ecosystems respond to these impacts will, in turn, have a significant effect on the quantity, quality, and timing of water supply for energy security, agriculture, industry, and municipal use. As a community, we lack sufficient quantitative and mechanistic understanding of the complex interplay between climate extremes (e.g., drought, floods), ecosystem dynamics (e.g., vegetation succession), and disruptive events (e.g., wildfire) to assess ecosystem vulnerabilities and to design mitigation strategies that minimize or prevent catastrophic ecosystem impacts. Through a combination of experimental and observational science and modeling, we are developing a unique multi-physics ecohydrologic framework for understanding and quantifying feedbacks between novel climate and extremes, surface and subsurface hydrology, ecosystem dynamics, and disruptive events in critical watersheds. The simulation capability integrates and advances coupled surface-subsurface hydrology from the Advanced Terrestrial Simulator (ATS), dynamic vegetation succession from the Ecosystem Demography (ED) model, and QUICFIRE, a novel wildfire behavior model developed from the FIRETEC platform. These advances are expected to make extensive contributions to the literature and to earth system modeling. The framework is designed to predict, quantify, and mitigate the impacts of climate change on vulnerable watersheds, with a focus on the US Mountain West and the energy-water nexus. This emerging capability is used to identify tipping points in watershed ecosystems, quantify impacts on downstream users, and formally evaluate mitigation efforts including forest (e.g., thinning, prescribed burns) and watershed (e.g., slope stabilization). The framework is being trained, validated, and demonstrated using field observations and remote data collections in the Valles Caldera National Preserve, including pre- and post-wildfire and infestation observations. Ultimately, the framework will be applied to the upper Colorado River basin. Here, we present an overview of the framework development strategy and latest field and modeling results.

  6. [Influence of deuterium depleted water on freeze-dried tissue isotopic composition and morphofunctional body performance in rats of different generations].

    PubMed

    Dzhimak, S S; Baryshev, M G; Basov, A A; Timakov, A A

    2014-01-01

    The influence of deuterium depleted water on the body of different rats generations was investigated in physiological conditions. As a result of this study it was established that the most significant and rapid reduction in D/H equilibrium was observed in plasma (by 36.2%), and lyophilized kidney tissues (by 15.8%). Less pronounced deuterium decrease was characteristic of liver tissue (9.3%) and heart (8.5%). Stabilization of the isotopic exchange reaction rate was fixed in the blood and tissues of rats, starting from the second generation. At the same time when deuterium depleted water (40 ppm) was used in dietary intake, the change in morphological and functional parameters in laboratory animals associated with the processes of adaptation to the effects of substress isotopic D/H gradient was also noted. The study shows that modification of:only drinking water intake regime can't significantly change the deuterium content in tissues of metabolically active organs, because of the concurrent deuterium receipt in food substances of plant and animal origin. PMID:25707243

  7. ANNAGNPS: ACCOUNTING FOR SNOWPACK, SNOWMELT, FREEZING AND THAWING OF SOIL

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The watershed model, AnnAGNPS (Annualized AGricultural Non-Point Source Pollution model) has been enhanced by incorporating winter climate algorithms that account for frozen soil conditions. The model includes snowpack accumulation and melt, and the freeze/thaw process in the soil. Three major imp...

  8. The osmotic rupture hypothesis of intracellular freezing injury.

    PubMed Central

    Muldrew, K; McGann, L E

    1994-01-01

    A hypothesis of the nature of intracellular ice formation is proposed in which the osmotically driven water efflux that occurs in cells during freezing (caused by the increased osmotic pressure of the extracellular solution in the presence of ice) is viewed as the agent responsible for producing a rupture of the plasma membrane, thus allowing extracellular ice to propagate into the cytoplasm. This hypothesis is developed into a mathematical framework and the forces that are present during freezing are compared to the forces which are required to rupture membranes in circumstances unrelated to low temperatures. The theory is then applied to systems which have been previously studied to test implications of the theory on the nature of intracellular ice formation. The pressure that develops during freezing due to water flux is found to be sufficient to cause a rupture of the plasma membrane and the theory gives an accurate description of the phenomenology of intracellular ice formation. PMID:8161706

  9. Effects of a Proprietary Freeze-Dried Water Extract of Eurycoma longifolia (Physta) and Polygonum minus on Sexual Performance and Well-Being in Men: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Study

    PubMed Central

    Udani, Jay K.; George, Annie A.; Musthapa, Mufiza; Pakdaman, Michael N.; Abas, Azreena

    2014-01-01

    Background. Physta is a proprietary product containing a freeze-dried water extract of Eurycoma longifolia (tongkat ali), which is traditionally used as an energy enhancer and aphrodisiac. We aim to evaluate a 300 mg combination of Physta and Polygonum minus, an antioxidant, with regard to sexual performance and well-being in men. Methods. Men that aged 40–65 years were screened for this 12-week randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group study. Outcome measures included validated questionnaires that aimed to evaluate erectile function, satisfaction with intervention, sexual intercourse performance, erectile hardness, mood, and overall quality of life. Results. 12 subjects in the active group and 14 in the placebo group completed the study. Significant improvements were noted in scores for the Sexual Intercourse Attempt diary, Erection Hardness Scale, Sexual Health Inventory of Men, and Aging Male Symptom scale (P < 0.05 for all). Three adverse events were reported in the active group and four in the placebo group, none of which were attributed to study product. Laboratory evaluations, including liver and kidney function testing, showed no clinically significant abnormality. Conclusion. Supplementation for twelve weeks with Polygonum minus and the proprietary Eurycoma longifolia extract, Physta, was well tolerated and more effective than placebo in enhancing sexual performance in healthy volunteers. PMID:24550993

  10. Selective ligandless cloud point extraction of palladium from water and dust samples.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi, Sayed Zia; Mohammadnezhad, Mohsen

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the phase-separation phenomenon of non-ionic surfactants was used for separation and preconcentration of Pd(II). The cloud point extraction (CPE) method is based on the formation of PdI2 which is then entrapped in the non-ionic surfactant Triton X-114. Ethanol acidified with 0.5 M HNO3 was added to the surfactant-rich phase prior to its analysis by flame atomic absorption spectrometry. The main factors affecting CPE efficiency, such as sample solution pH, concentration of iodide ion and Triton X-114, equilibration temperature and time, were all investigated and optimized. At optimum conditions, a calibration curve was constructed for the determination of palladium according to the ligandless CPE procedure. Linearity was maintained between 1.0 to 500.0 ng/mL. The LOD based on three times the SD of the blank divided by the slope of analytical curve, (3Sb/m) was 0.3 ng/mL. Seven replicate determinations of a solution containing of 4.0 μg palladium gave a mean absorbance of 0.359 with RSD±1.85%. The high efficiency of CPE to carry out the determination of palladium in complex matrixes was demonstrated. The proposed method has been applied to the determination of trace amounts of palladium in a platinum-iridium alloy, water, and dust samples, with satisfactory results. PMID:25857898

  11. Freeze-in through portals

    SciTech Connect

    Blennow, Mattias; Fernandez-Martínez, Enrique; Zaldívar, Bryan E-mail: enrique.fernandez-martinez@uam.es

    2014-01-01

    The popular freeze-out paradigm for Dark Matter (DM) production, relies on DM-baryon couplings of the order of the weak interactions. However, different search strategies for DM have failed to provide a conclusive evidence of such (non-gravitational) interactions, while greatly reducing the parameter space of many representative models. This motivates the study of alternative mechanisms for DM genesis. In the freeze-in framework, the DM is slowly populated from the thermal bath while never reaching equilibrium. In this work, we analyse in detail the possibility of producing a frozen-in DM via a mediator particle which acts as a portal. We give analytical estimates of different freeze-in regimes and support them with full numerical analyses, taking into account the proper distribution functions of bath particles. Finally, we constrain the parameter space of generic models by requiring agreement with DM relic abundance observations.

