Sample records for water oxidation cycle

  1. Low-temperature, manganese oxide-based, thermochemical water splitting cycle

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Bingjun; Bhawe, Yashodhan; Davis, Mark E.

    2012-01-01

    Thermochemical cycles that split water into stoichiometric amounts of hydrogen and oxygen below 1,000?°C, and do not involve toxic or corrosive intermediates, are highly desirable because they can convert heat into chemical energy in the form of hydrogen. We report a manganese-based thermochemical cycle with a highest operating temperature of 850?°C that is completely recyclable and does not involve toxic or corrosive components. The thermochemical cycle utilizes redox reactions of Mn(II)/Mn(III) oxides. The shuttling of Na+ into and out of the manganese oxides in the hydrogen and oxygen evolution steps, respectively, provides the key thermodynamic driving forces and allows for the cycle to be closed at temperatures below 1,000?°C. The production of hydrogen and oxygen is fully reproducible for at least five cycles. PMID:22647608

  2. The Water Cycle

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Ms. Andrus

    2007-10-12

    4th Grade Science Learn all about the Water Cycle! The Water Cycle: Water Storage Learn about Evaporation, Condensation, Precipitation, and Collection! The Water Cycle Here are some activites to learn about the water cycle. Hydrologic Cycle ...

  3. THE WATER CYCLE/ CLOUDS

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Ms.Brown

    2009-04-06

    Students will learn about the water cycle and how it works. You will explore many resources to find out many new factors about the water cycle. What is the water cycle? National water cycle Name the 4 water parts of the water cycle? Weather wonders Where are 3 places that the water cycle exists- What happens after condensation? animated water cycle Name 4 types of clouds? What is the highest level cloud called? Which cloud is associated with powerful thunderstorms? Cloud Types What do clouds have to do with the water cycle? National water cycle What is ...

  4. Redox cycle stability of mixed oxides used for hydrogen generation in the cyclic water gas shift process

    SciTech Connect

    Datta, Pradyot, E-mail: pradyot.datta@gmail.com

    2013-10-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} modified with CaO, SiO{sub 2} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} was studied in cyclic water gas shift reactor. • For the first time stability of such oxides were tested for 100 redox cycles. • Optimally added oxides significantly improved the activity and the stability of Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}. • Increased stability was attributed to the impediment of neck formation. - Abstract: Repeated cycles of the reduction of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} with reductive gas, e.g. hydrogen and subsequent oxidation of the reduced iron material with water vapor can be harnessed as a process for the production of pure hydrogen. The redox behavior of iron oxide modified with various amounts of SiO{sub 2}, CaO and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} was investigated in the present study. The total amount of the additional metal oxides was always below 15 wt%. The samples were prepared by co-precipitation using urea hydrolysis method. The influence of various metal oxides on the hydrogen production capacity and the material stability was studied in detail in terms of temperature-programmed reduction (TPR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and BET analysis. Furthermore, the activity and the stability of the samples were tested in repeated reduction with diluted H{sub 2} and re-oxidation cycles with H{sub 2}O. The results indicate that combination of several oxides as promoter increases the stability of the iron oxide material by mitigating the sintering process. The positive influence of the oxides in stabilizing the iron oxide material is attributed to the impediment of neck formation responsible for sintering.

  5. Water, Water Everywhere! Research the Water Cycle

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Regina Bale

    2012-07-17

    Water, Water Everywhere! Research the Water Cycle asks students to conduct their own research on the water cycle (hydrologic cycle). Working collaboratively in small groups, students will research and write about the relationships between stages in the water cycle and the three states of matter relating to water. After completing this lesson, students will be prepared to create a model of the water cycle.

  6. Water-oxidation catalysis by manganese in a geochemical-like cycle

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rosalie K. Hocking; Robin Brimblecombe; Lan-Yun Chang; Archana Singh; Mun Hon Cheah; Chris Glover; William H. Casey; Leone Spiccia

    2011-01-01

    Water oxidation in all oxygenic photosynthetic organisms is catalysed by the Mn4CaO4 cluster of Photosystem II. This cluster has inspired the development of synthetic manganese catalysts for solar energy production. A photoelectrochemical device, made by impregnating a synthetic tetranuclear-manganese cluster into a Nafion matrix, has been shown to achieve efficient water oxidation catalysis. We report here in situ X-ray absorption

  7. The Water Cycle: Water Storage

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This interactive, animated graphic helps explain the water cycle to younger students. The animation, with sound, explains the various parts of the water cycle and show how water moves from one part to another.

  8. Human Water Cycle

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2014-09-18

    Students learn about the human water cycle, or how humans impact the water cycle by settling down in civilizations. Specifically, they learn how people obtain, use and dispose of water. Students also learn about shortages of treated, clean and safe water and learn about ways that engineers address this issue through water conservation and graywater recycling.

  9. Discover the Water Cycle!

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This interactive tour of the water cycle allows students to follow a water molecule from a home's plumbing system as it follows different routes through the hydrologic cycle. Students learn about how water is used, treated, and returned to the natural environment where it can cycle through liquid, solid, and gas phases.

  10. The Water Cycle

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2007-12-12

    This interactive diagram of the water cycle invites students to click on a part of the cycle to get information about streamflow, surface runoff, freshwater storage, ground-water discharge, ground-water storage, infiltration, precipitation, snowmelt, runoff to streams, springs, condensation, evaporation, transpiration, water in the atmosphere, ice and snow, and oceans. A summary of the water cycle on a single webpage is also available as text with pictures in about fifty languages, text only in thirteen languages, or diagram only.

  11. Water Cycle Animation

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The water cycle is Earth's natural mechanism for transporting and recycling water between the surface and the atmosphere. Through the processes of condensation, precipitation, infiltration, runoff, transpiration, and evaporation, water continuously travels from the atmosphere to the ground and back again. In this animation from NASA, users can observe the steps of the water cycle. The segment is fifty-two seconds in length.

  12. THE WATER CYCLE

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Mr. Hughes

    2006-02-18

    DESK Standard: Understand the processes of evaporation, condensation, and precipitation as they relate to the water cycle. Water Cycle Diagram DATES: You can begin this activity on October 16. You should complete it by October 20. OBJECTIVE: You have been learning about the water cycle in class. This activity gives you the chance to review some important vocabulary: evaporation condensation precipitation collection You will watch a short video and complete a water ...

  13. Dissociation of manganese(III) oxide as part of a thermochemical water splitting cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francis, Todd Michael

    A three-step thermochemical cycle to produce renewable hydrogen was proposed, which utilizes manganese(III) oxide and thermal energy to produce hydrogen. Most work on the cycle has focused on the hydrogen generating and product recovery steps with little work on the dissociation. It is essential to understand the dissociation because the feasibility of the cycle is based on this reaction having a high conversion. Because of the importance of the reduction step, this reaction has been selected as the topic of this dissertation. Additionally, because the dispersion of Mn2O3 particles into an Aerosol Flow Reactor (AFR) is important, feeding concepts were developed as well. Two powder feeding systems were developed: a Spinning Wheel Feeder (SWF) and a Fluidized Bed Feeder (FBF). Results of statistical particle size distribution studies indicated that the FBF was the better choice to disperse Mn2O3 powder. Additionally, results in an AFR demonstrated that the FBF was able to produce higher dissociation conversions. A study in a Thermogravimetric Analyzer (TGA) indicated multiple mechanisms were controlling Mn2O3 dissociation. The first half reaction of the dissociation was calculated to be controlled by an Avrami-Erofeev mechanism and had an activation energy of 106.4+/-1.9 kJ/mol. The second half reaction had a duel mechanism utilizing an Avrami-Erofeev and Order of Reaction (OOR) mechanism. The mechanisms had activation energies of 251.2+/-6.5 and 110.7+/-24.6 kJ/mol respectively. Mn2O3 dissociation investigations were done in an AFR. They revealed oxygen is a significant factor and to effectively control the dissociation with temperature and gas flow rate, the oxygen concentration must be below 0.25%. Experimental runs that had oxygen concentrations less than 0.25% were used to calculate reaction rate constants. The Avrami-Erofeev mechanisms were combined into a single mechanism. Rate constants for the Avrami-Erofeev and OOR mechanisms were 1.8E7+/-1.3E7 and 5.6E3+/-4.1E3 s -1 respectively. The results of a CFD model compared favorably with what was observed experimentally. A heavy feed concentration case predicted this as well. When the gas flow rate was higher the r-velocity was concluded to transport the more reacted powder near the wall to the center of the reactor, leading to higher conversions for the high gas flow rate.

  14. NOAA Water Cycle Game

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The resource is a role-playing game in which students take on the role of a water molecule and travel through nine compartments of the water cycle to gain a better understanding for the true complexity of the movement of water.

  15. The Water Cycle

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Jenny

    2008-11-17

    We are about to enter into the world of science and discover many new things about the water cycle. Introduction Below is a list of websites I have created for you to go and do certain activities. I will give you directions of things I would like for you to do at each website. All About The Water Cycle Here is a game you can play. ...

  16. The Water Cycle

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This site provides information about precipitation, evaporation, condensation, surface runoff, infiltration and transpiration, which are all part of the water cycle, a complex process that not only gives us water to drink and fish to eat, but also weather patterns that help grow our crops. The site has four sections. The introduction presents the overall concept while the second section covers each of the six parts of the cycle in detail. In the third part, The Cycle, the dynamic process is stressed and a diagram is included. Cloud Formation is the final section and it covers factors that control the size and shape of clouds such as heat, seasons, mountain ranges, bodies of water, volcanic eruptions, and even global warming. In addition, cloud nomenclature is discussed with an explanation of the advent of such cloud names as cumulonimbus, nimbostratus, cirrocumulus, and altostratus.

  17. The Water Cycle

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This Classroom Connectors lesson plan discusses the continuous movement of water from Earth to air and back to Earth. Students list areas of the Earth where water circulates, explain evaporation and condensation, list the steps of the water cycle and explain what happens in each step. The site provides goals, objectives, an outline, time required, materials, activities, and closure ideas for the lesson. The Classroom Connectors address content with an activity approach while incorporating themes necessary to raise the activity to a higher cognition level. The major motivation is to employ instructional strategies that bring the students physically and mentally into touch with the science they are studying.

  18. GEOSS Water Cycle Integrator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koike, Toshio; Lawford, Richard; Cripe, Douglas

    2013-04-01

    It is critically important to recognize and co-manage the fundamental linkages across the water-dependent domains; land use, including deforestation; ecosystem services; and food-, energy- and health-securities. Sharing coordinated, comprehensive and sustained observations and information for sound decision-making is a first step; however, to take full advantage of these opportunities, we need to develop an effective collaboration mechanism for working together across different disciplines, sectors and agencies, and thereby gain a holistic view of the continuity between environmentally sustainable development, climate change adaptation and enhanced resilience. To promote effective multi-sectoral, interdisciplinary collaboration based on coordinated and integrated efforts, the intergovernmental Group on Earth Observations (GEO) is implementing the Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS). A component of GEOSS now under development is the "GEOSS Water Cycle Integrator (WCI)", which integrates Earth observations, modeling, data and information, management systems and education systems. GEOSS/WCI sets up "work benches" by which partners can share data, information and applications in an interoperable way, exchange knowledge and experiences, deepen mutual understanding and work together effectively to ultimately respond to issues of both mitigation and adaptation. (A work bench is a virtual geographical or phenomenological space where experts and managers collaborate to use information to address a problem within that space). GEOSS/WCI enhances the coordination of efforts to strengthen individual, institutional and infrastructure capacities, especially for effective interdisciplinary coordination and integration. GEO has established the GEOSS Asian Water Cycle Initiative (AWCI) and GEOSS African Water Cycle Coordination Initiative (AfWCCI). Through regional, inter-disciplinary, multi-sectoral integration and inter-agency coordination in Asia and Africa, GEOSS/WCI is now leading to effective actions and public awareness in support of water security and sustainable development.

  19. Weather and The Water Cycle

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Mrs. Merritt

    2005-10-15

    Students will be able to do activities dealing with weather and water cycles. Learn what makes weather wet and wild, forcast and predict weather. Webweather For Kids Learn about tornadoes and hurricanes. Kidstorm Learn about the water cycles. water Cycles Now click on the following link: Interactive weather maker 1. How much change in temperature is needed to make it snow? On the right side of the page click on Weather Detective Web Quest. Follow the ...

  20. Cycling Water Through the Environment

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2005-01-01

    In this lesson, students recognize the different forms that water takes and learn about where it exists in the environment. Using class discussion, multimedia resources, and experiments, students model the water cycle and explore how it can be used to create fresh water. They will identify the ways that water moves through the environment, recognize that most of Earth's surface is covered by water (but only a small amount is fresh water), and produce fresh water from salty water by distilling it.

  1. Nitrogen cycling. Rapid nitrous oxide cycling in the suboxic ocean.

    PubMed

    Babbin, Andrew R; Bianchi, Daniele; Jayakumar, Amal; Ward, Bess B

    2015-06-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is a powerful greenhouse gas and a major cause of stratospheric ozone depletion, yet its sources and sinks remain poorly quantified in the oceans. We used isotope tracers to directly measure N2O reduction rates in the eastern tropical North Pacific. Because of incomplete denitrification, N2O cycling rates are an order of magnitude higher than predicted by current models in suboxic regions, and the spatial distribution suggests strong dependence on both organic carbon and dissolved oxygen concentrations. Furthermore, N2O turnover is 20 times higher than the net atmospheric efflux. The rapid rate of this cycling coupled to an expected expansion of suboxic ocean waters implies future increases in N2O emissions. PMID:26045434

  2. Water Cycle in a Bag

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2012-06-26

    In this activity, learners create a biosphere in a baggie. Learners add soil, seeds and a little water in a ziplock bag, tape the bag to a sunny window and observe a microcosm of the water cycle (hydrologic cycle) that sustains life on Earth. This resource includes tips for using this activity with older children as well as useful web links.

  3. Nitrous oxide cycling in the Arabian Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bange, Hermann W.; Rapsomanikis, Spyridon; Andreae, Meinrat O.

    2001-01-01

    Depth profiles of dissolved nitrous oxide (N2O) were measured in the central and western Arabian Sea during four cruises in May and July-August 1995 and May-July 1997 as part of the German contribution to the Arabian Sea Process Study of the Joint Global Ocean Flux Study. The vertical distribution of N2O in the water column on a transect along 65°E showed a characteristic double-peak structure, indicating production of N2O associated with steep oxygen gradients at the top and bottom of the oxygen minimum zone. We propose a general scheme consisting of four ocean compartments to explain the N2O cycling as a result of nitrification and denitrification processes in the water column of the Arabian Sea. We observed a seasonal N2O accumulation at 600-800 m near the shelf break in the western Arabian Sea. We propose that, in the western Arabian Sea, N2O might also be formed during bacterial oxidation of organic matter by the reduction of IO3- to I-, indicating that the biogeochemical cycling of N2O in the Arabian Sea during the SW monsoon might be more complex than previously thought. A compilation of sources and sinks of N2O in the Arabian Sea suggested that the N2O budget is reasonably balanced.

  4. The NEWS Water Cycle Climatology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodell, Matthew; Beaudoing, Hiroko Kato; L'Ecuyer, Tristan; William, Olson

    2012-01-01

    NASA's Energy and Water Cycle Study (NEWS) program fosters collaborative research towards improved quantification and prediction of water and energy cycle consequences of climate change. In order to measure change, it is first necessary to describe current conditions. The goal of the first phase of the NEWS Water and Energy Cycle Climatology project was to develop "state of the global water cycle" and "state of the global energy cycle" assessments based on data from modern ground and space based observing systems and data integrating models. The project was a multi-institutional collaboration with more than 20 active contributors. This presentation will describe the results of the water cycle component of the first phase of the project, which include seasonal (monthly) climatologies of water fluxes over land, ocean, and atmosphere at continental and ocean basin scales. The requirement of closure of the water budget (i.e., mass conservation) at various scales was exploited to constrain the flux estimates via an optimization approach that will also be described. Further, error assessments were included with the input datasets, and we examine these in relation to inferred uncertainty in the optimized flux estimates in order to gauge our current ability to close the water budget within an expected uncertainty range.

  5. Water 2: The Hydrologic Cycle

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Linda Vanasupa

    This video looks at how water is provided for our use through the hydrologic cycle. It also explains how global climate change disturbs the storage of water in the various global compartments. This video is part of the Sustainability Learning Suites, made possible in part by a grant from the National Science Foundation. See 'Learn more about this resource' for Learning Objectives and Activities.

  6. The Water Cycle: Infiltration

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This site provides a discussion of the downward movement, or infiltration, of water from the surface into soil or porous rock. Graphics illustrate the processes affecting infiltration, including precipitation, soil characteristics and saturation, land cover, slope, and evapotranspiration. Links to additional sources of information are also provided.

  7. Droplet and the Water Cycle

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2001-01-01

    From NASA's For Kids Only Earth Science Enterprise Web site comes the interactive learning game, Droplet and the Water Cycle. Using Flash Macromedia, kids get to control an animated droplet of water falling from the sky in hopes of learning more about the water cycle. Controls are described on the first page, which allow you to move the droplet through a forest, a river, and an ocean while avoiding things, like butterflies and insects, which are very thirsty. The game can be downloaded to PC and Macintosh computers for free or played online. Although it is fun and challenging to play, it could use some more questions or other means of reinforcing the learning.

  8. Water treeing and polymer oxidation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. J. Densley; S. S. Bamji; A. T. Bulinski; J.-P. Crine

    1990-01-01

    The influence of oxidation on water tree degradation is examined. Studies of the thermal oxidation of cable-grade PE (polyethylene) and XLPE (cross-linked PE) and also of PE and XLPE immersed in hot aqueous solutions in the absence of an electric field are reviewed. The data are compared with the results of oxidation studies of water trees in PE and XLPE.

  9. Observing the Global Water Cycle from Space

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. H. Hildebrand

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents an approach to measuring all major components of the water cycle from space. Key elements of the global water cycle are discussed in terms of the storage of water-in the ocean, air, cloud and precipitation, in soil, ground water, snow and ice, and in lakes and rivers-and in terms of the global fluxes of water between these

  10. Water Cycling &the GPM Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, E. A.

    2003-04-01

    The GPM mission is currently planned for start in the late'07 - early'08 time frame. Its main scientific goal is to help answer pressing scientific problems arising within the context of global and regional water cycles. These problems cut across a hierarchy of scales and include climate-water cycle interactions, techniques for improving weather and climate predictions, and better methods for combining observed precipitation with hydrometeorological prediction models for applications to hazardous flood-producing storms, seasonal flood/draught conditions, and fresh water resource assessments. The GPM mission will expand the scope of precipitation measurement through the use of a constellation of some 9 satellites, one of which will be an advanced TRMM-like "core" satellite carrying a dual-frequency Ku-Ka band precipitation radar and an advanced, multifrequency passive microwave radiometer with vertical-horizontal polarization discrimination. The other constellation members will include new dedicated satellites and co-existing operational/research satellites carrying similar (but not identical) passive microwave radiometers. The goal of the constellation is to achieve 3-hour sampling at any spot on the globe - continuously. The constellation's orbit architecture will consist of a mix of sun-synchronous and non-sun-synchronous satellites with the "core" satellite providing measurements of cloud-precipitation microphysical processes plus calibration-quality rainrates to be used with the other retrieval information to ensure bias-free constellation coverage. GPM is organized internationally, involving existing, pending, projected, and under-study partnerships which will link NASA and NOAA in the US, NASDA in Japan, ESA in Europe, ISRO in India, CNES in France, and possibly ASI in Italy, KARI in South Korea, CSA in Canada, and AEB in Brazil. Additionally, the program is actively pursuing agreements with other international collaborators and domestic scientific agencies and institutions, as well as participation by individual scientists from academia, government, and the private sector to fulfill mission goals and to pave the way for what ultimately is expected to become an internationally-organized operational global precipitation observing system. Notably, the broad societal applications of GPM are reflected in the United Nation's identification of this mission as a foremost candidate for its Peaceful Uses of Space Program. An overview of the GPM mission design is given, followed by an explanation of its scientific agenda as an outgrowth of making improvements in rain retrieval accuracy, microphysics dexterity, sampling frequency, and global coverage. All of these improvements offer new means to observe variability in precipitation and water cycle fluxes, to improve water budget closure at regional and global scales, and to leverage these improvements in achieving improved predictability of weather, climate, and hydrometeorology. Specifically, the scientific agenda of GPM has been designed to leverage the measurement improvements to improve prognostic model performance, particularly quantitative precipitation forecasting and its linked phenomena at short, intermediate, and extended time scales. The talk addresses how GPM measurements will enable more accurate satellite-based calculations of the water cycle relative to where things stand today (two examples will be provided), and how such measurements can be used to evaluate accelerations and decelerations in regional and global water cycle processes and thus improve our understanding of water-driven climatic shifts. These improvements become possible by using more accurate, more microphysically-centric, more frequent, and fully global precipitation observations to achieve better water budget closure and to provide more realistic forcing and assessment of prediction models.

