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Sample records for water freezing point

  1. Reproducing Black's experiments: freezing point depression and supercooling of water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Güémez, J.; Fiolhais, C.; Fiolhais, M.

    2002-01-01

    We carried out two historical experiments referred to by Joseph Black, one on freezing mixtures of salted water with ice and another on freezing supercooled pure water by a small disturbance. The results confirm thermodynamical predictions for the depression of the freezing point of salted water and for the latent heat of freezing of supercooled water respectively, which came after Black. The depression of the freezing point can hardly be fitted in the framework of the caloric theory of heat, which was taken for granted by Black, and the instantaneous freezing of supercooled water also poses some difficulties for that theory.

  2. Measurement of freezing point depression of water in glass capillaries and the associated ice front shape

    E-print Network

    Wan, Richard G.

    Measurement of freezing point depression of water in glass capillaries and the associated ice front of the capillary diameter. As the diameter decreases, the freezing point of water is lowered, which is called are the freezing point and the normal equilibrium temperature of the ice-water interface i.e., 273.15 K , re

  3. Effects of impurities on the freezing plateau of the triple point of water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, X.; Zhang, J. T.; Duan, Y.; Wang, W.; Hao, X.

    2013-09-01

    The influence of impurities on the shape of the freezing curves of the triple point of water (TPW) in three small TPW cells was investigated using the freezing curve analysis method. We describe the procedure for preparing outer ice mantles in small TPW cells, for obtaining freezing plateaus, and for comparing the results between the old cell (s/n: 021) and the new cells (s/n: 001 and s/n: 008). The experimental results show that the maximum influence of impurities on the observed phase-transition temperature of water in the cell (s/n: 021) is approximately 0.2 mK below the peak temperature of the freezing plateau during freezing. Also, jagged temperature fluctuations were observed near the end of the freezing plateau in the old cell. However, these phenomena did not appear in the freezing plateaus of the new small cells. The equilibrium temperature realized with the old cell is 2.3 mK lower than that of the new cells, possibly due to excessive residual air. Therefore, assessing the effects of impurities on the TPW using an outer sheath method similar to that used in obtaining the fixed points of other metals is useful. Additionally, an estimated total mole fraction impurity concentration can be determined using Raoult's Law and the first cryoscopic constant for water.

  4. Cavitation in water under tension near the freezing point

    SciTech Connect

    Sosikov, V. A. Utkin, A. V.; Fortov, V. E.

    2008-05-15

    Experiments are reported on cavitation in water at an initial temperature of 0.7 deg. C under the dynamic tension created when a compression wave interacts with a free liquid surface. It is found that the tensile strength of water increases from 20 to 50 MPa as the strain rate is varied from 1.8 x 10{sup 4} to 5.2 x 10{sup 4} s{sup -1}. It is shown that the phase state of water obtained in experiments is in a double metastable region.

  5. Freezing point depression of water in phospholipid membranes: a solid-state NMR study.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong-Kuk; Kwon, Byung Soo; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2008-12-01

    Lipid-water interaction plays an important role in the properties of lipid bilayers, cryoprotectants, and membrane-associated peptides and proteins. The temperature at which water bound to lipid bilayers freezes is lower than that of free water. Here, we report a solid-state NMR investigation on the freezing point depression of water in phospholipid bilayers in the presence and absence of cholesterol. Deuterium NMR spectra at different temperatures ranging from -75 to + 10 degrees C were obtained from fully (2)H2O-hydrated POPC (1-palmitoyl-2-oleoylphosphatidylcholine) multilamellar vesicles (MLVs), prepared with and without cholesterol, to determine the freezing temperature of water and the effect of cholesterol on the freezing temperature of water in POPC bilayers. Our 2H NMR experiments reveal the motional behavior of unfrozen water molecules in POPC bilayers even at temperatures significantly below 0 degrees C and show that the presence of cholesterol further lowered the freezing temperature of water in POPC bilayers. These results suggest that in the presence of cholesterol the fluidity and dynamics of lipid bilayers can be retained even at very low temperatures as exist in the liquid crystalline phase of the lipid. Therefore, bilayer samples prepared with a cryoprotectant like cholesterol should enable the performance of multidimensional solid-state NMR experiments to investigate the structure, dynamics, and topology of membrane proteins at a very low temperature with enhanced sample stability and possibly a better sensitivity. Phosphorus-31 NMR data suggest that lipid bilayers can be aligned at low temperatures, while 15N NMR experiments demonstrate that such aligned samples can be used to enhance the signal-to-noise ratio of is 15N chemical shift spectra of a 37-residue human antimicrobial peptide, LL-37. PMID:18991419

  6. When hot water freezes before cold

    E-print Network

    J. I. Katz

    2006-04-27

    I suggest that the origin of the Mpemba effect (the freezing of hot water before cold) is freezing-point depression by solutes, either gaseous or solid, whose solubility decreases with increasing temperature so that they are removed when water is heated. They are concentrated ahead of the freezing front by zone refining in water that has not been heated, reduce the temperature of the freezing front, and thereby reduce the temperature gradient and heat flux, slowing the progress of the front. I present a simple calculation of this effect, and suggest experiments to test this hypothesis.

  7. When hot water freezes before cold

    E-print Network

    Katz, J I

    2006-01-01

    I suggest that the origin of the Mpemba effect (the freezing of hot water before cold) is freezing-point depression by solutes, either gaseous or solid, whose solubility decreases with increasing temperature so that they are removed when water is heated. They are concentrated ahead of the freezing front by zone refining in water that has not been heated, reduce the temperature of the freezing front, and thereby reduce the temperature gradient and heat flux, slowing the progress of the front. I present a simple calculation of this effect, and suggest experiments to test this hypothesis.

  8. Poly(vinyl methyl ether) hydrogels at temperatures below the freezing point of water-molecular interactions and states of water.

    PubMed

    Pastorczak, Marcin; Dominguez-Espinosa, Gustavo; Okrasa, Lidia; Pyda, Marek; Kozanecki, Marcin; Kadlubowski, Slawomir; Rosiak, Janusz M; Ulanski, Jacek

    2014-01-01

    Water interacting with a polymer reveals a number of properties very different to bulk water. These interactions lead to the redistribution of hydrogen bonds in water. It results in modification of thermodynamic properties of water and the molecular dynamics of water. That kind of water is particularly well observable at temperatures below the freezing point of water, when the bulk water crystallizes. In this work, we determine the amount of water bound to the polymer and of the so-called pre-melting water in poly(vinyl methyl ether) hydrogels with the use of Raman spectroscopy, dielectric spectroscopy, and calorimetry. This analysis allows us to compare various physical properties of the bulk and the pre-melting water. We also postulate the molecular mechanism responsible for the pre-melting of part of water in poly(vinyl methyl ether) hydrogels. We suggest that above -60 °C, the first segmental motions of the polymer chain are activated, which trigger the process of the pre-melting. PMID:25100897

  9. Hydrocarbon exclusion from ground water during freezing

    SciTech Connect

    Tumeo, M.A.; Davidson, B. )

    1993-08-01

    Bench-scale studies were conducted using a constant-head ground-water flow chamber and natural soil. Initial experiments with chlorides and dye were conducted to test the hydraulic and adsorptive characteristics of the chamber. A constant flow of phenol was then introduced into the chamber and contaminant movement with time was monitored under freezing and nonfreezing conditions. The chamber was located in a controlled-temperature room, and freezing fronts were induced from the soil surface downward using cooled Freon circulated through freezer pads placed on the surface of the soil. The results conclusively demonstrate that phenol is excluded from the freezing front and pushed downward through the system. Extensive exclusion of the chemical occurs even though the freezing point of phenol (43 C) is significantly higher than water. The information gained through this research is applicable in cold regions outside Alaska and the Arctic where ground water systems may undergo periodic freezing, and may also be of extreme importance in artificial-freezing scenarios such as those currently being investigated by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as a method of contaminant containment.

  10. Water Freezing and Ice Melting.

    PubMed

    Ma?olepsza, Edyta; Keyes, Tom

    2015-12-01

    The generalized replica exchange method (gREM) is designed to sample states with coexisting phases and thereby to describe strong first order phase transitions. The isobaric MD version of the gREM is presented and applied to the freezing of liquid water and the melting of hexagonal and cubic ice. It is confirmed that coexisting states are well-sampled. The statistical temperature as a function of enthalpy, TS(H), is obtained. Hysteresis between freezing and melting is observed and discussed. The entropic analysis of phase transitions is applied and equilibrium transition temperatures, latent heats, and surface tensions are obtained for hexagonal ice ? liquid and cubic ice ? liquid with excellent agreement with published values. A new method is given to assign water molecules among various symmetry types. Pathways for water freezing, ultimately leading to hexagonal ice, are found to contain intermediate layered structures built from hexagonal and cubic ice. PMID:26642983

  11. Freezing singularities in water drops

    E-print Network

    Enriquez, Oscar R; Winkels, Koen G; Snoeijer, Jacco H

    2011-01-01

    In this fluid dynamics video we show how a drop of water freezes into a singular shape when deposited on a cold surface. The process of solidification can be observed very clearly due to the change in refraction when water turns into ice. The drop remains approximately spherical during most of the process, with a freezing front moving upwards and smoothly following the interface. However, at the final stage of freezing, when the last cap of liquid turns into ice, a singular tip develops spontaneously. Interestingly, the sharp tip of the ice drop acts as a preferential site for deposition of water vapour, and a beautiful "tree" of ice crystals develops right at the tip. The tip singularity attracts the vapour in analogy to a sharp lightning rod attracting lightning.

  12. Device and method for determining freezing points

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mathiprakasam, Balakrishnan (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    A freezing point method and device (10) are disclosed. The method and device pertain to an inflection point technique for determining the freezing points of mixtures. In both the method and device (10), the mixture is cooled to a point below its anticipated freezing point and then warmed at a substantially linear rate. During the warming process, the rate of increase of temperature of the mixture is monitored by, for example, thermocouple (28) with the thermocouple output signal being amplified and differentiated by a differentiator (42). The rate of increase of temperature data are analyzed and a peak rate of increase of temperature is identified. In the preferred device (10) a computer (22) is utilized to analyze the rate of increase of temperature data following the warming process. Once the maximum rate of increase of temperature is identified, the corresponding temperature of the mixture is located and earmarked as being substantially equal to the freezing point of the mixture. In a preferred device (10), the computer (22), in addition to collecting the temperature and rate of change of temperature data, controls a programmable power supply (14) to provide a predetermined amount of cooling and warming current to thermoelectric modules (56).

  13. Magneto-caloric effect of a Gd50Co50 amorphous alloy near the freezing point of water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, L.; Wu, C.; Chen, S. H.; Chan, K. C.

    2015-09-01

    In the present work, we report the magneto-caloric effect (MCE) of a binary Gd50Co50 amorphous alloy near the freezing temperature of water. The Curie temperature of Gd50Co50 amorphous ribbons is about 267.5 K, which is very close to room temperature. The peak value of the magnetic entropy change (-?Smpeak) and the resulting adiabatic temperature rise (?Tad.) of the Gd50Co50 amorphous ribbons is much higher than that of any other amorphous alloys previously reported with a Tc near room temperature. On the other hand, although the -?Smpeak of Gd50Co50 amorphous ribbons is not as high as those of crystalline alloys near room temperature, its refrigeration capacity (RC) is still much larger than the RC values of these crystalline alloys. The binary Gd50Co50 amorphous alloy provides a basic alloy for developing high performance multi-component amorphous alloys near room temperature.

  14. Cold Heat Storage Characteristics of O/W-type Latent Heat Emulsion Including Continuum Phase of Water Treated with a Freezing Point Depression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inaba, Hideo; Morita, Shin-Ichi

    This paper deals with flow and cold heat storage characteristics of the oil (tetradecane, C14H30, freezing point 278.9 K, Latent heat 229 kJ/kg)/water emulsion as a latent heat storage material having a low melting point. The test emulsion includes a water-urea solution as a continuum phase. The freezing point depression of the continuum phase permits enhancement of the heat transfer rate of the emulison, due to the large temperature difference between the latent heat storage material and water-urea solution. The velocity of emulsion flow and the inlet temperature of coolant in a coiled double tube heat exchanger are chosen as the experimental parameters. The pressure drop, the heat transfer coefficient of the emulsion in the coiled tube are measured in the temperture region over solid and liquid phase of the latent heat storage material. The finishing time of the cold heat storage is defined experimentally in the range of sensible and latent heat storage. It is clarified that the flow behavior of the emulsion as a non-Newtonian fluid has an important role in cold heat storage. The useful nondimentional correlation equations for the additional pressure loss coefficient, the heat transfer coefficient and the finishing time of the cold heat storage are derived in terms of Dean number and heat capacity ratio.

  15. Measurement of Freezing Point Depression of Selected Food Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murata, Satoshi; Tanaka, Fumihiko; Matsuoka, Takahisa

    Freezing point depression of selected food solutions were measured at various concentrations in order to reveal the characteristics of solid-liquid phase equilibrium. The measurement were carried out on a hand made apparatus that was calibrated before the measurement by some of selected reagents (acid and sugar) with known thermal properties. The results revealed that the freezing point depression of selected food solutions deviated from the behavior of the ideal solution with increasing solute concentration, so the water activity for non-ideal solution were introduced to the freezing point depression equation. Further, assuming that the heat of fusion was a equation of temperature, thus the following new equation was led, ln {(1-Xs)/(l-Xs+?·Xs + ?·Xs2)} = A(1/To - 1/Tf) - Bln(To/Tf) The goodness of fit of the equation showed the best results. Futhermore, by using the parameters a formula of freezing ratio and the relative water activities, which showed deviation from the ideal solution, were derived.

  16. Study of freezing-point depression of selected food extracts

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Fumihiko; Murata, Satoshi; Habara, Kazuhiro; Amaratunga, K.S.P.

    1996-12-31

    The phenomenon of freezing-point depression that accompanies the solute concentration of selected food extracts was investigated to reveal the characteristics of solid-liquid phase equilibrium. The freezing curves of various food extracts did not exhibit ideal solution behavior in the higher concentration range. The experimental data were fitted to new freezing-point depression equations by the method of nonlinear least squares, and the results clearly indicated that the calculated freezing points at various concentrations were in good agreement with the experimental data. Furthermore, by using the determined parameters, the freezing ratio and the activation coefficient were derived.

  17. Vapor Pressure Plus: An Experiment for Studying Phase Equilibria in Water, with Observation of Supercooling, Spontaneous Freezing, and the Triple Point

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tellinghuisen, Joel

    2010-01-01

    Liquid-vapor, solid-vapor, and solid-liquid-vapor equilibria are studied for the pure substance water, using modern equipment that includes specially fabricated glass cells. Samples are evaporatively frozen initially, during which they typically supercool to -5 to -10 [degrees]C before spontaneously freezing. Vacuum pumping lowers the temperature…

  18. Freezing and Decorated Poisson Point Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subag, Eliran; Zeitouni, Ofer

    2015-07-01

    The limiting extremal processes of the branching Brownian motion (BBM), the two-speed BBM, and the branching random walk are known to be randomly shifted decorated Poisson point processes (SDPPP). In the proofs of those results, the Laplace functional of the limiting extremal process is shown to satisfy for any nonzero, nonnegative, compactly supported, continuous function f, where is the shift operator, is a real number that depends on f, and g is a real function that is independent of f. We show that, under some assumptions, this property characterizes the structure of SDPPP. Moreover, when it holds, we show that g has to be a convolution of the Gumbel distribution with some measure. The above property of the Laplace functional is closely related to a `freezing phenomenon' that is expected to occur in a wide class of log-correlated fields, and which has played an important role in the analysis of various models. Our results shed light on this intriguing phenomenon and provide a natural tool for proving an SDPPP structure in these and other models.

  19. Realization of the Temperature Scale in the Range from 234.3 K (Hg Triple Point) to 1084.62°C (Cu Freezing Point) in Croatia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zvizdic, Davor; Veliki, Tomislav; Grgec Bermanec, Lovorka

    2008-06-01

    This article describes the realization of the International Temperature Scale in the range from 234.3 K (mercury triple point) to 1084.62°C (copper freezing point) at the Laboratory for Process Measurement (LPM), Faculty of Mechanical Engineering and Naval Architecture (FSB), University of Zagreb. The system for the realization of the ITS-90 consists of the sealed fixed-point cells (mercury triple point, water triple point and gallium melting point) and the apparatus designed for the optimal realization of open fixed-point cells which include the gallium melting point, tin freezing point, zinc freezing point, aluminum freezing point, and copper freezing point. The maintenance of the open fixed-point cells is described, including the system for filling the cells with pure argon and for maintaining the pressure during the realization.

  20. Freezing and melting water in lamellar structures.

    PubMed

    Gleeson, J T; Erramilli, S; Gruner, S M

    1994-08-01

    The manner in which ice forms in lamellar suspensions of dielaidoylphosphatidylethanolamine, dielaidoylphosphatidylcholine, and dioleoylphosphatidylcholine in water depends strongly on the water fraction. For weight fractions between 15 and 9%, the freezing and melting temperatures are significantly depressed below 0 degree C. The ice exhibits a continuous melting transition spanning as much as 20 degrees C. When the water weight fraction is below 9%, ice never forms at temperatures as low as -40 degrees C. We show that when water contained in a lamellar lipid suspension freezes, the ice is not found between the bilayers; it exists as pools of crystalline ice in equilibrium with the bound water associated with the polar lipid headgroups. We have used this effect, together with the known chemical potential of ice, to measure hydration forces between lipid bilayers. We find exponentially decaying hydration repulsion when the bilayers are less than about 7 A apart. For larger separations, we find significant deviations from single exponential decay. PMID:7948683

  1. A search for the Mpemba effect: When hot water freezes faster then cold water

    E-print Network

    Brownridge, James D

    2010-01-01

    An explanation for why hot water will sometime freeze more rapidly than cold water is offered. Two specimens of water from the same source will often have different spontaneous freezing temperatures; that is, the temperature at which freezing begins. When both specimens supercool and the spontaneous freezing temperature of the hot water is higher than that of the cold water, then the hot water will usually freeze first, if all other conditions are equal and remain so during cooling. The probability that the hot water will freeze first if it has the higher spontaneous freezing temperature will be larger for a larger difference in spontaneous freezing temperature. Heating the water may lower, raise or not change the spontaneous freezing temperature. The keys to observing hot water freezing before cold water are supercooling the water and having a significant difference in the spontaneous freezing temperature of the two water specimens. We observed hot water freezing before cold water 28 times in 28 attempts und...

  2. Depression of soil moisture freezing point

    SciTech Connect

    Fedorov, V.I.

    1996-12-01

    Certain criteria for freezing temperature of clay soil have been found which are a relative moisture content at the soil liquid limit (W/W{sub L}) and maximum hydroscopic moisture (W/W{sub h}). On the strength of test data it has been established that the relative moisture content at the soil liquid limit (W/W{sub L}) may also serve as a criterion on compression pressure and resistance against shearing for soil paste with no structural binding. Linear correlation between the moisture content of natural soil and its paste -- the equation of moisture balance -- has been found which specifies a thermodynamic balance condition. The equation of moisture balance represents a whole set of properties for a certain type of soil, such as strength and compressibility. In this respect, it may be considered as a ``Soil equation`` which allows for further prognosis of its properties.

  3. Freezing Kinetics in Overcompressed Water

    SciTech Connect

    Bastea, M; Bastea, S; Reaugh, J; Reisman, D

    2006-09-27

    We report high pressure dynamic compression experiments of liquid water along a quasi-adiabatic path leading to the formation of ice VII. We observe dynamic features resembling Van der Waals loops and find that liquid water is compacted to a metastable state close to the ice density before the onset of crystallization. By analyzing the characteristic kinetic time scale involved we estimate the nucleation barrier and conclude that liquid water has been compressed to a high pressure state close to its thermodynamic stability limit.

  4. STABILIZATION OF THE PHOSPHATE RATIO OF SEA WATER BY FREEZING

    E-print Network

    STABILIZATION OF THE PHOSPHATE RATIO OF SEA WATER BY FREEZING BY ALBERT W. COLLIER AND KENNETH T, Director STABILIZATION OF THE PHOSPHATE RATIO OF SEA WATER BY FREEZING By ALBERT W. COLLIER and KENNETH T_________________________________________________ 76 u #12;STABILIZATION OF THE PHOSPHATE RATIO OF SEA WATER BY FREEZING By ALBERT W. COLLIER, Fishery

  5. Nano materials for efficiently lowering the freezing point of heat transfer nanofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Haiping; Roy, Walter

    2007-09-01

    In this paper, we report, for the first time, the effect of the lowered freezing point in a 50% water / 50% antifreeze coolant (PAC) or 50% water / 50% ethylene glycol (EG) solution by the addition of carbon nanotubes and other particles. The experimental results indicated that the nano materials are much more efficient (hundreds fold) in lowering the freezing point than the regular ionic materials (e.g. NaCl). The possible explanation for this interesting phenomenon is the colligative property of fluid and relative small size of nano material. It is quite certain that the carbon nanotubes and metal oxide nano particles could be a wonderful candidate for the nano coolant application because they could not only increase the thermal conductivity, but also efficiently lower the freezing point of traditional coolants.

  6. High-freezing-point fuels used for aviation turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedman, R.

    1979-01-01

    Broadened-specification aviation fuels could be produced from a greater fraction of crude source material with improvements in fuel supply and price. These fuels, particularly those with increased final boiling temperatures, would have higher freezing temperatures than current aviation turbine fuels. The higher-freezing-point fuels can be substituted in the majority of present commercial flights, since temperature data indicate that in-flight fuel temperatures are relatively mild. For the small but significant fraction of commercial flights where low fuel temperatures make higher freezing-point fuel use unacceptable, adaptations to the fuel or fuel system may be made to accommodate this fuel. Several techniques are discussed. Fuel heating is the most promising concept. One simple system design uses existing heat rejection from the fuel-lubricating oil cooler, another uses an engine-driven generator for electrical heating. Both systems offer advantages that outweigh the obvious penalties.

  7. Thermal properties of freezing bound water restrained by polysaccharides.

    PubMed

    Hatakeyama, Tatsuko; Tanaka, Masaru; Hatakeyama, Hyoe

    2010-01-01

    This review focuses on the thermal properties of bound water restrained by various kinds of polysaccharides and several synthetic polymers. The characteristic features of freezing bound water which is closely related with biocompatibility of polymers are summarized based on results obtained by differential scanning calorimetry. Glass transition, cold crystallization and melting of water-polysaccharide systems were observed. Three kinds of water, non-freezing, freezing bound and free water, were quantified from the enthalpy of melting of water in the system. Freezing bound water restrained by polysaccharides is in a metastable state. The equilibrium melting temperature of freezing bound water is lower than 0°C and the temperature decreases with decreasing water content. Nucleation and growth rate of freezing bound water were calculated from isothermal crystallization and the values were compared with those of free water. PMID:20557717

  8. An Equipment to Measure the Freezing Point of Soils under Higher Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dayan; Guan, Hui; Wen, Zhi; Ma, Wei

    2014-05-01

    Soil freezing point is the highest temperature at which ice can be presented in the system and soil can be referred to as frozen. The freezing temperature of soil is an important parameter for solving many practical problems in civil engineering, such as evaluation of soil freezing depth, prediction of soil heaving, force of soil suction, etc. However, as the freezing temperature is always affected by many factors like soil particle size, mineral composition, water content and the external pressure endured by soils, to measure soil freezing point is a rather difficult task until now, not to mention the soil suffering higher pressure. But recently, with the artificial freezing technology widely used in the excavation of deep underground space, the frozen wall thickness is a key factor to impact the security and stability of deep frozen wall. To determine the freeze wall thickness, the location of the freezing front must be determined firstly, which will deal with the determination of the soil freezing temperature. So how to measure the freezing temperature of soil suffering higher pressure is an important problem to be solved. This paper will introduce an equipment which was developed lately by State Key Laboratory of Frozen Soil Engineering to measure the freezing-point of soils under higher pressure. The equipment is consisted of cooling and keeping temperature system, temperature sensor and data collection system. By cooling and keeping temperature system, not only can we make the higher pressure soil sample's temperature drop to a discretionary minus temperature, but also keep it and reduce the heat exchange of soil sample with the outside. The temperature sensor is the key part to our measurement, which is featured by high precision and high sensitivity, what is more important is that the temperature sensor can work in a higher pressure condition. Moreover, the major benefit of this equipment is that the soil specimen's loads can be loaded by any microcomputer control electron universal testing machines. All of above mentioned advantages of this equipment ensures one to catch up the moment soil turns from the thawed state into ice and enable one to determine the freezing point experimentally by recording the temperature-time history (cooling curve) at particular points within the sample used for analysis. Therefore, this equipment has excellent characteristics such as compact construction, convenient operation, high reliability and the measuring accuracy. The authors would like to thank the following agents for their financial supports: the National Natural Science Foundation (No.41071048),Hundred Talent Young Scientists program of the Chinese Academy of Sciences granted to Dr. Zhi Wen.

  9. The Freezing Point Depression Law in Physical Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franzen, Hugo F.

    1988-01-01

    Suggests a change in physical chemistry courses to use a slightly more complicated but significantly more useful generalization of the simple freezing point depression law. Lists reasons for the change and presents the treatment of solid-liquid equilibria where solid-solution is allowed. Provides a mathematical treatment. (MVL)

  10. Mechano-freezing of the ambient water

    E-print Network

    Zhang, Xi; Zou, Bo; Sun, Chang Q

    2013-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy examination of the 25 deg-C water freezing under compression revealed transition from 1.35 GPa to 0.86 GPa upon ice being formed at continued volume change. The transition is associated with a slight blue shift of the high-frequency phonon (omiga_H ~ 3120 cm-1) and creation of the low-frequency phonons (Omiga_L ~ 200 cm-1). In the liquid and in the solid phase, the increased pressure softens the Omiga_H and stiffens the Omida_L, which indicates the presence of the inter-electron-pair repulsion in both liquid and solid water.

  11. Mechano-freezing of the ambient water

    E-print Network

    Xi Zhang; Tingting Yan; Bo Zou; Chang Q Sun

    2013-10-05

    Raman spectroscopy examination of the 25 deg-C water freezing under compression revealed transition from 1.35 GPa to 0.86 GPa upon ice being formed at continued volume change. The transition is associated with a slight blue shift of the high-frequency phonon (omiga_H ~ 3120 cm-1) and creation of the low-frequency phonons (Omiga_L ~ 200 cm-1). In the liquid and in the solid phase, the increased pressure softens the Omiga_H and stiffens the Omida_L, which indicates the presence of the inter-electron-pair repulsion in both liquid and solid water.

  12. High freezing point fuels used for aviation turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedman, R.

    1979-01-01

    Broadened-specification aviation fuels could be produced from a greater fraction of crude source material with improvements in fuel supply and price. These fuels, particularly those with increased final boiling temperatures, would have higher freezing temperatures than current aviation turbine fuels. For the small but significant fraction of commercial flights where low fuel temperatures make higher freezing-point fuel use unacceptable, adaptations to the fuel or fuel system may be made to accommodate this fuel. Several techniques are discussed. Fuel heating is the most promising concept. One simple design uses existing heat rejection from the fuel-lubricating oil cooler, another uses an engine-driven generator for electrical heating.

  13. Hot water can freeze faster than cold?!?

    E-print Network

    Jeng, M

    2005-01-01

    We review the Mpemba effect, where intially hot water freezes faster than initially cold water. While the effect appears impossible at first sight, it has been seen in numerous experiments, was reported on by Aristotle, Francis Bacon, and Descartes, and has been well-known as folklore around the world. It has a rich and fascinating history, which culminates in the dramatic story of the secondary school student, Erasto Mpemba, who reintroduced the effect to the twentieth century scientific community. The phenomenon, while simple to describe, is deceptively complex, and illustrates numerous important issues about the scientific method: the role of skepticism in scientific inquiry, the influence of theory on experiment and observation, the need for precision in the statement of a scientific hypothesis, and the nature of falsifiability. We survey proposed theoretical mechanisms for the Mpemba effect, and the results of modern experiments on the phenomenon. Studies of the observation that hot water pipes are more ...

  14. Chilled water coil freeze protection via internal drying

    SciTech Connect

    LaRocca, D.V.

    1997-12-01

    Winter lay-up for chilled water coils has been a problem for as long as there has been air conditioning. A frozen coil may be so seriously damaged that it must be replaced. Also, as the coil thaws, significant flooding of adjacent areas may result. Over the years, various methods of freeze protection have been used. These methods include using a glycol solution to lower the freezing point, blowing the coil clear with compressed air, or installing coils that incorporate freeze plugs in the coil design. Each of these methods has one or more significant drawbacks. A new approach, nicknamed ``The LaRocca Solution`` is a simple procedure. Air is blown continuously through the coils to ensure that they become completely dry and remain so. Instead of using a separate blower or air compressor to blow out the water, the supply fan itself is used. On most medium- and high-pressure HVAC systems, the static pressure produced by the supply fan is sufficient to overcome the internal resistance of the coil tubes. One simply configures the chilled water piping in a manner that permits the coils to be drained by gravity and then purged by the discharge of the fan. The fan does all the work.

  15. Experimental results for the rapid determination of the freezing point of fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mathiprakasam, B.

    1984-01-01

    Two methods for the rapid determination of the freezing point of fuels were investigated: an optical method, which detected the change in light transmission from the disappearance of solid particles in the melted fuel; and a differential thermal analysis (DTA) method, which sensed the latent heat of fusion. A laboratory apparatus was fabricated to test the two methods. Cooling was done by thermoelectric modules using an ice-water bath as a heat sink. The DTA method was later modified to eliminate the reference fuel. The data from the sample were digitized and a point of inflection, which corresponds to the ASTM D-2386 freezing point (final melting point), was identified from the derivative. The apparatus was modifified to cool the fuel to -60 C and controls were added for maintaining constant cooling rate, rewarming rate, and hold time at minimum temperature. A parametric series of tests were run for twelve fuels with freezing points from -10 C to -50 C, varying cooling rate, rewarming rate, and hold time. Based on the results, an optimum test procedure was established. The results showed good agreement with ASTM D-2386 freezing point and differential scanning calorimetry results.

  16. Close-Packed Floating Clusters: Granular Hydrodynamics Beyond the Freezing Point? Baruch Meerson,1

    E-print Network

    Meerson, Baruch

    Close-Packed Floating Clusters: Granular Hydrodynamics Beyond the Freezing Point? Baruch Meerson,1 a simple explanation for the success of NSGH beyond the freezing point. DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevLett.91 the packing fraction approaches the freezing point value f ' 0:49 (in three dimensions) or 0.69 (in two

  17. Electrical Indicator of Imminent Freezing in Supercooled Water

    E-print Network

    James D. Brownridge

    2002-04-02

    Data is presented that demonstrate electrical activity and evidences of dipole alignment in supercooled water and heavy water before and after the onset of freezing. Voltage signals as high as 13 mV have been recorded. In some cases up to 3 seconds before latent heat is released and freezing began. The polarity of the voltage signals is suggestive of molecule dipole alignment prior to freezing.

  18. Theoretical and experimental studies on sequential freezing solar water heater

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang Xinian; Tao Zhen; Lu Junsheng; Ge Hongchuan )

    1994-08-01

    This article presents the principle of using sequential freezing for the purpose of freeze protection in a solar water heater. Sequential freezing is accomplished by maintaining a temperature gradient across the collector so that water is squeezed out of the collector rather than being trapped by ice at the ends of the tubes. The authors give the mathematical models of tubular sequential freezing, compare the predicted results of models with the measured data, and investigate the influences of various factors on the tubular sequential freezing state with the model. A series of experiments show that a solar water heater designed according to the principle of sequential freezing can operate effectively in winter without drain-down, electricity, and heat exchanger systems.

  19. Immersion freezing of birch pollen washing water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Augustin, S.; Wex, H.; Niedermeier, D.; Pummer, B.; Grothe, H.; Hartmann, S.; Tomsche, L.; Clauss, T.; Voigtländer, J.; Ignatius, K.; Stratmann, F.

    2013-11-01

    Birch pollen grains are known to be ice nucleating active biological particles. The ice nucleating activity has previously been tracked down to biological macromolecules that can be easily extracted from the pollen grains in water. In the present study, we investigated the immersion freezing behavior of these ice nucleating active (INA) macromolecules. Therefore we measured the frozen fractions of particles generated from birch pollen washing water as a function of temperature at the Leipzig Aerosol Cloud Interaction Simulator (LACIS). Two different birch pollen samples were considered, with one originating from Sweden and one from the Czech Republic. For the Czech and Swedish birch pollen samples, freezing was observed to start at -19 and -17 °C, respectively. The fraction of frozen droplets increased for both samples down to -24 °C. Further cooling did not increase the frozen fractions any more. Instead, a plateau formed at frozen fractions below 1. This fact could be used to determine the amount of INA macromolecules in the droplets examined here, which in turn allowed for the determination of nucleation rates for single INA macromolecules. The main differences between the Swedish birch pollen and the Czech birch pollen were obvious in the temperature range between -17 and -24 °C. In this range, a second plateau region could be seen for Swedish birch pollen. As we assume INA macromolecules to be the reason for the ice nucleation, we concluded that birch pollen is able to produce at least two different types of INA macromolecules. We were able to derive parameterizations for the heterogeneous nucleation rates for both INA macromolecule types, using two different methods: a simple exponential fit and the Soccer ball model. With these parameterization methods we were able to describe the ice nucleation behavior of single INA macromolecules from both the Czech and the Swedish birch pollen.

  20. Hot water can freeze faster than cold?!?

    E-print Network

    Monwhea Jeng

    2005-12-29

    We review the Mpemba effect, where intially hot water freezes faster than initially cold water. While the effect appears impossible at first sight, it has been seen in numerous experiments, was reported on by Aristotle, Francis Bacon, and Descartes, and has been well-known as folklore around the world. It has a rich and fascinating history, which culminates in the dramatic story of the secondary school student, Erasto Mpemba, who reintroduced the effect to the twentieth century scientific community. The phenomenon, while simple to describe, is deceptively complex, and illustrates numerous important issues about the scientific method: the role of skepticism in scientific inquiry, the influence of theory on experiment and observation, the need for precision in the statement of a scientific hypothesis, and the nature of falsifiability. We survey proposed theoretical mechanisms for the Mpemba effect, and the results of modern experiments on the phenomenon. Studies of the observation that hot water pipes are more likely to burst than cold water pipes are also described.

  1. Freezing techniques defeat ground water problems

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-02-01

    The sinking of a new shaft at Walsum Colliery, West Germany, is described. The 640 m of strata above the coal seams were known to be unstable and include the Bunter Sandstone. The shaft is also within 1 km of the River Rhine. Freezing techniques were therefore adopted. Details of the freezing operation are given, including the drilling of the freezing holes and the determination of the size and strength of the ice wall.

  2. Correction for solute/solvent interaction extends accurate freezing point depression theory to high concentration range.

    PubMed

    Fullerton, G D; Keener, C R; Cameron, I L

    1994-12-01

    The authors describe empirical corrections to ideally dilute expressions for freezing point depression of aqueous solutions to arrive at new expressions accurate up to three molal concentration. The method assumes non-ideality is due primarily to solute/solvent interactions such that the correct free water mass Mwc is the mass of water in solution Mw minus I.M(s) where M(s) is the mass of solute and I an empirical solute/solvent interaction coefficient. The interaction coefficient is easily derived from the constant in the linear regression fit to the experimental plot of Mw/M(s) as a function of 1/delta T (inverse freezing point depression). The I-value, when substituted into the new thermodynamic expressions derived from the assumption of equivalent activity of water in solution and ice, provides accurate predictions of freezing point depression (+/- 0.05 degrees C) up to 2.5 molal concentration for all the test molecules evaluated; glucose, sucrose, glycerol and ethylene glycol. The concentration limit is the approximate monolayer water coverage limit for the solutes which suggests that direct solute/solute interactions are negligible below this limit. This is contrary to the view of many authors due to the common practice of including hydration forces (a soft potential added to the hard core atomic potential) in the interaction potential between solute particles. When this is recognized the two viewpoints are in fundamental agreement. PMID:7699200

  3. Understanding freeze stress in biological tissues: thermodynamics of interfacial water

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A thermodynamic approach to distinguish forms of freeze energy that injure plants as the temperature decreases is developed. The pattern resulting from this analysis dictated the sequence of thermal requirements for water to exist as an independent state. Improvement of freezing tolerance in biolo...

  4. Spin Probe ESR Signature of Freezing in Water: Is it Global or Local?

    E-print Network

    Debamalya Banerjee; S. V. Bhat

    2008-10-26

    First systematic spin probe ESR study of water freezing has been conducted using TEMPOL and TEMPO as the probes. The spin probe signature of the water freezing has been described in terms of the collapse of narrow triplet spectrum into a single broad line. This spin probe signature of freezing has been observed at an anomalously low temperature when a milimoler solution of TEMPOL is slowly cooled from room temperature. A systematic observation has revealed a spin probe concentration dependence of these freezing and respective melting points. These results can be explained in terms of localization of spin probe and liquid water, most probably in the interstices of ice grains, in an ice matrix. The lowering of spin probe freezing point, along with the secondary evidences, like spin probe concentration dependence of peak-to-peak width in frozen limit signal, indicates a possible size dependence of these localizations/entrapments with spin probe concentration. A weak concentration dependence of spin probe assisted freezing and melting points, which has been observed for TEMPO in comparison to TEMPOL, indicates different natures of interactions with water of these two probes. This view is also supported by the relaxation behavior of the two probes.

  5. Photomicrographic Investigation of Spontaneous Freezing Temperatures of Supercooled Water Droplets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorsch, R. G.; Hacker, P. T.

    1950-01-01

    A photomicrographic technique for investigating eupercooled. water droplets has been devised and. used. to determine the spontaneous freezing temperatures of eupercooled. water droplets of the size ordinarily found. in the atmosphere. The freezing temperatures of 4527 droplets ranging from 8.75 to 1000 microns in diameter supported on a platinum surface and 571 droplets supported on copper were obtained. The average spontaneous freezing temperature decreased with decrease in the size of the droplets. The effect of size on the spontaneous freezing temperature was particularly marked below 60 microns. Frequency-distribution curves of the spontaneous freezing temperatures observed for droplets of a given size were obtained. Although no droplet froze at a temperature above 20 0 F, all droplets melted at 32 F. Results obtained with a copper support did not differ essentially from those obtained with a platinum surface.

  6. Response of New zealand mudsnails Potamopyrgus antipodarum to freezing and near freezing fluctuating water temperatures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moffitt, Christine M.; James, Christopher A.

    2012-01-01

    We explored the resilience of the invasive New Zealand mudsnail Potamopyrgus antipodarum to fluctuating winter freezing and near-freezing temperature cycles in laboratory tests. Our goal was to provide data to confirm field observations of mortality and presumed mortality in stream habitats with fluctuating freezing to near-freezing temperatures. We tested individuals from 2 locations with distinctly different thermal regimes and population densities. One location had low snail densities and water temperatures with strong diel and seasonal water variation. The other location had high snail densities and nearly constant water temperatures. Groups of individuals from both locations were tested in each of 3 laboratory-created diel thermal cycles around nominal temperatures of 0, 2, or 4°C. Mortality occurred in cycles around 0°C in both populations, and little to no mortality occurred at temperatures >0°C. Individuals from both sources held in diel 0°C cycles for 72 h showed 100% mortality. Our findings support observations from published field studies that survival was limited in infested habitats subject to freezing temperatures.

  7. An approximation for homogeneous freezing temperature of water droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O, K.-T.; Wood, R.

    2015-11-01

    In this work, based on the well-known formulae of classical nucleation theory (CNT), the temperature TNc = 1 at which the mean number of critical embryos inside a droplet is unity is derived and proposed as a new approximation for homogeneous freezing temperature of water droplets. Without consideration of time dependence and stochastic nature of the ice nucleation process, the approximation TNc = 1 is able to reproduce the dependence of homogeneous freezing temperature on drop size and water activity of aqueous drops observed in a wide range of experimental studies. We use the TNc = 1 approximation to argue that the distribution of homogeneous freezing temperatures observed in the experiments may largely be explained by the spread in the size distribution of droplets used in the particular experiment. It thus appears that this approximation is useful for predicting homogeneous freezing temperatures of water droplets in the atmosphere.

  8. Universality of tip singularity formation in freezing water drops.

    PubMed

    Marín, A G; Enríquez, O R; Brunet, P; Colinet, P; Snoeijer, J H

    2014-08-01

    A drop of water deposited on a cold plate freezes into an ice drop with a pointy tip. While this phenomenon clearly finds its origin in the expansion of water upon freezing, a quantitative description of the tip singularity has remained elusive. Here we demonstrate how the geometry of the freezing front, determined by heat transfer considerations, is crucial for the tip formation. We perform systematic measurements of the angles of the conical tip, and reveal the dynamics of the solidification front in a Hele-Shaw geometry. It is found that the cone angle is independent of substrate temperature and wetting angle, suggesting a universal, self-similar mechanism that does not depend on the rate of solidification. We propose a model for the freezing front and derive resulting tip angles analytically, in good agreement with the experiments. PMID:25126922

  9. Universality of Tip Singularity Formation in Freezing Water Drops

    E-print Network

    Marin, Alvaro G; Brunet, Philipe; Colinet, Pierre; Snoeijer, Jacco H

    2014-01-01

    A drop of water deposited on a cold plate freezes into an ice drop with a pointy tip. While this phenomenon clearly finds its origin in the expansion of water upon freezing, a quantitative description of the tip singularity has remained elusive. Here we demonstrate how the geometry of the freezing front, determined by heat transfer considerations, is crucial for the tip formation. We perform systematic measurements of the angles of the conical tip, and reveal the dynamics of the solidification front in a Hele-Shaw geometry. It is found that the cone angle is independent of substrate temperature and wetting angle, suggesting a universal, self-similar mechanism that does not depend on the rate of solidification. We propose a model for the freezing front and derive resulting tip angles analytically, in good agreement with observations.

  10. Freezing of liquid water under combined compression and electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stafford, S.; Bland, S.; Dolan, D.; Eakins, D.; Institute of Shock Physics Collaboration; Sandia National Labs Collaboration

    2013-06-01

    The melt curves of materials hold rich information concerning phase stability, coexistence, and other kinetics, typically studied through heating and cooling. Compression-induced solidification exposes new kinetics, yet is a practical challenge due to adiabatic heating. Water has a large heat capacity and many solid phases, making it a good candidate for compression freezing. Optical transmission measurements and high-speed imaging have demonstrated that water can freeze on nanosecond time scales. Being highly polar, freezing in water is strongly influenced by electric fields at atmospheric pressure. However, the role of external electric fields in freezing has yet to be determined at high pressure. We present experimental and theoretical results from our attempts to transform liquid water into solid ice under rapid compression. To minimize heating, samples are quasi-isentropically compressed via multiple shock or ramp wave compression. An external electric field applied to the sample imparts local order to the system, influencing solidification onset and growth. Classical molecular dynamic simulations show significant ordering effects at V/nm field strength, well above the dielectric strength of water. We present work that to address this issue. Freezing of liquid water under combined compression and electric fields.

  11. Freezing Point of Milk: A Natural Way to Understand Colligative Properties

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Novo, Mercedes; Reija, Belen; Al-Soufi, Wajih

    2007-01-01

    A laboratory experiment is presented in which the freezing point depression is analyzed using milk as solution. The nature of milk as a mixture of different solutes makes it a suitable probe to learn about colligative properties. The first part of the experiment illustrates the analytical use of freezing point measurements to control milk quality,…

  12. Oxygen demand of aircraft and airfield pavement deicers and alternative freezing point depressants

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Corsi, Steven; Mericas, Dean; Bowman, George

    2012-01-01

    Aircraft and pavement deicing formulations and other potential freezing point depressants were tested for biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) and chemical oxygen demand (COD). Propylene glycol-based aircraft deicers exhibited greater BOD5 than ethylene glycol-based aircraft deicers, and ethylene glycol-based products had lower degradation rates than propylene glycol-based products. Sodium formate pavement deicers had lower COD than acetate-based pavement deicers. The BOD and COD results for acetate-based pavement deicers (PDMs) were consistently lower than those for aircraft deicers, but degradation rates were greater in the acetate-based PDM than in aircraft deicers. In a 40-day testing of aircraft and pavement deicers, BOD results at 20°C (standard) were consistently greater than the results from 5°C (low) tests. The degree of difference between standard and low temperature BOD results varied among tested products. Freshwater BOD test results were not substantially different from marine water tests at 20°C, but glycols degraded slower in marine water than in fresh water for low temperature tests. Acetate-based products had greater percentage degradation than glycols at both temperatures. An additive component of the sodium formate pavement deicer exhibited toxicity to the microorganisms, so BOD testing did not work properly for this formulation. BOD testing of alternative freezing point depressants worked well for some, there was little response for some, and for others there was a lag in response while microorganisms acclimated to the freezing point depressant as a food source. Where the traditional BOD5 test performed adequately, values ranged from 251 to 1,580 g/kg. Where the modified test performed adequately, values of BOD28 ranged from 242 to 1,540 g/kg.

  13. Units of freezing of deep supercooled water in woody xylem.

    PubMed

    Hong, S G; Sucoff, E

    1980-07-01

    The low temperature exotherms (LTE) of 1-year-old twigs of Haralson apple (Malus pumila Mill.), shagbark hickory (Carya ovata [Mill.] K. Koch), green ash (Fraxinus pennsylvanica Marsh), honey locust (Gleditsia triacanthos L.), American chestnut (Castanea dentata [Marsh] Borkh.), and red oak (Quercus rubra L.) were determined by differential thermal analysis (DTA). In one type of experiment freezing during a DTA experiment was halted for up to 2.5 hours after part of the supercooled water had frozen at temperatures between -25 and -42 C. Upon resumption of cooling the freezing started within 2 C of the stopping temperature. In a second type of experiment living and dead cells were microscopically observed in the same ray after partial freezing in the DTA apparatus. In another experiment, the LTE persisted even after tangential and radial sectioning of the twig to 0.13 millimeters. In a final experiment the LTE of a single multiseriate ray of red oak had the same shape as the LTE of wood with many uniseriate rays.These experiments confirm that the deep supercooled water in woody xylem or pith freezes in numerous independent events over a span of as much as 20 C. The units which freeze in an event are single cells or small groups of cells. Ice grows very slowly if at all from these units, and water moves very slowly from unfrozen cells to frozen ones. Deep supercooling of ray parenchyma does not require an intact ray. PMID:16661390

  14. Determination of end point of primary drying in freeze-drying process control.

    PubMed

    Patel, Sajal M; Doen, Takayuki; Pikal, Michael J

    2010-03-01

    Freeze-drying is a relatively expensive process requiring long processing time, and hence one of the key objectives during freeze-drying process development is to minimize the primary drying time, which is the longest of the three steps in freeze-drying. However, increasing the shelf temperature into secondary drying before all of the ice is removed from the product will likely cause collapse or eutectic melt. Thus, from product quality as well as process economics standpoint, it is very critical to detect the end of primary drying. Experiments were conducted with 5% mannitol and 5% sucrose as model systems. The apparent end point of primary drying was determined by comparative pressure measurement (i.e., Pirani vs. MKS Baratron), dew point, Lyotrack (gas plasma spectroscopy), water concentration from tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy, condenser pressure, pressure rise test (manometric temperature measurement or variations of this method), and product thermocouples. Vials were pulled out from the drying chamber using a sample thief during late primary and early secondary drying to determine percent residual moisture either gravimetrically or by Karl Fischer, and the cake structure was determined visually for melt-back, collapse, and retention of cake structure at the apparent end point of primary drying (i.e., onset, midpoint, and offset). By far, the Pirani is the best choice of the methods tested for evaluation of the end point of primary drying. Also, it is a batch technique, which is cheap, steam sterilizable, and easy to install without requiring any modification to the existing dryer. PMID:20058107

  15. Design and evaluation of aircraft heat source systems for use with high-freezing point fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pasion, A. J.

    1979-01-01

    The objectives were the design, performance and economic analyses of practical aircraft fuel heating systems that would permit the use of high freezing-point fuels on long-range aircraft. Two hypothetical hydrocarbon fuels with freezing points of -29 C and -18 C were used to represent the variation from current day jet fuels. A Boeing 747-200 with JT9D-7/7A engines was used as the baseline aircraft. A 9300 Km mission was used as the mission length from which the heat requirements to maintain the fuel above its freezing point was based.

  16. Equilibrium freezing of leaf water and extracellular ice formation in Afroalpine 'giant rosette' plants.

    PubMed

    Beck, E; Schulze, E D; Senser, M; Scheibe, R

    1984-09-01

    The water potentials of frozen leaves of Afroalpine plants were measured psychrometrically in the field. Comparison of these potentials with the osmotic potentials of an expressed cellular sap and the water potentials of ice indicated almost ideal freezing behaviour and suggested equilibrium freezing. On the basis of the osmotic potentials of expressed cellular sap, the fractions of frozen cellular water which correspond to the measured water potentials of the frozen leaves could be determined (e.g. 74% at -3.0° C). The freezing points of leaves were found to be in the range between 0° C and -0.5° C, rendering evidence for freezing of almost pure water and thus confirming the conclusions drawn from the water-potential measurements. The leaves proved to be frost resistant down to temperatures between -5° C and -15° C, as depending on the species. They tolerated short supercooling periods which were necessary in order to start ice nucleation. Extracellular ice caps and ice crystals in the intercellular space were observed when cross sections of frozen leaves were investigated microscopically at subfreezing temperatures. PMID:24253100

  17. Experimental research of "microcable in a microconduct" system stability to effect of freezing water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreev, Vladimir A.; Burdin, Vladimir A.; Nikulina, Tatiana G.; Alekhin, Ivan N.; Gavryushin, Sergey A.; Nikulin, Aleksey G.; Praporshchikov, Denis E.

    2011-12-01

    Results of experimental researches of "optical microcable in a microduct" system stability to effect of freezing water are presented. It is shown this system is steadier to water freezing in comparison to lighten optical cable in protective polymer tube.

  18. Free Energy Perturbation Monte Carlo Simulations of Salt Influences on Aqueous Freezing Point Depression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dick, Thomas J.; Wierzbicki, Andrzej; Madura, Jeffry D.

    Free energy perturbation Monte Carlo (FEP/MC) simulations are performed for both the liquid and solid phases of water to determine the melting temperature of several popular three and four-site water models. Gibbs free energy vs. temperature plots are constructed from the simulations to determine the melting temperature. For the liquid phase, standard FEP/MC simulations are used to calculate the free energy relative to the gas phase at multiple temperatures. The free energy of the solid phase relative to the gas phase is calculated at multiple temperatures using the lattice-coupling method. The intersection of the free energy regression lines determines the estimate of the melting temperature. Additionally, simulations were carried out for simple salt solutions to determine the freezing point depressions (FPD). The simulations reproduce the FPD as a function of salt concentration for solutions of NaCl, KCl, CaCl2, and MgCl2.

  19. Theoretical and experimental studies on freezing point depression and vapor pressure deficit as methods to measure osmotic pressure of aqueous polyethylene glycol and bovine serum albumin solutions.

    PubMed

    Kiyosawa, Keitaro

    2003-05-01

    For survival in adverse environments where there is drought, high salt concentration or low temperature, some plants seem to be able to synthesize biochemical compounds, including proteins, in response to changes in water activity or osmotic pressure. Measurement of the water activity or osmotic pressure of simple aqueous solutions has been based on freezing point depression or vapor pressure deficit. Measurement of the osmotic pressure of plants under water stress has been mainly based on vapor pressure deficit. However, differences have been noted for osmotic pressure values of aqueous polyethylene glycol (PEG) solutions measured by freezing point depression and vapor pressure deficit. For this paper, the physicochemical basis of freezing point depression and vapor pressure deficit were first examined theoretically and then, the osmotic pressure of aqueous ethylene glycol and of PEG solutions were measured by both freezing point depression and vapor pressure deficit in comparison with other aqueous solutions such as NaCl, KCl, CaCl(2), glucose, sucrose, raffinose, and bovine serum albumin (BSA) solutions. The results showed that: (1) freezing point depression and vapor pressure deficit share theoretically the same physicochemical basis; (2) theoretically, they are proportional to the molal concentration of the aqueous solutions to be measured; (3) in practice, the osmotic pressure levels of aqueous NaCl, KCl, CaCl(2), glucose, sucrose, and raffinose solutions increase in proportion to their molal concentrations and there is little inconsistency between those measured by freezing point depression and vapor pressure deficit; (4) the osmotic pressure levels of aqueous ethylene glycol and PEG solutions measured by freezing point depression differed from the values measured by vapor pressure deficit; (5) the osmotic pressure of aqueous BSA solution measured by freezing point depression differed slightly from that measured by vapor pressure deficit. PMID:12834836

  20. Universality of Tip Singularity Formation in Freezing Water Drops A. G. Marn,1

    E-print Network

    Snoeijer, Jacco

    Universality of Tip Singularity Formation in Freezing Water Drops A. G. Marín,1 O. R. Enríquez,2 P its origin in the expansion of water upon freezing, a quantitative description of the tip singularity simpler situation of a water drop freezing on a cold substrate, it has been observed that the final shape

  1. A Holistic Description of Immersion Freezing of Water and Aqueous Solution Droplets Using a Water Activity Based Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knopf, D. A.; Alpert, P. A.

    2013-12-01

    Immersion freezing of water and aqueous solutions by particles acting as ice nuclei (IN) is a common process of heterogeneous ice nucleation in the atmosphere where it results in the glaciation of mixed-phase and cirrus clouds. Using a variety of IN types suspended in various aqueous solutions and pure water, we find that immersion freezing temperatures and kinetics can be described solely by temperature, T, and solution water activity, aw, which is the ratio of the vapor pressure of the solution and the saturation water vapor pressure under the same conditions and, in equilibrium, is equivalent to relative humidity (RH). This allows the freezing point and corresponding heterogeneous ice nucleation rate coefficient, Jhet, to be uniquely expressed by T and aw, a result termed the aw based immersion freezing model (ABIFM). This method is independent of the nature of the solute, applicable for pure water droplet freezing which is significant for mixed-phase cloud formation, and accounts for several varying parameters, including cooling rate and IN surface area, while providing a holistic description of immersion freezing capable of predicting of freezing temperatures, Jhet, frozen fractions, ice particle production rates and numbers. Our findings are based on experimental freezing data collected for various IN surface areas and cooling rates of droplets containing marine biogenic material, two soil humic acids, four mineral dusts, and one organic monolayer acting as IN. For all investigated IN types we demonstrate that droplet freezing temperatures increase as IN surface area increases. Similarly, droplet freezing temperatures increase as the cooling rate decreases. The experimental data implicitly questions the common notion that one active site initiates the formation of an ice embryo leading to the crystallization of the aqueous phase. The log10(Jhet) values for the various IN types derived exclusively by T and aw, provide a complete description of the heterogeneous ice nucleation kinetics. Thus, the ABIFM can be applied over the entire range of T, RH, total IN surface area, and cloud activation timescales typical of atmospheric conditions. Lastly, we demonstrate that ABIFM can be used to derive frozen fractions of droplets and ice particle production for atmospheric models of cirrus and mixed phase cloud conditions.

  2. Freeze Dried Zn-DNA: Magnetism Dominated by Water Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumeta, Tsubasa; Sakamoto, Hirokazu; Mizoguchi, Kenji

    2014-08-01

    Magnetic behaviors in freeze dried DNA complexes with Zn ions (FD-Zn-DNA) are reported. Dehydrated Zn-DNA was prepared from pure Zn-DNA by a freeze drying procedure. Complete dehydration of Zn-DNA by the freeze drying induces an irreversible structural change and produces one ? electron spin at each base pair of FD-Zn-DNA. Magnetic behaviors essential to the ? electron spins are markedly changed by introducing water molecules in FD-Zn-DNA. In the dehydrated FD-Zn-DNA, the paramagnetism of the ? spin system is totally suppressed because of the spin singlet ground state caused by the strong off-site Coulomb repulsion V, which is larger than the on-site Coulomb repulsion U. In contrast, the hydrated FD-Zn-DNA carries large Pauli-like temperature-independent paramagnetism, whose magnitude corresponds to the ?-band width of ?0.24 eV. A possible mechanism of the ? electron spin creation is proposed. As a subsidiary effect of the freeze drying procedure, the nonlinear paramagnetism saturating below 0.1 T is observed in both DNA and Zn-DNA. The nonlinear paramagnetism disappears after the hydration of the sample. On the basis of the magnitude of the saturation magnetization, it is suggested that the origin of the nonlinear paramagnetism is the magnetic impurities in DNA.

  3. Timescale analysis of aerosol sensitivity during homogeneous freezing and implications for upper tropospheric water vapor budgets

    E-print Network

    Wood, Robert

    and depletion of water vapor, we predict aerosol sensitivity in clouds formed by homogeneous freezing. Our freezing and implications for upper tropospheric water vapor budgets, Geophys. Res. Lett., 35, L10809, doiTimescale analysis of aerosol sensitivity during homogeneous freezing and implications for upper

  4. Evaluation of methods for rapid determination of freezing point of aviation fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mathiprakasam, B.

    1982-01-01

    Methods for identification of the more promising concepts for the development of a portable instrument to rapidly determine the freezing point of aviation fuels are described. The evaluation process consisted of: (1) collection of information on techniques previously used for the determination of the freezing point, (2) screening and selection of these techniques for further evaluation of their suitability in a portable unit for rapid measurement, and (3) an extensive experimental evaluation of the selected techniques and a final selection of the most promising technique. Test apparatuses employing differential thermal analysis and the change in optical transparency during phase change were evaluated and tested. A technique similar to differential thermal analysis using no reference fuel was investigated. In this method, the freezing point was obtained by digitizing the data and locating the point of inflection. Results obtained using this technique compare well with those obtained elsewhere using different techniques. A conceptual design of a portable instrument incorporating this technique is presented.

  5. Note: equation of state and the freezing point in the hard-sphere model.

    PubMed

    Robles, Miguel; López de Haro, Mariano; Santos, Andrés

    2014-04-01

    The merits of different analytical equations of state for the hard-sphere system with respect to the recently computed high-accuracy value of the freezing-point packing fraction are assessed. It is found that the Carnahan-Starling-Kolafa and the branch-point approximant equations of state yield the best performance. PMID:24712819

  6. Promising freeze protection alternatives in solar domestic hot water systems

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, D.E.

    1997-12-31

    Since the gains associated with solar thermal energy technologies are comparatively small in relation to the required capital investment, it is vital to maximize conversion efficiency. While providing the necessary function of freeze protection, the heat exchanger commonly included in solar domestic water heating systems represents a system inefficiency. This thesis explores two alternate methods of providing freeze protection without resorting to a heat exchanger. Commonly, collectors are made of rigid copper tubes separated by copper or aluminum fins. Cracking damage can occur when water is allowed to freeze and expand inside the non compliant tubes. The possibility of making collectors out of an elastic material was investigated and shown to be effective. Since unlike copper, elastomers typically have low thermal conductivities, the standard collector performance prediction equations do not apply. Modified thermal performance prediction equations were developed which can be used for both low and high thermal conductivity materials to provide accurate predictions within a limited range of plate geometries. An elastomeric collector plate was then designed and shown to have comparable performance to a copper plate collector whose aperture area is approximately 33% smaller. Another options for providing freeze protection to an SDHW system is to turn it off during the winter. Choosing a three-season operating period means two things. First, the system will have different optimums such as slope and collector area. Second, the wintertime solar energy incident on the collector is unavailable for meeting a heating load. However, the system`s heat exchanger becomes unnecessary and removing it increases the amount of energy that arrives at the storage tank during those periods in which the system is operating.

  7. A water activity based model of heterogeneous ice nucleation kinetics for freezing of water and aqueous solution droplets.