  12. Freezing D2O clay gels.

    PubMed

    Letellier, M

    1998-01-01

    To obtain the T1 surface value in smectites/D2O diluted suspensions or gels, as was obtained on a monolayer deuterated clay, we freeze them. The broad Pake's doublets similar to ice doublets and with the same T1 show that we can separate frozen from unfrozen D2O. The latter exhibits a narrower line and a single T1 and is attributed to the liquid surface water layer in rapid exchange with the nearby supercooled water, the quantity of which diminishes with the lowering of the temperature depending on the gel porosity. It is possible to measure the supercooled water quantity and to correct the T1 measured values to extract the T1 surface. The value extrapolated at room temperature allows the complete clay surface area measurement. The example of a montmorillonite is given and a comparison with laponite is made. PMID:9803898

  13. Freeze-dried microarterial allografts

    SciTech Connect

    Raman, J.; Hargrave, J.C.

    1990-02-01

    Rehydrated freeze-dried microarterial allografts were implanted to bridge arterial defects using New Zealand White rabbits as the experimental model. Segments of artery from the rabbit ear and thigh were harvested and preserved for a minimum of 2 weeks after freeze-drying. These allografts, approximately 1 mm in diameter and ranging from 1.5 to 2.5 cm in length, were rehydrated and then implanted in low-pressure and high-pressure arterial systems. Poor patency was noted in low-pressure systems in both allografts and autografts, tested in 12 rabbits. In the high-pressure arterial systems, allografts that were freeze-dried and reconstituted failed in a group of 10 rabbits with an 8-week patency rate of 30 percent. Gamma irradiation in an effort to reduce infection and antigenicity of grafts after freeze-drying was associated with a patency rate of 10 percent at 8 weeks in this system in another group of 10 rabbits. Postoperative cyclosporin A therapy was associated with a patency rate of 22.2 percent in the high-pressure arterial system in a 9-rabbit group. Control autografts in this system in a group of 10 rabbits showed a 100 percent patency at 8 weeks. Microarterial grafts depend on perfusion pressure of the vascular bed for long-term patency. Rehydrated freeze-dried microarterial allografts do not seem to function well in lengths of 1 to 2.5 cm when implanted in a high-pressure arterial system. Freeze-dried arterial allografts are probably not antigenic.

  14. Supressed Water Crystallization in Nano-Structured Physical Hydrogel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiener, Clinton; Vogt, Bryan; Weiss, Robert

    2015-03-01

    Suppressed water crystallization occurs in some organisms, such as the common wood frog, which allows it to hibernate in a frozen state without damage to its cells. Knowledge of the behavior of supercooled water and alternate ice forms may have many implications to many fields of science. Supercooling of water by several degrees below the normal freezing point is often observed in hydrogels that have attractive interactions with water, e.g., hydrogen bonding. Repulsive confinement, such as in hydrophobic porous carbon, can have even more significant effects on the supercooling of the entrapped water. This talk describes the freezing behavior in nano-structured, hydrophobically modified poly(dimethyl acrylamide) hydrogels that possess attractive and repulsive interactions with water and are physically crosslinked by hydrophobic nanodomains. Three distinct water freezing regimes were observed in the hydrogel swollen to about 50% water by weight. Differential scanning calorimetry detected three crystallization exotherms at 254K, 244K, and 227K. Quasi-elastic neutron scattering experiments have shown that although the water mobility was suppressed at room temperature, the water remained significantly mobile below the normal freezing point of water. The talk will discuss how tuning the concentration of the hydrophobic composition of the hydrogel affects the porous length scales in the hydrogel, which may alter the state of water and the crystal form produced by supercooling.

  15. Freezing Tolerance of Citrus, Spinach, and Petunia Leaf Tissue 1

    PubMed Central

    Yelenosky, George; Guy, Charles L.

    1989-01-01

    Seasonal variations in freezing tolerance, water content, water and osmotic potential, and levels of soluble sugars of leaves of field-grown Valencia orange (Citrus sinensis) trees were studied to determine the ability of citrus trees to cold acclimate under natural conditions. Controlled environmental studies of young potted citrus trees, spinach (Spinacia pleracea), and petunia (Petunia hybrids) were carried out to study the water relations during cold acclimation under less variable conditions. During the coolest weeks of the winter, leaf water content and osmotic potential of field-grown trees decreased about 20 to 25%, while soluble sugars increased by 100%. At the same time, freezing tolerance increased from lethal temperature for 50% (LT50) of ?2.8 to ?3.8C. In contrast, citrus leaves cold acclimated at a constant 10C in growth chambers were freezing tolerant to about ?6C. The calculated freezing induced cellular dehydration at the LT50 remained relatively constant for field-grown leaves throughout the year, but increased for leaves of plants cold acclimated at 10C in a controlled environment. Spinach leaves cold acclimated at 5C tolerated increased cellular dehydration compared to nonacclimated leaves. Cold acclimated petunia leaves increased in freezing tolerance by decreasing osmotic potential, but had no capacity to change cellular dehydration sensitivity. The result suggest that two cold acclimation mechanisms are involved in both citrus and spinach leaves and only one in petunia leaves. The common mechanism in all three species tested was a minor increase in tolerance (about ?1C) resulting from low temperature induced osmotic adjustment, and the second in citrus and spinach was a noncolligative mechanism that increased the cellular resistance to freeze hydration. PMID:16666563

  16. Synchrotron x-ray visualisation of ice formation in insects during lethal and non-lethal freezing.

    PubMed

    Sinclair, Brent J; Gibbs, Allen G; Lee, Wah-Keat; Rajamohan, Arun; Roberts, Stephen P; Socha, John J