  11. THE WATER CYCLE REVISITED:THE WATER CYCLE REVISITED: LINKAGES WITH ELEMENTLINKAGES WITH ELEMENT

    E-print Network

    Slatton, Clint

    THE WATER CYCLE REVISITED:THE WATER CYCLE REVISITED: LINKAGES WITH ELEMENTLINKAGES WITH ELEMENT?s to revisit? #12;USGCRP Water Cycle Science Plan Hornberger et al. 2001 (3rd Science Question) How will variability and changes in the cycling of water though terrestrial and freshwater ecosystems be linked

  12. EMERGING CONTAMINANTS IN THE DRINKING WATER CYCLE

    EPA Science Inventory

    PRESENTATION OUTLINE: I. General overview of the water cycle; II. USEPA and USGS Research; a. Wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) effluents and downstream surface waters; b. Groundwater down gradient from WW lagoon; c. Source and finished water fro...

  13. Global Changes of the Water Cycle Intensity

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michael G. Bosilovich; Siegfried D. Schubert; Gregory K. Walker

    2005-01-01

    In this study, numerical simulations of the twentieth-century climate are evaluated, focusing on the changes in the intensity of the global water cycle. A new model diagnostic of atmospheric water vapor cycling rate is developed and employed that relies on constituent tracers predicted at the model time step. This diagnostic is compared to a simplified traditional calculation of cycling rate,

  14. Getting up to Speed: The Water Cycle and Water Conservation

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This is an introduction to a module on water conservation. It presents the concepts of limited supply, the water cycle, and the impact by and on populations. It gives an overview of water conservation and what would happen without it.

  15. ENGINEERING BULLETIN: SUPERCRITICAL WATER OXIDATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    This engineering bulletin presents a description and status of supercritical water oxidation technology, a summary of recent performance tests, and the current applicability of this emerging technology. his information is provided to assist remedial project managers, contractors ...

  16. ENGINEERING BULLETIN: SUPERCRITICAL WATER OXIDATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    This engineering bulletin presents a description and status of supercritical water oxidation technology, a summary of recent performance tests, and the current applicability of this emerging technology. This information is provided to assist remedial project managers, contractors...

  17. The water-water cycle as alternative photon and electron sinks.

    PubMed Central

    Asada, K

    2000-01-01

    The water-water cycle in chloroplasts is the photoreduction of dioxygen to water in photosystem I (PS I) by the electrons generated in photosystem II (PS II) from water. In the water-water cycle, the rate of photoreduction of dioxygen in PS I is several orders of magnitude lower than those of the disproportionation of superoxide catalysed by superoxide dismutase, the reduction of hydrogen peroxide to water catalysed by ascorbate peroxidase, and the reduction of the resulting oxidized forms of ascorbate by reduced ferredoxin or catalysed by either dehydroascorbate reductase or monodehydroascorbate reductase. The water-water cycle therefore effectively shortens the lifetimes of photoproduced superoxide and hydrogen peroxide to suppress the production of hydroxyl radicals, their interactions with the target molecules in chloroplasts, and resulting photoinhibition. When leaves are exposed to photon intensities of sunlight in excess of that required to support the fixation of CO2, the intersystem electron carriers are over-reduced, resulting in photoinhibition. Under such conditions, the water-water cycle not only scavenges active oxygens, but also safely dissipates excess photon energy and electrons, in addition to downregulation of PS II and photorespiration. The dual functions of the water-water cycle for protection from photoinhibition under photon excess stress are discussed, along with its functional evolution. PMID:11127996

  18. The Doe Water Cycle Pilot Study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    N. L. Miller; A. W. King; M. A. Miller; E. P. Springer; M. L. Wesely; K. E. Bashford; M. E. Conrad; K. Costigan; P. N. Foster; H. K. Gibbs; J. Jin; J. Klazura; B. M. Lesht; M. V. Machavaram; F. Pan; J. Song; D. Troyan; R. A. Washington-Allen

    2005-01-01

    A Department of Energy (DOE) multilaboratory Water Cycle Pilot Study (WCPS) investigated components of the local water budget at the Walnut River watershed in Kansas to study the relative importance of various processes and to determine the feasibility of observational water budget closure. An extensive database of local meteorological time series and land surface characteristics was compiled. Numerical simulations of

  19. Monitoring cycle water chemistry in fossil plants

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. F. Aschoff; D. M. Sopocy; D. T. Eglar; O. Jonas; J. K. Rice; C. C. Stauffer; W. E. Allmon

    1991-01-01

    EPRI report CS-4629, published in 1986, contains operating cycle chemistry guidelines to assist utilities in reducing water and steam contamination and resulting corrosion, scaling, and deposition. These guidelines were based on consensus opinion utilizing information then available and were not validated through actual plant testing. The objectives of this project are: to monitor the major parameters of cycle chemistry in

  20. Polymer oxidation and water treeing

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. T. Bulinski; J.-P. Crine; B. Noirhomme; R. J. Densley; S. Bamji

    1998-01-01

    In order to determine whether or not oxidation of polymer influences water treeing, more than 200 vented and bow-tie trees from 31 field-aged cables were investigated. Micro-IR spectroscopy analysis has not shown any consistent excess of carbonyl content in water trees as compared with the adjacent non-treed regions of the insulation. Although the levels of carbonyl content of the bulk

  1. CLOSED-CYCLE WATER-BOILER REACTOR

    Microsoft Academic Search

    1962-01-01

    The design and characteristics of a liquid homogeneous reactor ; providing ultimate protection of the surrounding area against radioactive ; contamination are described. The reactor system is comprised of a water boiler ; reactor having a water solution of enriched uranyl nitrate for a core, hydrogen-; oxygen recombiner system, nitrogen-oxygen recombiner system, sealed closed cycle ; gas recirculating system operating

  2. Monitoring cycle water chemistry in fossil plants

    Microsoft Academic Search

    1992-01-01

    This report presents a survey of foreign water treatment practices and experience in 12 countries together with the results of cycle water and steam chemistry monitoring from 29 units in nine countries andnine different organizations. With data from the open literature, over 40 drum and 30 once-through boiler units are included. The report covers drum boilers using phosphate, phosphate plus

  3. The seasonal cycle of water on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakosky, B. M.

    1985-06-01

    A review of the behavior of water in the Mars atmosphere and subsurface is appropriate now that data from the Mariner and Viking spacecraft have been analyzed and discussed for several years following completion of those missions. Observations and analyses pertinent to the seasonal cycle of water vapor in the atmosphere of Mars are reviewed, with attention toward transport of water and the seasonal exchange of water between the atmosphere and various non-atmospheric reservoirs. Possible seasonally-accessible sources and sinks for water include water ice on or within the seasonal and residual polar caps; surface or subsurface ice in the high-latitude regions of the planet; adsorbed or chemically-bound water within the near-surface regolith; or surface or subsurface liquid water. The stability of water within each of these reservoirs is discussed, as are the mechanisms for driving exchange of the water with the atmosphere and the timescales for exchange. Specific conclusions are reached about the distribution of water and the viability of each mechanism as a seasonal reservoir. Discussion is also included of the behavior of water on longer timescales, driven by the variations in solar forcing due to the quasi-periodic variations of the orbital obliquity. Finally, specific suggestions are made for future observations from spacecraft which would further define or constrain the seasonal cycle of water.

  4. Annual cycle and temperature dependence of pinene oxidation products and other water-soluble organic compounds in coarse and fine aerosol samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.; Müller, L.; Winterhalter, R.; Moortgat, G. K.; Hoffmann, T.; Pöschl, U.

    2010-05-01

    Filter samples of fine and coarse particulate matter were collected over a period of one year and analyzed for water-soluble organic compounds, including the pinene oxidation products pinic acid, pinonic acid, 3-methyl-1,2,3-butanetricarboxylic acid (3-MBTCA) and a variety of dicarboxylic acids (C5-C16) and nitrophenols. Seasonal variations and other characteristic features are discussed with regard to aerosol sources and sinks and data from other studies and regions. The ratios of adipic acid (C6) and phthalic acid (Ph) to azelaic acid (C9) indicate that the investigated aerosols samples were mainly influenced by biogenic sources. An Arrhenius-type correlation was found between the 3-MBTCA concentration and inverse temperature. Model calculations suggest that the temperature dependence is largely due to enhanced emissions and OH radical concentrations at elevated temperatures, whereas the influence of gas-particle partitioning appears to play a minor role. Enhanced ratios of pinic acid to 3-MBTCA indicate strong chemical aging of the investigated aerosols in summer and spring. Acknowledgment: The authors would like to thank M. Claeys for providing synthetic 3-methyl-1,2,3-butanetricarboxylic acid standards for LC-MS analysis and J. Fröhlich for providing filter samples and related information.

  5. Geothermal Water Use: Life Cycle Water Consumption, Water Resource Assessment, and Water Policy Framework

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, Jenna N.

    2014-06-10

    This report examines life cycle water consumption for various geothermal technologies to better understand factors that affect water consumption across the life cycle (e.g., power plant cooling, belowground fluid losses) and to assess the potential water challenges that future geothermal power generation projects may face. Previous reports in this series quantified the life cycle freshwater requirements of geothermal power-generating systems, explored operational and environmental concerns related to the geochemical composition of geothermal fluids, and assessed future water demand by geothermal power plants according to growth projections for the industry. This report seeks to extend those analyses by including EGS flash, both as part of the life cycle analysis and water resource assessment. A regional water resource assessment based upon the life cycle results is also presented. Finally, the legal framework of water with respect to geothermal resources in the states with active geothermal development is also analyzed.

  6. Geothermal Water Use: Life Cycle Water Consumption, Water Resource Assessment, and Water Policy Framework

    DOE Data Explorer

    Schroeder, Jenna N.

    This report examines life cycle water consumption for various geothermal technologies to better understand factors that affect water consumption across the life cycle (e.g., power plant cooling, belowground fluid losses) and to assess the potential water challenges that future geothermal power generation projects may face. Previous reports in this series quantified the life cycle freshwater requirements of geothermal power-generating systems, explored operational and environmental concerns related to the geochemical composition of geothermal fluids, and assessed future water demand by geothermal power plants according to growth projections for the industry. This report seeks to extend those analyses by including EGS flash, both as part of the life cycle analysis and water resource assessment. A regional water resource assessment based upon the life cycle results is also presented. Finally, the legal framework of water with respect to geothermal resources in the states with active geothermal development is also analyzed.

  7. Under the Lawn: Engaging the Water Cycle

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sharon Moran

    2008-01-01

    This paper explores how several water technologies mediate people's relationship with nature in the domestic sphere. While septic systems are critical to the built environment in exurban North America, they remain largely unacknowledged. Their hidden participation in the backyards of private homes silently facilitates—yet outwardly denies—people's continued engagement in the water cycle. Now, a growing array of alternative practices (e.g.

  8. The artificial water cycle: emergy analysis of waste water treatment.

    PubMed

    Bastianoni, Simone; Fugaro, Laura; Principi, Ilaria; Rosini, Marco

    2003-04-01

    The artificial water cycle can be divided into the phases of water capture from the environment, potabilisation, distribution, waste water collection, waste water treatment and discharge back into the environment. The terminal phase of this cycle, from waste water collection to discharge into the environment, was assessed by emergy analysis. Emergy is the quantity of solar energy needed directly or indirectly to provide a product or energy flow in a given process. The emergy flow attributed to a process is therefore an index of the past and present environmental cost to support it. Six municipalities on the western side of the province of Bologna were analysed. Waste water collection is managed by the municipal councils and treatment is carried out in plants managed by a service company. Waste water collection was analysed by compiling a mass balance of the sewer system serving the six municipalities, including construction materials and sand for laying the pipelines. Emergy analysis of the water treatment plants was also carried out. The results show that the great quantity of emergy required to treat a gram of water is largely due to input of non renewable fossil fuels. As found in our previous analysis of the first part of the cycle, treatment is likewise characterised by high expenditure of non renewable resources, indicating a correlation with energy flows. PMID:12817633

  9. Following the Water Cycle to Sustainability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lutz, T. M.

    2012-12-01

    For scientists, modeling the connections among the parts of complex, dynamic systems is crucial. Doing so lets us understand emergent phenomena such as ecosystem behavior and climate patterns that could not otherwise be predicted. Emergent phenomena can typically only be understood or appreciated when we stand "outside" the system. When scientists take such an outsiders view of earth's systems they can propose many ways that human activities modify the climate system (e.g., increasing or reducing GHG emissions). But what should we do to achieve a sustainable future? Sustainability is an emergent property that arises at the level of the planetary management system, of which the scientific establishment is just a part. We are "insiders" and it is impossible to completely envision the conditions for sustainability or to plan for it. The crises in our atmosphere, biosphere, oceans, and in the natural and energy resource sectors are based in science and do call for urgent changes in science education. But education that focuses solely on science to meet the challenges of sustainability may be as likely to harm humanity's long-term prospects as to improve them. I present activities and teaching strategies that I use in general education classes at West Chester University, a comprehensive institution of roughly 14,000 undergraduates. The overarching concept is to extend "modeling the connections" to the sustainability level and to train students to think outside the system. To make the ideas more accessible, I have the students become sensors at their particular point in the web of connections that constitute the planetary management system. I ask them to evaluate their connection in three domains proposed by John Ehrenfeld (Sustainability by Design, Yale University Press, 2008): sense of place in the natural world; sense of responsibility for our actions, and sense of what it is to be a human being. I have them analyze their sense of connection with reference to a systems learning model based on feedback and limits to perception. I focus on a part of the course that builds on connections that start in the hydrosphere and that includes some basic experiential learning about the water cycle and students' reliance on it. We measure and visualize aspects of the water cycle in nearby areas of campus (designated as an outdoor classroom and demonstration garden). The evapotranspiration flow is used to introduce notions of what can happen when flows are not sensed (e.g., invisible to us). Students use an online water footprint calculator to discover how large their water reliance is, particularly through energy generation, food consumption and food waste; and how far their water reach extends (virtual water trade). They consider the ethical implications of their water use in a world in which it is becoming a more rare resource and in some cases a valued commodity. They learn about non-utilitarian values of water based on an activity on the values of nature. They look at local, community-based efforts to improve water quality and to re-localize water dependence. A reading from Aldo Leopold puts the water cycle in a historical and cultural perspective. The water cycle is strongly interwoven with natural and human energy systems, the climate system, the carbon cycle, nutrient cycles, the rock cycle, and serves as a starting point to reach many other topics.

  10. The DOE Water Cycle Pilot Study

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, N.L.; King, A.W.; Miller, M.A.; Springer, E.P.; Wesely, M.L.; Bashford, K.E.; Conrad, M.E.; Costigan, K.; Foster, P.N.; Gibbs, H.K.; Jin, J.; Klazura, J.; Lesht, B.M.; Machavaram, M.V.; Pan, F.; Song, J.; Troyan, D.; Washington-Allen, R.A.

    2003-09-20

    A Department of Energy (DOE) multi-laboratory Water Cycle Pilot Study (WCPS) investigated components of the local water budget at the Walnut River Watershed in Kansas to study the relative importance of various processes and to determine the feasibility of observational water budget closure. An extensive database of local meteorological time series and land surface characteristics was compiled. Numerical simulations of water budget components were generated and, to the extent possible, validated for three nested domains within the Southern Great Plains; the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Measurement/Cloud Atmospheric Radiation Testbed (ARM/CART), the Walnut River Watershed (WRW), and the Whitewater Watershed (WW), Kansas A 2-month Intensive Observation Period (IOP) was conducted to gather detailed observations relevant to specific details of the water budget, including fine-scale precipitation, streamflow, and soil moisture measurements not made routinely by other programs. Event and season al water isotope (delta 18O, delta D) sampling in rainwater, streams, soils, lakes, and wells provided a means of tracing sources and sinks within and external to the WW, WRW, and the ARM/CART domains. The WCPS measured changes in leaf area index for several vegetation types, deep groundwater variations at two wells, and meteorological variables at a number of sites in the WRW. Additional activities of the WCPS include code development toward a regional climate model with water isotope processes, soil moisture transect measurements, and water level measurements in ground water wells.

  11. US Water Cycle Research to Support Improved Water Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawford, R.

    2003-04-01

    Over the past four years the United States has been developing a research program under the auspices of the United States Climate Change Science Program (CCSP) that is intended to focus research efforts on the global water cycle including the improved application of this research to the management of water resources. This focus has arisen because of the importance of the global water cycle for climate and the opportunities for improving existing and proposed water management strategies. The questions considered in this program cover a range of space and time scales. Space scales range from basins as large as the Mississippi Basin to catchments that cover a few kilometers. The issues also range over many time scales extending from problems of non-stationarity in the long-term precipitation regimes arising from climate change to estimating water yields from a rain event in a small basin. This paper provides an overview of the plans of the Global Water Cycle program as they relate to water management needs and reviews some of the research being undertaken within this program.

  12. Transpiration in the Global Water Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlesinger, W. H.; Jasechko, S.

    2014-12-01

    A compilation of 81 studies that have partitioned evapotranspiration (ET) into its components—transpiration (T) and evaporation (E)—at the ecosystem scale indicates that T accounts for 61% (±15% s.d.) of ET and returns approximately 39±10% of incident precipitation (P) to the atmosphere, creating a dominant force in the global water cycle. T as a proportion of ET is highest in tropical rainforests (70±14 %) and lowest in steppes, shrublands and deserts (51±15%), but there is no relationship of T/ET versus P across all available data (R2 = 0.01). Changes to transpiration due to increasing CO2 concentrations, land use changes, shifting ecozones and climate warming are expected to have significant impacts upon runoff and groundwater recharge, reflecting human impacts on the global biogeochemical cycle of water.