    PubMed

    Knopf, Daniel A; Alpert, Peter A

    2013-01-01

    Immersion freezing of water and aqueous solutions by particles acting as ice nuclei (IN) is a common process of heterogeneous ice nucleation which occurs in many environments, especially in the atmosphere where it results in the glaciation of clouds. Here we experimentally show, using a variety of IN types suspended in various aqueous solutions, that immersion freezing temperatures and kinetics can be described solely by temperature, T, and solution water activity, a(w), which is the ratio of the vapour pressure of the solution and the saturation water vapour pressure under the same conditions and, in equilibrium, equivalent to relative humidity (RH). This allows the freezing point and corresponding heterogeneous ice nucleation rate coefficient, J(het), to be uniquely expressed by T and a(w), a result we term the a(w) based immersion freezing model (ABIFM). This method is independent of the nature of the solute and accounts for several varying parameters, including cooling rate and IN surface area, while providing a holistic description of immersion freezing and allowing prediction of freezing temperatures, J(het), frozen fractions, ice particle production rates and numbers. Our findings are based on experimental freezing data collected for various IN surface areas, A, and cooling rates, r, of droplets variously containing marine biogenic material, two soil humic acids, four mineral dusts, and one organic monolayer acting as IN. For all investigated IN types we demonstrate that droplet freezing temperatures increase as A increases. Similarly, droplet freezing temperatures increase as the cooling rate decreases. The log10(J(het)) values for the various IN types derived exclusively by Tand a(w), provide a complete description of the heterogeneous ice nucleation kinetics. Thus, the ABIFM can be applied over the entire range of T, RH, total particulate surface area, and cloud activation timescales typical of atmospheric conditions. Lastly, we demonstrate that ABIFM can be used to derive frozen fractions of droplets and ice particle production for atmospheric models of cirrus and mixed phase cloud conditions. PMID:24601020

  8. Metastable states of water and ice during pressure-supported freezing of potato tissue.

    PubMed

    Schlüter, O; Benet, G Urrutia; Heinz, V; Knorr, D

    2004-01-01

    Different ice modifications were obtained during freezing processes at several pressure levels from atmospheric pressure up to 300 MPa. In the pressure range between 210 and 240 MPa, a metastable ice I modification area was observed, as the nucleation of ice I crystals in the thermodynamically stable region of ice III was reached. A significant degree of supercooling was obtained before freezing the tissue water to ice III, which has to be considered when designing pressure-supported freezing processes. The effect of supercooling phenomenon on the phase transition time is discussed using a mathematical model based on the solution of the heat transfer governing differential equations. Phase transition and freezing times for the different freezing paths experimented are compared for the processes: freezing at atmospheric pressure, pressure-assisted freezing, and pressure-shift freezing. Different metastable states of liquid water are defined according to their process-dependent stability. PMID:15176885

  9. Freeze-protection loop for direct solar-water-heating systems. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-11-04

    Even a one-time freeze condition can do destructive damage to a direct solar water heating system. The project funded under grant DE-FG4480R4, 1-1-80 to 8-1-81, proposed to demonstrate a simple installation procedure whereby thermosiphoning warm water from storage would prevent solar collectors from freezing. Installing the freeze protection loop in owner maintained solar systems was inconclusive. Owners were not attentive to freeze warnings or did not understand the simple instructions. A controlled situation was established using a refrigerator to produce below freezing temperatures. Experiments conducted with this equipment showed that the thermosiphoning principle could not be relied on to prevent freezing. Thermosiphoning cannot be relied on to prevent freezing in a direct solar water heating system. The direct system is an effective means of heating water in north Florida, but the system must be drained, either manually or automatically, to provide reliable system protection.

  10. Observations on the Freezing of Supercooled Pollen Washing Water by a New Electrodynamic Balance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Haijie; Pope, Francis D.; Kalberer, Markus

    2014-05-01

    Primary biological particles can act as efficient ice nuclei (IN) by initiating freezing events at temperatures warmer than the homogenous freezing temperature [1, 2]. For example, pollen grain particles can trigger freezing events at temperatures as warm as -5 °C in the contact freezing mode [3]. More recently pollen residues, which are released by washing pollen grains in water, were also observed to act as efficient IN in the immersion mode [4, 5]. In this study we developed a new cold electrodynamic balance (CEDB) system and investigated the freezing properties of single particles of supercooled pollen washing water (SPWW). The EDB technique allows for a contact free measurement of freezing events. The phase of the particle (liquid or frozen solid) can be distinguished via measuring the Mie scattering signal from the particle. Furthermore the size of liquid (spherical) particles can be determined. The freezing events are characterized through the loss of the regular Mie scattering signal from the levitated droplet as it changes state from liquid to a frozen solid. The statistical freezing probabilities of SPWW were obtained in the temperature range: -15 to -40 °C. Each temperature measurement point consists of the analysis of 30-100 droplets. Preliminary conclusions are that SPWW is IN active in the immersion mode. Further discussion will focus on the temperature range of the IN activity, the important variables (other than temperature) for IN activity, other likely modes of IN activity, and the implications of these results in terms of the atmospheric relevance of SPWW. This study was supported by the NERC. We acknowledge Professor Jonathan Reid and James Davis from the University of Bristol for providing information of the design of the warm EDB system. References: [1] Möhler, O., et al. (2007) Biogeosciences, 4, 1059-1071. [2] Prenni, A. J., et al. (2009) Nat. Geosci., 2, 401-404. [3] Diehl, K., et al. (2002) Atmos. Res., 61, 125-133. [4] Pummer, B. G., et al. (2012) Atmos. Chem. Phys., 12, 2541-2550. [5] Augustin, S., et al. (2013) Atmos. Chem. Phys., 13, 10989-11003.

  11. Influence of surface groups of proteins on water studied by freezing/thawing hysteresis and infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Zelent, Bogumil; Bryan, Michael A; Sharp, Kim A; Vanderkooi, Jane M

    2009-05-01

    The influence of proteins and solutes on hysteresis of freezing and melting of water was measured by infrared (IR) spectroscopy. Of the solutes examined, poly-L-arginine and flounder antifreeze protein produced the largest freezing point depression of water, with little effect on the melting temperature. Poly-L-lysine, poly-L-glutamate, cytochrome c and bovine serum albumin had less effect on the freezing of water. Small compounds used to mimic non-polar (trimethylamine N-oxide, methanol), positively charged (guanidinium chloride, NH(4)Cl, urea) and negatively charged (Na acetate) groups on protein surfaces were also examined. These molecules and ions depress water's freezing point and the melting profiles became broad. Since infrared absorption measures both bulk solvent and solvent bound to the solutes, this result is consistent with solutes interacting with liquid water. The amide I absorption bands of antifreeze protein and poly-L-arginine do not detectably change with the phase transition of water. An interpretation is that the antifreeze protein and poly-L-arginine order liquid water such that the water around the group is ice-like. PMID:19251353

  12. Effect of nanoscale confinement on freezing of modified water at room temperature and ambient pressure.

    PubMed

    Deshmukh, Sanket; Kamath, Ganesh; Sankaranarayanan, Subramanian K R S

    2014-06-01

    Understanding the phase behavior of confined water is central to fields as diverse as heterogeneous catalysis, corrosion, nanofluidics, and to emerging energy technologies. Altering the state points (temperature, pressure, etc.) or introduction of a foreign surface can result in the phase transformation of water. At room temperature, ice nucleation is a very rare event and extremely high pressures in the GPa-TPa range are required to freeze water. Here, we perform computer experiments to artificially alter the balance between electrostatic and dispersion interactions between water molecules, and demonstrate nucleation and growth of ice at room temperature in a nanoconfined environment. Local perturbations in dispersive and electrostatic interactions near the surface are shown to provide the seed for nucleation (nucleation sites), which lead to room temperature liquid-solid phase transition of confined water. Crystallization of water occurs over several tens of nanometers and is shown to be independent of the nature of the substrate (hydrophilic oxide vs. hydrophobic graphene and crystalline oxide vs. amorphous diamond-like carbon). Our results lead us to hypothesize that the freezing transition of confined water can be controlled by tuning the relative dispersive and electrostatic interaction. PMID:24715572

  13. Revised equation and table for determining the freezing point depression of H[sub 2]O-NaCl solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Bodnar, R.J. )

    1993-02-01

    Salinities of H[sub 2]O-salt inclusions are most often determined by measuring the melting temperature of ice in the inclusion and then referring this value to an equation or table describing the relationship between salinity and freezing-point depression. Generally, data for the system H[sub 2]O-NaCl are used to determine an NaCl-equivalent salinity, owing to lack of information concerning the salts (or other electrolytes) actually contributing to the freezing-point depression. The equation most often used to determine the salinity of H[sub 2]O-salt inclusions from freezing measurements is that of Potter et al (1978), which is based on a regression of data available in the literature at that time. More recently, Hall et al (1988) experimentally redetermined the ice-melting temperatures of H[sub 2]O-NaCl-KCl solutions having compositions ranging from pure water to the ternary eutectic and to each of the two binary (H[sub 2]O-NaCl and H[sub 2]O-KCl) eutectics.

  14. Metabolic activity of permafrost bacteria below the freezing point

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rivkina, E. M.; Friedmann, E. I.; McKay, C. P.; Gilichinsky, D. A.

    2000-01-01

    Metabolic activity was measured in the laboratory at temperatures between 5 and -20 degrees C on the basis of incorporation of (14)C-labeled acetate into lipids by samples of a natural population of bacteria from Siberian permafrost (permanently frozen soil). Incorporation followed a sigmoidal pattern similar to growth curves. At all temperatures, the log phase was followed, within 200 to 350 days, by a stationary phase, which was monitored until the 550th day of activity. The minimum doubling times ranged from 1 day (5 degrees C) to 20 days (-10 degrees C) to ca. 160 days (-20 degrees C). The curves reached the stationary phase at different levels, depending on the incubation temperature. We suggest that the stationary phase, which is generally considered to be reached when the availability of nutrients becomes limiting, was brought on under our conditions by the formation of diffusion barriers in the thin layers of unfrozen water known to be present in permafrost soils, the thickness of which depends on temperature.

  15. Thermodynamical effects accompanied freezing of two water layers separated by sea ice sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogorodsky, Petr; Marchenko, Aleksey

    2014-05-01

    The process of melt pond freezing is very important for generation of sea ice cover thermodynamic and mass balance during winterperiod. However, due to significant difficulties of field measurements the available data of model estimations still have no instrumental confirmation. In May 2009 the authors carried out laboratory experiment on freezing of limited water volume in the University Centre in Svalbard ice tank. In the course of experiment fresh water layer of 27.5 cm thickness at freezing point poured on the 24 cm sea ice layer was cooled during 50 hours at the temperature -10º C and then once again during 60 hours at -20º C. For revealing process typical characteristics the data of continuous measurements of temperature and salinity in different phases were compared with data of numerical computations obtained with thermodynamic model which was formulated in the frames of 1-D equation system (infinite extension of water freezing layer) and adapted to laboratory conditions. The known surprise of the experiment became proximity of calculated and measured estimates of process dynamics that confirmed the adequacy of the problem mathematical statement (excluding probably process finale stage). This effect can be explained by formation of cracks on the upper layer of ice at sharp decreases of air temperature, which temporary compensated hydrostatic pressure growth during freezing of closed water volume. Another compensated mechanism can be migration of brine through the lower layer of ice under influence of vertical pressure gradient and also rejection of gas dissolved in water which increased its compressibility. During 110 hours cooling thickness of water layer between ice layers reduced approximately to 2 cm. According to computations this layer is not chilled completely but keeps as thin brine interlayer within ice body whose thickness (about units of mm) is determined by temperature fluctuations of cooled surface. Nevertheless, despite good coincidence of experimental and model estimates the question of existence of liquid phase under actual conditions is still open and can be clarified in a continuous laboratory experiment. This work was supported by Russian Foundation for Basic Research (Project # 14-05-00677).

  16. Mechanism to Diminish the Supercooling of the Tin Freezing Point by using Graphite Powder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jin Tao; Wang, Y. N.

    2008-06-01

    The formation of crystallization centers from extremely pure molten tin is normally associated with deep supercooling. This deep supercooling is inconvenient for the operation of tin freezing-point cells, especially for sealed tin fixed-point cells without a holder to facilitate removal from the furnace. Researchers of the National Institute of Metrology (NIM) intended and succeeded in reducing this deep supercooling by adding fine and pure graphite powders to tin fixed-point cells without influencing the fixed-point temperature, but the mechanism is yet to be properly clarified. The principle of heterogeneous nucleation indicates that a decrease of the contact angle of the crystalline nucleus on the substrate surface results in a significant reduction of supercooling required for initiation of nucleation. The heterogeneous theory is utilized by the authors of this paper to give a reasonable description of the mechanism of supercooling reduction by addition of graphite powder. It is demonstrated that the freezing plateau can be realized by the natural cooling of the tin cell within the furnace without using the ‘outside nucleation’ technique. The maximum temperature of the freezing curves of the tin cell with graphite powder agrees well with the reference tin cell without the graphite powder, and the cells with graphite powder show good consistency.

  17. The migration and transformation of dissolved organic matter during the freezing processes of water.

    PubMed

    Xue, Shuang; Wen, Yang; Hui, Xiujuan; Zhang, Lina; Zhang, Zhaohong; Wang, Jie; Zhang, Ying

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the partitioning behavior of dissolved organic matter (DOM) in liquid and ice phases, as well as the changes in the optical properties and chlorine reactivity of DOM during the freezing processes of water. DOM was rejected from the ice phase and accumulated in the remaining liquid phase during water freezing. Moreover, the decrease in freezing temperature, as well as the increase in dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentration of feed water, caused an increase in DOM captured in the ice phase. The ultraviolet-absorbing compounds, trihalomethane precursors, as well as fulvic acid- and humic acid-like fluorescent materials, were more liable to be to be rejected from the ice phase and were more easily retained in the unfrozen liquid phase during water freezing, as compared with organics (on average) that comprise DOC. In addition, it was also found a higher accumulation of these organics in the unfrozen liquid phase during water freezing at higher temperature. The freeze/thaw processes altered the quantity, optical properties, and chlorine reactivity of DOM. The decrease in ultraviolet light at 254 nm as well as the production of aromatic protein- and soluble microbial byproduct-like fluorescent materials in DOM due to freeze/thaw were consistently observed. On the other hand, the changes in DOC, trihalomethane formation potential, and fulvic acid- and humic acid-like fluorescence caused by freeze/thaw varied significantly between samples. PMID:25597675

  18. Pointy ice-drops: How water freezes into a singular shape Jacco H. Snoeijer and Philippe Brunet

    E-print Network

    Snoeijer, Jacco

    Pointy ice-drops: How water freezes into a singular shape Jacco H. Snoeijer and Philippe Brunet;Pointy ice-drops: How water freezes into a singular shape Jacco H. Snoeijer Physics of Fluids Group and J May 2012) A water drop that is gently deposited on a very cold surface freezes into a pointy ice

  19. Early Mars was wet but not warm: Erosion, fluvial features, liquid water habitats, and life below freezing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckay, C. P.; Davis, W. L.

    1993-01-01

    There is considerable evidence that Mars had liquid water early in its history and possibly at recurrent interval. It has generally been assumed that this implied that the climate was warmer as a result of a thicker CO2 atmosphere than at the present. However, recent models suggest that Mars may have had a thick atmosphere but may not have experienced mean annual temperatures above freezing. In this paper we report on models of liquid water formation and maintenance under temperatures well below freezing. Our studies are based on work in the north and south polar regions of Earth. Our results suggest that early Mars did have a thick atmosphere but precipitation and hence erosion was rare. Transient liquid water, formed under temperature extremes and maintained under thick ice covers, could account for the observed fluvial features. The main difference between the present climate and the early climate was that the total surface pressure was well above the triple point of water.

  20. Water in a Polymeric Electrolyte Membrane: Sorption/Desorption and Freezing phenomena

    E-print Network

    Marie Plazanet; Francesco Sacchetti; Caterina Petrillo; Bruno Deme; Paolo Bartolini; Renato Torre

    2013-12-17

    Nafion is a perfluorosulfonated polymer, widely used in Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells. This polymer adopts a complex structural organisation resulting from the microsegregation between hydrophobic backbones and hydrophilic sulfonic acid groups. Upon hydration appear water-filled channels and cavities, in which are released the acidic protons to form a solution of hydronium ions in water embedded in the polymer matrix. Below 273 K, a phenomenon of water sorption/desorption occurs, whose origin is still an open question. Performing neutron diffraction, we monitored the quantity of ice formed during the sorption/desorption as a function of temperature down to 180 K. Upon cooling, we observe that ice forms outside of the membrane and crystallises in the hexagonal Ih form. Simultaneously, the membrane shrinks and dehydrate, leading to an increase of the hydronium ions concentration inside the matrix. Reversibly, the ice melts and the membrane re-hydrate upon heating. A model of solution, whose freezing point varies with the hydronium concentration, is proposed to calculate the quantity of ice formed as a function of temperature. The quantitative agreement between the model and experimental data explains the smooth and reversible behavior observed during the sorption or desorption of water, pointing out the origin of the phenomena. The proposed picture reconciles both confinement and entropic effects. Other examples of water filled electrolyte nano-structures are eventually discussed, in the context of clarifying the conditions for water transport at low temperature.

  1. The freezing process of continuously sprayed water droplets on the superhydrophobic silicone acrylate resin coating surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Jianlin; Xu, Ke; Wu, Yao; Lan, Binhuan; Jiang, Xingliang; Shu, Lichun

    2014-10-01

    This study conducted experiments on freezing process of water droplets on glass slides covered with superhydrophobic coatings under the continuous water spray condition in the artificial climatic chamber which could simulate low temperature and high humidity environments. The freezing mechanism and freezing time of water droplets under the condition of continuous spray were observed by the microscope and were compared with those of the single static droplet. Then, differences of freezing process between continuously sprayed droplets and single static droplet were analyzed. Furthermore, the effects of static contact angle (CA), contact angle hysteresis (CAH) and roughness of the superhydrophobic coating surface on the freezing time of continuously sprayed droplets were explored. Results show that the freezing process of the continuously sprayed droplets on the superhydrophobic coating started with the homogeneous nucleation at gas-liquid interfaces. In addition, the temperature difference between the location near the solid-liquid interface and the location near the gas-liquid interface was the key factor that influenced the ice crystallization mechanism of water droplets. Moreover, with the larger CA, the smaller CAH and the greater roughness of the surface, droplets were more likely to roll down the surface and the freezing duration on the surface was delayed. Based on the findings, continuous water spray is suggested in the anti-icing superhydrophobic coatings research.

  2. Realization of tin freezing point using a loop heat pipe-based hydraulic temperature control technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joung, Wukchul; Gam, Kee Sool; Kim, Yong-Gyoo

    2015-10-01

    In this work, the freezing point of tin (Sn FP) was realized by inside nucleation where the supercooling of tin and the reheating of the sample after the nucleation were achieved without extracting the cell from an isothermal apparatus. To this end, a novel hydraulic temperature control technique, which was based on the thermo-hydraulic characteristics of a pressure-controlled loop heat pipe (LHP), was employed to provide a slow cooling of the sample for deep supercooling and fast reheating after nucleation to minimize the amount of initial freeze of the sample. The required temperature controls were achieved by the active pressure control of a control gas inside the compensation chamber of the pressure-controlled LHP, and slow cooling at??-0.05 K min-1 for the deep supercooling of tin and fast heating at 2 K min-1 for reheating the sample after nucleation was attained. Based on this hydraulic temperature control technique, the nucleation of tin was realized at supercooling of around 19 K, and a satisfactorily fast reheating of the sample to the plateau-producing temperature (i.e. 0.5 K below the Sn FP) was achieved without any temperature overshoots of the isothermal region. The inside-nucleated Sn FP showed many desirable features compared to the Sn FP realized by the conventional outside nucleation method. The longer freezing plateaus and the better immersion characteristics of the Sn FP were obtained by inside nucleation, and the measured freezing temperature of the inside-nucleated Sn FP was as much as 0.37 mK higher than the outside-nucleated Sn FP with an expanded uncertainty of 0.19 mK. Details on the experiment are provided and explanations for the observed differences are discussed.

  3. Development of modulated optical transmission system to determinate the cloud and freezing points in biofuels.

    PubMed

    Jaramillo-Ochoa, Liliana; Ramirez-Gutierrez, Cristian F; Sánchez-Moguel, Alonso; Acosta-Osorio, Andrés; Rodriguez-Garcia, Mario E

    2015-01-01

    This work is focused in the development of a modulated optical transmission system with temperature control to determine the thermal properties of biodiesels such as the cloud and freezing points. This system is able to determine these properties in real time without relying on the operator skills as indicated in the American Society for Testing Materials (ASTM) norms. Thanks to the modulation of the incident laser, the noise of the signal is reduced and two information channels are generated: amplitude and phase. Lasers with different wavelengths can be used in this system but the sample under study must have optical absorption at the wavelength of the laser. PMID:25638112

  4. Development of modulated optical transmission system to determinate the cloud and freezing points in biofuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaramillo-Ochoa, Liliana; Ramirez-Gutierrez, Cristian F.; Sánchez-Moguel, Alonso; Acosta-Osorio, Andrés; Rodriguez-Garcia, Mario E.

    2015-01-01

    This work is focused in the development of a modulated optical transmission system with temperature control to determine the thermal properties of biodiesels such as the cloud and freezing points. This system is able to determine these properties in real time without relying on the operator skills as indicated in the American Society for Testing Materials (ASTM) norms. Thanks to the modulation of the incident laser, the noise of the signal is reduced and two information channels are generated: amplitude and phase. Lasers with different wavelengths can be used in this system but the sample under study must have optical absorption at the wavelength of the laser.

  5. Ultra-high temperature isothermal furnace liners (IFLS) for copper freeze point cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dussinger, P. M.; Tavener, J. P.

    2013-09-01

    Primary Laboratories use large fixed-point cells in deep calibration furnaces utilizing heat pipes to achieve temperature uniformity. This combination of furnace, heat pipe, and cell gives the smallest of uncertainties. The heat pipe, also known as an isothermal furnace liner (IFL), has typically been manufactured with Alloy 600/601 as the envelope material since the introduction of high temperature IFLs over 40 years ago. Alloy 600/601 is a widely available high temperature material, which is compatible with Cesium, Potassium, and Sodium and has adequate oxidation resistance and reasonable high temperature strength. Advanced Cooling Technologies, Inc. (ACT) Alloy 600/Sodium IFLs are rated to 1100°C for approximately 1000 hours of operation (based on creep strength). Laboratories interested in performing calibrations and studies around the copper freezing point (1084.62°C) were frustrated by the 1000 hours at 1100°C limitation and the fact that expensive freeze-point cells were getting stuck and/or crushed inside the IFL. Because of this growing frustration/need, ACT developed an Ultra High Temperature IFL to take advantage of the exceptional high temperature strength properties of Haynes 230.

  6. Improvements in the realization of the ITS-90 over the temperature range from the melting point of gallium to the freezing point of silver at NIM

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, J.; Zhang, J. T.; Ping, Q.

    2013-09-11

    The temperature primary standard over the range from the melting point of gallium to the freezing point of silver in National institute of Metrology (NIM), China, was established in the early 1990s. The performance of all of fixed-point furnaces degraded and needs to be updated due to many years of use. Nowadays, the satisfactory fixed point materials can be available with the development of the modern purification techniques. NIM plans to use a group of three cells for each defining fixed point temperature. In this way the eventual drift of individual cells can be evidenced by periodic intercomparison and this will increase the reliability in disseminating the ITS-90 in China. This article describes the recent improvements in realization of ITS-90 over temperature range from the melting point of gallium to the freezing point of silver at NIM. Taking advantages of the technological advances in the design and manufacture of furnaces, the new three-zone furnaces and the open-type fixed points were developed from the freezing point of indium to the freezing point of silver, and a furnace with the three-zone semiconductor cooling was designed to automatically realize the melting point of gallium. The reproducibility of the new melting point of gallium and the new open-type freezing points of In, Sn, Zn. Al and Ag is improved, especially the freezing points of Al and Ag with the reproducibility of 0.2mK and 0.5mK respectively. The expanded uncertainty in the realization of these defining fixed point temperatures is 0.34mK, 0.44mK, 0.54mK, 0.60mK, 1.30mK and 1.88mK respectively.

  7. Practical limitations of ITS-90 from the mercury triple point to the silver freeze point

    SciTech Connect

    Tavener, J. P.; Tavener, S. J.; Tavener, I. F.; Davies, N.

    2013-09-11

    The NPL published a forward to the ITS-90 text as follows:- 'The purpose of the ITS is to define procedures by which certain specified practical thermometers of the required quality can be calibrated in such a way that the values of temperature obtained from them can be precise and reproducible, while at the same time closely approximating the corresponding thermodynamic values.' [1]. The paper investigates the properties of thirty four lots of 6N pure metal used to make cells conforming to ITS-90 from mercury through silver over a period of twenty years. Three hundred individual cells are analysed by the impurities listed and supplied with each lot, melt and freeze curve slopes are also summarised for each lot and depressions calculated. These are then compared to the slopes and depressions suggested in the Supplementary Information for the ITS-90 and in CCT/2000-13 'Optimal Realizations'. Results are summarised, tabulated and discussed. Three lots of the thirty four were found to produce cells outside 6N expectations; however the remaining thirty one lots no matter how well or badly the accompanying certification was presented produced cells that conformed to 6N expectations as suggested in Supplementary Information to ITS-90 and CCT/2000-13.

  8. Practical limitations of ITS-90 from the mercury triple point to the silver freeze point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavener, J. P.; Tavener, S. J.; Tavener, I. F.; Davies, N.

    2013-09-01

    The NPL published a forward to the ITS-90 text as follows:- "The purpose of the ITS is to define procedures by which certain specified practical thermometers of the required quality can be calibrated in such a way that the values of temperature obtained from them can be precise and reproducible, while at the same time closely approximating the corresponding thermodynamic values." [1]. The paper investigates the properties of thirty four lots of 6N pure metal used to make cells conforming to ITS-90 from mercury through silver over a period of twenty years. Three hundred individual cells are analysed by the impurities listed and supplied with each lot, melt and freeze curve slopes are also summarised for each lot and depressions calculated. These are then compared to the slopes and depressions suggested in the Supplementary Information for the ITS-90 and in CCT/2000-13 "Optimal Realizations". Results are summarised, tabulated and discussed. Three lots of the thirty four were found to produce cells outside 6N expectations; however the remaining thirty one lots no matter how well or badly the accompanying certification was presented produced cells that conformed to 6N expectations as suggested in Supplementary Information to ITS-90 and CCT/2000-13.

  9. The nature of aqueous solutions: insights into multiple facets of chemistry and biochemistry from freezing-point depressions.

    PubMed

    Zavitsas, Andreas A

    2010-05-25

    Contrary to current widely held beliefs, many concentrated aqueous solutions of electrolytes and nonelectrolytes behave ideally. For both, the same simple equation yields mole fractions of water that are equal to the theoretical activities of water. No empirical activity coefficients or ad hoc parameters are needed. Thermodynamic hydration numbers and the number of particles produced per mole of solute are found by searching freezing-point depression measurements, as if asking the water, "How much available water solvent is left and how many solute particles are there?" The results answer questions currently under debate: Do solutes alter the nature of water outside their immediate surroundings? What is the number of ion pairs formed by various electrolytes and what affects extents of their formation? What are some factors that cause precipitation of proteins, latexes, and so forth from aqueous solutions upon addition of other solutes (Hofmeister series)? Which nonelectrolytes form aggregates in water and what are the implications? Why do different solutes affect viscosity differently? How do ion-selective channels in cell membranes function at the molecular level? PMID:20397243

  10. Water freezes differently on positively and negatively charged surfaces of pyroelectric materials.

    PubMed

    Ehre, David; Lavert, Etay; Lahav, Meir; Lubomirsky, Igor

    2010-02-01

    Although ice melts and water freezes under equilibrium conditions at 0 degrees C, water can be supercooled under homogeneous conditions in a clean environment down to -40 degrees C without freezing. The influence of the electric field on the freezing temperature of supercooled water (electrofreezing) is of topical importance in the living and inanimate worlds. We report that positively charged surfaces of pyroelectric LiTaO3 crystals and SrTiO3 thin films promote ice nucleation, whereas the same surfaces when negatively charged reduce the freezing temperature. Accordingly, droplets of water cooled down on a negatively charged LiTaO3 surface and remaining liquid at -11 degrees C freeze immediately when this surface is heated to -8 degrees C, as a result of the replacement of the negative surface charge by a positive one. Furthermore, powder x-ray diffraction studies demonstrated that the freezing on the positively charged surface starts at the solid/water interface, whereas on a negatively charged surface, ice nucleation starts at the air/water interface. PMID:20133568

  11. How Circulation of Water Affects Freezing in Ponds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moreau, Theresa; Lamontagne, Robert; Letzring, Daniel

    2007-01-01

    One means of preventing the top of a pond from freezing involves running a circulating pump near the bottom to agitate the surface and expose it to air throughout the winter months. This phenomenon is similar to that of the flowing of streams in subzero temperatures and to the running of taps to prevent pipe bursts in winter. All of these cases…

  12. A comparative study of freeze-thaw processes for conditioning wastewater and water treatment sludges

    SciTech Connect

    Trahern, P.G.

    1989-01-01

    This research effort involved the application of indirect- and direct-contact, freeze-thaw conditioning techniques for improving the dewatering characteristics of both waste water and water treatment sludges. Sludges tested included waste activated sludge, primary sewage sludge, waste activated/primary sewage sludge mixtures and alum sludge. The direct-freeze methods examined were the use of a secondary refrigerant (butane) evaporated in the sludge and the use of gas hydrate or clathrate formation by addition of Freon 12 under appropriate temperature and pressure conditions. Sludges were also frozen solid using indirect freezing methods, thawed and tested for comparative purposes. Particle size distribution and floc density measurements were used to determine changes in particle characteristics; specific resistance values and dewatered dry solids concentration were used to assess dewatering characteristics. Results of direct and indirect-contact, freeze-thaw conditioning were compared to the effects of polymer conditioning. The results indicated that direct-freeze methods do not appear technically or economically competitive with currently accepted conditioning methods. The superior results obtained with the indirect-contact, freeze-thaw process when compared to the direct-contact processes suggested that the extent and rate of freezing may greatly influence the particle characteristics of the conditioned sludge, and thus its dewatering characteristics.

  13. Freeze concentration for enrichment of nutrients in yellow water from no-mix toilets.

    PubMed

    Gulyas, H; Bruhn, P; Furmanska, M; Hartrampf, K; Kot, K; Lüttenberg, B; Mahmood, Z; Stelmaszewska, K; Otterpohl, R

    2004-01-01

    Separately collected urine ("yellow water") can be utilized as fertilizer. In order to decrease storage volumes and energy consumption for yellow water transport to fields, enrichment of nutrients in yellow water has to be considered. Laboratory-scale batch freeze concentration of yellow water has been tested in ice-front freezing apparatus: a stirred vessel and a falling film freeze concentrator (coolant temperatures: -6 to -16 degrees C). With progressing enrichment of the liquid concentrate, the frozen ice was increasingly contaminated with yellow water constituents (ammonia, total nitrogen, total phosphorus, TOC, and salts determined as conductivity). The higher the initial salinity of the yellow water and the lower the mechanical agitation of the liquid phase contacting the growing ice front, the more the frozen ice was contaminated. The results indicate, that in ice-front freezing devices multistage processes are necessary, i.e. the melted ice phase has to be purified (and the concentrates must be further enriched) in a second or even in a third stage. Energy consumption of this process is very high. However, technical scale suspension freeze concentration is reasonable in centralized ecological sanitation schemes if the population exceeds 0.5 million and distance of yellow water transportation to fields is more than 80 km. PMID:15536991

  14. Effects of freezing in and out of water on length and weight of Lake Michigan bloaters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sayers, Richard E.

    1987-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if freezing significantly alters the length or weight of bloaters Coregonus hoyi. Bloaters were collected from southern Lake Michigan and were frozen for periods of 2-200 d. Freezing in water caused a significant decrease in length and a significant increase in weight. These changes did not vary predictably with time. The mean change in weight was greater for adults than for juveniles, but the mean change in length was not significantly different between juveniles and adults. Regressions for weight or length after freezing versus weight or length before freezing were highly significant and can be used as correction equations for estimating the original lengths and weights of fresh specimens after fish have been frozen. Test fish that were subsequently refrozen in air shrank more than those refrozen in water.

  15. Journal of the Physical Society of Japan Freeze Dried Zn-DNA: Magnetism Dominated by Water Molecules

    E-print Network

    Mizoguchi, Kenji

    Journal of the Physical Society of Japan Freeze Dried Zn-DNA: Magnetism Dominated by Water University, Hachioji, Tokyo 192-0397, Japan Magnetic behaviors in freeze dried DNA complexes with Zn ions (FD-Zn-DNA) are reported. Dehydrated Zn-DNA was prepared from pure Zn-DNA by a freeze drying procedure. Com- plete

  16. Molecular dynamics simulation of the ice nucleation and growth process leading to water freezing.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Masakazu; Saito, Shinji; Ohmine, Iwao

    2002-03-28

    Upon cooling, water freezes to ice. This familiar phase transition occurs widely in nature, yet unlike the freezing of simple liquids, it has never been successfully simulated on a computer. The difficulty lies with the fact that hydrogen bonding between individual water molecules yields a disordered three-dimensional hydrogen-bond network whose rugged and complex global potential energy surface permits a large number of possible network configurations. As a result, it is very challenging to reproduce the freezing of 'real' water into a solid with a unique crystalline structure. For systems with a limited number of possible disordered hydrogen-bond network structures, such as confined water, it is relatively easy to locate a pathway from a liquid state to a crystalline structure. For pure and spatially unconfined water, however, molecular dynamics simulations of freezing are severely hampered by the large number of possible network configurations that exist. Here we present a molecular dynamics trajectory that captures the molecular processes involved in the freezing of pure water. We find that ice nucleation occurs once a sufficient number of relatively long-lived hydrogen bonds develop spontaneously at the same location to form a fairly compact initial nucleus. The initial nucleus then slowly changes shape and size until it reaches a stage that allows rapid expansion, resulting in crystallization of the entire system. PMID:11919626

  17. Understanding and Analyzing Freezing-Point Transitions of Confined Fluids within Nanopores.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Steven; Agrawal, Kumar Varoon; O'Mahony, Marcus; Drahushuk, Lee W; Manohar, Neha; Myerson, Allan S; Strano, Michael S

    2015-09-22

    Understanding phase transitions of fluids confined within nanopores is important for a wide variety of technological applications. It is well known that fluids confined in nanopores typically demonstrate freezing-point depressions, ?Tf, described by the Gibbs-Thomson (GT) equation. Herein, we highlight and correct several thermodynamic inconsistencies in the conventional use of the GT equation, including the fact that the enthalpy of melting, ?Hm, and the solid-liquid surface energy, ?SL, are functions of pore diameter, complicating their prediction. We propose a theoretical analysis that employs the Turnbull coefficient, originally derived from metal nucleation theory, and show its consistency as a more reliable quantity for the prediction of ?Tf. This analysis provides a straightforward method to estimate ?Tf of nanoconfined organic fluids. As an example, we apply this technique to ibuprofen, an active pharmaceutical ingredient (API), and show that this theory fits well to the experimental ?Tf of nanoconfined ibuprofen. PMID:26332689

  18. Freezing tolerance and water relations of Opuntia fragilis from Canada and the United States

    SciTech Connect

    Loik, M.E.; Nobel, P.S. )

    1993-09-01

    To investigate the influence of winter climate on freezing tolerance at the population level, minimum January air temperatures in the field and cold acclimation determined in the laboratory were compared for Opuntia fragilis. Populations occurred at 20 locations as far north as 56[degrees]46' N latitude and at elevations up to 3029 m in Canada and the United States, most of which experience extreme freezing temperatures each winter. Low-temperature responses and water relations of stems were examined in the laboratory at day/night air temperatures of 25[degrees]/15[degrees]C and 14 d after the plants were shifted to a 5[degrees]/[minus]5[degrees]C temperature cycle. Cold acclimation averaged 17[degrees]C and freezing tolerance averaged [minus]29[degrees]C for the 20 populations following a shift to low day/night air temperatures, indicating that O. fragilis has the greatest cold acclimation ability and the greatest freezing tolerance reported for any cactus. Moreover, freezing tolerance and cold acclimation were both positively correlated (r[sup 2] [congruent] 0.7) with the minimum temperatures at the 20 locations. Plants lost water during low-temperature acclimation, leading to 30% decreases in cladode and chlorenchyma thickness; the decrease in water content was greater for the five warmest populations than for the five coldest ones. Over the same period, the average osmotic pressure of the chlorenchyma increased from 1.42 to 1.64 MPa, and the relative water content (RWC) decreased from 0.58 to 0.49, but the average osmotic pressure of saturated chlorenchyma was unchanged, indicating no net change in solute content during acclimation. Although the role of water relations in freezing tolerance is unclear, the substantial freezing tolerance and cold acclimation ability of O. fragilis leads to its distribution into regions of Canada and the United States that experience minimum temperatures below [minus]40[degrees]C during the winter. 47 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs.

  19. Freezing singularities in water drops Oscar R. Enrquez, lvaro G. Marn, Koen G. Winkels, and Jacco H. Snoeijer

    E-print Network

    Snoeijer, Jacco

    Freezing singularities in water drops Oscar R. Enríquez, Álvaro G. Marín, Koen G. Winkels of a drop of water on a cold plate (T = -20 C). The freezing front travels from bottom to top in about 18 s.1063/1.4747185.1]. Freezing singularities in water drops Oscar R. Enr´iquez,a) ´Alvaro G. Mar´in, Koen G. Winkels, and Jacco H

  20. The initial freezing point temperature of beef rises with the rise in pH: a short communication.

    PubMed

    Farouk, M M; Kemp, R M; Cartwright, S; North, M

    2013-05-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that the initial freezing point temperature of meat is affected by pH. Sixty four bovine M. longissimus thoracis et lumborum were classified into two ultimate pH groups: low (<5.8) and high pH (>6.2) and their cooling and freezing point temperatures were determined. The initial freezing temperatures for beef ranged from -0.9 to -1.5°C (?=0.6°C) with the higher and lower temperatures associated with high and low ultimate pH respectively. There was a significant correlation (r=+0.73, P<0.01) between beef pH and freezing point temperature in the present study. The outcome of this study has implications for the meat industry where evidence of freezing (ice formation) in a shipment as a result of high pH meat could result in a container load of valuable chilled product being downgraded to a lower value frozen product. PMID:23410892

  1. In situ freeze-capturing of fracture water using cryogenic coring

    SciTech Connect

    Su, Grace W.; Wang, Joseph S.Y.; Zacny, Kris

    2004-01-29

    Current methods do not allow for sampling of in situ water from unsaturated fractures in low-moisture environments. A novel cryogenic coring technique based on the method developed by Simon and Cooper (1996) is used to collect in situ water in unsaturated fractures. This method uses liquid nitrogen as the drilling fluid, which can freeze the fracture water in place while coring. Laboratory experiments are conducted to demonstrate that water in an unsaturated fracture can be frozen and collected using cryogenic coring.

  2. Homogeneous Freezing of Water Droplets and its Dependence on Droplet Size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, Thea; Möhler, Ottmar; Höhler, Kristina; Leisner, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    The formulation and parameterisation of microphysical processes in tropospheric clouds, such as phase transitions, is still a challenge for weather and climate models. This includes the homogeneous freezing of supercooled water droplets, since this is an important process in deep convective systems, where almost pure water droplets may stay liquid until homogeneous freezing occurs at temperatures around 238 K. Though the homogeneous ice nucleation in supercooled water is considered to be well understood, recent laboratory experiments with typical cloud droplet sizes showed one to two orders of magnitude smaller nucleation rate coefficients than previous literature results, including earlier results from experiments with single levitated water droplets and from cloud simulation experiments at the AIDA (Aerosol Interaction and Dynamics in the Atmosphere) facility. This motivated us to re-analyse homogeneous droplet freezing experiments conducted during the previous years at the AIDA cloud chamber. This cloud chamber has a volume of 84m3 and operates under atmospherically relevant conditions within wide ranges of temperature, pressure and humidity, whereby investigations of both tropospheric mixed-phase clouds and cirrus clouds can be realised. By controlled adiabatic expansions, the ascent of an air parcel in the troposphere can be simulated. According to our new results and their comparison to the results from single levitated droplet experiments, the homogeneous freezing of water droplets seems to be a volume-dependent process, at least for droplets as small as a few micrometers in diameter. A contribution of surface induced freezing can be ruled out, in agreement to previous conclusions from the single droplet experiments. The obtained volume nucleation rate coefficients are in good agreement, within error bars, with some previous literature data, including our own results from earlier AIDA experiments, but they do not agree with recently published lower volume nucleation rate coefficients. This contribution will show the results from the re-analysis of AIDA homogeneous freezing experiments with pure water droplets and will discuss the comparison to the literature data.

  3. Optimization of thermophysical properties of Pacific white shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei) previously treated with freezing-point regulators using response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Wang, Liang; Liu, Zunying; Zhao, Yuanhui; Dong, Shiyuan; Zeng, Mingyong; Yang, Huicheng

    2015-08-01

    Three freezing-point regulators (glycine, sodium chloride and D-sorbitol) were employed to optimize thermophysical properties of Pacific white shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei) using response surface methodology (RSM). The independent variables were glycine content (0.250-1.250 %), sodium chloride content (0.500-2.500 %) and D-sorbitol content (0.125-0.625 %) and analysis of variance showed that the effects of glycine, sodium chloride and D-sorbitol on the thermophysical properties were statistically significant (P?freezing point (T i ), unfreezable water mass fraction (W u ), apparent specific heat (C app ) and Enthalpy (H) were 0.896?~?0.999. The combined effects of these independent variables on T i , W u , C app and H were investigated. The results indicated that T i , C app and H varied curvilinearly with increasing of glycine, sodium chloride and D-sorbitol content whereas W u increased nearly linearly. Based on response plots and desirability functions, the optimum combination of process variables for Pacific white shrimp previously treated with freezing-point regulators were 0.876 % for glycine content, 2.298 % for sodium chloride content and 0.589 % for D-sorbitol content, correspondently the optimized thermophysical properties were T i , - 5.086 °C; W u , 17.222 %; C app , 41.038 J/g °C and H, 155.942 J/g, respectively. Briefly, the application of freezing-point regulators depressed T i and obtained the optimum W u , C app and H, which would be obviously beneficial for the exploitation of various thermal processing and food storage. PMID:26243904

  4. Effect of freezing temperature, thawing and cooking rate on water distribution in two pork qualities.

    PubMed

    Mortensen, Margit; Andersen, Henrik Jørgen; Engelsen, Søren Balling; Bertram, Hanne Christine

    2006-01-01

    The effects of freezing temperature (-20 versus -80°C) in combination with long-term freezer storage (-20°C) on water mobility and distribution in pork of two qualities (normal and high ultimate pH) were explored using low-field NMR T(2) relaxometry. A marked effect of freezing temperature on the characteristics of intra- and extramyofibrillar water (T(2) relaxation times) in the thawed pork was demonstrated, implying that the freezing temperature in combination with prolonged freezer storage affects the distribution and chemical-physical state of water in the thawed meat. Determination of technological properties (thawing and cooking loss) revealed that the observed T(2) variations related to water distribution and water properties, which were found to be consistent with the degree of structural damage assessed by light microscopy, also were reflected in the technological quality of the meat. Low freezing temperature in combination with prolonged freezer storage was associated with increased thawing and cooking loss. In addition, pH in the fresh meat had a pronounced effect on the distribution of myofibrillar water, as a more homogenous pore size distribution was evident in meat with high pH compared with normal pH. A clear effect of cooking rate on the T(2) relaxation characteristics in the cooked pork was also demonstrated, probably reflecting a cooking rate-induced effect on the myofibrillar structures. The effect of cooking rate on water distribution resulted in a significantly lower cooking loss upon a slow cooking rate (0.5°C/min from 25 to 65°C and 0.3°C/min from 65 to 80°C) compared with a fast cooking rate (1°C/min). PMID:22061371

  5. Accuracy of two osmometers on standard samples: electrical impedance technique and freezing point depression technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Resúa, Carlos; Pena-Verdeal, Hugo; Miñones, Mercedes; Gilino, Jorge; Giraldez, Maria J.; Yebra-Pimentel, Eva

    2013-11-01

    High tear fluid osmolarity is a feature common to all types of dry eye. This study was designed to establish the accuracy of two osmometers, a freezing point depression osmometer (Fiske 110) and an electrical impedance osmometer (TearLab™) by using standard samples. To assess the accuracy of the measurements provided by the two instruments we used 5 solutions of known osmolarity/osmolality; 50, 290 and 850 mOsm/kg and 292 and 338 mOsm/L. Fiske 110 is designed to be used in samples of 20 ?l, so measurements were made on 1:9, 1:4, 1:1 and 1:0 dilutions of the standards. Tear Lab is addressed to be used in tear film and only a sample of 0.05 ?l is required, so no dilutions were employed. Due to the smaller measurement range of the TearLab, the 50 and 850 mOsm/kg standards were not included. 20 measurements per standard sample were used and differences with the reference value was analysed by one sample t-test. Fiske 110 showed that osmolarity measurements differed statistically from standard values except those recorded for 290 mOsm/kg standard diluted 1:1 (p = 0.309), the 292 mOsm/L H2O sample (1:1) and 338 mOsm/L H2O standard (1:4). The more diluted the sample, the higher the error rate. For the TearLab measurements, one-sample t-test indicated that all determinations differed from the theoretical values (p = 0.001), though differences were always small. For undiluted solutions, Fiske 110 shows similar performance than TearLab. However, for the diluted standards, Fiske 110 worsens.

  6. Ice slurry cooling research: Microscale study of ice particles characteristics, role of freezing point depressant, and influence on slurry fluidity

    SciTech Connect

    Hayashi, K.; Kasza, K.

    2000-05-03

    The influences of freezing-point-depressants on ice slurry characteristics in the form of ice slurry fluidity and on the microscale ice particle features are studied. The results identify microscale features of ice particles such as surface roughness that greatly influence slurry fluidity that are altered favorably by the use of a freezing point depressant. The engineering of a workable and efficient ice slurry cooling system depends very strongly on the characteristics of the individual ice particles in the slurry and, in turn, on the method of ice production. Findings from this study provide guidance on the fluidity and handleability of slurry produced by several methods currently under development and already many achieved.

  7. High-speed Imaging of Freezing Drops: Investigating the Role of Point-like Contact in Heterogeneous Ice Nucleation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurganus, C.; Charnawskas, J.; Shaw, R. A.; Kostinski, A. B.

    2013-12-01

    Formation of ice by contact nucleation remains enigmatic and the possible role of the three-phase boundary (i.e., liquid water-ice-aerosol contact line) is still undetermined. Because aerosol size, surface area, composition and exact region of contact remain difficult to measure, we examine a simpler geometry with a spherical cap droplet resting on a substrate. In this configuration, the droplet simultaneously experiences a two-phase immersion region and a three phase contact region around the perimeter of the droplet. Utilizing high speed imaging of the droplet-substrate plane, we are able to identify nucleation sites in individual droplets. This technique allows for a spatial distribution of freezing sites in addition to a freezing temperature distribution. Our initial study indicated no preference for nucleation originating at the three phase boundary for an atomically smooth homogenous substrate [1]. The nucleation site distribution agreed well with the stochastic view in that the germ sites are distributed uniformly over the surface area. In that study we minimized the thermal variation (?T) across a droplet during cooling to prevent biased observations. We also compared ?T for several experiments in literature using a simple formulation of droplet size (r) and cooling rate (?). Large variations in some experiments could possibly explain observed 'contact nucleation' events in the laboratory as artifacts of radial thermal variations during droplet cooling. As a continuation of this study, we redesigned our system to enable much greater substrate cooling rates, but these experiments too revealed no preference for nucleation in the contact mode. Thermal modeling of the new system confirmed that while a vertical thermal gradient does develop within the droplet, no horizontal gradient is induced in the drop near the substrate. This result argues against a thermodynamic bias toward contact nucleation in substrate cooled geometries. Another possible explanation for this contact phenomenon comes in a lowering of the energy barrier for nucleation due to the existence of a line tension at the point of contact. A scale analysis of the line and surface energy values available in the literature suggests that line tension may become dominant below length scales of ~10 nm [1]. From this simple result we postulate that 'point-like' surface features might play an important role at the three phase boundary. To mimic these features on substrates we introduce chemical and mechanical processes to enhance substrate surface roughness. Using these new substrates we repeat our experimental procedure to compare effectiveness of the immersion (two phase) and contact (three phase) regions for a variety of surface topologies. Here we report the initial findings from this work. 1. Gurganus, C.; Kostinski, A. B.; Shaw, R. A., Fast Imaging of Freezing Drops: No Preference for Nucleation at the Contact Line. J Phys Chem Lett 2011, 2 (12) Identifying nucleation sites with two high speed cameras.

  8. Competition between ices Ih and Ic in homogeneous water freezing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaragoza, Alberto; Conde, Maria M.; Espinosa, Jorge R.; Valeriani, Chantal; Vega, Carlos; Sanz, Eduardo

    2015-10-01

    The role of cubic ice, ice Ic, in the nucleation of ice from supercooled water has been widely debated in the past decade. Computer simulations can provide insightful information about the mechanism of ice nucleation at a molecular scale. In this work, we use molecular dynamics to study the competition between ice Ic and hexagonal ice, ice Ih, in the process of ice nucleation. Using a seeding approach, in which classical nucleation theory is combined with simulations of ice clusters embedded in supercooled water, we estimate the nucleation rate of ice for a pathway in which the critical nucleus has an Ic structure. Comparing our results with those previously obtained for ice Ih [Sanz et al., J. Am. Chem. Soc. 135, 15008 (2013)], we conclude that within the accuracy of our calculations both nucleation pathways have the same rate for the studied water models (TIP4P/Ice and TIP4P/2005). We examine in detail the factors that contribute to the nucleation rate and find that the chemical potential difference with the fluid, the attachment rate of particles to the cluster, and the ice-water interfacial free energy are the same within the estimated margin of error for both ice polymorphs. Furthermore, we study the morphology of the ice clusters and conclude that they have a spherical shape.

  9. Competition between ices Ih and Ic in homogeneous water freezing.

    PubMed

    Zaragoza, Alberto; Conde, Maria M; Espinosa, Jorge R; Valeriani, Chantal; Vega, Carlos; Sanz, Eduardo

    2015-10-01

    The role of cubic ice, ice Ic, in the nucleation of ice from supercooled water has been widely debated in the past decade. Computer simulations can provide insightful information about the mechanism of ice nucleation at a molecular scale. In this work, we use molecular dynamics to study the competition between ice Ic and hexagonal ice, ice Ih, in the process of ice nucleation. Using a seeding approach, in which classical nucleation theory is combined with simulations of ice clusters embedded in supercooled water, we estimate the nucleation rate of ice for a pathway in which the critical nucleus has an Ic structure. Comparing our results with those previously obtained for ice Ih [Sanz et al., J. Am. Chem. Soc. 135, 15008 (2013)], we conclude that within the accuracy of our calculations both nucleation pathways have the same rate for the studied water models (TIP4P/Ice and TIP4P/2005). We examine in detail the factors that contribute to the nucleation rate and find that the chemical potential difference with the fluid, the attachment rate of particles to the cluster, and the ice-water interfacial free energy are the same within the estimated margin of error for both ice polymorphs. Furthermore, we study the morphology of the ice clusters and conclude that they have a spherical shape. PMID:26450320

  10. Confined water in hydrophobic nanopores: dynamics of freezing into bilayer ice.

    PubMed

    Slovák, J; Koga, K; Tanaka, H; Zeng, X C

    1999-11-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations for a thin film of water confined to a slit nanopore are performed in order to investigate the dynamic process of crystallization of the system. The system upon freezing creates a bilayer ice crystal composed of two layers of hexagonal rings. We perform one simulation at T=257 K during which the system remains a supercooled liquid state, and another one at T=253 K during which the system freezes. Many patterns of molecular arrangement are found upon freezing, and an account is given of the origin of multiple peaks in the distributions of binding energy and pair interaction energy. A definition of the solid-like cluster is introduced in order to analyze the time evolution of the clusters' population and their shapes. A large variety of shapes including highly nonspherical ones can be detected during simulations. A steady population of clusters is found at T=257 K, whereas at T=253 K a post-critical nucleus of the solid phase emerges within a few nanoseconds and continues to grow until the system freezes completely. PMID:11970482

  11. Watershed water circle dynamics during long term farmland conversion in freeze-thawing area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouyang, Wei; Bing, Liu; Huang, Haobo; Hao, Fanghua; Hao, Zengchao

    2015-04-01

    Water resource is increasingly scarce in agricultural watershed under the pressure of socio-economic development. Long term land use conversion and freeze-thawing process posed additional characteristics to the water cycle. The semi-distributed hydrologic model Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) was employed for surface runoff, evaporation, and percolation simulations in freeze-thawing agricultural watershed. The interpreted five terms of land use data over three decades demonstrated that the percentage of the farmland area of the whole watershed increased from 23.5% to 62.1% and about half of dryland shifted to the paddy land in the recent ten years. The validated SWAT simulation showed that the spatial distribution of the surface runoff volume and the watershed averaged value increased 60 mm. The correlations of precipitation with surface runoff at monthly and yearly scales decreased from 0.8-0.9 to 0.6-0.7 respectively, which highlighted the impact of land use change over the surface runoff. The watershed evaporation was lower under the freeze-thawing condition, which increased from 363.7 mm to 418.5 mm over three decades. The field monitoring recorded the decreasing groundwater level, which was coincided with the expanding area of the paddy land. The watershed precipitation did not varied intensively in the whole simulation period (CV ? 0.01), but the percolation varied as the result of the cultivation disturbance on soil properties. The analysis showed that the expanding paddy land decreased the groundwater level at 0.17 m/yr during 1997 and 2012, which posed new challenge on regional water management. The evapotranspiration in the extreme size of paddy land was relatively small and the groundwater level also decreased relatively slow. These characteristics demonstrated the impact of freeze-thawing on the water cycle. The proposed method can be used as an effective tool for quantitative prediction of irrigation water amount and identify the impact of land use change on the water cycle at freeze-thawing agricultural watershed.

  12. Fish antifreeze protein and the freezing and recrystallization of ice.

    PubMed

    Knight, C A; DeVries, A L; Oolman, L D

    Antifreeze glycopeptide and peptides from the blood of polar fishes prevent the growth of ice crystals in water at temperatures down to approximately 1 degree C below freezing point, but do not appreciably influence the equilibrium freezing point. This freezing point hysteresis must be a disequilibrium effect, or it would violate Gibbs' phase rule, but the separate freezing and melting points are experimentally very definite: ice neither melts nor freezes perceptibly within the 'hysteresis gap', for periods of hours or days. We report here unusual crystal faces on ice crystals grown from solutions of very low concentrations of the anti-freeze glycopeptides and peptides. This is a clue to the mechanism of freezing inhibition, and it may be the basis of a simple, very sensitive test for antifreeze material. Very low concentrations of the antifreeze protein are also remarkably effective in preventing the recrystallization of ice. PMID:6700733

  13. Water-Hydrogel Binding Affinity Modulates Freeze-Drying-Induced Micropore Architecture and Skeletal Myotube Formation.

    PubMed

    Rich, Max H; Lee, Min Kyung; Marshall, Nicholas; Clay, Nicholas; Chen, Jinrong; Mahmassani, Ziad; Boppart, Marni; Kong, Hyunjoon

    2015-08-10

    Freeze-dried hydrogels are increasingly used to create 3D interconnected micropores that facilitate biomolecular and cellular transports. However, freeze-drying is often plagued by variance in micropore architecture based on polymer choice. We hypothesized that water-polymer binding affinity plays a significant role in sizes and numbers of micropores formed through freeze-drying, influencing cell-derived tissue quality. Poly(ethylene glycol)diacrylate (PEGDA) hydrogels with alginate methacrylate (AM) were used due to AM's higher binding affinity for water than PEGDA. PEGDA-AM hydrogels with larger AM concentrations resulted in larger sizes and numbers of micropores than pure PEGDA hydrogels, attributed to the increased mass of water binding to the PEGDA-AM gel. Skeletal myoblasts loaded in microporous PEGDA-AM hydrogels were active to produce 3D muscle-like tissue, while those loaded in pure PEGDA gels were localized on the gel surface. We propose that this study will be broadly useful in designing and improving the performance of various microporous gels. PMID:26113238

  14. Supercooling Point Plasticity During Cold Storage in the Freeze-tolerant Sugarbeet Root Maggot Tetanops myopaeformis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The sugarbeet root maggot, Tetanops myopaeformis (Röder), overwinters as a freeze-tolerant 3rd instar larva. While most larvae are thought to overwinter for only one year, some may exhibit prolonged diapause in the field. In the laboratory, they can live for over five years using a combination of ...

  15. Reply to Comment on "Pointy ice-drops: how water freezes into a singular shape", Am. J. Phys. 80, 764-771 (2012)

    E-print Network

    Snoeijer, Jacco

    2012-01-01

    Reply to Comment on "Pointy ice-drops: how water freezes into a singular shape", Am. J. Phys. 80.H. Snoeijer, "Freezing singularities in water drops", Phys. Fluids 24, 053103 (2012). 2 The Gallery of Fluid that the shape of the freezing front is far from horizontal. The trick to remove the unfrozen liquid

  16. Modeling salt precipitation from brines on Mars: Evaporation versus freezing origin for soil salts

    E-print Network

    Winglee, Robert M.

    they are among the most hygroscopic salts known (Gough et al., 2011), and can depress the freezing point of water found that $1.3 wt.% H2O is held in hydrated salts if WCL solutions freeze. Given minimum water contentsModeling salt precipitation from brines on Mars: Evaporation versus freezing origin for soil salts

  17. Evaluation of the freeze-thaw/evaporation process for the treatment of produced waters. Quarterly technical progress report, October 1, 1995--December 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Boysen, J.; Morotti, J.

    1996-01-01

    The use of freeze-crystallization is being increasingly acknowledged as a low-cost, energy-efficient method for purifying contaminated water. Freeze-crystallization has been shown to be effective in removing a wide variety of contaminants from water. Water purification by using natural conditions to promote freezing appears to be an extremely attractive process for the treatment of contaminated water in many areas where natural climatic conditions will seasonally promote freezing. The natural freezing process can be coupled with natural evaporative processes to treat oil and gas produced waters year-round in regions where sub-freezing temperatures seasonally occur. The objectives of this research are related to development of a commercially-economic natural freeze-thaw/evaporation (FTE) process for the treatment and purification of water produced in conjunction with oil and gas.

  18. Molecular Dynamics Study of Freezing Point and Solid-Liquid Interfacial Free Energy of Stockmayer Fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J.; Apte, Pankaj; Morris, James R; Zeng, X.C.

    2013-01-01

    Freezing temperatures of Stockmayer fluids with different dipolar strength at zero pressure are estimated and computed using three independent molecular-dynamics (MD) simulation methods, namely, the superheating-undercooling method, the constant-pressure and constant-temperature (NPT) two phase coexistence method, and the constant-pressure and constant-enthalpy (NPH) coexistence method. The best estimate of the freezing temperature (in reduced unit) for the Stockmayer (SM) fluid with a reduced dipole moment is 0.656 0.001, 0.726 0.002 and 0.835 0.005, respectively. The freezing temperature increases with the dipolar strength. The solid-liquid interfacial free energies of the (111), (110) and (100) interface are calculated for the first time using two independent methods, namely, the cleaving-wall method and the interfacial fluctuation method. Both methods predict that the interfacial free energy increases with the dipole moment. Although the interfacial fluctuation method suggests a weaker interfacial anisotropy, particularly for strongly dipolar SM fluids, both methods predicted the same trend of interfacial anisotropy, that is, .