    2009-01-01

    Although the biochemical correlates of freeze tolerance in insects are becoming well-known, the process of ice formation in vivo is subject to speculation. We used synchrotron x-rays to directly visualise real-time ice formation at 3.3 Hz in intact insects. We observed freezing in diapausing 3(rd) instar larvae of Chymomyza amoena (Diptera: Drosophilidae), which survive freezing if it occurs above -14 degrees C, and non-diapausing 3(rd) instar larvae of C. amoena and Drosophila melanogaster (Diptera: Drosophilidae), neither of which survive freezing. Freezing was readily observed in all larvae, and on one occasion the gut was seen to freeze separately from the haemocoel. There were no apparent qualitative differences in ice formation between freeze tolerant and non-freeze tolerant larvae. The time to complete freezing was positively related to temperature of nucleation (supercooling point, SCP), and SCP declined with decreasing body size, although this relationship was less strong in diapausing C. amoena. Nucleation generally occurred at a contact point with the thermocouple or chamber wall in non-diapausing larvae, but at random in diapausing larvae, suggesting that the latter have some control over ice nucleation. There were no apparent differences between freeze tolerant and non-freeze tolerant larvae in tracheal displacement or distension of the body during freezing, although there was markedly more distension in D. melanogaster than in C. amoena regardless of diapause state. We conclude that although control of ice nucleation appears to be important in freeze tolerant individuals, the physical ice formation process itself does not differ among larvae that can and cannot survive freezing. This suggests that a focus on cellular and biochemical mechanisms is appropriate and may reveal the primary adaptations allowing freeze tolerance in insects. PMID:20011523

  17. Synchrotron X-Ray Visualisation of Ice Formation in Insects during Lethal and Non-Lethal Freezing

    PubMed Central

    Sinclair, Brent J.; Gibbs, Allen G.; Lee, Wah-Keat; Rajamohan, Arun; Roberts, Stephen P.; Socha, John J.

    2009-01-01

    Although the biochemical correlates of freeze tolerance in insects are becoming well-known, the process of ice formation in vivo is subject to speculation. We used synchrotron x-rays to directly visualise real-time ice formation at 3.3 Hz in intact insects. We observed freezing in diapausing 3rd instar larvae of Chymomyza amoena (Diptera: Drosophilidae), which survive freezing if it occurs above −14°C, and non-diapausing 3rd instar larvae of C. amoena and Drosophila melanogaster (Diptera: Drosophilidae), neither of which survive freezing. Freezing was readily observed in all larvae, and on one occasion the gut was seen to freeze separately from the haemocoel. There were no apparent qualitative differences in ice formation between freeze tolerant and non-freeze tolerant larvae. The time to complete freezing was positively related to temperature of nucleation (supercooling point, SCP), and SCP declined with decreasing body size, although this relationship was less strong in diapausing C. amoena. Nucleation generally occurred at a contact point with the thermocouple or chamber wall in non-diapausing larvae, but at random in diapausing larvae, suggesting that the latter have some control over ice nucleation. There were no apparent differences between freeze tolerant and non-freeze tolerant larvae in tracheal displacement or distension of the body during freezing, although there was markedly more distension in D. melanogaster than in C. amoena regardless of diapause state. We conclude that although control of ice nucleation appears to be important in freeze tolerant individuals, the physical ice formation process itself does not differ among larvae that can and cannot survive freezing. This suggests that a focus on cellular and biochemical mechanisms is appropriate and may reveal the primary adaptations allowing freeze tolerance in insects. PMID:20011523

  18. Evaluation of combined effects of ageing period and freezing rate on quality attributes of beef loins.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yuan H Brad; Liesse, Charlotte; Kemp, Robert; Balan, Prabhu

    2015-12-01

    The objective of our study was to evaluate the combined effects of ageing period and different freezing rates on meat quality attributes of beef loins. Pairs of loins (M. longissimus at 1 day post mortem) from 12 carcasses were divided into four equal portions and randomly assigned to four ageing/freezing treatments (aged only, frozen only, and 3 or 4 weeks ageing at -1.5°C then frozen). Two freezing methods (fast freezing by calcium chloride immersion or slow freezing by air freezer at -18°C) were applied to the loin sections. Fast freezing had no effect on shear force (P>0.05), but significantly improved the water-holding capacity of the aged/frozen loins by reducing purge and drip losses. Ageing-then-freezing significantly improved shear force values of loins compared to both the aged only and frozen only loins. These observations suggest that fast freezing will add more value to the aged/frozen/thawed meat by minimising the amount of water-loss due to the freezing/thawing process. PMID:26172242

  19. Source to point of use drinking water changes and knowledge, attitude and practices in Katsina State, Northern Nigeria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onabolu, B.; Jimoh, O. D.; Igboro, S. B.; Sridhar, M. K. C.; Onyilo, G.; Gege, A.; Ilya, R.

    In many Sub-Saharan countries such as Nigeria, inadequate access to safe drinking water is a serious problem with 37% in the region and 58% of rural Nigeria using unimproved sources. The global challenge to measuring household water quality as a determinant of safety is further compounded in Nigeria by the possibility of deterioration from source to point of use. This is associated with the use of decentralised water supply systems in rural areas which are not fully reticulated to the household taps, creating a need for an integrated water quality monitoring system. As an initial step towards establishing the system in the north west and north central zones of Nigeria, The Katsina State Rural Water and Sanitation Agency, responsible for ensuring access to safe water and adequate sanitation to about 6 million people carried out a three pronged study with the support of UNICEF Nigeria. Part 1 was an assessment of the legislative and policy framework, institutional arrangements and capacity for drinking water quality monitoring through desk top reviews and Key Informant Interviews (KII) to ascertain the institutional capacity requirements for developing the water quality monitoring system. Part II was a water quality study in 700 households of 23 communities in four local government areas. The objectives were to assess the safety of drinking water, compare the safety at source and household level and assess the possible contributory role of end users’ Knowledge Attitudes and Practices. These were achieved through water analysis, household water quality tracking, KII and questionnaires. Part III was the production of a visual documentary as an advocacy tool to increase awareness of the policy makers of the linkages between source management, treatment and end user water quality. The results indicate that except for pH, conductivity and manganese, the improved water sources were safe at source. However there was a deterioration in water quality between source and point of use in 18%, 12.5%, 27% and 50% of hand pump fitted boreholes, motorised boreholes, hand dug wells and streams respectively. Although no statistical correlation could be drawn between water management practices and water quality deterioration, the survey of the study households gave an indication of the possible contributory role of their knowledge, attitudes and practices to water contamination after provision. Some of the potential water related sources of contamination were poor source protection and location, use of unimproved water source and poor knowledge and practice of household water treatment methods, poor hand washing practices in terms of percentage that wash hands and use soap. Consequently 34 WASH departments have been created at the local government level towards establishment of a community based monitoring system and piloting has begun in Kaita local government area.

  20. Plant cover, soil temperature, freeze, water stress, and evapotranspiration conditions. [Lower Rio Grande Valley Test Site: Weslaco, Texas; Falco Reservoir and the Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiegand, C. L.; Nixon, P. R.; Gausman, H. W.; Namken, L. N.; Leamer, R. W.; Richardson, A. J. (Principal Investigator)

    1980-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. HCMM day/night coverage 12 hours apart cannot be obtained at 26 deg N latitude; nor have any pairs 36 hours apart been obtained. A day-IR scene and a night scene for two different dates were analyzed. A profile across the test site for the same latitude shows that the two profiles are near mirror images of each other over land surfaces and that the temperature of two large water bodies, Falcon Reservoir and the Gulf of Mexico, are nearly identical on two dates. During the time interval between overpasses, the vegetative cover remained static due to winter dormancy. The data suggest that day/night temperature differences measured weeks apart may yield meaningful information about the contrast between daytime maximum and nighttime minimum temperatures for a given site.