  13. Alternating electron and proton transfer steps in photosynthetic water oxidation

    PubMed Central

    Klauss, André; Haumann, Michael; Dau, Holger

    2012-01-01

    Water oxidation by cyanobacteria, algae, and plants is pivotal in oxygenic photosynthesis, the process that powers life on Earth, and is the paradigm for engineering solar fuel–production systems. Each complete reaction cycle of photosynthetic water oxidation requires the removal of four electrons and four protons from the catalytic site, a manganese–calcium complex and its protein environment in photosystem II. In time-resolved photothermal beam deflection experiments, we monitored apparent volume changes of the photosystem II protein associated with charge creation by light-induced electron transfer (contraction) and charge-compensating proton relocation (expansion). Two previously invisible proton removal steps were detected, thereby filling two gaps in the basic reaction-cycle model of photosynthetic water oxidation. In the S2 ? S3 transition of the classical S-state cycle, an intermediate is formed by deprotonation clearly before electron transfer to the oxidant (). The rate-determining elementary step (?, approximately 30 µs at 20?°C) in the long-distance proton relocation toward the protein–water interface is characterized by a high activation energy (Ea = 0.46 ± 0.05 eV) and strong H/D kinetic isotope effect (approximately 6). The characteristics of a proton transfer step during the S0 ? S1 transition are similar (?, approximately 100 µs; Ea = 0.34 ± 0.08 eV; kinetic isotope effect, approximately 3); however, the proton removal from the Mn complex proceeds after electron transfer to . By discovery of the transient formation of two further intermediate states in the reaction cycle of photosynthetic water oxidation, a temporal sequence of strictly alternating removal of electrons and protons from the catalytic site is established. PMID:22988080

  14. Soar's basic operation cycle Water-Jug Problem

    E-print Network

    Bremen, Universität

    Components Soar Rules Soar's basic operation cycle Tools Water-Jug Problem Eaters Cognitive Systems's basic operation cycle 4 Tools 5 Water-Jug Problem Solving the problem 6 Eaters Creating a move Searching cycle Tools Water-Jug Problem Eaters Rule Memory Working Memory Componenents of Soar Christopher

  15. 359MARCH 2005AMERICAN METEOROLOGICAL SOCIETY | THE DOE WATER CYCLE

    E-print Network

    Pan, Feifei

    359MARCH 2005AMERICAN METEOROLOGICAL SOCIETY | I THE DOE WATER CYCLE PILOT STUDY BY N. L. MILLER, A and modeling. n 1999, the U.S. Global Change Research Program (USGCRP) formed a Water Cycle Study Group was followed by a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Water Cycle Research Plan (Department of Energy 2002

  16. The cycling and oxidation pathways of organic carbon in a shallow estuary along the Texas Gulf Coast

    SciTech Connect

    Warnken, Kent W.; Santschi, Peter H.; Roberts, Kimberly A.; Gill, Gary A.

    2007-08-08

    The cycling and oxidation pathways of organic carbon were investigated at a single shallow water estuarine site in Trinity Bay, Texas, the uppermost lobe of Galveston Bay, during November 2000. Radio-isotopes were used to estimate sediment mixing and accumulation rates, and benthic chamber and pore water measurements were used to determine sediment-water exchange fluxes of oxygen, nutrients and metals, and infer carbon oxidation rates.

  17. EDITORIAL: The global atmospheric water cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bengtsson, Lennart

    2010-06-01

    Water vapour plays a key role in the Earth's energy balance. Almost 50% of the absorbed solar radiation at the surface is used to cool the surface, through evaporation, and warm the atmosphere, through release of latent heat. Latent heat is the single largest factor in warming the atmosphere and in transporting heat from low to high latitudes. Water vapour is also the dominant greenhouse gas and contributes to a warming of the climate system by some 24°C (Kondratev 1972). However, water vapour is a passive component in the troposphere as it is uniquely determined by temperature and should therefore be seen as a part of the climate feedback system. In this short overview, we will first describe the water on planet Earth and the role of the hydrological cycle: the way water vapour is transported between oceans and continents and the return of water via rivers to the oceans. Generally water vapour is well observed and analysed; however, there are considerable obstacles to observing precipitation, in particular over the oceans. The response of the hydrological cycle to global warming is far reaching. Because different physical processes control the change in water vapour and evaporation/precipitation, this leads to a more extreme distribution of precipitation making, in general, wet areas wetter and dry areas dryer. Another consequence is a transition towards more intense precipitation. It is to be expected that the changes in the hydrological cycle as a consequence of climate warming may be more severe that the temperature changes. Water on planet Earth The total amount of available water on the Earth amounts to some 1.5 x 109 km3. The dominant part of this, 1.4 x 109 km3, resides in the oceans. About 29 x 106 km3 are locked up in land ice and glaciers and some 15 x 106 km3 are estimated to exist as groundwater. If all land ice and glaciers were to melt the sea level would rise some 80 m (Baumgartner and Reichel 1975). 13 x 103 km3 of water vapour are found in the atmosphere corresponding to a global average of 26 kg m-2 or 26 mm m-2 of water for each column of air on the surface of the Earth. There are large geographical differences such as between low and high latitudes. Figure 1 shows an estimate of the global water exchange between ocean and land, an annual average in units of 103 km3 (Baumgartner and Reichel 1975). An updated version can be found in Trenberth et al 2007 (their figure 1) showing broadly similar results. There is a net transport of some 38 units from ocean to land with about the same amount returning by the rivers to the ocean. However the amount of precipitation over the continents is almost three times as high, indicating a considerable recirculation of water over land. As shown by Trenberth et al (2007) the recirculation has a marked annual cycle as well as having large variations between continents. The recirculation is larger during the summer and for tropical land areas. The hydrological cycle of the world's oceans interacts differently with that of the continents. Most of the water from the Pacific Ocean recirculates between different parts of the Pacific itself, as and there is little net transport towards land. The pattern of water exchange between ocean and land is different in the Atlantic and Indian Oceans. Two thirds of the total net transport of water towards the continents comes from the Atlantic Ocean, with the rest essentially from the Indian Ocean. Most of the continental water for North and South America, Europe and Africa emanates from the Atlantic and is also returned to the Atlantic by the rivers. Figure 1 Figure 1. The global water cycle following Baumgartner and Reichel (1975). Annual values are in units of 103 km3 year-1. There is widespread evaporation (maximum some 2 m year-1) on each side of the inter-tropical convergence zone (ITCZ), transporting water vapour into the ITCZ and into the storm tracks of high latitudes. Conversely, in regions of net evaporation ocean salinity is increasing, leading to increased ocean vertical mixing. In the ITCZ and in the extra-tropical storm

  18. The Water Cycle and Global Warming

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2008-04-02

    The Baylor University College of Medicine continues to work at a furious pace on their delightful BioEd Online site, and educators everywhere love them for their work and dedication. Recently, they placed this lesson on the water cycle and global warming online. As with the other lessons in this series, the materials here include a brief description of the lessonâ??s objective, along with information on the intended audience, the materials required to complete the lesson, and so on. Teachers will note that they will need to download a slide set, several activity sheets, and a â??State of the Climate Reportâ? offered from the National Climatic Data Center.

  19. Hydrologic Cycle and Water Balance Equation

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Eric Peterson

    This exercise is designed to evaluate the students' understanding of both the hydrologic cycle and the water budget (mass balance) equation. In my course, the exercise is the students' first exposure to models in the course. While the exercise may seem basic, students gain experience in creating conceptual models and then generating mathematical models from the conceptual model. The exercise provides students with an introduction (or refresher) to some basic Excel formulas. Finally, the exercise can be modified to include more "what if" scenarios that require critical thinking and analysis from the students.

  20. Watch: Current knowledge of the terrestrial Global Water Cycle\\

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. Harding; M. Best; S. Hagemann; P. Kabat; L. M. Tallaksen; T. Warnaars; D. Wiberg; G. P. Weedon; Lanen van H. A. J; F. Ludwig; I. Haddeland

    2011-01-01

    Water-related impacts are among the most important consequences of increasing greenhouse gas concentrations. Changes in the global water cycle will also impact the carbon and nutrient cycles and vegetation patterns. There is already some evidence of increasing severity of floods and droughts and increasing water scarcity linked to increasing greenhouse gases. So far, however, the most important impacts on water

  1. West African Monsoon water cycle: 1. A hybrid water budget data set

    E-print Network

    Guichard, Francoise

    West African Monsoon water cycle: 1. A hybrid water budget data set R. Meynadier,1 O. Bock,1,2 F water cycle with the help of a new hybrid water budget data set developed within the framework and net radiation. The annual mean and the seasonal cycle of the atmospheric water budget are presented

  2. Regular paper Search for intermediates of photosynthetic water oxidation

    E-print Network

    Junge, Wolfgang

    Key words: intermediate, photosynthesis, Photosystem II, S-state, water oxidation Abstract PhotosystemRegular paper Search for intermediates of photosynthetic water oxidation Juergen Clausen & Wolfgang II of cyanobacteria and plants incorporates the catalytic centre of water oxidation. Powered

  3. Chromium cycling in soils and water: links, gaps, and methods.

    PubMed Central

    Bartlett, R J

    1991-01-01

    The major links in the cycling of chromium in soils and in natural waters are between chromium(III) and chromium (VI). Between the larger links are lesser links involving processes of mobilization and oxidation of CrIII and reduction of CrVI. The gaps are mainly in our understanding of the factors that control these processes. If soluble CrIII is added to an "average" soil, a portion of it will become immediately oxidized by manganese oxides to CrVI. The rest of the CrIII may remain reduced for long periods of time, even in the presence of electron-accepting manganese oxides. However, this less available CrIII can be mobilized by low molecular weight organic complexers and then oxidized where redox conditions are optimal. Usually part of any CrVI added to a soil or sediment will be reduced instantly, especially under acid conditions. On the other hand, high concentrations of polluting CrVI may quickly exhaust the readily available reducing power of the matrix material and excess CrVI, the thermodynamically stable form in air, may persist for years in soils or lagoons without reduction. Cleanup of chromium pollution must involve the surrounding of both CrIII and CrVI with excesses of slowly available reducing substances and sealing them permanently from inputs of atmospheric oxygen. Monitoring the effectiveness of the measures is mandatory, but fortunately the chemical testing for CrVI in soil and water is simple and problem free compared with most colorimetric determinations. PMID:1935847

  4. Plumbing the Global Carbon Cycle: Integrating Inland Waters into the

    E-print Network

    Berkowitz, Alan R.

    Plumbing the Global Carbon Cycle: Integrating Inland Waters into the Terrestrial Carbon Budget J. J constructed a budget for the role of inland water ecosystems in the global carbon cycle. Our analysis: terrestrial, oceanic and atmospheric. Simplified depictions of the global carbon cycle have generally

  5. Highly efficient 6-stroke engine cycle with water injection

    DOEpatents

    Szybist, James P; Conklin, James C

    2012-10-23

    A six-stroke engine cycle having improved efficiency. Heat is recovered from the engine combustion gases by using a 6-stroke engine cycle in which combustion gases are partially vented proximate the bottom-dead-center position of the fourth stroke cycle, and water is injected proximate the top-dead-center position of the fourth stroke cycle.

  6. Nitrous oxide in coastal waters

    SciTech Connect

    Bange, H.W.; Rapsomanikis, S.; Andreae, M.O. [Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, Mainz (Germany)] [Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, Mainz (Germany)

    1996-03-01

    Measurements of dissolved and atmospheric nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O) are presented for three coastal environments: (1) the central North Sea, (2) the German Bight, and (3) the Gironde estuary. The contribution of coastal regions to the oceanic emissions of atmospheric N{sub 2}O were also determined. N{sub 2}O was measured with a gas chromatograph equipped with an electron capture detector and analyzed. The surface waters of the central North Sea and the German bight were found to be near equilibrium with the overlying atmosphere, while the mean saturation in the Gironde estuary was 132%. Mean saturations in coastal regions without estuaries or upwelling phenomena were only slightly higher than in the open ocean. When estuaries and regions with upwelling are included, however, approximately 60% of the oceanic N{sub 2}O flux is attributable to coastal regions. A review of published data indicated that previous studies have seriously underestimated N{sub 2}O sea-to-air flux from coastal regions. 69 refs., 8 figs., 4 tabs.

  7. The Water Cycle - Back and Forth (part 2)

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Maribel Magdaleno

    2012-07-17

    Students will learn more about the water cycle components and how they work together. They will learn it is a closed system and the importance of the ocean in the cycle. Reading for understanding is a focus in this lesson.

  8. Life cycle assessment of nuclear-based hydrogen production via thermochemical water splitting using a copper-chlorine (Cu-Cl) cycle

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ahmet Ziyaettin Ozbilen

    2010-01-01

    The energy carrier hydrogen is expected to solve some energy challenges. Since its oxidation does not emit greenhouse gases (GHGs), its use does not contribute to climate change, provided that it is derived from clean energy sources. Thermochemical water splitting using a Cu-Cl cycle, linked with a nuclear super-critical water cooled reactor (SCWR), which is being considered as a Generation

  9. Water clustering on nanostructured iron oxide films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merte, Lindsay R.; Bechstein, Ralf; Peng, Guowen; Rieboldt, Felix; Farberow, Carrie A.; Zeuthen, Helene; Knudsen, Jan; Lægsgaard, Erik; Wendt, Stefan; Mavrikakis, Manos; Besenbacher, Flemming

    2014-06-01

    The adhesion of water to solid surfaces is characterized by the tendency to balance competing molecule-molecule and molecule-surface interactions. Hydroxyl groups form strong hydrogen bonds to water molecules and are known to substantially influence the wetting behaviour of oxide surfaces, but it is not well-understood how these hydroxyl groups and their distribution on a surface affect the molecular-scale structure at the interface. Here we report a study of water clustering on a moiré-structured iron oxide thin film with a controlled density of hydroxyl groups. While large amorphous monolayer islands form on the bare film, the hydroxylated iron oxide film acts as a hydrophilic nanotemplate, causing the formation of a regular array of ice-like hexameric nanoclusters. The formation of this ordered phase is localized at the nanometre scale; with increasing water coverage, ordered and amorphous water are found to coexist at adjacent hydroxylated and hydroxyl-free domains of the moiré structure.

  10. Connecting the oxidation of soot to its redox cycling abilities

    PubMed Central

    Antiñolo, María; Willis, Megan D.; Zhou, Shouming; Abbatt, Jonathan P.D.

    2015-01-01

    Although it is known that soot particles are emitted in large quantities to the atmosphere, our understanding of their environmental effects is limited by our knowledge of how their composition is subsequently altered through atmospheric processing. Here we present an on-line mass spectrometric study of the changing chemical composition of hydrocarbon soot particles as they are oxidized by gas-phase ozone, and we show that the surface-mediated loss rates of adsorbed polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in soot are directly connected to a significant increase in the particle redox cycling abilities. With redox cycling implicated as an oxidative stress mechanism that arises after inhalation of atmospheric particles, this work draws a quantitative connection between the detailed heterogeneous chemistry occurring on atmospheric particles and a potential toxic mechanism attributable to that aerosol. PMID:25873384

  11. Connecting the oxidation of soot to its redox cycling abilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antiñolo, María; Willis, Megan D.; Zhou, Shouming; Abbatt, Jonathan P. D.

    2015-04-01

    Although it is known that soot particles are emitted in large quantities to the atmosphere, our understanding of their environmental effects is limited by our knowledge of how their composition is subsequently altered through atmospheric processing. Here we present an on-line mass spectrometric study of the changing chemical composition of hydrocarbon soot particles as they are oxidized by gas-phase ozone, and we show that the surface-mediated loss rates of adsorbed polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in soot are directly connected to a significant increase in the particle redox cycling abilities. With redox cycling implicated as an oxidative stress mechanism that arises after inhalation of atmospheric particles, this work draws a quantitative connection between the detailed heterogeneous chemistry occurring on atmospheric particles and a potential toxic mechanism attributable to that aerosol.

  12. The human cycle of water: water management and anthropogenic contaminant pathways in Pótam, Sonora, Mexico’s water cycle

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Stacey A. Pilling

    2011-01-01

    Women are the primary decision makers regarding household water sources in many developing nations, but are often overlooked\\u000a by researchers and organizations as primary water managers. This study took place in Pótam, Sonora, Mexico, during the summer\\u000a of 2007, with a follow-up visit in February 2008. The study aimed at understand the human cycle of water by identifying potential\\u000a exposure

  13. Chloride-assisted catalytic water oxidation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zuofeng; Concepcion, Javier J; Song, Na; Meyer, Thomas J

    2014-07-28

    Rates of electrocatalytic water oxidation to oxygen by Ru(II) polypyridyl complexes are enhanced by added NaCl. Observations based on the single-site catalyst [Ru(II)(Mebimpy)(bpy)(OH2)](2+) (Mebimpy is 2,6-bis(1-methylbenzimidazol-2-yl)pyridine; bpy is 2,2'-bipyridine) at pH 7.0 in a phosphate buffer suggest a mechanism involving initial oxidation of the catalyst to Ru(V)(O)(3+) followed by Cl(-) oxidation to HOCl. Once formed, HOCl is oxidized to O2. PMID:24924315

  14. Anaerobic Ammonium Oxidation (Anammox) A new sink in the marine nitrogen cycle

    E-print Network

    Fischlin, Andreas

    Term paper Anaerobic Ammonium Oxidation (Anammox) ­ A new sink in the marine nitrogen cycle@ethz.ch Tutor: Prof. Bernhard Wehrli #12;Abstract Anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) is a recently of anaerobic ammonium oxidation........................................................1 2. The "new" marine

  15. Rethinking the light water reactor fuel cycle

    E-print Network

    Shwageraus, Evgeni, 1973-

    2004-01-01

    The once through nuclear fuel cycle adopted by the majority of countries with operating commercial power reactors imposes a number of concerns. The radioactive waste created in the once through nuclear fuel cycle has to ...

  16. Supercritical Water Oxidation Data Acquisition Testing

    SciTech Connect

    K. M. Garcia

    1996-08-01

    Supercritical Water Oxidation (SCWO) is a high pressure oxidation process that blends air, water, and organic waste material in an oxidizer in which where the temperature and pressure in the oxidizer are maintained above the critical point of water. Supercritical water mixed with hydrocarbons, which would be insoluble at subcritical conditions, forms a homogeneous phase which possesses properties associated with both a gas and a liquid. Hydrocarbons in contact with oxygen and SCW are readily oxidized. These properties of SCW make it an attractive means for the destruction of waste streams containing organic materials. SCWO technology holds great promise for treating mixed wastes in an environmentally safe and efficient manner. In the spring of 1994 the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) initiated a Supercritical Water Oxidation Data Acquisition Testing (SCWODAT) program. The SCWODAT program provided further information and operational data on the effectiveness of treating both simulated mixed waste and typical Navy hazardous waste using the SCWO technology. The program concentrated on the acquisition of data through pilot plant testing. The Phase I DOE testing used a simulated waste stream that contained a complex machine cutting oil and metals, that acted as surrogates for radionuclides. The Phase II Navy testing included pilot testing using hazardous waste materials to demonstrate the effectiveness of the SCWO technology. The SCWODAT program demonstrated that the SCWO process oxidized the simulated waste stream containing complex machine cutting oil, selected by DOE as representative of one of the most difficult of the organic waste streams for which SCWO had been applied. The simulated waste stream with surrogate metals in solution was oxidized, with a high destruction efficiency, on the order of 99.97%, in both the neutralized and unneutralized modes of operation.