  19. Supercooling and freezing processes in nanoconfined water by time-resolved optical Kerr effect spectroscopy

    E-print Network

    A. Taschin; P. Bartolini; A. Marcelli; R. Righini; R. Torre

    2014-08-06

    Using heterodyne-detected optical Kerr effect (HD-OKE) measurements, we investigate the vibrational dynamics and the structural relaxation of water nanoconfined in Vycor porous silica samples (pore size $\\simeq~4~nm$ ) at different levels of hydration and temperatures. At low level of hydration, corresponding to two complete superficial water layers, no freezing occurs and water remains mobile at all the investigated temperatures with dynamic features similar, but not equal, to the bulk water. The fully hydrated sample shows formation of ice at about 248 K, this process does not involve all the contained water; a part of it remains in a supercooled phase. The structural relaxation times measured from the decay of the time-dependent HD-OKE signal shows temperature dependence largely affected by the hydration level; the low frequency ($\

  20. Ice Surface Entropy Induction by Humidity or How Humidity Prompts Freezing

    E-print Network

    Jose Luis Perez-Diaz; Marco Antonio Alvarez-Valenzuela; Juan Sanchez-Garcia-Casarrubios; Sergio Jimenez-Lopez

    2015-09-22

    In this work we measured Surface Energy and Freezing Temperature of supercooled water droplets in air. We find that freezing of water droplets is triggered at the water-air interface and that freezing progresses faster on the surface than in the bulk. The Freezing Point of water droplets is strongly depressed by dryness in air and how humidity triggers freezing. Additionally it is shown to be a Surface phenomenon related to a transfer of Entropy from water vapour to the surface of ice.

  1. The Mpemba effect: When can hot water freeze faster than cold?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeng, Monwhea

    2006-06-01

    We review the Mpemba effect, where initially hot water freezes faster than initially cold water. Although the effect might appear impossible, it has been observed in numerous experiments and was discussed by Aristotle, Francis Bacon, Roger Bacon, and Descartes. It has a rich and fascinating history, including the story of the secondary school student, Erasto Mpemba, who reintroduced the effect to the twentieth century scientific community. The phenomenon is simple to describe and illustrates numerous important issues about the scientific method: the role of skepticism in scientific inquiry, the influence of theory on experiment and observation, the need for precision in the statement of a scientific hypothesis, and the nature of falsifiability. Proposed theoretical mechanisms for the Mpemba effect and the results of contemporary experiments on the phenomenon are surveyed. The observation that hot water pipes are more likely to burst than cold water pipes is also discussed.

  2. Formation of Martian Gullies by the Flow of Simultaneously Freezing and Boiling Liquid Water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heldmann, Jennifer L.; Mellon, Michael T.; Toon, Owen B.; Pollard, Wayne H.; Mellon, Michael T.; Pitlick, John; McKay, Christopher P.; Andersen, Dale T.

    2004-01-01

    Geomorphic evidence suggests that recent gullies on Mars were formed by fluvial activity. The Martian gully features are significant because their existence implies the presence of liquid water near the surface on Mars in geologically recent times. Irrespective of the ultimate source of the fluid carving the gullies, we seek to understand the behavior of this fluid after it reaches the Martian surface. We find that, contrary to popular belief, the fluvially-carved Martian gullies require formation conditions such as now occur on Mars, outside of the temperature-pressure stability regime of liquid water. Mars Global Surveyor observations of gully length and our modeling of water stability are consistent with gully formation from the action of pure liquid water that is simultaneously boiling and freezing.

  3. Immersion freezing of water and aqueous ammonium sulphate droplets initiated by Humic Like Substances as a function of water activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rigg, Y. J.; Alpert, P. A.; Knopf, D. A.

    2013-02-01

    Immersion freezing of water and aqueous (NH4)2SO4 droplets containing Leonardite (LEO) and Pahokee peat (PP) serving as surrogates for Humic Like Substances (HULIS) has been investigated. Organic aerosol containing HULIS are ubiquitous in the atmosphere, however, their potential for ice cloud formation is uncertain. Immersion freezing has been studied for temperatures as low as 215 K and solution water activity, aw, from 0.85-1.0. The freezing temperatures of water and aqueous solution droplets containing LEO and PP are 5-15 K warmer than homogeneous ice nucleation temperatures. Heterogeneous freezing temperatures can be represented by a horizontal shift of the ice melting curve as a function of solution aw, ?aw, by 0.2703 and 0.2466, respectively. Corresponding heterogeneous ice nucleation rate coefficients, Jhet, are (9.6 ± 2.5)×104 and (5.4 ± 1.4)×104 cm-2 s-1 for LEO and PP containing droplets, respectively, and remain constant along freezing curves characterized by ?aw. Consequently predictions of freezing temperatures and kinetics can be made without knowledge of the solute type when relative humidity and IN surface areas are known. The acquired ice nucleation data are applied to evaluate different approaches to fit and reproduce experimentally derived frozen fractions. In addition, we apply a basic formulation of classical nucleation theory (?(T)-model) to calculate contact angles and frozen fractions. Contact angles calculated for each ice nucleus as a function of temperature, ?(T)-model, reproduce exactly experimentally derived frozen fractions without involving free fit parameters. However, assigning the IN a single contact angle for entire population (single-? model) is not suited to represent the frozen fractions. Application of ?-PDF, active sites, and deterministic model approaches to measured frozen fractions yield similar good representations. Thus, from fitting frozen fractions only, the underlying ice nucleation mechanism and nature of the ice nucleating sites cannot be inferred. In contrast to using fitted functions obtained to represent experimental conditions only, we suggest to use experimentally derived Jhet as a function of temperature and aw that can be applied to conditions outside of those probed in laboratory. This is because Jhet(T) is independent of time and IN surface areas in contrast to the fit parameters obtained by representation of experimentally derived frozen fractions.

  4. Dielectric relaxation of water below the melting point: the effect of inner pressure

    E-print Network

    Abril Angulo-Sherman; Hilda Mercado-Uribe

    2013-08-16

    Despite water is the most studied substance in the Earth, it is not completely understood why its structural and dynamical properties give rise to some anomalous behaviors. Interesting properties emerge when experiments at low temperatures and/or high pressures, are performed. Here we report dielectric measurements of cold water under constrained conditions, i.e. water that below the melting point can not freeze. The inner pressure shifts the {\\alpha} relaxation peak to similar frequencies as seen in ice Ih. Also, when we reach the triple point at 251 K, ice III seems to form. As far as we know, this via to obtain such crystalline phase has not been observed.

  5. Dielectric relaxation of water below the melting point: the effect of inner pressure

    E-print Network

    Angulo-Sherman, Abril

    2013-01-01

    Despite water is the most studied substance in the Earth, it is not completely understood why its structural and dynamical properties give rise to some anomalous behaviors. Interesting properties emerge when experiments at low temperatures and/or high pressures, are performed. Here we report dielectric measurements of cold water under constrained conditions, i.e. water that below the melting point can not freeze. The inner pressure shifts the {\\alpha} relaxation peak to similar frequencies as seen in ice Ih. Also, when we reach the triple point at 251 K, ice III seems to form. As far as we know, this via to obtain such crystalline phase has not been observed.

  6. FIELD DEPLOYMENT EVALUATION OF THE FREEZE-THAW/EVAPORATION (FTE) PROCESS TO TREAT OIL AND GAS PRODUCED WATERS. Task 45. Final topical report

    SciTech Connect

    Ames A. Grisanti; James A. Sorensen

    1999-05-01

    TASK 45 FIELD DEPLOYMENT EVALUATION OF THE FREEZE-THAW/ EVAPORATION (FTE ) PROCESS TO TREAT OIL AND GAS PRODUCED WATERS coupling evaporation with freezing. This offers operators a year- round method for treating produced water. Treating water with the FTE process reduces the volume of water to be disposed of as well as purifying the water to a level acceptable for watering livestock and agricultural lands. This process is currently used at two evaporation facilities, one in the San Juan Basin in New Mexico and one in the Green River Basin in Wyoming. the freezing point below that of pure water. When such a solution is cooled below 32EF, relatively pure ice crystals form, along with an unfrozen brine solution that contains elevated concentrations of salts. Because of the brine's high concentration of these constituents, its density is greater than that of the ice, and the purified ice and brine are easily separated. Coupling the natural processes of freezing and evaporation makes the FTE process a more cost- effective and efficient method for the treatment and disposal of produced water and allows for year-round operation of an FTE facility. drops below 32 F, produced water is automatically pumped from a holding pond and sprayed onto a freezing pad. The freezing pad consists of an elevated framework of piping with regularly placed, upright, extendable spray heads similar to those used to irrigate lawns. As the spray freezes, an ice pile forms over the elevated framework of pipes, and the brine, with an elevated constituent concentration, drains from the ice pile. The high-salinity brine, identified by its high electrical conductivity, is separated using automatic valves and pumped to a pond where it can subsequently be disposed of by conventional methods. As the ice pile increases in height, the sprayers are extended. When the ice on the freezing pad melts, the relatively pure water is pumped from the freezing pad and discharged or stored for later use . No new wastes are generated by the FTE process. and the U. S. Department of Energy has been conducted since 1992 to develop a commercial FTE purification process for produced waters. Numeric process and economic modeling, as well as the laboratory-scale process simulation that confirmed the technical and economic feasibility of the process, was performed by B. C. Technologies, Ltd., and the University of North Dakota Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) from 1992 to 1995. They then conducted a field evaluation from 1995 to 1997 in New Mexico's San Juan Basin at a conventional evaporation facility operated by Amoco Production Company. The results of this evaluation confirmed that the FTE process has significant commercial economic potential. A new facility was designed in 1998, and its construction is expected to begin in 1999.

  7. AgRISTARS: Early warning and crop condition assessment. Plant cover, soil temperature, freeze, water stress, and evapotranspiration conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiegand, C. L. (principal investigator); Nixon, P. R.; Gausman, H. W.; Namken, L. N.; Leamer, R. W.; Richardson, A. J.

    1981-01-01

    Emissive (10.5 to 12.5 microns) and reflective (0.55 to 1.1 microns) data for ten day scenes and infrared data for six night scenes of southern Texas were analyzed for plant cover, soil temperature, freeze, water stress, and evapotranspiration. Heat capacity mapping mission radiometric temperatures were: within 2 C of dewpoint temperatures, significantly correlated with variables important in evapotranspiration, and related to freeze severity and planting depth soil temperatures.

  8. Coprecipitation of enzymes with water soluble starch--an alternative to freeze-drying.

    PubMed

    Randén, L; Nilson, J; Edman, P

    1988-11-01

    Krill proteases were prepared in solid form from a partially purified extract by coprecipitation of the enzymes with water-soluble starch in an organic solvent at 22 degrees C. The precipitation did not affect the activity of the enzymes. The recovery of proteolytic activity was 100%. The thermostability of the krill proteases increased when incorporated in the starch precipitate. No reduction in enzymatic activity could be seen after storage at +50 degrees C for 99 days. After milling the coprecipitate could be dispensed. The enzyme preparation consisted of irregular needle-shaped particles. This simple precipitation technique offers an alternative to freeze-drying or spray-drying. PMID:2907554

  9. Plant vitrification solution 2 lowers water content and alters freezing behavior in shoot tips during cryoprotection.

    PubMed

    Volk, Gayle M; Walters, Christina

    2006-02-01

    Plant shoot tips do not survive exposure to liquid nitrogen temperatures without cryoprotective treatments. Some cryoprotectant solutions, such as plant vitrification solution 2 (PVS2), dehydrate cells and decrease lethal ice formation, but the extent of dehydration and the effect on water freezing properties are not known. We examined the effect of a PVS2 cryoprotection protocol on the water content and phase behavior of mint and garlic shoot tips using differential scanning calorimetry. The temperature and enthalpy of water melting transitions in unprotected and recovering shoot tips were comparable to dilute aqueous solutions. Exposure to PVS2 changed the behavior of water in shoot tips: enthalpy of melting transitions decreased to about 40 J g H2O(-1) (compared to 333 J g H2O(-1) for pure H2O), amount of unfrozen water increased to approximately 0.7 g H2O g dry mass(-1) (compared to approximately 0.4 g H2Og dry mass(-1) for unprotected shoot tips), and a glass transition (T(g)) at -115 degrees C was apparent. Evaporative drying at room temperature was slower in PVS2-treated shoot tips compared to shoot tips receiving no cryoprotection treatments. We quantified the extent that ethylene glycol and dimethyl sulfoxide components permeate into shoot tips and replace some of the water. Since T(g) in PVS2-treated shoot tips occurs at -115 degrees C, mechanisms other than glass formation prevent freezing at temperatures between 0 and -115 degrees C. Protection is likely a result of controlled dehydration or altered thermal properties of intracellular water. A comparison of thermodynamic measurements for cryoprotection solutions in diverse plant systems will identify efficacy among cryopreservation protocols. PMID:16321367

  10. Measurement of water transport during freezing in cell suspensions using a differential scanning calorimeter.

    PubMed

    Devireddy, R V; Raha, D; Bischof, J C

    1998-03-01

    A new technique using a differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) was developed to obtain dynamic and quantitative water transport data in cell suspensions during freezing. The model system investigated was a nonattached spherical lymphocyte (Epstein-Barr virus transformed, EBVT) human cell line. Data from the technique show that the initial heat release of a prenucleated sample containing osmotically active cells in media is greater than the final heat release of an identical sample of osmotically inactive or lysed cells in media. The total integrated magnitude of this difference, Deltaqdsc, was found to be proportional to the cytocrit and hence also to the supercooled water volume in the sample. Further, the normalized fractional integrated heat release difference as a function of temperature, Deltaq(T)dsc/Deltaqdsc, was shown to correlate with the amount of supercooled cellular water which had exosmosed from the cell as a function of subzero temperature at constant cooling rates of 5, 10, and 20 degrees C/min. Several important limitations of the technique are (1) that it requires a priori knowledge of geometric parameters such as the surface area, initial volume, and osmotically inactive cell volume and (2) that the technique alone cannot determine whether the heat released from supercooled cellular water is due to dehydration or intracellular ice formation. Cryomicroscopy was used to address these limitations. The initial cell volume and surface area were obtained directly whereas a Boyle-van't Hoff (BVH) plot was constructed to obtain the osmotically inactive cell volume Vb. Curve fitting the BVH data assuming linear osmometric behavior yielded Vb = 0.258V0; however, nonlinearity in the data suggests that the EBVT lymphocyte cells are not "ideal osmometers" at low subzero temperatures and created some uncertainty in the actual value of Vb. Cryomicroscopy further confirmed that dehydration was the predominant biophysical response of the cells over the range of cooling rates investigated. One notable exception occurred at a rate of 20 degrees C/min where evidence for intracellular ice formation due to a DSC measured heat release between -30 and -34 degrees C correlated with a higher end volume but no darkening of the cells during cryomicroscopy. For the cooling rate tested (5 degrees C/min) the cryomicroscopy data correlated statistically very well with the DSC water transport data. A model of water transport was fit to the DSC water transport data and the average (5, 10, and 20 degrees C/min) biophysical parameters for the EBVT lymphocytes were found to be Lpg = 0.10 micro m/min-atm, ELp = 15.5 kcal/mol. Finally, the decrease in heat release from osmotically active cells measured by the DSC during repetitive freezing and thawing was found to correlate strongly with the viability of the cells measured during identical freeze/thaw protocols with cryomicroscopy. This shows the additional ability of the technique to assess freeze/thaw injury. In summary, this DSC technique is a promising new approach for measuring water transport in cellular systems during freezing. PMID:9527874

  11. (1)H NMR Analysis of Water Freezing in Nanospace Involved in a Nafion Membrane.

    PubMed

    Wakai, Chihiro; Shimoaka, Takafumi; Hasegawa, Takeshi

    2015-06-25

    Water involved in a polyelectrolyte membrane of Nafion has recently been revealed to comprise three distinctive molecular species with respect to molecular motion correlated with the hydrogen bonding structure by using (1)H NMR, infrared, and mass spectrometries. The three species are assigned to the condensed water, hydration water, and strongly bounded water on the sulfonic acid group. In the present study, on the contrary to an expectation on this schematic, even the condensed water is found unfrozen when the membrane is cooled down to -50 °C, and a freezing begins when it is cooled down to -60 °C or lower. Two-thirds of the condensed water remains unfrozen even at -80 °C, which is attributed to the effect of nanospace where the water molecules are too short to construct the ice-like structure. The reduction of rotational motion of water is, on the other hand, commonly found for all the water species revealed via the calculation of the activation energies. PMID:26010773

  12. Mpemba effect and phase transitions in the adiabatic cooling of water before freezing

    E-print Network

    S. Esposito; R. De Risi; L. Somma

    2007-04-11

    An accurate experimental investigation on the Mpemba effect (that is, the freezing of initially hot water before cold one) is carried out, showing that in the adiabatic cooling of water a relevant role is played by supercooling as well as by phase transitions taking place at 6 +/- 1 oC, 3.5 +/- 0.5 oC and 1.3 +/- 0.6 oC, respectively. The last transition, occurring with a non negligible probability of 0.21, has not been detected earlier. Supported by the experimental results achieved, a thorough theoretical analysis of supercooling and such phase transitions, which are interpreted in terms of different ordering of clusters of molecules in water, is given.

  13. Evaluation of the freeze-thaw/evaporation process for the treatment of produced waters. Quarterly technical progress report, April 1, 1994--June 30, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Boysen, J.; Morotti, J.

    1994-07-01

    The use of freeze-crystallization is being increasingly acknowledged as a low-cost, energy-efficient method for purifying contaminated water. Freeze-crystallization has been shown to be effective in removing a wide variety of contaminants from water. Water purification by using natural conditions to promote freezing appears to be an extremely attractive process for the treatment of contaminated water in many areas where natural climatic conditions will seasonally promote freezing. The natural freezing process can be coupled with natural evaporative processes to treat oil and gas produced waters year-round in regions where subfreezing temperatures seasonally occur. The objectives of this research are related to development of a commercially-economic natural freeze-thaw/evaporation (FTE) process for the treatment and purification of water produced in conjunction with oil and gas.

  14. Ice nucleation of Snomax® particles below water vapor saturation: immersion freezing in concentrated solution droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wex, Heike; Kanji, Zamin A.; Boose, Yvonne; Beyer, Alexander; Henning, Silvia; Augustin-Bauditz, Stefanie

    2015-04-01

    Heterogeneous ice nucleation has received an increasing amount of interest in the past years, as it initiates the ice phase in mixed phase clouds (MPCs) and, to some extent, also in cirrus clouds. The presence of ice influences cloud radiative properties and, for mixed phase clouds, also the formation of precipitation. Immersion freezing is thought to be the most important mechanism through which ice formation could take place in MPCs. Here, we examine the ice nucleation activity of biological ice nucleating particles (INP) derived from bacteria, namely, particles generated from Snomax® suspensions, both above and below water vapor saturation. During a measurement campaign in Leipzig, ice nucleation measurements were conducted with PINC (Portable Ice Nucleus Counter, Chou et al., 2011) and LACIS (Leipzig Aerosol Cloud Interaction Simulator, see e.g. Wex et al., 2014a). Immersion freezing measurements from PINC and LACIS were in agreement in the temperature regime for which both instruments operate reliably. Here, we will show that measurements done below water vapour saturation and above the deliquescence relative humidity of the Snomax® particles follow what would be expected for immersion freezing in concentrated solutions, similar to what was suggested for coated kaolinite particles in Wex et al. (2014b). Additionally, some measurements reported in the literature that were done in the water vapour sub-saturated regime will be evaluated based on the assumption made above, showing that at least some of the ice nucleation which previously was ascribed to deposition ice nucleation rather follows the behavior of immersion freezing in concentrated solutions. Literature: Chou, C., O. Stetzer, E. Weingartner, Z. Juranyi, Z. A. Kanji, and U. Lohmann (2011), Ice nuclei properties within a Saharan dust event at the Jungfraujoch in the Swiss Alps, Atmos. Chem. Phys., 11(10), 4725-4738, doi:10.5194/acp-11-4725-2011. Wex, H. et al. (2014a) Intercomparing different devices for the investigation of ice nucleating particles using Snomax as test substance, Atmos. Chem. Phys. Discuss. (accepted for ACP), 14, 22321-22384, 2014. Wex, H., P. J. DeMott, Y. Tobo, S. Hartmann, M. Rösch, T. Clauss, L. Tomsche, D. Niedermeier, and F. Stratmann (2014b), Kaolinite particles as ice nuclei: learning from the use of different kaolinite samples and different coatings, Atmos. Chem. Phys., 14, doi:10.5194/acp-14-5529-2014.

  15. Ice Nucleation of Snomax® Particles below Water Vapor Saturation: Immersion Freezing in Concentrated Solution Droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanji, Z. A.; Boose, Y.; Augustin, S.; Wex, H.

    2014-12-01

    Heterogeneous ice nucleation in the atmosphere is important and has received an increasing amount of interest in the past years, as it initiates the ice phase in mixed phase clouds and, to some extent, also in cirrus clouds. The presence of ice influences cloud radiative properties and, for mixed phase clouds, also the formation of precipitation and cloud lifetime. Immersion freezing has been in the focus of ice nucleation research in recent years. Here, we examine ice nucleation activity of biological ice nuclei (IN) derived from bacteria, namely of particles generated from a suspensions of Snomax®, both above and below water vapor saturation. Measurements were done with PINC (Portable Ice Nucleus Counter, Chou et al., 2011) during a measurement campaign at LACIS (Leipzig Aerosol Cloud Interaction Simulator, see e.g. Wex et al., 2014) in Leipzig. Immersion freezing measurements from PINC and LACIS were in agreement in the temperature regime for which both instruments operate reliably. Here, we will show that measurements done below water vapor saturation follow what would be expected for immersion freezing in concentrated solutions, similar to what was suggested for coated kaolinite particles in Wex et al. (2014). Chou, C., O. Stetzer, E. Weingartner, Z. Juranyi, Z. A. Kanji, and U. Lohmann (2011), Ice nuclei properties within a Saharan dust event at the Jungfraujoch in the Swiss Alps, Atmos. Chem. Phys., 11(10), 4725-4738, doi:10.5194/acp-11-4725-2011. Wex, H., P. J. DeMott, Y. Tobo, S. Hartmann, M. Rösch, T. Clauss, L. Tomsche, D. Niedermeier, and F. Stratmann (2014), Kaolinite particles as ice nuclei: learning from the use of different kaolinite samples and different coatings, Atmos. Chem. Phys., 14, doi:10.5194/acp-14-5529-2014.

  16. Exploration of Impinging Water Spray Heat Transfer at System Pressures Near the Triple Point

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golliher, Eric L.; Yao, Shi-Chune

    2013-01-01

    The heat transfer of a water spray impinging upon a surface in a very low pressure environment is of interest to cooling of space vehicles during launch and re-entry, and to industrial processes where flash evaporation occurs. At very low pressure, the process occurs near the triple point of water, and there exists a transient multiphase transport problem of ice, water and water vapor. At the impingement location, there are three heat transfer mechanisms: evaporation, freezing and sublimation. A preliminary heat transfer model was developed to explore the interaction of these mechanisms at the surface and within the spray.

  17. The influence of residual water on the secondary structure and crystallinity of freeze-dried fibrinogen.

    PubMed

    Wahl, Verena; Scheibelhofer, Otto; Roessl, Ulrich; Leitgeb, Stefan; De Beer, Thomas; Khinast, Johannes

    2015-04-30

    The purpose of this work was to investigate the influence of water content on the secondary structure of a freeze-dried protein (fibrinogen) after a storage period of two weeks. To that end, attenuated reflectance Fourier transformed infrared (ATR-FTIR) and Raman spectra were generated and evaluated and the crystalline state of the fibrinogen bulks was determined via X-ray diffraction. First, a PCA (principal component analysis) of the spectral data was performed. While the ?-helix and ?-turn contents were increasing with the increasing water content, the ?-sheet content was decreasing. A partial least squares (PLS) model was developed to correlate the mid-infrared and Raman spectral changes with the degree of crystallinity. The obtained R(2) value of 0.953 confirmed a correlation between changes in the secondary structure and crystallinity of the samples. The results demonstrated that the combined ATR-FTIR and Raman approach could be used to predict the crystalline state in freeze-dried fibrinogen products. PMID:25701629

  18. HybridICE® filter: ice separation in freeze desalination of mine waste waters.

    PubMed

    Adeniyi, A; Maree, J P; Mbaya, R K K; Popoola, A P I; Mtombeni, T; Zvinowanda, C M

    2014-01-01

    Freeze desalination is an alternative method for the treatment of mine waste waters. HybridICE(®) technology is a freeze desalination process which generates ice slurry in surface scraper heat exchangers that use R404a as the primary refrigerant. Ice separation from the slurry takes place in the HybridICE filter, a cylindrical unit with a centrally mounted filter element. Principally, the filter module achieves separation of the ice through buoyancy force in a continuous process. The HybridICE filter is a new and economical means of separating ice from the slurry and requires no washing of ice with water. The performance of the filter at a flow-rate of 25 L/min was evaluated over time and with varied evaporating temperature of the refrigerant. Behaviours of the ice fraction and residence time were also investigated. The objective was to find ways to improve the performance of the filter. Results showed that filter performance can be improved by controlling the refrigerant evaporating temperature and eliminating overflow. PMID:24804655

  19. Kinetics of osmotic water flow across cell membranes in non-ideal solutions during freezing and thawing.

    PubMed

    Weng, Lindong; Li, Weizhong; Zuo, Jianguo

    2010-10-01

    Cryopreservation requires quantitatively analytical models to simulate the biophysical responses of biomaterials during cryopreservation. The Mazur model and other improved ones, such as Karlsson model concerning solutions containing cryoprotectants (CPA), are somehow precluded by some minor points, particularly, the assumption of ideal solutions. To avoid the ideal solution assumption, in this study a new method is developed to simulate water transport across cell membranes in non-ideal solutions during cooling and thawing. The comparison between osmolalities calculated by the linear freezing-point depression used in this new method and other non-ideal ones is conducted and a good agreement is achieved. In addition, in an ideal case, besides a theoretical agreement, this new approach has been validated by its numerical simulation results. Comparisons between this new approach and the traditional ones with an ideal solution assumption have been conducted based on a spherical hypothetical cell. The main results are (1) the predicted non-ideal intracellular water content is larger than the ideal results; (2) the concentration of CPA solutions is directly proportional to the deviation between the non-ideal and ideal curves. In the end, this study presents a direct description of the degree of subcooling of the protoplasm during dynamic cooling. This study demonstrates that our experimental data-based method is a valid one with clear physical interpretations, convenient expressions and a more extensive application room than traditional ones. PMID:20654609

  20. Visualization of the freeze/thaw characteristics of a copper/water heat pipe - Effects of non-condensible gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ochterbeck, J. M.; Peterson, G. P.

    1991-01-01

    The freeze/thaw characteristics of a copper/water heat pipe of rectangular cross section were investigated experimentally to determine the effect of variations in the amount of non-condensible gases (NCG) present. The transient internal temperature profiles in both the liquid and vapor channels are presented along with contours of the frozen fluid configuration obtained through visual observation. Several interesting phenomena were observed including total blockage of the vapor channel by a solid plug, evaporator dryout during restart, and freezing blowby. In addition, the restart characteristics are shown to be strongly dependent upon the shutdown procedure used prior to freezing, indicating that accurate prediction of the startup or restart characteristics requires a complete thermal history. Finally, the experimental results indicate that the freeze/thaw characteristics of room temperature heat pipes may be significantly different from those occurring in higher temperature, liquid metal heat pipes due to differences in the vapor pressures in the frozen condition.

  1. Visualization of the freeze/thaw characteristics of a copper/water heat pipe - Effects of non-condensible gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ochterbeck, J. M.; Peterson, G. P.

    1991-06-01

    The freeze/thaw characteristics of a copper/water heat pipe of rectangular cross section were investigated experimentally to determine the effect of variations in the amount of non-condensible gases (NCG) present. The transient internal temperature profiles in both the liquid and vapor channels are presented along with contours of the frozen fluid configuration obtained through visual observation. Several interesting phenomena were observed including total blockage of the vapor channel by a solid plug, evaporator dryout during restart, and freezing blowby. In addition, the restart characteristics are shown to be strongly dependent upon the shutdown procedure used prior to freezing, indicating that accurate prediction of the startup or restart characteristics requires a complete thermal history. Finally, the experimental results indicate that the freeze/thaw characteristics of room temperature heat pipes may be significantly different from those occurring in higher temperature, liquid metal heat pipes due to differences in the vapor pressures in the frozen condition.

  2. Field observations of slush ice generated during freeze-up in arctic coastal waters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reimnitz, E.; Kempema, E.W.

    1987-01-01

    In some years, large volumes of slush ice charged with sediment are generated from frazil crystals in the shallow Beaufort Sea during strong storms at the time of freeze-up. Such events terminate the navigation season, and because of accompanying hostile conditions, little is known about the processes acting. The water-saturated slush ice, which may reach a thickness of 4 m, exists for only a few days before freezing from the surface downward arrests further wave motion or pancake ice forms. Movements of small vessels and divers in the slush ice occurs only in phase with passing waves, producing compression and rarefaction, and internal pressure pulses. Where in contact with the seafloor, the agitated slush ice moves cobble-size material, generates large sediment ripples, and may possibly produce a flat rampart observed on the arctic shoreface in some years. Processes charging the slush ice with as much as 1000 m3 km-2 of sediment remain uncertain, but our field observations rule out previously proposed filtration from turbid waters as a likely mechanism. Sedimentary particles apparently are only trapped in the interstices of the slush ice rather than being held by adhesion, since wave-related internal pressure oscillations result in downward particle movement and cleansing of the slush ice. This loss of sediment explains the typical downward increase in sediment concentration in that part of the fast-ice canopy composed largely of frazil ice. The congealing slush ice in coastal water does not become fast ice until grounded ridges are formed in the stamukhi zone, one to two months after freeze-up begins. During this period of new-ice mobility, long-range sediment transport occurs. The sediment load held by the fast-ice canopy in the area between the Colville and Sagavanirktok River deltas in the winter of 1978-1979 was 16 times larger than the yearly river input to the same area. This sediment most likely was rafted from Canada, more than 400 km to the east, during a brief time period in the previous fall. Ocean turbulence is greatly reduced while the congealing slush ice drifts about. Therefore, new ice then forming in intervening open-water areas is clean. These events explain the patchy appearance of the fast ice after the summer snowmelt. More work on the important phenomena reported here is needed to close a major gap in the knowledge of the arctic marine environment. ?? 1987.

  3. Neutron diffraction study of water freezing on aircraft engine combustor soot.

    PubMed

    Tishkova, V; Demirdjian, B; Ferry, D; Johnson, M

    2011-12-14

    The study of the formation of condensation trails and cirrus clouds on aircraft emitted soot particles is important because of its possible effects on climate. In the present work we studied the freezing of water on aircraft engine combustor (AEC) soot particles under conditions of pressure and temperature similar to the upper troposphere. The microstructure of the AEC soot was found to be heterogeneous containing both primary particles of soot and metallic impurities (Fe, Cu, and Al). We also observed various surface functional groups such as oxygen-containing groups, including sulfate ions, that can act as active sites for water adsorption. Here we studied the formation of ice on the AEC soot particles by using neutron diffraction. We found that for low amount of adsorbed water, cooling even up to 215 K did not lead to the formation of hexagonal ice. Whereas, larger amount of adsorbed water led to the coexistence of liquid water (or amorphous ice) and hexagonal ice (I(h)); 60% of the adsorbed water was in the form of ice I(h) at 255 K. Annealing of the system led to the improvement of the crystal quality of hexagonal ice crystals as demonstrated from neutron diffraction. PMID:21996755

  4. Visualization of Fuel Cell Water Transport and Performance Characterization under Freezing Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Kandlikar, S.G.; Lu, Z.; Rao, N.; Sergi, J.; Rath, C.; Dade, C.; Trabold, T.; Owejan, J.; Gagliardo, J.; Allen, J.; Yassar, R.S.; Medici, E.; Herescu, A.

    2010-05-30

    In this program, Rochester Institute of Technology (RIT), General Motors (GM) and Michigan Technological University (MTU) have focused on fundamental studies that address water transport, accumulation and mitigation processes in the gas diffusion layer and flow field channels of the bipolar plate. These studies have been conducted with a particular emphasis on understanding the key transport phenomena which control fuel cell operation under freezing conditions. Technical accomplishments are listed below: • Demonstrated that shutdown air purge is controlled predominantly by the water carrying capacity of the purge stream and the most practical means of reducing the purge time and energy is to reduce the volume of liquid water present in the fuel cell at shutdown. The GDL thermal conductivity has been identified as an important parameter to dictate water accumulation within a GDL. • Found that under the normal shutdown conditions most of the GDL-level water accumulation occurs on the anode side and that the mass transport resistance of the membrane electrode assembly (MEA) thus plays a critically important role in understanding and optimizing purge. • Identified two-phase flow patterns (slug, film and mist flow) in flow field channel, established the features of each pattern, and created a flow pattern map to characterize the two-phase flow in GDL/channel combination. • Implemented changes to the baseline channel surface energy and GDL materials and evaluated their performance with the ex situ multi-channel experiments. It was found that the hydrophilic channel (contact angle ? ? 10?) facilitates the removal of liquid water by capillary effects and by reducing water accumulation at the channel exit. It was also found that GDL without MPL promotes film flow and shifts the slug-to-film flow transition to lower air flow rates, compared with the case of GDL with MPL. • Identified a new mechanism of water transport through GDLs based on Haines jump mechanism. The breakdown and redevelopment of the water paths in GDLs lead to an intermittent water drainage behavior, which is characterized by dynamic capillary pressure and changing of breakthrough location. MPL was found to not only limit the number of water entry locations into the GDL (thus drastically reducing water saturation), but also stabilizes the water paths (or morphology). • Simultaneously visualized the water transport on cathode and anode channels of an operating fuel cell. It was found that under relatively dry hydrogen/air conditions at lower temperatures, the cathode channels display a similar flow pattern map to the ex-situ experiments under similar conditions. Liquid water on the anode side is more likely formed via condensation of water vapor which is transported through the anode GDL. • Investigated the water percolation through the GDL with pseudo-Hele-Shaw experiments and simulated the capillary-driven two-phase flow inside gas diffusion media, with the pore size distributions being modeled by using Weibull distribution functions. The effect of the inclusion of the microporous layer in the fuel cell assembly was explored numerically. • Developed and validated a simple, reliable computational tool for predicting liquid water transport in GDLs. • Developed a new method of determining the pore size distribution in GDL using scanning electron microscope (SEM) image processing, which allows for separate characterization of GDL wetting properties and pore size distribution. • Determined the effect of surface wettability and channel cross section and bend dihedral on liquid holdup in fuel cell flow channels. A major thrust of this research program has been the development of an optimal combination of materials, design features and cell operating conditions that achieve a water management strategy which facilitates fuel cell operation under freezing conditions. Based on our various findings, we have made the final recommendation relative to GDL materials, bipolar design and surface properties, and the combination of materials, design featur

  5. Water sorption properties, molecular mobility and probiotic survival in freeze dried protein-carbohydrate matrices.

    PubMed

    Hoobin, Pamela; Burgar, Iko; Zhu, ShouChuang; Ying, DanYang; Sanguansri, Luz; Augustin, Mary Ann

    2013-09-01

    The moisture uptake and molecular mobility of freeze-dried powders containing whey protein isolate-carbohydrate matrices (1WPI:2maltodextrin; 1WPI:1maltodextrin:1d-glucose; and 1WPI:1maltodextrin:1l-glucose) and encapsulated Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG) in these matrices were investigated at 25 °C and 33% and 70% relative humidity (RH). The inactivation rate constant for probiotics in freeze-dried matrices were positively correlated (R(2) = 0.98) to moisture uptake and molecular mobility measured by NMR relaxometry. The stability of probiotics in glassy protein-carbohydrate matrices was dependent on the composition of the matrix. The partial substitution of maltodextrin with glucose (d- or l-) which improved microbial survival at 33% RH was related to the reduced molecular mobility and lower water uptake of the matrix. This study suggests that moisture uptake properties and molecular mobility of the matrix composition, as opposed to the relative humidity of the environment, are better determinants of probiotic viability during storage. Dynamic vapour sorption and NMR relaxometry are promising tools to assist in the selection of protein-carbohydrate matrices for enhancing probiotic viability during storage. PMID:23851914

  6. Experimental investigation of freezing blowby in a copper/water heat pipe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ochterbeck, J. M.; Peterson, G. P.

    1992-01-01

    An experimental investigation designed to evaluate and better define the overall characteristics of freezing blowby in a copper/water heat pipe was conducted. The results from various rates of restart heat addition and channel blockage, indicate that upon breakthrough the depressurization of the evaporator may result in an effective heat transport capacity far in excess of the steady-state transport limit. The resulting transient conditions imposed on the heat pipe by the effective increased heat transport capacity can cause a loss of liquid in the evaporator and potential dryout. Evidence is presented which indicates that in order to prevent either temporary or permanent dryout, sufficient liquid inventory must be present in the evaporator wicking structure to accommodate the increased transient thermal load and allow sufficient time for the capillary wicking structure to reprime.

  7. Experimental investigation of freezing blowby in a copper/water heat pipe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ochterbeck, J. M.; Peterson, G. P.

    1992-07-01

    An experimental investigation designed to evaluate and better define the overall characteristics of freezing blowby in a copper/water heat pipe was conducted. The results from various rates of restart heat addition and channel blockage, indicate that upon breakthrough the depressurization of the evaporator may result in an effective heat transport capacity far in excess of the steady-state transport limit. The resulting transient conditions imposed on the heat pipe by the effective increased heat transport capacity can cause a loss of liquid in the evaporator and potential dryout. Evidence is presented which indicates that in order to prevent either temporary or permanent dryout, sufficient liquid inventory must be present in the evaporator wicking structure to accommodate the increased transient thermal load and allow sufficient time for the capillary wicking structure to reprime.

  8. Influence of melt freezing characteristics on steam explosion energetics

    SciTech Connect

    Okkonen, T.; Sehgal, B.R.

    1996-08-01

    This paper examines the freezing process of distinct melt particles interacting with water. Approximate time scales of freezing are estimated for some high-temperature melt materials that are of interest in experimental and reactor situations. Transient conduction calculations are performed to clarify the special freezing characteristics of oxidic melt materials (low conductivity) and binary melt mixtures (no definite freezing point). The transient calculations are compared with recent experiments indicating ``non-explosivity`` of Corium (UO{sub 2}-ZrO{sub 2}). One potential explanation, based on the freezing characteristics of binary Corium mixture, is proposed for the experimental observations. The numerical results are generalized by discussing the scaling implications of the thermal conduction analysis and by defining different freezing categories. Finally, conclusions are drawn on the potential influence of melt freezing characteristics on steam explosion energetic.

  9. The effect of dimethylsulfoxide on the water transport response of rat hepatocytes during freezing.

    PubMed

    Smith, D J; Schulte, M; Bischof, J C

    1998-10-01

    Successful improvement of cryopreservation protocols for cells in suspension requires knowledge of how such cells respond to the biophysical stresses of freezing (intracellular ice formation, water transport) while in the presence of a cryoprotective agent (CPA). This work investigates the biophysical water transport response in a clinically important cell type--isolated hepatocytes--during freezing in the presence of dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO). Sprague-Dawley rat liver hepatocytes were frozen in Williams E media supplemented with 0, 1, and 2 M DMSO, at rates of 5, 10, and 50 degrees C/min. The water transport was measured by cell volumetric changes as assessed by cryomicroscopy and image analysis. Assuming that water is the only species transported under these conditions, a water transport model of the form dV/dT = f(Lpg([CPA]), ELp([CPA]), T(t)) was curve-fit to the experimental data to obtain the biophysical parameters of water transport--the reference hydraulic permeability (Lpg) and activation energy of water transport (ELp)--for each DMSO concentration. These parameters were estimated two ways: (1) by curve-fitting the model to the average volume of the pooled cell data, and (2) by curve-fitting individual cell volume data and averaging the resulting parameters. The experimental data showed that less dehydration occurs during freezing at a given rate in the presence of DMSO at temperatures between 0 and -10 degrees C. However, dehydration was able to continue at lower temperatures (< -10 degrees C) in the presence of DMSO. The values of Lpg and ELp obtained using the individual cell volume data both decreased from their non-CPA values--4.33 x 10(-13) m3/N-s (2.69 microns/min-atm) and 317 kJ/mol (75.9 kcal/mol), respectively--to 0.873 x 10(-13) m3/N-s (0.542 micron/min-atm) and 137 kJ/mol (32.8 kcal/mol), respectively, in 1 M DMSO and 0.715 x 10(-13) m3/N-s (0.444 micron/min-atm) and 107 kJ/mol (25.7 kcal/mol), respectively, in 2 M DMSO. The trends in the pooled volume values for Lpg and ELp were very similar, but the overall fit was considered worse than for the individual volume parameters. A unique way of presenting the curve-fitting results supports a clear trend of reduction of both biophysical parameters in the presence of DMSO, and no clear trend in cooling rate dependence of the biophysical parameters. In addition, these results suggest that close proximity of the experimental cell volume data to the equilibrium volume curve may significantly reduce the efficiency of the curve-fitting process. PMID:10412431

  10. Water balance in the sugarbeet root maggot, Tetanops myopaeformis, during long-term low-temperature storage and after freezing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The sugarbeet root maggot, Tetanops myopaeformis (Röder), can be stored in moist sand at 4 - 6°C for up to five years and is freeze tolerant. The majority of the stored larvae are in post-diapause quiescence and the rest of the larvae are in a multi-year diapause. The percent body mass of water and ...

  11. Real-time Non-contact Millimeter Wave Characterization of Water-Freezing and Ice-Melting Dynamics

    E-print Network

    Woskov, Paul P.

    We applied millimeter wave radiometry for the first time to monitor water-freezing and ice-melting dynamics in real-time non-contact. The measurements were completed at a frequency of 137 GHz. Small amounts (about 2 mL) ...

  12. Freeze Brand Marking of Steelhead Trout and Chinook Salmon Juveniles for Water Budget Studies, Idaho, 1985 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, V. Lance

    1986-06-01

    During the fall of 1984 and spring of 1985, 362,428 chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawtscha) and steelhead trout (Salmo gairdneri) juveniles were freeze branded for Water Budget Center - Downstream Smolt Monitoring Studies. Of these, 106,361 fish received a coded wire tag. Release of the freeze brand groups began March 20, 1985 and were completed by June 4, 1985. After brand loss and mortality, there were 133,025 spring chinook, 25,600 summer chinook, 33,850 fall chinook, 65,125 A-run steelhead, and 62,400 B-run steelhead released with brands.

  13. Simulating soil freeze/thaw dynamics with an improved pan-Arctic water balance model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rawlins, M. A.; Nicolsky, D. J.; McDonald, K. C.; Romanovsky, V. E.

    2013-12-01

    The terrestrial Arctic water cycle is strongly influenced by the presence of permafrost, which is at present degrading as a result of warming. In this study, we describe improvements to the representation of processes in the pan-Arctic Water Balance Model (PWBM) and evaluate simulated soil temperature at four sites in Alaska and active-layer thickness (ALT) across the pan-Arctic drainage basin. Model improvements include new parameterizations for thermal and hydraulic properties of organic soils; an updated snow model, which accounts for seasonal changes in density and thermal conductivity; and a new soil freezing and thawing model, which simulates heat conduction with phase change. When compared against observations across Alaska within differing landscape vegetation conditions in close proximity to one another, PWBM simulations show no systematic soil temperature bias. Simulated temperatures agree well with observations in summer. In winter, results are mixed, with both positive and negative biases noted at times. In two pan-Arctic simulations forced with atmospheric reanalysis, the model captures the mean in observed ALT, although predictability as measured by correlation is limited. The geographic pattern in northern hemisphere permafrost area is well estimated. Simulated permafrost area differs from observed extent by 7 and 17% for the two model runs. Results of two simulations for the periods 1996-1999 and 2066-2069 for a single grid cell in central Alaska illustrate the potential for a drying of soils in the presence of increases in ALT, annual total precipitation, and winter snowfall.

  14. Control of crystal growth in water purification by directional freeze crystallization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conlon, William M. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    A Directional Freeze Crystallization system employs an indirect contact heat exchanger to freeze a fraction of liquid to be purified. The unfrozen fraction is drained away and the purified frozen fraction is melted. The heat exchanger must be designed in accordance with a Growth Habit Index to achieve efficient separation of contaminants. If gases are dissolved in the liquid, the system must be pressurized.

  15. Freezing in confined geometries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sokol, P. E.; Ma, W. J.; Herwig, K. W.; Snow, W. M.; Wang, Y.; Koplik, Joel; Banavar, Jayanth R.

    1992-01-01

    Results of detailed structural studies, using elastic neutron scattering, of the freezing of liquid O2 and D2 in porous vycor glass, are presented. The experimental studies have been complemented by computer simulations of the dynamics of freezing of a Lennard-Jones liquid in narrow channels bounded by molecular walls. Results point to a new simple physical interpretation of freezing in confined geometries.

  16. Vacuum Freeze-Drying, a Method Used To Salvage Water-Damaged Archival and Library Materials: A RAMP Study with Guidelines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCleary, John M.

    This Records and Archives Management Programme (RAMP) study covers the conservation of archival documents and the application of freeze-drying to the salvage of documents damaged by flood. Following an introductory discussion of the hazards of water, the study presents a broad summary of data on freeze-drying, including the behavior of…

  17. Tropical anvil characteristics and water vapor of the tropical tropopause layer: Impact of heterogeneous and homogeneous freezing parameterizations

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, Jiwen; Comstock, Jennifer M.; Ovchinnikov, Mikhail; McFarlane, Sally A.; McFarquhar, Greg; Allen, Grant

    2010-06-16

    Abstract Two isolated deep convective clouds (DCCs) that developed in clean-humid and polluted-dry air masses, observed during the TWP-ICE and ACTIVE campaigns, are simulated using a 3-dimensional cloud-resolving model with size-resolved aerosol and cloud microphysics. We examine the impacts of different homogeneous and immersion freezing parameterizations on the anvil characteristics and the water vapor content (WVC) in the Tropical Tropopause Layer (TTL) for the two DCCs that developed in contrasting environments. The modeled cloud properties such as liquid/ice water path and precipitation generally agree with the available radar and satellite retrievals and in situ aircraft measurements. We find that anvil size and anvil microphysical properties such as ice number concentration and ice effective radius (rei) are much more sensitive to the homogeneous freezing parameterization (HomFP) under the polluted-dry condition, while the strength of anvil convection is more sensitive to HomFP under the clean-humid condition. Specifically, the cloud anvil with the Koop et al. (2000) (KOOP) relative humidity dependent scheme has up to 2 and 4 times lower ice number than those with other schemes (temperature dependent) for the clean humid and polluted-dry cases, respectively. Consequently, the rei is increased in both cases, with a larger increase in the polluted-dry case. As a result, extinction coefficient of cloud anvils is reduced by over 25% for the polluted-dry case. Anvil size and evolution are also much affected by HomFPs in the polluted-dry case. Higher immersion-freezing rates leads to a stronger convective cloud, with higher precipitation and ice water path under both humid and dry conditions. As a result, homogeneous freezing rates are enhanced by over 20%. Also, the higher immersion-freezing rate results in stronger convection in cloud anvils, much larger anvil size (up to 3 times) and longer lifetime. The moistening effect of deep convection on the WVC in the TTL is very significant with a increase of more than 2 times. Homogeneous freezing parameterizations do not significantly change the WVC in the TTL, but higher immersion freezing rate leads to an increase in TTL WVC by enhancing convection.

  18. Synergistic impacts of land-use change and soil property variation on non-point source nitrogen pollution in a freeze-thaw area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouyang, Wei; Huang, Haobo; Hao, Fanghua; Guo, Bobo

    2013-07-01

    Quantifying the non-point source (NPS) nitrogen pollution response to the varied land-use and soil properties in highly agricultural regions is critical for the proper management of NPS pollution. This study simulated the NPS nitrogen loading responses to variations of land-use and soil from 1979 to 2009. The Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) was used to model the NPS organic nitrogen and nitrate loading in a freeze-thaw area in northeast China. The temporal-spatial simulations of land-use in four periods indicated that the NPS nitrogen loading responded to the disappearance of wetlands and the conversion of uplands to paddy rice. After updating the soil data, the watershed NPS nitrogen loading decreased, and the spatial distribution of the loading indicated that the NPS organic nitrogen was more sensitive than was the nitrate to soil variation. F-tests were employed to assess the significance of each of the predictor variables in five types of scenarios. Overall, the results indicate that the watershed NPS nitrogen loading is sensitive to changes of soil and land-use, but soil changes have a more significant impact. The results of this study also suggest that temperature has significant effects on NPS nitrogen yield and that it caused the twin peaks in the temporal scale. Increasing the temperature above zero in April caused a temporal shift in soil water movement and transported nitrogen pollution earlier in the year, causing an increased loading in water before the summer irrigation, which is advantageous for NPS nitrogen pollution control.

  19. Real-time Non-contact Millimeter Wave Characterization of Water-Freezing and Ice-Melting Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Sundaram, S. K.; Woskov, Paul P.

    2008-11-12

    We applied millimeter wave radiometry for the first time to monitor water-freezing and ice-melting dynamics in real-time non-contact. The measurements were completed at a frequency of 137 GHz. Small amounts (about 2 mL) of freshwater or saltwater were frozen over a Peltier cooler and the freezing and melting sequence was recorded. Saltwater was prepared in the laboratory that contained 3.5% of table salt to simulate the ocean water. The dynamics of freezing-melting was observed by measuring the millimeter wave temperature as well as the changes in the ice or water surface reflectivity and position. This was repeated using large amounts of freshwater and saltwater (800 mL) mimicking glaciers. Millimeter wave surface level fluctuations indicated as the top surface melted, the light ice below floated up indicating lower surface temperature until the ice completely melted. Our results are useful for remote sensing and tracking temperature for potentially large-scale environmental applications, e.g., global warming.

  20. Preliminary report on fluid inclusions from halites in the Castile and lower Salado formations of the Delaware Basin, southeastern New Mexico. [Freezing-point depression

    SciTech Connect

    Stein, C.L.

    1985-09-01

    A suite of samples composed primarily of halite from the upper Castile and lower Salado Formations of the Permian Basin was selected from Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) core for a reconnaissance study of fluid inclusions. Volume percent of these trapped fluids averaged 0.7% to 1%. Freezing-point depressions varied widely and appeared to be unrelated to fluid-inclusion type, to sedimentary facies, or to stratigraphic depth. However, because very low freezing points were usually associated with anhydrite, a relation may exist between freezing-point data and lithology. Dissolved sulfate values were constant through the Castile, then decreased markedly with lesser depth in the lower Salado. This trend correlates very well with observed mineralogy and is consistent with an interpretation of the occurrence of secondary polyhalite as a result of gypsum or anhydrite alteration with simultaneous consumption of dissolved sulfate from the coexisting fluids. Together with the abundance and distribution of fluid inclusions in primary or ''hopper'' crystal structures, this evidence suggests that inclusions seen in these halites did not migrate any significant geographical distance since their formation. 28 refs., 17 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. The effect of water-soluble polymers on the microstructure and properties of freeze-cast alumina ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pekor, Christopher Michael

    Porous ceramics can be divided into three separate classes based on their pore size: microporous ceramics with pores less than 2 nm, mesoporous ceramics with pores in the range of 2--50 nm and macroporous ceramics with pores that are greater than 50 nm. In particular, macroporous ceramics are used in a variety of applications such as refractories, molten metal filtration, diesel particulate filters, heterogeneous catalyst supports and biomedical scaffolds. Freeze casting is a novel method used to create macroporous ceramics. In this method growing ice crystals act as a template for the pores and are solidified, often directionally, through a ceramic dispersion and removed from the green body through a freeze drying procedure. This method has attracted some attention over the past few years due to its relative simplicity, flexibility and environmental friendliness. On top of this freeze casting is capable of producing materials with high pore volume fractions, which is an advantage over processing by packing and necking of particles, where the pore volume fraction is typically less than 50%. Many of the basic processing variables that affect the freeze cast microstructure, such as the temperature gradient, interfacial velocity and solid loading of the dispersion have been well established in the literature. On the other hand, areas such as the effect of additives on the microstructure and mechanical properties have not been covered in great detail. In this study the concept of constitutional supercooling from basic solidification theory is used to explain the effects of two water-soluble polymers, polyethylene glycol and polyvinyl alcohol, on the microstructure of freeze cast alumina ceramics. In addition, changes in the observed microstructure will be related to experimentally determined values of permeability and compressive strength.

  2. The Freezing Bomb

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mills, Allan

    2010-01-01

    The extreme pressures that are generated when water freezes were traditionally demonstrated by sealing a small volume in a massive cast iron "bomb" and then surrounding it with a freezing mixture of ice and salt. This vessel would dramatically fail by brittle fracture, but no quantitative measurement of bursting pressure was available. Calculation…

  3. Martian Post-Impact Hydrothermal Systems: Effects of Permeability and Freezing on Surface Discharge and Water:Rock Ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnhart, C. J.; Nimmo, F.; Travis, B. J.

    2008-12-01

    A km-scale bolide delivers enough energy to heat subsurface water, and drive hydrothermal circulation (Abramov and Kring, 2005). This post-impact hydrothermal (PIH) circulation can lead to surface discharge of water, and chemical alteration - both are potentially detectable. We present the effects that permeability and freezing have on discharge and water:rock (W/R) ratios. We simulate the evolution of PIH systems using MAGHNUM (detailed in Travis et al., 2003). MAGHNUM solves the time-dependent transport of water and heat through a porous medium, incorporating phase transitions between ice (applicable to Mars), vapor and water. PIH evolution depends on heat sources and permeability (k); these, in turn, control discharge and chemical alteration which depends on both the peak temperatures and the W/R ratio (Schwenzer and Kring, 2008). Recently, CRISM detected phyllosilicate-rich material within ~45 km craters (Mustard et al., 2008) and the HiRISE camera imaged gullies, some emanating from central peaks, within many high latitude craters. We model a 45 km crater created by a 3.9 km dia., 7 km/s impactor. Simulations run for 100,000 yrs in a 2D axisymmetric domain with a heat flux of 32.5 mW m-2. Thus far we have tested systems with a range of surface k's (10-4 to 1 darcys) that decay exponentially with depth and are exposed to two surface temperatures (5°C and -53°C). In general W/R ratios increase with increased k. Focusing in on the upper 200 m at the center of the crater, fluid temperatures remain > 100°C for 9000 yrs and flow yields W/R ratios of 10 when exposed to a surface temperature of 5°C. Dropping the surface temperature below freezing to a Mars-like - 53°C maintains upper 200 m temperatures > 100°C for only 600 yrs and W/R ratios are reduced to 1. Higher permeabilities yield higher W/R ratios but reduced time exposure to high temperatures. When surface temperatures are below freezing total system discharge is roughly independent of k for modest permeabilities but the time until the surface freezes increases with lower k. Freezing reduces both W/R ratios and discharge because ice closes pores and restricts flow.

  4. Immersion freezing of water and aqueous ammonium sulfate droplets initiated by humic-like substances as a function of water activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rigg, Y. J.; Alpert, P. A.; Knopf, D. A.

    2013-07-01

    Immersion freezing of water and aqueous (NH4)2SO4 droplets containing leonardite (LEO) and Pahokee peat (PP) serving as surrogates for humic-like substances (HULIS) has been investigated. Organic aerosol containing HULIS are ubiquitous in the atmosphere; however, their potential for ice cloud formation is uncertain. Immersion freezing has been studied for temperatures as low as 215 K and solution water activity, aw, from 0.85 to 1.0. The freezing temperatures of water and aqueous solution droplets containing LEO and PP are 5-15 K warmer than homogeneous ice nucleation temperatures. Heterogeneous freezing temperatures can be represented by a horizontal shift of the ice melting curve as a function of solution aw by ?aw = 0.2703 and 0.2466, respectively. Corresponding hetrogeneous ice nucleation rate coefficients, Jhet, are (9.6 ± 2.5)×104 and (5.4 ± 1.4)×104 cm-2 s-1 for LEO and PP containing droplets, respectively, and remain constant along freezing curves characterized by ?aw. Consequently predictions of freezing temperatures and kinetics can be made without knowledge of the solute type when relative humidity and ice nuclei (IN) surface areas are known. The acquired ice nucleation data are applied to evaluate different approaches to fit and reproduce experimentally derived frozen fractions. In addition, we apply a basic formulation of classical nucleation theory (?(T)-model) to calculate contact angles and frozen fractions. Contact angles calculated for each ice nucleus as a function of temperature, ?(T)-model, reproduce exactly experimentally derived frozen fractions without involving free-fit parameters. However, assigning the IN a single contact angle for the entire population (single-? model) is not suited to represent the frozen fractions. Application of ?-PDF, active sites, and deterministic model approaches to measured frozen fractions yield similar good representations. Furthermore, when using a single parameterization of ?-PDF or active sites distribution to fit all individual aw immersion freezing data simultaneously, frozen fraction curves are not reproduced. This implies that these fitting formulations cannot be applied to immersion freezing of aqueous solutions, and suggests that derived fit parameters do not represent independent particle properties. Thus, from fitting frozen fractions only, the underlying ice nucleation mechanism and nature of the ice nucleating sites cannot be inferred. In contrast to using fitted functions obtained to represent experimental conditions only, we suggest to use experimentally derived Jhet as a function of temperature and aw that can be applied to conditions outside of those probed in laboratory. This is because Jhet(T) is independent of time and IN surface areas in contrast to the fit parameters obtained by representation of experimentally derived frozen fractions.

  5. Immersion Freezing of Water and Aqueous Ammonium Sulfate Droplets Initiated by Humic-Like Substances as a Function of Water Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rigg, Y.; Alpert, P. A.; Knopf, D. A.

    2013-12-01

    Immersion freezing of water and aqueous (NH4)2SO4 droplets containing leonardite (LEO) and pahokee peat (PP) serving as surrogates for humic-like substances (HULIS) has been investigated. Organic aerosol containing HULIS are ubiquitous in the atmosphere; however, their potential for ice cloud formation is uncertain. Immersion freezing has been studied for temperatures as low as 215 K and solution water activity, aw, from 0.85 to 1.0. The freezing temperatures of water and aqueous solution droplets containing LEO and PP are 5-15 K warmer than homogeneous ice nucleation temperatures. Heterogeneous freezing temperatures can be represented by a horizontal shift of the ice melting curve as a function of solution aw and ?aw by 0.2703 and 0.2466, respectively. Corresponding heterogeneous ice nucleation rate coefficients, Jhet, are (9.6×2.5)x104 and (5.4×1.4)x104 cm-2 s-1 for LEO and PP containing droplets, respectively, and remain constant along freezing curves characterized by ?aw. Consequently predictions of freezing temperatures and kinetics can be made without knowledge of the solute type when relative humidity and ice nuclei (IN) surface areas are known. The acquired ice nucleation data are applied to evaluate different approaches to fit and reproduce experimentally derived frozen fractions. In addition, we apply a basic formulation of classical nucleation theory (?(T)-model) to calculate contact angles and frozen fractions. Contact angles calculated for each ice nucleus as a function of temperature, ?(T)-model, reproduce exactly experimentally derived frozen fractions without involving free-fit parameters. However, assigning the IN a single contact angle for the entire population (single-? model) is not suited to represent the frozen fractions. Application of ?-PDF, active sites, and deterministic model approaches to measured frozen fractions yield similar good representations. Furthermore, when using a single parameterization of ?-PDF or active sites distribution to fit all individual aw immersion freezing data simultaneously, frozen fraction curves are not reproduced. This implies that these fitting formulations cannot be applied to immersion freezing of aqueous solutions, and suggests that derived fit parameters do not represent independent particle properties. Thus, from fitting frozen fractions only, the underlying ice nucleation mechanism and nature of the ice nucleating sites cannot be inferred. In contrast to using fitted functions obtained to represent experimental conditions only, we suggest to use experimentally derived Jhet as a function of temperature and aw that can be applied to conditions outside of those probed in laboratory. This is because Jhet(T) is independent of time and IN surface areas in contrast to the fit parameters obtained by representation of experimentally derived frozen fractions.