  1. Pressure Dependence of Fragile-to-Strong Transition and a Possible Second Critical Point in Supercooled Confined Water

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Li; Chen, S.-H.; Faraone, Antonio; Yen, C.-W.; Mou, C.-Y.

    2005-09-09

    By confining water in nanopores of silica glass, we can bypass the crystallization and study the pressure effect on the dynamical behavior in deeply supercooled state using neutron scattering. We observe a clear evidence of a cusplike fragile-to-strong (FS) dynamic transition. Here we show that the transition temperature decreases steadily with an increasing pressure, until it intersects the homogenous nucleation temperature line of bulk water at a pressure of 1600 bar. Above this pressure, it is no longer possible to discern the characteristic feature of the FS transition. Identification of this end point with the possible second critical point is discussed.

  2. High rates of energy expenditure and water flux in free-ranging Point Reyes mountain beavers Aplodontia rufa phaea

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crocker, D.E.; Kofahl, N.; Fellers, G.D.; Gates, N.B.; Houser, D.S.

    2007-01-01

    We measured water flux and energy expenditure in free-ranging Point Reyes mountain beavers Aplodontia rufa phaea by using the doubly labeled water method. Previous laboratory investigations have suggested weak urinary concentrating ability, high rates of water flux, and low basal metabolic rates in this species. However, free-ranging measurements from hygric mammals are rare, and it is not known how these features interact in the environment. Rates of water flux (210 ?? 32 mL d-1) and field metabolic rates (1,488 ?? 486 kJ d-1) were 159% and 265%, respectively, of values predicted by allometric equations for similar-sized herbivores. Mountain beavers can likely meet their water needs through metabolic water production and preformed water in food and thus remain in water balance without access to free water. Arginine-vasopressin levels were strongly correlated with rates of water flux and plasma urea : creatinine ratios, suggesting an important role for this hormone in regulating urinary water loss in mountain beavers. High field metabolic rates may result from cool burrow temperatures that are well below lower critical temperatures measured in previous laboratory studies and suggest that thermoregulation costs may strongly influence field energetics and water flux in semifossorial mammals. ?? 2007 by The University of Chicago. All rights reserved.

  3. Experimental analysis and modeling of ultrasound assisted freezing of potato spheres.

    PubMed

    Kiani, Hossein; Zhang, Zhihang; Sun, Da-Wen

    2015-09-01

    In recent years, innovative methods such as ultrasound assisted freezing have been developed in order to improve the freezing process. During freezing of foods, accurate prediction of the temperature distribution, phase ratios, and process time is very important. In the present study, ultrasound assisted immersion freezing process (in 1:1 ethylene glycol-water solution at 253.15K) of potato spheres (0.02 m diameter) was evaluated using experimental, numerical and analytical approaches. Ultrasound (25 kHz, 890 W m(-2)) was irradiated for different duty cycles (DCs=0-100%). A finite volume based enthalpy method was used in the numerical model, based on which temperature and liquid fraction profiles were simulated by a program developed using OpenFOAM® CFD software. An analytical technique was also employed to calculate freezing times. The results showed that ultrasound irradiation could decrease the characteristic freezing time of potatoes. Since ultrasound irradiation increased the heat transfer coefficient but simultaneously generated heat at the surface of the samples, an optimum DC was needed for the shortest freezing time which occurred in the range of 30-70% DC. DCs higher than 70% increased the freezing time. DCs lower than 30% did not provide significant effects on the freezing time compared to the control sample. The numerical model predicted the characteristic freezing time in accordance with the experimental results. In addition, analytical calculation of characteristic freezing time exhibited qualitative agreement with the experimental results. As the numerical simulations provided profiles of temperature and water fraction within potatoes frozen with or without ultrasound, the models can be used to study and control different operation situations, and to improve the understanding of the freezing process. PMID:25776740

  4. Morphological study of endothelial cells during freezing.

    PubMed

    Zhang, A; Xu, L X; Sandison, G A; Cheng, S

    2006-12-01

    Microvascular injury is recognized as a major tissue damage mechanism of ablative cryosurgery. Endothelial cells lining the vessel wall are thought to be the initial target of freezing. However, details of this injury mechanism are not yet completely understood. In this study, ECMatrix 625 was used to mimic the tumour environment and to allow the endothelial cells cultured in vitro to form the tube-like structure of the vasculature. The influence of water dehydration on the integrity of this structure was investigated. It was found that the initial cell shape change was mainly controlled by water dehydration, dependent on the cooling rate, resulting in the shrinkage of cells in the direction normal to the free surface. As the cooling was prolonged and temperature was lowered, further cell shape change could be induced by the chilling effects on intracellular proteins, and focal adhesions to the basement membrane. Quantitative analysis showed that the freezing induced dehydration greatly enhanced the cell surface stresses, especially in the axial direction. This could be one of the major causes of the final breaking of the cell junction and cell detachment. PMID:17110769

  5. Ground-water resources in the vicinity of the Crown Point fish hatchery, Essex County, New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kantrowitz, I.H.

    1968-01-01

    The Crown Point Fish Hatchery, one of several hatcheries operated by the New York State Conservation Department, is located in Crown Point Center, Essex County, on the eastern edge of the Adirondack Highlands and about 2 miles west of lake Champlain. Figure 1 is a location map of the vicinity of the Hatchery. This report summarizes an investigation by the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the New York State Conservation Department, Division of Water Resources, to locate and evaluate sources of additional ground-water supply for the Hatchery. In order to expand the facilities at the Hatchery, an additional water supply of about 100 gpm (gallons per minute) to as much as 350 gpm is needed. In addition, the type of fish culture practiced requires a water temperature of about 7 to 13 degrees Celsius (centigrade) for optimum results.

  6. Heat Capacity Anomaly Near the Lower Critical Consolute Point of Triethylamine-Water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flewelling, Anne C.; DeFonseka, Rohan J.; Khaleeli, Nikfar; Partee, J.; Jacobs, D. T.

    1996-01-01

    The heat capacity of the binary liquid mixture triethylamine-water has been measured near its lower critical consolute point using a scanning, adiabatic calorimeter. Two data runs are analyzed to provide heat capacity and enthalpy data that are fitted by equations with background terms and a critical term that includes correction to scaling. The critical exponent a was determined to be 0.107 +/- 0.006, consistent with theoretical predictions. When alpha was fixed at 0.11 to determine various amplitudes consistently, our values of A(+) and A(-) agreed with a previous heat capacity measurement, but the value of A(-) was inconsistent with values determined by density or refractive index measurements. While our value for the amplitude ratio A(+)/ A(-) = 0.56 +/- 0.02 was consistent with other recent experimental determinations in binary liquid mixtures, it was slightly larger than either theoretical predictions or recent experimental values in liquid-vapor systems. The correction to scaling amplitude ratio D(+)/D(-) = 0.5 +/- 0.1 was half of that predicted. As a result of several more precise theoretical calculations and experimental determinations, the two-scale-factor universality ratio X, which we found to be 0.019 +/- 0.003, now is consistent among experiments and theories. A new 'universal' amplitude ratio R(sup +/-)(sub Bcr) involving the amplitudes for the specific heat was tested. Our determination of R(sup +/-)(sub Bcr) = -0.5 +/- 0.1 and R(sup -)(sub Bcr) = 1.1 +/- 0.1 is smaller in magnitude than predicted and is the first such determination in a binary fluid mixture.