  17. Tunable water desalination across Graphene Oxide Frameworks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolai, Adrien; Meunier, Vincent

    2014-03-01

    ``Water, water, everywhere, nor any drop to drink.'' wrote Samuel Taylor Coleridge in 1798. Today's scientific advances in water desalination promise to change the second part of the sentence into ``and every drop to drink,'' by transforming sea water into fresh water and quench the thirst of 1.2B people facing shortages of water. To achieve this, the design of nanoporous materials with high water permeability and coupled with high salt rejection capacity is crucial. Graphene Oxide Frameworks (GOF) materials are a class of porous materials consisting of layers of graphene oxide sheets interconnected by linear boronic acid linkers. Water desalination across GOF is studied using classical Molecular Dynamics simulations. We used quantum mechanically obtained boron-related force field parameters to study the diffusion of water molecules inside bulk GOF. Properties, such as the self-diffusion coefficient of water molecules increases linearly with linker concentration n. Further, the desalination performance of GOF membranes reveals that the water permeability of GOF is several orders of magnitude higher than conventional membranes and an high water permeability can be coupled with a 100% efficiency of salt rejection by choosing the appropriate concentration n and thickness h.

  18. Using GPS to Study the Terrestrial Water Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larson, Kristine M.; Small, Eric E.

    2013-12-01

    Researchers are using GPS—usually thought of as a way to measure position—to measure water cycle properties, including surface soil moisture, snow depth, and vegetation growth, which are important for climate studies and satellite validation. Water managers need these data to predict, and possibly mitigate, hazards such as floods and droughts. While there are strong international efforts to use ground networks to measure and archive data for these quantities, the GPS-based water cycle data have the advantage that existing instrumentation can be used, significantly reducing the cost of operating this new terrestrial water cycle network.

  19. Supercritical Water Oxidation Program (SCWOP); Technology summary

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1994-02-01

    Purpose of SCWOP is to develop and demonstrate supercritical water oxidation as a viable technology for treating DOE hazardous and mixed wastes and to coordinate SCWO research, development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation activities. The process involves bringing together organic waste, water, and an oxidant (air, O{sub 2}, etc.) to temperatures and pressures above water`s critical point (374 C, 22.1 MPa); organic destruction is >99.99% efficient, and the resulting effluents (mostly water, CO{sub 2}) are relatively benign. Pilot-scale (300--500 gallons/day) SCWO units are to be constructed and demonstrated. Two phases will be conducted: hazardous waste pilot plant demonstration and mixed waste pilot demonstration. Contacts for further information and for getting involved are given.

  20. Supercritical water oxidation - Microgravity solids separation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Killilea, William R.; Hong, Glenn T.; Swallow, Kathleen C.; Thomason, Terry B.

    1988-01-01

    This paper discusses the application of supercritical water oxidation (SCWO) waste treatment and water recycling technology to the problem of waste disposal in-long term manned space missions. As inorganic constituents present in the waste are not soluble in supercritical water, they must be removed from the organic-free supercritical fluid reactor effluent. Supercritical water reactor/solids separator designs capable of removing precipitated solids from the process' supercritical fluid in zero- and low- gravity environments are developed and evaluated. Preliminary experiments are then conducted to test the concepts. Feed materials for the experiments are urine, feces, and wipes with the addition of reverse osmosis brine, the rejected portion of processed hygiene water. The solid properties and their influence on the design of several oxidation-reactor/solids-separator configurations under study are presented.

  1. Ceramic coating system or water oxidation environments

    DOEpatents

    Hong, Glenn T. (Tewksbury, MA)

    1996-01-01

    A process for water oxidation of combustible materials in which during at least a part of the oxidation corrosive material is present and makes contact with at least a portion of the apparatus over a contact area on the apparatus. At least a portion of the contact surface area comprises titanium dioxide coated onto a titanium metal substrate. Such ceramic composites have been found to be highly resistant to environments encountered in the process of supercritical water oxidation. Such environments typically contain greater than 50 mole percent water, together with oxygen, carbon dioxide, and a wide range of acids, bases, and salts. Pressures are typically about 27.5 to about 1000 bar while temperatures range as high as 700.degree. C. The ceramic composites are also resistant to degradation mechanisms caused by thermal stresses.

  2. OXIDATION-REDUCTION POTENTIAL MEASUREMENTS OF IMPORTANT OXIDANTS IN DRINKING WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Oxidation-reduction (redox) reactions are important in drinking water treatment and distribution. Oxidation-reduction potential (ORP) measurements of water reflect the tendency of major constituents in the water to accept or lose electrons. Although ORP measurements are valuable...

  3. Arsenic(III) detection using electrochemical-chemical-chemical redox cycling at bare indium-tin oxide electrodes.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Jinkyo; Das, Jagotamoy; Choi, Moonjung; Jo, Jinkyung; Aziz, Md Abdul; Yang, Haesik

    2014-11-21

    Sensitive As(III) detection in ground water is of great importance for evaluating the quality of drinking water. We report a sensitive electrochemical method for As(III) detection based on electrochemical-chemical-chemical (ECC) redox cycling involving Ru(IV) [an oxidized species of Ru(III)(NH3)5NH2(2+)], As(III), and tris(3-carboxyethyl)phosphine (TCEP). Electrochemical oxidation of Ru(III)(NH3)5NH2(2+) formed from Ru(III)(NH3)6(3+) generates Ru(IV), which quickly oxidizes As(III). This electro-mediated oxidation of As(III) produces As(V), which is reduced back to As(III) by TCEP. Electrochemically generated Ru(IV) then reoxidizes As(III), allowing ECC redox cycling to occur at a high rate on bare indium-tin oxide (ITO) electrodes without modifying the surfaces with electrocatalytic materials. Because most interfering metal ions precipitate in a carbonate buffer, water samples are mixed with carbonate buffers prior to electrochemical measurements, rendering the effects of Cu(+), Cu(2+), Fe(2+), Fe(3+), and Pb(2+) insignificant. The detection limit calculated by ECC redox cycling using a chronocoulogram is 1.2 ?M, much lower than that obtained using only the electro-mediated oxidation of As(III) (90 ?M). PMID:25209319

  4. Metal Oxide Composite Enabled Nanotextured Si Photoanode for Efficient Solar Driven Water Oxidation

    E-print Network

    Wang, Deli

    Metal Oxide Composite Enabled Nanotextured Si Photoanode for Efficient Solar Driven Water Oxidation oxide composite modified n-Si photoanode for efficient and stable water oxidation. This sputter of operation, the oxide composite provides a simple method to enable unstable photoanode materials for solar

  5. A Porphyrin-Stabilized Iridium Oxide Water Oxidation Catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Sherman, Ben; Pillai, Smitha; Kodis, Gerdenis; Bergkamp, Jesse; Mallouk, Thomas E.; Gust, Devens; Moore, Thomas A.; Moore, Ana L.

    2011-01-01

    Colloidal solutions of iridium oxide hydrate (IrO{sub 2}·NH{sub 2}O) were formed using porphyrin stabilizers bearing malonate-like functional groups at each of the four meso positions of the porphyrin ring. Cyclic voltammetry and monitoring of solution oxygen concentrations under constant applied potential demonstrated the electrochemical catalytic activity of the porphyrin–IrO{sub 2}·NH{sub 2}O complexes for the oxidation of water to oxygen. Quenching of the porphyrin fluorescence in the complex implies strong interaction between the porphyrin and the IrO{sub 2}·NH{sub 2}O. These results mark a step toward developing a porphyrin-based photoanode for use in a photoelectrochemical water-splitting cell.

  6. Supercritical water oxidation of landfill leachate

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Shuzhong, E-mail: s_z_wang@yahoo.cn [School of Energy and Power Engineering of Xi' an Jiao Tong University, Xi'an 710049 (China); Guo Yang [School of Energy and Power Engineering of Xi' an Jiao Tong University, Xi'an 710049 (China); Chen Chongming [Hebei Electric Power Research Institute, Shijizhuang, Hebei 050021 (China); Zhang Jie; Gong Yanmeng; Wang Yuzhen [School of Energy and Power Engineering of Xi' an Jiao Tong University, Xi'an 710049 (China)

    2011-09-15

    Highlights: > Thermal analysis of NH{sub 3} in supercritical water oxidation reaction. > Research on the catalytic reaction of landfill leachate by using response surface method. > Kinetic research of supercritical water oxidation of NH{sub 3} with and without MnO{sub 2} catalyst. - Abstract: In this paper, ammonia as an important ingredient in landfill leachate was mainly studied. Based on Peng-Robinson formulations and Gibbs free energy minimization method, the estimation of equilibrium composition and thermodynamic analysis for supercritical water oxidation of ammonia (SCWO) was made. As equilibrium is reached, ammonia could be totally oxidized in SCW. N{sub 2} is the main product, and the formation of NO{sub 2} and NO could be neglected. The investigation on SCWO of landfill leachate was conducted in a batch reactor at temperature of 380-500 deg. C, reaction time of 50-300 s and pressure of 25 MPa. The effect of reaction parameters such as oxidant equivalent ratio, reaction time and temperature were investigated. The results showed that COD and NH{sub 3} conversion improved as temperature, reaction time and oxygen excess increased. Compared to organics, NH{sub 3} is a refractory compound in supercritical water. The conversion of COD and NH{sub 3} were higher in the presence of MnO{sub 2} than that without catalyst. The interaction between reaction temperature and time was analyzed by using response surface method (RSM) and the results showed that its influence on the NH{sub 3} conversion was relatively insignificant in the case without catalyst. A global power-law rate expression was regressed from experimental data to estimate the reaction rate of NH{sub 3}. The activation energy with and without catalyst for NH{sub 3} oxidation were 107.07 {+-} 8.57 kJ/mol and 83.22 {+-} 15.62 kJ/mol, respectively.

  7. Massive swings in the marine N cycle during the Great Oxidation Event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zerkle, A.; Poulton, S.; Newton, R.; Claire, M.; Bekker, A.

    2012-12-01

    Nitrogen isotope values preserved in sedimentary organic matter show a general increase sometime between 2.5 and 2.1 Ga (e.g., Beaumont and Robert, 1999), coincident with the initial rise of O2 in the Earth's atmosphere (the Great Oxidation Event; Holland, 2002). This shift is commonly interpreted to represent a major change in the global N cycle related to oxygenation of Earth's surficial environments. Despite the invoked connection between ?15N values and the GOE, high resolution studies of N isotopes across this critical time interval are lacking. Here we present ?15N data for kerogens from the ~2.32 Ga Rooihoogte and Timeball Hill formations, South Africa. These sediments were deposited during the GOE, when the disappearance of S-isotope mass-independent fractionation first indicates O2 levels consistently greater than 10-5 times present atmospheric level (e.g., Bekker et al., 2004). We interpret these data in the context of paleoredox indicators for ocean chemistry (Fe speciation analysis), further allowing us to explore changes in the N cycle under evolving environmental conditions. Our data show unusually 15N-depleted values (down to -13‰) at the bottom of the stratigraphic succession, in sediments deposited under a water column with dynamic redox conditions that fluctuated between oxic, ferruginous, and sulfidic states (possibly related to a shifting chemocline). The ?15N values increase dramatically (up to +14‰) across the boundary between the Rooihoogte and Timeball Hill formations, before settling to near modern values (+6‰) in sediments that were deposited under persistently oxygenated waters. We suggest that this record reflects the permanent onset of the oxidative N cycle (nitrification), which would have produced sufficient oxidized N compounds to establish denitrification and anammox as the dominant controls on ?15N values of marine organic matter. We also estimate the N fluxes required to produce this record using a global marine nitrogen cycle model.

  8. Potassium vapor topping cycle gas-fired boiler water test

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. B. Lloyd; R. H. Guymon; R. S. Holcomb

    1978-01-01

    The potassium vapor topping cycle is a concept for increasing the efficiency of the Rankine vapor cycle by raising the peak temperature by employing a potassium vapor cycle with a turbine inlet temperature of 1500 to 1600°F (815 to 870°C) in which the waste heat rejected from the condensing potassium vapor is transferred to boiling water and steam in a

  9. Electric field cycling behavior of ferroelectric hafnium oxide.

    PubMed

    Schenk, Tony; Schroeder, Uwe; Peši?, Milan; Popovici, Mihaela; Pershin, Yuriy V; Mikolajick, Thomas

    2014-11-26

    HfO2 based ferroelectrics are lead-free, simple binary oxides with nonperovskite structure and low permittivity. They just recently started attracting attention of theoretical groups in the fields of ferroelectric memories and electrostatic supercapacitors. A modified approach of harmonic analysis is introduced for temperature-dependent studies of the field cycling behavior and the underlying defect mechanisms. Activation energies for wake-up and fatigue are extracted. Notably, all values are about 100 meV, which is 1 order of magnitude lower than for conventional ferroelectrics like lead zirconate titanate (PZT). This difference is mainly atttributed to the one to two orders of magnitude higher electric fields used for cycling and to the different surface to volume ratios between the 10 nm thin films in this study and the bulk samples of former measurements or simulations. Moreover, a new, analog-like split-up effect of switching peaks by field cycling is discovered and is explained by a network model based on memcapacitive behavior as a result of defect redistribution. PMID:25365475

  10. Atmospheric Water and Energy Cycle Changes With Global Warming

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Previdi; B. G. Liepert

    2008-01-01

    The annual loss of radiative energy from Earth's atmosphere is largely balanced by latent heating from cloud formation and precipitation, thus closely coupling the water and energy cycles. Here we analyze changes in the atmospheric energy cycle that occur with global mean surface warming using a series of observational datasets. Changes in radiative heating and cooling are examined using radiative

  11. Waste disposal from the light water reactor fuel cycle

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. M. Costello; C. J. Hardy

    1981-01-01

    Alternaive nuclear fuel cycles for support of light water reactors are described and wastes containing naturally occurring or artificially produced radioactivity reviewed. General principles and objectives in radioactive waste management are outlined, and methods for their practical application to fuel cycle wastes discussed. Management of wastes from upgrading processes of uranium hexafluoride manufacture and uranium manufacture and enrichment, and, to

  12. Direct energy conversion bottoming cycles for solid oxide fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Paramonov, D.V.; Carelli, M.D.

    1998-07-01

    Besides high conversion efficiency, advantages of Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) include ability of low pressure operation, absence of moving parts and resulting inherently low maintenance requirements, modularity, long lifetime and unattended operation. A further increase in the conversion efficiency, without compromising the advantages inherent with static devices, can be achieved by employing a direct energy conversion bottoming cycle. The biggest challenges in the integration of direct energy conversion devices with SOFC are: (a) the need to preheat the SOFC feed air while maximizing the bottoming cycle power, and (b) limited temperature of the SOFC exhaust. These restrictions limit the choice to the Alkali Metal Thermal to Electric Conversion (AMTEC) and Thermoelectric (TE) technologies while eliminating thermionics and thermophotovoltaics. In addition to the aforementioned advantages, the SOFC-AMTEC and SOFC-TE cycles are attractive for certain applications such as cogeneration and power supplies for remote locations where the use of higher efficiency dynamic bottoming cycles might be undesirable due to maintenance and noise restrictions. A preliminary feasibility assessment of AMTEC and TE bottoming of SOFC power systems has been performed. Five SOFC bottoming cycle concepts were considered. They include: TE bottoming with cogeneration capability, TE bottoming with additional heat recovery, TE bottoming with uncoupled TE converter and air preheater, AMTEC bottoming, and Cascaded AMTEC-TE bottoming. The cascaded AMTEC-TE bottoming cycle increases the overall cycle efficiency by 4.7 percentage points. TE bottoming cycle with additional heat recovery adds 3.8 percentage points, and the other concepts are between 3 and 3.5 percentage points. The results are also compared with results of similar studies reported in literature. The AMTEC-TE cascade has the largest potential, however, development of both AMTEC and TE components would be required. The second best option from the efficiency point of view is the TE bottoming with additional heat recovery which would require development of only the TE component. Despite that fact that AMTEC is generally perceived as more efficient than thermoelectrics, efficiencies of the considered AMTEC and TE bottoming cycles are almost equal. The reason is that the somewhat more efficient AMTEC requires relatively high hot side temperature ({gt}850--900 K) and, at the same time, air has to be preheated to 973 K. (This is equally true for a high efficiency TE converter operating at the highest hot side to cold side temperature difference possible). As a result, only a small fraction ({lt}30 %) of the total heat available is directed to the bottoming cycle where it is converted with relatively high efficiency. When a TE converter operating in a wider hot side temperature range, but at a smaller hot side--cold side temperature difference is employed, its lower efficiency is offset by its larger thermal power and the overall bottoming cycle efficiency changes insignificantly.

  13. Economics of nuclear fuel cycles : option valuation and neutronics simulation of mixed oxide fuels

    E-print Network

    De Roo, Guillaume

    2009-01-01

    In most studies aiming at the economic assessment of nuclear fuel cycles, a primary concern is to keep scenarios economically comparable. For Uranium Oxide (UOX) and Mixed Oxide (MOX) fuels, a traditional way to achieve ...

  14. Supercritical water oxidation of ammonium picrate

    SciTech Connect

    LaJeunesse, C.A.; Mills, B.E.; Brown, B.G.

    1994-11-01

    This study demonstrates the feasibility of using supercritical water oxidation to destroy ammonium picrate. Analyses of reactor effluent composition at various temperatures, residence times, and oxidant concentrations were used to design an improved reactor configuration for achieving destruction with minimum corrosion. The engineering evaluation reactor, a room-sized laboratory scale reactor, was reconfigured to incorporate this design change. Destruction of ammonium picrate with minimized corrosion was demonstrated on this reconfigured reactor. Factors that must be considered in scaling up to pilot plant size are discussed.

  15. Solar cycle variation of thermospheric nitric oxide at solstice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerard, J.-C.; Fesen, C. G.; Rusch, D. W.

    1990-01-01

    A coupled, two-dimensional, chemical-diffusive model of the thermosphere is used to study the role of solar activity in the global distribution of nitric oxide. The model calculates self-consistently the zonally averaged temperature, circulation, and composition for solstice under solar maximum and solar minimum conditions. A decrease of the NO density by a factor of three to four in the E region is predicted from solar maximum to solar minimum. It is found that the main features of the overall morphology and the changes induced by the solar cycle are well reproduced in the model, although some details are not satisfactorily predicted. The sensitivity of the NO distribution to eddy transport and to the quenching of metastable N(2D) atoms by atomic oxygen is also described.

  16. The Water Cycle: Snowmelt Runoff to Streams

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This site describes how snow and ice runoff become surface water and emphasizes how runoff from snowmelt is a major component of the global movement of water. A hydrograph from the U.S. Geological Survey shows a four-year time series of streamflow and illustrates how runoff from snowmelt affects the daily mean values, particularly at certain times of the year.

  17. Modelling carbon and water cycles in a beech forest

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. Davi; E. Dufrêne; A. Granier; V. Le Dantec; C. Barbaroux; C. François; N. Bréda

    2005-01-01

    A forest ecosystem model (CASTANEA) simulating the carbon balance (canopy photosynthesis, autotrophic and heterotrophic respirations, net ecosystem exchange, wood and root growth) and the water cycle (transpiration, soil evaporation, interception, drainage and soil water status) is tested with data from a young beech forest (Fagus sylvatica L.). For this purpose, the model validity is assessed by comparison between net CO2

  18. Estimated Seasonal Cycle of North Atlantic Eighteen Degree Water Volume

    E-print Network

    Forget, Gael

    The seasonal cycle in the volume and formation rate of Eighteen Degree Water (EDW) in the North Atlantic is quantified over the 3-yr period from 2004 to 2006. The EDW layer is defined as all waters that have a temperature ...