  6. Evaluation of the freeze-thaw/evaporation process for the treatment of produced waters. Final report, August 1992--August 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Boysen, J.E.; Walker, K.L.; Mefford, J.L.; Kirsch, J.R.; Harju, J.A.

    1996-06-01

    The use of freeze-crystallization is becoming increasingly acknowledged as a low-cost, energy-efficient method for purifying contaminated water. The natural freezing process can be coupled with natural evaporative processes to treat oil and gas produced waters year round in regions where subfreezing temperatures seasonally occur. The climates typical of Colorado`s San Juan Basin and eastern slope, as well as the oil and gas producing regions of Wyoming, are well suited for application of these processes in combination. Specifically, the objectives of this research are related to the development of a commercially-economic FTE (freeze-thaw/evaporation) process for the treatment and purification of water produced in conjunction with oil and natural gas. The research required for development of this process consists of three tasks: (1) a literature survey and process modeling and economic analysis; (2) laboratory-scale process evaluation; and (3) field demonstration of the process. Results of research conducted for the completion of these three tasks indicate that produced water treatment and disposal costs for commercial application of the process, would be in the range of $0.20 to $0.30/bbl in the Rocky Mountain region. FTE field demonstration results from northwestern New Mexico during the winter of 1995--96 indicate significant and simultaneous removal of salts, metals, and organics from produced water. Despite the unusually warm winter, process yields demonstrate disposal volume reductions on the order of 80% and confirm the potential for economic production of water suitable for various beneficial uses. The total dissolved solids concentrations of the FTE demonstration streams were 11,600 mg/L (feed), 56,900 mg/L (brine), and 940 mg/L (ice melt).

  7. Combined impacts of freeze-thaw processes on paddy land and dry land in Northeast China.

    PubMed

    Chen, Siyang; Ouyang, Wei; Hao, Fanghua; Zhao, Xuchen

    2013-07-01

    The quantity of spring snowmelt infiltration and runoff, which affects the hydrology of the freeze zone, depends on the antecedent soil water content (SWC) conditions at the time of the soil's freezing. An understanding of the characteristics of frozen soil is essential for spring sowing in the agricultural freeze zones. The main goal of this study was to evaluate the differences in the freeze-thaw process and the freeze-thaw-induced water redistribution between the paddy and dry lands in a freeze zone. For this purpose, a field study was conducted in the winter of 2011-2012 for two types of farmlands in Northeast China. To illustrate the soil's frost dynamics over time, the measured SWCs at different depths (15, 30, 60, and 90 cm) were transformed into different expressions including the SWC dynamic, the frozen soil's profile, and the freezing and thawing front trace. The freezing characteristics in the paddy land, in contrast to that in the dry land, had a higher freezing point temperature, a larger amount of water movement to the upper layer, and a 2.76 mm larger accumulation of water in the upper layer. However, the increase of SWC (which is equivalent to thawing) was evidently faster than the decrease of SWC (which is equivalent to freezing). The water in the frozen soil's profile was most likely redistributed towards the freezing front before soil temperature (ST) falls below the freezing point. The findings may partially explain the soil's freeze-thaw characteristics for the different stages as well as the combined impact of these characteristics with farmland use types on soil hydrology; the findings may also provide a foundation for forecasting the hydrologic response of the freeze-thaw process and provide guidance for management strategies dealing with seasonally frozen agricultural soils. PMID:23584030

  8. Freezing avoidance by supercooling in Olea europaea cultivars: the role of apoplastic water, solute content and cell wall rigidity.

    PubMed

    Arias, Nadia S; Bucci, Sandra J; Scholz, Fabian G; Goldstein, Guillermo

    2015-10-01

    Plants can avoid freezing damage by preventing extracellular ice formation below the equilibrium freezing temperature (supercooling). We used Olea europaea cultivars to assess which traits contribute to avoid ice nucleation at sub-zero temperatures. Seasonal leaf water relations, non-structural carbohydrates, nitrogen and tissue damage and ice nucleation temperatures in different plant parts were determined in five cultivars growing in the Patagonian cold desert. Ice seeding in roots occurred at higher temperatures than in stems and leaves. Leaves of cold acclimated cultivars supercooled down to -13?°C, substantially lower than the minimum air temperatures observed in the study site. During winter, leaf ice nucleation and leaf freezing damage (LT50 ) occurred at similar temperatures, typical of plant tissues that supercool. Higher leaf density and cell wall rigidity were observed during winter, consistent with a substantial acclimation to sub-zero temperatures. Larger supercooling capacity and lower LT50 were observed in cold-acclimated cultivars with higher osmotically active solute content, higher tissue elastic adjustments and lower apoplastic water. Irreversible leaf damage was only observed in laboratory experiments at very low temperatures, but not in the field. A comparative analysis of closely related plants avoids phylogenetic independence bias in a comparative study of adaptations to survive low temperatures. PMID:25737264

  9. Measurement of water transport during freezing in mammalian liver tissue: Part II--The use of differential scanning calorimetry.

    PubMed

    Devireddy, R V; Bischof, J C

    1998-10-01

    There is currently a need for experimental techniques to assay the biophysical response (water transport or intracellular ice formation, IIF) during freezing in the cells of whole tissue slices. These data are important in understanding and optimizing biomedical applications of freezing, particularly in cryosurgery. This study presents a new technique using a Differential Scanning Calorimeter (DSC) to obtain dynamic and quantitative water transport data in whole tissue slices during freezing. Sprague-Dawley rat liver tissue was chosen as our model system. The DSC was used to monitor quantitatively the heat released by water transported from the unfrozen cell cytoplasm to the partially frozen vascular/extracellular space at 5 degrees C/min. This technique was previously described for use in a single cell suspension system (Devireddy, et al. 1998). A model of water transport was fit to the DSC data using a nonlinear regression curve-fitting technique, which assumes that the rat liver tissue behaves as a two-compartment Krogh cylinder model. The biophysical parameters of water transport for rat liver tissue at 5 degrees C/min were obtained as Lpg = 3.16 x 10(-13) m3/Ns (1.9 microns/min-atm), ELp = 265 kJ/mole (63.4 kcal/mole), respectively. These results compare favorably to water transport parameters in whole liver tissue reported in the first part of this study obtained using a freeze substitution (FS) microscopy technique (Pazhayannur and Bischof, 1997). The DSC technique is shown to be a fast, quantitative, and reproducible technique to measure dynamic water transport in tissue systems. However, there are several limitations to the DSC technique: (a) a priori knowledge that the biophysical response is in fact water transport, (b) the technique cannot be used due to machine limitations at cooling rates greater than 40 degrees C/min, and (c) the tissue geometric dimensions (the Krogh model dimensions) and the osmotically inactive cell volumes Vb, must be determined by low-temperature microscopy techniques. PMID:10412432

  10. Ripples in Rocks Point to Water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This image taken by the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity's panoramic camera shows the rock nicknamed 'Last Chance,' which lies within the outcrop near the rover's landing site at Meridiani Planum, Mars. The image provides evidence for a geologic feature known as ripple cross-stratification. At the base of the rock, layers can be seen dipping downward to the right. The bedding that contains these dipping layers is only one to two centimeters (0.4 to 0.8 inches) thick. In the upper right corner of the rock, layers also dip to the right, but exhibit a weak 'concave-up' geometry. These two features -- the thin, cross-stratified bedding combined with the possible concave geometry -- suggest small ripples with sinuous crest lines. Although wind can produce ripples, they rarely have sinuous crest lines and never form steep, dipping layers at this small scale. The most probable explanation for these ripples is that they were formed in the presence of moving water.

    Crossbedding Evidence for Underwater Origin Interpretations of cross-lamination patterns presented as clues to this martian rock's origin under flowing water are marked on images taken by the panoramic camera and microscopic imager on NASA's Opportunity.

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure 1Figure 2

    The red arrows (Figure 1) point to features suggesting cross-lamination within the rock called 'Last Chance' taken at a distance of 4.5 meters (15 feet) during Opportunity's 17th sol (February 10, 2004). The inferred sets of fine layers at angles to each other (cross-laminae) are up to 1.4 centimeters (half an inch) thick. For scale, the distance between two vertical cracks in the rock is about 7 centimeters (2.8 inches). The feature indicated by the middle red arrow suggests a pattern called trough cross-lamination, likely produced when flowing water shaped sinuous ripples in underwater sediment and pushed the ripples to migrate in one direction. The direction of the ancient flow would have been either toward or away from the line of sight from this perspective. The lower and upper red arrows point to cross-lamina sets that are consistent with underwater ripples in the sediment having moved in water that was flowing left to right from this perspective.

    The yellow arrows (Figure 2) indicate places in the panoramic camera view that correlate with places in the microscope's view of the same rock.

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure 3

    The microscopic view (Figure 3) is a mosaic of some of the 152 microscopic imager frames of 'Last Chance' that Opportunity took on sols 39 and 40 (March 3 and 4, 2004).

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure 4

    Figure 4 shows cross-lamination expressed by lines that trend downward from left to right, traced with black lines in the interpretive overlay. These cross-lamination lines are consistent with dipping planes that would have formed surfaces on the down-current side of migrating ripples. Interpretive blue lines indicate boundaries between possible sets of cross-laminae.

  11. Homogeneous ice nucleation from aqueous inorganic/organic particles representative of biomass burning: water activity, freezing temperatures, nucleation rates.

    PubMed

    Knopf, Daniel A; Rigg, Yannick J

    2011-02-10

    Homogeneous ice nucleation plays an important role in the formation of cirrus clouds with subsequent effects on the global radiative budget. Here we report on homogeneous ice nucleation temperatures and corresponding nucleation rate coefficients of aqueous droplets serving as surrogates of biomass burning aerosol. Micrometer-sized (NH(4))(2)SO(4)/levoglucosan droplets with mass ratios of 10:1, 1:1, 1:5, and 1:10 and aqueous multicomponent organic droplets with and without (NH(4))(2)SO(4) under typical tropospheric temperatures and relative humidities are investigated experimentally using a droplet conditioning and ice nucleation apparatus coupled to an optical microscope with image analysis. Homogeneous freezing was determined as a function of temperature and water activity, a(w), which was set at droplet preparation conditions. The ice nucleation data indicate that minor addition of (NH(4))(2)SO(4) to the aqueous organic droplets renders the temperature dependency of water activity negligible in contrast to the case of aqueous organic solution droplets. The mean homogeneous ice nucleation rate coefficient derived from 8 different aqueous droplet compositions with average diameters of ?60 ?m for temperatures as low as 195 K and a(w) of 0.82-1 is 2.18 × 10(6) cm(-3) s(-1). The experimentally derived freezing temperatures and homogeneous ice nucleation rate coefficients are in agreement with predictions of the water activity-based homogeneous ice nucleation theory when taking predictive uncertainties into account. However, the presented ice nucleation data indicate that the water activity-based homogeneous ice nucleation theory overpredicts the freezing temperatures by up to 3 K and corresponding ice nucleation rate coefficients by up to ?2 orders of magnitude. A shift of 0.01 in a(w), which is well within the uncertainty of typical field and laboratory relative humidity measurements, brings experimental and predicted freezing temperatures and homogeneous ice nucleation rate coefficients into agreement. The experimentally derived ice nucleation data are applied to constrain the water activity-based homogeneous ice nucleation theory to smaller than ±1 order of magnitude compared to the predictive uncertainty of larger than ±6 orders of magnitude. The atmospheric implications of these findings are discussed. PMID:21235213

  12. Novel real-time diagnosis of the freezing process using an ultrasonic transducer.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Yen-Hsiang; Cheng, Chin-Chi; Cheng, Hong-Ping; Lee, Dasheng

    2015-01-01

    The freezing stage governs several critical parameters of the freeze drying process and the quality of the resulting lyophilized products. This paper presents an integrated ultrasonic transducer (UT) in a stainless steel bottle and its application to real-time diagnostics of the water freezing process. The sensor was directly deposited onto the stainless steel bottle using a sol-gel spray technique. It could operate at temperature range from -100 to 400 °C and uses an ultrasonic pulse-echo technique. The progression of the freezing process, including water-in, freezing point and final phase change of water, were all clearly observed using ultrasound. The ultrasonic signals could indicate the three stages of the freezing process and evaluate the cooling and freezing periods under various processing conditions. The temperature was also adopted for evaluating the cooling and freezing periods. These periods increased with water volume and decreased with shelf temperature (i.e., speed of freezing). This study demonstrates the effectiveness of the ultrasonic sensor and technology for diagnosing and optimizing the process of water freezing to save energy. PMID:25946629

  13. Novel Real-Time Diagnosis of the Freezing Process Using an Ultrasonic Transducer

    PubMed Central

    Tseng, Yen-Hsiang; Cheng, Chin-Chi; Cheng, Hong-Ping; Lee, Dasheng

    2015-01-01

    The freezing stage governs several critical parameters of the freeze drying process and the quality of the resulting lyophilized products. This paper presents an integrated ultrasonic transducer (UT) in a stainless steel bottle and its application to real-time diagnostics of the water freezing process. The sensor was directly deposited onto the stainless steel bottle using a sol-gel spray technique. It could operate at temperature range from ?100 to 400 °C and uses an ultrasonic pulse-echo technique. The progression of the freezing process, including water-in, freezing point and final phase change of water, were all clearly observed using ultrasound. The ultrasonic signals could indicate the three stages of the freezing process and evaluate the cooling and freezing periods under various processing conditions. The temperature was also adopted for evaluating the cooling and freezing periods. These periods increased with water volume and decreased with shelf temperature (i.e., speed of freezing). This study demonstrates the effectiveness of the ultrasonic sensor and technology for diagnosing and optimizing the process of water freezing to save energy. PMID:25946629

  14. Prevention of freezing in measuring and regulating equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Wofford, D.

    1995-12-01

    The strict and competitive business environment in which the natural gas industry operates today dictates that measurement and control systems which are utilized are of the highest achievable operational integrity. This entails not only that measurements and controls are performed and maintained precisely and reliably, but also that consideration is given to operational phenomena which may adversely affect the overall performance and integrity of such systems. Freezing is an operational occurrence winch frequently affects the functionality and performance of measurement and regulating systems. Freezing is the result of either ice or hydrate formation within the gas stream and is dependent upon the presence of water. Ice forms in the system when the water vapor within the gas stream experiences such conditions that condensation and freezing occurs. Ice will form at approximately 320 Fahrenheit Hydrates form in the system when water vapor within the gas stream combines with hydrocarbons and forms a compound which will condense and freeze at temperatures winch are often above the freezing point for water alone. Hydrate formations usually occur in gathering lines which are saturated with water vapor. In either case, the freezing condition can result in measurement errors, regulating and control equipment malfunction, and complete line blockages. These results ultimately have detrimental economic and operational impact. Therefore, the avoidance of freezing problems is a good long term investment.

  15. Initiation of Freezing a Super-cooled Water Droplet in Oil by Colliding with the Electrodes for Applying Uniform DC Electric Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tochitani, Yoshiro; Kawasaki, Naoto

    A water droplet injected into silicone oil, to which uniform electric field is applied by use of a pair of electrode plate, reciprocates colliding alternately with each electrode plate. This paper proposes to use the collision to augment initiation of freezing nucleation of super-cooling water droplet, and deals with the characteristics of the phenomena. The shuttle migration of a droplet between electrodes and initiation of freezing is photographed by use of a video camera, and the phenomena are analyzed on a monitor. As a result, the freezing initiation of the droplet is observed while the droplet is touched to the negative electrode plate. Relative frequency of the initiation is shown by the super-cooling degree and the electric field strength. The upper limitation of the temperature at which all sample droplets initiate to freeze is -3°C. Characteristics of the initiation are clarified and the effectiveness of this method is shown.

  16. Avoidance and tolerance of freezing in ectothermic vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Costanzo, Jon P; Lee, Richard E

    2013-06-01

    Ectothermic vertebrates have colonized regions that are seasonally or perpetually cold, and some species, particularly terrestrial hibernators, must cope with temperatures that fall substantially below 0°C. Survival of such excursions depends on either freeze avoidance through supercooling or freeze tolerance. Supercooling, a metastable state in which body fluids remain liquid below the equilibrium freezing/melting point, is promoted by physiological responses that protect against chilling injury and by anatomical and behavioral traits that limit risk of inoculative freezing by environmental ice and ice-nucleating agents. Freeze tolerance evolved from responses to fundamental stresses to permit survival of the freezing of a substantial amount of body water under thermal and temporal conditions of ecological relevance. Survival of freezing is promoted by a complex suite of molecular, biochemical and physiological responses that limit cell death from excessive shrinkage, damage to macromolecules and membranes, metabolic perturbation and oxidative stress. Although freeze avoidance and freeze tolerance generally are mutually exclusive strategies, a few species can switch between them, the mode used in a particular instance of chilling depending on prevailing physiological and environmental conditions. PMID:23678097

  17. Isotope Exchange and Fractionation Corrections for Extraction of Tritiated Water in Silica Gel by Freeze-Drying Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Guthrie, E B; Shen, N C; Bandong, B B

    2001-09-24

    A concentration correction curve was established for measuring the activity concentration of airborne tritiated water collected with dried silica gel and extracted by the LLNL Environmental Monitoring Radiological Laboratory freeze-dry technique. A tracer study using standard tritiated water with silica gel showed that the concentration of tritium in the extracted water is lower than that in the adsorbed water by a fraction proportional to the amount of adsorbed water. The observed decrease in tritium concentration in the extracted water can be accounted for by dilution due to isotopic exchange with both non-tritiated water and hydroxyl groups within the silica gel matrix. For the range of 8-35% adsorbed water, which is typical of samples collected in LLNL monitoring stations, the derived exchangeable water in the silica gel material under investigation was (5.12 {+-} 0.08)%. The contribution of the H{sub 2}O/HTO vapor pressure effect using published empirical data in the literature was also considered in calculating the degree of isotopic exchange.

  18. Drought increases freezing tolerance of both leaves and xylem of Larrea tridentatapce_2224 43..51

    E-print Network

    Pockman, William T.

    Drought increases freezing tolerance of both leaves and xylem of Larrea tridentatapce_2224 43 decreasing it in the xylem, potentially creating a mismatch between water supply and demand. To test exchange, cell death, freezing point depression and leaf-specific xylem hydraulic conductance (kl). Drought

  19. Experimental investigation of molten metal freezing on to a structure

    SciTech Connect

    Mizanur Rahman, M.; Hino, Tomohiko; Morita, Koji; Matsumoto, Tatsuya; Nakagawa, Kiyoshi; Fukuda, Kenji; Maschek, Werner

    2007-10-15

    During core disruptive accidents (CDAs) of Liquid Metal Reactors (LMRs), it is important to understand the freezing phenomena of molten metal, which may prevent fuel dispersal and subsequent shutdown. The present paper describes the freezing behavior of molten metal during interaction with a structure with a view to the safety of LMRs. In this study, Wood's metal (melting point 78.8 C) was used as a simulant melt, while stainless steel and copper were used as freezing structures. A series of simulation experiments was conducted to study the freezing behavior of Wood's metal during pouring on to the freezing structures immersed in a coolant. In the experiments, simulant melt was poured into a stainless steel tube and finally ejected into a coolant through a nozzle so as to observe the freezing behavior of the molten metal. The penetration length and width were measured in the air cooled experiments, whereas penetration length and the proportion of adhering frozen metal were measured in water coolant experiment. The melt flow and distribution were observed in both types of experiment using a high-speed video camera. Distinct freezing modes were observed in the water coolant experiments, whereas only one freezing mode with a longer melt penetration was found in air coolant experiments. The present result will be utilized to create a relevant database for the verification of reactor safety analysis codes. (author)

  20. Flight Instrument for Measurement of Liquid-Water Content in Clouds at Temperatures Above and Below Freezing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perkins, Porter J.

    1951-01-01

    A principle formerly used in an instrument for cloud detection was further investigated to provide a simple and rapid means for measuring the liquid-water content of clouds at temperatures above and below freezing. The instrument consists of a small cylindrical element so operated at high surface temperatures that the impingement of cloud droplets creates a significant drop in the surface temperature. ? The instrument is sensitive to a wide range of liquid-water content and was calibrated at one set of fixed conditions against rotating multicylinder measurements. The limited conditions of the calibration Included an air temperature of 20 F, an air velocity of 175 miles per hour, and a surface temperature in clear air of 475 F. The results obtained from experiments conducted with the instrument indicate that the principle can be used for measurements in clouds at temperatures above and below freezing. Calibrations for ranges of airspeed, air temperature, and air density will be necessary to adapt the Instrument for general flight use.

  1. Solitary gravity-capillary water waves with point vortices

    E-print Network

    Kristoffer Varholm

    2015-11-02

    We construct small-amplitude solitary traveling gravity-capillary water waves with a finite number of point vortices along a vertical line, on finite depth. This is done using a local bifurcation argument. The properties of the resulting waves are also examined: We find that they depend significantly on the position of the point vortices in the water column.

  2. Plant cover, soil temperature, freeze, water stress, and evapotranspiration conditions. [south Texas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiegand, C. L.; Nixon, P. R.; Gausman, H. W.; Namken, L. N.; Leamer, R. W.; Richardson, A. J. (principal investigators)

    1981-01-01

    Emissive and reflective data for 10 days, and IR data for 6 nights in south Texas scenes were analyzed after procedures were developed for removing cloud-affected data. HCMM radiometric temperatures were: within 2 C of dewpoint temperatures on nights when air temperature approached dewpoint temperatures; significantly correlated with variables important in evapotranspiration; and, related to freeze severity and planting depth soil temperatures. Vegetation greenness indexes calculated from visible and reflective IR bands of NOAA-6 to -9 meteorological satellites will be useful in the AgRISTARS program for seasonal crop development, crop condition, and drought applications.

  3. Evaluation of the freeze-thaw/evaporation process for the treatment of produced waters. Quarterly technical progress report, January 1, 1996--March 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Boysen, J.

    1996-04-01

    The use of freeze-crystallization is being increasingly acknowledged as a crystallization is being increasingly acknowledged as a low-cost, energy-efficient method for purifying contaminated water. The natural freezing process can be coupled with natural evaporative processes to treat oil and gas produced waters year-round in regions where sub-freezing temperatures seasonally occur. The objectives of this research are related to development of a commercially-economic natural freezethaw/evaporation (FTE) process for the treatment and purification of water produced in conjunction with oil and gas Research efforts this quarter were: to complete the draft of the ``Task 1 and Task 2 Report``; to complete sampling and analysis of the FTE demonstration process streams; to begin data evaluation of the demonstration based on the results of process stream analyses; and to begin work on the final project report.

  4. Non-equilibrium freezing of water-ice in sandy basaltic regoliths and implications for fluidized debris flows on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gooding, J. L.

    1987-01-01

    Many geomorphic features on Mars were attributed to Earth-analogous, cold-climate processes involving movement of water or ice lubricated debris. Clearly, knowledge of the behavior of water in regolith materials under Martian conditions is essential to understanding the postulated geomorphic processes. Experiments were performed with sand-sized samples of natural basaltic regoliths in order to further elucidate how water/regolith interactions depend upon grain size and mineralogy. The data reveal important contrasts with data for clay-mineral substrates and suggest that the microphysics of water/mineral interactions might affect Martian geomorphic processes in ways that are not fully appreciated. Sand and silt sized fractions of two soils from the summit of Mauna Kea were used as Mars-analogous regolith materials. Temperatures were measured for water/ice phase transitions as wet slurries of individual soil fractions which were cooled or heated at controlled rates under a carbon dioxide atmosphere. Freezing and melting of ice was studied as a function of water/soil mass ratio, soil particle size, and thermal-cycle rate. Comparison tests were done under the same conditions with U.S. Geological Survey standard rock powders.

  5. Evaluation of the freeze-thaw/evaporation process for the treatment of produced waters. Quarterly technical progress report, January 1--March 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Boysen, J.; Morotti, J.

    1994-04-01

    The use of freeze-crystallization is being increasingly acknowledged as a low-cost, energy-efficient method for purifying contaminated water. Freeze-crystallization has been shown to be effective in removing a wide variety of contaminants from water. Water purification by using natural conditions to promote freezing appears to be an extremely attractive process for the treatment of contaminated water in many areas where natural climatic conditions will seasonally promote freezing. The natural freezing process can be coupled with natural evaporative processes to treat oil and gas produced waters year round in regions where subfreezing temperatures seasonally occur. The objectives of this research are related to development of a commercially-economic natural freeze-thaw/evaporation (FTE) process for the treatment and purification of water produced in conjunction with oil and gas. During the reporting period of 1/1/94 to 3/31/94, project research concentrated on Subtasks 2.0 (Task 2 Project Reporting) and 2.1 (Laboratory-scale FTE Simulations) . The objectives of Task 2 are to conduct laboratory- and bench-scale simulations for optimizing the design of the FTE process. Task 2 requires completion of six subtasks: Subtask 2.0 - Task 2 Project Reporting (initiated 3/1/93), Subtask 2.1 - Laboratory-scale FTE Simulations, Subtask 2.2 Re-evaluation of Process Economics Based on Laboratory-scale Process Simulation Results, Subtask 2.3 - Bench-scale FTE Simulations, Subtask 2.4 - Economic Assessment of Bench-scale Simulations, and Subtask 2.5 - Technical Report of Task 2. The construction, shakedown, and operation of the laboratory-scale process simulations planned were planned for this quarter (Subtask 2.1).

  6. Intrusion of warm surface water beneath the McMurdo Ice Shelf, A. A. Stern,1

    E-print Network

    Holland, David

    is formed at the surface and the freezing point of salt water decreases with increased pressure, the HSSW is warmer than the freezing point at the grounding line and its intrusion causes melting at the grounding the in situ freez- ing points and causes rapid melting. Mode 2 melting is largely responsible for the recent

  7. A novel particle engineering technology to enhance dissolution of poorly water soluble drugs: spray-freezing into liquid.

    PubMed

    Rogers, True L; Nelsen, Andrew C; Hu, Jiahui; Brown, Judith N; Sarkari, Marazban; Young, Timothy J; Johnston, Keith P; Williams, Robert O

    2002-11-01

    A novel cryogenic spray-freezing into liquid (SFL) process was developed to produce microparticulate powders consisting of an active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) molecularly embedded within a pharmaceutical excipient matrix. In the SFL process, a feed solution containing the API was atomized beneath the surface of a cryogenic liquid such that the liquid-liquid impingement between the feed and cryogenic liquids resulted in intense atomization into microdroplets, which were frozen instantaneously into microparticles. The SFL micronized powder was obtained following lyophilization of the frozen microparticles. The objective of this study was to develop a particle engineering technology to produce micronized powders of the hydrophobic drug, danazol, complexed with hydroxypropyl-beta-cyclodextrin (HPbetaCD) and to compare these SFL micronized powders to inclusion complex powders produced from other techniques, such as co-grinding of dry powder mixtures and lyophilization of bulk solutions. Danazol and HPbetaCD were dissolved in a water/tetrahydrofuran cosolvent mixture prior to SFL processing or slow freezing. Identical quantities of the API and HPbetaCD used in the solutions were co-ground in a mortar and pestle and blended to produce a co-ground physical mixture for comparison. The powder samples were characterized by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectrometry (FTIR), scanning electron microscopy, surface area analysis, and dissolution testing. The results provided by DSC, XRD, and FTIR suggested the formation of inclusion complexes by both slow-freezing and SFL. However, the specific surface area was significantly higher for the latter. Dissolution results suggested that equilibration of the danazol/HPbetaCD solution prior to SFL processing was required to produce the most soluble conformation of the resulting inclusion complex following SFL. SFL micronized powders exhibited better dissolution profiles than the slowly frozen aggregate powder. Results indicated that micronized SFL inclusion complex powders dissolved faster in aqueous dissolution media than inclusion complexes formed by conventional techniques due to higher surface areas and stabilized inclusion complexes obtained by ultra-rapid freezing. PMID:12445556

  8. Protein crowding in solution, frozen and freeze-dried states: small-angle neutron and X-ray scattering study of lysozyme/sorbitol/water systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krueger, Susan; Khodadadi, Sheila; Clark, Nicholas; McAuley, Arnold; Cristiglio, Viviana; Theyencheri, Narayanan; Curtis, Joseph; Shalaev, Evgenyi

    2015-03-01

    For effective preservation, proteins are often stored as frozen solutions or in glassy states using a freeze-drying process. However, aggregation is often observed after freeze-thaw or reconstitution of freeze-dried powder and the stability of the protein is no longer assured. In this study, small-angle neutron and X-ray scattering (SANS and SAXS) have been used to investigate changes in protein-protein interaction distances of a model protein/cryoprotectant system of lysozyme/sorbitol/water, under representative pharmaceutical processing conditions. The results demonstrate the utility of SAXS and SANS methods to monitor protein crowding at different stages of freezing and drying. The SANS measurements of solution samples showed at least one protein interaction peak corresponding to an interaction distance of ~ 90 Å. In the frozen state, two protein interaction peaks were observed by SANS with corresponding interaction distances at 40 Å as well as 90 Å. On the other hand, both SAXS and SANS data for freeze-dried samples showed three peaks, suggesting interaction distances ranging from ~ 15 Å to 170 Å. Possible interpretations of these interaction peaks will be discussed, as well as the role of sorbitol as a cryoprotectant during the freezing and drying process.

  9. Decontamination of poultry carcasses using steam or hot water in combination with rapid cooling, chilling or freezing of carcass surfaces.

    PubMed

    James, Christian; James, Stephen J; Hannay, Neil; Purnell, Graham; Barbedo-Pinto, Catia; Yaman, Hilmi; Araujo, Marlene; Gonzalez, M Luisa; Calvo, Javier; Howell, Mary; Corry, Janet E L

    2007-03-10

    The effects of the application of steam at atmospheric pressure for times up to 20 s on the numbers of inoculated Campylobacter jejuni and Escherichia coli on whole chicken carcasses were investigated in a pilot steam cabinet. Steam treatments reduced the numbers of C. jejuni AR6 by ca. 1.8, 2.6 and 3.3 log(10) cfu cm(-2) in 10, 12 and 20 s, respectively. Corresponding reductions in numbers of E. coli K12 were 1.7, 2.3 and 2.8 log(10) cfu cm(-2). However, such treatments caused the skin to shrink and change colour. The optimum treatment for maximum reductions of C. jejuni and E. coli, least skin shrinkage and change of colour was concluded to be <12 s. Further work was carried out to determine whether a modified air chilling system in combination with steam or hot water decontamination treatments could be used to reduce numbers of pathogens, particularly campylobacters, on the surface of poultry carcasses. Whole chicken carcasses inoculated with C. jejuni and E. coli were either not treated, treated with steam at atmospheric pressure for up to 10 s or treated with hot water at 80 degrees C for up to 20 s, then either chilled by crust freezing, chilled at 0 degrees C, or chilled at 15 degrees C, in a pilot chilling chamber. The optimum combination was treatment with water at 80 degrees C for 20 s followed by crust freezing, which reduced the numbers of C. jejuni and E. coli by ca. 2.9 and 3.2 log(10) cfu cm(-2), respectively, without extensive degradation of carcass appearance. PMID:17140687

  10. Passively operated spool valve for drain-down freeze protection of thermosyphon water heaters. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    1982-04-30

    The work done to extend the existing drain-down valve technology to provide passive drain-down freeze protection for thermosyphon-based solar water heaters is described. The basic design of the existing valve model is that of a spool valve, employing a cylindrical spool which moves axially in a mating cartridge to open and close o-rings at the two operating extremes (drain and operate) to perform the valving function. Three passive actuators to drive the basic valving mechanism were designed, fabricated, and tested. Two piping configurations used to integrate the spool valve with the thermosyphon system are described, as are the passive actuators. The three actuator designs are: photovoltaic driven, refrigerant-based bellows, and heat motor cable-drive designs. Costs are compared for the alternative actuator designs, and operating characteristics were examined for the thermosyphon system, including field tests. The market for the valve for thermosyphon systems is then assessed. (LEW)

  11. Final report on COOMET.T-S1. Comparison of type S thermocouples at the freezing points of zinc, aluminium and copper 2014—2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pokhodun, A. I.; Ivanova, A. G.; Duysebayeva, K. K.; Ivanova, K. P.

    2015-01-01

    Regional comparison of type S thermocouples at the freezing points of zinc, aluminium and copper was initiated by COOMET TC1.1-10 (the technical committee of COOMET `Thermometry and thermal physics'). Three NMI take part in COOMET regional comparison: D I Mendeleev Institute for Metrology (VNIIM) (Russian Federation), National Scientific Centre (Institute of Metrology) (NSC IM, Ukraine), Republic State Enterprise (Kazakhstan Institute of Metrology) (KazInMetr, Republic of Kazakhstan). VNIIM (Russia) was chosen as the coordinator-pilot of the regional comparison. A star type comparison was used. The participants: KazInMetr and NSC IM constructed the type S thermocouples and calibrated them in three fixed points: zinc, aluminum and copper points, using methods of ITS-90 fixed point realizations. The thermocouples have been sent to VNIIM together with the results of the calibration at three fixed points, with the values of the inhomogeneity at temperature 200 °C and the uncertainty evaluations of the results. For calibration of thermocouples the same VNIIM fixed points cells were used. Participating laboratories repeated the calibration of thermocouples after its returning in zinc, aluminum and copper points to determine the stability of its results. In result of the comparison was to evaluate the equivalence of the type S thermocouples calibration in fixed points by NMIs to confirm corresponding lines of international website for NMI's Calibration and Measurement Capabilities (CMC). This paper is the final report of the comparison including analysis of the uncertainty of measurement results. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCT WG-KC, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  12. On the use of tert-butanol/water cosolvent systems in production and freeze-drying of poly-?-caprolactone nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Zelenková, Tereza; Barresi, Antonello A; Fissore, Davide

    2015-01-01

    This work deals with the use of a water/tert-butyl alcohol (TBA) system in the manufacturing process of poly-?-caprolactone (PCL) nanoparticles, namely in the synthesis stage, using the solvent displacement method in a confined impinging jet mixer (CIJM), and in the following freeze-drying stage. The experimental investigation evidenced that the nanoparticles size is significantly reduced with respect to the case where acetone is the solvent. Besides, the solvent evaporation step is not required before freeze-drying as TBA is fully compatible with the freeze-drying process. The effect of initial polymer concentration, flow rate, water to TBA flow rate ratio, and quench volumetric ratio on the mean nanoparticles size was investigated, and a simple equation was proposed to relate the mean nanoparticles size to these operating parameters. Then, freeze-drying of the nanoparticles suspensions was studied. Lyoprotectants (sucrose and mannitol) and steric stabilizers (Cremophor EL and Poloxamer 388) have to be used to avoid nanoparticles aggregation, thus preserving particle size distribution and mean nanoparticles size. Their effect, as well as that of the heating shelf temperature, has been investigated by means of statistical techniques, with the goal to identify which of these factors, or combination of factors, plays the key role in the nanoparticles size preservation at the end of the freeze-drying process. PMID:25421731

  13. On the freezing process of sea water from data of laboratory measurements based on nuclear magnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melnichenko, N. A.; Stunzhas, P. A.

    2014-11-01

    Results of measurements of the relative brine content ( Q m ) and proton magnetic relaxation time ( T 1) in the liquid phase of freezing sea water at temperatures between -2°C and -43°C are given for variable directions of temperature changes using different pulse and stationary methods of NMR. The results are compared with current published evidence. The results of the temperature dependences of Q m at adding NaCl in sea water are shown. In all the cases, the hysteresis loops in the temperature dependencies of Q m and T 1 in brine were discovered. They correspond to the crystallization range of the main salt of sea water (NaCl), which partially precipitates in the crystalline hydrate form (NaCl · 2H2O) at temperatures lower than -23°C. We demonstrate that crystalline hydrates begin to form in brine after complete salvatation of the ions of basic sea water salts at salinity from 85 to 90‰ and temperatures from -5 to -6°C. The determinations of Q m allowed us to calculate the salinity of brine, which agreed well with the current published estimates.

  14. Deeply-cooled water under strong confinement: neutron scattering investigations and the liquid-liquid critical point hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Bertrand, Christopher E; Zhang, Yang; Chen, Sow-Hsin

    2013-01-21

    We present an overview of recent experimental investigations into the properties of strongly-confined water below the bulk freezing temperature. Under strong confinement, the crystallization of water is completely suppressed and the behavior of the confined liquid state can be measured at temperatures and pressures that are inaccessible to the bulk liquid. We focus on two phenomena that have recently been discovered in strongly confined water: the density minimum and the fragile-to-strong dynamic crossover. All experimental results seem to indicate that confined water undergoes a unique kind of transition below the bulk homogeneous nucleation limit. Much of the recent work on deeply-cooled water under strong confinement has been motivated by the liquid-liquid critical point (LLCP) hypothesis. We discuss this hypothesis in the context of the various experimental findings. PMID:23184078

  15. 7 CFR 305.18 - Quick freeze treatment schedule.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...2010-01-01 false Quick freeze treatment schedule. 305...PHYTOSANITARY TREATMENTS Quick Freeze Treatments § 305.18 Quick freeze treatment schedule. (a...United States or its territorial waters, or is otherwise disposed...

  16. Freezing of phosphocholine headgroup in fully hydrated sphingomyelin bilayers and its effect on the dynamics of nonfreezable water at subzero temperatures.

    PubMed

    Wu, W G; Chi, L M; Yang, T S; Fang, S Y

    1991-07-25

    Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy are applied to characterize the nonfreezable water molecules in fully hydrated D2O/sphingomyelin at temperatures below 0 degrees C. Upon cooling, DSC thermogram displays two thermal transitions peaked at -11 and -34 degrees C. The high-temperature exothermic transition corresponds to the freezing of the bulk D2O, and the low-temperature transition, which has not previously been reported, can be ascribed to the freezing of the phosphocholine headgroup in the lipid bilayer. The dynamics of nonfreezable water are also studied by 2H NMR T1 (spin-lattice relaxation time) and T2e (spin-spin relaxation time obtained by two pulse echo) measurements at 30.7 MHz and at temperatures down to -110 degrees C. The temperature dependence of the T1 relaxation time is characterized by a distinct minimum value of 2.1 +/- 0.1 ms at -30 degrees C. T2e is discontinuous at temperature around -70 degrees C, indicating another freezing-like event for the bound water at this temperature. Analysis of the relaxation data suggest that nonfreezable water undergoes both fast and slow motions at characteristic NMR time scales. The slow motions are affected when the lipid headgroup freezes. PMID:1649825

  17. Evaluation of the freeze-thaw/evaporation process for the treatment of produced waters. Quarterly technical progress report, July 1--September 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Boysen, J.; Morotti, J.

    1995-10-01

    The use of freeze-crystallization is being increasingly acknowledged as a low-cost, energy-efficient method for purifying contaminated water. The natural freezing process can be coupled with natural evaporative processes to treat oil and gas produced waters year round in regions where sub-freezing temperatures seasonally occur. The objectives of this research are related to development of a commercially-economic natural freeze-thaw/evaporation (FTE) process for the treatment and purification of water produced in conjunction with oil and gas. Research efforts this quarter were: to complete the required annual reports; to continue work to finalize the draft of the Task 1 and Task 2 Report; and to obtain site information and design a 200 bbl/day FTE demonstration plant to operate in the San Juan Basin of New Mexico. Specific objectives of the whole project are to: develop an economic model for determining the commercial viability, economically significant parameters, and research issues of the FTE process; conduct laboratory-scale process simulations to optimize the design of the FTE process; and to evaluate on-location treatment of water from a producing well to demonstrate the technical and economic viability of the FTE process.

  18. Evaluation of the freeze-thaw/evaporation process for the treatment of produced waters. Quarterly technical progress report, January 1, 1995--March 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Boysen, J.; Morotti, J.

    1995-04-01

    The objectives of this project are related to the development of a commercially-economic natural freeze-thaw/evaporation process for the treatment and purification of water produced in conjunction with oil and gas. Progress is reported on laboratory scale process evaluation and field demonstration of the process.

  19. MOST CURRENT SECTION 305(B) LISTED WATERS - POINT EVENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    River segments, lakes, and estuaries designated under Section 305(b) of the Clean Water Act. Most Current 305(b) Waterbodies coded onto route.rch (Transport and Coastline Reach) feature of NHD to create Point Events. Point events are attached to a reach in NHD to represent assess...

  20. A water maser search towards colourselected IRAS point sources

    E-print Network

    Hardcastle, Martin

    A water maser search towards colour­selected IRAS point sources By C l a ud i o C o d e l l ay) of sources extracted from the IRAS Point Source Catalogue (IRAS (1985)). More recently, several works have carried out with the 32­m 1 #12; 2 C. Codella & F. Palla: A maser search towards IRAS point sources Figure

  1. Suppression of Sub-surface Freezing in Free-Standing Films of a Coarse-grained Model of Water

    E-print Network

    Haji-Akbari, Amir; Sarupria, Sapna; Debenedetti, Pablo G

    2014-01-01

    Freezing in the vicinity of water-vapor interfaces is of considerable interest to a wide range of disciplines, most notably the atmospheric sciences. In this work, we use molecular dynamics and two advanced sampling techniques, forward flux sampling and umbrella sampling, to study homogeneous nucleation of ice in free-standing thin films of supercooled water. We use a coarse-grained monoatomic model of water, known as mW, and we find that in this model a vapor-liquid interface suppresses crystallization in its vicinity. This suppression occurs in the vicinity of flat interfaces where no net Laplace pressure in induced. Our free energy calculations reveal that the pre-critical crystalline nuclei that emerge near the interface are thermodynamically less stable than those that emerge in the bulk. We investigate the origin of this instability by computing the average asphericity of nuclei that form in different regions of the film, and observe that average asphericity increases closer to the interface, which is c...

  2. Non-Toxic, Low-Freezing, Drop-In Replacement Heat Transfer Fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cutbirth, J. Michael

    2012-01-01

    A non-toxic, non-flammable, low-freezing heat transfer fluid is being developed for drop-in replacement within current and future heat transfer loops currently using water or alcohol-based coolants. Numerous water-soluble compounds were down-selected and screened for toxicological, physical, chemical, compatibility, thermodynamic, and heat transfer properties. Two fluids were developed, one with a freezing point near 0 C, and one with a suppressed freezing point. Both fluids contain an additive package to improve material compatibility and microbial resistance. The optimized sub-zero solution had a freezing point of 30 C, and a freezing volume expansion of 10-percent of water. The toxicity of the solutions was experimentally determined as LD(50) greater than 5g/kg. The solutions were found to produce minimal corrosion with materials identified by NASA as potentially existing in secondary cooling loops. Thermal/hydrodynamic performance exceeded that of glycol-based fluids with comparable freezing points for temperatures Tf greater than 20 C. The additive package was demonstrated as a buffering agent to compensate for CO2 absorption, and to prevent microbial growth. The optimized solutions were determined to have physically/chemically stable shelf lives for freeze/thaw cycles and longterm test loop tests.

  3. Ground freezing

    SciTech Connect

    Kinosita, S.; Fukuda, M.

    1985-01-01

    The authors' discuss how artificial freezing of the ground has been used in increasingly in the last few decades to stabilize earth materials and control groundwater seepage in geotechnical construction. Emphasis is on the relation between theory, design and application of ground freezing in construction: Thermal properties and processes in earth materials; Frost action; Mechanical properties and processes in earth materials; Engineering design and case histories (tunnels, pipelines, foundations, slopes, LNG tanks, shafts).

  4. The effects of freezing and thawing on the aqueous availability of creosote contamination in soil

    SciTech Connect

    Bevel, A.; Hrudey, S.; Dudas, M.; Sego, D.

    1996-11-01

    A variety of methods have been tested in attempts to remediate contaminated sites. Fine-grained soils are extremely problematic to remediate, due to the high adsorption capacity of the fine soil particles and the trapping effect of soil particle micropores. It is well documented that freezing of soil causes particle restructuring and reorganization, with different pore structures found after freezing. Some factors affecting restructuring include soil moisture content, freezing rate, freezing end-point temperature, and number of freezing cycles. This poster presents an experiment that determines if freezing creosote contaminated soil improves accessibility of the creosote, by measuring aqueous phase contaminant dissolution. This method was selected since water is the most common solvent in naturally occurring systems, and water represents a worst-case scenario since many contaminants have low aqueous solubilities. Freezing is carried out under controlled laboratory conditions. Variables examined include moisture content, freezing rate, and soil contamination level. If contaminant availability is increased through soil freezing, remediation becomes an easier task in fine grained soils.

  5. Improvement of Freezing Quality of Food by Pre-dehydration with Microwave-Vacuum Drying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamidi, Nurkholis; Tsuruta, Takaharu

    Partial dehydration by microwave vacuum drying has been applied to tuna, oyster and mackerel prior to freezing in order to reduce quality damages due to freezing and thawing. Samples were dehydrated at pressure of 4kPa and temperature lower than 25°C. Two cooling conditions were tested in the experiment by using the freezing chamber of temperatures -20°C and -80°C. The experimental results showed that decreasing the water content in tuna could lower the freezing point temperature and made the freezing time shorter. It was also found that removing some water was effective to reduce the size of ice crystal and the drip loss in mackerel. After thawing, the pre-dehydrated mackerel showed better microstructure than that frozen without pre-treatment. Furthermore, the sensory tests have been done by a group of panelist for the evaluation on aroma, flavor, and general acceptability of mackerels.

  6. New methods of subcooled water recognition in dew point hygrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weremczuk, Jerzy; Jachowicz, Ryszard

    2001-08-01

    Two new methods of sub-cooled water recognition in dew point hygrometers are presented in this paper. The first one- impedance method use a new semiconductor mirror in which the dew point detector, the thermometer and the heaters were integrated all together. The second one an optical method based on a multi-section optical detector is discussed in the report. Experimental results of both methods are shown. New types of dew pont hydrometers of ability to recognized sub-cooled water were proposed.

  7. Bjorken expansion with gradual freeze out

    E-print Network

    V. K. Magas; L. P. Csernai; E. Molnar

    2007-02-27

    The freeze out of the expanding systems, created in relativistic heavy ion collisions, will be discussed. We combine kinetic freeze out equations with Bjorken type system expansion into a unified model. Such a model is a more physical generalization of the earlier simplified non-expanding freeze out models. We shall see that the basic freeze out features, pointed out in the earlier works, are not smeared out by the expansion.

  8. Homogeneous condensation - Freezing nucleation rate measurements for small water droplets in an expansion cloud chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagen, D. E.; Anderson, R. J.; Kassner, J. L., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Experimental data on ice nucleation, presented in an earlier paper, are analyzed to yield information about the homogeneous nucleation rate of ice from supercooled liquid and the heights of energy barriers to that nucleation. The experiment consisted of using an expansion cloud chamber to nucleate from the vapor a cloud of supercooled pure water drops and the observation of the fraction of drops which subsequently froze. The analysis employed standard classical homogeneous nucleation theory. The data are used to extract the first experimental measurement (albeit indirect) of the activation energy for the transfer of a water molecule across the liquid-ice interface at temperatures near -40 C. The results provide further evidence that the local liquid structure becomes more icelike as the temperature is lowered.

  9. Experimental and analytical investigation of a freezing point depressant fluid ice protection system. M.S. Thesis. Final Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albright, A. E.

    1984-01-01

    A glycol-exuding porous leading edge ice protection system was tested in the NASA Icing Research Tunnel. Stainless steel mesh, laser drilled titanium, and composite panels were tested on two general aviation wing sections. Two different glycol-water solutions were evaluated. Minimum glycol flow rates required for anti-icing were obtained as a function of angle of attack, liquid water content, volume median drop diameter, temperature, and velocity. Ice accretions formed after five minutes of icing were shed in three minutes or less using a glycol fluid flow equal to the anti-ice flow rate. Two methods of predicting anti-ice flow rates are presented and compared with a large experimental data base of anti-ice flow rates over a wide range of icing conditions. The first method presented in the ADS-4 document typically predicts flow rates lower than the experimental flow rates. The second method, originally published in 1983, typically predicts flow rates up to 25 percent higher than the experimental flow rates. This method proved to be more consistent between wing-panel configurations. Significant correlation coefficients between the predicted flow rates and the experimental flow rates ranged from .867 to .947.

  10. Recent Advances in Point-of-Access Water Quality Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korostynska, O.; Arshak, K.; Velusamy, V.; Arshak, A.; Vaseashta, Ashok

    Clean water is one of our most valuable natural resources. In addition to providing safe drinking water it assures functional ecosystems that support fisheries and recreation. Human population growth and its associated increased demands on water pose risks to maintaining acceptable water quality. It is vital to assess source waters and the aquatic systems that receive inputs from industrial waste and sewage treatment plants, storm water systems, and runoff from urban and agricultural lands. Rapid and confident assessments of aquatic resources form the basis for sound environmental management. Current methods engaged in tracing the presence of various bacteria in water employ bulky laboratory equipment and are time consuming. Thus, real-time water quality monitoring is essential for National and International Health and Safety. Environmental water monitoring includes measurements of physical characteristics (e.g. pH, temperature, conductivity), chemical parameters (e.g. oxygen, alkalinity, nitrogen and phosphorus compounds), and abundance of certain biological taxa. Monitoring could also include assays of biological activity such as alkaline phosphatase, tests for toxins such as microcystins and direct measurements of pollutants such as heavy metals or hydrocarbons. Real time detection can significantly reduce the level of damage and also the cost to remedy the problem. This paper presents overview of state-of-the-art methods and devices used for point-of-access water quality monitoring and suggest further developments in this area.

  11. Modeling the effect of antecedent soil water storage on water and heat status in seasonally freezing and thawing agricultural soils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Taking Hetao Irrigation District of Inner Mongolia's agricultural production as a background and based on field observation data and field measured meteorological data, the influence of antecedent soil water storage (ASWS) on water and heat conditions was simulated and analyzed using the SHAW model ...

  12. Commercial Application of Freeze Crystallization 

    E-print Network

    Gorgol, R. G.

    1992-01-01

    the world bcgan. The most noticeable frozen substance is, of course, water. Snow, ice cubcs, frozen lakes and streams, even iccbcrgs are all evidences of the freezing process at work. This process is also used to form crystalline compounds in industry... understand the water they obtained from ice was potable. RECENT APPLICATIONS Scientists have understood the basic mechanism of the freezing phase change for many years. ID an effort to harness the power of this phenomena, applications were researched...

  13. Design of self-dispersible dry nanosuspension through wet milling and spray freeze-drying for poorly water-soluble drugs.

    PubMed

    Niwa, Toshiyuki; Danjo, Kazumi

    2013-11-20

    The purpose of the present research is to establish a novel nanosizing technique starting from wet nano-milling, named "dry nanosuspension" technique for poorly water-soluble drugs. The spray freeze-drying (SFD) method was applied instead of the spray-drying one previously developed. Drug particles were milled in the aqueous solution of dispersing agents using an oscillating beads-milling apparatus. The milled nanosuspension was sprayed to the surface of liquid nitrogen, and the resultant iced droplets were freeze-dried to obtain the powdery product. The loading ratio of a dispersing agent was investigated to enhance its redispersing property. Dry nanosuspension, which could be spontaneously dispersed into original nanosuspension in water, was obtained by SFD process. It was assumed that self dispersion property would be attributed to its structure with porous network, in which the primary milled drug crystals were embedded. Such unique structure contributed greatly to immediate release behaviors of the drug in gastrointestinal buffered media. These pharmaceutical properties were enhanced by increasing the ratio of the dispersing agent to the drug and the solid content in suspension to be sprayed. The present technique via wet milling and spray freeze-drying processes would be a novel dissolution-enhanced technology for poorly water-soluble drugs. PMID:23907001

  14. Modeling the contribution of point sources and non-point sources to Thachin River water pollution.

    PubMed

    Schaffner, Monika; Bader, Hans-Peter; Scheidegger, Ruth

    2009-08-15

    Major rivers in developing and emerging countries suffer increasingly of severe degradation of water quality. The current study uses a mathematical Material Flow Analysis (MMFA) as a complementary approach to address the degradation of river water quality due to nutrient pollution in the Thachin River Basin in Central Thailand. This paper gives an overview of the origins and flow paths of the various point- and non-point pollution sources in the Thachin River Basin (in terms of nitrogen and phosphorus) and quantifies their relative importance within the system. The key parameters influencing the main nutrient flows are determined and possible mitigation measures discussed. The results show that aquaculture (as a point source) and rice farming (as a non-point source) are the key nutrient sources in the Thachin River Basin. Other point sources such as pig farms, households and industries, which were previously cited as the most relevant pollution sources in terms of organic pollution, play less significant roles in comparison. This order of importance shifts when considering the model results for the provincial level. Crosschecks with secondary data and field studies confirm the plausibility of our simulations. Specific nutrient loads for the pollution sources are derived; these can be used for a first broad quantification of nutrient pollution in comparable river basins. Based on an identification of the sensitive model parameters, possible mitigation scenarios are determined and their potential to reduce the nutrient load evaluated. A comparison of simulated nutrient loads with measured nutrient concentrations shows that nutrient retention in the river system may be significant. Sedimentation in the slow flowing surface water network as well as nitrogen emission to the air from the warm oxygen deficient waters are certainly partly responsible, but also wetlands along the river banks could play an important role as nutrient sinks. PMID:19501876

  15. Lidar point density analysis: implications for identifying water bodies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Worstell, Bruce B.; Poppenga, Sandra; Evans, Gayla A.; Prince, Sandra

    2014-01-01

    Most airborne topographic light detection and ranging (lidar) systems operate within the near-infrared spectrum. Laser pulses from these systems frequently are absorbed by water and therefore do not generate reflected returns on water bodies in the resulting void regions within the lidar point cloud. Thus, an analysis of lidar voids has implications for identifying water bodies. Data analysis techniques to detect reduced lidar return densities were evaluated for test sites in Blackhawk County, Iowa, and Beltrami County, Minnesota, to delineate contiguous areas that have few or no lidar returns. Results from this study indicated a 5-meter radius moving window with fewer than 23 returns (28 percent of the moving window) was sufficient for delineating void regions. Techniques to provide elevation values for void regions to flatten water features and to force channel flow in the downstream direction also are presented.

  16. 23.11.2014bo Akademi Univ -Thermal and Flow Engineering Piispankatu 8, 20500 Turku 1/28 6. Food cooling and freezing

    E-print Network

    Zevenhoven, Ron

    crystals that destroy the texture which gives loss of juices during thawing; fast freezing gives growth of many small ice crystals. The respiration of fruits and vegetables after harvesting means production, consuming oxygen) during storage Water content is very important: Also, the (first) freezing point drops

  17. Peculiar thermodynamics of the second critical point in supercooled water.

    PubMed

    Bertrand, C E; Anisimov, M A

    2011-12-01

    On the basis of the principle of critical-point universality, we examine the peculiar thermodynamics of the liquid-liquid critical point in supercooled water. We show that the liquid-liquid criticality in water represents a special kind of critical behavior in fluids, intermediate between two limiting cases: the lattice gas, commonly used to model liquid-vapor transitions, and the lattice liquid, a weakly compressible liquid with an entropy-driven phase separation. While the ordering field in the lattice gas is associated with the chemical potential and the order parameter with the density, in the lattice liquid the ordering field is the temperature and the order parameter is the entropy. The behavior of supercooled water is much closer to lattice-liquid behavior than to lattice-gas behavior. Using new experimental data recently obtained by Mishima [J. Chem. Phys. 2010, 133, 144503], we have revised the parametric scaled equation of state, previously suggested by Fuentevilla and Anisimov [Phys. Rev. Lett. 2006, 97, 195702], and obtain a consistent description of the thermodynamic anomalies of supercooled water by adjusting linear backgrounds, one critical amplitude, and the critical pressure. We also show how the lattice-liquid description affects the finite-size scaling description of supercooled water in confined media. PMID:21661753

  18. Water Electrolyzers and the Zero-Point Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, M. B.

    The gas emitted from popular water electrolyzer projects manifests unusual energetic anomalies, which include vaporizing tungsten when used in a welding torch and running internal combustion engines on small quantities of the gas. Some claim to run generators in closed loop fashion solely on the gas from the electrolyzer, which is powered solely from the generator. Most investigators believe the energy is from burning hydrogen. A hypothesis is proposed that the dominant energy is not coming from hydrogen, but rather it is coming from charged water gas clusters, which activate and coherently trap zero-point energy.

  19. Satellite freeze forecast system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martsolf, J. D. (principal investigator)

    1983-01-01

    Provisions for back-up operations for the satellite freeze forecast system are discussed including software and hardware maintenance and DS/1000-1V linkage; troubleshooting; and digitized radar usage. The documentation developed; dissemination of data products via television and the IFAS computer network; data base management; predictive models; the installation of and progress towards the operational status of key stations; and digital data acquisition are also considered. The d addition of dew point temperature into the P-model is outlined.

  20. Novel ultra-rapid freezing particle engineering process for enhancement of dissolution rates of poorly water-soluble drugs.

    PubMed

    Overhoff, Kirk A; Engstrom, Josh D; Chen, Bo; Scherzer, Brian D; Milner, Thomas E; Johnston, Keith P; Williams, Robert O

    2007-01-01

    An ultra-rapid freezing (URF) technology has been developed to produce high surface area powders composed of solid solutions of an active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) and a polymer stabilizer. A solution of API and polymer excipient(s) is spread on a cold solid surface to form a thin film that freezes in 50 ms to 1s. This study provides an understanding of how the solvent's physical properties and the thin film geometry influence the freezing rate and consequently the final physico-chemical properties of URF-processed powders. Theoretical calculations of heat transfer rates are shown to be in agreement with infrared images with 10ms resolution. Danazol (DAN)/polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) powders, produced from both acetonitrile (ACN) and tert-butanol (T-BUT) as the solvent, were amorphous with high surface areas (approximately 28-30 m2/g) and enhanced dissolution rates. However, differences in surface morphology were observed and attributed to the cooling rate (film thickness) as predicted by the model. Relative to spray-freezing processes that use liquid nitrogen, URF also offers fast heat transfer rates as a result of the intimate contact between the solution and cold solid surface, but without the complexity of cryogen evaporation (Leidenfrost effect). The ability to produce amorphous high surface area powders with submicron primary particles with a simple ultra-rapid freezing process is of practical interest in particle engineering to increase dissolution rates, and ultimately bioavailability. PMID:16987642

  1. Metabolic engineering of oilseed crops to produce high levels of novel acetyl glyceride oils with reduced viscosity, freezing point and calorific value.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jinjie; Rice, Adam; McGlew, Kathleen; Shaw, Vincent; Park, Hyunwoo; Clemente, Tom; Pollard, Mike; Ohlrogge, John; Durrett, Timothy P

    2015-08-01

    Seed oils have proved recalcitrant to modification for the production of industrially useful lipids. Here, we demonstrate the successful metabolic engineering and subsequent field production of an oilseed crop with the highest accumulation of unusual oil achieved so far in transgenic plants. Previously, expression of the Euonymus alatus diacylglycerol acetyltransferase (EaDAcT) gene in wild-type Arabidopsis seeds resulted in the accumulation of 45 mol% of unusual 3-acetyl-1,2-diacyl-sn-glycerols (acetyl-TAGs) in the seed oil (Durrett et al., 2010 PNAS 107:9464). Expression of EaDAcT in dgat1 mutants compromised in their ability to synthesize regular triacylglycerols increased acetyl-TAGs to 65 mol%. Camelina and soybean transformed with the EaDAcT gene accumulate acetyl-triacylglycerols (acetyl-TAGs) at up to 70 mol% of seed oil. A similar strategy of coexpression of EaDAcT together with RNAi suppression of DGAT1 increased acetyl-TAG levels to up to 85 mol% in field-grown transgenic Camelina. Additionally, total moles of triacylglycerol (TAG) per seed increased 20%. Analysis of the acetyl-TAG fraction revealed a twofold reduction in very long chain fatty acids (VLCFA), consistent with their displacement from the sn-3 position by acetate. Seed germination remained high, and seedlings were able to metabolize the stored acetyl-TAGs as rapidly as regular triacylglycerols. Viscosity, freezing point and caloric content of the Camelina acetyl-TAG oils were reduced, enabling use of this oil in several nonfood and food applications. PMID:25756355

  2. POINT-OF-CONTACT/EXPERTISE LIST (WATER SUPPLY AND WATER RESOURCES DIVISION, NRMRL)

    EPA Science Inventory

    NRMRL's Water Supply and Water Resources Division's (WSWRD's)Expertise/Point-of-Contact page lists research areas in the Division along with the names and telephone numbers for responsible individuals and their expertise.WSWRD conducts research to help prepare the primary and s...