  7. Point-of-use water disinfection using ultraviolet and visible light-emitting diodes.

    PubMed

    Lui, Gough Yumu; Roser, David; Corkish, Richard; Ashbolt, Nicholas J; Stuetz, Richard

    2016-05-15

    Improvements in point-of-use (POU) drinking water disinfection technologies for remote and regional communities are urgently needed. Conceptually, UV-C light-emitting diodes (LEDs) overcome many drawbacks of low-pressure mercury tube based UV devices, and UV-A or visible light LEDs also show potential. To realistically evaluate the promise of LED disinfection, our study assessed the performance of a model 1.3L reactor, similar in size to solar disinfection bottles. In all, 12 different commercial or semi-commercial LED arrays (270-740nm) were compared for their ability to inactivate Escherichia coli K12 ATCC W3110 and Enterococcus faecalis ATCC 19433 over 6h. Five log10 and greater reductions were consistently achieved using the 270, 365, 385 and 405nm arrays. The output of the 310nm array was insufficient for useful disinfection while 430 and 455nm performance was marginal (≈4.2 and 2.3-log10s E. coli and E. faecalis over the 6h). No significant disinfection was observed with the 525, 590, 623, 660 and 740nm arrays. Delays in log-phase inactivation of E. coli were observed, particularly with UV-A wavelengths. The radiation doses required for >3-log10 reduction of E. coli and E. faecalis differed by 10 fold at 270nm but only 1.5-2.5 fold at 365-455nm. Action spectra, consistent with the literature, were observed with both indicators. The design process revealed cost and technical constraints pertaining to LED electrical efficiency, availability and lifetime. We concluded that POU LED disinfection using existing LED technology is already technically possible. UV-C LEDs offer speed and energy demand advantages, while UV-A/violet units are safer. Both approaches still require further costing and engineering development. Our study provides data needed for such work. PMID:26967007

  8. Investigation of wind and water level for the Giacomini Wetland Restoration Project, Point Reyes National Seashore

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dingler, John R.; Anima, Roberto J.

    2007-01-01

    Point Reyes National Seashore (PRNS), comprising unique elements of geological, biological, and historical interest, is located on the central California coast approximately 60 km northwest of San Francisco. The National Seashore contains nearly 130 km of exposed and protected shorelines, spectacular coastal cliffs and headlands, lagoons, open grasslands, bushy hillsides, and forested ridges. Approximately 30 km of the shoreline are coastal-dune habitat that supports 11 federally listed species, including the threatened western snowy plover and the endangered plants Tidestrom's lupine (Lupinus tidestromii) and beach layia (Layia carnosa). The San Andreas Fault, a right-lateral strike-slip fault, trends northwest along the northeastern side of the park. Tomales Bay, which is straight, long, narrow, and shallow, runs along the northeastern boundary of PRNS. The Bay, which fills the northwestern end of a rift valley at the intersection of the San Andreas Fault with the coastline, is approximately 20 km long, 2 km wide, and 6 m deep with mountainous terrain to the southwest and rolling hills to the northeast. Tomales Bay is one of the cleanest estuaries on the West Coast. In winter, approximately 17,000 to 20,000 shorebirds inhabit Tomales Bay and Bodega Bay, which lies directly to the north. At the head of Tomales Bay, the Giacomini Ranch comprises 563 acres of pastureland currently being used for grazing dairy cattle. After more than 50 years of operation as a dairy, the National Park Service acquired the Giacomini property with the intention to restore most of it and the nearby Olema Marsh to tidal wetland. Restoration will add approximately 4% to the existing coastal wetlands in California. The project will return the headwaters of Tomales Bay and two major stream intersections to an intertidal marsh environment, enhancing habitat for both wildlife and fish populations and contributing to the long-term health of Tomales Bay. Prior to the establishment of the ranch, the area was primarily salt marsh that formed as the delta of Lagunitas Creek expanded into Tomales Bay. In converting the salt marsh to dairy land, levees and tide gates were constructed to prevent tidal incursion and stream flooding. Those levees have significantly altered the patterns of estuarine circulation and sediment deposition. To restore natural hydrologic processes within the area and to promote the return of ecological functions and processes, the levees will have to be breached or removed. Developing a successful restoration strategy requires knowledge of elevations within the pastureland and the range of water depths that can be expected from tidal, river, and wind action. In support of the restoration program, the USGS provides technical assistance to PRNS in the form of a scientific study focusing on understanding the physical processes that could affect the Giacomini wetland restoration. The study will yield scientific products that NPS resource managers can use in designing and implementing the restoration project. Research elements include: - Develop a Geodetic Control Network (GCN) throughout PRNS that meets the standards specified National Geodetic Survey data base (the NGS "Bluebook"). The grid will allow this and future studies to be conducted to a precision commensurate with the expressed goals of PRNS. The survey will consist of three steps: (1) verify existing GPS control monuments in the area; (2) tie control monuments in the study areas to the GPS control monuments; and (3) establish NAVD88 elevations using a digital electronic level. - Conduct a detailed survey of the Giacomini site to produce an accurate topographic map of the property. The site survey can be coupled with on-site water-level measurements to produce an empirical flooding model. - Measure water level and wind regime at the Giacomini site. The water-level range is critical to determining the wetland types based on the elevation of the dairy land. Water level at Sacramento Landing, in central Tomales Bay, will also be measured for comparison. As of November 2005, we have created a GCN, produced a detailed topographic map of the Giacomini site, and collected approximately three years of water-level and wind data at the Giacomini site and over one year of usable water-level data at the Sacramento Landing pier.

  9. Non-freezing cold injury.

    PubMed

    Glennie, J S; Milner, R

    2014-01-01

    Non-freezing cold injury can be a diagnostic challenge for clinicians in the United Kingdom Armed Forces. It is associated with operations in adverse climatic conditions, and may result in significant long-term morbidity. In this article we discuss the operational importance of this condition and the current best practice in its management and prevention. PMID:25895405

  10. COMBINED REVERSE OSMOSIS AND FREEZE CONCENTRATION OF BLEACH PLANT EFFLUENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Reverse osmosis (RO) and freeze concentration (FC) were evaluated at three different pulp and paper mills as tools for concentrating bleach plant effluents. By these concentration processes, the feed effluent was divided into two streams. The clean water stream approached drinkin...

  11. Sinkholes in West-central Florida, Freeze Event of 2010

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Cracks shown here in the exterior and supporting structures of this home are indicative of subsidence damage associated with sinkhole activity. More than 110 sinkholes formed in the Dover area of Florida during a freeze event in January 2010. Ground water levels dropped to record-setting l...

  12. Sinkholes in West-central Florida, Freeze Event of 2010

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    A section of a strawberry field that was destroyed by a sinkhole and filled in, as is done with many sinkholes if possible. More than 110 sinkholes formed in the Dover area of Florida during a freeze event in January 2010. Ground water levels dropped to record-setting lows as farmers pump...