  19. Carbon catalysts for waste water oxidative treatment

    Microsoft Academic Search

    N. M. Dobrynkin; A. S. Noskov

    2002-01-01

    Catalytic oxidation of environmental contaminants by oxygen has been investigated in water phase at elevated temperatures and pressures. Chlorine and nitrogen containing substances in model solutions, real wastewater of chocolate factory and alcohol plant (-oxygen-containing compounds), petrochemical plant (-sulfurous substances), chemical-recovery plant (-ammonia, sulfurous substances) were used for tests. Initial concentrations of contaminants were up 0.1 to 60 g\\/l, pH

  20. What Goes Around Comes Around: Water Cycle

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Mary LeFever

    This resource guide from the Middle School Portal 2 project, written specifically for teachers, provides links to exemplary resources including background information, lessons, career information, and related national science education standards. The resources here will provide you with content information as well as lessons and activities to guide your students to deeper understandings of the nature of water, the need for and intricacies of its management, and why water management issues can be difficult and emotional.

  1. Biotransformations Utilizing ?-Oxidation Cycle Reactions in the Synthesis of Natural Compounds and Medicines

    PubMed Central

    Œwizdor, Alina; Panek, Anna; Milecka-Tronina, Natalia; Ko?ek, Teresa

    2012-01-01

    ?-Oxidation cycle reactions, which are key stages in the metabolism of fatty acids in eucaryotic cells and in processes with a significant role in the degradation of acids used by microbes as a carbon source, have also found application in biotransformations. One of the major advantages of biotransformations based on the ?-oxidation cycle is the possibility to transform a substrate in a series of reactions catalyzed by a number of enzymes. It allows the use of sterols as a substrate base in the production of natural steroid compounds and their analogues. This route also leads to biologically active compounds of therapeutic significance. Transformations of natural substrates via ?-oxidation are the core part of the synthetic routes of natural flavors used as food additives. Stereoselectivity of the enzymes catalyzing the stages of dehydrogenation and addition of a water molecule to the double bond also finds application in the synthesis of chiral biologically active compounds, including medicines. Recent advances in genetic, metabolic engineering, methods for the enhancement of bioprocess productivity and the selectivity of target reactions are also described. PMID:23443116

  2. Life cycle assessment of municipal waste water systems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Anne-Marie Tillman; Mikael Svingby; Henrik Lundström

    1998-01-01

    Life Cycle Assessment was applied to municipal planning in a study of waste water systems in Bergsjön, a Göteborg suburb,\\u000a and Hamburgsund, a coastal village. Existing waste water treatment consists of mechanical, biological and chemical treatment.\\u000a The heat in the waste water from Bergsjön is recovered for the district heating system. One alternative studied encompassed\\u000a pretreatment, anaerobic digestion or drying

  3. What regulates the annual cycle of stratospheric water vapor?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jucker, Martin; Gerber, Edwin

    2015-04-01

    Stratospheric water vapor is a potent greenhouse gas and active chemical tracer. Most of the stratosphere is well below saturation due to freeze drying at the tropical cold point -- the coldest region of the lower stratosphere where most air enters the middle atmosphere. The leading mode of variability of the tropical cold point is an annual cycle, despite the semi-annual cycle of radiative forcing in the tropics. This causes the stratospheric water vapor mixing ratio to follow a similar annual cycle, even remotely from the entry point, the so-called tape recorder. We develop an idealized GCM to investigate the origin of the annual cycle in the tropical cold point, with a particular focus on the interaction between dynamics and radiation. By varying the surface conditions of the model, we first show that planetary scale asymmetries in the midlatitude troposphere drive the annual cycle in the cold point. Both large scale topography and land sea contrast are important, influencing synoptic and planetary scale wave forcing. We then probe the impact of water vapor on the stratospheric circulation by comparing fully interactive integrations of the model to companion integrations where the coupling between the circulation and water vapor is disconnected. Our findings have implications in estimating the impacts of stratospheric water vapor feedbacks on decadal time scales and sensitivities to climate change.

  4. Emerging Contaminants in the Drinking Water Cycle.

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the past decade, the scientific community and general public have become increasingly aware of the potential for the presence of unregulated, and generally unmonitored contaminants, found at low concentrations (sub-¿g/L) in surface, ground and drinking water. The most common...

  5. Study group assists in global water cycle program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hornberger, George M.

    The U.S. Global Change Research Program (USGCRP) has appointed a Water Cycle Study Group (WCSG),chaired by George Hornberger of the University of Virginia, to advise the USGCRP agencies on development of a Global Water Cycle Program within the USGCRPThe aim is to define a USGCRP initiative for fiscal years 2001 and beyond. In appointing the group, Robert Corell (then chair of the Subcommittee on Global Change Research) noted that “Deficiencies in our understanding of the global water cycle severely handicap efforts to improve climate prediction and guide water resource planning. Central to this initiative is the establishment of a science community-based research planning process complemented by an enhanced interagency coordination effort to address the content of this effort for FY 2001 and beyond.”The charge to the WCSG is to “formulate a research strategy and scientific plan for investigating the global water cycle, its role in climate, and the fundamental processes that govern the availability and the biogeochemistry of water resources, [and to] develop the strategy and science plan for a national program.” The WCSG is assisted by a parallel Interagency Working Group (IWG), which is charged with coordinating agency activities with the development of the WCSG science plan.The IWG is cochaired by Rick Lawford of NOAA's Office of Global Programs and Robert Schiffer of NASA's Earth Science Enterprise.

  6. Nitrous Oxide Cycling and its Isotopic Signatures in South West Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mullungal, M.; Van Hale, R.; Frew, R. D.; Law, C. S.

    2013-12-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is a significant greenhouse gas and is also involved in ozone depletion. The contribution of N2O to both these processes is expected to increase this century. The ocean contributes about 30% to the atmospheric N2O budget so there is strong interest in the oceanic N2O cycle. In the ocean N2O is produced via a number of different processes (e.g. bacterial nitrification, and denitrification). While coastal regions are well-studied there are limited data available for open ocean N2O especially in the Southern Ocean, with few studies of the relative contribution of different bacterial processes. Here we apply new stable isotope techniques and present a detailed overview of the distribution and fate of dissolved nitrous oxide from sampling sites in the southwest Pacific Ocean near New Zealand. Samples for nitrous oxide and nutrients were collected along the depth profiles from two biophysical mooring stations (subtropical and sub- Antarctic), four Geotraces stations (GP13, subtropical Pacific) and two bloom voyage stations in the subtropical front and subtropical pacific waters. The N2O saturation ranged from near equilibrium with air at the surface to a maximum value in the oxygen minimum zone. Thus the surface water masses are not a significant sink or atmospheric source for N2O .Multi-isotope characterization of N2O including d15Nbulk, d18O, d15N? and its site preference (SP, the difference between d15N? and d15N?)indicates that nitrification is the primary process responsible for nitrous oxide production in oxic waters whereas coupling between nitrification and denitrification may be an important mechanism for production in the oxygen minimum zone with a minor contribution by nitrification.

  7. Effects of the Fabrication Process and Thermal Cycling on the Oxidation of Zirconium-Niobium Pressure Tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nam, Cheol

    2009-12-01

    Pressure tubes made of Zr-2.5%Nb alloy are used to contain fuels and coolant in CANDU nuclear power reactors The pressure tube oxidizes during reactor operation and hydrogen ingress through the oxide grown on the tube limits its lifetime. Little attention was paid to the intermediate tube manufacturing processes in enhancing the oxidation resistance. In addition, the oxide grown on the tube experiences various thermal cycles depending on the reactor shutdown and startup cycles. To address these two aspects and to better understand the oxidation process of the Zr-2.5Nb tube, research was conducted in two parts: (i) effects of tube fabrication on oxidation behavior, and (ii) thermal cycling behaviors of oxides grown on a pressure tube. In the first part, the optimum manufacturing process was pursued to improve the corrosion resistance of Zr-2.5Nb tubes. Experimental micro-tubes were fabricated with various manufacturing routes in the stages of billet preparation, hot extrusion and cold drawing. These were oxidized in air at 400°C and 500°C, and in an autoclave at 360°C lithiated water. Microstructure and texture of the tubes and oxides were characterized with X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscope and optical microscope. Special emphasis was given to examinations of the metal/oxide interface structures. A correlation between the manufacturing process and oxidation resistance was investigated in terms of tube microstructure and the metal/oxide interface structure. As a result, it was consistently observed that uniform interface structures were formed on the tubes which had a fine distribution of secondary phases. These microstructures were found to be beneficial in enhancing the oxidation resistance as opposed to the tubes that had coarse and continuous beta-Zr phases. Based on these observations, a schematic model of the oxidation process was proposed with respect to the oxidation resistance under oxidizing temperatures of 360°C, 400°C and 500°C. In the second part, the oxides grown on a standard Zr-2.5Nb pressure tube were analyzed by X-ray diffraction peak broadening and line shift. Crystallite size, t-ZrO2 fraction and residual stress of the zirconium oxides were investigated upon several thermal cycles at DeltaT range of 500°C--750°C. The oxide residual stresses measured by the sin2psi method were always compressive around 2 GPa. Different stress-states were noticed with the oxides grown on different sections of pressure tube. The compressive stress was released when the oxide was thermally cycled at the highest DeltaT of 750°C. Discussion was given to the effects of anisotropic nature of thermal expansion coefficients and crystallographic texture on the stress-state of Zr oxides.

  8. DIURNAL CYCLE OF PRECIPITABLE WATER VAPOR OVER SPAIN

    SciTech Connect

    Ortiz de Galisteo, J. P.; Cachorro, V. E.; Toledano, C.; Torres, B.; Laulainen, Nels S.; Bennouna, Yasmine; de Frutos, A. M.

    2011-05-20

    Despite the importance of the diurnal cycle of precipitable water vapor (PWV), its knowledge is very limited due to the lack of data with sufficient temporal resolution. Currently, from GPS receivers, PWV can be obtained with high temporal resolution in all weather conditions for all hours of the day. In this study we have calculated the diurnal cycle of PWV for ten GPS stations over Spain. The minimum value is reached approximately at the same time at all the stations, ~0400-0500 UTC, whereas the maximum is reached in the second half of the day, but with a larger dispersion of its occurrence between stations. The amplitude of the cycle ranges between 0.72 mm and 1.78 mm. The highest values are recorded at the stations on the Mediterranean coast, with a doubling of the values of the stations on the Atlantic coast or inland. The amplitude of the PWV cycle, relative to the annual mean value, ranges between 8.8 % on the Mediterranean coast and 3.6 % on the Atlantic coast. Two distinctly different seasonal diurnal cycles have been identified, one in winter and other in summer, with spring and autumn being only transition states. The winter cycle is quite similar at all locations, whereas in summer, local effects are felt strongly, making the diurnal cycle quite different between stations. The amplitude of the summer cycle is 1.69 mm, it is almost double the winter one (0.93 mm). Analogous to the annual cycles, the seasonal cycles of the different stations are more similar during the night and early morning hours than during the afternoon. The observed features of the PWV diurnal cycle are explained in a qualitative way on the basis of the air temperature, the transport of moisture by local winds, and the turbulent vertical mixing.

  9. The effect of different metal ions between nanolayers of manganese oxide on water oxidation.

    PubMed

    Najafpour, Mohammad Mahdi; Isaloo, Mohsen Abbasi; Ghobadi, Mohadeseh Zarei; Amini, Emad; Haghighi, Behzad

    2014-12-01

    Here, we used a strategy to answer to the question that whether Ca(II) ion is specific for water oxidation or not? In the procedure, first we synthesized layered Mn oxides with K(I) between layers and then replaced K(I) by Ca(II), K(I), Mg(II), La(III) or Ni(II). We proposed that Ca(II), K(I), Mg(II), La(III) and Ni(II), between layers are important to form efficient water-oxidizing catalyst, but not specific in water oxidation. However, Cu(II) ions decrease water-oxidizing activity of layered Mn oxides. The result is important to find critical factors in water oxidation by low-cost and environmentally friendly nanolayered Mn oxides. PMID:25463674

  10. Geographical features of global water cycle during warm geological epochs

    SciTech Connect

    Georgiadi, A.G. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation). Inst. of Geography

    1996-12-31

    The impact of global warming on the water cycle can be extremely complex and diverse. The goal of the investigation was to estimate the geographic features of the mean annual water budget of the world during climatic optimums of the Holocene and the Eemian interglacial periods. These geological epochs could be used as analogs of climatic warming on 1 degree, centigrade and 2 degrees, centigrade. The author used the results of climatic reconstructions based on a simplified version of a GCM.

  11. A Seamless Framework for Global Water Cycle Monitoring and Prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheffield, J.; Wood, E. F.; Chaney, N.; Fisher, C. K.; Caylor, K. K.

    2013-12-01

    The Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS) Water Strategy ('From Observations to Decisions') recognizes that 'water is essential for ensuring food and energy security, for facilitating poverty reduction and health security, and for the maintenance of ecosystems and biodiversity', and that water cycle data and observations are critical for improved water management and water security - especially in less developed regions. The GEOSS Water Strategy has articulated a number of goals for improved water management, including flood and drought preparedness, that include: (i) facilitating the use of Earth Observations for water cycle observations; (ii) facilitating the acquisition, processing, and distribution of data products needed for effective management; (iii) providing expertise, information systems, and datasets to the global, regional, and national water communities. There are several challenges that must be met to advance our capability to provide near real-time water cycle monitoring, early warning of hydrological hazards (floods and droughts) and risk assessment under climate change, regionally and globally. Current approaches to monitoring and predicting hydrological hazards are limited in many parts of the world, and especially in developing countries where national capacity is limited and monitoring networks are inadequate. This presentation describes the development of a seamless monitoring and prediction framework at all time scales that allows for consistent assessment of water variability from historic to current conditions, and from seasonal and decadal predictions to climate change projections. At the center of the framework is an experimental, global water cycle monitoring and seasonal forecast system that has evolved out of regional and continental systems for the US and Africa. The system is based on land surface hydrological modeling that is driven by satellite remote sensing precipitation to predict current hydrological conditions, flood potential and the state of drought. Seasonal climate model forecasts are downscaled and bias-corrected to drive the land surface model to provide hydrological forecasts and drought products out 6-9 months. The system relies on historic reconstructions of water variability over the 20th century, which forms the background climatology to which current conditions can be assessed. Future changes in water availability and drought risk are quantified based on bias-corrected and downscaled climate model projections that are used to drive the land surface models. For regions with lack of on-the-ground data we are field-testing low-cost environmental sensors and along with new satellite products for terrestrial hydrology and vegetation, integrating these into the system for improved monitoring and prediction. We provide an overview of the system and some examples of real-world applications to flood and drought events, with a focus on Africa.

  12. Waste disposal from the light water reactor fuel cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costello, J. M.; Hardy, C. J.

    1981-05-01

    Alternaive nuclear fuel cycles for support of light water reactors are described and wastes containing naturally occurring or artificially produced radioactivity reviewed. General principles and objectives in radioactive waste management are outlined, and methods for their practical application to fuel cycle wastes discussed. Management of wastes from upgrading processes of uranium hexafluoride manufacture and uranium manufacture and enrichment, and, to a lesser extent, nuclear power reactor wastes are discussed. Some estimates of radiological dose commitments and health effects from nuclear power and fuel cycle wastes were made for US conditions. These indicate that the major part of the radiological dose arises from uranium mining and milling, operation of nuclear reactors, and spent fuel reprocessing. However, the total dose from the fuel cycle is estimated to be only a small fraction of that from natural background radiation.

  13. PHOTOREACTIONS IN SURFACE WATERS AND THEIR ROLE IN BIOGEOCHEMICAL CYCLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    During the past decade significant interest has developed in the influence of photochemical reactions on biogeochemical cycles in surface waters of lakes and the sea. A major portion of recent research on these photoreactions has focused on the colored component of dissolved org...

  14. Water, Melting, and the Deep Earth H2O Cycle

    E-print Network

    Jellinek, Mark

    Water, Melting, and the Deep Earth H2O Cycle Marc M. Hirschmann Department of Geology anhydrous silicates Abstract Hydrous melting driven by changes in H2O storage capacity may occur and below the transition zone. The 50­200 ppm H2O in the upper mantle likely derives from a blend of sources

  15. Nanoscale manganese oxide within Faujasite zeolite as an efficient and biomimetic water oxidizing catalyst.

    PubMed

    Najafpour, Mohammad Mahdi; Pashaei, Babak

    2012-09-14

    Nanoscale manganese oxides within Faujasite zeolite have been synthesized with a simple method and characterized by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction spectrometry, N(2) adsorption-desorption isotherms, transmission electron microscopy, and atomic absorption spectroscopy. These oxides showed efficient water oxidizing activity in the presence of cerium(IV) ammonium nitrate as a non-oxo transfer oxidant. PMID:22833185

  16. Abiotic and biogeochemical signals derived from the seasonal cycles of tropospheric nitrous oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nevison, C. D.; Dlugokencky, E.; Dutton, G.; Elkins, J. W.; Fraser, P.; Hall, B.; Krummel, P. B.; Langenfelds, R. L.; Prinn, R. G.; Steele, L. P.; Weiss, R. F.

    2010-11-01

    Seasonal cycles in the mixing ratios of tropospheric nitrous oxide (N2O) are derived by detrending long-term measurements made at sites across four global surface monitoring networks. These cycles are examined for physical and biogeochemical signals. The detrended monthly data display large interannual variability, which at some sites challenges the concept of a "mean" seasonal cycle. The interannual variability in the seasonal cycle is not always correlated among networks that share common sites. In the Northern Hemisphere, correlations between detrended N2O seasonal minima and polar winter lower stratospheric temperature provide compelling evidence for a stratospheric influence, which varies in strength from year to year and can explain much of the interannual variability in the surface seasonal cycle. Even at sites where a strong, competing, regional N2O source exists, such as from coastal upwelling at Trinidad Head, California, the stratospheric influence must be understood in order to interpret the biogeochemical signal in monthly mean data. In the Southern Hemisphere, detrended surface N2O monthly means are correlated with polar lower stratospheric temperature in months preceding the N2O minimum, suggesting a coherent stratospheric influence in that hemisphere as well. A decomposition of the N2O seasonal cycle in the extratropical Southern Hemisphere suggests that ventilation of deep ocean water (microbially enriched in N2O) and the stratospheric influx make similar contributions in phasing, and may be difficult to disentangle. In addition, there is a thermal signal in N2O due to seasonal ingassing and outgassing of cooling and warming surface waters that is out of phase and thus competes with the stratospheric and ventilation signals. All the seasonal signals discussed above are subtle and are generally better quantified in high-frequency in situ data than in data from weekly flask samples, especially in the Northern Hemisphere. The importance of abiotic influences (thermal, stratospheric influx, and tropospheric transport) on N2O seasonal cycles suggests that, at many sites, surface N2O mixing ratio data by themselves are unlikely to provide information about seasonality in surface sources (e.g., for atmospheric inversions), but may be more powerful if combined with complementary data such as CFC-12 mixing ratios or N2O isotopes.