  3. Freeze Technology for Nuclear Applications - 13590

    SciTech Connect

    Rostmark, Susanne C.; Knutsson, Sven; Lindberg, Maria

    2013-07-01

    Freezing of soil materials is a complicated process of a number of physical processes: - freezing of pore water in a thermal gradient, - cryogenic suction causing water migration and - ice formation expanding pores inducing frost heave. Structural changes due to increase of effective stress during freezing also take place. The over consolidation gives a powerful dewatering/drying effect and the freeze process causes separation of contaminates. Artificial ground freezing (AGF is a well established technique first practiced in south Wales, as early as 1862. AGF is mostly used to stabilize tunnels and excavations. During the last ten years underwater applications of freeze technologies based on the AGF have been explored in Sweden. The technology can, and has been, used in many different steps in a remediation action. Freeze Sampling where undisturbed samples are removed in both soft and hard sediment/sludge, Freeze Dredging; retrieval of sediment with good precision and minimal redistribution, and Freeze Drying; volume reduction of contaminated sludge/sediment. The application of these technologies in a nuclear or radioactive environment provides several advantages. Sampling by freezing gives for example an advantage of an undisturbed sample taken at a specified depth, salvaging objects by freezing or removal of sludges is other applications of this, for the nuclear industry, novel technology. (authors)

  4. Particle-size dependence of immersion freezing: Investigation of INUIT test aerosol particles with freely suspended water drops.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diehl, Karoline; Debertshäuser, Michael; Eppers, Oliver; Jantsch, Evelyn; Mitra, Subir K.

    2014-05-01

    One goal of the research group INUIT (Ice Nuclei research UnIT) is to investigate the efficiencies of several test ice nuclei under comparable conditions but with different experimental techniques. In the present studies, two methods are used: the Mainz vertical wind tunnel and an acoustic levitator placed inside a cold chamber. In both cases drops are freely levitated, either at their terminal velocity in the wind tunnel updraft or around the nodes of a standing ultrasonic wave in the acoustic levitator. Thus, heat transfer conditions are well approximated, and wall contact effects on freezing as well as electrical charges of the drops are avoided. Drop radii are 370 ?m and 1 mm, respectively. In the wind tunnel, drops are investigated at constant temperatures within a certain time period and the onset of freezing is observed directly. In the acoustic levitator, the drop temperature decreases during the experiments and is measured by an in-situ calibrated Infrared thermometer. The onset of freezing is indicated by a rapid rise of the drop surface temperature because of the release of latent heat. Investigated test ice nuclei are Snomax® as a proxy of biological particles and illite NX as well as K-feldspar as represents of mineral dust. The particle concentrations are 1 × 10-12 to 3 × 10-6 g Snomax® per drop and 5 × 10-9 to 5 × 10-5 g mineral dust per drop. Freezing temperatures are between -2 and -18° C in case of Snomax® and between -14 and -26° C in case of mineral dust. The lower the particle masses per drop the lower are the freezing temperatures. For similar particle concentrations in the drops, the median freezing temperatures determined by the two techniques agree well within the measurement errors. With the knowledge of the specific particle surface area of the mineral dusts, the results are interpreted also in terms of particle surface area per drop. Results from the wind tunnel experiments which are performed at constant temperatures indicate that the freezing times are shorter the lower the temperatures are. For evaluation and comparisons of the data, two models of heterogeneous freezing are applied, the stochastic and the time-independent singular description. The nucleation rate coefficients J(T) as well as the surface densities of active sites ns(T) or the numbers of active sites nm(T) are determined from the experimental data. It is shown that both models are suited to describe the present heterogeneous freezing results for the range of investigated particle masses or surface areas per drop. The comparison of the results from the two experimental techniques evaluated with the time-independent singular model indicates an excellent agreement within the measurement errors.

  5. 40 CFR 142.57 - Bottled water, point-of-use, and point-of-entry devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    (a) A State may require a public water system to use bottled water, point-of-use devices, or point-of-entry devices as a condition of granting an exemption from the requirements of §§ 141.61 (a) and (c), and 141.62 of this...

  6. 40 CFR 142.57 - Bottled water, point-of-use, and point-of-entry devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    (a) A State may require a public water system to use bottled water, point-of-use devices, or point-of-entry devices as a condition of granting an exemption from the requirements of §§ 141.61 (a) and (c), and 141.62 of this...

  7. 40 CFR 142.57 - Bottled water, point-of-use, and point-of-entry devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    (a) A State may require a public water system to use bottled water, point-of-use devices, or point-of-entry devices as a condition of granting an exemption from the requirements of §§ 141.61 (a) and (c), and 141.62 of this...

  8. Preservation of flavor in freeze dried green beans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huber, C. S.; Heidelbaugh, N. D.; Davis, D.

    1973-01-01

    Before freeze drying, green beans are heated to point at which their cell structure is altered. Beans freeze dried with altered cell structure have improved rehydration properties and retain color, flavor, and texture.

  9. Freezing Rate Due to Heterogeneous Nucleation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vali, Gabor

    1994-07-01

    The heterogeneous nucleation of ice from supercooled water is influenced by the nature of the foreign nuclei that serve as the sites for ice embryo formation, and by the stochastic nature of the process of embryo growth to critical size. The relative roles of these two factors have been the subject of some debate, especially as they influence the way nucleation of ice is modeled in clouds. `Freezing rate' is defined as the time-dependent rate at which a population of macroscopically identical samples (e.g., drops in a volume of air) freeze due to the nuclei contained in them. Freezing rate is the combined result of nucleus content and of time dependence. The time-dependent freezing rate model (TDFR) is consistent with available empirical evidence. For droplets cooled at rates of the order of 1°C per min, the nucleus content, or nucleus spectrum, predicts the freezing rate with reasonable accuracy. For samples exposed to a fixed temperature, the time dependence of the freezing rate becomes important, but the probability of freezing is not the same for each individual of the sample population. Stochastic models are not supported by the results. Application of the TDFR model and use of measured freezing nucleus data for precipitation provide a basis for the description of ice formation via immersion-freezing nucleation in cloud models. Limitations to full development of these models arise from inadequate knowledge about the freezing nucleus content of cloud water as a function of cloud evolution.

  10. Benchmarking numerical freeze/thaw models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rühaak, Wolfram; Anbergen, Hauke; Molson, John; Grenier, Christophe; Sass, Ingo

    2015-04-01

    The modeling of freezing and thawing of water in porous media is of increasing interest, and for which very different application areas exist. For instance, the modeling of permafrost regression with respect to climate change issues is one area, while others include geotechnical applications in tunneling and for borehole heat exchangers which operate at temperatures below the freezing point. The modeling of these processes requires the solution of a coupled non-linear system of partial differential equations for flow and heat transport in space and time. Different code implementations have been developed in the past. Analytical solutions exist only for simple cases. Consequently, an interest has arisen in benchmarking different codes with analytical solutions, experiments and purely numerical results, similar to the long-standing DECOVALEX and the more recent "Geothermal Code Comparison" activities. The name for this freezing/ thawing benchmark consortium is INTERFROST. In addition to the well-known so-called Lunardini solution for a 1D case (case T1), two different 2D problems will be presented, one which represents melting of a frozen inclusion (case TH2) and another which represents the growth or thaw of permafrost around a talik (case TH3). These talik regions are important for controlling groundwater movement within a mainly frozen ground. First results of the different benchmark results will be shown and discussed.

  11. Modification of physical properties of freeze-dried rice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huber, C. S.

    1971-01-01

    Freeze cycling process consists of alternately freezing and thawing precooked rice for two cycles, rice is then frozen and freeze-dehydrated in vacuum sufficient to remove water from rice by sublimitation. Process modifies rice grain structure and porosity, enabling complete rehydration in one minute in hot water.

  12. Modeling elephant-mediated cascading effects of water point closure.

    PubMed

    Hilbers, Jelle P; Van Langevelde, Frank; Prins, Herbert H T; Grant, C C; Peel, Mike J S; Coughenour, Michael B; De Knegt, Henrik J; Slotow, Rob; Smit, Izak P J; Kiker, Greg A; De Boer, Willem F

    2015-03-01

    Wildlife management to reduce the impact of wildlife on their habitat can be done in several ways, among which removing animals (by either culling or translocation) is most often used. There are, however, alternative ways to control wildlife densities, such as opening or closing water points. The effects of these alternatives are poorly studied. In this paper, we focus on manipulating large herbivores through the closure of water points (WPs). Removal of artificial WPs has been suggested in order to change the distribution of African elephants, which occur in high densities in national parks in Southern Africa and are thought to have a destructive effect on the vegetation. Here, we modeled the long-term effects of different scenarios of WP closure on the spatial distribution of elephants, and consequential effects on the vegetation and other herbivores in Kruger National Park, South Africa. Using a dynamic ecosystem model, SAVANNA, scenarios were evaluated that varied in availability of artificial WPs; levels of natural water; and elephant densities. Our modeling results showed that elephants can indirectly negatively affect the distributions of meso-mixed feeders, meso-browsers, and some meso-grazers under wet conditions. The closure of artificial WPs hardly had any effect during these natural wet conditions. Under dry conditions, the spatial distribution of both elephant bulls and cows changed when the availability of artificial water was severely reduced in the model. These changes in spatial distribution triggered changes in the spatial availability of woody biomass over the simulation period of 80 years, and this led to changes in the rest of the herbivore community, resulting in increased densities of all herbivores, except for giraffe and steenbok, in areas close to rivers. The spatial distributions of elephant bulls and cows showed to be less affected by the closure of WPs than most of the other herbivore species. Our study contributes to ecologically informed decisions in wildlife management. The results from this modeling exercise imply that long-term effects of this intervention strategy should always be investigated at an ecosystem scale. PMID:26263663

  13. Freeze Prediction Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrow, C. T. (principal investigator)

    1981-01-01

    Measurements of wind speed, net irradiation, and of air, soil, and dew point temperatures in an orchard at the Rock Springs Agricultural Research Center, as well as topographical and climatological data and a description of the major apple growing regions of Pennsylvania were supplied to the University of Florida for use in running the P-model, freeze prediction program. Results show that the P-model appears to have considerable applicability to conditions in Pennsylvania. Even though modifications may have to be made for use in the fruit growing regions, there are advantages for fruit growers with the model in its present form.

  14. Liquid Freezing Dynamics on Hydrophobic and Superhydrophobic Surfaces

    E-print Network

    Miljkovic, Nenad

    False color environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM) images of water freezing on smooth (?e ? 120°) and nanostructured (l ~ 50 nm, ?e ? 170 - 180°) hydrophobic surfaces are presented. To obtain the freezing dynamics ...

  15. Hydraulic modeling of clay ceramic water filters for point-of-use water treatment.

    PubMed

    Schweitzer, Ryan W; Cunningham, Jeffrey A; Mihelcic, James R

    2013-01-01

    The acceptability of ceramic filters for point-of-use water treatment depends not only on the quality of the filtered water, but also on the quantity of water the filters can produce. This paper presents two mathematical models for the hydraulic performance of ceramic water filters under typical usage. A model is developed for two common filter geometries: paraboloid- and frustum-shaped. Both models are calibrated and evaluated by comparison to experimental data. The hydraulic models are able to predict the following parameters as functions of time: water level in the filter (h), instantaneous volumetric flow rate of filtrate (Q), and cumulative volume of water produced (V). The models' utility is demonstrated by applying them to estimate how the volume of water produced depends on factors such as the filter shape and the frequency of filling. Both models predict that the volume of water produced can be increased by about 45% if users refill the filter three times per day versus only once per day. Also, the models predict that filter geometry affects the volume of water produced: for two filters with equal volume, equal wall thickness, and equal hydraulic conductivity, a filter that is tall and thin will produce as much as 25% more water than one which is shallow and wide. We suggest that the models can be used as tools to help optimize filter performance. PMID:23210424

  16. Droplet coalescence and freezing on hydrophilic, hydrophobic, and biphilic surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Dyke, Alexander S.; Collard, Diane; Derby, Melanie M.; Betz, Amy Rachel

    2015-10-01

    Frost and ice formation can have severe negative consequences, such as aircraft safety and reliability. At atmospheric pressure, water heterogeneously condenses and then freezes at low temperatures. To alter this freezing process, this research examines the effects of biphilic surfaces (surfaces which combine hydrophilic and hydrophobic regions) on heterogeneous water nucleation, growth, and freezing. Silicon wafers were coated with a self-assembled monolayer and patterned to create biphilic surfaces. Samples were placed on a freezing stage in an environmental chamber at atmospheric pressure, at a temperature of 295 K, and relative humidities of 30%, 60%, and 75%. Biphilic surfaces had a significant effect on droplet dynamics and freezing behavior. The addition of biphilic patterns decreased the temperature required for freezing by 6 K. Biphilic surfaces also changed the size and number of droplets on a surface at freezing and delayed the time required for a surface to freeze. The main mechanism affecting freezing characteristics was the coalescence behavior.

  17. Freezing of a Liquid Marble

    E-print Network

    Ali Hashmi; Adam Strauss; Jie Xu

    2012-07-03

    In this study, we present for the first time the observations of a freezing liquid marble. In the experiment, liquid marbles are gently placed on the cold side of a Thermo-Electric Cooler (TEC) and the morphological changes are recorded and characterized thereafter. These liquid marbles are noticed to undergo a shape transition from a spherical to a flying-saucer shaped morphology. The freezing dynamics of liquid marbles is observed to be very different from that of a freezing water droplet on a superhydrophobic surface. For example, the pointy tip appearing on a frozen water drop could not be observed for a frozen liquid marble. In the end, we highlight a possible explanation for the observed morphology.

  18. CHEMICAL ANALYSES OF MARINE AND ESTUARINE WATERS USED BY THE

    E-print Network

    in sea water could be minimized by similar treatment. After quick-freezing, samples were stored at below cabinet. Freezing can reduce the air pressure within a sample container to a point where impurities around349 CHEMICAL ANALYSES OF MARINE AND ESTUARINE WATERS USED BY THE GALVESTON BIOLOGICAL LABORATORY

  19. Colloid-facilitated mobilization of metals by freeze-thaw cycles.

    PubMed

    Mohanty, Sanjay K; Saiers, James E; Ryan, Joseph N

    2014-01-21

    The potential of freeze-thaw cycles to release colloids and colloid-associated contaminants into water is unknown. We examined the effect of freeze-thaw cycles on the mobilization of cesium and strontium in association with colloids in intact cores of a fractured soil, where preferential flow paths are prevalent. Two intact cores were contaminated with cesium and strontium. To mobilize colloids and metal cations sequestered in the soil cores, each core was subjected to 10 intermittent wetting events separated by 66 h pauses. During the first five pauses, the cores were dried at room temperature, and during last five pauses, the cores were subjected to 42 h of freezing followed by 24 h of thawing. In comparison to drying, freeze-thaw cycles created additional preferential flow paths through which colloids, cesium, and strontium were mobilized. The wetting events following freeze-thaw intervals mobilized about twice as many colloids as wetting events following drying at room temperature. Successive wetting events following 66 h of drying mobilized similar amounts of colloids; in contrast, successive wetting events after 66 h of freeze-thaw intervals mobilized greater amounts of colloids than the previous one. Drying and freeze-thaw treatments, respectively, increased and decreased the dissolved cesium and strontium, but both treatments increased the colloidal cesium and strontium. Overall, the freeze-thaw cycles increased the mobilization of metal contaminants primarily in association with colloids through preferential flow paths. These findings suggest that the mobilization of colloid and colloid-associated contaminants could increase when temperature variations occur around the freezing point of water. Thus, climate extremes have the potential to mobilize contaminants that have been sequestered in the vadose zone for decades. PMID:24377325

  20. Survival of freezing by free-living Antarctic soil nematodes.

    PubMed

    Convey, P; Worland, M R

    2000-01-01

    Free-living microbivorous nematodes become numerically dominant in Antarctic terrestrial faunas as environmental conditions become more severe, while also reaching very high levels of abundance in moist, vegetated habitats. Nematodes have little resistance to freezing via exogenous ice nucleation, such as would occur as their microhabitat freezes. We report the results of experiments testing the ability of seven maritime Antarctic nematode taxa to survive freezing in small water droplets at high sub-zero temperatures. Isolated individuals of these species possessed supercooling characteristics similar to those previously reported (supercooling points -6 to -25 degree C). When frozen in water at -3 to -6 degree C, most showed high (> 70%) survival both (i) after rapid cooling (1 degree C/min) to c. -60 degree C followed by immediate rewarming, and (ii) when held for 7-12 h at either -10 or -30 degree C, although the proportions surviving varied between species. We propose that the ability to survive freezing while fully hydrated at high sub-zero temperatures is one of the most important aspects of these species' survival tactics. PMID:12148024

  1. Evaluation of the freeze-thaw/evaporation process for the treatment of produced waters. Quarterly technical progress report, April 1--June 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Boysen, J.; Morotti, J.

    1995-07-01

    The cost of treating the water produced in association with oil and natural gas has prevented the completion of wells in economically marginal formations and has caused low-productivity wells to be prematurely shut-in. An economical method for treatment, disposal, and/or reuse of these waters on a commercial-scale would assist the oil and natural gas industries in continuing to provide reasonably priced fuels to the consumer by allowing for economic production from marginal, unconventional, and depleted reserves. A treatment process that could produce water of suitable quality for reuse would also be advantageous for municipal, industrial, and agricultural development in the arid western US where there is significant oil and natural gas production. The natural processes of freezing and evaporation can be coupled to effectively and inexpensively treat waters produced in association with natural gas. This document delineates research conducted, during the time period from 4/1/95 to 6/30/95, for evaluating the technical and economic feasibility of this water treatment process. The research required for development of this process can be completed in two tasks: Task 1--Literature Survey and Preliminary Economic Analysis; Task 2--Laboratory-Scale Process Evaluation and Field Demonstration of the Process. The main work this quarter focused on a re-evaluation of process economics based on lab-scale process simulation results.

  2. JV TASK 7-FIELD APPLICATION OF THE FREEZE-THAW/EVAPORATION (FTE) PROCESS FOR THE TREATMENT OF NATURAL GAS PRODUCED WATER IN WYOMING

    SciTech Connect

    James A. Sorensen; John Boysen; Deidre Boysen; Tim Larson

    2002-10-01

    The freeze-thaw/evaporation (FTE{reg_sign}) process treats oil and gas produced water so that the water can be beneficially used. The FTE{reg_sign} process is the coupling of evaporation and freeze-crystallization, and in climates where subfreezing temperatures seasonally occur, this coupling improves process economics compared to evaporation alone. An added benefit of the process is that water of a quality suited for a variety of beneficial uses is produced. The evolution, from concept to successful commercial deployment, of the FTE{reg_sign} process for the treatment of natural gas produced water has now been completed. In this document, the histories of two individual commercial deployments of the FTE{reg_sign} process are discussed. In Wyoming, as in many other states, the permitting and regulation of oil and gas produced water disposal and/or treatment facilities depend upon the legal relationship between owners of the facility and the owners of wells from which the water is produced. An ''owner-operated'' facility is regulated by the Wyoming Oil and Gas Conservation Commission (WOGCC) and is defined as an entity which only processes water which comes from the wells in fields of which they have an equity interest. However, if a facility processes water from wells in which the owners of the facility have no equity interest, the facility is considered a ''commercial'' facility and is permitted and regulated by the Wyoming Department of Environmental Quality. For this reason, of the two commercial FTE{reg_sign} process deployments discussed in this document, one is related to an ''owner-operated'' facility, and the other relates to a ''commercial'' facility. Case 1 summarizes the permitting, design, construction, operation, and performance of the FTE{reg_sign} process at an ''owner-operated'' facility located in the Jonah Field of southwestern Wyoming. This facility was originally owned by the McMurry Oil Company and was later purchased by the Alberta Energy Company (now EnCana). Case 2 summarizes the permitting, design, construction, operation, and performance at a ''commercial'' FTE{reg_sign} facility located in the Great Divide Basin of south central Wyoming. Permits required for the construction and operation of each facility are described in detail. The respective qualities of each feed water, treated water, and concentrate stream are presented along with the relative yields of treated water and concentrate at each facility. Treated water from the owner-operated facility has been beneficially used in drilling and dust abatement, and treated water from the commercial facility has been used for dust abatement, construction, and land application. The permitting requirements and evaluation of beneficial use of the water at each facility are discussed. The results of this research confirm that the FTE{reg_sign} process is economic at a commercial-scale for the treatment and disposal of natural gas produced water in Wyoming. Further, the treated water produced from the process is of a quality suitable for beneficial uses such as irrigation, drilling mix, wildlife or livestock watering, and/or dust abatement on local roads.

  3. The energy equation for freezing of biological tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Rubinsky, B. )

    1989-11-01

    In the past, the process of freezing in biological tissue was modeled using the regular energy equation for a homogeneous compound. New experimental evidence shows that in tissue the water freezes separately in the vascular system and in the cells. The freezing process is affected by the water transport between the cells and the blood vessels. A new equation was developed to model the experimental results. In this work the general equation for freezing of biological tissue will be presented together with a linearized version of the new equation. A perturbation solution is obtained for the linearized equation to illustrate the effect of the water transport on the freezing process in tissue.

  4. Drought increases freezing tolerance of both leaves and xylem of Larrea tridentata.

    PubMed

    Medeiros, Juliana S; Pockman, William T

    2011-01-01

    Drought and freezing are both known to limit desert plant distributions, but the interaction of these stressors is poorly understood. Drought may increase freezing tolerance in leaves while decreasing it in the xylem, potentially creating a mismatch between water supply and demand. To test this hypothesis, we subjected Larrea tridentata juveniles grown in a greenhouse under well-watered or drought conditions to minimum temperatures ranging from -8 to -24 °C. We measured survival, leaf retention, gas exchange, cell death, freezing point depression and leaf-specific xylem hydraulic conductance (k?). Drought-exposed plants exhibited smaller decreases in gas exchange after exposure to -8 °C compared to well-watered plants. Drought also conferred a significant positive effect on leaf, xylem and whole-plant function following exposure to -15 °C; drought-exposed plants exhibited less cell death, greater leaf retention, higher k? and higher rates of gas exchange than well-watered plants. Both drought-exposed and well-watered plants experienced 100% mortality following exposure to -24 °C. By documenting the combined effects of drought and freezing stress, our data provide insight into the mechanisms determining plant survival and performance following freezing and the potential for shifts in L. tridentata abundance and range in the face of changing temperature and precipitation regimes. PMID:20825578

  5. Accuracy of tropospheric and stratospheric water vapor measurements by the cryogenic frost point hygrometer

    E-print Network

    Vömel, Holger

    Accuracy of tropospheric and stratospheric water vapor measurements by the cryogenic frost point] The cryogenic frost point hygrometer (CFH), currently built at the University of Colorado, is a new balloon of tropospheric and stratospheric water vapor measurements by the cryogenic frost point hygrometer: Instrumental

  6. Transmission electron microscopy of thin sections of Drosophila: high-pressure freezing and freeze-substitution.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Kent L; Sharp, David J; Rickoll, Wayne

    2012-04-01

    The state of the art in fine-structure preservation for thin sectioning can be achieved by using fast-freezing technology followed by freeze substitution and embedding in resin. Samples prepared by high-pressure freezing are estimated to be "fixed" in 20-50 msec. Fast freezing also freezes every cell component regardless of its chemistry. Once frozen, tissues can be processed in a variety of ways before viewing in the electron microscope; here we describe only freeze substitution. In freeze substitution, cells are dehydrated at very low temperatures and cell water is replaced with organic solvent at -80°C to -90°C. At this temperature, large molecules such as proteins are immobilized, yet smaller molecules such as water (ice) can be dissolved and replaced with organic solvents, e.g., acetone. The ideal way to do freeze substitution is with a dedicated freeze-substitution device such as the Leica AFS2 system. These devices allow programming of the times and temperatures needed. Alternatively, if this equipment is not available, freeze substitution can still be performed using items commonly found around the laboratory, as is described here. This protocol is useful for preparing thin sections of Drosophila when the best possible preservation of ultrastructure and antigenicity is required. PMID:22474654

  7. PUBLISHED ONLINE: 4 JULY 2010 | DOI: 10.1038/NPHYS1708 Phase transitions in confined water nanofilms

    E-print Network

    Stanley, H. Eugene

    at a critical point1 . In recent years, however, it was reported that inside carbon nanotubes, freezing of water are consistent with the idea that water may freeze by means of both first- order and continuous phase transitionsLETTERS PUBLISHED ONLINE: 4 JULY 2010 | DOI: 10.1038/NPHYS1708 Phase transitions in confined water

  8. Effects of In Vitro Zinc Sulphate Additive to The Semen Extender on Water Buffalo (Bubalusbubalis) Spermatozoa before and after Freezing

    PubMed Central

    Dorostkar, Kamran; Alavi Shoushtari, Sayed Mortaza; Khaki, Amir

    2014-01-01

    Background The objective of the study was to investigate the effects of in vitro zinc sulphate additive to semen extender on sperm parameters (progressive motility, viability, membrane integrity and DNA stability) after cryopreservation. Materials and Methods In this Prospective longitudinal laboratory study, semen samples of 5 buffalo bulls of 3-5 years old were collected at 5 different occasions from Iran, Urmia during summer and autumn 2011, 25 samples were used in each treatment. Sperm progressive motility, viability and abnormal morphology were measured before and at 0.5 (T0), 1(T1) and 2(T2) hours after diluting semen(1:10 v/v) in Tris-citric acid based extender (without egg yolk and glycerol) at 37?C containing none (control group), 0.072, 0.144, 0.288, 0.576 and 1.152 mg/L zinc sulphate to investigate dose and time effects. Next, a Tris-citric acid-egg yolk-glycerol extender (20% egg yolk and 7% glycerol) containing the same amount of zinc sulphate was prepared, diluted semen (1:10 v/v) was cooled and kept into a refrigerated chamber (4?C) for 4 hours to equilibrate. Sperm progressive motility, viability, abnormal morphology, membrane integrity and DNA damage were estimated.The equilibrated semen was loaded in 0.5 ml French straws and frozen in liquid nitrogen. Later, the frozen semen was thawed and the same parameters as well as total antioxidant capacity (TAC) of the frozen-thawed semen were determined. Results The results showed that zinc sulphate additive at the rate of 0.288 mg/L gave a higher protection of sperm progressive motility (53.7 ± 1.8% vs. 40.5 ± 1.7%), viability (70.8 ± 1.8% vs. 60.1 ± 1.5%), membrane integrity (67.3 ± 1.6% vs. 56.6 ± 1.7%), DNA stability (10.1 ± 0.47% vs. 11.8 ± 0.33% damaged DNA) through the process of dilution, equilibration and freeze-thawing and caused a higher TAC level (81 ± 3.3% vs. 63 ± 3.2 µmol/L) after freez-thawing compared to the control group. Adding 0.576 and 1.152 mg/L zinc sulphate, however, was deleterious to the sperm and significantly reduced the studied sperm parameters. Conclusion Adding 0.288 mg/L zinc sulphate to the extender, compared to the control group, gives a better sperm preservation upon freezing processes which in turn, may results in higher semen fertility. But, addition of higher zinc sulphate concentrations (0.576 and 1.152 mg/L) are detrimental to buffalo spermatozoa. PMID:25379162

  9. Influence of surface groups of proteins on water studied by freezing/thawing hysteresis and infrared spectroscopy

    E-print Network

    Sharp, Kim

    and melting of water was measured by infrared (IR) spectroscopy. Of the solutes examined, poly-L-arginine bands of antifreeze protein and poly-L- arginine do not detectably change with the phase transition of water. An interpretation is that the antifreeze protein and poly-L-arginine order liquid water

  10. Freezing and Food Safety

    MedlinePLUS

    ... its quality. Rapid freezing prevents undesirable large ice crystals from forming throughout the product because the molecules ... sided snowflake. Slow freezing creates large, disruptive ice crystals. During thawing, they damage the cells and dissolve ...

  11. Insects that overwinter in regions where they are exposed to subzero temperatures must adapt by either becoming freeze

    E-print Network

    Barnes, Brian McRae

    by either becoming freeze tolerant (able to survive freezing of their body fluids) or freeze avoiding compared and, as expected, the supercooling points (the temperatures at which they froze) of these freeze Alaska C. clavipes did not freeze when cooled to ­80°C. Key words: beetle, insect, cold tolerance

  12. 3 CFR - Pay Freeze

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 3 The President 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Pay Freeze Presidential Documents Other Presidential Documents Memorandum of January 21, 2009 Pay Freeze Memorandum for the Assistant to the President and Chief... facing, I intend to freeze the salaries of senior members of the White House staff, to the...

  13. 24 CFR 3285.603 - Water supply.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...valve, or equivalent valve. (d) Freezing protection. Water line crossovers...during installation must be protected from freezing. The freeze protection design requirements...this chapter. (1) If subject to freezing temperatures, the water...

  14. 24 CFR 3285.603 - Water supply.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...valve, or equivalent valve. (d) Freezing protection. Water line crossovers...during installation must be protected from freezing. The freeze protection design requirements...this chapter. (1) If subject to freezing temperatures, the water...

  15. 24 CFR 3285.603 - Water supply.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...valve, or equivalent valve. (d) Freezing protection. Water line crossovers...during installation must be protected from freezing. The freeze protection design requirements...this chapter. (1) If subject to freezing temperatures, the water...

  16. 24 CFR 3285.603 - Water supply.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...valve, or equivalent valve. (d) Freezing protection. Water line crossovers...during installation must be protected from freezing. The freeze protection design requirements...this chapter. (1) If subject to freezing temperatures, the water...

  17. Investigation of the effect of power ultrasound on the nucleation of water during freezing of agar gel samples in tubing vials.

    PubMed

    Kiani, Hossein; Sun, Da-Wen; Delgado, Adriana; Zhang, Zhihang

    2012-05-01

    Nucleation, as an important stage of freezing process, can be induced by the irradiation of power ultrasound. In this study, the effect of irradiation temperature (-2 °C, -3 °C, -4 °C and -5 °C), irradiation duration (0s, 1s, 3s, 5s, 10s or 15s) and ultrasound intensity (0.07 W cm(-2), 0.14 W cm(-2), 0.25 W cm(-2), 0.35 W cm(-2) and 0.42 W cm(-2)) on the dynamic nucleation of ice in agar gel samples was studied. The samples were frozen in an ethylene glycol-water mixture (-20 °C) in an ultrasonic bath system after putting them into tubing vials. Results indicated that ultrasound irradiation is able to initiate nucleation at different supercooled temperatures (from -5 °C to -2 °C) in agar gel if optimum intensity and duration of ultrasound were chosen. Evaluation of the effect of 0.25 W cm(-2) ultrasound intensity and different durations of ultrasound application on agar gels showed that 1s was not long enough to induce nucleation, 3s induced the nucleation repeatedly but longer irradiation durations resulted in the generation of heat and therefore nucleation was postponed. Investigation of the effect of ultrasound intensity revealed that higher intensities of ultrasound were effective when a shorter period of irradiation was used, while lower intensities only resulted in nucleation when a longer irradiation time was applied. In addition to this, higher intensities were not effective at longer irradiation times due to the heat generated in the samples by the heating effect of ultrasound. In conclusion, the use of ultrasound as a means to control the crystallization process offers promising application in freezing of solid foods, however, optimum conditions should be selected. PMID:22070859

  18. A single-bond approach to orientation-dependent interactions and its implications for liquid water

    E-print Network

    favorable and thus increase appreciably in size as the liquid is cooled towards its freezing point. This has. If the liquid is cooled below its freezing point without crystallization super- cooled , many of its physical prA single-bond approach to orientation-dependent interactions and its implications for liquid water

  19. Homogeneous freezing nucleation of stratospheric solution droplets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jensen, Eric J.; Toon, Owen B.; Hamill, Patrick

    1991-01-01

    The classical theory of homogeneous nucleation was used to calculate the freezing rate of sulfuric acid solution aerosols under stratospheric conditions. The freezing of stratospheric aerosols would be important for the nucleation of nitric acid trihydrate particles in the Arctic and Antarctic stratospheres. In addition, the rate of heterogeneous chemical reactions on stratospheric aerosols may be very sensitive to their state. The calculations indicate that homogeneous freezing nucleation of pure water ice in the stratospheric solution droplets would occur at temperatures below about 192 K. However, the physical properties of H2SO4 solution at such low temperatures are not well known, and it is possible that sulfuric acid aerosols will freeze out at temperatures ranging from about 180 to 195 K. It is also shown that the temperature at which the aerosols freeze is nearly independent of their size.

  20. Molecular biology of freezing tolerance.

    PubMed

    Storey, Kenneth B; Storey, Janet M

    2013-07-01

    Winter survival for many kinds of animals involves freeze tolerance, the ability to endure the conversion of about 65% of total body water into extracellular ice and the consequences that freezing imposes including interruption of vital processes (e.g., heartbeat and breathing), cell shrinkage, elevated osmolality, anoxia/ischemia, and potential physical damage from ice. Freeze-tolerant animals include various terrestrially hibernating amphibians and reptiles, many species of insects, and numerous other invertebrates inhabiting both terrestrial and intertidal environments. Well-known strategies of freezing survival include accumulation of low molecular mass carbohydrate cryoprotectants (e.g., glycerol), use of ice nucleating agents/proteins for controlled triggering of ice growth and of antifreeze proteins that inhibit ice recrystallization, and good tolerance of anoxia and dehydration. The present article focuses on more recent advances in our knowledge of the genes and proteins that support freeze tolerance and the metabolic regulatory mechanisms involved. Important roles have been identified for aquaporins and transmembrane channels that move cryoprotectants, heat shock proteins and other chaperones, antioxidant defenses, and metabolic rate depression. Genome and proteome screening has revealed many new potential targets that respond to freezing, in particular implicating cytoskeleton remodeling as a necessary facet of low temperature and/or cell volume adaptation. Key regulatory mechanisms include reversible phosphorylation control of metabolic enzymes and microRNA control of gene transcript expression. These help to remodel metabolism to preserve core functions while suppressing energy expensive metabolic activities such as the cell cycle. All of these advances are providing a much more complete picture of life in the frozen state. PMID:23897687

  1. Freezing of living cells

    SciTech Connect

    Mazur, P.

    1985-01-01

    It can be calculated that a living cell will survive more than 5000 years at -196/sup 0/C. This ability to essentially stop biological time has important implications in medicine and agriculture, and in biological research. In medicine the chief implications are in the banking of transplantable tissues and organs and in in vitro fertilization. In agriculture the applications stem in part from the role of frozen embryos in amplifying the number of calves produced by high quanlity cows. The problem is how can cells survive both the cooling to such very low temperatures and the return to normal temperatures. The answers involve fundamental characteristics of cells such as the permeability of their surface membranes to water and solutes. These characteristics determine whether or not cells undergo lethal internal ice formation and other response during freezing and thawing. 27 refs., 12 figs.

  2. Groundwater flow with energy transport and water-ice phase change: Numerical simulations, benchmarks, and application to freezing in peat bogs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McKenzie, J.M.; Voss, C.I.; Siegel, D.I.

    2007-01-01

    In northern peatlands, subsurface ice formation is an important process that can control heat transport, groundwater flow, and biological activity. Temperature was measured over one and a half years in a vertical profile in the Red Lake Bog, Minnesota. To successfully simulate the transport of heat within the peat profile, the U.S. Geological Survey's SUTRA computer code was modified. The modified code simulates fully saturated, coupled porewater-energy transport, with freezing and melting porewater, and includes proportional heat capacity and thermal conductivity of water and ice, decreasing matrix permeability due to ice formation, and latent heat. The model is verified by correctly simulating the Lunardini analytical solution for ice formation in a porous medium with a mixed ice-water zone. The modified SUTRA model correctly simulates the temperature and ice distributions in the peat bog. Two possible benchmark problems for groundwater and energy transport with ice formation and melting are proposed that may be used by other researchers for code comparison. ?? 2006 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. New particle dependant parameterizations of heterogeneous freezing processes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diehl, Karoline; Mitra, Subir K.

    2014-05-01

    For detailed investigations of cloud microphysical processes an adiabatic air parcel model with entrainment is used. It represents a spectral bin model which explicitly solves the microphysical equations. The initiation of the ice phase is parameterized and describes the effects of different types of ice nuclei (mineral dust, soot, biological particles) in immersion, contact, and deposition modes. As part of the research group INUIT (Ice Nuclei research UnIT), existing parameterizations have been modified for the present studies and new parameterizations have been developed mainly on the basis of the outcome of INUIT experiments. Deposition freezing in the model is dependant on the presence of dry particles and on ice supersaturation. The description of contact freezing combines the collision kernel of dry particles with the fraction of frozen drops as function of temperature and particle size. A new parameterization of immersion freezing has been coupled to the mass of insoluble particles contained in the drops using measured numbers of ice active sites per unit mass. Sensitivity studies have been performed with a convective temperature and dew point profile and with two dry aerosol particle number size distributions. Single and coupled freezing processes are studied with different types of ice nuclei (e.g., bacteria, illite, kaolinite, feldspar). The strength of convection is varied so that the simulated cloud reaches different levels of temperature. As a parameter to evaluate the results the ice water fraction is selected which is defined as the relation of the ice water content to the total water content. Ice water fractions between 0.1 and 0.9 represent mixed-phase clouds, larger than 0.9 ice clouds. The results indicate the sensitive parameters for the formation of mixed-phase and ice clouds are: 1. broad particle number size distribution with high number of small particles, 2. temperatures below -25°C, 3. specific mineral dust particles as ice nuclei such as illite or montmorillonite. Coupled cases of deposition and contact freezing show that they are hardly in competition because of differences in the preferred particle sizes. In the contact mode, small particles are less efficient for collisions as well as less efficient as ice nuclei so that these are available for deposition freezing. On the other hand, immersion freezing is the dominant process when it is coupled with deposition freezing. As it is initiated earlier the formed ice particles consume water vapor for growing. The competition of combined contact and immersion freezing leads to lower ice water contents because more ice particles are formed via the immersion mode. In general, ice clouds and mixed-phase clouds with high ice water fractions are not directly the result of primary ice formation but of secondary ice formation and growth of ice particles at the expense of liquid drops.

  4. Metabolomics for in situ environmental monitoring of surface waters impacted by contaminants from both point and non-point sources

    EPA Science Inventory

    We investigated the efficacy of metabolomics for field-monitoring of fish exposed to waste water treatment plant (WWTP) effluents and non-point sources of chemical contamination. Lab-reared male fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas, FHM) were held in mobile monitoring units and e...

  5. A Fixed Point Charge Model for Water Optimized to the Vapor-Liquid Coexistence Properties

    E-print Network

    A Fixed Point Charge Model for Water Optimized to the Vapor-Liquid Coexistence Properties Jeffrey R@ipst.umd.edu #12;1 Abstract A new fixed-point charge potential model for water has been developed, targeting the accurate prediction of the vapor-liquid coexistence properties over a broad temperature range. The model

  6. GEOtop: Simulating the combined energy and water balance at and below the land surface accounting for soil freezing, snow cover and terrain effects (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endrizzi, S.; Dall'Amico, M.; Gruber, S.; Rigon, R.

    2013-12-01

    One of the most interesting characteristics of the GEOtop distributed model is the way that it treats soil freezing. The theory behind soil freezing in GEOtop is here reviewed by means of a neat thermodynamical treatment that includes a discussion of the Clausius-Clapeyron relation. Effects of soil freezing on the production of subsurface fluxes and surface runoff are presented through some simple "virtual" case study, which constitutes a possible benchmark for comparing soil freezing models. Effects of freezing and thawing is also presented in a real case study. Effects of snow-cover on the thermal evolution of soil is also presented and discussed. Eventually ways to improve GEOtop are presented and discussed.

  7. Monitoring the freeze-thaw process of soil with different moisture contents using piezoceramic transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ruolin; Zhu, Daopei; Liu, Xiaoyan; Sima, Jun

    2015-05-01

    Water content plays an active and important role in the performance of the soil freeze-thaw cycle to form frozen soil mechanical properties. Monitoring the freeze-thaw cycle of soil with various types of soil with varied moisture content will provide a direct observation of the properties of soil in cold regions. This paper presents new findings from monitoring the freeze-thaw process of soil using a piezoceramic-based smart aggregate (SA). For comparison, clay soil and medium sand with different moisture contents were used to study the behavior of the soil under the freeze-thaw process. Two SAs were embedded in the soil specimens with a pre-determined distance between them, one as an actuator to generate a stress wave and the other as a sensor to detect the propagated wave. As the propagation of the emitted wave is sensitive to soil status and properties, it is possible to monitor the soil freeze-thaw process by interpreting the SA sensor signal. Based on the attenuation of the energy, a freeze-thaw status indicator was established to describe the freezing-thawing condition. Indicator values of soil specimens with different types and different levels of moisture in freeze-thaw cycles were studied. The test results indicate that the freezing duration in the freezing-thawing process varied for different types of soil and different initial moisture content of the soil. Soil with different particle sizes and moisture content will determine the frozen soil microstructure and its corresponding mechanical properties. Our results illustrate that if soil particle size is bigger, then the signal indicator is stronger; if the moisture content is higher for the same soil, then the signal indicator is stronger. The research presents an innovative method to investigate the freezing-thawing performance of soil and potentially points to a new method to study the variation of soil mechanical properties during the freezing-thawing process, which is a critical problem for infrastructure in cold regions.

  8. The thermodynamics of freezing soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dall'Amico, Matteo; Rigon, Riccardo; Gruber, Stephan; Endrizzi, Stefano

    2010-05-01

    In this work a throughout derivation of the soil freezing process is performed, from the thermodynamic equilibrium to the derivation of the water and ice content in the ground. Starting from a capillary tube schematization for the soil and the findings of Loch (1978), the generalized Clapeyron equation may be directly obtained by the Gibbs-Duhem identity. In this equation, however, the ice pressure complicates the formulation as it adds an unknown to the thermodynamic equilibrium. The only way to obtain the common generalized Clapeyron equation often used in literature is to hypothesize the behavior ''freezing=drying'' as proposed by Miller (1963). In this case the pressure at the ice-water interface is equal to the air-water interface, and so the ice pressure may be set constant and equal to the zero gauge pressure given by air pressure. This assumption, often tacitly assumed in literature, implies precise limitations on the physical processes that may be dealt with. In particular, frost heave may not be modeled. The objective of this work is to derive the thermodynamic equilibrium of the ice and water phases in a porous medium, to clarify the ''freezing=drying'' assumption and to propose a fully explicit formulation for the equilibrium where the ice pressure is added to the set of unknowns.

  9. 33 CFR 154.2112 - Vapors with potential to polymerize or freeze-Special requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... polymerize or freeze-Special requirements. 154.2112 Section 154.2112 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST... Vapors with potential to polymerize or freeze—Special requirements. (a) A vapor control system (VCS) that... freeze at ambient temperature must have a design that prevents the freezing of vapors or condensate...

  10. Spray freezing into liquid (SFL) particle engineering technology to enhance dissolution of poorly water soluble drugs: organic solvent versus organic/aqueous co-solvent systems.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jiahui; Johnston, Keith P; Williams, Robert O

    2003-11-01

    A spray freezing into liquid (SFL) particle engineering technology has been developed to produce micronized powders to enhance the dissolution of poorly water soluble active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs). Previously, a tetrahydrofuran (THF)/water co-solvent was used as the solution source in the SFL process. In the present study, an organic system was developed to further enhance the properties of particles produced by SFL. The influence of solution type (e.g. organic versus organic/water) on the physicochemical properties of SFL powders was investigated and compared. The physicochemical properties of SFL carbamazepine (CBZ)/poloxamer 407/PVP K15 (2:1:1 ratio) powders were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), particle size distribution, surface area analysis, contact angle measurement, Karl-Fisher (KF) titration, gas chromatography (GC) analysis, HPLC analysis, and dissolution testing. The CBZ loading in the feed solution of the SFL acetonitrile system was 2.2% (w/w), which was greater than 0.22% (w/w) loading of the THF/water co-solvent system. XRD results indicated CBZ was amorphous in SFL powders produced by either system. SEM micrographs indicated that SFL powders from acetonitrile appeared less porous with a smaller primary particle size than particles from the co-solvent. The M50 (50% cumulative percent undersize) of micronized powder from the SFL acetonitrile system and the THF/water co-solvent system with 0.22% CBZ loading were 680nm and 7.06microm, respectively. The surface area of SFL powders from the acetonitrile and co-solvent systems were 12.89 and 13.31m(2)/g, respectively. The contact angle of the SFL powders against purified water was about 35 degrees for both systems. The SFL powders from both systems exhibited similar and significantly enhanced dissolution rates compared to the bulk CBZ. Acetonitrile was an effective alternative solvent to THF/water co-solvent for use with the SFL micronization process to produce free flowing particles containing CBZ with significantly enhanced wetting and dissolution properties. PMID:14592695

  11. RADON REMOVAL USING POINT-OF-ENTRY WATER TREATMENT TECHNIQUES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this EPA Cooperative Agreement was to evaluate the performance of POE granular activated carbon (GAG), and diffused bubble and bubble place aeration systems treating a ground water supply containing radon (35,620 + or - 6,717 pCi/L. he pattern of loading to the uni...

  12. RADON REMOVAL USING POINT-OF-ENTRY WATER TREATMENT TECHNIQUES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of the EPA Cooperative Agreement was to evaluate the performance of POE granular activated carbon (GAC), and diffused bubble and bubble place aeration systems treating a ground water supply containing radon (35,620 ±6,717 pCi/L). The pattern of loading to the uni...

  13. EVALUATING POINT-NONPOINT SOURCE WATER QUALITY TRADING IN A RARITAN RIVER BASIN SUB-WATERSHED

    EPA Science Inventory

    This project addresses water quality issues in the Raritan River Basin of New Jersey. It will build upon an existing study that determined the technical feasibility of implementing a point-nonpoint source water quality trading program in the Basin. Water quality trading is ...

  14. ANNUAL REPORT TO CONGRESS ON FUTURE WATER RESOURCES DEVELOPMENT --TALKING POINTS

    E-print Network

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    ANNUAL REPORT TO CONGRESS ON FUTURE WATER RESOURCES DEVELOPMENT -- TALKING POINTS US ARMY CORPS OF ENGINEERS BUILDING STRONG® Annual Report to Congress on Future Water Resources Development Section 7001 of Water Resources Reform and Development Act (WRRDA) 2014 requires that the Secretary of the Army annually

  15. Sensitivity of liquid clouds to homogenous freezing parameterizations

    PubMed Central

    Herbert, Ross J; Murray, Benjamin J; Dobbie, Steven J; Koop, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Water droplets in some clouds can supercool to temperatures where homogeneous ice nucleation becomes the dominant freezing mechanism. In many cloud resolving and mesoscale models, it is assumed that homogeneous ice nucleation in water droplets only occurs below some threshold temperature typically set at ?40°C. However, laboratory measurements show that there is a finite rate of nucleation at warmer temperatures. In this study we use a parcel model with detailed microphysics to show that cloud properties can be sensitive to homogeneous ice nucleation as warm as ?30°C. Thus, homogeneous ice nucleation may be more important for cloud development, precipitation rates, and key cloud radiative parameters than is often assumed. Furthermore, we show that cloud development is particularly sensitive to the temperature dependence of the nucleation rate. In order to better constrain the parameterization of homogeneous ice nucleation laboratory measurements are needed at both high (>?35°C) and low (Points Homogeneous freezing may be significant as warm as ?30°C Homogeneous freezing should not be represented by a threshold approximation There is a need for an improved parameterization of homogeneous ice nucleation PMID:26074652

  16. The Plant Journal (1995) 8(4), 583-593 Immunolocalization of freezing-tolerance-associated

    E-print Network

    Sarhan, Fathey

    1995-01-01

    tissue expression suggests that the sensitive cells near the regions where water tends to freeze first measurements have shown that water freezes in several stages during the lowering of the external temperature (Franks, 1985). The major exotherm represents the freezing of extracellular water whereas the minor

  17. Soil water repellency of Antarctic soils (Elephant Point). First results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, Paulo; Oliva, Marc; Ruiz Fernández, Jesus

    2015-04-01

    Hydrophobicity it is a natural properties of many soils around the world. Despite the large body of research about soil water hydrophobicity (SWR) in many environments, little information it is available about Antarctic soils and their hydro-geomorphological consequences. According to our knowledge, no previous work was carried out on this environment. Soil samples were collected in the top-soil (0-5 cm) and SWR was analysed according to the water drop penetration test. The preliminary results showed that all the soils collected were hydrophilic, however further research should be carried out in order to understand if SWR changes with soil depth and if have implications on soil infiltration during the summer season.

  18. Soil salinity increases survival of freezing in the enchytraeid Enchytraeus albidus.

    PubMed

    Silva, A L Patrício; Holmstrup, M; Kostal, V; Amorim, M J B

    2013-07-15

    Enchytraeus albidus is a freeze-tolerant enchytraeid found in diverse habitats, ranging from supralittoral to terrestrial and spanning temperate to arctic regions. Its freeze tolerance is well known but the effect of salinity in this strategy is still poorly understood. We therefore studied the combined effect of salinity (0, 15, 35, 50‰ NaCl) and sub-zero temperatures (-5, -14, -20°C) on the freeze tolerance of E. albidus collected from two distinct geographical regions (Greenland and Germany). A full factorial design was used to study survival, and physiological and biochemical end points. The effect of salinity on the reproduction of German E. albidus was also assessed. Exposure for 48 h to saline soils prior to cold exposure triggered an increase in osmolality and decrease in water content. Worms exposed to saline soils had an improved survival of freezing compared to worms frozen in non-saline soils, particularly at -20°C (survival more than doubled). Differential scanning calorimetry measurements showed that the fraction of water frozen at -5 and -14°C was lower in worms exposed to 35‰ NaCl than in control worms. The lowering of ice content by exposure to saline soils was probably the main explanation for the better freeze survival in saline-exposed worms. Glucose increased with decreasing temperature, but was lower in saline than in non-saline soils. Thus, glucose accumulation patterns did not explain differences in freeze survival. Overall, the physiological responses to freezing of E. albidus from Greenland and Germany were similar after exposure to saline soils. Soil salinity up to 30‰ improved reproduction by a factor of ca. 10. PMID:23531829

  19. Prospective Primary School Teachers' Perceptions on Boiling and Freezing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Senocak, Erdal

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the perceptions of prospective primary school teachers on the physical state of water during the processes of boiling and freezing. There were three stages in the investigation: First, open-ended questions concerning the boiling and freezing of water were given to two groups of prospective primary school…

  20. Freeze drying method

    SciTech Connect

    Coppa, Nicholas V.; Stewart, Paul; Renzi, Ernesto

    1999-01-01

    The present invention provides methods and apparatus for freeze drying in which a solution, which can be a radioactive salt dissolved within an acid, is frozen into a solid on vertical plates provided within a freeze drying chamber. The solid is sublimated into vapor and condensed in a cold condenser positioned above the freeze drying chamber and connected thereto by a conduit. The vertical positioning of the cold condenser relative to the freeze dryer helps to help prevent substances such as radioactive materials separated from the solution from contaminating the cold condenser. Additionally, the system can be charged with an inert gas to produce a down rush of gas into the freeze drying chamber to also help prevent such substances from contaminating the cold condenser.

  1. Gravitino Freeze-In

    E-print Network

    Clifford Cheung; Gilly Elor; Lawrence Hall

    2011-03-22

    We explore an alternative mechanism for the production of gravitino dark matter whereby relic gravitinos originate from the decays of superpartners which are still in thermal equilibrium, i.e. via freeze-in. Contributions to the gravitino abundance from freeze-in can easily dominate over those from thermal scattering over a broad range of parameter space, e.g. when the scalar superpartners are heavy. Because the relic abundance from freeze-in is independent of the reheating temperature after inflation, collider measurements may be used to unambiguously reconstruct the freeze-in origin of gravitinos. In particular, if gravitino freeze-in indeed accounts for the present day dark matter abundance, then the lifetime of the next-to-lightest superpartner is uniquely fixed by the superpartner spectrum.

  2. Freeze drying apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Coppa, Nicholas V. (Malvern, PA); Stewart, Paul (Youngstown, NY); Renzi, Ernesto (Youngstown, NY)

    2001-01-01

    The present invention provides methods and apparatus for freeze drying in which a solution, which can be a radioactive salt dissolved within an acid, is frozen into a solid on vertical plates provided within a freeze drying chamber. The solid is sublimated into vapor and condensed in a cold condenser positioned above the freeze drying chamber and connected thereto by a conduit. The vertical positioning of the cold condenser relative to the freeze dryer helps to help prevent substances such as radioactive materials separated from the solution from contaminating the cold condenser. Additionally, the system can be charged with an inert gas to produce a down rush of gas into the freeze drying chamber to also help prevent such substances from contaminating the cold condenser.

  3. Freeze drying method

    SciTech Connect

    Coppa, N.V.; Stewart, P.; Renzi, E.

    1999-12-07

    The present invention provides methods and apparatus for freeze drying in which a solution, which can be a radioactive salt dissolved within an acid, is frozen into a solid on vertical plates provided within a freeze drying chamber. The solid is sublimated into vapor and condensed in a cold condenser positioned above the freeze drying chamber and connected thereto by a conduit. The vertical positioning of the cold condenser relative to the freeze dryer helps to help prevent substances such as radioactive materials separated from the solution from contaminating the cold condenser. Additionally, the system can be charged with an inert gas to produce a down rush of gas into the freeze drying chamber to also help prevent such substances from contaminating the cold condenser.

  4. Freezing-thawing action in the deterioration of the stones of Chambord Castle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alomari, Asaad; Brunetaud, Xavier; Beck, Kevin; Al-Mukhtar, Muzahim

    2013-04-01

    Limestone is very common in architecture (monuments and cultural heritage buildings) and used in the sculptures. The soft and porous limestone soaks up water and show weathering patterns and forms: alveolar weathering, granular disintegration, efflorescences. Freezing-thawing actions can be considered as one of the processes that contribute in the deterioration of stones located in the "cold regions" characterized with air temperatures below freezing point temperature. The amount of water within the pore space of the stones is a crucial factor of the decay. The experimental work presented in this paper is a part of a research program that aims to study the mechanisms that lead to the degradation of stone building materials due to the variation of climatic conditions. The analysis of the meteorological data of the field around the castle of Chambord shows the magnitude of temperature variations and the frequency of freezing-thawing cycles. The critical degrees of saturation at which the stone start to deteriorate after treatment with freezing-thawing cycles were examined in the tests conducted. The study concerns two porous limestone used in the construction and conservation of Chambord castle; highly porous Tuffeau stone having a total porosity of about 48 %, and medium porous Richemont stone with a total porosity of 27 %. Richemont stone has been used as a substitute stone of the degraded Tuffeau stone on the castle. The main physical properties, total porosity, apparent dry density and skeleton density and sound velocity for mechanical properties were measured for the stone samples before and during freezing-thawing cycles. ASTM (D5312-04) procedure was applied in the freezing-thawing tests. Tuffeau and Richmond samples were prepared at nine different degrees of saturations; 0, 20, 40, 70, 80, 85, 90, 95 and 100%, and properties were measured after different freezing-thawing cycles conditions; 2, 4, 8, 12, 16, 20, 30 and 50 cycles. The results of these tests show that when the degree of saturation exceeds 80-85%, freeze-thaw damage is inevitable even for a very few freeze-thaw cycles. Moreover, results indicate that the two studied stones have similar critical degree of saturation of about 85 %. This can be attributed to the similar percentage of macro-pores in the two tested stones. Finally, the critical degree of saturation was not changed after increasing the number of freezing-thawing cycles, thus the critical degree of saturation can be considered as a stone property.

  5. Point-of-entry removal of radon from drinking water

    SciTech Connect

    Lowry, J.D.; Brutsaert, W.F.; Mc Enerney, T.; Molk, C.

    1987-04-01

    Two processes were investigated in the laboratory to determine their efficiency for removing radon from household water supplies. Granular activated carbon (GAC) adsorption was found to be extremely effective as a result of an adsorption-decay steady state that is established quickly and continues for years. The GAC bed, however, adsorbs radon progeny as the radon decays, and it becomes a source of gamma radiation. This problem is believed to be manageable for the vast majority of potential applications. Diffused bubble aeration was found to be as effective as GAC, with removals of greater than 99 percent being practical. Although more costly than GAC, aeration does not have the problem of gamma activity buildup.

  6. Building the water edge : a public event for art and artists at Fort Point Channel

    E-print Network

    Godwin, Audrey

    1996-01-01

    The thesis deals with building the water edge at Fort Point Channel, between Congress Street and Summer Street Bridges. It serves as a public event that intends to establish continuity of movement along the waterfront. The ...

  7. Exploring the Nature of Contact Freezing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiselev, A. A.; Hoffmann, N.; Duft, D.; Leisner, T.

    2012-12-01

    The freezing of supercooled water droplets upon contact with aerosol particles (contact nucleation of ice) is the least understood mechanism of ice formation in atmospheric clouds. Although experimental evidences suggest that some aerosols can be better IN in the contact than in the immersion mode (that is, triggering ice nucleation at higher temperature), no final explanation of this phenomena currently exists. On the other hand, the contact freezing is believed to be responsible for the enhanced rate of secondary ice formation occasionally observed in LIDAR measurements in the cold mixed phase clouds. Recently we have been able to show that the freezing of supercooled droplets electrodynamically levitated in the laminar flow containing mineral dust particles (kaolinite) is a process solely governed by a rate of collisions between the supercooled droplet and the aerosol particles. We have shown that the probability of droplet freezing on a single contact with aerosol particle may differ over an order of magnitude for kaolinite particles having different genesis and morphology. In this presentation we extend the study of contact nucleation of ice and compare the IN efficiency measured for DMA-selected kaolinite, illite and hematite particles. We show that the freezing probability increases towards unity as the temperature decreases and discuss the functional form of this temperature dependence. We explore the size dependence of the contact freezing probability and show that it scales with the surface area of the particles, thus resembling the immersion freezing behavior. However, for all minerals investigated so far, the contact freezing has been shown to dominate over immersion freezing on the short experimental time scales. Finally, based on the combined ESEM and electron microprobe analysis, we discuss the significance of particle morphology and variability of chemical composition on its IN efficiency in contact mode.

  8. Core-softened Fluids, Water-like Anomalies and the Liquid-Liquid Critical Points

    E-print Network

    Barbosa, Marcia C. B.

    PREPRINT Core-softened Fluids, Water-like Anomalies and the Liquid-Liquid Critical Points Evy simulations are used to examine the relationship between water-like anoma- lies and the liquid-liquid critical of the shoulder well is chosen so that the resulting potential reproduces the oxygen-oxygen radial distribution

  9. Freezing Fish and Shellfish. 

    E-print Network

    Nickelson, Ranzell; Reddell, Annette

    1980-01-01

    them home. Place ice in the belly cavity of each fish and provide adequate ice between and around fish. The ice chest should have a false bottom to allow for drainage of melting ice and eliminate the possibility of fish floating in bloody, dirty... at about - 20 degrees F ( - 28 degrees C). Rapid freezing is important. In the initial stage of a slow freezing process, small ice crystals form within the tissue cells. As the freezing continues the size of the ice crystals increases until...