  13. Sinkholes in West-central Florida, Freeze Event of 2010

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Sinkholes affect structures as well as many types of supporting infrastructure such as buried utilities lines seen here. More than 110 sinkholes formed in the Dover area of Florida during a freeze event in January 2010. Ground water levels dropped to record-setting lows ...

  14. Investigation of Microcrystalline Cellulose as Ice Nucleus in Immersion Freezing Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Häusler, Thomas; Khaybulkina, Evgeniya; Felgitsch, Laura; Bichler, Magdalena; Grothe, Hinrich

    2015-04-01

    Aerosol-cloud interactions play an important role in earth's radiation balance. Aerosol particles act as cloud condensation nuclei for liquid droplets and/or as ice nuclei for the formation of ice particles. Previous research in our group has been related to biological ice nucleation.1-3 Here, we present a proxy for many biological macromolecular substances, i.e. microcrystalline cellulose. Due to the chemical convenience of cellulose compared to other biological ice nuclei, basic, but still unknown ice nucleation mechanisms can be investigated. Cellulose is a polysaccharide consisting of a linear chain of several hundred to many thousands of β(1→4) linked D-glucose units. It is an important structural element of the primary cell wall of green plants, many forms of algae and the oomycetes. Several types of microcrystalline cellulose were analysed and investigated due to their physico-chemical properties. Immersion freezing experiments were carried out in a unique reaction gadget. In this device a water-in-oil suspension (with the cellulose suspended in the aqueous phase) was cooled till the freezing point and was observed through a microscope. The results of the immersion freezing experiments of the different cellulose types showed variable ice nucleation activities depending on their morphology (e.g. particle size) and their concentration. Further analysis methods as scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and small angle X-ray scattering (SAX) were carried out to entirely describe the cellulose and their ice nucleation activity. [1] S.Augustin, H. Wex, D. Niedermeier, B. Pummer, H.Grothe, S. Hartmann, L. Tomsche, T. Clauss, J. Voigtländer, K. Ingatius, and F. Stratmann. Immersion freezing of birch pollen washing water. Atmospheric Chemistry Physics 2013, 13, 10989-11003 [2] B. Pummer, L. Atanasova, H. Bauer, H. Bernardi, I. S. Druzhinina, J. Froehlich-Nowoisky, H. Grothe. Spores of many common airborne fungi reveal no ice nucleation activity in oil immersion freezing experiments. Biogeosciences 2013, 10, 8083- 8091 [3] B. Pummer, H. Baue, J. Bernardi, S. Bleicher, H. Grothe. Suspendable macromolecules are responsible for ice nucleation activity of birch and conifer pollen. Atmospheric Chemistry Physics 2012, 12, 2541-2550

  15. 9 CFR 590.534 - Freezing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... PRODUCTS INSPECTION INSPECTION OF EGGS AND EGG PRODUCTS (EGG PRODUCTS INSPECTION ACT) Sanitary, Processing, and Facility Requirements § 590.534 Freezing facilities. (a) Freezing rooms, either on or off...

  16. 9 CFR 590.534 - Freezing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... PRODUCTS INSPECTION INSPECTION OF EGGS AND EGG PRODUCTS (EGG PRODUCTS INSPECTION ACT) Sanitary, Processing, and Facility Requirements § 590.534 Freezing facilities. (a) Freezing rooms, either on or off...

  17. Freeze-drying today and tomorrow.

    PubMed

    Leary, J H; Stanford, E A

    1976-10-01

    The freeze-drying process and equipment have been improved over the years; the cycle times have shortened and the dried products have improved as a result. This talk will deal with these improvements and how we have progressed from the early systems to where we are today. Such areas of discussion will include: vacuum pumping systems, how they are sized and designed to meet the needs for general and special applications; heat transfer systems, and their use in maintaining the drying profile; condensing surface design, and what is best for certain types of dryers; controls and instrumentation, and how these have played a big part in the drying process and have made it possible to get repeatability; refrigeration systems, and the part they play in the performance of freeze-drying; and lastly the effect of internal stoppering, bottomless trays, and other items such as these have had on the present state of the art. It goes without saying that there have been many changes and there will continue to be changes and we shall endeavor to look into the future--as to what might well bo some of these changes. Included in the talk will be a number of slides and illustrations to point out the various items as they are discussed. PMID:1030422

  18. Temperature and flow measurements on near-freezing aviation fuels in a wing-tank model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedman, R.; Stockemer, F. J.

    1980-01-01

    Freezing behavior, pumpability, and temperature profiles for aviation turbine fuels were measured in a 190-liter tank chilled to simulate internal temperature gradients encountered in commercial airplane wing tanks. When the bulk of the fuel was above the specification freezing point, pumpout of the fuel removed all fuel except a layer adhering to the bottom chilled surfaces, and the unpumpable fraction depended on the fuel temperature near these surfaces. When the bulk of the fuel was at or below the freezing point, pumpout ceased when solids blocked the pump inlet, and the unpumpable fraction depended on the overall average temperature.

  19. Temperature and flow measurements on near-freezing aviation fuels in a wing-tank model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedman, R.; Stockemer, F. J.

    1980-01-01

    Freezing behavior, pumpability, and temperature profiles for aviation turbine fuels were measured in a 190-liter tank, to simulate internal temperature gradients encountered in commercial airplane wing tanks. Two low-temperature situations were observed. Where the bulk of the fuel is above the specification freezing point, pumpout of the fuel removes all fuel except a layer adhering to the bottom chilled surfaces, and the unpumpable fraction depends on the fuel temperature near these surfaces. Where the bulk of the fuel is at or below the freezing point, pumpout ceases when solids block the pump inlet, and the unpumpable fraction depends on the overall average temperature.

  20. Investigation of water quality parameters at selected points on the Tennessee River

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The thermal and water quality parameters in the vicinity of widows Creek Steam Generation Plant were investigated. The water quality analysis and temperature profiles are presented for 24 sampling sites.

  1. Point Sources of Emerging Contaminants Along the Colorado River Basin: Impact on Water Use and Reuse in the Arid Southwest

    EPA Science Inventory

    Emerging contaminants (ECs) (e.g., pharmaceuticals, illicit drugs, personal care products) have been detected in waters across the United States. The objective of this study was to evaluate point sources of ECs along the Colorado River, from the headwaters in Colorado to the Gulf...

  2. Comparison of Byproduct Formation in Waters Treated With Chlorine and Iodine: Relevance To Point-Of-Use Treatment

    EPA Science Inventory

    Due to their efficacy in deactivating a range of microbial pathogens, particularly amoebic cysts, iodine-based disinfectants have been a popular option for point-of-use (POU) drinking water disinfection by campers, the military, and rural consumers in developing countries. Recent...