  17. Using NASA Products of the Water Cycle for Improved Water Resources Management

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. L. Toll; B. Doorn; E. T. Engman; R. G. Lawford

    2010-01-01

    NASA Water Resources works within the Earth sciences and GEO community to leverage investments of space-based observation and modeling results including components of the hydrologic cycle into water resources management decision support tools for the goal towards the sustainable use of water. These Earth science hydrologic related observations and modeling products provide a huge volume of valuable data in both

  18. Solar Metal Sulfate-Ammonia Based Thermochemical Water Splitting Cycle for Hydrogen Production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Cunping (Inventor); T-Raissi, Ali (Inventor); Muradov, Nazim (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Two classes of hybrid/thermochemical water splitting processes for the production of hydrogen and oxygen have been proposed based on (1) metal sulfate-ammonia cycles (2) metal pyrosulfate-ammonia cycles. Methods and systems for a metal sulfate MSO.sub.4--NH3 cycle for producing H2 and O2 from a closed system including feeding an aqueous (NH3)(4)SO3 solution into a photoctalytic reactor to oxidize the aqueous (NH3)(4)SO3 into aqueous (NH3)(2)SO4 and reduce water to hydrogen, mixing the resulting aqueous (NH3)(2)SO4 with metal oxide (e.g. ZnO) to form a slurry, heating the slurry of aqueous (NH4)(2)SO4 and ZnO(s) in the low temperature reactor to produce a gaseous mixture of NH3 and H2O and solid ZnSO4(s), heating solid ZnSO4 at a high temperature reactor to produce a gaseous mixture of SO2 and O2 and solid product ZnO, mixing the gaseous mixture of SO2 and O2 with an NH3 and H2O stream in an absorber to form aqueous (NH4)(2)SO3 solution and separate O2 for aqueous solution, recycling the resultant solution back to the photoreactor and sending ZnO to mix with aqueous (NH4)(2)SO4 solution to close the water splitting cycle wherein gaseous H2 and O2 are the only products output from the closed ZnSO4--NH3 cycle.

  19. HIV-1 gp120 and morphine induced oxidative stress: role in cell cycle regulation

    PubMed Central

    Samikkannu, Thangavel; Ranjith, Deepa; Rao, Kurapati V. K.; Atluri, Venkata S. R.; Pimentel, Emely; El-Hage, Nazira; Nair, Madhavan P. N.

    2015-01-01

    HIV infection and illicit drugs are known to induce oxidative stress and linked with severity of viral replication, disease progression, impaired cell cycle regulation and neurodegeneration. Studies have shown that morphine accelerates HIV infection and disease progression mediated by Reactive oxygen species (ROS). Oxidative stress impact redox balance and ROS production affect cell cycle regulation. However, the role of morphine in HIV associated acceleration of oxidative stress and its link to cell cycle regulation and neurodegeneration has not been elucidated. The aim of present study is to elucidate the mechanism of oxidative stress induced glutathione synthases (GSS), super oxide dismutase (SOD), and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) impact cell cycle regulated protein cyclin-dependent kinase 1, cell division cycle 2 (CDK-1/CDC-2), cyclin B, and cell division cycle 25C (CDC-25C) influencing neuronal dysfunction by morphine co-morbidity with HIV-1 gp120. It was observed that redox imbalance inhibited the GSS, GPx and increased SOD which, subsequently inhibited CDK-1/CDC-2 whereas cyclin B and CDC-25C significantly up regulated in HIV-1 gp120 with morphine compared to either HIV-1 gp120 or morphine treated alone in human microglial cell line. These results suggest that HIV positive morphine users have increased levels of oxidative stress and effect of cell cycle machinery, which may cause the HIV infection and disease progression.

  20. RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN OXIDATION-REDUCTION POTENTIAL, OXIDANT, AND PH IN DRINKING WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Oxidation and reduction (redox) reactions are very important in drinking water. Oxidation-reduction potential (ORP) measurements reflect the redox state of water. Redox measurements are not widely made by drinking water utilities in part because they are not well understood. The ...

  1. RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN OXIDATION-REDUCTION, OXIDANT, AND PH IN DRINKING WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Oxidation and reduction (redox) reactions are very important in drinking water. Oxidation-reduction potential (ORP) measurements reflect the redox state of water. Redox measurements are not widely made by drinking water utilities in part because they are not well understood. The ...

  2. EARTH'S DEEP WATER CYCLE Steven D. Jacobsen and Suzan van der Lee

    E-print Network

    van der Lee, Suzan

    CONTENTS EARTH'S DEEP WATER CYCLE Preface Steven D. Jacobsen and Suzan van der Lee I. Overviews Nominally Anhydrous Minerals and Earth's Deep Water Cycle Joseph R. Smyth and Steven D. Jacobsen Seismological Constraints on Earth's Deep Water Cycle Suzan van der Lee and Doug Wiens II. Water Storage

  3. Center for Climate Systems Modeling The Water Cycle in a Changing Climate

    E-print Network

    Fischlin, Andreas

    C2SM Center for Climate Systems Modeling Symposium The Water Cycle in a Changing Climate July 1 Schädler (University of Berne) Abstract submission and registration: http://www.c2sm.ethz.ch/Symposium_Water-Cycle affect the Earth's water cycle. Yet, our understan- ding and our ability to predict changes in the water

  4. Observe a raindrop traveling through various parts of the water cycle

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The representation is an interactive resource in which students move a raindrop through different parts of the water cycle. In each part of the cycle, a drop of water represents where the water is. Clicking on the red arrows show the process as water travels through the cycle.

  5. Exploring causes of interannual variability in the seasonal cycles of tropospheric nitrous oxide

    E-print Network

    Prinn, Ronald G.

    Seasonal cycles in the mixing ratios of tropospheric nitrous oxide (N[subscript 2]O) are derived by detrending long-term measurements made at sites across four global surface monitoring networks. The detrended monthly data ...

  6. Challenges and Opportunities in Water Cycle Research: WCRP Contributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trenberth, Kevin E.; Asrar, Ghassem R.

    2014-05-01

    The state of knowledge and outstanding challenges and opportunities in global water cycle observations, research and modeling are briefly reviewed to set the stage for the reasons behind the new thrusts promoted by the World Climate Research Programme (WCRP) as Grand Challenges to be addressed on a 5- to 10-year time frame. Those focused on water are led by the GEWEX (Global Energy and Water Exchanges) project. A number of GEWEX science questions are being brought forward within GEWEX and the WCRP under guidance of the Joint Scientific Committee. Here, we describe what are some imperatives and opportunities for major advancements in observations, understanding, modeling and product development for water resources and climate that will enable a wide range of climate services and inform decisions on water resources management and practices.

  7. Nanostructured transition metal oxides useful for water oxidation catalysis

    DOEpatents

    Frei, Heinz M; Jiao, Feng

    2013-12-24

    The present invention provides for a composition comprising a nanostructured transition metal oxide capable of oxidizing two H.sub.2O molecules to obtain four protons. In some embodiments of the invention, the composition further comprises a porous matrix wherein the nanocluster of the transition metal oxide is embedded on and/or in the porous matrix.

  8. Selective oxidations of activated alcohols in water at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Lipshutz, B H; Hageman, M; Fennewald, J C; Linstadt, R; Slack, E; Voigtritter, K

    2014-10-01

    Allylic and benzylic alcohols can be selectively oxidized to their corresponding aldehydes or ketones in water containing nanoreactors composed of the designer surfactant TPGS-750-M. The oxidation relies on catalytic amounts of CuBr, bpy, and TEMPO, with N-methyl-imidazole; air is the stoichiometric oxidant. PMID:25126656

  9. Changes in continental Europe water cycle in a changing climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouholahnejad, Elham; Schirmer, Mario; Abbaspour, Karim

    2015-04-01

    Changes in atmospheric water vapor content provide strong evidence that the water cycle is already responding to a warming climate. According to IPCC's last report on Climate Change (AR5), the water cycle is expected to intensify in a warmer climate as the atmosphere can hold more water vapor. This changes the frequency of precipitation extremes, increases evaporation and dry periods, and effects the water redistribution in land. This process is represented by most global climate models (GCMs) by increased summer dryness and winter wetness over large areas of continental mid to high latitudes in the Northern Hemisphere, associated with a reduction in water availability at continental scale. Observing changes in precipitation and evaporation directly and at continental scale is difficult, because most of the exchange of fresh water between the atmosphere and the surface happens the oceans. Long term precipitation records are available only from over the land and there are no measurement of evaporation or redistribution of precipitation over the land area. On the other hand, understanding the extent of climate change effects on various components of the water cycle is of strategic importance for public, private sectors, and policy makers when it comes to fresh water management. In order to better understand the extent of climate change impacts on water resources of continental Europe, we developed a distributed hydrological model of Europe at high spatial and temporal resolution using the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT). The hydrological model was calibrated for 1970 to 2006 using daily observation of streamflow and nitrate loads from 360 gauging stations across Europe. A vegetation growth routine was added to the model to better simulate evapotranspiration. The model results were calibrated with available agricultural crop yield data from other sources. As of future climate scenarios, we used the ISI-MIP project results which provides bias-corrected climate data from the GCMs participating in the CMIP5 at 0.5° x 0.5° resolution. Data cover the time period from 1901 to 2099, i.e. the historical period, and future projections for all Representative Concentration Pathways (RCP2.6, RCP 4.5, RCP 6.0, and RCP 8.5). We used four different models output (GFDL, HADGEMES, MIROC, and IPSL) for all RCPs for near (2006-2035) and far (3065-2099) future. Multi-model ensembles (16 scenarios) are then used to study the potential impacts of future climate change on fresh water availability across Europe.

  10. The displacement of the thermally grown oxide in thermal barrier systems upon temperature cycling

    E-print Network

    Hutchinson, John W.

    yields at the peak temperature, during growth, while the bond coat yields on thermal cycling. The trends barrier coatings; Thermal cycling; Oxidation 1. Introduction Thermal barrier systems used in gas turbinesO3, that forms between the thermal barrier coating (TBC) and the bond coat (Fig. 1). This thin layer

  11. Molecular fossil evidence for anaerobic ammonium oxidation in the Arabian Sea over the last glacial cycle

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Andrea Jaeschke; Martin Ziegler; Ellen C. Hopmans; Gert-Jan Reichart; Lucas J. Lourens; Stefan Schouten; Jaap S. Sinninghe Damsté

    2009-01-01

    Anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) has been recognized as an important process converting fixed nitrogen to N2 in many marine environments, thereby having a major impact on the present-day marine nitrogen cycle. However, essentially nothing is known about the importance of anammox in past marine nitrogen cycles. In this study, we analyzed the distribution of fossil ladderane lipids, derived from bacteria

  12. Diurnal Cycles in Water Quality Across the Periodic Table

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirchner, J. W.

    2013-12-01

    Diurnal cycles in water quality can provide important clues to the processes that regulate aquatic chemistry, but they often are masked by longer-term, larger-amplitude variability, making their detection and quantification difficult. Here I outline several methods that can detect diurnal cycles even when they are massively obscured by statistically ill-behaved noise. I demonstrate these methods using high-frequency water quality data from the Plylimon catchment in mid-Wales (Neal et al., 2013; Kirchner and Neal, 2013). Several aspects combine to make the Plynlimon data set unique worldwide. Collected at 7-hour intervals, the Plynlimon data set is much more densely sampled than typical long-term weekly or monthly water quality data. This 7-hour sampling was also continued for two years, much longer than typical intensive sampling campaigns, and the resulting time series encompass a wide range of climatic and hydrological conditions. Furthermore, each sample was analyzed for a wide range of solutes with diverse sources in the natural environment. However, the 7-hour sampling frequency is both coarse and irregular in comparison to diurnal cycles, making their detection and quantification difficult. Nonetheless, the methods outlined here enable detection of statistically significant diurnal cycles in over 30 solutes at Plynlimon, including alkali metals (Li, Na, K, Rb, and Cs), alkaline earths (Be, Mg, Ca, Sr, and Ba), transition metals (Al, Ti, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Zn, Mo, Cd, and Pb), nonmetals (B, NO3, Si, As, and Se), lanthanides and actinides (La, Ce, Pr, and U), as well as total dissolved nitrogen (TDN), dissolved organic carbon (DOC), Gran alkalinity, pH, and electrical conductivity. These solutes span every row of the periodic table, and more than six orders of magnitude in concentration. Many of these diurnal cycles are subtle, representing only a few percent, at most, of the total variance in the concentration time series. Nonetheless they are diagnostically useful, because their amplitude and phase contain important clues to the mechanisms controlling these solutes in streamwater. Examples of these cycles and their likely origins will be discussed. Neal, C., B. Reynolds, J. W. Kirchner, P. Rowland, D. Norris, D. Sleep, A. Lawlor, C. Woods, S. Thacker, H. Guyatt, C. Vincent, K. Lehto, S. Grant, J. Williams, M. Neal, H. Wickham, S. Harman, and L. Armstrong. 2013. High-frequency precipitation and stream water quality time series from Plynlimon, Wales: an openly accessible data resource spanning the periodic table. Hydrological Processes 27:2531-2539. Kirchner, J. W., and C. Neal. 2013. Universal fractal scaling in stream chemistry and its implications for solute transport and water quality trend detection. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 110:12213-12218.

  13. Manganese cluster in photosynthesis: Where plants oxidize water to dioxygen

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Vittal K. Yachandra; M. P. Klein; K. Sauer

    1996-01-01

    The essential involvement of manganese in photosynthetic water oxidation was implicit in the observation by Pirson in 1937 that plants and algae deprived of Mn in their growth medium lost the ability to evolve Oâ. Addition of this essential element to the growth medium resulted in the restoration of water oxidation within 30 min. There is increased interest in the

  14. Water cycles in closed ecological systems: effects of atmospheric pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rygalov, Vadim Y.; Fowler, Philip A.; Metz, Joannah M.; Wheeler, Raymond M.; Bucklin, Ray A.; Sager, J. C. (Principal Investigator)

    2002-01-01

    In bioregenerative life support systems that use plants to generate food and oxygen, the largest mass flux between the plants and their surrounding environment will be water. This water cycle is a consequence of the continuous change of state (evaporation-condensation) from liquid to gas through the process of transpiration and the need to transfer heat (cool) and dehumidify the plant growth chamber. Evapotranspiration rates for full plant canopies can range from 1 to 10 L m-2 d-1 (1 to 10 mm m-2 d-1), with the rates depending primarily on the vapor pressure deficit (VPD) between the leaves and the air inside the plant growth chamber. VPD in turn is dependent on the air temperature, leaf temperature, and current value of relative humidity (RH). Concepts for developing closed plant growth systems, such as greenhouses for Mars, have been discussed for many years and the feasibility of such systems will depend on the overall system costs and reliability. One approach for reducing system costs would be to reduce the operating pressure within the greenhouse to reduce structural mass and gas leakage. But managing plant growth environments at low pressures (e.g., controlling humidity and heat exchange) may be difficult, and the effects of low-pressure environments on plant growth and system water cycling need further study. We present experimental evidence to show that water saturation pressures in air under isothermal conditions are only slightly affected by total pressure, but the overall water flux from evaporating surfaces can increase as pressure decreases. Mathematical models describing these observations are presented, along with discussion of the importance for considering "water cycles" in closed bioregenerative life support systems.

  15. Connecting oxidative stress, auxin, and cell cycle regulation through a plant mitogen-activated

    E-print Network

    Hirt, Heribert

    Commentary Connecting oxidative stress, auxin, and cell cycle regulation through a plant mitogen stress MAPKs, AtMPK3, and AtMPK6. H2O2 is a well- known product of oxidative stress playing multiple of Vienna, Dr. Bohrgasse 9, 1030 Vienna, Austria Like all living organisms, plants must respond to many

  16. The Water Cycle (title provided or enhanced by cataloger)

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This Classroom Connectors lesson plan discusses the steps of the water cycle, factors which affect runoff, underground water, and stalactities and stalagmites. The site provides goals, objectives, an outline, time required, materials, activities, and closure ideas for the lesson. The Classroom Connectors address content with an activity approach while incorporating themes necessary to raise the activity to a higher cognition level. The major motivation is to employ instructional strategies that bring the students physically and mentally into touch with the science they are studying.

  17. Competitive photoelectrochemical methanol and water oxidation with hematite electrodes.

    PubMed

    Klahr, Benjamin; Gimenez, Sixto; Zandi, Omid; Fabregat-Santiago, Francisco; Hamann, Thomas

    2015-04-15

    Photocatalytic water and methanol oxidation were studied at thin film hematite electrodes synthesized by atomic layer deposition (ALD). Systematic photoelectrochemical characterization along with O2 evolution measurements were carried out in order to better understand the mechanisms of both water and methanol oxidation at hematite electrodes. When both water and methanol are present in the solution, they are oxidized competitively with each other, allowing the detection and assignment of distinct surface states characteristic to each process. The measurement of different surface states for methanol and water oxidation, along with the absence of measurable surface states in an inert acetonitrile electrolyte, clearly shows that the detected surface states are chemically distinct reaction intermediates of water or methanol oxidation. PMID:25804788

  18. The nocturnal water cycle in an open-canopy forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berkelhammer, M.; Hu, J.; Bailey, A.; Noone, D. C.; Still, C. J.; Barnard, H.; Gochis, D.; Hsiao, G. S.; Rahn, T.; Turnipseed, A.

    2013-09-01

    The movement of moisture into, out-of, and within forest ecosystems is modulated by feedbacks that stem from processes which couple plants, soil, and the atmosphere. While an understanding of these processes has been gleaned from Eddy Covariance techniques, the reliability of the method suffers at night because of weak turbulence. During the summer of 2011, continuous profiles of the isotopic composition (i.e., ?18O and ?D) of water vapor and periodic measurements of soil, leaf, and precipitation pools were measured in an open-canopy ponderosa pine forest in central Colorado to study within-canopy nocturnal water cycling. The isotopic composition of the nocturnal water vapor varies significantly based on the relative contributions of the three major hydrological processes acting on the forest: dewfall, exchange of moisture between leaf waters and canopy vapor, and periodic mixing between the canopy and background air. Dewfall proved to be surprisingly common (˜30% of the nights) and detectable on both the surface and within the canopy through the isotopic measurements. While surface dew could be observed using leaf wetness and soil moisture sensors, dew in the foliage was only measurable through isotopic analysis of the vapor and often occurred even when no dew accumulated on the surface. Nocturnal moisture cycling plays a critical role in water availability in forest ecosystems through foliar absorption and transpiration, and assessing these dynamics, as done here, is necessary for fully characterizing the hydrological controls on terrestrial productivity.

  19. Climate change and the water cycle in newly irrigated areas.

    PubMed

    Abrahão, Raphael; García-Garizábal, Iker; Merchán, Daniel; Causapé, Jesús

    2015-02-01

    Climate change is affecting agriculture doubly: evapotranspiration is increasing due to increments in temperature while the availability of water resources is decreasing. Furthermore, irrigated areas are expanding worldwide. In this study, the dynamics of climate change impacts on the water cycle of a newly irrigated watershed are studied through the calculation of soil water balances. The study area was a 752-ha watershed located on the left side of the Ebro river valley, in Northeast Spain. The soil water balance procedures were carried out throughout 1827 consecutive days (5 years) of hydrological and agronomical monitoring in the study area. Daily data from two agroclimatic stations were used as well. Evaluation of the impact of climate change on the water cycle considered the creation of two future climate scenarios for comparison: 2070 decade with climate change and 2070 decade without climate change. The main indicators studied were precipitation, irrigation, reference evapotranspiration, actual evapotranspiration, drainage from the watershed, and irrigation losses. The aridity index was also applied. The results represent a baseline scenario in which adaptation measures may be included and tested to reduce the impacts of climate change in the studied area and other similar areas. PMID:25626569

  20. DESIGN OF HYBRID POWER GENERATION CYCLES EMPLOYING AMMONIA-WATER-CARBON DIOXIDE MIXTURES

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ashish Gupta

    2002-01-01

    A power cycle generates electricity from the heat of combustion of fossil fuels. Its efficiency is governed by the cycle configuration, the operating parameters, and the working fluid. Typical. designs use pure water as the fluid. in the last two decades, hybrid cycles based on ammonia-water, and carbon-dioxide mixtures as the working fluid have been proposed. These cycles may improve

  1. Using NASA Products of the Water Cycle for Improved Water Resources Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toll, D. L.; Doorn, B.; Engman, E. T.; Lawford, R. G.