  10. Freezing Characteristics of Droplet on a Cooled Wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horibe, Akihiko; Fukusako, Shouichiro; Yamada, Masahiko

    An experimental study has been performed to investigate the freezing characteristics of an aqueous binary solution droplet on a cooled wall. Pure water, ethylene-glycol aqueous solutions of 1to 10 mass%, and NaCl aqueous solutions of 1 to 15 mass% in concentration were adopted as the testing solutions. The droplet was frozen under a variety of cooling conditions such as wall temperature, air temperature, air velocity, and solute concentration in both the static atmosphere and the cold air flow. The observations on both the freezing characteristics and the morphologies of the droplet were extensively carried out. In addition, the inside flow of the droplets were observed. It was found that the morphology of the droplet on the cooled wall varied markedly depending on the solution, which appears to be mainly caused by the difference in the surface tension of the solution. On the other hand, under the conditions with a cold air flow, initial freezing point of the droplet was found to be mainly owing to the cooling rate between the cooled wall and the cold air.

  11. Costs and water quality effects of controlling point and nonpoint pollution sources

    SciTech Connect

    Macal, C.M.; Broomfield, B.J.

    1980-01-01

    Costs and water quality effects of controlling point and nonpoint pollution sources are compared for the DuPage River basin in northern Illinois. Costs are estimated for effluent standards for municipal wastewater treatment plants and for the alternative, controlling runoff from nonpoint sources such as streets, agricultural lands, and forests. A dynamic water-quality/hydrology simulation model is used to determine water quality effects of various treatment plant standards and nonpoint-source controls. Costs and water quality data are combined, and the point-source and nonpoint-source plans are compared on a cost-effectiveness basis. Nonpoint-source controls are found to be more cost-effective than stricter control of pollutants from point sources.

  12. Periodic ice banding in freezing colloidal dispersions.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Anthony M; Worster, M Grae

    2012-12-01

    Concentrated colloidal alumina dispersions were frozen in a directional solidification apparatus that provides independent control of the freezing rate and temperature gradient. Two distinct steady-state modes of periodic ice banding were observed in the range of freezing rates examined. For each mode, the wavelength between successive bands of segregated ice decreases with increasing freezing rate. At low freezing rates (0.25-3 ?m s(-1)), the ice segregates from the suspension into ice lenses, which are cracklike in appearance, and there is visible structure in the layer of rejected particles in the unfrozen region ahead of the ice lenses. In this regime, we argue that compressive cryosuction forces lead to the irreversible aggregation of the rejected particles into a close-packed cohesive layer. The temperature in the aggregated layer is depressed below the bulk freezing point by more than 2 °C before the ice lenses are encountered; moreover, this undercooled region appears as a light-colored layer. The magnitude of the undercooling and the color change in this region both suggest the presence of pore ice and the formation of a frozen fringe. The possibility of a frozen fringe is supported by a quantitative model of the freezing behavior. At intermediate freezing rates, around 4 ?m s(-1), the pattern of ice segregation is disordered, coinciding with the disappearance of the dark- and light-colored layers. Finally, at high freezing rates (5-10 ?m s(-1)), there is a new mode of periodic ice banding that is no longer cracklike and is absent of any visible structure in the suspension ahead of the ice bands. We discuss the implications of our experimental findings for theories of ice lensing. PMID:23110707

  13. Improved freezing level retrieval 

    E-print Network

    Hong, Sungwook

    2002-01-01

    TRMM Microwave Imager(TMI)-based passive microwave retrieval techniques result in biased estimates of the freezing level and rainfall over the east Pacific in the Inter Tropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ). Passive microwave rainfall estimates...

  14. Future freeze forecasting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartholic, J. F.; Sutherland, R. A.

    1979-01-01

    Real time GOES thermal data acquisition, an energy balance minimum temperature prediction model and a statistical model are incorporated into a minicomputer system. These components make up the operational "Satellite Freeze Forecast System" being used to aid NOAA, NWS forecasters in developing their freeze forecasts. The general concept of the system is presented in this paper. Specific detailed aspects of the system can be found in the reference cited.

  15. Freezing Cellular Automata Bootstrap Percolation

    E-print Network

    Theyssier, Guillaume

    Freezing Cellular Automata and Bootstrap Percolation UAI - Doctorado en Ingenería de Sistemas-nilpotency is a simpler problem (0 2) in the simply convergent case #12;#12;Freezing cellular automata #12;Freezing cellular automata Q = {0, . . . , n - 1} with natural order N arbitrary neighborhood F is freezing if x, z

  16. Phase separation during freezing upon warming of aqueous solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogdan, A.; Loerting, T.

    2014-11-01

    Using differential scanning calorimetry, we show that the addition of solute(s) to emulsified water lowers the freezing temperature to <231 K, the homogeneous nucleation temperature of pure bulk water, or even completely suppresses freezing. In the latter case, freezing upon warming occurs above TX ? 150 K and leads to a phase separation into pure ice and a freeze-concentrated solution (FCS) which crystallizes upon further warming. We also show that emulsified 20-21.5 wt. % HCl solutions and the FCS of HCl/H2O solutions transform to glass at Tg ? 127-128 K, i.e., lower than Tg ? 136 K of water. We suggest that water nanodrops adsorbed on fumed silica resemble bulk water more than water confined in nanoscaled confinement and also more than nanoscaled water domains in aqueous solution.

  17. 40 CFR 141.100 - Criteria and procedures for public water systems using point-of-entry devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... water system customer convey with title upon sale of property. ... water systems using point-of-entry devices. 141.100 Section 141.100 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL PRIMARY DRINKING...

  18. 40 CFR 141.100 - Criteria and procedures for public water systems using point-of-entry devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... water system customer convey with title upon sale of property. ... water systems using point-of-entry devices. 141.100 Section 141.100 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL PRIMARY DRINKING...

  19. 40 CFR 141.100 - Criteria and procedures for public water systems using point-of-entry devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...false Criteria and procedures for public water systems using point-of-entry devices...ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS Use of Non-Centralized...

  20. 40 CFR 141.100 - Criteria and procedures for public water systems using point-of-entry devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...false Criteria and procedures for public water systems using point-of-entry devices...ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS Use of Non-Centralized...

  1. 40 CFR 141.100 - Criteria and procedures for public water systems using point-of-entry devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...false Criteria and procedures for public water systems using point-of-entry devices...ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS Use of Non-Centralized...

  2. 40 CFR 141.100 - Criteria and procedures for public water systems using point-of-entry devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...false Criteria and procedures for public water systems using point-of-entry devices...ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS Use of Non-Centralized...

  3. 40 CFR 141.100 - Criteria and procedures for public water systems using point-of-entry devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...false Criteria and procedures for public water systems using point-of-entry devices...ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS Use of Non-Centralized...

  4. 33 CFR 149.575 - How must objects protruding from the water, other than platforms and single point moorings, be...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01...How must objects protruding from the water, other than platforms and single point...149.575 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF...

  5. Two-dimensional freezing criteria for crystallizing colloidal monolayers

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Ziren; Han Yilong; Alsayed, Ahmed M.

    2010-04-21

    Video microscopy was employed to explore crystallization of colloidal monolayers composed of diameter-tunable microgel spheres. Two-dimensional (2D) colloidal liquids were frozen homogenously into polycrystalline solids, and four 2D criteria for freezing were experimentally tested in thermal systems for the first time: the Hansen-Verlet freezing rule, the Loewen-Palberg-Simon dynamical freezing criterion, and two other rules based, respectively, on the split shoulder of the radial distribution function and on the distribution of the shape factor of Voronoi polygons. Importantly, these freezing criteria, usually applied in the context of single crystals, were demonstrated to apply to the formation of polycrystalline solids. At the freezing point, we also observed a peak in the fluctuations of the orientational order parameter and a percolation transition associated with caged particles. Speculation about these percolated clusters of caged particles casts light on solidification mechanisms and dynamic heterogeneity in freezing.

  6. Impact of point and nonpoint source pollution on pore waters of two Chesapeake Bay tributaries.

    PubMed

    Karuppiah, M; Gupta, G

    1996-10-01

    Chesapeake Bay and its tributaries are contaminated by industrial and municipal point sources and agricultural nonpoint sources of pollution. The objective of this study was to compare the porewater characteristics of two Chesapeake Bay tributaries: Wicomico River (WR) contaminated by point source and Pocomoke River (PR) contaminated by both point and nonpoint sources of pollution. Four study sites (1 mile before, adjacent to, and 1 and 2 miles after the sewage treatment plant) were chosen to collect sediment samples in both the rivers. The sediment-pore waters were analyzed for toxicity using Microtox marine luminescent bacteria-Vibrio fischeri. USEPA toxicity identification evaluation tests on these pore waters confirmed that the contaminants (ammonia and heavy metals) in WR were from municipal point sources, whereas in PR the contamination (metals, pesticides, and PCBs) was from nonpoint sources (agriculture) of pollution. The toxicity (and the concentration of contaminants) decreased both upstream and downstream from the most polluted site in both the rivers. PMID:8930508

  7. Freeze-drying of lactic acid bacteria.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, Fernanda; Cenard, Stéphanie; Passot, Stéphanie

    2015-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria are of great importance for the food and biotechnology industry. They are widely used as starters for manufacturing food (e.g., yogurt, cheese, fermented meats, and vegetables) and probiotic products, as well as for green chemistry applications. Freeze-drying or lyophilization is a convenient method for preservation of bacteria. By reducing water activity to values below 0.2, it allows long-term storage and low-cost distribution at suprazero temperatures, while minimizing losses in viability and functionality. Stabilization of bacteria via freeze-drying starts with the addition of a protectant solution to the bacterial suspension. Freeze-drying includes three steps, namely, (1) freezing of the concentrated and protected cell suspension, (2) primary drying to remove ice by sublimation, and (3) secondary drying to remove unfrozen water by desorption. In this chapter we describe a method for freeze-drying of lactic acid bacteria at a pilot scale, thus allowing control of the process parameters for maximal survival and functionality recovery. PMID:25428024

  8. High-freezing-point fuel studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tolle, F. F.

    1980-01-01

    Considerable progress in developing the experimental and analytical techniques needed to design airplanes to accommodate fuels with less stringent low temperature specifications is reported. A computer technique for calculating fuel temperature profiles in full tanks was developed. The computer program is being extended to include the case of partially empty tanks. Ultimately, the completed package is to be incorporated into an aircraft fuel tank thermal analyser code to permit the designer to fly various thermal exposure patterns, study fuel temperatures versus time, and determine holdup.

  9. Glass transition in biomolecules and the liquid-liquid critical point of water

    E-print Network

    P. Kumar; Z. Yan; L. Xu; M. G. Mazza; S. V. Buldyrev; S. -H. Chen; S. Sastry; H. E. Stanley

    2006-08-28

    Using molecular dynamics simulations, we investigate the relation between the dynamic transitions of biomolecules (lysozyme and DNA) and the dynamic and thermodynamic properties of hydration water. We find that the dynamic transition of the macromolecules, sometimes called a ``protein glass transition'', occurs at the temperature of dynamic crossover in the diffusivity of hydration water, and also coincides with the maxima of the isobaric specific heat $C_P$ and the temperature derivative of the orientational order parameter. We relate these findings to the hypothesis of a liquid-liquid critical point in water. Our simulations are consistent with the possibility that the protein glass transition results from crossing the Widom line, which is defined as the locus of correlation length maxima emanating from the hypothesized second critical point of water.

  10. A nonprotein thermal hysteresis-producing xylomannan antifreeze in the freeze-tolerant

    E-print Network

    Barnes, Brian McRae

    A nonprotein thermal hysteresis-producing xylomannan antifreeze in the freeze-tolerant Alaskan between the melting and freezing points of a solution that is indicative of the presence of large) have not yet been structur- ally characterized, and none have been characterized from a freeze

  11. Quality of Drinking Water Treated at Point of Use in Residential Healthcare Facilities for the Elderly

    PubMed Central

    Sacchetti, Rossella; De Luca, Giovanna; Guberti, Emilia; Zanetti, Franca

    2015-01-01

    Municipal tap water is increasingly treated at the point of use (POU) to improve the acceptability and palatability of its taste. The aim of this study was to assess the bacteriologic and nutritional characteristics of tap water treated at the point of use in residential healthcare facilities for the elderly. Two types of POU devices were used: microfiltered water dispensers (MWDs) and reverse-osmosis water dispensers (ROWDs). All samples of water entering the devices and leaving them were tested for the bacteriological parameters set by Italian regulations for drinking water and for opportunistic pathogens associated with various infections in healthcare settings; in addition, the degree of mineralization of the water was assessed. The results revealed widespread bacterial contamination in the POU treatment devices, particularly from potentially pathogenic species. As expected, the use of ROWDs led to a decrease in the saline content of the water. In conclusion, the use of POU treatment in healthcare facilities for the elderly can be considered advisable only if the devices are constantly and carefully maintained. PMID:26371025

  12. Quality of Drinking Water Treated at Point of Use in Residential Healthcare Facilities for the Elderly.

    PubMed

    Sacchetti, Rossella; De Luca, Giovanna; Guberti, Emilia; Zanetti, Franca

    2015-09-01

    Municipal tap water is increasingly treated at the point of use (POU) to improve the acceptability and palatability of its taste. The aim of this study was to assess the bacteriologic and nutritional characteristics of tap water treated at the point of use in residential healthcare facilities for the elderly. Two types of POU devices were used: microfiltered water dispensers (MWDs) and reverse-osmosis water dispensers (ROWDs). All samples of water entering the devices and leaving them were tested for the bacteriological parameters set by Italian regulations for drinking water and for opportunistic pathogens associated with various infections in healthcare settings; in addition, the degree of mineralization of the water was assessed. The results revealed widespread bacterial contamination in the POU treatment devices, particularly from potentially pathogenic species. As expected, the use of ROWDs led to a decrease in the saline content of the water. In conclusion, the use of POU treatment in healthcare facilities for the elderly can be considered advisable only if the devices are constantly and carefully maintained. PMID:26371025

  13. Bjorken model with Freeze Out

    E-print Network

    V. K. Magas; L. P. Csernai

    2007-11-19

    The freeze out of the expanding systems, created in relativistic heavy ion collisions, is discussed. We combine Bjorken scenario with earlier developed freeze out equations into a unified model. The important feature of the proposed model is that physical freeze out is completely finished in a finite time, which can be varied from 0 (freeze out hypersurface) to infinity. The dependence of the post freeze out distribution function on this freeze out time will be studied. As an example model is completely solved and analyzed for the gas of pions.

  14. Freezing of HNO{sub 3}/H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}/H{sub 2}O solutions at stratospheric temperatures: Nucleation statistics and experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Koop, T.; Luo, B.; Biermann, U.M.; Crutzen, P.J.; Peter, T.

    1997-02-06

    Calorimetric freezing experiments with aqueous sulfuric and nitric acid solutions are presented and applied to the formation of polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs). We show that the nucleation of hydrates from these solutions is a stochastic process and that nucleation rates and their uncertainties can be determined using Poisson statistics. Under thermodynamic equilibrium conditions above the ice frost point, the homogeneous nucleation rates of stratospheric aerosols are exceedingly low, ruling out homogeneous freezing as a pathway for PSC formation. Several stratospherically important substrates were tested concerning their ability to induce heterogeneous nucleation. None of the experiments indicated a relevant enhancement of the freezing probability of liquid aerosols. Moreover, the experiments reveal that the freezing process of the solutions under stratospheric conditions is limited by the nucleation rates of the hydrates, rather than their crystal growth rates, thus ruling out the possibility of a glassy state of stratospheric aerosol droplets. Also, we argue why a glacial state of the aerosols seems to be unlikely. The only processes leading to freezing of the hydrates appear to be the heterogeneous nucleation on water ice crystals forming below the frost point and the homogeneous freezing of almost binary HNO{sub 3}/H{sub 2}O droplets with H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} concentrations below approximately 0.01 wt%. 68 refs., 18 figs., 4 tabs.

  15. Freezing of Lennard-Jones-type fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Khrapak, Sergey A.; Chaudhuri, Manis; Morfill, Gregor E.

    2011-02-07

    We put forward an approximate method to locate the fluid-solid (freezing) phase transition in systems of classical particles interacting via a wide range of Lennard-Jones-type potentials. This method is based on the constancy of the properly normalized second derivative of the interaction potential (freezing indicator) along the freezing curve. As demonstrated recently it yields remarkably good agreement with previous numerical simulation studies of the conventional 12-6 Lennard-Jones (LJ) fluid [S.A.Khrapak, M.Chaudhuri, G.E.Morfill, Phys. Rev. B 134, 052101 (2010)]. In this paper, we test this approach using a wide range of the LJ-type potentials, including LJ n-6 and exp-6 models, and find that it remains sufficiently accurate and reliable in reproducing the corresponding freezing curves, down to the triple-point temperatures. One of the possible application of the method--estimation of the freezing conditions in complex (dusty) plasmas with ''tunable'' interactions--is briefly discussed.

  16. POINT-OF-USE TREATMENT OF DRINKING WATER IN SAN YSIDRO, NM

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study was conducted to determine whether point-of-use (POU) reverse osmosis (RO) units could satisfactorily function in lieu of central treatment to remove arsenic and fluoride from the drinking water supply of San Ysidro, NM. POU treatment was evaluated for removal efficien...

  17. A point focusing collector for an integrated water/power complex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zewen, H.; Schmidt, G.; Moustafa, S.

    1982-01-01

    The utilization potential of the point focusing parabolic dish is identified. Its main design parameters are summarized. Performance tests and the utilization of the collector as primary energy source in a food-water-power complex are described. Process heat, heat storage, heat transfer, and cogeneration are discussed.

  18. Natural Wetlands Mediate Non-point Source Water Pollution From Irrigated Pastures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knox, K.; Dahlgren, R. A.; Tate, K. W.

    2005-12-01

    Non-point source discharge from grazed pastures may be high in nutrients, sediment, and pathogens, three major contributors to water quality impairment in California. Intercepting pollution at its source and managing water quality within the landscape are essential to maintaining healthy downstream waters. We investigated the efficacy of flow-through wetlands interspersed throughout the agricultural landscape to reduce non-point source pollution of tailwater from cattle-grazed, irrigated pastures in the Sierra Nevada Foothills of California. Wetlands are known to positively impact water quality through ecological processes such as filtration, sedimentation, microbial transformations and plant uptake of nutrients. Influent and effluent water of small (0.25 ha), natural wetlands located downstream from flood irrigated pastures was analyzed for Escherichia coli, NO3-N, total N, total suspended solids (TSS), total P, and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) throughout two summer irrigation seasons (June to October). We compared reductions of sediment, nutrients and E. coli provided by a healthy, non-degraded wetland with reductions from flow through a channelized, degraded wetland. Large reductions in E. coli (>75%) and TSS (>50%) were observed in water exiting the healthy wetland while nutrient and DOC (~ 20%) concentrations were less affected by flow through the wetland. The channelized wetland provided smaller reductions in all constituents than did the non-degraded wetland. Results from this study demonstrate that small flow-through wetlands can improve water quality through the attenuation of E. coli and suspended sediments, and to a lesser degree DOC and nutrients.

  19. Langevin Poisson-Boltzmann equation: point-like ions and water dipoles near a charged surface.

    PubMed

    Gongadze, Ekaterina; van Rienen, Ursula; Kralj-Igli?, Veronika; Igli?, Aleš

    2011-06-01

    Water ordering near a charged membrane surface is important for many biological processes such as binding of ligands to a membrane or transport of ions across it. In this work, the mean-field Poisson-Boltzmann theory for point-like ions, describing an electrolyte solution in contact with a planar charged surface, is modified by including the orientational ordering of water. Water molecules are considered as Langevin dipoles, while the number density of water is assumed to be constant everywhere in the electrolyte solution. It is shown that the dielectric permittivity of an electrolyte close to a charged surface is decreased due to the increased orientational ordering of water dipoles. The dielectric permittivity close to the charged surface is additionally decreased due to the finite size of ions and dipoles. PMID:21613667

  20. Use of optical coherence tomography to monitor biological tissue freezing during cryosurgery

    E-print Network

    Aguilar, Guillermo

    Use of optical coherence tomography to monitor biological tissue freezing during cryosurgery were acquired during freezing of water, IntralipidTM, and in vivo hamster skin. Sub- surface morphological changes were evident only during freezing of Intralipid and skin. A simple thermal model

  1. Entropic Aspects of Supercooled Droplet Freezing ALEXANDER KOSTINSKI AND WILL CANTRELL

    E-print Network

    Kostinski, Alex

    Entropic Aspects of Supercooled Droplet Freezing ALEXANDER KOSTINSKI AND WILL CANTRELL Department, in final form 27 December 2007) ABSTRACT The freezing of supercooled water droplets in the atmosphere to establish a lower bound on the amount of latent heat that can be liberated by the freezing droplets

  2. 33 CFR 334.412 - Albemarle Sound, Pamlico Sound, Harvey Point and adjacent waters, NC; restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Albemarle Sound, Pamlico Sound, Harvey Point and adjacent waters, NC; restricted...RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.412 Albemarle Sound, Pamlico Sound, Harvey Point and adjacent...

  3. 33 CFR 334.412 - Albemarle Sound, Pamlico Sound, Harvey Point and adjacent waters, NC; restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Albemarle Sound, Pamlico Sound, Harvey Point and adjacent waters, NC; restricted...RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.412 Albemarle Sound, Pamlico Sound, Harvey Point and adjacent...

  4. 33 CFR 334.412 - Albemarle Sound, Pamlico Sound, Harvey Point and adjacent waters, NC; restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Albemarle Sound, Pamlico Sound, Harvey Point and adjacent waters, NC; restricted...RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.412 Albemarle Sound, Pamlico Sound, Harvey Point and adjacent...

  5. 33 CFR 334.412 - Albemarle Sound, Pamlico Sound, Harvey Point and adjacent waters, NC; restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Albemarle Sound, Pamlico Sound, Harvey Point and adjacent waters, NC; restricted...RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.412 Albemarle Sound, Pamlico Sound, Harvey Point and adjacent...

  6. 33 CFR 334.412 - Albemarle Sound, Pamlico Sound, Harvey Point and adjacent waters, NC; restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Albemarle Sound, Pamlico Sound, Harvey Point and adjacent waters, NC; restricted...RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.412 Albemarle Sound, Pamlico Sound, Harvey Point and adjacent...

  7. Freezing Poultry for Home Use 

    E-print Network

    Davis, Michael

    2006-08-31

    Purchasing fresh poultry in large packages and freezing it in quantities suitable for individual meals can stretch time and food dollars. Topics include packaging needs, cutting, storing and thawing instructions, and freezing pre-cooked meals....

  8. Freeze Branding Horses 

    E-print Network

    Householder, Doug; Webb, Gary; Wigington, Sam; Bruemmer, Jason

    2001-06-29

    Freeze branding of horses has many advantages. It is safe, economical, simple to do and relatively painless. It can be done on horses of any age and does not damage the horse's hide. This publication gives complete, step-by-step instructions...

  9. Freezing and thawing processes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Seasonally frozen soil strongly influences runoff and erosion on large areas of land around the world. In many areas, rain or snowmelt on seasonally frozen soil is the single leading cause of severe runoff and erosion events. As soils freeze, ice blocks the soil pores, greatly diminishing the permea...

  10. Evaluation of Point of Use Water Treatment Devices for Removal of Mine Wastes from Well Water

    EPA Science Inventory

    U.S. EPA Region VII and the Office of Research and Development (ORD) are conducting a large-scale study to identify the prevalence of lead (Pb) and other contaminants in drinking water at four mine waste areas in Washington County, Missouri. Numerous households in Potosi, Richwoo...

  11. Atmospheric science: Sea-spray particles cause freezing in clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, Lynn M.

    2015-09-01

    Ice clouds in marine regions at high latitudes might form in warmer and drier air than was previously believed because of freezing induced by airborne particles that contain organic materials from ocean surface waters. See Letter p.234

  12. Point observations of liquid water content in natural snow - investigating methodical, spatial and temporal aspects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Techel, F.; Pielmeier, C.

    2010-10-01

    Information on the amount and distribution of liquid water in the snowpack is important for forecasting wet snow avalanches and predicting melt-water run-off. Considerable spatial and temporal variations of snowpack wetness exist. Currently, available information relies mostly on point observations. Often, the snow wetness is estimated manually using a hand test. However, quantitative measures are also applied. We compare the hand test to quantitative measurements and investigate temporal and small-scale spatial aspects of the snowpack wetness. For this, the liquid water content was measured using dielectric methods, with the Snow Fork and Denoth wetness instrument in the Swiss Alps, mostly above tree-line. More than 12 000 water content measurements were observed on 30 days in 85 locations. The qualitative hand test provides an indication of snowpack wetness, although snowpack wetness is often over-estimated and quantitative water content measurements are more reliable. If the measured water content is very low, it is unclear if the snow is dry or contains small quantities of liquid water. In particular during the initial melt-phase, when the snowpack is only partially wet, it is important to consider spatial aspects when interpreting point observations. One measurement taken at a certain measurement depth may significantly deviate in 10-20% of the cases from snowpack wetness in the surrounding snow. Not surprisingly, diurnal changes in snowpack wetness are significant in layers close to the snow surface. At depth, changes were noted within the course of a day. From a single vertical profile, it was often unclear if these changes were due to the heterogeneous nature of water infiltration. Based on our observations, we propose to repeat three measurements at horizontal distances greater than 50 cm. This approach provides representative snow wetness information for horizontal distances up to 5 m. Further, we suggest a simplified classification scheme of snowpack wetness by introducing five wetness types of the snowpack incorporating both vertical and horizontal liquid water content distribution.

  13. 7 CFR 58.621 - Freezing tunnels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Freezing tunnels. 58.621 Section 58.621 Agriculture...Service 1 Rooms and Compartments § 58.621 Freezing tunnels. Freezing tunnels for quick freezing at extremely low...

  14. 7 CFR 58.621 - Freezing tunnels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Freezing tunnels. 58.621 Section 58.621 Agriculture...Service 1 Rooms and Compartments § 58.621 Freezing tunnels. Freezing tunnels for quick freezing at extremely low...

  15. 7 CFR 58.621 - Freezing tunnels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Freezing tunnels. 58.621 Section 58.621 Agriculture...Service 1 Rooms and Compartments § 58.621 Freezing tunnels. Freezing tunnels for quick freezing at extremely low...

  16. 7 CFR 58.621 - Freezing tunnels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Freezing tunnels. 58.621 Section 58.621 Agriculture...Service 1 Rooms and Compartments § 58.621 Freezing tunnels. Freezing tunnels for quick freezing at extremely low...

  17. Freezing Spring Temperatures Damage Knobcone Pine

    E-print Network

    Freezing Spring Temperatures Damage Knobcone Pine Stanley L. Krugman U. S. FOREST SERVICE RESEARCH, Stanley L. 1966. Freezing spring temperatures damage knobcone pine conelets. Berkeley, Calif.. Pacific pine, conelets, freezing temperature) Krugman, Stanley L. 1966. Freezing spring temperatures damage

  18. 7 CFR 58.621 - Freezing tunnels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Freezing tunnels. 58.621 Section 58.621 Agriculture...Service 1 Rooms and Compartments § 58.621 Freezing tunnels. Freezing tunnels for quick freezing at extremely low...

  19. Did Water Leave Its Mark on Mars?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Secosky, James J.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses the missing water on Mars. Describes five experiments simulating conditions on Mars: (1) behavior of dry ice; (2) low-pressure vacuum; (3) freezing point depression; (4) water in hydrated minerals and clay; and (5) properties of carbon dioxide. (YP)

  20. SURROGATE BRIDGE FREEZING SRDJAN JANKOVIC

    E-print Network

    SURROGATE BRIDGE FREEZING SENSORS by SRDJAN JANKOVIC Bachelor of Science University of Belgrade: Stillwater, Oklahoma Title of Study: SURROGATE BRIDGE FREEZING SENSORS Pages in Study: 121 Candidate of this study was to design and test surrogate bridge freezing sensors in order to provide training data

  1. The existence of an isopermitive point of water at low frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mercado, Hilda; Angulo, Abril

    2011-03-01

    Water has been studied extensively since the last past century and it continues to be a subject of great interest because it has special properties and a relevant role in biological functions. One of the most used techniques to study water is the dielectric spectroscopy. Normally, the studies with this method are carried out at frequencies higher than 1 MHz. We have studied the relative permittivity of water at low frequencies (100 Hz to 1 MHz), and we found that this varies strongly as a function of the frequency. In addition, we found a specific frequency where this parameter is independent of temperature and we called it the isopermitive point. Below this point the relative permittivity increase with temperature, above, it decreases. Our explanation of this behavior is that water can be considered as a system of two species: dipoles and ions. The first obey the Maxwell-Boltzmann statistics, while the second causes the Maxwell-Wagner-Sillars effect. At the isopermitive point the effect of both mechanisms in the relative permittivity compensate each other.

  2. On estimating freezing times during tissue rapid freezing.

    PubMed

    Jones, G J

    1984-12-01

    For the study of morphological changes that are associated with fast physiological processes, it is important to know the times at which the surface regions of specimens are frozen during rapid freezing. A simple physical model has been used to estimate the freezing times and the cooling rates at 10 micron depths in specimens. The calculations indicate that cooling rates in excess of 4 X 10(4) K s-1 are associated with freezing times of less than 0.5 ms. Using the same model, experimental measurements of freezing times at much larger depths have been extrapolated to a depth of 10 micron, the times obtained are 0.1-0.6 ms for freezing by rapid immersion in cryogenic liquids, and 0.1 ms or less for freezing on a metal block. It is concluded that the delay time between contact with a cryogenic source and specimen freezing is less than 0.5 ms. The uncertainty in the time of freezing may be larger than this, because of an uncertainty of about +/- 0.5 ms in determining the exact time of contact and, for freeze fracture studies, because of an uncertainty of up to 0.5 ms due to imprecision in the depth of fracture. At the same time it is estimated that the time during which freezing takes place may be as high as 250 microseconds, which can be taken as an upper limit for the resolution time for rapid freezing. PMID:6520865

  3. Double freezing of (NH(4))(2)SO(4)/H(2)O droplets below the eutectic point and the crystallization of (NH(4))(2)SO(4) to the ferroelectric phase.

    PubMed

    Bogdan, A

    2010-09-23

    This paper presents the differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) results obtained from measurements of single droplets of different subeutectic concentrations (<40 wt % (NH4)2SO4) and diameters of 1-1.5 mm. The measurements show that despite the fact that the freezing of the droplets takes place below the eutectic temperature of Te ? 254.5 K, a phase separation into ice and a residual freeze-concentrated solution occurs. The residual solution is formed by the expulsion of NH4+ and SO42- ions from the ice lattice during the nucleation and growth of ice and may possess the eutectic concentration of 40 wt % (NH4)2SO4. On further cooling, the residual solution freezes to the eutectic solid mixture of ice/(NH4)2SO4 at a temperature that is either above or below the ferroelectric "Curie" temperature of Tc ? 223 K. If the freezing of the residual solution takes place below the Tc, then (NH4)2SO4 crystallizes directly into the ferroelectric phase. PMID:20735056

  4. Point-of-use water filtration reduces healthcare-associated infections in bone marrow transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Cervia, J S; Farber, B; Armellino, D; Klocke, J; Bayer, R-L; McAlister, M; Stanchfield, I; Canonica, F P; Ortolano, G A

    2010-06-01

    Outbreaks of infection with gram-negative bacteria (GNB) have been linked to hospital water. We sought to determine whether point-of-use (POU) water filtration might result in decreased risk of infection in hospitalized bone marrow transplant (BMT) recipients in the absence of any recognized outbreak. Unfiltered water was sampled from taps in the BMT unit of a major US teaching hospital, and cultured at a reference laboratory. POU bacterial-retentive filters (0.2 mum) were installed throughout the unit, and replaced every 14 days. Infection rates were tracked over a 9-month period, and compared with rates for a 16-month period before POU filtration. Unfiltered water samples from 50% (2 of 4) outlets sampled grew P. aeruginosa (2 of 4) and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia (1 of 4). Clinical infection rates in the unit were significantly reduced from 1.4 total and 0.4 GNB infections per 100 patient days in the period before POU filtration to 0.18 total and 0.09 GNB infections per 100 patient days (P=0.0068 and 0.0431, respectively) in the 9-month period for which filters were in place. Infections during the POU filtration period were due to non-waterborne organisms. Point-of-use (POU) water filtration may significantly reduce infection rates in BMT recipients in the absence of any recognized outbreak. PMID:19781018

  5. On the particle paths and the stagnation points in small-amplitude deep-water waves

    E-print Network

    Delia Ionescu-Kruse

    2012-02-22

    In order to obtain quite precise information about the shape of the particle paths below small-amplitude gravity waves travelling on irrotational deep water, analytic solutions of the nonlinear differential equation system describing the particle motion are provided. All these solutions are not closed curves. Some particle trajectories are peakon-like, others can be expressed with the aid of the Jacobi elliptic functions or with the aid of the hyperelliptic functions. Remarks on the stagnation points of the small-amplitude irrotational deep-water waves are also made.

  6. Ground-water conditions at the Veterans Facility, Castle Point, New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brashears, M.L., Jr.

    1950-01-01

    The rock aquifers in the vicinity of the Castle Point Veterans Hospital yield limited quantities of water which, in general, are sufficient for domestic and farm purposes only. The possibility of obtaining the stated quantity requirements of about 200,000 gallons daily or more from the bedrock formations seems poor with the exception of the Wappinger limestone underlying the Fishkill Valley three miles to the south.

  7. The effect of water contamination on the dew-point temperature scale realization with humidity generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilbaste, M.; Heinonen, M.; Saks, O.; Leito, I.

    2013-08-01

    The purpose of this paper is to study the effect of contaminated water in the context of humidity generators. Investigation of different methods to determine the drop in dew-point temperature due to contamination and experiments on actual contamination rates are reported. Different methods for calculating the dew-point temperature effect from electrical conductivity and density measurements are studied with high-purity water and aqueous solutions of NaCl and LiCl. The outcomes of the calculation methods are compared with the results of direct humidity measurements. The results show that the often applied Raoult's law based calculation method is in good agreement with other methods. For studying actual contamination, water samples were kept in glass, plastic, copper and stainless-steel vessels for up to 13 months to investigate natural ionic and organic contamination in vessels with different wall materials. The amount of ionic contamination was found to be higher in copper and glass vessels than in stainless-steel and plastic vessels. The amount of organic contamination was found to be highest in the plastic vessel. In all the cases, however, the corresponding drop in dew-point temperature due to natural contamination was found to be below 0.1 mK. The largest rate of change of dew-point temperature was 26 µK/month. Thus, if proper cleanness is maintained in a humidity generator the effect of contamination of water in the saturator is insignificant compared with the major uncertainty components even in the most accurate generators today.

  8. THE EFFECT OF FROST/FREEZE EVENTS ON MOPANE TREES Prepared by Melissa Whitecross, Honours student, at the University of the Witwatersrand

    E-print Network

    THE EFFECT OF FROST/FREEZE EVENTS ON MOPANE TREES Prepared by Melissa Whitecross, Honours student that Colophospermum mopane (Mopane Tree) is affected by frost/freeze events and this could be related to the unique in temperatures falling below the freezing point (0°C). A freeze event, however, describes a severe cooling event

  9. Point observations of liquid water content in wet snow - investigating methodical, spatial and temporal aspects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Techel, F.; Pielmeier, C.

    2011-05-01

    Information about the volume and the spatial and temporal distribution of liquid water in snow is important for forecasting wet snow avalanches and for predicting melt-water run-off. The distribution of liquid water in snow is commonly estimated from point measurements using a "hand" squeeze test, or a dielectric device such as a "Snow Fork" or a "Denoth meter". Here we compare estimates of water content in the Swiss Alps made using the hand test to those made with a Snow Fork and a Denoth meter. Measurements were conducted in the Swiss Alps, mostly above tree line; more than 12 000 measurements were made at 85 locations over 30 days. Results show that the hand test generally over estimates the volumetric liquid water content. Estimates using the Snow Fork are generally 1 % higher than those derived from the Denoth meter. The measurements were also used to investigate temporal and small-scale spatial patterns of wetness. Results show that typically a single point measurement does not characterize the wetness of the surrounding snow. Large diurnal changes in wetness are common in the near-surface snow, and associated changes at depth were also observed. A single vertical profile of measurements is not sufficient to determine whether these changes were a result of a spatially homogeneous wetting front or caused by infiltration through pipes. Based on our observations, we suggest that three measurements at horizontal distances greater than 50 cm are needed to adequately characterize the distribution of liquid water through a snowpack. Further, we suggest a simplified classification scheme that includes five wetness patterns that incorporate both the vertical and horizontal distribution of liquid water in a snowpack.

  10. Effect of freezing and dehydration on ion and cryoprotectant distribution and hemolymph volume in the goldenrod gall fly, Eurosta solidaginis

    E-print Network

    Lee Jr., Richard E.

    Effect of freezing and dehydration on ion and cryoprotectant distribution and hemolymph volume water loss we examined the effect of extracellular freezing and dehydration on hemolymph volume dehydration stress can occur through several mechanisms including the polymerization of amino acids

  11. Validation of Aura Microwave Limb Sounder water vapor by balloon-borne Cryogenic Frost point Hygrometer measurements

    E-print Network

    Vömel, Holger

    Validation of Aura Microwave Limb Sounder water vapor by balloon- borne Cryogenic Frost point extensive observations of stratospheric and upper tropospheric water vapor using the balloon-borne Cryogenic vapor by balloon-borne Cryogenic Frost point Hygrometer measurements, J. Geophys. Res., 112, D24S37, doi

  12. Evaluation and Validation of the Messinger Freezing Fraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, David N.; Tsao, Jen-Ching

    2005-01-01

    One of the most important non-dimensional parameters used in ice-accretion modeling and scaling studies is the freezing fraction defined by the heat-balance analysis of Messinger. For fifty years this parameter has been used to indicate how rapidly freezing takes place when super-cooled water strikes a solid body. The value ranges from 0 (no freezing) to 1 (water freezes immediately on impact), and the magnitude has been shown to play a major role in determining the physical appearance of the accreted ice. Because of its importance to ice shape, this parameter and the physics underlying the expressions used to calculate it have been questioned from time to time. Until now, there has been no strong evidence either validating or casting doubt on the current expressions. This paper presents experimental measurements of the leading-edge thickness of a number of ice shapes for a variety of test conditions with nominal freezing fractions from 0.3 to 1.0. From these thickness measurements, experimental freezing fractions were calculated and compared with values found from the Messinger analysis as applied by Ruff. Within the experimental uncertainty of measuring the leading-edge thickness, agreement of the experimental and analytical freezing fraction was very good. It is also shown that values of analytical freezing fraction were entirely consistent with observed ice shapes at and near rime conditions: At an analytical freezing fraction of unity, experimental ice shapes displayed the classic rime shape, while for conditions producing analytical freezing fractions slightly lower than unity, glaze features started to appear.

  13. PUBLISHED ONLINE: 15 MAY 2011 | DOI: 10.1038/NPHYS1993 Liquidliquid critical point in supercooled silicon

    E-print Network

    Loss, Daniel

    , implying an `amorphous-liquid' phase transition near 1,450 K (below the freezing point of the liquid, 1LETTERS PUBLISHED ONLINE: 15 MAY 2011 | DOI: 10.1038/NPHYS1993 Liquid­liquid critical point transition has been investigated for a wide variety of pure substances, including water, silica and silicon

  14. Assessment of ground-water contamination in the alluvial aquifer near West Point, Kentucky

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lyverse, M.A.; Unthank, M.D.

    1988-01-01

    Well inventories, water level measurements, groundwater quality samples, surface geophysical techniques (specifically, electromagnetic techniques), and test drilling were used to investigate the extent and sources of groundwater contamination in the alluvial aquifer near West Point, Kentucky. This aquifer serves as the principal source of drinking water for over 50,000 people. Groundwater flow in the alluvial aquifer is generally unconfined and moves in a northerly direction toward the Ohio River. Two large public supply well fields and numerous domestic wells are located in this natural flow path. High concentrations of chloride in groundwater have resulted in the abandonment of several public supply wells in the West Point areas. Chloride concentrations in water samples collected for this study were as high as 11,000 mg/L. Electromagnetic techniques indicated and test drilling later confirmed that the source of chloride in well waters was probably improperly plugged or unplugged, abandoned oil and gas exploration wells. The potential for chloride contamination of wells exists in the study area and is related to proximity to improperly abandoned oil and gas exploration wells and to gradients established by drawdowns associated with pumped wells. Periodic use of surface geophysical methods, in combination with added observation wells , could be used to monitor significant changes in groundwater quality related to chloride contamination. (USGS)

  15. Monitoring of metals, organic compounds and coliforms in water catchment points from the Sinos River basin.

    PubMed

    Nascimento, C A; Staggemeier, R; Bianchi, E; Rodrigues, M T; Fabres, R; Soliman, M C; Bortoluzzi, M; Luz, R B; Heinzelmann, L S; Santos, E L; Fleck, J D; Spilki, F R

    2015-05-01

    Unplanned use and occupation of the land without respecting its capacity of assimilation and environmental purification leads to the degradation of the environment and of water used for human consumption. Agricultural areas, industrial plants and urban centres developed without planning and the control of effluent discharges are the main causes of water pollution in river basins that receive all the liquid effluents produced in those places. Over the last decades, environmental management has become part of governmental agendas in search of solutions for the preservation of water quality and the restoration of already degraded resources. This study evaluated the conditions of the main watercourse of the Sinos River basin by monitoring the main physical, chemical and microbiological parameters described in the CONAMA Resolution no. 357/2005.The set of parameters evaluated at five catchment points of water human consumption revealed a river that has different characteristics in each reach, as the upper reach was class 1, whereas the middle and lower reaches of the basin were class 4. Monitoring pointed to households as the main sources of pollutants in those reaches, although metals used in the industrial production of the region were found in the samples analyzed. PMID:26270213

  16. Dynamics of protein hydration water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, M.; Emmert, S.; Gulich, R.; Lunkenheimer, P.; Loidl, A.

    2015-09-01

    We present the frequency- and temperature-dependent dielectric properties of lysozyme solutions in a broad concentration regime, measured at subzero temperatures, and compare the results with measurements above the freezing point of water and on hydrated lysozyme powder. Our experiments allow examining the dynamics of unfreezable hydration water in a broad temperature range. The obtained results prove the bimodality of the hydration shell dynamics. In addition, we find indications of a fragile-to-strong transition of hydration water.

  17. Dynamics of protein hydration water.

    PubMed

    Wolf, M; Emmert, S; Gulich, R; Lunkenheimer, P; Loidl, A

    2015-09-01

    We present the frequency- and temperature-dependent dielectric properties of lysozyme solutions in a broad concentration regime, measured at subzero temperatures, and compare the results with measurements above the freezing point of water and on hydrated lysozyme powder. Our experiments allow examining the dynamics of unfreezable hydration water in a broad temperature range. The obtained results prove the bimodality of the hydration shell dynamics. In addition, we find indications of a fragile-to-strong transition of hydration water. PMID:26465518

  18. Evaluating the sustainability of ceramic filters for point-of-use drinking water treatment.

    PubMed

    Ren, Dianjun; Colosi, Lisa M; Smith, James A

    2013-10-01

    This study evaluates the social, economic, and environmental sustainability of ceramic filters impregnated with silver nanoparticles for point-of-use (POU) drinking water treatment in developing countries. The functional unit for this analysis was the amount of water consumed by a typical household over ten years (37,960 L), as delivered by either the POU technology or a centralized water treatment and distribution system. Results indicate that the ceramic filters are 3-6 times more cost-effective than the centralized water system for reduction of waterborne diarrheal illness among the general population and children under five. The ceramic filters also exhibit better environmental performance for four of five evaluated life cycle impacts: energy use, water use, global warming potential, and particulate matter emissions (PM10). For smog formation potential, the centralized system is preferable to the ceramic filter POU technology. This convergence of social, economic, and environmental criteria offers clear indication that the ceramic filter POU technology is a more sustainable choice for drinking water treatment in developing countries than the centralized treatment systems that have been widely adopted in industrialized countries. PMID:23991752

  19. Freeze out of the expanding system

    E-print Network

    V. K. Magas; L. P. Csernai; E. Molnar

    2007-02-22

    The freeze out (FO) of the expanding systems, created in relativistic heavy ion collisions, is discussed. We start with kinetic FO model, which realizes complete physical FO in a layer of given thickness, and then combine our gradual FO equations with Bjorken type system expansion into a unified model. We shall see that the basic FO features, pointed out in the earlier works, are not smeared out by the expansion.

  20. Polarizable six-point water models from computational and empirical optimization.

    PubMed

    Tröster, Philipp; Lorenzen, Konstantin; Tavan, Paul

    2014-02-13

    Tröster et al. (J. Phys. Chem B 2013, 117, 9486-9500) recently suggested a mixed computational and empirical approach to the optimization of polarizable molecular mechanics (PMM) water models. In the empirical part the parameters of Buckingham potentials are optimized by PMM molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The computational part applies hybrid calculations, which combine the quantum mechanical description of a H2O molecule by density functional theory (DFT) with a PMM model of its liquid phase environment generated by MD. While the static dipole moments and polarizabilities of the PMM water models are fixed at the experimental gas phase values, the DFT/PMM calculations are employed to optimize the remaining electrostatic properties. These properties cover the width of a Gaussian inducible dipole positioned at the oxygen and the locations of massless negative charge points within the molecule (the positive charges are attached to the hydrogens). The authors considered the cases of one and two negative charges rendering the PMM four- and five-point models TL4P and TL5P. Here we extend their approach to three negative charges, thus suggesting the PMM six-point model TL6P. As compared to the predecessors and to other PMM models, which also exhibit partial charges at fixed positions, TL6P turned out to predict all studied properties of liquid water at p0 = 1 bar and T0 = 300 K with a remarkable accuracy. These properties cover, for instance, the diffusion constant, viscosity, isobaric heat capacity, isothermal compressibility, dielectric constant, density, and the isobaric thermal expansion coefficient. This success concurrently provides a microscopic physical explanation of corresponding shortcomings of previous models. It uniquely assigns the failures of previous models to substantial inaccuracies in the description of the higher electrostatic multipole moments of liquid phase water molecules. Resulting favorable properties concerning the transferability to other temperatures and conditions like the melting of ice are also discussed. PMID:24437570

  1. InsideFood Symposium, 9-12 April 2013, Leuven, Belgium 1 | P a g e Multi-length scale structural imaging of freeze-dried carrots

    E-print Network

    van Vliet, Lucas J.

    imaging of freeze-dried carrots and their rehydration behaviour. Gerard van Dalen a , Adrian Voda a , Arno of carrots in their freeze-dried, rehydrating and rehydrated form. This work established a predictive relation between freezing rate and freeze damage. Water imbibition rates could be explained from the porous

  2. Quality Evaluation of Pork with Various Freezing and Thawing Methods

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the physicochemical and sensory quality characteristics due to the influence of various thawing methods on electro-magnetic and air blast frozen pork were examined. The packaged pork samples, which were frozen by air blast freezing at ?45? or electro-magnetic freezing at ?55?, were thawed using 4 different methods: refrigeration (4±1?), room temperature (RT, 25?), cold water (15?), and microwave (2450 MHz). Analyses were carried out to determine the drip and cooking loss, water holding capacity (WHC), moisture content and sensory evaluation. Frozen pork thawed in a microwave indicated relatively less thawing loss (0.63-1.24%) than the other thawing methods (0.68-1.38%). The cooking loss after electro-magnetic freezing indicated 37.4% by microwave thawing, compared with 32.9% by refrigeration, 36.5% by RT, and 37.2% by cold water in ham. The thawing of samples frozen by electro-magnetic freezing showed no significant differences between the methods used, while the moisture content was higher in belly thawed by microwave (62.0%) after electro-magnetic freezing than refrigeration (54.8%), RT (61.3%), and cold water (61.1%). The highest overall acceptability was shown for microwave thawing after electro-magnetic freezing but there were no significant differences compared to that of the other samples.

  3. Water polarization induced by thermal gradients: The extended simple point charge model (SPC/E)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armstrong, J. A.; Bresme, F.

    2013-07-01

    We investigate the non-equilibrium response of extended simple point charge (SPC/E) water to thermal gradients. Using non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations, we show that SPC/E water features the thermo-polarization orientation effect, namely, water becomes polarized as a response to a thermal gradient. The polarization field increases linearly with the thermal gradient, in agreement with predictions of non-equilibrium thermodynamics theory. This observation confirms the generality of the thermo-polarization effect, first reported using the Modified Central Force Model (MCFM), and shows this physical effect is present irrespective of the water model details, in particular, dipole moment magnitude and model flexibility. The magnitude of the effect is the same for both models, although the sign of the electrostatic field is reversed in going from the MCFM to the SPC/E model. We further analyze the impact that the molecular geometry and mass distribution has on the magnitude of the polarization. Our results indicate that the thermo-polarization effect should be observed in a wide range of polar fluids, including fluids where hydrogen bonding is not present. Using various molecular models, we show that the polarization of these fluids under appropriate thermodynamic conditions can be of the same order or stronger than in water.

  4. 33 CFR 149.575 - How must objects protruding from the water, other than platforms and single point moorings, be...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false How must objects protruding from the water, other than platforms and single point moorings, be marked? 149.575 Section 149.575 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) DEEPWATER PORTS DEEPWATER PORTS: DESIGN, CONSTRUCTION,...

  5. 33 CFR 149.575 - How must objects protruding from the water, other than platforms and single point moorings, be...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false How must objects protruding from the water, other than platforms and single point moorings, be marked? 149.575 Section 149.575 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) DEEPWATER PORTS DEEPWATER PORTS: DESIGN, CONSTRUCTION,...

  6. 33 CFR 149.575 - How must objects protruding from the water, other than platforms and single point moorings, be...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false How must objects protruding from the water, other than platforms and single point moorings, be marked? 149.575 Section 149.575 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) DEEPWATER PORTS DEEPWATER PORTS: DESIGN, CONSTRUCTION,...

  7. 40 CFR 141.100 - Criteria and procedures for public water systems using point-of-entry devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Criteria and procedures for public water systems using point-of-entry devices. 141.100 Section 141.100 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS Use of Non-Centralized Treatment Devices...

  8. PEM Fuel Cell Freeze Durability and Cold Start Project

    SciTech Connect

    Patterson, T.; O'Neill, Jonathan

    2008-01-02

    UTC has taken advantage of the unique water management opportunities inherent in micro-porous bipolar-plates to improve the cold-start performance of its polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFC). Diagnostic experiments were used to determine the limiting factors in micro-porous plate PEFC freeze performance and the causes of any performance decay. Alternative cell materials were evaluated for their freeze performance. Freeze-thaw cycling was also performed to determine micro-porous plate PEFC survivability. Data from these experiments has formed the basis for continuing development of advanced materials capable of supporting DOE's cold-start and durability objectives.

  9. Sustainable colloidal-silver-impregnated ceramic filter for point-of-use water treatment.

    PubMed

    Oyanedel-Craver, Vinka A; Smith, James A

    2008-02-01

    Cylindrical colloidal-silver-impregnated ceramic filters for household (point-of-use) water treatment were manufactured and tested for performance in the laboratory with respect to flow rate and bacteria transport. Filters were manufactured by combining clay-rich soil with water, grog (previously fired clay), and flour, pressing them into cylinders, and firing them at 900 degrees C for 8 h. The pore-size distribution of the resulting ceramic filters was quantified by mercury porosimetry. Colloidal silver was applied to filters in different quantities and ways (dipping and painting). Filters were also tested without any colloidal-silver application. Hydraulic conductivity of the filters was quantified using changing-head permeability tests. [3H]H2O water was used as a conservative tracer to quantify advection velocities and the coefficient of hydrodynamic dispersion. Escherichia coli (E. coli) was used to quantify bacterial transport through the filters. Hydraulic conductivity and pore-size distribution varied with filter composition; hydraulic conductivities were on the order of 10(-5) cm/s and more than 50% of the pores for each filter had diameters ranging from 0.02 to 15 microm. The filters removed between 97.8% and 100% of the applied bacteria; colloidal-silver treatments improved filter performance, presumably by deactivation of bacteria. The quantity of colloidal silver applied per filter was more important to bacteria removal than the method of application. Silver concentrations in effluent filter water were initially greater than 0.1 mg/L, but dropped below this value after 200 min of continuous operation. These results indicate that colloidal-silver-impregnated ceramic filters, which can be made using primarily local materials and labor, show promise as an effective and sustainable point-of-use water treatment technology for the world's poorest communities. PMID:18323124

  10. Assessing Impurities in Triple-Point-of-Water Cells Using a Capacitance Conductivity Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, X. K.; White, D. R.; Hao, X. M.; Yu, Z. J.; Edgar, H.; Duan, Y. N.

    2015-03-01

    Chemical analysis of old triple-point-of-water (TPW) cells has shown that the dominant impurities in the water are the principal constituents of borosilicate glass, which suggests the long-term downward drift observed in the realized triple-point temperature of TPW cells is caused by gradual dissolution of the glass containers. Because some of the glass constituents contribute to the electrical conductivity of the water, measurement of the conductivity provides a possible means for monitoring the long-term drift of TPW cells. This paper investigates the utility of a conductivity measurement, based on the measurement of a capacitor using the TPW cell as a dielectric, as a non-destructive means for monitoring the long-term stability of cells. The measurement exploits the cylindrical geometry of the cell and uses a two-terminal-pair coaxial electrical definition of capacitance. The results include estimates of the sensitivity of the method and examples of the long-term behavior of TPW cells, some as old as 38 years and monitored for periods of up to 10 years. It is found that the conductivity measurements correlate well with the cell age, with the drift rates increasing with time, as expected from the chemical model of glass dissolution. Measurements of temperature differences between cells show the technique can detect changes as small as , and therefore the method is a useful means of monitoring TPW cells.

  11. Effects of Pressure-shift Freezing on the Structural and Physical Properties of Gelatin Hydrogel Matrices

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Byeongsoo; Gil, Hyung Bae; Min, Sang-Gi; Lee, Si-Kyung; Choi, Mi-Jung

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates the effects of the gelatin concentration (10-40%, w/v), freezing temperatures (from -20? to -50?) and freezing methods on the structural and physical properties of gelatin matrices. To freeze gelatin, the pressure-shift freezing (PSF) is being applied at 0.1 (under atmospheric control), 50 and 100 MPa, respectively. The freezing point of gelatin solutions decrease with increasing gelatin concentrations, from -0.2? (10% gelatin) to -6.7? (40% gelatin), while the extent of supercooling did not show any specific trends. The rheological properties of the gelatin indicate that both the storage (G') and loss (G") moduli were steady in the strain amplitude range of 0.1-10%. To characterize gelatin matrices formed by the various freezing methods, the ice crystal sizes which were being determined by the scanning electron microscopy (SEM) are affected by the gelatin concentrations. The ice crystal sizes are affected by gelatin concentrations and freezing temperature, while the size distributions of ice crystals depend on the freezing methods. Smaller ice crystals are being formed with PSF rather than under the atmospheric control where the freezing temperature is above -40?. Thus, the results of this study indicate that the PSF processing at a very low freezing temperature (-50?) offers a potential advantage over commercial atmospheric freezing points for the formation of small ice crystals.

  12. Freeze-Tolerant Condensers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crowley, Christopher J.; Elkouhk, Nabil

    2004-01-01

    Two condensers designed for use in dissipating heat carried by working fluids feature two-phase, self-adjusting configurations such that their working lengths automatically vary to suit their input power levels and/or heat-sink temperatures. A key advantage of these condensers is that they can function even if the temperatures of their heat sinks fall below the freezing temperatures of their working fluids and the fluids freeze. The condensers can even be restarted from the frozen condition. The top part of the figure depicts the layout of the first condenser. A two-phase (liquid and vapor) condenser/vapor tube is thermally connected to a heat sink typically, a radiatively or convectively cooled metal panel. A single-phase (liquid) condensate-return tube (return artery) is also thermally connected to the heat sink. At intervals along their lengths, the condenser/vapor tube and the return artery are interconnected through porous plugs. This condenser configuration affords tolerance of freezing, variable effective thermal conductance (such that the return temperature remains nearly constant, independently of the ultimate sink temperature), and overall pressure drop smaller than it would be without the porous interconnections. An additional benefit of this configuration is that the condenser can be made to recover from the completely frozen condition either without using heaters, or else with the help of heaters much smaller than would otherwise be needed. The second condenser affords the same advantages and is based on a similar principle, but it has a different configuration that affords improved flow of working fluid, simplified construction, reduced weight, and faster recovery from a frozen condition.

  13. Studies on Freezing RAM Semen in Absence of Glycerol.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelnaby, Abdelhady Abdelhakeam

    1988-12-01

    Glycerol is widely used as a major cryoprotective agent for freezing spermatozoa of almost all species. However, it reduces fertility of sheep inseminated cervically compared with intrauterine insemination. Studies were conducted to develop a method and procedure for freezing ram semen in the absence of glycerol. Post -thaw survival of ram spermatozoa frozen in the absence of glycerol was affected by time and temperature after collection and before dilution and time after dilution and before freezing. Increase in time at 5^ circC before or after dilution and before freezing increased both post-thaw motility and number of cells passing through Sephadex filter. A cold dilution method was developed. Slow cooling of fresh ram semen and diluting at 5^circ C 2-3 hr. after collection, then freezing 1 hr. after dilution improved both post-thaw motility and number of cells passing through Sephadex filter compared with immediate dilution at 30-37^circC after collection and freezing 3-4 hr. later (P < 0.05). An extender was developed to freeze ram semen in the absence of glycerol. An increase in post-thaw motility was obtained when semen was extended in TES titrated with Tris to pH 7.0 (TEST) and osmotic pressure of 375-400 mOsm/kg, containing 25-30% (v/v) egg yolk and 10% (v/v) maltose. A special device (boat) for freezing was constructed to insure the same height of the sample above LN _2 and thus the same freezing rate from freeze to freeze. Freezing of semen in 0.25cc straws at 5-10 cm above LN_2 (73.8 to 49.5 ^circC/min) yielded higher post-thaw motility than the rates resulted from freezing at 15 cm above LN_2 or 1 cm above LN _2. Faster Thawing in 37^ circC water for 30 sec. (7.8^ circC/sec.) increased post-thaw motility compared with slower thawing in 5 or 20^circ C water (P < 0.05). A lambing rate of 52.2% was obtained in one fertility trial conducted with ram semen frozen without glycerol and 17.1% in a second trial. One injection (IM) of 15 mg PGF_{2alpha}/ewe for estrus synchronization during breeding season resulted in higher heat response and lambing rate than two injections given 10 days apart.

  14. Cloud point extraction for the spectrophotometric determination of phosphorus(V) in water samples.

    PubMed

    Afkhami, Abbas; Norooz-Asl, Rasoul

    2009-08-15

    A rapid, selective and sensitive cloud point extraction process using the nonionic surfactant, Triton X-114, to extract phosphorus in the form of orthophosphate from aqueous solutions was investigated. The method is based on the color reaction of orthophosphate with molybdate in acidic medium and in the presence of Sb(III) and ascorbic acid, then cloud point extraction of phosphomolybdenum blue in micellar medium. Effects of reaction and extraction parameters were studied and optimum parameters were established. The analytical characteristics of the method (e.g., limit of detection, linear range, relative standard deviation) were obtained. Linearity was obeyed in the range of 1.0-125 ng mL(-1) of P. The detection limit of the method was 0.5 ng mL(-1) of P. The interference effect of some common ions was also tested. The method was applied to the determination of orthophosphate in natural water samples. PMID:19201535

  15. Impacts by point and diffuse micropollutant sources on the stream water quality at catchment scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petersen, M. F.; Eriksson, E.; Binning, P. J.; Bjerg, P. L.