  3. Impact behaviour of freeze-dried and fresh pomelo (Citrus maxima) peel: influence of the hydration state

    PubMed Central

    Thielen, Marc; Speck, Thomas; Seidel, Robin

    2015-01-01

    Pomelos (Citrus maxima) are known for their thick peel which—inter alia—serves as energy dissipator when fruits impact on the ground after being shed. It protects the fruit from splitting open and thus enables the contained seeds to stay germinable and to potentially be dispersed by animal vectors. The main part of the peel consists of a parenchymatous tissue that can be interpreted from a materials point of view as open pored foam whose struts are pressurized and filled with liquid. In order to investigate the influence of the water content on the energy dissipation capacity, drop weight tests were conducted with fresh and with freeze-dried peel samples. Based on the coefficient of restitution it was found that freeze-drying markedly reduces the relative energy dissipation capacity of the peel. Measuring the transmitted force during impact furthermore indicated a transition from a uniform collapse of the foam-like tissue to a progressive collapse due to water extraction. Representing the peel by a Maxwell model illustrates that freeze-drying not only drastically reduces the damping function of the dashpots but also stiffens the springs of the model. PMID:26543566

  4. Impact behaviour of freeze-dried and fresh pomelo (Citrus maxima) peel: influence of the hydration state.

    PubMed

    Thielen, Marc; Speck, Thomas; Seidel, Robin

    2015-06-01

    Pomelos (Citrus maxima) are known for their thick peel which-inter alia-serves as energy dissipator when fruits impact on the ground after being shed. It protects the fruit from splitting open and thus enables the contained seeds to stay germinable and to potentially be dispersed by animal vectors. The main part of the peel consists of a parenchymatous tissue that can be interpreted from a materials point of view as open pored foam whose struts are pressurized and filled with liquid. In order to investigate the influence of the water content on the energy dissipation capacity, drop weight tests were conducted with fresh and with freeze-dried peel samples. Based on the coefficient of restitution it was found that freeze-drying markedly reduces the relative energy dissipation capacity of the peel. Measuring the transmitted force during impact furthermore indicated a transition from a uniform collapse of the foam-like tissue to a progressive collapse due to water extraction. Representing the peel by a Maxwell model illustrates that freeze-drying not only drastically reduces the damping function of the dashpots but also stiffens the springs of the model. PMID:26543566

  5. Source of salts in the Waianae part of the Pearl Harbor aquifer near Barbers Point water tunnel, Oahu, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eyre, P.R.

    1987-01-01

    The salinity of the water supply of Barbers Point Naval Air Station has increased markedly since 1983. The Naval Air Station obtains its water, about 3 million gal/day, from Barbers Point shaft, a water shaft that taps the Waianae part of the Pearl Harbor aquifer underlying the dry, southeastern flank of the Waianae mountains on the island on Oahu, Hawaii. From 1983 to 1985 the chloride concentration of the water, increased from 220 to 250 mg/L and has remained near that level through 1986. The EPA has established 250 mg/L as the maximum recommended chloride concentration in drinking water because above that level many people can taste the salt. The high chloride concentration in shallow groundwater at all wells in the area indicates that most of the salts in the freshwater lens are contributed by rainfall, sea spray, and irrigation return water. At Barbers Point shaft, pumping may draw a small amount of saltwater from the transition zone and increase the chloride concentration in the pumped water by about 20 mg/L. Salinity of the lens decreases progressively inland in response to recharge from relatively fresher water and in response to an increasing lens thickness with increasing distance from the shoreline. The increase, in 1983, in the chloride concentration of water at the shaft was most probably the result of saltier recharge water reaching the water table, and not the result of increased mixing of underlying saltwater with the freshwater. The chloride concentration of the recharge water has probably increased because, in 1980, the drip method of irrigation began to replace the furrow method on sugarcane fields near the shaft. A mixing-cell model was used to estimate the effect of drip irrigation on the chloride concentration of the groundwater in the vicinity of Barbers Point shaft. The model predicted an increase in chloride concentration of about 50 mg/L. The observed increase was about 30 mg/L and the chloride concentration is presently stable at 245 to 250 mg/L; hence, the chloride concentration is not expected to increase significantly more. (Lantz-PTT)

  6. Determination of Unfrozen Water in Winter Cereals at Subfreezing Temperatures

    PubMed Central

    Gusta, Lawrence V.; Burke, Michael J.; Kapoor, Amin C.

    1975-01-01

    The freezing of water in acclimated and nonacclimated cereals was studied using pulsed nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The quantity of unfreezable water per unit dry matter was not strongly dependent on the degree of cold acclimation. In contrast, the fraction of water frozen which was tolerated by nonacclimated winter cereals and by an acclimated spring wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) was less than in acclimated hardy cereals. The freezing curves had the following form:LT = L0?Tm/T + KLT and L0 are liquid water per unit dry matter at T and 0 C, respectively. ?Tm is the melting point depression and K is the liquid water which does not freeze. PMID:16659377

  7. Wastewater treatment by radial freezing with stirring effects.

    PubMed

    Gay, Guillaume; Lorain, Olivier; Azouni, Aza; Aurelle, Yves

    2003-05-01

    Radial freezing experiments on wastewater models were conducted in the presence of imposed stirring in order to remove impurities. The studied samples (dilute Na-montmorillonite suspensions charged with nitrates and with zinc or lead) were placed inside a cylindrical annulus, cooled at a controlled temperature around -7 degrees C at its inner wall which rotated around a vertical axis. The freezing front propagated toward the still outer wall which was maintained at a constant temperature around +1 degrees C. Thanks to stirring, considerable purification rates up to 99.97% were attained. It was also demonstrated that combining radial freezing and stirring ended in residual concentrations which agreed with drinking water standards. PMID:12727265

  8. Atmospheric concentrations of submicron contact-freezing nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deshler, Terry; Vali, Gabor

    1992-01-01

    Atmospheric concentrations of contact-freezing nuclei were measured using a technique primarily sensitive to submicron aerosol particles. Diffusion and phoretic forces were relied on for the capture of nuclei by supercooled drops of distilled water exposed to the sample air. Nucleus concentrations were deduced from the rate at which the drops were observed to freeze, interpreting that rate on the basis of a theoretical prediction of aerosol capture rate for different assumed sizes of the nuclei. Measurements at Laramie, Wyoming, yielded average concentrations of contact-freezing nuclei of 1.7/L at -15 C and 3.1/L at -18 C for an assumed radius of 0.01 micron for the nucleating particles.

  9. Measuring freezing tolerance: Survival and regrowth assays

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Screening plants for freezing tolerance under tightly-controlled conditions is an invaluable technique for studying freezing tolerance and selecting for improved winterhardiness. Artificial freezing tests of cereal plants historically have used isolated crown and stem tissue prepared by “removing a...

  10. Combined infrared and freeze-drying.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The drying of the combined infrared (IR) and freeze-drying of food materials has been shown to be very rapid compared to regular freeze drying (FD). The resulting tissue structure of products processed with sequential infrared and freeze drying (SIRFD) tends to have higher crispness than those proce...

  11. 7 CFR 51.1562 - Freezing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Freezing. 51.1562 Section 51.1562 Agriculture..., CERTIFICATION, AND STANDARDS) United States Standards for Grades of Potatoes 1 Definitions § 51.1562 Freezing. Freezing means that the potato is frozen or shows evidence of having been frozen....