    2010-12-01

    NASA Water Resources works within the Earth sciences and GEO community to leverage investments of space-based observation and modeling results including components of the hydrologic cycle into water resources management decision support tools for the goal towards the sustainable use of water. These Earth science hydrologic related observations and modeling products provide a huge volume of valuable data in both near-real-time and extended back nearly 50 years. Observations of this type enable assessment of numerous water resources management issues including water scarcity, extreme events of drought and floods, and water quality. Examples of water cycle estimates make towards the contributions to the water management community include snow cover and snowpack, soil moisture, evapotranspiration, precipitation, streamflow and ground water. The availability of water is also contingent on the quality of water and hence water quality is an important part of NASA Water Resources. Water quality activities include both nonpoint source (agriculture land use, ecosystem disturbances, impervious surfaces, etc.) and direct remote sensing ( i.e., turbidity, algae, aquatic vegetation, temperature, etc.). . The NASA Water Resources Program organizes its projects under five functional themes: 1) stream-flow and flood forecasting; 2) water consumptive use and irrigation (includes evapotranspiration); 3) drought; 4) water quality; and 5) climate impacts on water resources. Currently NASA Water Resources is supporting 21 funded projects with 11 additional projects being concluded. To maximize the use of NASA water cycle measurements end to projects are supported with strong links with decision support systems. The NASA Water Resources Program works closely with other government agencies NOAA, USDA-FAS, USGS, AFWA, USAID, universities, and non-profit, international, and private sector organizations. International water cycle applications include: 1) Famine Early Warning System Network (FEWSNET) being expanded for famine relief to many developing nations of the world using a NASA Land Data Assimilation System (LDAS); 2) Air Force Weather Agency (AFWA) global hydrology mapping program that extends their global hydrology to much finer resolutions through use of an optimized LDAS; 3) 'SERVIR' a visualization and monitoring center of Earth science information in Central America and East Africa with plans for additional locations in developing countries of the world; 4) installing NASA Water Information System Platforms (WISPs) strategically located throughout the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) in partnerships with USAID and the World Bank; and 5) Latin American capacity building efforts within GEO.

  2. Assessing the combined benefits of water recycling technologies by modelling the total urban water cycle

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Evangelos Rozos; Christos Makropoulos

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates the potential benefits of new technologies, modern appliances, and innovative techniques that help to improve the performance of the urban water cycle. Urbanisation is a major source of additional pressures (both qualitative and quantitative) on the environment. For example abstractions to cover the increased demands for water supply or alterations of the topographic and geomorphologic properties of

  3. Assessing the combined benefits of water recycling technologies by modelling the total urban water cycle

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Evangelos Rozos; Christos Makropoulos

    2011-01-01

    This study investigates the potential benefits of new technologies, modern appliances, and innovative techniques that help to improve the performance of the urban water cycle. Urbanisation is a major source of additional pressures (both qualitative and quantitative) on the environment. For example abstractions to cover the increased demands for water supply or alterations of the topographic and geomorphologic properties of

  4. Mars Water cycle workshop, Paris 2008 MAPPING WATER ICE CLOUD MICROPHYSICS WITH OMEGA/MEX.

    E-print Network

    Madeleine, Jean-Baptiste

    Mars Water cycle workshop, Paris 2008 MAPPING WATER ICE CLOUD MICROPHYSICS WITH OMEGA/MEX. J is made possible on Mars by the OMEGA (Observatoire pour la Minéralogie, l'Eau, les Glaces et l (TES, 6 to 50 µm [4,5]) with Mars Global Surveyor. Bridging the gap, OMEGA data are spectral image

  5. The water cycle at the Phoenix landing site, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cull, Selby

    2010-01-01

    The water cycle is critically important to understanding Mars system science, especially interactions between water and surface minerals or possible biological systems. In this thesis, the water cycle is examined at the Mars Phoenix landing site (68.22°N, 125.70°W), using data from the Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM), High-Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE), the Phoenix Lander Surface Stereo Imager (SSI), and employing non-linear spectral mixing models. The landing site is covered for part of the year by the seasonal ice cap, a layer of CO2 and H2O ice that is deposited in mid-fall and sublimates in mid-spring. During the mid-summer, H2O ice is deposited on the surface at the Phoenix landing site. CO2 ice forms at the site during fall. The onset date of seasonal ices varies annually, perhaps due to variable levels of atmospheric dust. During fall and winter, the CO2 ice layer thickens and sinters into a slab of ice, ˜30 cm thick. After the spring equinox, the CO2 slab breaks into smaller grains as it sublimates. Long before all of the CO2 ice is gone, H2O ice dominates the near-infrared spectra of the surface. Additional H2O ice is cold-trapped onto the surface of the CO2 ice deposit during this time. Sublimation during the spring is not uniform, and depends on the thermal inertia properties of the surface, including depth of ground ice. All of the seasonal ices have sublimated by mid-spring; however, a few permanent ice deposits remain throughout the summer. These are small water ice deposits on the north-facing slopes of Heimdal Crater and adjacent plateaus, and a small patch of mobile water ices that chases shadows in a small crater near the landing site. During the late spring and early summer, the site is free of surface ice. During this time, the water cycle is dominated by vapor exchange between the subsurface water ice deposits and the atmosphere. Two types of subsurface ice were found at the Phoenix landing site: a pore water ice that appears to be in diffusive equilibrium with the atmosphere, and an almost pure water ice deposit that is apparently not in equilibrium. In addition to vapor and solid phases of the water cycle, there is strong evidence of a liquid phase. Patches of concentrated perchlorate salt are observed in trenches dug by the lander. Perchlorate is believed to form at the landing site through atmospheric interactions, which deposit the salts on the surface. The salts are then dissolved and translocated to the subsurface by thin films of liquid water. These thin films may arise due to perchlorate interactions with the atmospheric water vapor or seasonal ices. It is possible that the winter CO2 ice slab may act as a greenhouse cap, trapping enough heat for the underlying fall-deposited water ice to react with the perchlorate to form thin films of brines. Alternatively, the brines may form when summertime water vapor interacts with perchlorate on the surface, when temperatures rise above the perchlorate brine eutectic.

  6. Life-cycle testing of receiving waters with Ceriodaphnia dubia

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, A.J.; Konetsky, B.K.

    1996-12-31

    Seven-day tests with Ceriodaphnia dubia are commonly used to estimate toxicity of effluents or receiving waters but can sometimes yield {open_quotes}no toxicity{close_quotes} outcomes even if pollutants are present. We conducted two sets of full life-cycle tests with C. dubia to (1) see if tests with longer exposure periods would reveal evidence for toxicity that might not be evident from 7-day tests, and (2) determine the relative importance of water quality versus food as factors influencing C. dubia reproduction. In the first set of tests, C. dubia was reared in diluted mineral water (negative control), water from a stream impacted by coal fly-ash, or water from a retention basin containing sediments contaminated with mercury, other metals and polychlorinated biphenyls. The second set of tests used water from the retention basin only, but this water was either filtered or not filtered, and food was either added or not added, prior to testing. C. dubia survival and reproduction did not differ much among the three water types in the first set of tests, but these two parameters were strongly affected by the filtering and food-addition treatments in the second set of tests. Thus, C. dubia appeared to be relatively insensitive to general water-quality factors, but quite sensitive to food-related factors. Regression analyses showed that the predictability of life-time reproduction by C. dubia from the results of 7-day tests was very low (R{sup 2}< 0.35) in five of the six experiments. The increase in predictability as a function of test duration also differed among water types in the first set of tests, and among treatments in the second set of tests. Thus, 7-day tests with C. dubia may be used to quantify water-quality problems, but it may not be possible to reliably extrapolate the results of these tests to longer time scales.

  7. Exploring causes of interannual variability in the seasonal cycles of tropospheric nitrous oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nevison, C. D.; Dlugokencky, E.; Dutton, G.; Elkins, J. W.; Fraser, P.; Hall, B.; Krummel, P. B.; Langenfelds, R. L.; O'Doherty, S.; Prinn, R. G.; Steele, L. P.; Weiss, R. F.

    2011-04-01

    Seasonal cycles in the mixing ratios of tropospheric nitrous oxide (N2O) are derived by detrending long-term measurements made at sites across four global surface monitoring networks. The detrended monthly data display large interannual variability, which at some sites challenges the concept of a "mean" seasonal cycle. In the Northern Hemisphere, correlations between polar winter lower stratospheric temperature and detrended N2O data, around the month of the seasonal minimum, provide empirical evidence for a stratospheric influence, which varies in strength from year to year and can explain much of the interannual variability in the surface seasonal cycle. Even at sites where a strong, competing, regional N2O source exists, such as from coastal upwelling at Trinidad Head, California, the stratospheric influence must be understood to interpret the biogeochemical signal in monthly mean data. In the Southern Hemisphere, detrended surface N2O monthly means are correlated with polar spring lower stratospheric temperature in months preceding the N2O minimum, providing empirical evidence for a coherent stratospheric influence in that hemisphere as well, in contrast to some recent atmospheric chemical transport model (ACTM) results. Correlations between the phasing of the surface N2O seasonal cycle in both hemispheres and both polar lower stratospheric temperature and polar vortex break-up date provide additional support for a stratospheric influence. The correlations discussed above are generally more evident in high-frequency in situ data than in data from weekly flask samples. Furthermore, the interannual variability in the N2O seasonal cycle is not always correlated among in situ and flask networks that share common sites, nor do the mean seasonal amplitudes always agree. The importance of abiotic influences such as the stratospheric influx and tropospheric transport on N2O seasonal cycles suggests that, at sites remote from local sources, surface N2O mixing ratio data by themselves are unlikely to provide information about seasonality in surface sources, e.g., for atmospheric inversions, unless the ACTMs employed in the inversions accurately account for these influences. An additional abioitc influence is the seasonal ingassing and outgassing of cooling and warming surface waters, which creates a thermal signal in tropospheric N2O that is of particular importance in the extratropical Southern Hemisphere, where it competes with the biological ocean source signal.

  8. Reversal of the ?-oxidation cycle in Saccharomyces cerevisiae for production of fuels and chemicals.

    PubMed

    Lian, Jiazhang; Zhao, Huimin

    2015-03-20

    Functionally reversing the ?-oxidation cycle represents an efficient and versatile strategy for synthesis of a wide variety of fuels and chemicals. However, due to the compartmentalization of cellular metabolisms, reversing the ?-oxidation cycle in eukaryotic systems remains elusive. Here, we report the first successful reversal of the ?-oxidation cycle in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, an important cell factory for large-scale production of fuels and chemicals. After extensive gene cloning and enzyme activity assays, a reversed ?-oxidation pathway was functionally constructed in the yeast cytosol, which led to the synthesis of n-butanol, medium-chain fatty acids (MCFAs), and medium-chain fatty acid ethyl esters (MCFAEEs). The resultant recombinant strain provides a new broadly applicable platform for synthesis of fuels and chemicals in S. cerevisiae. PMID:24959659

  9. Modeling Potential Equilibrium States of Vegetation and Terrestrial Water Cycle of Mesoamerica under Climate Change Scenarios*

    E-print Network

    Boyer, Edmond

    Modeling Potential Equilibrium States of Vegetation and Terrestrial Water Cycle of Mesoamerica and the water cycle in Mesoamerica is evaluated. Mesoamerica is a global biodiversity hotspot with highly and water cycle under three ensembles of model runs, one for each of the groups of greenhouse gas emission

  10. Ecological controls on water-cycle response to climate variability in deserts

    E-print Network

    Scanlon, Bridget R.

    Ecological controls on water-cycle response to climate variability in deserts B. R. Scanlon* , D. G variability on the water cycle in desert ecosystems is controlled by biospheric feedback at interannual in controlling water cycle response to interannual climate variability related to El Nin~ o southern oscillation

  11. Hydrological consistency using multi-sensor remote sensing data for water and energy cycle studies

    E-print Network

    Pan, Ming

    Hydrological consistency using multi-sensor remote sensing data for water and energy cycle studies-sensor/multi-platform approach to water and energy cycle prediction is demonstrated in an effort to understand the variability to an improved understanding of water and energy cycles within the NAME region and providing a novel framework

  12. New processes and players in the nitrogen cycle: the microbial ecology of anaerobic and archaeal ammonia oxidation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Christopher A Francis; J Michael Beman; Marcel M M Kuypers

    2007-01-01

    Microbial activities drive the global nitrogen cycle, and in the past few years, our understanding of nitrogen cycling processes and the micro-organisms that mediate them has changed dramatically. During this time, the processes of anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox), and ammonia oxidation within the domain Archaea, have been recognized as two new links in the global nitrogen cycle. All available evidence

  13. Solid Oxide Fuel Cell/Gas Turbine Hybrid Cycle Technology for Auxiliary Aerospace Power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steffen, Christopher J., Jr.; Freeh, Joshua E.; Larosiliere, Louis M.

    2005-01-01

    A notional 440 kW auxiliary power unit has been developed for 300 passenger commercial transport aircraft in 2015AD. A hybrid engine using solid-oxide fuel cell stacks and a gas turbine bottoming cycle has been considered. Steady-state performance analysis during cruise operation has been presented. Trades between performance efficiency and system mass were conducted with system specific energy as the discriminator. Fuel cell performance was examined with an area specific resistance. The ratio of fuel cell versus turbine power was explored through variable fuel utilization. Area specific resistance, fuel utilization, and mission length had interacting effects upon system specific energy. During cruise operation, the simple cycle fuel cell/gas turbine hybrid was not able to outperform current turbine-driven generators for system specific energy, despite a significant improvement in system efficiency. This was due in part to the increased mass of the hybrid engine, and the increased water flow required for on-board fuel reformation. Two planar, anode-supported cell design concepts were considered. Designs that seek to minimize the metallic interconnect layer mass were seen to have a large effect upon the system mass estimates.

  14. Polyoxometalate water oxidation catalysts and methods of use thereof

    DOEpatents

    Hill, Craig L.; Gueletii, Yurii V.; Musaev, Djamaladdin G.; Yin, Qiushi; Botar, Bogdan

    2014-09-02

    Homogeneous water oxidation catalysts (WOCs) for the oxidation of water to produce hydrogen ions and oxygen, and methods of making and using thereof are described herein. In a preferred embodiment, the WOC is a polyoxometalate WOC which is hydrolytically stable, oxidatively stable, and thermally stable. The WOC oxidized waters in the presence of an oxidant. The oxidant can be generated photochemically, using light, such as sunlight, or electrochemically using a positively biased electrode. The hydrogen ions are subsequently reduced to form hydrogen gas, for example, using a hydrogen evolution catalyst (HEC). The hydrogen gas can be used as a fuel in combustion reactions and/or in hydrogen fuel cells. The catalysts described herein exhibit higher turn over numbers, faster turn over frequencies, and/or higher oxygen yields than prior art catalysts.

  15. Rare earth element partitioning between hydrous ferric oxides and acid mine water during iron oxidation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Philip L. Verplanck; D. Kirk Nordstrom; Howard E. Taylor; Briant A. Kimball

    2004-01-01

    Ferrous iron rapidly oxidizes to Fe (III) and precipitates as hydrous Fe (III) oxides in acid mine waters. This study examines the effect of Fe precipitation on the rare earth element (REE) geochemistry of acid mine waters to determine the pH range over which REEs behave conservatively and the range over which attenuation and fractionation occur. Two field studies were

  16. eWaterCycle: A global operational hydrological forecasting model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van de Giesen, Nick; Bierkens, Marc; Donchyts, Gennadii; Drost, Niels; Hut, Rolf; Sutanudjaja, Edwin

    2015-04-01

    Development of an operational hyper-resolution hydrological global model is a central goal of the eWaterCycle project (www.ewatercycle.org). This operational model includes ensemble forecasts (14 days) to predict water related stress around the globe. Assimilation of near-real time satellite data is part of the intended product that will be launched at EGU 2015. The challenges come from several directions. First, there are challenges that are mainly computer science oriented but have direct practical hydrological implications. For example, we aim to make use as much as possible of existing standards and open-source software. For example, different parts of our system are coupled through the Basic Model Interface (BMI) developed in the framework of the Community Surface Dynamics Modeling System (CSDMS). The PCR-GLOBWB model, built by Utrecht University, is the basic hydrological model that is the engine of the eWaterCycle project. Re-engineering of parts of the software was needed for it to run efficiently in a High Performance Computing (HPC) environment, and to be able to interface using BMI, and run on multiple compute nodes in parallel. The final aim is to have a spatial resolution of 1km x 1km, which is currently 10 x 10km. This high resolution is computationally not too demanding but very memory intensive. The memory bottleneck becomes especially apparent for data assimilation, for which we use OpenDA. OpenDa allows for different data assimilation techniques without the need to build these from scratch. We have developed a BMI adaptor for OpenDA, allowing OpenDA to use any BMI compatible model. To circumvent memory shortages which would result from standard applications of the Ensemble Kalman Filter, we have developed a variant that does not need to keep all ensemble members in working memory. At EGU, we will present this variant and how it fits well in HPC environments. An important step in the eWaterCycle project was the coupling between the hydrological and hydrodynamic models. The hydrological model will run operationally for the whole globe. Once special situations are predicted, such as floods, navigation hindrances, or water shortages, a detailed local hydraulic model will start to predict the exact local consequences. In Vienna, we will show for the first time the operational global eWaterCycle model, including high resolution forecasts, our new data assimilation technique, and coupled hydrological/hydraulic models.