    2012-04-01

    The water quality of surface waters is threatened by multiple anthropogenic pollutants and the large variety of pollutants challenges the monitoring and assessment of the water quality. The aim of this study was to characterize and quantify both point and diffuse sources of micropollutants impacting the water quality of a stream at catchment scale. Grindsted stream in western Jutland, Denmark was used as a study site. The stream passes both urban and agricultural areas and is impacted by severe groundwater contamination in Grindsted city. Along a 12 km reach of Grindsted stream, the potential pollution sources were identified including a pharmaceutical factory site with a contaminated old drainage ditch, two waste deposits, a wastewater treatment plant, overflow structures, fish farms, industrial discharges and diffuse agricultural and urban sources. Six water samples were collected along the stream and analyzed for general water quality parameters, inorganic constituents, pesticides, sulfonamides, chlorinated solvents, BTEXs, and paracetamol and ibuprofen. The latter two groups were not detected. The general water quality showed typical conditions for a stream in western Jutland. Minor impacts by releases of organic matter and nutrients were found after the fish farms and the waste water treatment plant. Nickel was found at concentrations 5.8 - 8.8 ?g/l. Nine pesticides and metabolites of both agricultural and urban use were detected along the stream; among these were the two most frequently detected and some rarely detected pesticides in Danish water courses. The concentrations were generally consistent with other findings in Danish streams and in the range 0.01 - 0.09 ?g/l; except for metribuzin-diketo that showed high concentrations up to 0.74 ?g/l. The groundwater contamination at the pharmaceutical factory site, the drainage ditch and the waste deposits is similar in composition containing among others sulfonamides and chlorinated solvents (including vinyl chloride). Vinyl chloride concentrations surpassed Danish stream water quality criteria with a factor 10. The largest chemical impact occurs at the reach downstream Grindsted city revealing that the main contaminant groundwater discharge zones are found here. The contaminant plume from the factory site north of the stream is known to impact the stream whereas the impact by the old landfill south of the stream remains to be assessed. A conceptual model of the chemical impacts by the identified sources was made, and high impact was assigned to the contaminant plume from the factory site and to the diffuse sources of urban-use and agricultural pesticides. The next step will be a quantification of the sources, which will be presented at the conference.

  16. Point-Source Contributions to the Water Quality of an Urban Stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Little, S. F. B.; Young, M.; Lowry, C.

    2014-12-01

    Scajaquada Creek, which runs through the heart of the city of Buffalo, is a prime example of the ways in which human intervention and local geomorphology can impact water quality and urban hydrology. Beginning in the 1920's, the Creek has been partially channelized and connected to Buffalo's combined sewer system (CSS). At Forest Lawn Cemetery, where this study takes place, Scajaquada Creek emerges from a 3.5-mile tunnel built to route stream flow under the city. Collocated with the tunnel outlet is a discharge point for Buffalo's CSS, combined sewer outlet (CSO) #53. It is at this point that runoff and sanitary sewage discharge regularly during rain events. Initially, this study endeavored to create a spatial and temporal picture for this portion of the Creek, monitoring such parameters as conductivity, dissolved oxygen, pH, temperature, and turbidity, in addition to measuring Escherichia coli (E. coli) concentrations. As expected, these factors responded directly to seasonality, local geomorphology, and distance from the point source (CSO #53), displaying a overall, linear response. However, the addition of nitrate and phosphate testing to the study revealed an entirely separate signal from that previously observed. Concentrations of these parameters did not respond to location in the same manner as E. coli. Instead of decreasing with distance from the CSO, a distinct periodicity was observed, correlating with a series of outflow pipes lining the stream banks. It is hypothesized that nitrate and phosphate occurring in this stretch of Scajaquada Creek originate not from the CSO, but from fertilizers used to maintain the lawns within the subwatershed. These results provide evidence of the complexity related to water quality issues in urban streams as a result of point- and nonpoint-source hydrologic inputs.

  17. TESTING & EVALUATION OF POINT-OF-USE (POU) AND POINT-OF-ENTRY (POE) TECHNOLOGIES FOR DRINKING WATER TREATMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Centralized water treatment and distribution are still the recommended methods for producing safe drinking water. But in reality this approach cannot and will not meet the needs of millions of homes in both the U.S. and around the world, which do not have the option of connectin...

  18. California State Waters Map Series—Offshore of Pigeon Point, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cochrane, Guy R.; Watt, Janet T.; Dartnell, Peter; Greene, H. Gary; Erdey, Mercedes D.; Dieter, Bryan E.; Golden, Nadine E.; Johnson, Samuel Y.; Endris, Charles A.; Hartwell, Stephen R.; Kvitek, Rikk G.; Davenport, Clifton W.; Krigsman, Lisa M.; Ritchie, Andrew C.; Sliter, Ray W.; Finlayson, David P.; Maier, Katherine L.

    2015-01-01

    The Offshore of Pigeon Point map area lies within the cold-temperate biogeographic zone that is called either the “Oregonian province” or the “northern California ecoregion.” This biogeographic province is maintained by the long-term stability of the southward-flowing California Current, the eastern limb of the North Pacific subtropical gyre that flows from southern British Columbia to Baja California. At its midpoint off central California, the California Current transports subarctic surface (0–500 m deep) waters southward, about 150 to 1,300 km from shore. Seasonal northwesterly winds that are, in part, responsible for the California Current,

  19. Effective thermostat induced by coarse graining of simple point charge water.

    PubMed

    Eriksson, Anders; Jacobi, Martin Nilsson; Nyström, Johan; Tunstrøm, Kolbjørn

    2008-07-14

    We investigate how the transport properties of a united atom fluid with a dissipative particle dynamics thermostat depend on the functional form and magnitude of both the conservative and the stochastic interactions. We demonstrate how the thermostat strongly affects the hydrodynamics, especially diffusion, viscosity, and local escape times. As model system we use simple point charge (SPC) water, from which projected trajectories are used to determine the effective interactions in the united atom model. The simulation results support our argument that the thermostat should be viewed as an integral part of the coarse-grained dynamics rather than a tool for approaching thermal equilibrium. As our main result we show that the united atom model with the adjusted effective interactions approximately reproduces the diffusion constant and the viscosity of the underlying detailed SPC water model. PMID:18624515

  20. Performance Characteristics of an Isothermal Freeze Valve

    SciTech Connect

    Hailey, A.E.

    2001-08-22

    This document discusses performance characteristics of an isothermal freeze valve. A freeze valve has been specified for draining the DWPF melter at the end of its lifetime. Two freeze valve designs have been evaluated on the Small Cylindrical Melter-2 (SCM-2). In order to size the DWPF freeze valve, the basic principles governing freeze valve behavior need to be identified and understood.

  1. Freezing-induced deformation of biomaterials in cryomedicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozcelikkale, Altug

    Cryomedicine utilizes low temperature treatments of biological proteins, cells and tissues for cryopreservation, materials processing and cryotherapy. Lack of proper understanding of cryodamage that occurs during these applications remains to be the primary bottleneck for development of successful tissue cryopreservation and cryosurgery procedures. An engineering approach based on a view of biological systems as functional biomaterials can help identify, predict and control the primary cryodamage mechanisms by developing an understanding of underlying freezing-induced biophysical processes. In particular, freezing constitutes the main structural/mechanical origin of cryodamage and results in significant deformation of biomaterials at multiple length scales. Understanding of these freezing-induced deformation processes and their effects on post-thaw biomaterial functionality is currently lacking but will be critical to engineer improved cryomedicine procedures. This dissertation addresses this problem by presenting three separate but related studies of freezing-induced deformation at multiple length scales including nanometer-scale protein fibrils, single cells and whole tissues. A combination of rigorous experimentation and computational modeling is used to characterize post-thaw biomaterial structure and properties, predict biomaterial behavior and assess its post-thaw biological functionality. Firstly, freezing-induced damage on hierarchical extracellular matrix structure of collagen is investigated at molecular, fibril and matrix levels. Results indicate to a specific kind of fibril damage due to freezing-induced expansion of intrafibrillar fluid. This is followed by a study of freezing-induced cell and tissue deformation coupled to osmotically driven cellular water transport. Computational and semi empirical modeling of these processes indicate that intracellular deformation of the cell during freezing is heterogeneous and can interfere with cellular water transport, thereby leading to previously unconsidered mechanisms of cell freezing response. In addition, cellular water transport is identified as the critical limiting factor on the amount of freezing-induced tissue deformation, particularly in native tissues with high cell densities. Finally, effects of cryopreservation on post-thaw biological functionality of collagen engineered tissue constructs is investigated where cell-matrix interactions during fibroblast migration are considered as the functional response. Simultaneous cell migration and extracellular matrix deformation are characterized. Results show diminished cell-matrix coupling by freeze/thaw accompanied by a subtle decrease in cell migration. A connection between these results and freezing-induced collagen fibril damage is also suggested. Overall, this dissertation provides new fundamental knowledge on cryodamage mechanisms and a collection of novel multi-purpose engineering tools that will open the way for rational design of cryomedicine technologies.

  2. Removal of virus to protozoan sized particles in point-of-use ceramic water filters.

    PubMed

    Bielefeldt, Angela R; Kowalski, Kate; Schilling, Cherylynn; Schreier, Simon; Kohler, Amanda; Scott Summers, R

    2010-03-01

    The particle removal performance of point-of-use ceramic water filters (CWFs) was characterized in the size range of 0.02-100 microm using carboxylate-coated polystyrene fluorescent microspheres, natural particles and clay. Particles were spiked into dechlorinated tap water, and three successive water batches treated in each of six different CWFs. Particle removal generally increased with increasing size. The removal of virus-sized 0.02 and 0.1 microm spheres were highly variable between the six filters, ranging from 63 to 99.6%. For the 0.5 microm spheres removal was less variable and in the range of 95.1-99.6%, while for the 1, 2, 4.5, and 10 microm spheres removal was >99.6%. Recoating four of the CWFs with colloidal silver solution improved removal of the 0.02 microm spheres, but had no significant effects on the other particle sizes. Log removals of 1.8-3.2 were found for natural turbidity and spiked kaolin clay particles; however, particles as large as 95 microm were detected in filtered water. PMID:19926110

  3. Supressed Water Crystallization in Nano-Structured Physical Hydrogel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiener, Clinton; Vogt, Bryan; Weiss, Robert

    2015-03-01

    Suppressed water crystallization occurs in some organisms, such as the common wood frog, which allows it to hibernate in a frozen state without damage to its cells. Knowledge of the behavior of supercooled water and alternate ice forms may have many implications to many fields of science. Supercooling of water by several degrees below the normal freezing point is often observed in hydrogels that have attractive interactions with water, e.g., hydrogen bonding. Repulsive confinement, such as in hydrophobic porous carbon, can have even more significant effects on the supercooling of the entrapped water. This talk describes the freezing behavior in nano-structured, hydrophobically modified poly(dimethyl acrylamide) hydrogels that possess attractive and repulsive interactions with water and are physically crosslinked by hydrophobic nanodomains. Three distinct water freezing regimes were observed in the hydrogel swollen to about 50% water by weight. Differential scanning calorimetry detected three crystallization exotherms at 254K, 244K, and 227K. Quasi-elastic neutron scattering experiments have shown that although the water mobility was suppressed at room temperature, the water remained significantly mobile below the normal freezing point of water. The talk will discuss how tuning the concentration of the hydrophobic composition of the hydrogel affects the porous length scales in the hydrogel, which may alter the state of water and the crystal form produced by supercooling.

  4. The Long-Term Drift of Triple-Point-of-Water Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, X. K.; Ma, C. F.; Zhang, Z.; Wu, H. L.; Qiu, P.; Feng, Y. L.; Zhang, J. T.; Duan, Y. N.

    2008-06-01

    As the triple point of water is of great importance for the International Temperature Scale of 1990 (ITS-90) and for the definition of the unit of thermodynamic temperature, its long-term stability has attracted a great deal of attention. In a study of long-term stability, a mystery has been uncovered. Some triple-point-of-water cells remain stable for many decades, while others decrease with increasing age of the cells, which is called long-term drift. To investigate this mystery, we used cells with different manufacture dates ranging from 1974 to 2002 and compared their analyses, which were done in 1984 and 2003. Using the same model of long-term drift as that used by Hill, the long-term drift rates of the two data sets are 4.7 ?K·year-1 and 9.2 ?K·year-1, respectively. One is consistent with the observed depression of about 4 ?K·year-1 measured by Hill, whereas the other differs greatly from Hill’s result. In addition, corresponding factors influencing long-term drift are discussed in this paper.

  5. Melting point equations for the ternary system water/sodium chloride/ethylene glycol revisited.

    PubMed

    Benson, James D; Bagchi, Aniruddha; Han, Xu; Critser, John K; Woods, Erik J

    2010-12-01

    Partial phase diagrams are of considerable utility in the development of optimized cryobiological procedures. Recent theoretical predictions of the melting points of ternary solutions of interest to cryobiology have caused us to re-examine measurements that our group made for the ethylene-glycol-sodium chloride-water phase diagram. Here we revisit our previous experiments by measuring melting points at five ethylene-glycol to sodium chloride ratios (R values; R=5, 10, 15, 30, and 45) and five levels of concentration for each ratio. Melting points were averaged from three measurements and plotted as a function of total solute concentration for each R value studied. The new measurements differed from our original experimental values and agreed with predicted values from both theoretical models. Additionally, the data were fit to the polynomial described in our previous report and the resulting equation was obtained: T(m) = (38.3-2.145 x 10?¹ R)w + (81.19 - 2.909×10?¹ R)w², where w is the total solute mass fraction. This new equation provided good fits to the experimental data as well as published values and relates the determined polynomial constants to the R value of the corresponding isopleths of the three dimensional phase diagram, allowing the liquids curve for any R value to be obtained. PMID:20955693

  6. Freezing in Sealed Capillaries for Preparation of Frozen Hydrated Sections

    PubMed Central

    Yakovlev, Sergey; Downing, Kenneth H.

    2014-01-01

    We have investigated the freezing of specimens in a confined volume for preparation of vitreous samples for cryosectioning. With 15% dextran as a cryoprotectant, a sample sealed in a copper tube begins to freeze into crystalline ice when plunged into liquid ethane. Crystallization rapidly causes an increase in the pressure to the point that much of the sample freezes in a vitreous state. We used synchrotron X-ray diffraction of samples frozen with various amounts of dextran to characterize the ice phases and crystal orientation, providing insights on the freezing process. We have characterized cryosections obtained from these samples to explore the optimum amount of cryoprotectant. Images of cryosectioned bacteria frozen with various levels of cryoprotectant illustrate effects of cryoprotectant concentration. PMID:22077543

  7. Mineralization of Carbon and Nitrogen from Freeze-and Oven-Dried Plant Material Added to Soil

    E-print Network

    Florida, University of

    Mineralization of Carbon and Nitrogen from Freeze- and Oven-Dried Plant Material Added to Soil K. K. Freeze- and oven-dried water hyacinth (Eichhornia crassipes [Mart] Solms) was added to a Kendricksoil the mineral content of the plant material compared to freeze drying. The total C and N was not significantly

  8. Synchrotron X-ray Diffraction Investigation of the Anomalous Behavior of Ice During Freezing of Aqueous Systems

    E-print Network

    Elliott, James

    Synchrotron X-ray Diffraction Investigation of the Anomalous Behavior of Ice During Freezing be used to quantify stresses during freezing, which could improve our understanding of the role of water, such as freeze-induced destabilization of biological systems, and laboratory or industrial practices

  9. Cloud point extraction for speciation of chromium in water samples by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiashi; Hu, Bin; Jiang, Zucheng; Li, Mingfang

    2005-02-01

    A new method based on the cloud point extraction (CPE) separation and electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS) detection was proposed for the determination of chromium species. When the system temperature is higher than the cloud point extraction temperature (CPT) of selected surfactant p-octyl polyethyleneglycolphenyether (Triton X-100), the complex of Cr(VI) with dibromophenylfluorone (Br-PF) could enter surfactant-rich phase, whereas the Cr(III) remained in aqueous phase. Thus, an in situ separation of Cr(VI) and Cr(III) could be realized. Cr(VI) in surfactant-rich phase was analyzed by ETAAS and Cr(III) was calculated by subtracting of Cr(VI) from the total chromium which was directly determined by ETAAS. The main factors affecting the cloud point extraction, such as pH, concentration of Br-PF and Triton X-100, equilibration temperature and time, were investigated systematically. Under the optimized conditions, the quantitation limit for Cr(VI) as low as 0.01 microg/L was obtained by preconcentrating a 10 mL sample solution, and the relative standard deviation (n=6, c=2.0 microg/L) was 2.6%. The proposed method was applied to the speciation of chromium in different water samples and the recoveries in the range of 98.9-105.3% were obtained by spiking the real samples. In order to verify the accuracy of the method, a certified reference water sample was analyzed and the results obtained were in good agreement with the certified values. PMID:15707631

  10. Disaggregating meteorites by automated freeze thaw.

    PubMed

    Charles, Christopher R J

    2011-06-01

    An automated freeze-thaw (AFT) instrument for disaggregating meteorites is described. Meteorite samples are immersed in 18.2 M? water and hermetically sealed in a clean 30 ml Teflon vial. This vial and its contents are dipped between baths of liquid nitrogen and hot water over a number of cycles by a dual-stepper motor system controlled by LabView. Uniform and periodic intervals of freezing and thawing induce multiple expansions and contractions, such that cracks propagate along natural flaws in the meteorite for a sufficient number of AFT cycles. For the CR2 chondrite NWA801, the boundaries between different phases (i.e., silicates, metal, matrix) became progressively weaker and allowed for an efficient recovery of 500 individual chondrules and chondrule fragments spanning 0.2-4.7 mm diameters after 243 AFT cycles over 103.3 h. Further FT experiments on a basalt analog showed that the time required for freezing and thawing the same number of cycles can be reduced by a factor of ?4. PMID:21721725

  11. 9 CFR 590.534 - Freezing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Freezing facilities. 590.534 Section 590.534...Processing, and Facility Requirements § 590.534 Freezing facilities. (a) Freezing rooms, either on or off the premises,...

  12. 9 CFR 590.534 - Freezing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Freezing facilities. 590.534 Section 590.534...Processing, and Facility Requirements § 590.534 Freezing facilities. (a) Freezing rooms, either on or off the premises,...

  13. 9 CFR 590.534 - Freezing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Freezing facilities. 590.534 Section 590.534...Processing, and Facility Requirements § 590.534 Freezing facilities. (a) Freezing rooms, either on or off the premises,...

  14. 9 CFR 590.534 - Freezing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Freezing facilities. 590.534 Section 590.534...Processing, and Facility Requirements § 590.534 Freezing facilities. (a) Freezing rooms, either on or off the premises,...

  15. 9 CFR 590.534 - Freezing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Freezing facilities. 590.534 Section 590.534...Processing, and Facility Requirements § 590.534 Freezing facilities. (a) Freezing rooms, either on or off the premises,...

  16. Reaction kinetics and critical phenomena: iodination of acetone in isobutyric acid + water near the consolute point.

    PubMed

    Hu, Baichuan; Baird, James K

    2010-01-14

    The rate of iodination of acetone has been measured as a function of temperature in the binary solvent isobutyric acid (IBA) + water near the upper consolute point. The reaction mixture was prepared by the addition of acetone, iodine, and potassium iodide to IBA + water at its critical composition of 38.8 mass % IBA. The value of the critical temperature determined immediately after mixing was 25.43 degrees C. Aliquots were extracted from the mixture at regular intervals in order to follow the time course of the reaction. After dilution of the aliquot with water to quench the reaction, the concentration of triiodide ion was determined by the measurement of the optical density at a wavelength of 565 nm. These measurements showed that the kinetics were zeroth order. When at the end of 24 h the reaction had come to equilibrium, the critical temperature was determined again and found to be 24.83 degrees C. An Arrhenius plot of the temperature dependence of the observed rate constant, k(obs), was linear over the temperature range 27.00-38.00 degrees C, but between 25.43 and 27.00 degrees C, the values of k(obs) fell below the extrapolation of the Arrhenius line. This behavior is evidence in support of critical slowing down. Our experimental method and results are significant in three ways: (1) In contrast to in situ measurements of optical density, the determination of the optical density of diluted aliquots avoided any interference from critical opalescence. (2) The measured reaction rate exhibited critical slowing down. (3) The rate law was pseudo zeroth order both inside and outside the critical region, indicating that the reaction mechanism was unaffected by the presence of the critical point. PMID:19928887

  17. Assessing point-of-use ultraviolet disinfection for safe water in urban developing communities.

    PubMed

    Barstow, Christina K; Dotson, Aaron D; Linden, Karl G

    2014-12-01

    Residents of urban developing communities often have a tap in their home providing treated and sometimes filtered water but its microbial quality cannot be guaranteed. Point-of-use (POU) disinfection systems can provide safe drinking water to the millions who lack access to clean water in urban communities. While many POU systems exist, there are several concerns that can lead to low user acceptability, including low flow rate, taste and odor issues, high cost, recontamination, and ineffectiveness at treating common pathogens. An ultraviolet (UV) POU system was constructed utilizing developing community-appropriate materials and simple construction techniques based around an inexpensive low-wattage, low pressure UV bulb. The system was tested at the bench scale to characterize its hydrodynamic properties and microbial disinfection efficacy. Hydraulically the system most closely resembled a plug flow reactor with minor short-circuiting. The system was challenge tested and validated for a UV fluence of 50 mJ/cm(2) and greater, over varying flow rates and UV transmittances, corresponding to a greater than 4 log reduction of most pathogenic bacteria, viruses, and protozoa of public health concern. This study presents the designed system and testing results to demonstrate the potential architecture of a low-cost, open-source UV system for further prototyping and field-testing. PMID:25473974

  18. Incorporation of copper nanoparticles into paper for point-of-use water purification

    PubMed Central

    Smith, James A.

    2014-01-01

    As a cost-effective alternative to silver nanoparticles, we have investigated the use of copper nanoparticles in paper filters for point-of-use water purification. This work reports an environmentally benign method for the direct in situ preparation of copper nanoparticles (CuNPs) in paper by reducing sorbed copper ions with ascorbic acid. Copper nanoparticles were quickly formed in less than 10 minutes and were well distributed on the paper fiber surfaces. Paper sheets were characterized by x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, and atomic absorption spectroscopy. Antibacterial activity of the CuNP sheets was assessed for by passing Escherichia coli bacteria suspensions through the papers. The effluent was analyzed for viable bacteria and copper release. The CuNP papers with higher copper content showed a high bacteria reduction of log 8.8 for E. coli. The paper sheets containing copper nanoparticles were effective in inactivating the test bacteria as they passed through the paper. The copper levels released in the effluent water were below the recommended limit for copper in drinking water (1 ppm). PMID:25014431

  19. Understanding Slag Freeze Linings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fallah-Mehrjardi, Ata; Hayes, Peter C.; Jak, Evgueni

    2014-09-01

    Slag freeze linings, the formation of protective deposit layers on the inner walls of furnaces and reactors, are increasingly used in industrial pyrometallurgical processes to ensure that furnace integrity is maintained in these aggressive, high-temperature environments. Most previous studies of freeze-linings have analyzed the formation of slag deposits based solely on heat transfer considerations. These thermal models have assumed that the interface between the stationary frozen layer and the agitated molten bath at steady-state deposit thickness consists of the primary phase, which stays in contact with the bulk liquid at the liquidus temperature. Recent experimental studies, however, have clearly demonstrated that the temperature of the deposit/liquid bath interface can be lower than the liquidus temperature of the bulk liquid. A conceptual framework has been proposed to explain the observations and the factors influencing the microstructure and the temperature of the interface at steady-state conditions. The observations are consistent with a dynamic steady state that is a balance between (I) the rate of nucleation and growth of solids on detached crystals in a subliquidus layer as this fluid material moves toward the stagnant deposit interface and (II) the dissolution of these detached crystals as they are transported away from the interface by turbulent eddies. It is argued that the assumption that the interface temperature is the liquidus of the bulk material represents only a limiting condition, and that the interface temperature can be between T liquidus and T solidus depending on the process conditions and bath chemistry. These findings have implications for the modeling approach and boundary conditions required to accurately describe these systems. They also indicate the opportunity to integrate considerations of heat and mass flows with the selection of melt chemistries in the design of future high temperature industrial reactors.

  20. Freeze shoe sampler for the collection of hyporheic zone sediments and porewater.

    PubMed

    Bianchin, M; Smith, L; Beckie, R

    2015-01-01

    The Starr and Ingleton (1992) drive point piston sampler (DPPS) design was modified by fitting it with a Murphy and Herkelrath (1996) type sample-freezing drive shoe (SFDS), which uses liquid carbon dioxide as a cryogen. Liquid carbon dioxide was used to freeze sediments in the lower 0.1?m of the core and the drive-point piston sealed the core at the top preserving the reductive-oxidation (redox) sensitive sediments from the atmosphere and maintaining natural stratigraphy. The use of nitrogen gas to provide positive pressure on the gas system blocked the ingress of water which froze on contact with the cryogen thus blocking the gas lines with ice. With this adaptation to the gas system cores could be collected at greater depths beneath the static water level. This tool was used to collect intact saturated sediment cores from the hyporheic zone of the tidally influenced Fraser River in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada where steep geochemical and microbial gradients develop within the interface between discharging anaerobic groundwater and recharging aerobic river water. In total, 25 cores driven through a 1.5?m sampling interval were collected from the river bed with a mean core recovery of 75%. The ability to deploy this method from a fishing vessel makes the tool more cost effective than traditional marine-based drilling operations which often use barges, tug boats, and drilling rigs. PMID:24825508

  1. Intercomparisons of Stratospheric Water Vapor Sensors: FLASH-B and NOAA/CMDL Frost-Point Hygrometer

    E-print Network

    Vömel, Holger

    Intercomparisons of Stratospheric Water Vapor Sensors: FLASH-B and NOAA/CMDL Frost-Point Hygrometer and Diagnostics Laboratory (CMDL) frost-point hygrometer and the Fluorescent Advanced Stratospheric Hygrometer for Balloon (FLASH-B) Lyman-alpha hygrometer is reported. Both instruments were part of a small balloon

  2. The role of time in heterogeneous freezing nucleation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, Timothy P.; Petters, Markus D.

    2013-05-01

    A small fraction of particles in the atmosphere can catalyze ice formation in cloud water drops through heterogeneous freezing nucleation at temperatures warmer than the homogeneous freezing temperature of approximately -38°C. The rate for heterogeneous freezing nucleation is dependent on several factors, including the type and surface area of dust that is immersed inside the drop. Although nucleation is an inherently stochastic process resulting from size fluctuations of the incipient ice germ, there is a growing body of literature that suggests that quasi-deterministic models of ice nucleation can describe laboratory experiments. Here we present new experiments and simulations that aim to better constrain theoretical models fitted to laboratory data. We collected ice nucleation data for Arizona Test Dust aerosol immersed in water using a droplet freezing assay setup that allows for the cooling rates to be changed between 10 and 0.01 K min-1. Discrete event simulations based on a variant of the multiple-component stochastic model of heterogeneous freezing nucleation were used to simulate different experimental procedures. The nucleation properties of the dust are specified by four material-dependent parameters that accurately describe the time dependence of the freezing process. We anticipate that the combination of discrete event simulations and a spectrum of experimental procedures described here can be used to design more meaningful laboratory experiments probing ice nucleation and will aid the development of better parameterizations for use in models.

  3. Developing a Framework to Estimate Land Use Export Coefficients for the Modelling of Point and Non Point Source Pollutant Loads into Water Bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrestha, S.; Kazama, F.

    2006-12-01

    Several methodologies have been developed to estimate point and non point source pollution loadings into water bodies. These methodologies range from field data collection to modelling studies. Modelling techniques ranges from simple export coefficient models, regression models to complex mechanistic models. All export coefficients models and some complex mechanistic models have frequently relied on land use based export coefficients to estimate pollution sources and transport in large watersheds. Typically, land use export coefficients are determined by monitoring single land uses, such as forest, row crop or urban, using field plots to isolate individual land uses. However, the use of export coefficients derived from field plot techniques cannot be used in catchment scale water quality modelling owing to the number of limitations. Therefore, the general objective of this paper is to provide a framework to estimate the land use export coefficients of nutrients, organic matters and suspended sediments from available long-term in-stream water quality monitoring data sets by addressing and minimizing the limitations and disadvantages of the field plot isolation techniques. Several readily and freely available statistical, spatial and hydrological tools and multiple regression methodology was proposed to estimate land use export coefficients from a mixture of land uses for the modelling of pollutant loads in a catchment scale. A case study was carried out by employing the developed methodology to estimate loadings of organic matters and nutrients from both point and non point sources into Fuji River, Japan. First, we estimated land use export coefficients of organic matters and nutrients specific to Fuji river basin. These land use export coefficients were used to estimate the total loadings and relative contribution of point and non point source loadings of organic matters and nutrients within the basin by developing an empirical source-contribution model. The comparable estimated loadings to observed loadings shows that the methodology can be used to estimate land use export coefficients from mixture of land uses and catchment scale pollution loading estimation.

  4. Thermal freeze-out versus chemical freeze-out reexamined

    E-print Network

    Dariusz Prorok

    2010-03-04

    An alternative, to the commonly used blast-wave, model describing the freeze-out hypersurface is applied to fit the $p_{T}$-spectra of identified hadrons measured at relativistic heavy-ion collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}=62.4, 130$ and 200 GeV. Decays of resonances are taken into account completely. It has turned out that the fitted freeze-out temperature and baryon number chemical potential depend weakly on the centrality of the collision and their values are close to the chemical freeze-out values determined from fits to particle yield ratios.

  5. Freeze Tolerant Radiator for an Advanced EMU

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Copeland, Robert J.; Elliott, Jeannine; Weislogel, Mark

    2004-01-01

    During an Extravehicular Activity (EVA), the astronaut s metabolic heat and the heat produced by the Portable Life Support Unit (PLSS) must be rejected. This heat load is currently rejected by a sublimator, which vents up to eight pounds of water each EVA. However, for advanced space missions of the future, water venting to space needs to be minimized because resupply impacts from earth will be prohibitive. If this heat load could be radiated to space from the PLSS, which has enough surface area to radiate most of the heat, the amount of water now vented could be greatly reduced. Unfortunately, a radiator rejects heat at a relatively constant rate, but the astronauts generate a variable heat load depending on how hard they are working. Without a way to vary the heat removal rate, the astronaut would experience cold discomfort or even frostbite. A proven method allowing a radiator to be turned-down is to sequentially allow tubes that carry the heat transfer fluid to the radiator to freeze. A drawback of current freezable radiators using this method is that they are far to heavy for use on a PLSS, because they use heavy construction to prevent the tubes from bursting as they freeze and thaw. This creates the need for a large radiator to reject most of the heat but with a lightweight tube that doesn t burst as it freezes and thaws. The new freezable radiator for the Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) has features to accommodate the expansion of the radiator fluid when it freezes, and still have the high tube to fin conductance needed to minimize the number and weight of the tubes. Radiator fluid candidates are water and a propylene glycol-water mixture. This design maintains all materials within their elastic limits so that large volume changes can be achieved without breaking the tube. This concept couples this elastic expansion with an extremely lightweight, extremely high conductivity carbon fiber fin that can carry the heat needed to thaw a frozen tube. By using most of the exposed surface area of the PLSS as a radiator, the system can reject about 75% of the highest heat load, and reduce the loss of water through sublimation by a factor of four. The proposed radiator and a small water tank can be no heavier than the current system.

  6. Sinkholes in West-central Florida, Freeze Event of 2010

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    More than 110 sinkholes formed in the Dover area of Florida during a freeze event in January 2010. Ground water levels dropped to record-setting lows as farmers pumped water to irrigate their plants for protection from the cold temperatures. The sinkholes destroyed homes, roads and se...

  7. Sinkholes in West-central Florida, Freeze Event of 2010

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Sinkholes damage roadways and require constant maintenance for road safety. More than 110 sinkholes formed in the Dover area of Florida during a freeze event in January 2010. Ground water levels dropped to record-setting lows as farmers pumped water to irrigate their plants for protection ...

  8. Sinkholes in West-central Florida, Freeze Event of 2010

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Sinkholes affect roadway safety and require constant maintenance and monitoring. More than 110 sinkholes formed in the Dover area of Florida during a freeze event in January 2010. Ground water levels dropped to record-setting lows as farmers pumped water to irrigate their plants for p...

  9. Sinkholes in West-central Florida, Freeze Event of 2010

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    A sinkhole formed in a roadway caused traffic to detour around it while it is filled in, stabilized and repaved. More than 110 sinkholes formed in the Dover area of Florida during a freeze event in January 2010. Ground water levels dropped to record-setting lows as farmers pumped water to...

  10. Sinkholes in West-central Florida, Freeze Event of 2010

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    The entire root perimeter of this tree collapsed in response to subsidence activity. More than 110 sinkholes formed in the Dover area of Florida during a freeze event in January 2010. Ground water levels dropped to record-setting lows as farmers pumped water to irrigate their plants for pr...

  11. 33 CFR 334.412 - Albemarle Sound, Pamlico Sound, Harvey Point and adjacent waters, NC; restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Albemarle Sound, Pamlico Sound... REGULATIONS § 334.412 Albemarle Sound, Pamlico Sound, Harvey Point and adjacent waters, NC; restricted area. (a) The area. Beginning on the north shore of Albemarle Sound and the easternmost tip of Harvey...

  12. 33 CFR 334.412 - Albemarle Sound, Pamlico Sound, Harvey Point and adjacent waters, NC; restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Albemarle Sound, Pamlico Sound... REGULATIONS § 334.412 Albemarle Sound, Pamlico Sound, Harvey Point and adjacent waters, NC; restricted area. (a) The area. Beginning on the north shore of Albemarle Sound and the easternmost tip of Harvey...

  13. Cloud point extraction, preconcentration and simultaneous spectrophotometric determination of nickel and cobalt in water samples.

    PubMed

    Safavi, A; Abdollahi, H; Hormozi Nezhad, M R; Kamali, R

    2004-10-01

    Cloud point extraction has been used for the preconcentration and simultaneous spectrophotometric determination of nickel and cobalt after the formation of a complex with 2-amino-cyclopentene-1-dithiocarboxylic acid (ACDA), and latter analysis by spectrophotometer using Triton X-114 as surfactant. The parameters affecting the separation phase and detection process were optimized. Under the optimum experimental conditions (i.e. pH=5, 0.07 mM ACDA, Triton X-114=0.25% (w/v)), calibration graphs were linear in the range of 20-500 and 20-200 microg l(-1) with detection limits of 10 and 7.5 microg l(-1) for Ni and Co, respectively. The method was applied to the determination of Ni and Co in natural and waste water samples with satisfactory results. PMID:15350927

  14. Semi-Lagrangian integration of a grid-point shallow water model on the sphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdonald, A.; Bates, J. R.

    1988-01-01

    This paper describes a semi-Lagrangian technique for integrating the equations of motion on the global domain. The technique uses an auxiliary spherical coordinate system at each near-polar gridpoint of the latitude-longitude grid; the auxiliary system is obtained by a rotation such that the new equator passes through the gridpoint in question and the new coordinate directions coincide with those of the original system at that point. The technique was applied to the shallow water equations, incorporating a semiimplicit treatment of the adjustment terms on a C-grid, with two-time levels. A five day integration was successfully carried out for a situation involving strong cross-polar flow. No filtering or diffusion was required to maintain stability over a five day period.

  15. The Temperature of Europa's Subsurface Water Ocean H. J. Melosh, jmelosh@lpl.arizona.edu, Corresponding Author

    E-print Network

    Melosh, H. Jay

    1 The Temperature of Europa's Subsurface Water Ocean H. J. Melosh, jmelosh: Is the temperature of the ocean equal to the freezing point of water at the bottom of the ice shell, or is it equal to the somewhat warmer temperature at which water attains its maximum density? We argue that most of the ocean

  16. [Determination of trace lead in water samples and salt samples by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry after cloud point extraction].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuan; Luo, Wen-Hong; Li, Hui

    2006-07-01

    A method was developed for the determination of trace lead in water samples and salt samples by GFAAS after cloud point extraction. The parameters of extraction system such as pH, the concentrations of the extractant and the surfactant, and the time for cloud point extraction were optimized. Under the optimized conditions, the detection limits of lead were 0.000 5 microg x g(-1) for salt, and 0.01 microg x L(-1) for water, respectively. The proposed method was applied to the determination of lead in water samples and salt samples, and satisfactory results were obtained. PMID:17020058

  17. Including non-point sfources in a water quality trading permit program.

    PubMed

    Collentine, D

    2005-01-01

    There has been overwhelming interest in addressing water quality issues through the use of economic instruments. Much of this attention has focused on the cost efficiencies offered by Transferable Discharge Permit (TDP) systems. Unfortunately, the attempts to start up permit markets which are able to exploit abatement cost differences between sources have not met with the success expected. Two of the reasons for the lack of success that have been taken up in analysis of these programs have been the problem of transaction costs and in the case of non-point sources (NPS), undefined property rights. The composite market design is a proposal for a TDP system which specifically includes agricultural non-point source (NPS) dischargers and addresses both property rights and transaction cost problems. The composite market consists of three interrelated markets each serving a particular function. When the composite market is mature, the total number of permits issued represents the cap on discharges allowed in the catchment. The structure of the composite market allows this system to be phased in over time with existing institutions and limited demands on financing. PMID:15850173

  18. An Experimental Investigation of the Long-Term Stability of Triple-Point-of-Water Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, K. D.

    2014-04-01

    Contamination of triple-point-of-water (TPW) cells by the chemical components of the borosilicate glass that contains the water is now widely recognized as the principal contributor to long-term drift of the cell temperature. To add to the available experimental data, a comparison of 24 TPW cells of various ages (from 10 years to 59 years), manufacturers (NRC, Jarrett, Isotech), and materials (borosilicate glass and fused quartz) was undertaken in 2013. Twelve cells from this group were compared to one another in 1997. By comparing the current inter-cell temperature differences to those determined 16 years earlier, it was found that some cells have remained stable, others have become colder (as might be expected from ongoing dissolution of the glass), and one or two show an apparent increase in temperature that seems anomalous. Also included among the 24 cells are five cells of borosilicate glass and five of fused quartz that were purchased 10 years ago. By comparing the relative temperature differences among this group of borosilcate and fused-quartz-encapsulated cells to the values obtained when they were last compared 6 years ago, it was found that the average temperature of the borosilcate group of cells decreases by , in reasonable agreement with an average drift of suggested 12 years ago. It was concluded that fused quartz is the superior container for TPW cells.

  19. Pollution of surface waters by metalaxyl and nitrate from non-point sources.

    PubMed

    Bermúdez-Couso, Alipio; Fernández-Calviño, David; Álvarez-Enjo, Manuel Ali; Simal-Gándara, Jesús; Nóvoa-Muñoz, Juan Carlos; Arias-Estévez, Manuel

    2013-09-01

    The mobility of contaminants in soil is highly dependent upon the characteristics of the contaminant chemical and the properties of the soil. In order to explore these relationships, the district of A Limia (Galicia, NW Spain) was selected as the study area--a cropland devoted to growing potatoes, where the soil had been managed intensively over the last 50 years. The soil was characterised by low slopes with the water table located very close to the soil surface. Our aim was to study the influence of high and intensive crop production on the water bodies and non-point source contamination, with a particular focus on metalaxyl and nitrate. The highest concentrations of metalaxyl occurred when rainfalls were low and in zones of the study area where natural hydrology was significantly altered by numerous drainage canals. The spatial and temporal distributions of the nitrate also showed a high variability, with the interaction between seasons and sampling area being the most significant factor in explaining the levels found. PMID:23738984

  20. Measuring Total Column Water Vapor by Pointing an Infrared Thermometer at the Sky

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mims, Forrest M., III; Chambers, Lin H.; Brooks, David R.

    2011-01-01

    A 2-year study affirms that the temperature (Tz) indicated by an inexpensive ($20 to $60) IR thermometer pointed at the cloud-free zenith sky provides an approximate indication of the total column water vapor (precipitable water or PW). PW was measured by a MICROTOPS II sun photometer. The coefficient of correlation (r2) of the PW and Tz was 0.90, and the rms difference was 3.2 mm. A comparison of the Tz data with the PW provided by a GPS site 31 km NNE yielded an r2 of 0.79, and an rms difference of 5.8 mm. An expanded study compared Tz from eight IR thermometers with PW at various times during the day and night from 17 May to 18 October 2010, mainly at the Texas site and 10 days at Hawaii's Mauna Loa Observatory (MLO). The best results of this comparison were provided by two IR thermometers models that yielded an r2 of 0.96 and an rms difference with the PW of 2.7 mm. The results of both the ongoing 2-year study and the 5-month instrument comparison show that IR thermometers can measure PW with an accuracy (rms difference/mean PW) approaching 10%, the accuracy typically ascribed to sun photometers.

  1. Instantaneous normal mode analysis for intermolecular and intramolecular vibrations of water from atomic point of view

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Yu-Chun; Tang, Ping-Han; Wu, Ten-Ming; National Center for Theoretical Sciences, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan

    2013-11-28

    By exploiting the instantaneous normal mode (INM) analysis for models of flexible molecules, we investigate intermolecular and intramolecular vibrations of water from the atomic point of view. With two flexible SPC/E models, our investigations include three aspects about their INM spectra, which are separated into the unstable, intermolecular, bending, and stretching bands. First, the O- and H-atom contributions in the four INM bands are calculated and their stable INM spectra are compared with the power spectra of the atomic velocity autocorrelation functions. The unstable and intermolecular bands of the flexible models are also compared with those of the SPC/E model of rigid molecules. Second, we formulate the inverse participation ratio (IPR) of the INMs, respectively, for the O- and H-atom and molecule. With the IPRs, the numbers of the three species participated in the INMs are estimated so that the localization characters of the INMs in each band are studied. Further, by the ratio of the IPR of the H atom to that of the O atom, we explore the number of involved OH bond per molecule participated in the INMs. Third, by classifying simulated molecules into subensembles according to the geometry of their local environments or their H-bond configurations, we examine the local-structure effects on the bending and stretching INM bands. All of our results are verified to be insensible to the definition of H-bond. Our conclusions about the intermolecular and intramolecular vibrations in water are given.

  2. Coastal water circulation patterns around the Northern Channel Islands and Point Conception, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fewings, Melanie R.; Washburn, Libe; Ohlmann, J. Carter

    2015-11-01

    The Northern Channel Islands in California host multiple Marine Protected Areas containing kelp forest ecosystems. Little is known about the water circulation onshore of the 20-m isobath. We use water velocity recorded at 21 sites near the 15-m isobath at the Islands and mainland during 1999-2012 to describe the water circulation on time scales of days to months. The mean circulation is eastward or weak at the Islands but poleward along the mainland (speeds 0-10 cm s-1). The subinertial-frequency along-shelf flow is surface-intensified and reverses direction on time scales of days. In summer, the flow becomes more poleward throughout the region. The mean cross-shelf flow profiles are strikingly similar at most sites, with flow speeds 1-2 cm s-1. The mean flow near bottom in the vicinity of the kelp forests is offshore. The time-varying, two-layered response to wind is stronger, up to 6 cm s-1. The flushing time of the shelf onshore of the 15-m isobath is short, at most ?2 dy. At a few sites exposed to the prevailing wind, up to 60% of the velocity variance is predictable from wind measured in the Santa Barbara Channel. In the lee of Point Conception or at the Islands, however, regional wind explains little of the velocity variance. During weak winds, the velocity at some mainland, but not Island, sites responds to pressure gradients measured along the mainland coast. These pressure gradients are associated with local wind relaxations at Pt. Conception, not with remotely-generated coastal-trapped waves.

  3. Validation of Aura Microwave Limb Sounder stratospheric water vapor measurements by the NOAA frost point hygrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurst, Dale F.; Lambert, Alyn; Read, William G.; Davis, Sean M.; Rosenlof, Karen H.; Hall, Emrys G.; Jordan, Allen F.; Oltmans, Samuel J.

    2014-02-01

    Differences between stratospheric water vapor measurements by NOAA frost point hygrometers (FPHs) and the Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) are evaluated for the period August 2004 through December 2012 at Boulder, Colorado, Hilo, Hawaii, and Lauder, New Zealand. Two groups of MLS profiles coincident with the FPH soundings at each site are identified using unique sets of spatiotemporal criteria. Before evaluating the differences between coincident FPH and MLS profiles, each FPH profile is convolved with the MLS averaging kernels for eight pressure levels from 100 to 26 hPa (~16 to 25 km) to reduce its vertical resolution to that of the MLS water vapor retrievals. The mean FPH - MLS differences at every pressure level (100 to 26 hPa) are well within the combined measurement uncertainties of the two instruments. However, the mean differences at 100 and 83 hPa are statistically significant and negative, ranging from -0.46 ± 0.22 ppmv (-10.3 ± 4.8%) to -0.10 ± 0.05 ppmv (-2.2 ± 1.2%). Mean differences at the six pressure levels from 68 to 26 hPa are on average 0.8% (0.04 ppmv), and only a few are statistically significant. The FPH - MLS differences at each site are examined for temporal trends using weighted linear regression analyses. The vast majority of trends determined here are not statistically significant, and most are smaller than the minimum trends detectable in this analysis. Except at 100 and 83 hPa, the average agreement between MLS retrievals and FPH measurements of stratospheric water vapor is better than 1%.

  4. Measurement of water-holding capacity in raw and freeze-dried broiler breast meat with visible and near-infrared spectroscopy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The feasibility of using visible/near-infrared spectroscopy (vis/NIR) to segregate broiler breast fillets by water-holding capacity (WHC) was determined. Broiler breast fillets (n = 72) were selected from a commercial deboning line based on visual color assessment. Meat color (L*a*b*), pH (2 and 2...

  5. Freezing of Martian streams under climatic conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carr, M. H.

    1984-01-01

    The valley networks of Mars are widely believed to have formed at a time when climatic conditions on the planet were significantly different from those that currently prevail. This view arises from the following observations: (1) the valleys form integrated branching networks which suggests fluid drainage, and water is the most plausible fluid, (2) the present atmosphere contains only minute amounts of water, (3) the networks appear to be more akin to terrestrial valleys that are eroded by streams of modest discharges than features that form by catastrophic floods, and (4) small streams of water will rapidly freeze under present climatic conditions. Climatic conditions at the time of formation of the valleys are studied based on the assumption that they were cut by running water.

  6. Chemical stability of amorphous materials: specific and general media effects in the role of water in the degradation of freeze-dried zoniporide.

    PubMed

    Luthra, Suman A; Shalaev, Evgenyi Y; Medek, Ales; Hong, Jinyang; Pikal, Michael J

    2012-09-01

    The objective of the present work was to determine whether hydrolysis in a model lyophile was influenced by general media effects with water-changing properties of the medium or via a specific mechanism of water as a reactant. Four formulations of zoniporide and sucrose (1:10) were prepared with variable amounts of sorbitol [0%-25% (w/v) of total solids). These formulations were then equilibrated at 6% and 11% relative humidity using saturated salt solutions. The lyophile cakes were analyzed by differential scanning calorimetery (DSC), (isothermal microcalorimetry (IMC), solid- state nuclear magnetic resonance (ssNMR) spectroscopy, and ultraviolet-visible diffuse reflectance (DFR) spectroscopy. DSC and IMC were used to assess the global molecular mobility. ssNMR relaxation times were measured to access local mobility. The DFR was used to determine the solid-state acidity expressed as the Hammett acidity function. Stability of samples was evaluated at 40°C by monitoring potency and purity by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Results were interpreted in terms of the various roles of water: media effect, plasticization, polarity, and reactant. The kinetics of hydrolysis was observed to be correlated with either/both specific "chemical" effects, that is, water reactant as well as media effect, specifically global molecular mobility of the matrix. Increase in reaction rate with increase in water content is not linear and is a weaker dependence than in some hydrolytic reactions in organic solvents. A moderate amount of an inert plasticizer, sorbitol, conferred additional stabilization, possibly by restricting the amplitude and frequency of fast motions that are on a small length scale. PMID:22461087

  7. Freeze or dehydrate: only two options for the survival of subzero temperatures in the arctic enchytraeid Fridericia ratzeli.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, P G; Holmstrup, M

    2003-09-01

    Hygrophilic soil animals, like enchytraeids, overwintering in frozen soil are unlikely to base their cold tolerance on supercooling of body fluids. It seems more likely that they will either freeze due to inoculative freezing, or dehydrate and adjust their body fluid melting point to ambient temperature as has been shown for earthworm cocoons and Collembola. In the present study we tested this hypothesis by exposing field-collected adult Fridericia ratzeli from Disko, West Greenland, to freezing temperatures under various moisture regimes. When cooled at -1 degrees C min(-1) under dry conditions F. ratzeli had a mean temperature of crystallisation ( T(c)) of -5.8 degrees C. However, when exposed to temperatures above standard T(c) for 22 h, at -4 degrees C, most individuals (90%, n= 30) remained unfrozen. Slow cooling from -1 degrees C to -6 degrees C in vials where the air was in equilibrium with the vapour pressure of ice resulted in freezing in about 65% of the individuals. These individuals maintained a normal body water content of 2.7-3.0 mg mg(-1) dry weight and had body fluid melting points of about -0.5 degrees C with little or no change due to freezing. About 35% of the individuals dehydrated drastically to below 1.1 mg mg(-1) dry weight at -6 degrees C, and consequently had lowered their body fluid melting point to ca. -6 degrees C at this time. Survival was high in both frozen and dehydrated animals at -6 degrees C, about 60%. Approximately 25% of the animals (both frozen and dehydrated individuals) had elevated glucose concentrations, but the mean glucose concentration was not increased to any great extent in any group due to cold exposure. The desiccating potential of ice was simulated using aqueous NaCl solutions at 0 degrees C. Water loss and survival in this experiment were in good agreement with results from freezing experiments. The influence of soil moisture on survival and tendency to dehydrate was also evaluated. However, soil moisture ranging between 0.74 g g(-1) and 1.15 g g(-1) dry soil did not result in any significant differences in survival or frequency of dehydrated animals even though the apparent wetness and structure of the soil was clearly different in these moisture contents. PMID:12898166

  8. White Spruce Biochar for Point-of-Use Drinking Water Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cliggett, M. S.; Murdoch, L.; Soria, J. A.; Dotson, A.

    2014-12-01

    Small systems regularly struggle to produce treated drinking water compliant with the health standards established by the USEPA thus prompting an obvious need for appropriate innovative treatment solutions. Of these potential solutions, point-of-use treatment devices designed to effectively reduce chemical contaminants in residences using inexpensive, replaceable sorbent materials may be best suited. Our current USEPA-funded project focuses on the production, performance and introduced application of a locally produced Alaskan biochar intended for use as an alternative sorbent media in point-of-use filtration technology. Conducted through the University of Alaska Anchorage, this research effort attempts to develop our value-added biochar product into a sustainable, single-media sorbent capable of removing multiple contaminants from groundwater sources. In this study, the sorptive efficiencies of White Spruce biochar for regulated organic (TOC) and inorganic (As, Cl2, F-) contaminants are experimentally evaluated using dynamic, small scale column testing. To achieve optimal understanding of White Spruce biochar sorption and identify the most effective type of sorbent material, a wide array of production technologies and processing conditions were conducted. Lower conversion temperatures (450-550 oC) were achieved in the laboratory in the absence of oxygen using a manufactured pyrolysis unit while higher temperature ranges (800-1000oC) were achieved in field environments using a custom-built, low oxygen gasification system. Differences in production technologies and corresponding temperature ranges may impact biochar compositions and subsequent surface areas and possibly influence each material's ability to effectively sorb targeted contaminants. Small scale column testing was chosen for this project due to its convenience as a bench-scale technology and scalability to point-of-use devices. The results of this project will reveal the practicality of using this low-cost, sustainable sorbent in small-scale, point-of-use applications and ultimately establish any evidence for this product's undiscovered placement in innovative treatment solutions. This poster will present our biochar production and characterization methodology and treatment efficacy results.

  9. Cirrus crystal nucleation by homogeneous freezing of solution droplets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heymsfield, Andrew J.; Sabin, Robert M.

    1989-01-01

    A numerical model consisting of a system of differential equations is used to study cirrus crystal nucleation in a rising parcel containing a distribution of cloud condensation nuclei. The evolution of the particle population and the thermodynamic variables in the parcel are examined. The results suggest that, if homogeneous freezing is not considered, liquid water should be detected below -40 C. If homogeneous freezing is considered, the rapid growth of ice crystals and vapor depletion prevent water saturation from being reached. It is shown that the likelihood of a droplet being frozen is increased by lower temperatures, larger droplet diameter, or lower solution density.

  10. Alcohol Brine Freezing of Japanese Horse Mackerel (Trachurus japonicus) for Raw Consumption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maeda, Toshimichi; Yuki, Atsuhiko; Sakurai, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Koichiro; Itoh, Nobuo; Inui, Etsuro; Seike, Kazunori; Mizukami, Yoichi; Fukuda, Yutaka; Harada, Kazuki

    In order to test the possible application of alcohol brine freezing to Japanese horse mackerel (Trachurus japonicus) for raw consumption, the quality and taste of fish frozen by direct immersion in 60% ethanol brine at -20, -25 and -30°C was compared with those by air freezing and fresh fish without freezing. Cracks were not found during the freezing. Smell of ethanol did not remain. K value, an indicator of freshness, of fish frozen in alcohol brine was less than 8.3%, which was at the same level as those by air freezing and fresh fish. Oxidation of lipid was at the same level as air freezing does, and lower than that of fresh fish. The pH of fish frozen in alcohol brine at -25 and -30°C was 6.5 and 6.6, respectively, which were higher than that by air freezing and that of fresh fish. Fish frozen in alcohol brine was better than that by air and at the same level as fresh fish in total evaluation of sensory tests. These results show that the alcohol brine freezing is superior to air freezing, and fish frozen in alcohol brine can be a material for raw consumption. The methods of thawing in tap water, cold water, refrigerator, and at room temperature were compared. Thawing in tap water is considered to be convenient due to the short thaw time and the quality of thawed fish that was best among the methods.

  11. A novel bottom-up process to produce drug nanocrystals: controlled crystallization during freeze-drying.

    PubMed

    de Waard, H; Hinrichs, W L J; Frijlink, H W

    2008-06-01

    To improve the dissolution behavior of lipophilic drugs, a novel bottom-up process based upon freeze drying which allows for the production of nanocrystalline particles was developed: "controlled crystallization during freeze drying". This novel process could strongly increase the dissolution behavior of fenofibrate. For example at a drug load of 30% w/w, 80% of the drug dissolved within 10 min from tablets prepared from the controlled crystallized dispersions, while from tablets prepared from the physical mixture only 50% was dissolved after 120 min. Furthermore it was found that faster freezing or using a solution with a lower water/tertiary butyl alcohol (TBA) ratio resulted in faster dissolution, indicating that the crystalline dispersions contained smaller crystals. Crystallization of the drug could occur during freezing or during drying. When crystallization occurs during freezing, faster freezing or using solutions with a lower water/TBA ratio results in the formation of more nuclei and consequently smaller crystals. When crystallization occurs during drying, faster freezing or using solutions with a higher water/TBA ratio results in the formation of smaller solvent crystals and therefore smaller interstitial spaces which contain the freeze-concentrated fraction. Since crystallization occurs in the freeze-concentrated fraction and the size of the crystals are limited to the size of the interstitial spaces, smaller crystals are formed in these situations. PMID:18423767

  12. RESEARCH ARTICLE Cryoprotectants and Extreme Freeze

    E-print Network

    Lee Jr., Richard E.