  12. 7 CFR 51.1562 - Freezing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Freezing. 51.1562 Section 51.1562 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Standards for Grades of Potatoes 1 Definitions § 51.1562 Freezing. Freezing means that the potato is...

  13. 7 CFR 51.1562 - Freezing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Freezing. 51.1562 Section 51.1562 Agriculture..., CERTIFICATION, AND STANDARDS) United States Standards for Grades of Potatoes 1 Definitions § 51.1562 Freezing. Freezing means that the potato is frozen or shows evidence of having been frozen....

  14. 7 CFR 51.1562 - Freezing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Freezing. 51.1562 Section 51.1562 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Standards for Grades of Potatoes 1 Definitions § 51.1562 Freezing. Freezing means that the potato is...

  15. 7 CFR 51.1562 - Freezing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Freezing. 51.1562 Section 51.1562 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Standards for Grades of Potatoes 1 Definitions § 51.1562 Freezing. Freezing means that the potato is...

  16. 23 CFR 658.23 - LCV freeze; cargo-carrying unit freeze.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false LCV freeze; cargo-carrying unit freeze. 658.23 Section 658.23 Highways FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION ENGINEERING AND TRAFFIC OPERATIONS TRUCK SIZE AND WEIGHT, ROUTE DESIGNATIONS-LENGTH, WIDTH AND WEIGHT LIMITATIONS § 658.23 LCV freeze; cargo-carrying unit freeze....

  17. PROCEEDINGS OF THE CONFERENCE ON POINT-OF-USE TREATMENT OF DRINKING WATER HELD AT CINCINNATI, OHIO ON OCTOBER 6-8, 1987

    EPA Science Inventory

    A Conference on Point-of-Use Treatment of Drinking Water was held on October 6-8, 1987, to provide information on the application of point-of-use (POU) and point-of-entry (POE) systems for treating drinking water to a wide-cross section of people interested in the technology. The...

  18. History of Debris-bearing Basal ice: Comparing Numerical Simulations of Basal Freeze-on to Borehole Video Images and Laboratory Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christoffersen, P.; Tulaczyk, S.

    2002-12-01

    Debris-bearing basal ice are frequently observed in a variety of glaciers as well as in ice cores drilled to the base of modern ice sheets. A common feature of frozen-on basal ice is an layered structure of debris-rich, dirty ice and clean, transparent ice. The thermodynamic aspects governing the segregation mechanism that separates dirty ice and clean ice are poorly understood and quantitative assessments of basal freeze-on are rarely conducted. We have investigated the response of subglacial sediments to basal freeze-on in a high-resolution numerical model (node spacing: 0.01 m). The model adapts thermodynamics of frost heave (which is a much-studied process in permafrost engineering) to subglacial conditions. In fine-grained sub-ice stream till, in-situ freezing of pore water is inhibited due to surface tension arising from a small characteristic particle size. The till becomes super-cooled by up to -0.35°C from the pressure-melting point and thermally driven pore water flow is induced. This water flow feeds accretion of clean ice onto the ice base while the till dewaters. Our model predictions compare favorably with observations from the Ross sector of the West Antarctic ice sheet. When the ice base is in direct contact with the till, ice stream stoppage is predicted to occur ca. 70 years after basal freeze-on is triggered. Fast ice stream flow may be prolonged if a widespread basal water system is capable of separating the freezing ice base from the till. However, the small thickness of water filled gaps (ca. 1-2 mm) limits the time of enhanced flow prolongation. After the freezing ice base has consumed the water film, the ice stream will shut down due to dewatering of the till. However, the bed remains unfrozen and highly porous for long time periods subsequent to stoppage. We predict that complete freeze-up of a 5 m till layer takes several centuries. This result is supported by radar data showing that Ice Stream C, which stopped ca. 150 years ago, has a largely unfrozen bed, while Siple Ice Stream, which stopped about 300 years earlier, exhibits a partially frozen bed. A self-adjusting upper boundary in our numerical simulation allows the freezing front to move downwards into the till domain. This occurs when the ice-till interface is no longer the thermodynamically most favorable location for freezing. We can thus simulate growth of ice lenses within the till. Our model reproduces basal ice with a layered structure consisting of uniform bands of debris-filled ice and clean segregation ice. Medium-grained till develops thin ice lenses that are closely spaced while fine-grained till develops thick ice lenses with a wider spacing. Comparison of our results to borehole video images of basal ice beneath Ice Stream C and images from laboratory studies of freezing porous media indicates that thermodynamics of basal freeze-on and frost heaving are fundamentally related.

  19. Study on the introduction of hazard analysis and critical control point (HACCP) concept of the water quality management in water supply systems.

    PubMed

    Yokoi, H; Embutsu, I; Yoda, M; Waseda, K

    2006-01-01

    In the latest revision in 2004, the 3rd edition, the Water Safety Plans (WSP) was newly introduced into the World Health Organization (WHO) Guidelines for Drinking Water Quality. The Hazard analysis and critical control point (HACCP) is a basic concept that underlies the WSPs, and is also known as the product quality management method in the field of food and the medical manufacturing industries. In the amendments of the Drinking Water Quality Standards in Japan, water suppliers are required to reasonably achieve both safe water and efficient water quality management. Therefore, the HACCP concept is focused as an adequate management method covering a whole process of water supply systems, in a systematic way. The purpose of this study is to investigate a practical procedure in introducing the HACCP into water quality management in Japan. In comparison to conventional applications of the HACCP, unmanageable variations of raw water quality, continuous treatment and supply, and numerous standards of water quality items need to be considered. The HACCP system is expected to achieve a quick response to improvements in water quality, accountability towards consumers and a decrease in accidents. PMID:16722101

  20. Intact preservation of environmental samples by freezing under an alternating magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Morono, Yuki; Terada, Takeshi; Yamamoto, Yuhji; Xiao, Nan; Hirose, Takehiro; Sugeno, Masaya; Ohwada, Norio; Inagaki, Fumio

    2015-04-01

    The study of environmental samples requires a preservation system that stabilizes the sample structure, including cells and biomolecules. To address this fundamental issue, we tested the cell alive system (CAS)-freezing technique for subseafloor sediment core samples. In the CAS-freezing technique, an alternating magnetic field is applied during the freezing process to produce vibration of water molecules and achieve a stable, super-cooled liquid phase. Upon further cooling, the temperature decreases further, achieving a uniform freezing of sample with minimal ice crystal formation. In this study, samples were preserved using the CAS and conventional freezing techniques at 4, -20, -80 and -196 (liquid nitrogen) C. After 6 months of storage, microbial cell counts by conventional freezing significantly decreased (down to 10.7% of initial), whereas that by CAS-freezing resulted in minimal. When Escherichia coli cells were tested under the same freezing conditions and storage for 2.5 months, CAS-frozen E. coli cells showed higher viability than the other conditions. In addition, an alternating magnetic field does not impact on the direction of remanent magnetization in sediment core samples, although slight partial demagnetization in intensity due to freezing was observed. Consequently, our data indicate that the CAS technique is highly useful for the preservation of environmental samples. PMID:25403324