    RESEARCH ARTICLE Cryoprotectants and Extreme Freeze Tolerance in a Subarctic Population of the Wood in freeze tolerance, with sub- arctic populations tolerating experimental freezing to temperatures at least investigated their physiological responses to somatic freezing at extreme temperatures. Alaskan frogs collected

  13. Introducing freezing cellular automata Taller @ Concepcin

    E-print Network

    Theyssier, Guillaume

    Introducing freezing cellular automata Taller @ Concepción G. Theyssier (CNRS, CMM) October, 2013;#12;Freezing cellular automata Q = {0, . . . , n - 1} with natural order N arbitrary neighborhood F is freezing if x, z : F(x)z xz #12;Freezing cellular automata Q = {0, . . . , n - 1} with natural order N

  14. California State Waters Map Series: offshore of Coal Oil Point, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, Samuel Y.; Dartnell, Peter; Cochrane, Guy R.; Golden, Nadine E.; Phillips, Eleyne L.; Ritchie, Andrew C.; Kvitek, Rikk G.; Dieter, Bryan E.; Conrad, James E.; Lorenson, T.D.; Krigsman, Lisa M.; Greene, H. Gary; Endris, Charles A.; Seitz, Gordon G.; Finlayson, David P.; Sliter, Ray W.; Wong, Florence L.; Erdey, Mercedes D.; Gutierrez, Carlos I.; Leifer, Ira; Yoklavich, Mary M.; Draut, Amy E.; Hart, Patrick E.; Hostettler, Frances D.; Peters, Kenneth E.; Kvenvolden, Keith A.; Rosenbauer, Robert J.; Fong, Grace

    2014-01-01

    In 2007, the California Ocean Protection Council initiated the California Seafloor Mapping Program (CSMP), designed to create a comprehensive seafloor map of high-resolution bathymetry, marine benthic habitats, and geology within the 3-nautical-mile limit of California’s State Waters. The CSMP approach is to create highly detailed seafloor maps through collection, integration, interpretation, and visualization of swath sonar data, acoustic backscatter, seafloor video, seafloor photography, high-resolution seismic-reflection profiles, and bottom-sediment sampling data. The map products display seafloor morphology and character, identify potential marine benthic habitats, and illustrate both the surficial seafloor geology and shallow (to about 100 m) subsurface geology. The Offshore of Coal Oil Point map area lies within the central Santa Barbara Channel region of the Southern California Bight. This geologically complex region forms a major biogeographic transition zone, separating the cold-temperate Oregonian province north of Point Conception from the warm-temperate California province to the south. The map area is in the southern part of the Western Transverse Ranges geologic province, which is north of the California Continental Borderland. Significant clockwise rotation—at least 90°—since the early Miocene has been proposed for the Western Transverse Ranges province, and geodetic studies indicate that the region is presently undergoing north-south shortening. Uplift rates (as much as 2.0 mm/yr) that are based on studies of onland marine terraces provide further evidence of significant shortening. The cities of Goleta and Isla Vista, the main population centers in the map area, are in the western part of a contiguous urban area that extends eastward through Santa Barbara to Carpinteria. This urban area is on the south flank of the east-west-trending Santa Ynez Mountains, on coalescing alluvial fans and uplifted marine terraces underlain by folded and faulted Miocene bedrock. In the map area, the relatively low-relief, elevated coastal bajada narrows from about 2.5 km wide in the east to less than 500 m wide in the west. Several beaches line the actively utilized coastal zone, including Isla Vista County Park beach, Coal Oil Point Reserve, and Goleta Beach County Park. The beaches are subject to erosion each winter during storm-wave attack, and then they undergo gradual recovery or accretion during the more gentle wave climate of the late spring, summer, and fall months. The Offshore of Coal Oil Point map area lies in the central part of the Santa Barbara littoral cell, which is characterized by littoral drift to the east-southeast. Longshore drift rates have been reported to range from about 160,000 to 800,000 tons/yr, averaging 400,000 tons/yr. Sediment supply to the western and central parts of the littoral cell, including the map area, is largely from relatively small transverse coastal watersheds. Within the map area, these coastal watersheds include (from east to west) Las Llagas Canyon, Gato Canyon, Las Varas Canyon, Dos Pueblos Canyon, Eagle Canyon, Tecolote Canyon, Winchester Canyon, Ellwood Canyon, Glen Annie Canyon, and San Jose Creek. The Santa Ynez and Santa Maria Rivers, the mouths of which are about 100 to 140 km northwest of the map area, are not significant sediment sources because Point Conception and Point Arguello provide obstacles to downcoast sediment transport and also because much of their sediment load is trapped in dams. The Ventura and Santa Clara Rivers, the mouths of which are about 45 to 55 km southeast of the map area, are much larger sediment sources. Still farther east, eastward-moving sediment in the littoral cell is trapped by Hueneme and Mugu Canyons and then transported to the deep-water Santa Monica Basin. The offshore part of the map area consists of a relatively flat and shallow continental shelf, which dips gently seaward (about 0.8° to 1.0°) so that water depths at the shelf break, roughly coincident with the California’s State Waters limit, are about 90 m. This part

  15. Freeze avoidance: a dehydrating moss gathers no ice.

    PubMed

    Lenné, Thomas; Bryant, Gary; Hocart, Charles H; Huang, Cheng X; Ball, Marilyn C

    2010-10-01

    Using cryo-SEM with EDX fundamental structural and mechanical properties of the moss Ceratodon purpureus (Hedw.) Brid. were studied in relation to tolerance of freezing temperatures. In contrast to more complex plants, no ice accumulated within the moss during the freezing event. External ice induced desiccation with the response being a function of cell type; water-filled hydroid cells cavitated and were embolized at -4 °C while parenchyma cells of the inner cortex exhibited cytorrhysis, decreasing to ? 20% of their original volume at a nadir temperature of -20 °C. Chlorophyll fluorescence showed that these winter acclimated mosses displayed no evidence of damage after thawing from -20 °C while GCMS showed that sugar concentrations were not sufficient to confer this level of freezing tolerance. In addition, differential scanning calorimetry showed internal ice nucleation occurred in hydrated moss at ?-12 °C while desiccated moss showed no evidence of freezing with lowering of nadir temperature to -20 °C. Therefore the rapid dehydration of the moss provides an elegantly simple solution to the problem of freezing; remove that which freezes. PMID:20525002

  16. Hepatitis B vaccine freezing in the Indonesian cold chain: evidence and solutions.

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Carib M.; Wibisono, Hariadi; Purwanto, Hary; Mansyur, Isa; Moniaga, Vanda; Widjaya, Anton

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To document and characterize freezing temperatures in the Indonesian vaccine cold chain and to evaluate the feasibility of changes designed to reduce the occurrence of freezing. METHODS: Data loggers were used to measure temperatures of shipments of hepatitis B vaccine from manufacturer to point of use. Baseline conditions and three intervention phases were monitored. During each of the intervention phases, vaccines were removed progressively from the standard 2-8 degrees C cold chain. FINDINGS: Freezing temperatures were recorded in 75% of baseline shipments. The highest rates of freezing occurred during transport from province to district, storage in district-level ice-lined refrigerators, and storage in refrigerators in health centres. Interventions reduced freezing, without excessive heat exposure. CONCLUSIONS: Inadvertent freezing of freeze-sensitive vaccines is widespread in Indonesia. Simple strategies exist to reduce freezing - for example, selective transport and storage of vaccines at ambient temperatures. The use of vaccine vial monitors reduces the risk associated with heat-damaged vaccines in these scenarios. Policy changes that allow limited storage of freeze-sensitive vaccines at temperatures >2-8 degrees C would enable flexible vaccine distribution strategies that could reduce vaccine freezing, reduce costs, and increase capacity. PMID:15042231

  17. Dehydrin from citrus, which confers in vitro dehydration and freezing protection activity, is constitutive and highly expressed in the flavedo of fruit but responsive to cold and water stress in leaves.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Ballesta, Maria Teresa; Rodrigo, Maria Jesus; Lafuente, Maria Teresa; Granell, Antonio; Zacarias, Lorenzo

    2004-04-01

    A cDNA encoding a dehydrin was isolated from the flavedo of the chilling-sensitive Fortune mandarin fruit (Citrus clementina Hort. Ex Tanaka x Citrus reticulata Blanco) and designed as Crcor15. The predicted CrCOR15 protein is a K2S member of a closely related dehydrin family from Citrus, since it contains two tandem repeats of the unusual Citrus K-segment and one S-segment (serine cluster) at an unusual C-terminal position. Crcor15 mRNA is consistently and highly expressed in the flavedo during fruit development and maturation. The relative abundance of Crcor15 mRNA in the flavedo was estimated to be higher than 1% of total RNA. The high mRNA level remained unchanged during fruit storage at chilling (2 degrees C) and nonchilling (12 degrees C) temperatures, and it was depressed by a conditioning treatment (3 days at 37 degrees C) that induced chilling tolerance. Therefore, the expression of Crcor15 appears not to be related to the acquisition of chilling tolerance in mandarin fruits. However, Crcor15, which was barely detected in unstressed mandarin leaves, was rapidly induced in response to both low temperature and water stress. COR15 protein was expressed in Escherichia coli, and the purified protein conferred in vitro protection against freezing and dehydration inactivation. The potential role of Citrus COR15 is discussed. PMID:15053535

  18. Freezing on heating of liquid solutions.

    PubMed

    Plazanet, M; Floare, C; Johnson, M R; Schweins, R; Trommsdorff, H P

    2004-09-15

    We report a reversible liquid-solid transition upon heating of a simple solution composed of a-cyclodextrine (alpha CD), water, and 4-methylpyridine. These solutions are homogeneous and transparent at ambient temperature and solidify when heated to temperatures between 45 degrees and 75 degrees. Quasielastic and elastic neutron scattering show that molecular motions are slowed down in the solid and that crystalline order is established. The solution "freezes on heating." This process is fully reversible, on cooling the solid melts. A rearrangement of hydrogen bonds is postulated to be responsible for the observed phenomenon. PMID:15352791

  19. Critical effect of freezing/freeze-drying on sustained release of FITC-dextran encapsulated within PLGA microspheres.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae Hyoung; Park, Tae Gwan

    2004-03-01

    The cause of initial burst release of hydrophilic macromolecular drugs from biodegradable polymeric microspheres was identified. Poly(D,L-lactic-co-glycolic acid) microspheres encapsulating fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-labled dextran was prepared by a double emulsion solvent evaporation method. The extent of initial burst release was examined by varying the formulation process conditions such as solvent evaporation, washing, freezing, and freeze-drying. Confocal microscopy was employed to analyze the underlying mechanism of burst release. The extent of burst release was gradually reduced after the repeated washing of embryonic microspheres before freeze-drying, indicating that FITC-dextran molecules entrapped within unhardened microspheres were slowly diffused out. However, freezing and subsequent drying processes of the embryonic microspheres resulted in much increased extent of burst release, suggesting that the initial burst release was primarily caused by the rapid diffusion of FITC-dextran through the microporous channels. Confocal microscopic analysis revealed that the freeze-drying process generated water-escaping micro-channels, through which the encapsulated molecules were presumably dumped out. Vacuum-drying was a good alternative choice in reducing the initial burst, compared to freeze-drying. PMID:15129987

  20. Critical Watersheds: Climate Change, Tipping Points, and Energy-Water Impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Middleton, R. S.; Brown, M.; Coon, E.; Linn, R.; McDowell, N. G.; Painter, S. L.; Xu, C.

    2014-12-01

    Climate change, extreme climate events, and climate-induced disturbances will have a substantial and detrimental impact on terrestrial ecosystems. How ecosystems respond to these impacts will, in turn, have a significant effect on the quantity, quality, and timing of water supply for energy security, agriculture, industry, and municipal use. As a community, we lack sufficient quantitative and mechanistic understanding of the complex interplay between climate extremes (e.g., drought, floods), ecosystem dynamics (e.g., vegetation succession), and disruptive events (e.g., wildfire) to assess ecosystem vulnerabilities and to design mitigation strategies that minimize or prevent catastrophic ecosystem impacts. Through a combination of experimental and observational science and modeling, we are developing a unique multi-physics ecohydrologic framework for understanding and quantifying feedbacks between novel climate and extremes, surface and subsurface hydrology, ecosystem dynamics, and disruptive events in critical watersheds. The simulation capability integrates and advances coupled surface-subsurface hydrology from the Advanced Terrestrial Simulator (ATS), dynamic vegetation succession from the Ecosystem Demography (ED) model, and QUICFIRE, a novel wildfire behavior model developed from the FIRETEC platform. These advances are expected to make extensive contributions to the literature and to earth system modeling. The framework is designed to predict, quantify, and mitigate the impacts of climate change on vulnerable watersheds, with a focus on the US Mountain West and the energy-water nexus. This emerging capability is used to identify tipping points in watershed ecosystems, quantify impacts on downstream users, and formally evaluate mitigation efforts including forest (e.g., thinning, prescribed burns) and watershed (e.g., slope stabilization). The framework is being trained, validated, and demonstrated using field observations and remote data collections in the Valles Caldera National Preserve, including pre- and post-wildfire and infestation observations. Ultimately, the framework will be applied to the upper Colorado River basin. Here, we present an overview of the framework development strategy and latest field and modeling results.

  1. Aqueous Chemistry in the Diamond Anvil Cell up to and Beyond the Critical Point of Water

    SciTech Connect

    Bassett, William A.; Chou, I-Ming; Anderson, Alan J.; Mayanovic, Robert

    2008-08-28

    The hydrothermal diamond anvil cell (HDAC) has been developed for the study of fluids and their interactions with other phases. It is capable of pressures up to 10 GPa and temperatures from -190 C to 1200 C. It has found application in studies of equations of state of fluids, reactions between fluids and solids as well as fluids and melts, hydration and dehydration of hydrous solids under P{sub H2O}, fractionation of species between fluids and solids as well as fluids and melts, the effect of P{sub H2O} on melting of silicates, structures of ions and clathrates in solution, preservation of hosts of fluid inclusions at high temperatures, and reactions in clathrates and other organic materials. Visual, spectroscopic, and X-ray methods are used to analyze samples by taking advantage of the exceptional transparency of the diamond anvils. Examples of successful apphcations of the HDAC include the equation of state (EOS) of water, stability of the various stages of hydration of montmorillonite and calcium carbonate, leaching of elements from zircon, the effect of P{sub H2O} on the melting of albite, speciation and structures of Sc, Fe, Cu, Zn, Y, La, Yb, and Br in solution, stability of methane hydrates and Ca(OH){sub 2}, identifying a new H{sub 2}O ice form and sll of methane hydrate. The description of diamond cell configuration, analytical methods, and examples of applications provide evidence of the utility of the technique for many studies of fluids at temperatures and pressures up to and beyond the critical point of water.

  2. High rates of energy expenditure and water flux in free-ranging Point Reyes mountain beavers Aplodontia rufa phaea

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crocker, D.E.; Kofahl, N.; Fellers, G.D.; Gates, N.B.; Houser, D.S.

    2007-01-01

    We measured water flux and energy expenditure in free-ranging Point Reyes mountain beavers Aplodontia rufa phaea by using the doubly labeled water method. Previous laboratory investigations have suggested weak urinary concentrating ability, high rates of water flux, and low basal metabolic rates in this species. However, free-ranging measurements from hygric mammals are rare, and it is not known how these features interact in the environment. Rates of water flux (210 ?? 32 mL d-1) and field metabolic rates (1,488 ?? 486 kJ d-1) were 159% and 265%, respectively, of values predicted by allometric equations for similar-sized herbivores. Mountain beavers can likely meet their water needs through metabolic water production and preformed water in food and thus remain in water balance without access to free water. Arginine-vasopressin levels were strongly correlated with rates of water flux and plasma urea : creatinine ratios, suggesting an important role for this hormone in regulating urinary water loss in mountain beavers. High field metabolic rates may result from cool burrow temperatures that are well below lower critical temperatures measured in previous laboratory studies and suggest that thermoregulation costs may strongly influence field energetics and water flux in semifossorial mammals. ?? 2007 by The University of Chicago. All rights reserved.

  3. Thermal stresses from large volumetric expansion during freezing of biomaterials.

    PubMed

    Shi, X; Datta, A K; Mukherjee, Y

    1998-12-01

    Thermal stresses were studied in freezing of biomaterials containing significant amounts of water. An apparent specific heat formulation of the energy equation and a viscoelastic model for the mechanics problem were used to analyze the transient axi-symmetric freezing of a long cylinder. Viscoelastic properties were measured in an Instron machine. Results show that, before phase change occurs at any location, both radial and circumferential stresses are tensile and keep increasing until phase change begins. The maximum principal tensile stress during phase change increases with a decrease in boundary temperature (faster cooling). This is consistent with experimentally observed fractures at a lower boundary temperature. Large volumetric expansion during water to ice transformation was shown to be the primary contributor to large stress development. For very rapid freezing, relaxation may not be significant, and an elastic model may be sufficient. PMID:10412455

  4. ANNAGNPS: ACCOUNTING FOR SNOWPACK, SNOWMELT, FREEZING AND THAWING OF SOIL

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The watershed model, AnnAGNPS (Annualized AGricultural Non-Point Source Pollution model) has been enhanced by incorporating winter climate algorithms that account for frozen soil conditions. The model includes snowpack accumulation and melt, and the freeze/thaw process in the soil. Three major imp...

  5. Frost heave susceptibility of saturated soil under constant rate of freezing

    SciTech Connect

    Ryokai, K.; Iguro, M.; Yoneyama, K.

    1982-01-01

    Introduced are the results of experiments carried out to quantitatively obtain the frost heave pressure and displacement of soil subjected to artificial freezing or freezing around in-ground liquefied natural gas storage tanks. This experiment is conducted to evaluate the frost heave susceptibility of saturated soil under overconsolidation. In other words, this experiment was carried out to obtain the relation of the over-burden pressure and freezing rate to the frost heave ratio by observing the frost heave displacement and freezing time of specimens by freezing the specimens at a constant freezing rate under a constant overburden pressure, while letting water freely flow in and out of the system. Introduced are the procedures for frost heave test required to quantitatively obtain the frost heave displacement and pressure of soil. Furthermore, the relation between the frost heave susceptibility and physical properties of soil obtained by this test is reported.

  6. Ground-water resources in the vicinity of the Crown Point fish hatchery, Essex County, New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kantrowitz, I.H.

    1968-01-01

    The Crown Point Fish Hatchery, one of several hatcheries operated by the New York State Conservation Department, is located in Crown Point Center, Essex County, on the eastern edge of the Adirondack Highlands and about 2 miles west of lake Champlain. Figure 1 is a location map of the vicinity of the Hatchery. This report summarizes an investigation by the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the New York State Conservation Department, Division of Water Resources, to locate and evaluate sources of additional ground-water supply for the Hatchery. In order to expand the facilities at the Hatchery, an additional water supply of about 100 gpm (gallons per minute) to as much as 350 gpm is needed. In addition, the type of fish culture practiced requires a water temperature of about 7 to 13 degrees Celsius (centigrade) for optimum results.

  7. 9 CFR 381.66 - Temperatures and chilling and freezing procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... water tests. (e) Air chilling. In air chilling ready-to-cook poultry, the internal temperature of the... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Temperatures and chilling and freezing... Procedures § 381.66 Temperatures and chilling and freezing procedures. (a) General. Temperatures...

  8. 9 CFR 381.66 - Temperatures and chilling and freezing procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... water tests. (e) Air chilling. In air chilling ready-to-cook poultry, the internal temperature of the... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Temperatures and chilling and freezing... Procedures § 381.66 Temperatures and chilling and freezing procedures. (a) General. Temperatures...

  9. Grid-Mapped Freeze-Fracture Analysis of Gap Junctions in Gray and White Matter

    E-print Network

    Rash, John E.

    Grid-Mapped Freeze-Fracture Analysis of Gap Junctions in Gray and White Matter of Adult Rat Central-to-glia coupling hypotheses, we used ``grid-mapped freeze fracture,'' conventional thin-section electron microscopy coupling and glial coupling involved separate and distinct pathways. Finally, putative water channels (i

  10. Selective ligandless cloud point extraction of palladium from water and dust samples.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi, Sayed Zia; Mohammadnezhad, Mohsen

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the phase-separation phenomenon of non-ionic surfactants was used for separation and preconcentration of Pd(II). The cloud point extraction (CPE) method is based on the formation of PdI2 which is then entrapped in the non-ionic surfactant Triton X-114. Ethanol acidified with 0.5 M HNO3 was added to the surfactant-rich phase prior to its analysis by flame atomic absorption spectrometry. The main factors affecting CPE efficiency, such as sample solution pH, concentration of iodide ion and Triton X-114, equilibration temperature and time, were all investigated and optimized. At optimum conditions, a calibration curve was constructed for the determination of palladium according to the ligandless CPE procedure. Linearity was maintained between 1.0 to 500.0 ng/mL. The LOD based on three times the SD of the blank divided by the slope of analytical curve, (3Sb/m) was 0.3 ng/mL. Seven replicate determinations of a solution containing of 4.0 ?g palladium gave a mean absorbance of 0.359 with RSD±1.85%. The high efficiency of CPE to carry out the determination of palladium in complex matrixes was demonstrated. The proposed method has been applied to the determination of trace amounts of palladium in a platinum-iridium alloy, water, and dust samples, with satisfactory results. PMID:25857898

  11. Plant cover, soil temperature, freeze, water stress, and evapotranspiration conditions. [Lower Rio Grande Valley Test Site: Weslaco, Texas; Falco Reservoir and the Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiegand, C. L.; Nixon, P. R.; Gausman, H. W.; Namken, L. N.; Leamer, R. W.; Richardson, A. J. (principal investigators)

    1980-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. HCMM day/night coverage 12 hours apart cannot be obtained at 26 deg N latitude; nor have any pairs 36 hours apart been obtained. A day-IR scene and a night scene for two different dates were analyzed. A profile across the test site for the same latitude shows that the two profiles are near mirror images of each other over land surfaces and that the temperature of two large water bodies, Falcon Reservoir and the Gulf of Mexico, are nearly identical on two dates. During the time interval between overpasses, the vegetative cover remained static due to winter dormancy. The data suggest that day/night temperature differences measured weeks apart may yield meaningful information about the contrast between daytime maximum and nighttime minimum temperatures for a given site.

  12. Evaluation of combined effects of ageing period and freezing rate on quality attributes of beef loins.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yuan H Brad; Liesse, Charlotte; Kemp, Robert; Balan, Prabhu

    2015-12-01

    The objective of our study was to evaluate the combined effects of ageing period and different freezing rates on meat quality attributes of beef loins. Pairs of loins (M. longissimus at 1day post mortem) from 12 carcasses were divided into four equal portions and randomly assigned to four ageing/freezing treatments (aged only, frozen only, and 3 or 4weeks ageing at -1.5°C then frozen). Two freezing methods (fast freezing by calcium chloride immersion or slow freezing by air freezer at -18°C) were applied to the loin sections. Fast freezing had no effect on shear force (P>0.05), but significantly improved the water-holding capacity of the aged/frozen loins by reducing purge and drip losses. Ageing-then-freezing significantly improved shear force values of loins compared to both the aged only and frozen only loins. These observations suggest that fast freezing will add more value to the aged/frozen/thawed meat by minimising the amount of water-loss due to the freezing/thawing process. PMID:26172242

  13. Preventive efficacy and cost-effectiveness of point-of-use water filtration in a subacute care unit.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Charity; Cervia, Joseph S; Ortolano, Girolamo A; Canonica, Francis P

    2010-02-01

    Infections with Pseudomonas aeruginosa and other waterborne pathogens (WBPs) are major contributors to serious morbidity and mortality in hospitals. We sought to determine whether point-of-use (POU) water filtration might result in decreased risk of infection in the subacute care unit (SACU) of a 208-bed medical center. Our findings indicate that POU water filtration can significantly and cost-effectively reduce colonization of and infection with WBPs, including ventilator-associated pneumonia, in an SACU. PMID:19709779

  14. Infrared Monitoring of Interlayer Water in Stacks of Purple Membranes†

    PubMed Central

    Dioumaev, Andrei K.; Lanyi, Janos K

    2009-01-01

    The thermodynamic behavior of films of hydrated purple membranes from Halobacterium salinarum and the water confined in it was studied by FTIR spectroscopy in the 180–280 K range. Unlike bulk water, water in the thin layers sandwiched between the biological membranes does not freeze at 273 K but will be supercooled to ~256 K. The melting point is unaffected, leading to hysteresis between 250 and 273 K. In its heating branch a gradually increasing light-scattering by ice is observed with rate-limiting kinetics of tens of minutes. IR spectra decomposition provided extinction coefficients for the confined water vibrational bands and their changes upon freezing. Due to the hysteresis, at any given temperature in the 255–270 K range the inter-bilayer water could be either liquid or frozen, depending on thermal history. We find that this difference affects the dynamics of the bacteriorhodopsin photocycle in the hysteresis range: the decay of the M and N states and the redistribution between them are different depending on whether or not the water was initially pre-cooled to below the freezing point. However, freezing of inter-bilayer water does block the M to N transition. Unlike the water, the purple membrane lipids do not undergo any IR-detectable phase transition in the 180–280 K range. PMID:19192202

  15. Freezing Injury in Onion Bulb Cells: II. Post-thawing Injury or Recovery.

    PubMed

    Palta, J P; Levitt, J; Stadelmann, E J

    1977-09-01

    Onion (Allium cepa L.) bulbs were subjected for 12 days to either a moderate freeze (-4 C) or a severe freeze (-11 C). They were then thawed slowly over ice. During 7 to 12 days following the thaw, the injury progressed with time in the severely frozen bulbs, but appeared completely repaired in the moderately frozen bulbs. This was shown by the following post-thawing changes.Infiltration of the intercellular spaces increased from 80 to 90% to 100% after the severe freeze, and decreased from 30 to 50% to zero after the moderate freeze. All of the cells were alive immediately after thawing whether the freeze was moderate or severe. Corresponding to the infiltration results 7 to 12 days later, many to most were dead following the severe freeze, all were alive following the moderate freeze.The conductivity of the effusate from pieces of bulb tissue increased after the severe freezing, and decreased after the moderate freezing. The concentration of K(+), total solutes, and sugars in the effusate paralleled the conductivity changes. Neither the pH of the effusate nor the permeability of the cells (as long as cells were living) to water was changed following either the severe or the moderate freezes. Some treatments of the thawed tissue following the severe freeze halted the progress of injury.The above results indicate that the semipermeable properties of the cell are uninjured but that the ion and sugar transport mechanism is damaged by freezing. Most likely the primary injury is to the active transport mechanism involved in their transport. It must be concluded that the final injury following freezing and thawing cannot be evaluated from the degree of infiltration or the conductivity of the effusate immediately after thawing, since injury may progress or recede following the thawing. PMID:16660101

  16. Experimental analysis and modeling of ultrasound assisted freezing of potato spheres.

    PubMed

    Kiani, Hossein; Zhang, Zhihang; Sun, Da-Wen

    2015-09-01

    In recent years, innovative methods such as ultrasound assisted freezing have been developed in order to improve the freezing process. During freezing of foods, accurate prediction of the temperature distribution, phase ratios, and process time is very important. In the present study, ultrasound assisted immersion freezing process (in 1:1 ethylene glycol-water solution at 253.15K) of potato spheres (0.02 m diameter) was evaluated using experimental, numerical and analytical approaches. Ultrasound (25 kHz, 890 W m(-2)) was irradiated for different duty cycles (DCs=0-100%). A finite volume based enthalpy method was used in the numerical model, based on which temperature and liquid fraction profiles were simulated by a program developed using OpenFOAM® CFD software. An analytical technique was also employed to calculate freezing times. The results showed that ultrasound irradiation could decrease the characteristic freezing time of potatoes. Since ultrasound irradiation increased the heat transfer coefficient but simultaneously generated heat at the surface of the samples, an optimum DC was needed for the shortest freezing time which occurred in the range of 30-70% DC. DCs higher than 70% increased the freezing time. DCs lower than 30% did not provide significant effects on the freezing time compared to the control sample. The numerical model predicted the characteristic freezing time in accordance with the experimental results. In addition, analytical calculation of characteristic freezing time exhibited qualitative agreement with the experimental results. As the numerical simulations provided profiles of temperature and water fraction within potatoes frozen with or without ultrasound, the models can be used to study and control different operation situations, and to improve the understanding of the freezing process. PMID:25776740

  17. PROCEEDINGS OF THE CONFERENCE ON POINT-OF-USE TREATMENT OF DRINKING WATER HELD AT CINCINNATI, OHIO ON OCTOBER 6-8, 1987

    EPA Science Inventory

    A Conference on Point-of-Use Treatment of Drinking Water was held on October 6-8, 1987, to provide information on the application of point-of-use (POU) and point-of-entry (POE) systems for treating drinking water to a wide-cross section of people interested in the technology. The...

  18. Inverse Freezing in Mean-Field Models of Fragile Glasses

    E-print Network

    Mauro Sellitto

    2006-05-25

    A disordered spin model suitable for studying inverse freezing in fragile glass-forming systems is introduced. The model is a microscopic realization of the ``random-first order'' scenario in which the glass transition can be either continuous or discontinuous in thermodynamic sense. The phase diagram exhibits a first-order transition line between two fluid phases terminating at a critical point. When the interacting degrees of freedom are entropically favoured an inverse static glass transition and a double inverse dynamic freezing appear.

  19. Evaluation of a new water treatment for point-of-use household applications to remove microorganisms and arsenic from drinking water.

    PubMed

    Souter, Philip F; Cruickshank, Graeme D; Tankerville, Melanie Z; Keswick, Bruce H; Ellis, Brian D; Langworthy, Don E; Metz, Kathy A; Appleby, Martin R; Hamilton, Nicola; Jones, Amanda L; Perry, John D

    2003-06-01

    Contamination of drinking water by microorganisms and arsenic represents a major human health hazard in many parts of the world. An estimated 3.4 million deaths a year are attributable to waterborne diseases. Arsenic poisoning from contaminated water sources is causing a major health emergency in some countries such as Bangladesh where 35 to 77 million people are at risk. The World Health Organization (WHO) has recently recognized point-of-use water treatment as an effective means of reducing illness in developing country households. A new point-of-use water treatment system that is based on flocculation, sedimentation and disinfection was evaluated for the removal of bacterial, viral and parasitic pathogens as well as arsenic from drinking water to estimate its potential for use in developing countries. Tests were conducted with United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)-model and field- sample waters from developing countries. Samples were seeded with known numbers of organisms, treated with the combined flocculation/disinfection product, and assayed for survivors using standard assay techniques appropriate for the organism. Results indicated that this treatment system reduced the levels from 10(8)/l to undetectable (<1) of 14 types of representative waterborne bacterial pathogens including Salmonella typhi and Vibrio cholerae. No Escherichia coli were detected post-treatment in 320 field water samples collected from five developing countries. In addition, the water treatment system reduced polio and rotavirus titres by greater than 4-log values. Cyrptosporidium parvum and Giardia lamblia inocula were reduced by greater than 3-log values following use of this water treatment system. Arsenic, added to laboratory test waters, was reduced by 99.8%, and naturally occurring arsenic in field samples from highly contaminated Bangladeshi wells was reduced by 99.5% to mean levels of 1.2 microg/l. This water treatment system has demonstrated the potential to provide improved drinking water to households in developing countries by removing microbial and arsenic contaminants. PMID:15382736

  20. Investigation of Microcrystalline Cellulose as Ice Nucleus in Immersion Freezing Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Häusler, Thomas; Khaybulkina, Evgeniya; Felgitsch, Laura; Bichler, Magdalena; Grothe, Hinrich

    2015-04-01

    Aerosol-cloud interactions play an important role in earth's radiation balance. Aerosol particles act as cloud condensation nuclei for liquid droplets and/or as ice nuclei for the formation of ice particles. Previous research in our group has been related to biological ice nucleation.1-3 Here, we present a proxy for many biological macromolecular substances, i.e. microcrystalline cellulose. Due to the chemical convenience of cellulose compared to other biological ice nuclei, basic, but still unknown ice nucleation mechanisms can be investigated. Cellulose is a polysaccharide consisting of a linear chain of several hundred to many thousands of ?(1?4) linked D-glucose units. It is an important structural element of the primary cell wall of green plants, many forms of algae and the oomycetes. Several types of microcrystalline cellulose were analysed and investigated due to their physico-chemical properties. Immersion freezing experiments were carried out in a unique reaction gadget. In this device a water-in-oil suspension (with the cellulose suspended in the aqueous phase) was cooled till the freezing point and was observed through a microscope. The results of the immersion freezing experiments of the different cellulose types showed variable ice nucleation activities depending on their morphology (e.g. particle size) and their concentration. Further analysis methods as scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and small angle X-ray scattering (SAX) were carried out to entirely describe the cellulose and their ice nucleation activity. [1] S.Augustin, H. Wex, D. Niedermeier, B. Pummer, H.Grothe, S. Hartmann, L. Tomsche, T. Clauss, J. Voigtländer, K. Ingatius, and F. Stratmann. Immersion freezing of birch pollen washing water. Atmospheric Chemistry Physics 2013, 13, 10989-11003 [2] B. Pummer, L. Atanasova, H. Bauer, H. Bernardi, I. S. Druzhinina, J. Froehlich-Nowoisky, H. Grothe. Spores of many common airborne fungi reveal no ice nucleation activity in oil immersion freezing experiments. Biogeosciences 2013, 10, 8083- 8091 [3] B. Pummer, H. Baue, J. Bernardi, S. Bleicher, H. Grothe. Suspendable macromolecules are responsible for ice nucleation activity of birch and conifer pollen. Atmospheric Chemistry Physics 2012, 12, 2541-2550

  1. Impact behaviour of freeze-dried and fresh pomelo (Citrus maxima) peel: influence of the hydration state

    PubMed Central

    Thielen, Marc; Speck, Thomas; Seidel, Robin

    2015-01-01

    Pomelos (Citrus maxima) are known for their thick peel which—inter alia—serves as energy dissipator when fruits impact on the ground after being shed. It protects the fruit from splitting open and thus enables the contained seeds to stay germinable and to potentially be dispersed by animal vectors. The main part of the peel consists of a parenchymatous tissue that can be interpreted from a materials point of view as open pored foam whose struts are pressurized and filled with liquid. In order to investigate the influence of the water content on the energy dissipation capacity, drop weight tests were conducted with fresh and with freeze-dried peel samples. Based on the coefficient of restitution it was found that freeze-drying markedly reduces the relative energy dissipation capacity of the peel. Measuring the transmitted force during impact furthermore indicated a transition from a uniform collapse of the foam-like tissue to a progressive collapse due to water extraction. Representing the peel by a Maxwell model illustrates that freeze-drying not only drastically reduces the damping function of the dashpots but also stiffens the springs of the model. PMID:26543566

  2. Impact behaviour of freeze-dried and fresh pomelo (Citrus maxima) peel: influence of the hydration state.

    PubMed

    Thielen, Marc; Speck, Thomas; Seidel, Robin

    2015-06-01

    Pomelos (Citrus maxima) are known for their thick peel which-inter alia-serves as energy dissipator when fruits impact on the ground after being shed. It protects the fruit from splitting open and thus enables the contained seeds to stay germinable and to potentially be dispersed by animal vectors. The main part of the peel consists of a parenchymatous tissue that can be interpreted from a materials point of view as open pored foam whose struts are pressurized and filled with liquid. In order to investigate the influence of the water content on the energy dissipation capacity, drop weight tests were conducted with fresh and with freeze-dried peel samples. Based on the coefficient of restitution it was found that freeze-drying markedly reduces the relative energy dissipation capacity of the peel. Measuring the transmitted force during impact furthermore indicated a transition from a uniform collapse of the foam-like tissue to a progressive collapse due to water extraction. Representing the peel by a Maxwell model illustrates that freeze-drying not only drastically reduces the damping function of the dashpots but also stiffens the springs of the model. PMID:26543566

  3. Measuring and modeling hemoglobin aggregation below the freezing temperature.

    PubMed

    Rosa, Mónica; Lopes, Carlos; Melo, Eduardo P; Singh, Satish K; Geraldes, Vitor; Rodrigues, Miguel A

    2013-08-01

    Freezing of protein solutions is required for many applications such as storage, transport, or lyophilization; however, freezing has inherent risks for protein integrity. It is difficult to study protein stability below the freezing temperature because phase separation constrains solute concentration in solution. In this work, we developed an isochoric method to study protein aggregation in solutions at -5, -10, -15, and -20 °C. Lowering the temperature below the freezing point in a fixed volume prevents the aqueous solution from freezing, as pressure rises until equilibrium (P,T) is reached. Aggregation rates of bovine hemoglobin (BHb) increased at lower temperature (-20 °C) and higher BHb concentration. However, the addition of sucrose substantially decreased the aggregation rate and prevented aggregation when the concentration reached 300 g/L. The unfolding thermodynamics of BHb was studied using fluorescence, and the fraction of unfolded protein as a function of temperature was determined. A mathematical model was applied to describe BHb aggregation below the freezing temperature. This model was able to predict the aggregation curves for various storage temperatures and initial concentrations of BHb. The aggregation mechanism was revealed to be mediated by an unfolded state, followed by a fast growth of aggregates that readily precipitate. The aggregation kinetics increased for lower temperature because of the higher fraction of unfolded BHb closer to the cold denaturation temperature. Overall, the results obtained herein suggest that the isochoric method could provide a relatively simple approach to obtain fundamental thermodynamic information about the protein and the aggregation mechanism, thus providing a new approach to developing accelerated formulation studies below the freezing temperature. PMID:23808610

  4. Source of salts in the Waianae part of the Pearl Harbor aquifer near Barbers Point water tunnel, Oahu, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eyre, P.R.

    1987-01-01

    The salinity of the water supply of Barbers Point Naval Air Station has increased markedly since 1983. The Naval Air Station obtains its water, about 3 million gal/day, from Barbers Point shaft, a water shaft that taps the Waianae part of the Pearl Harbor aquifer underlying the dry, southeastern flank of the Waianae mountains on the island on Oahu, Hawaii. From 1983 to 1985 the chloride concentration of the water, increased from 220 to 250 mg/L and has remained near that level through 1986. The EPA has established 250 mg/L as the maximum recommended chloride concentration in drinking water because above that level many people can taste the salt. The high chloride concentration in shallow groundwater at all wells in the area indicates that most of the salts in the freshwater lens are contributed by rainfall, sea spray, and irrigation return water. At Barbers Point shaft, pumping may draw a small amount of saltwater from the transition zone and increase the chloride concentration in the pumped water by about 20 mg/L. Salinity of the lens decreases progressively inland in response to recharge from relatively fresher water and in response to an increasing lens thickness with increasing distance from the shoreline. The increase, in 1983, in the chloride concentration of water at the shaft was most probably the result of saltier recharge water reaching the water table, and not the result of increased mixing of underlying saltwater with the freshwater. The chloride concentration of the recharge water has probably increased because, in 1980, the drip method of irrigation began to replace the furrow method on sugarcane fields near the shaft. A mixing-cell model was used to estimate the effect of drip irrigation on the chloride concentration of the groundwater in the vicinity of Barbers Point shaft. The model predicted an increase in chloride concentration of about 50 mg/L. The observed increase was about 30 mg/L and the chloride concentration is presently stable at 245 to 250 mg/L; hence, the chloride concentration is not expected to increase significantly more. (Lantz-PTT)

  5. Sinkholes in West-central Florida, Freeze Event of 2010

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Cracks shown here in the exterior and supporting structures of this home are indicative of subsidence damage associated with sinkhole activity. More than 110 sinkholes formed in the Dover area of Florida during a freeze event in January 2010. Ground water levels dropped to record-setting l...

  6. Sinkholes in West-central Florida, Freeze Event of 2010

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    A section of a strawberry field that was destroyed by a sinkhole and filled in, as is done with many sinkholes if possible. More than 110 sinkholes formed in the Dover area of Florida during a freeze event in January 2010. Ground water levels dropped to record-setting lows as farmers pump...

  7. Sinkholes in West-central Florida, Freeze Event of 2010

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Sinkholes affect structures as well as many types of supporting infrastructure such as buried utilities lines seen here. More than 110 sinkholes formed in the Dover area of Florida during a freeze event in January 2010. Ground water levels dropped to record-setting lows ...

  8. COMBINED REVERSE OSMOSIS AND FREEZE CONCENTRATION OF BLEACH PLANT EFFLUENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Reverse osmosis (RO) and freeze concentration (FC) were evaluated at three different pulp and paper mills as tools for concentrating bleach plant effluents. By these concentration processes, the feed effluent was divided into two streams. The clean water stream approached drinkin...

  9. Moments of charge fluctuations, pseudo-critical temperatures and freeze-out in heavy ion collisions

    E-print Network

    Frithjof Karsch

    2011-08-03

    We discuss universal properties of higher order cumulants of net baryon number fluctuations and point out their relevance for the analysis of freeze-out and critical conditions in heavy ion collisions at LHC and RHIC.

  10. Comment on the "Freeze-In" mechanism of dark matter production

    E-print Network

    John McDonald

    2011-12-07

    We point out an earlier implementation of the "freeze-in" mechanism for the production of very weakly-interacting dark matter. We also clarify a footnote given in 0911.1120 regarding this eariler paper.

  11. Point Sources of Emerging Contaminants Along the Colorado River Basin: Impact on Water Use and Reuse in the Arid Southwest

    EPA Science Inventory

    Emerging contaminants (ECs) (e.g., pharmaceuticals, illicit drugs, personal care products) have been detected in waters across the United States. The objective of this study was to evaluate point sources of ECs along the Colorado River, from the headwaters in Colorado to the Gulf...

  12. Comparison of Byproduct Formation in Waters Treated With Chlorine and Iodine: Relevance To Point-Of-Use Treatment

    EPA Science Inventory

    Due to their efficacy in deactivating a range of microbial pathogens, particularly amoebic cysts, iodine-based disinfectants have been a popular option for point-of-use (POU) drinking water disinfection by campers, the military, and rural consumers in developing countries. Recent...

  13. Freeze-in through portals

    SciTech Connect

    Blennow, Mattias; Fernandez-Martínez, Enrique; Zaldívar, Bryan E-mail: enrique.fernandez-martinez@uam.es

    2014-01-01

    The popular freeze-out paradigm for Dark Matter (DM) production, relies on DM-baryon couplings of the order of the weak interactions. However, different search strategies for DM have failed to provide a conclusive evidence of such (non-gravitational) interactions, while greatly reducing the parameter space of many representative models. This motivates the study of alternative mechanisms for DM genesis. In the freeze-in framework, the DM is slowly populated from the thermal bath while never reaching equilibrium. In this work, we analyse in detail the possibility of producing a frozen-in DM via a mediator particle which acts as a portal. We give analytical estimates of different freeze-in regimes and support them with full numerical analyses, taking into account the proper distribution functions of bath particles. Finally, we constrain the parameter space of generic models by requiring agreement with DM relic abundance observations.

  14. Does improved access to water supply by rural households enhance the concept of safe water at the point of use? A case study from deep rural South Africa.

    PubMed

    Jagals, P

    2006-01-01

    The concept of safe water is defined by three principles: the health-related quality must be suitable, the supply/source must be accessible and the water must constantly be available in quantities sufficient for the intended use. If any one (or more) of these three elements is missing from a water services improvement programme, providing safe water is not successfully achieved. A study in a deep rural area in South Africa showed that providing small communities, using untreated river water as their only water source, with good quality water through a piped distribution system and accessible at communal taps did not fall within our parameters of safe water. The parameters for measuring the three principles were: absence of Escherichia coli in drinking water samples; accessibility by improving tap distances to within 200 m from each household; availability by assessing whether households have at least 25 L per person per day. Results show that although E. coli levels were reduced significantly, households were still consuming water with E. coli numbers at non-compliant levels. Access (distance) was improved from an average of 750 m from households to river source to an average of 120 m to new on-tap source points. This did not result in significant increases in household quantities, which on average remained around 18 L per person per day. PMID:17037126

  15. Heat Capacity Anomaly Near the Lower Critical Consolute Point of Triethylamine-Water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flewelling, Anne C.; DeFonseka, Rohan J.; Khaleeli, Nikfar; Partee, J.; Jacobs, D. T.

    1996-01-01

    The heat capacity of the binary liquid mixture triethylamine-water has been measured near its lower critical consolute point using a scanning, adiabatic calorimeter. Two data runs are analyzed to provide heat capacity and enthalpy data that are fitted by equations with background terms and a critical term that includes correction to scaling. The critical exponent a was determined to be 0.107 +/- 0.006, consistent with theoretical predictions. When alpha was fixed at 0.11 to determine various amplitudes consistently, our values of A(+) and A(-) agreed with a previous heat capacity measurement, but the value of A(-) was inconsistent with values determined by density or refractive index measurements. While our value for the amplitude ratio A(+)/ A(-) = 0.56 +/- 0.02 was consistent with other recent experimental determinations in binary liquid mixtures, it was slightly larger than either theoretical predictions or recent experimental values in liquid-vapor systems. The correction to scaling amplitude ratio D(+)/D(-) = 0.5 +/- 0.1 was half of that predicted. As a result of several more precise theoretical calculations and experimental determinations, the two-scale-factor universality ratio X, which we found to be 0.019 +/- 0.003, now is consistent among experiments and theories. A new 'universal' amplitude ratio R(sup +/-)(sub Bcr) involving the amplitudes for the specific heat was tested. Our determination of R(sup +/-)(sub Bcr) = -0.5 +/- 0.1 and R(sup -)(sub Bcr) = 1.1 +/- 0.1 is smaller in magnitude than predicted and is the first such determination in a binary fluid mixture.

  16. Selective determination of total vanadium in water samples by cloud point extraction of its ternary complex.

    PubMed

    Filik, Hayati; Yanaz, Zeynep; Apak, Re?at

    2008-07-14

    A highly sensitive micelle-mediated extraction methodology for the preconcentration of trace levels of vanadium as a prior step to its determination by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS) has been developed. Vanadium was complexed with 1-(2-pyridylazo)-2-naphthol (PAN) and hydrogen peroxide in acidic medium (0.2 mol L(-1) phosphoric acid) using Triton X-100 as surfactant and quantitatively extracted into a small volume of the surfactant-rich phase after centrifugation. The color reaction of vanadium ions with hydrogen peroxide and PAN in phosphoric acid medium is highly selective. The chemical variables affecting cloud point extraction (CPE) were evaluated and optimized. The R.S.D. for 5 replicate determinations at the 20 microg L(-1)V level was 3.6%. The calibration graph using the preconcentration system for vanadium was linear with a correlation coefficient of 0.99 at levels near the detection limits up to at least 0.6 microg L(-1). The method has good sensitivity and selectivity and was applied to the determination of trace amounts of vanadium in water samples with satisfactory result. The proposed method is a rare application of CPE-atomic spectrometry to vanadium assay, and is superior to most other similar methods, because its useful pH range is in the moderately acidic range achieved with phosphoric acid. At this pH, many potential interferents are not chelated with PAN, and iron(III) as the major interferent is bound in a stable phosphate complex. PMID:18558120

  17. Freeze-dried microarterial allografts

    SciTech Connect

    Raman, J.; Hargrave, J.C.

    1990-02-01

    Rehydrated freeze-dried microarterial allografts were implanted to bridge arterial defects using New Zealand White rabbits as the experimental model. Segments of artery from the rabbit ear and thigh were harvested and preserved for a minimum of 2 weeks after freeze-drying. These allografts, approximately 1 mm in diameter and ranging from 1.5 to 2.5 cm in length, were rehydrated and then implanted in low-pressure and high-pressure arterial systems. Poor patency was noted in low-pressure systems in both allografts and autografts, tested in 12 rabbits. In the high-pressure arterial systems, allografts that were freeze-dried and reconstituted failed in a group of 10 rabbits with an 8-week patency rate of 30 percent. Gamma irradiation in an effort to reduce infection and antigenicity of grafts after freeze-drying was associated with a patency rate of 10 percent at 8 weeks in this system in another group of 10 rabbits. Postoperative cyclosporin A therapy was associated with a patency rate of 22.2 percent in the high-pressure arterial system in a 9-rabbit group. Control autografts in this system in a group of 10 rabbits showed a 100 percent patency at 8 weeks. Microarterial grafts depend on perfusion pressure of the vascular bed for long-term patency. Rehydrated freeze-dried microarterial allografts do not seem to function well in lengths of 1 to 2.5 cm when implanted in a high-pressure arterial system. Freeze-dried arterial allografts are probably not antigenic.

  18. Determination of trace nickel in water samples by cloud point extraction preconcentration coupled with graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhimei; Liang, Pei; Ding, Qiong; Cao, Jing

    2006-09-21

    A new method based on the cloud point extraction (CPE) preconcentration and graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS) detection was proposed for the determination of trace nickel in water samples. When the micelle solution temperature is higher than the cloud point of surfactant p-octylpolyethyleneglycolphenyether (Triton X-100), the complex of Ni2+ with 1-phenyl-3-methyl-4-benzoyl-5-pyrazolone (PMBP) could enter surfactant-rich phase and be concentrated, then determined by GFAAS. The main factors affecting the cloud point extraction were investigated in detail. An enrichment factor of 27 was obtained for the preconcentration of Ni2+ with 10 mL solution. Under the optimal conditions, the detection limit of Ni2+ is 0.12 ng mL(-1) with R.S.D. of 4.3% (n = 10, c = 100 ng mL(-1)). The proposed method was applied to determination of trace nickel in water samples with satisfactory results. PMID:16704902

  19. Water Quality vs. Sanitation Accessibility: What is the most effective intervention point for preventing cholera in Dhaka, Bangladesh?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majumder, M. S.; Gute, D.; Faruque, A. S.

    2011-12-01

    Every year, 3 to 5 million individuals contract cholera, an acute diarrheal infection that is caused by the ingestion of food or water containing the Vibrio cholerae bacterium. Because cholera is a waterborne disease, it can be transmitted quickly in environments with inadequate water and sanitation systems where infected waste can easily pollute drinking water. Today, Bangladesh continues to struggle with endemic cholera. Donor organizations address water and sanitation via localized initiatives, including the installation of community water collection sites (i.e. tubewells; water-boiling points; etc.). At this small-scale level, water quality and sanitation accessibility can be improved independently of one another, and when resources are limited, donors must invest in the most effective disease prevention options. This study used laboratory-confirmed cholera incidence data (2000-2009) collected by the International Centre of Diarrheal Disease Research, Bangladesh at their on-site hospital to compare the efficacy of interventions addressing water quality versus sanitation accessibility in Dhaka, Bangladesh. Data regarding use of sanitary latrines and boiling of drinking water were extracted from sequential patient interviews conducted at the Dhaka facility and used as surrogate variables for sanitation accessibility and water quality respectively. Our analysis indicates that boiling water is 10 times more effective at preventing cholera than the use of a sanitary latrine. This finding suggests that regulating water quality is perhaps more critical to cholera prevention than increasing sanitation accessibility in an urban environment like that of Dhaka. At present, WaterAid - one of Bangladesh's most significant water and sanitation donor organizations - invests the majority of its budget on improving sanitation accessibility. The World Health Organization and the United Nations Millennium Development Goals also prioritize sanitation accessibility. However, in Bangladesh, water quality must be given greater attention. As the nation's most prevalent diarrheal disease, cholera outbreaks result in incalculable lost wages and treatment expenses, taken from the pockets of an already impoverished society. Bangladesh cannot afford cholera; prevention is the only sustainable control option, and water quality is the most effective intervention point for Dhaka, Bangladesh.

  20. Temperature and flow measurements on near-freezing aviation fuels in a wing-tank model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedman, R.; Stockemer, F. J.

    1980-01-01

    Freezing behavior, pumpability, and temperature profiles for aviation turbine fuels were measured in a 190-liter tank, to simulate internal temperature gradients encountered in commercial airplane wing tanks. Two low-temperature situations were observed. Where the bulk of the fuel is above the specification freezing point, pumpout of the fuel removes all fuel except a layer adhering to the bottom chilled surfaces, and the unpumpable fraction depends on the fuel temperature near these surfaces. Where the bulk of the fuel is at or below the freezing point, pumpout ceases when solids block the pump inlet, and the unpumpable fraction depends on the overall average temperature.

  1. Glass Transition in Biomolecules and the Liquid-Liquid Critical Point of Water Pradeep Kumar,1

    E-print Network

    Buldyrev, Sergey

    such as isobaric specific heat CP and isothermal compressibility have maxima as functions of temperature crystallization of bulk water. It was found that water remains unfrozen in hydrophilic nanopores for T > 200 K [19

  2. Investigation of water quality parameters at selected points on the Tennessee River

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The thermal and water quality parameters in the vicinity of widows Creek Steam Generation Plant were investigated. The water quality analysis and temperature profiles are presented for 24 sampling sites.

  3. Design of sampling locations for river water quality monitoring considering seasonal variation of point and diffuse pollution loads.

    PubMed

    Varekar, Vikas; Karmakar, Subhankar; Jha, Ramakar; Ghosh, N C

    2015-06-01

    The design of a water quality monitoring network (WQMN) is a complicated decision-making process because each sampling involves high installation, operational, and maintenance costs. Therefore, data with the highest information content should be collected. The effect of seasonal variation in point and diffuse pollution loadings on river water quality may have a significant impact on the optimal selection of sampling locations, but this possible effect has never been addressed in the evaluation and design of monitoring networks. The present study proposes a systematic approach for siting an optimal number and location of river water quality sampling stations based on seasonal or monsoonal variations in both point and diffuse pollution loadings. The proposed approach conceptualizes water quality monitoring as a two-stage process; the first stage of which is to consider all potential water quality sampling sites, selected based on the existing guidelines or frameworks, and the locations of both point and diffuse pollution sources. The monitoring at all sampling sites thus identified should be continued for an adequate period of time to account for the effect of the monsoon season. In the second stage, the monitoring network is then designed separately for monsoon and non-monsoon periods by optimizing the number and locations of sampling sites, using a modified Sanders approach. The impacts of human interventions on the design of the sampling net are quantified geospatially by estimating diffuse pollution loads and verified with land use map. To demonstrate the proposed methodology, the Kali River basin in the western Uttar Pradesh state of India was selected as a study area. The final design suggests consequential pre- and post-monsoonal changes in the location and priority of water quality monitoring stations based on the seasonal variation of point and diffuse pollution loadings. PMID:26009158

  4. Assessment of a low-cost, point-of-use, ultraviolet water disinfection technology

    E-print Network

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    are largely preventable through adequate hygiene, sanitation and safe drinking water; thus, one of the Millennium Development Goals (MDG) is to reduce the population without access to safe water and sanitation lack access to safe drinking water and an accelerated effort is required if the MDG is to be met (WHO

  5. Changes in abundance of aquaporin-like proteins occurs concomitantly with seasonal acquisition of freeze tolerance in the goldenrod gall fly, Eurosta solidaginis

    E-print Network

    Lee Jr., Richard E.

    of freeze tolerance in the goldenrod gall fly, Eurosta solidaginis Benjamin N. Philip *, Richard E. Lee Jr tolerate freezing of their body fluids when exposed to the cold (Salt, 1961). Ice crystals form and grow in extracellular water, whereas solutes are rejected from the growing ice lattice. This freeze concentration

  6. Atmospheric concentrations of submicron contact-freezing nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deshler, Terry; Vali, Gabor

    1992-01-01

    Atmospheric concentrations of contact-freezing nuclei were measured using a technique primarily sensitive to submicron aerosol particles. Diffusion and phoretic forces were relied on for the capture of nuclei by supercooled drops of distilled water exposed to the sample air. Nucleus concentrations were deduced from the rate at which the drops were observed to freeze, interpreting that rate on the basis of a theoretical prediction of aerosol capture rate for different assumed sizes of the nuclei. Measurements at Laramie, Wyoming, yielded average concentrations of contact-freezing nuclei of 1.7/L at -15 C and 3.1/L at -18 C for an assumed radius of 0.01 micron for the nucleating particles.

  7. Intact preservation of environmental samples by freezing under an alternating magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Morono, Yuki; Terada, Takeshi; Yamamoto, Yuhji; Xiao, Nan; Hirose, Takehiro; Sugeno, Masaya; Ohwada, Norio; Inagaki, Fumio

    2015-04-01

    The study of environmental samples requires a preservation system that stabilizes the sample structure, including cells and biomolecules. To address this fundamental issue, we tested the cell alive system (CAS)-freezing technique for subseafloor sediment core samples. In the CAS-freezing technique, an alternating magnetic field is applied during the freezing process to produce vibration of water molecules and achieve a stable, super-cooled liquid phase. Upon further cooling, the temperature decreases further, achieving a uniform freezing of sample with minimal ice crystal formation. In this study, samples were preserved using the CAS and conventional freezing techniques at 4, -20, -80 and -196 (liquid nitrogen) °C. After 6 months of storage, microbial cell counts by conventional freezing significantly decreased (down to 10.7% of initial), whereas that by CAS-freezing resulted in minimal. When Escherichia coli cells were tested under the same freezing conditions and storage for 2.5 months, CAS-frozen E. coli cells showed higher viability than the other conditions. In addition, an alternating magnetic field does not impact on the direction of remanent magnetization in sediment core samples, although slight partial demagnetization in intensity due to freezing was observed. Consequently, our data indicate that the CAS technique is highly useful for the preservation of environmental samples. PMID:25403324

  8. 9 CFR 590.536 - Freezing operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...AGRICULTURE EGG PRODUCTS INSPECTION INSPECTION OF EGGS AND EGG PRODUCTS (EGG PRODUCTS INSPECTION ACT) Sanitary, Processing, and Facility Requirements § 590.536 Freezing operations. (a) Freezing rooms shall be kept clean and...

  9. 9 CFR 590.536 - Freezing operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...AGRICULTURE EGG PRODUCTS INSPECTION INSPECTION OF EGGS AND EGG PRODUCTS (EGG PRODUCTS INSPECTION ACT) Sanitary, Processing, and Facility Requirements § 590.536 Freezing operations. (a) Freezing rooms shall be kept clean and...

  10. 9 CFR 590.536 - Freezing operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...AGRICULTURE EGG PRODUCTS INSPECTION INSPECTION OF EGGS AND EGG PRODUCTS (EGG PRODUCTS INSPECTION ACT) Sanitary, Processing, and Facility Requirements § 590.536 Freezing operations. (a) Freezing rooms shall be kept clean and...

  11. 9 CFR 590.536 - Freezing operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...AGRICULTURE EGG PRODUCTS INSPECTION INSPECTION OF EGGS AND EGG PRODUCTS (EGG PRODUCTS INSPECTION ACT) Sanitary, Processing, and Facility Requirements § 590.536 Freezing operations. (a) Freezing rooms shall be kept clean and...

  12. 9 CFR 590.536 - Freezing operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...AGRICULTURE EGG PRODUCTS INSPECTION INSPECTION OF EGGS AND EGG PRODUCTS (EGG PRODUCTS INSPECTION ACT) Sanitary, Processing, and Facility Requirements § 590.536 Freezing operations. (a) Freezing rooms shall be kept clean and...

  13. Status of Chemical Freeze-Out

    E-print Network

    J. Cleymans; H. Oeschler; K. Redlich; S. Wheaton

    2006-07-14

    The status of the energy dependence of the chemical freeze-out temperature and chemical potential obtained in heavy ion collisions is presented. Recent proposals for chemical freeze-out conditions are compared.

  14. Study on Ice Formation in Still Supercooled Water with Ice Nucleating Substance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inaba, Hideo; Takeya, Kengo; Asano, Takaya

    Relating to the problem of supercooling phenomenon for ice storage system, the effect of ice nucleating substances (Xanthan gum, Silver iodide, Copper sulfide, Cholesterole and Ice nucleating bacteria) in still bulk supercooled water was investigated. In the experiment, the test water sample containing the ice nucleating substance was cooled below the equilibrium freezing point temperature in low-temperature room maintained at -40 °C, and its freezing temperature was measured for various mass ratios of ice nucleating substance to water. The supercooling degree for the test water sample decreased with an increase in the mass ratio. It was found that the supercooling degree for the test sample with the insoluble ice nucleating substance was smaller than that for the soluble one. Among test ice nucleating substances, Cholesterole had a pronounced effect on the ice nucleation of supercooled water. However, it was clarified that the supercooling degree for each test sample increased by repeating the process of freezing and melting.

  15. Waste freezing, remote retrieval technology

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-01-01

    Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) scientists have successfully demonstrated a process of freezing soil and buried waste and retrieving it using remotely operated tools. Early results indicate that this cryogenic retrieval process may reduce risk to workers and protect the environment from airborne and liquid contaminants during actual waste cleanup projects.

  16. Investigating the significance of zero-point motion in small molecular clusters of sulphuric acid and water

    SciTech Connect

    Stinson, Jake L. Ford, Ian J.; Kathmann, Shawn M.

    2014-01-14

    The nucleation of particles from trace gases in the atmosphere is an important source of cloud condensation nuclei, and these are vital for the formation of clouds in view of the high supersaturations required for homogeneous water droplet nucleation. The methods of quantum chemistry have increasingly been employed to model nucleation due to their high accuracy and efficiency in calculating configurational energies; and nucleation rates can be obtained from the associated free energies of particle formation. However, even in such advanced approaches, it is typically assumed that the nuclei have a classical nature, which is questionable for some systems. The importance of zero-point motion (also known as quantum nuclear dynamics) in modelling small clusters of sulphuric acid and water is tested here using the path integral molecular dynamics method at the density functional level of theory. The general effect of zero-point motion is to distort the mean structure slightly, and to promote the extent of proton transfer with respect to classical behaviour. In a particular configuration of one sulphuric acid molecule with three waters, the range of positions explored by a proton between a sulphuric acid and a water molecule at 300 K (a broad range in contrast to the confinement suggested by geometry optimisation at 0 K) is clearly affected by the inclusion of zero point motion, and similar effects are observed for other configurations.

  17. Evaluation of non-point source pollution and river water quality using a multimedia two-model system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Y. C.; Yang, C. P.; Hsieh, C. Y.; Wu, C. Y.; Kao, C. M.

    2011-11-01

    SummaryIn this study, an integrated two-model system composed of a multimedia watershed model and a river water quality model was developed to effectively simulate the impacts of non-point source (NPS) pollution on river water quality. NPS pollution loadings from Kaoping River Basin were calculated using the Integrated Watershed Management Model (IWMM). Results from the IWMM modeling were used as the input data for the Kaoping River water quality evaluation using the Water Quality Analysis Simulation Program (WASP) modeling. The land use patterns classified using SPOT images and Digital Elevation Model techniques with the aid of Erdas Imagine® process and ArcView® geographical information system were applied to assist the NPS pollution simulation. Results indicate that land use patterns of orchard farms and farmland areas were the major causes of the NPS pollution, and they should be effectively controlled. Results show that higher flow rates (>200 m 3/s) were observed in the wet seasons, which would cause the increase in NPS pollution loadings. Results demonstrate that the integral approach could develop a direct linkage between upstream land use changes and downstream water quality. Using water quality modeling alone would underestimate the impact of NPS pollution on river water quality. The introduction of the integrated two-model system shows a significant advance in estimating the water quality.

  18. Freezing cleans food processing wastewater

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1998-01-01

    Snowfluent is a technology which atomizes wastewater effluent and sprays it into the air as ice crystals at cold temperatures. It has been found effective in treating municipal sewage and food processing wastes. This bulletin reviews pilot- and production-scale studies conducted at an Alberta malt producer to test whether the Snowfluent process has further applications for the treatment of food processing wastes. The study was designed to determine the percentage of nutrients removed by the technology, the point at which contaminants are reduced, the effect of the process on the shallow water table, and the health risk to operators involved.

  19. Freezing temperatures of H2SO4/HNO3/H2O mixtures: Implications for polar stratospheric clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Song, Naihui

    1994-01-01

    The freezing temperatures of H2SO4/HNO3/H2O mixtures were systematically documented. Nitric acid was found to affect freezing significantly. Measurements show that nitric acid can cause substantial supercooling over a broad composition range. However, some ternary compositions, like to those in polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs), have high freezing temperatures. The freezing of PSC particles could be controlled by the temperature and vapor pressure of both nitric acid and water in a non-linear way. Formation of polar stratospheric clouds may be forecasted on the basic of conditions of temperature and vapor contents of water and nitric acid.

  20. Undercooled water in basaltic regoliths and implications for fluidized debris flows on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gooding, James L.

    1987-01-01

    Pursuant to the past attribution of many geomorphic features on Mars to the movements of water- or ice-lubricated debris, experiments have been conducted for water freezing in wet, sand-like basaltic substrates. It is found that substantial undercooling can be achieved under Martian conditions, independently of freezing-point depressions due to soluble salts. Attention is given to results for a clay-poor soil with negligible salinity from Mauna Kea, Hawaii, which demonstrate that the degree of undercooling is essentially independent of both soil particle size and water/soil mass ratio, albeit with cooling rate variations.