  17. Electrocatalytic Water Oxidation by a Water-Soluble Nickel Porphyrin Complex at Neutral pH with Low Overpotential.

    PubMed

    Han, Yongzhen; Wu, Yizhen; Lai, Wenzhen; Cao, Rui

    2015-06-01

    The water-soluble cationic nickel(II) complex of meso-tetrakis(4-N-methylpyridyl)porphyrin (1) can electrocatalyze water oxidation to O2 in neutral aqueous solution (pH 7.0) with the onset of the catalytic wave appearing at ?1.0 V (vs NHE). The homogeneous catalysis with 1 was verified. Catalyst 1 exhibited water oxidation activity in a pH range 2.0-8.0 and had a strict linear dependence of catalytic current on its concentration. After 10 h of constant potential electrolysis at 1.32 V (vs NHE), a negligible difference of the solution was observed by UV-vis. In addition, inspection of the working electrode by electrochemistry, scanning electron microscope (SEM), and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) showed no sign of deposition of NiOx films. These results strongly argued that 1 is a real molecular electrocatalyst for water oxidation. The turnover frequency (TOF) for this process was 0.67 s(-1) at 20 °C. On the basis of results from the kinetic isotope effect (KIE) and inhibition experiments, electrochemical studies in various buffer solutions with different anions and pHs, and DFT calculations, a catalytic cycle of 1 for water oxidation via a formally Ni(IV) species was proposed. PMID:25985258

  18. The use of ozone and associated oxidation processes in drinking water treatment

    Microsoft Academic Search

    V Camel; A Bermond

    1998-01-01

    This paper summarizes the main applications of ozonation and associated oxidation processes in the treatment of natural waters (surface and ground waters) for drinking water production. In fact, oxidants may be added at several points throughout the treatment: pre-oxidation, intermediate oxidation or final disinfection. So, the numerous effects of chemical oxidation are discussed along the water treatment: removal of inorganic

  19. Sensitizer-catalyst assemblies for water oxidation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Mirmohades, Mohammad; Brown, Allison; Duan, Lele; Li, Fusheng; Daniel, Quentin; Lomoth, Reiner; Sun, Licheng; Hammarström, Leif

    2015-03-16

    Two molecular assemblies with one Ru(II)-polypyridine photosensitizer covalently linked to one Ru(II)(bda)L2 catalyst (1) (bda = 2,2'-bipyridine-6,6'-dicarboxylate) and two photosensitizers covalently linked to one catalyst (2) have been prepared using a simple C-C bond as the linkage. In the presence of sodium persulfate as a sacrificial electron acceptor, both of them show high activity for catalytic water oxidation driven by visible light, with a turnover number up to 200 for 2. The linked photocatalysts show a lower initial yield for light driven oxygen evolution but a much better photostability compared to the three component system with separate sensitizer, catalyst and acceptor, leading to a much greater turnover number. Photocatalytic experiments and time-resolved spectroscopy were carried out to probe the mechanism of this catalysis. The linked catalyst in its Ru(II) state rapidly quenches the sensitizer, predominantly by energy transfer. However, a higher stability under photocatalytic condition is shown for the linked sensitizer compared to the three component system, which is attributed to kinetic stabilization by rapid photosensitizer regeneration. Strategies for employment of the sensitizer-catalyst molecules in more efficient photocatalytic systems are discussed. PMID:25700086

  20. Rapid thermal cycling of metal-supported solid oxide fuel cellmembranes

    SciTech Connect

    Matus, Yuriy B.; De Jonghe, Lutgard C.; Jacobson, Craig P.; Visco, Steven J.

    2004-01-02

    Solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) membranes were developed in which zirconia-based electrolyte thin films were supported by a composite metal/ceramic electrode, and were subjected to rapid thermal cycling between 200 and 800 C. The effects of this cycling on membrane performance were evaluated. The membranes, not yet optimized for performance, showed a peak power density of 350mW/cm2at 900 C in laboratory-sized SOFCs that was not affected by the thermal cycling. This resistance to cycling degradation is attributed to the close matching of thermal expansion coefficient of the cermet support electrode with that of the zirconia electrolyte.

  1. Tracking evolution of urban biogeochemical cycles: salinization of fresh water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaushal, S.; McDowell, W. H.; Wollheim, W. M.; Duan, S.; Gorman, J. K.; Haq, S.; Hohman, S.; Smith, R. M.; Mayer, P. M.

    2014-12-01

    The built environment often changes quickly in response to human activities, thus contributing to an evolution of stream chemistry over time. Depending upon development and management strategies, these changes can result in pulses and/or long-term trends. Here, we explore patterns of evolving salinization of fresh water over time, and we evaluate the potential water quality implications of fresh water salinization. We show that there has been global salinization of freshwater across urbanizing landscapes over a century. We also show that human-accelerated weathering in watersheds and river alkalinization can further influence regional rates of salinization (in addition to anthropogenic sources such as road salts, sewage leaks, etc.). Finally, we investigate how salinization of fresh water can impact stream sediment fluxes of carbon, nutrients, and sulfate in watersheds across a land use gradient at the Baltimore Long-Term Ecological Research (LTER) site. The impacts of salinization on mobilization and uptake of carbon, nutrients, and sulfate in streams warrant further consideration in water quality management strategies. Overall, we propose that salinization can be a "universal tracer" of watershed urbanization globally with major regional consequences for drinking water and evolution of biogeochemical cycles in freshwater ecosystems.

  2. Arsenic cycling within the water column of a small lake receiving contaminated ground-water discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, Robert G.; Wilkin, Richard T.; Hernandez, Gina (EPA); (ECO)

    2008-09-18

    The fate of arsenic discharged from contaminated ground water to a small, shallow lake at a hazardous waste site was examined to understand the role of iron (hydr)oxide precipitation-dissolution processes within the water column. Field and laboratory observations indicate that arsenic solubility was controlled, in part, by the extent of ferrous iron oxidation-precipitation and arsenic sorption occurring near the lake chemocline. Laboratory experiments were conducted using site-derived water to assess the impact of these coupled processes on the removal of dissolved arsenic from the water column. The measured concentration of organic carbon from epilimnetic and hypolimnetic water sampled from the lake was approximately 1.3 mM and 17.0 mM, respectively. Experiments conducted with these samples along with synthetic controls containing no organic carbon demonstrated that observed rates of formation and crystallinity of the precipitated iron (hydr)oxide were dependent on the concentration of organic carbon in the lake water. Increasing dissolved organic matter concentration did not significantly interfere with ferrous iron oxidation, but inhibited iron (hydr)oxide precipitation and subsequent sorption of arsenic. For experiments using water sampled from the lake hypolimnion there was a strong relationship between the fraction of precipitated iron and the fraction of sorbed arsenic. Laboratory- and field-derived iron (hydr)oxide precipitates were characterized to evaluate mineralogy and arsenic distribution. In-situ suspended solids and precipitates formed in laboratory experiments using hypolimnetic water were identified as poorly crystalline 2-line ferrihydrite. These solids were readily dissolved in the presence of dithionite indicating that elevated dissolved iron and arsenic observed in the hypolimnion resulted, in part, from in-situ reductive dissolution of settling 2-line ferrihydrite near the sediment-water interface. These observations support the contention that the levels of dissolved arsenic observed in the shallow lake can be attributed to ground-water discharge and internal recycling of arsenic within the water column. The efficiency of the process resulting in iron (hydr)oxide precipitation and arsenic sorption limits the downgradient export of arsenic derived from ground-water discharge.

  3. Diverse arsenic- and iron-cycling microbial communities in arsenic-contaminated aquifers used for drinking water in Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Zahid; Sultana, Munawar; van Breukelen, Boris M; Khan, Sirajul I; Röling, Wilfred F M

    2015-04-01

    Subsurface removal of arsenic by injection with oxygenated groundwater has been proposed as a viable technology for obtaining 'safe' drinking water in Bangladesh. While the oxidation of ferrous iron to solid ferric iron minerals, to which arsenic adsorbs, is assumed to be driven by abiotic reactions, metal-cycling microorganisms may potentially affect arsenic removal. A cultivation-independent survey covering 24 drinking water wells in several geographical regions in Bangladesh was conducted to obtain information on microbial community structure and diversity in general, and on specific functional groups capable of the oxidation or reduction of arsenic or iron. Each functional group, targeted by either group-specific 16S rRNA or functional gene amplification, occurred in at least 79% of investigated samples. Putative arsenate reducers and iron-oxidizing Gallionellaceae were present at low diversity, while more variation in potentially arsenite-oxidizing microorganisms and iron-reducing Desulfuromonadales was revealed within and between samples. Relations between community composition on the one hand and hydrochemistry on the other hand were in general not evident, apart from an impact of salinity on iron-cycling microorganisms. Our data suggest widespread potential for a positive contribution of arsenite and iron oxidizers to arsenic removal upon injection with oxygenated water, but also indicate a potential risk for arsenic re-mobilization by anaerobic arsenate and iron reducers once injection is halted. PMID:25778510

  4. Diurnal cycles in water quality across the periodic table

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirchner, James

    2014-05-01

    Diurnal cycles in water quality can provide important clues to the processes that regulate aquatic chemistry, but they often are masked by longer-term, larger-amplitude variability, making their detection and quantification difficult. Here I outline methods that can detect diurnal cycles even when they are massively obscured by statistically ill-behaved noise. I demonstrate these methods using high-frequency water quality data from the Plylimon catchment in mid-Wales (Neal et al., 2013; Kirchner and Neal, 2013). Several aspects combine to make the Plynlimon data set unique worldwide. Collected at 7-hour intervals, the Plynlimon data set is much more densely sampled than typical long-term weekly or monthly water quality data. This 7-hour sampling was also continued for two years, much longer than typical intensive sampling campaigns, and the resulting time series encompass a wide range of climatic and hydrological conditions. Furthermore, each sample was analyzed for a wide range of solutes with diverse sources in the natural environment. However, the 7-hour sampling frequency is both coarse and irregular in comparison to diurnal cycles, making their detection and quantification difficult. Nonetheless, the methods outlined here enable detection of statistically significant diurnal cycles in over 30 solutes at Plynlimon, including alkali metals (Li, Na, K, Rb, and Cs), alkaline earths (Be, Mg, Ca, Sr, and Ba), transition metals (Al, Ti, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Zn, Mo, Cd, and Pb), nonmetals (B, NO3, Si, As, and Se), lanthanides and actinides (La, Ce, Pr, and U), as well as total dissolved nitrogen (TDN), dissolved organic carbon (DOC), Gran alkalinity, pH, and electrical conductivity. These solutes span every row of the periodic table, and more than six orders of magnitude in concentration. Many of these diurnal cycles are subtle, representing only a few percent, at most, of the total variance in the concentration time series. Nonetheless they are diagnostically useful, because their amplitude and phase contain important clues to the mechanisms controlling these solutes in streamwater. The amplitudes of these cycles vary seasonally, and from wet to dry conditions; the phases are typically much more consistent over time. Under low-flow conditions, the diurnal cycle phases of different elements vary systematically with their electronic structure, as reflected in their placement in the periodic table. Potential mechanisms for this surprising pattern will be discussed. Neal, C., B. Reynolds, J. W. Kirchner, P. Rowland, D. Norris, D. Sleep, A. Lawlor, C. Woods, S. Thacker, H. Guyatt, C. Vincent, K. Lehto, S. Grant, J. Williams, M. Neal, H. Wickham, S. Harman, and L. Armstrong. 2013. High-frequency precipitation and stream water quality time series from Plynlimon, Wales: an openly accessible data resource spanning the periodic table. Hydrological Processes 27:2531-2539. Kirchner, J. W., and C. Neal. 2013. Universal fractal scaling in stream chemistry and its implications for solute transport and water quality trend detection. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 110:12213-12218.

  5. Water footprint of European cars: potential impacts of water consumption along automobile life cycles.

    PubMed

    Berger, Markus; Warsen, Jens; Krinke, Stephan; Bach, Vanessa; Finkbeiner, Matthias

    2012-04-01

    Due to global increase of freshwater scarcity, knowledge about water consumption in product life cycles is important. This study analyzes water consumption and the resulting impacts of Volkswagen's car models Polo, Golf, and Passat and represents the first application of impact-oriented water footprint methods on complex industrial products. Freshwater consumption throughout the cars' life cycles is allocated to material groups and assigned to countries according to import mix shares or location of production sites. Based on these regionalized water inventories, consequences for human health, ecosystems, and resources are determined by using recently developed impact assessment methods. Water consumption along the life cycles of the three cars ranges from 52 to 83 m(3)/car, of which more than 95% is consumed in the production phase, mainly resulting from producing iron, steel, precious metals, and polymers. Results show that water consumption takes place in 43 countries worldwide and that only 10% is consumed directly at Volkswagen's production sites. Although impacts on health tend to be dominated by water consumption in South Africa and Mozambique, resulting from the production of precious metals and aluminum, consequences for ecosystems and resources are mainly caused by water consumption of material production in Europe. PMID:22390631

  6. Mobility of Water on Oxide Surfaces Studied by QENS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mamontov

    2007-01-01

    Although neutron scattering is often considered a bulk probe, we demonstrate that the mobility of surface water on oxide nano-powders can be investigated using quasielastic neutron scattering. We discuss how the reduced number of hydrogen bonds per water molecule associated with surface confinement leads to a qualitative modification of single-particle translational dynamics compared to bulk water. The mobility of surface

  7. Life cycle assessment of nuclear-based hydrogen production via thermochemical water splitting using a copper-chlorine (Cu-Cl) cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozbilen, Ahmet Ziyaettin

    The energy carrier hydrogen is expected to solve some energy challenges. Since its oxidation does not emit greenhouse gases (GHGs), its use does not contribute to climate change, provided that it is derived from clean energy sources. Thermochemical water splitting using a Cu-Cl cycle, linked with a nuclear super-critical water cooled reactor (SCWR), which is being considered as a Generation IV nuclear reactor, is a promising option for hydrogen production. In this thesis, a comparative environmental study is reported of the three-, four- and five-step Cu-Cl thermochemical water splitting cycles with various other hydrogen production methods. The investigation uses life cycle assessment (LCA), which is an analytical tool to identify and quantify environmentally critical phases during the life cycle of a system or a product and/or to evaluate and decrease the overall environmental impact of the system or product. The LCA results for the hydrogen production processes indicate that the four-step Cu-Cl cycle has lower environmental impacts than the three- and five-step Cu-Cl cycles due to its lower thermal energy requirement. Parametric studies show that acidification potentials (APs) and global warming potentials (GWPs) for the four-step Cu-Cl cycle can be reduced from 0.0031 to 0.0028 kg SO2-eq and from 0.63 to 0.55 kg CO2-eq, respectively, if the lifetime of the system increases from 10 to 100 years. Moreover, the comparative study shows that the nuclear-based S-I and the four-step Cu-Cl cycles are the most environmentally benign hydrogen production methods in terms of AP and GWP. GWPs of the S-I and the four-step Cu-Cl cycles are 0.412 and 0.559 kg CO2-eq for reference case which has a lifetime of 60 years. Also, the corresponding APs of these cycles are 0.00241 and 0.00284 kg SO2-eq. It is also found that an increase in hydrogen plant efficiency from 0.36 to 0.65 decreases the GWP from 0.902 to 0.412 kg CO 2-eq and the AP from 0.00459 to 0.00209 kg SO2-eq for the four-step Cu-Cl cycle. Keywords: Hydrogen production, nuclear energy, Cu-Cl cycle, environmental impact, LCA.

  8. Highly efficient binuclear ruthenium catalyst for water oxidation.

    PubMed

    Sander, Anett C; Maji, Somnath; Francàs, Laia; Böhnisch, Torben; Dechert, Sebastian; Llobet, Antoni; Meyer, Franc

    2015-05-22

    Water splitting is one of the key steps in the conversion of sunlight into a usable renewable energy carrier such as dihydrogen or more complex chemical fuels. Developing rugged and highly efficient catalysts for the oxidative part of water splitting, the water oxidation reaction generating dioxygen, is a major challenge in the field. Herein, we introduce a new, and rationally designed, pyrazolate-based diruthenium complex with the highest activity in water oxidation catalysis for binuclear systems reported to date. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction showed favorable preorganization of the metal ions, well suited for binding two water molecules at a distance adequate for O?O bond formation; redox titrations as well as spectroelectrochemistry allowed characterization of the system in several oxidation states. Low oxidation potentials reflect the trianionic character of the elaborate compartmental pyrazolate ligand furnished with peripheral carboxylate groups. Water oxidation has been mediated both by a chemical oxidant (Ce(IV) )-by means of manometry and a Clark electrode for monitoring the dioxygen production-and electrochemically with impressive activities. PMID:25727691

  9. A Strategy for Integrated Water Cycle Observations from Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, E. F.; Houser, P. R.

    2005-12-01

    The coupling of land surface hydrologic processes to atmospheric processes over a range of spatial and temporal scales is needed for understanding how atmosphere-land surface interactions operate and feed back onto the regional and larger scale climate system. An integral component of NASA's Global Water and Energy Cycle (GWEC) program and the World Climate Research is whether knowledge of land surface hydrologic states results in improved weather and short-term climate predictions. The inherent research strategy for NASA/GWEC and WCRP/GEWEX for investigating this is through the merging (assimilation) of remotely sensed observations of the surface hydrospheric state with process-based, terrestrial water and energy balance models. NASA assumes that remote sensing observations using current (TRMM, Terra, and Aqua) and planned (e.g. Global Precipitation Mission, HYDROS for surface soil moisture and freeze-thaw state, and possibly snow and surface water) platforms will provide sufficient estimates of surface hydrologic state variables. The extent to which this assumption can be realized remains an open question. The unmet needs facing the community in fully exploiting space-borne observations include: (i) having sufficiently accurate retrieval of physical surface states, including validation programs that can estimate retrieval error characteristics; (ii) overcoming satellite sensor programs that primarily focus on a single physical parameter; and (iii) having consistency between satellite observations and land surface models in terms of consistency in the retrieved variables as they relate to the spatial and temporal variability of the terrestrial hydrosphere. This presentation will offer a new vision for water cycle observation and modeling that has, at its core, the concept of integrated observations as opposed to isolated observations, and consistency between models and observations. By integrated observations, we mean the simultaneous retrieval of related water cycle variables from a single satellite platform with sensors for multiple frequencies, combining passive and active sensors, and perhaps lidar. By consistency between observations and models, we mean the satellite observations be processed and utilized in an integrated manner with water cycle models. By recognizing that there are fast and slow components to the hydrosphere, an observational strategy can be developed that combines sensors in either Geostationary Earth Obit (GEO) for the fast components or Low Earth (polar) Orbit (LEO) for the slow components. The talk will present the challenges that need to be addressed and a roadmap for this vision. The challenges in developing an integrated observation strategy include innovative sensor and antennae technology, including the identification and selection of frequencies and sensors to meet the needs of water cycle research. For the modeling component, the challenge is in developing computational solutions that extract the maximum information from the integrated observations. This includes both retrieval algorithms that better relate model variables to satellite measurements and land models that more effectively reflect and describe the retrieved variables.

  10. Community of Practice Applications from WaterNet: The NASA Water Cycle Solutions Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, D.; Brilly, M.; Gregoric, G.; Polajnar, J.; Houser, P.; Rodell, M.; Lehning, M.

    2009-04-01

    WaterNet is a new international network of researchers, stakeholders, and end-users of remote sensing tools that will benefit the water resources management community. It addresses a means for enhancing the social and economic developments of nations by increased use of practical research products from the terrestrial water cycle for making informed decisions. This paper provides a summary of the Water Cycle Community of Practice (CoP) plans and examples of Land Surface Model (LSM) applications for extreme events - floods, droughts, and heavy snowstorms in Europe. It discusses the concept of NASA's solutions networks focusing on the WaterNet. It invites EGU teams to join our WaterNet network. The NASA Water cycle Solutions Network's goal is to improve and optimize the sustained ability of water cycle researchers, stakeholders, organizations and networks to interact, identify, harness, and extend NASA research results to augment decision support tools and meet national needs. Our team is developing WaterNet by engaging relevant NASA water cycle research and community-of-practice organizations, to develop what we term an "actionable database" that can be used to communicate and connect NASA Water cycle research Results (NWRs) towards the improvement of water-related Decision Support Tools (DSTs). Recognizing that the European Commission and European Space Agency have also developed many related research products (EWRs), we seek to learn about these and network with the EU teams to include their information in the WaterNet actionable data base. Recognizing the many existing highly valuable water-related science and application networks in the US and EU, we focus the balance of our efforts on enabling their interoperability - facilitating access and communications among decision-makers and scientists. We present results of our initial focus on identification, collection, and analysis of the two end points, these being the NWRs and EWRs and water related DSTs. We discuss strategies to connect these two end points via innovative communication strategies, improved user access to NASA resources, improved water cycle research community appreciation for user DST requirements, improved policymaker, management and stakeholder knowledge of NASA and EU research and application products, and improved identification of pathways for progress. Extreme event analysis and prediction is important to water managers, emergency managers-civil defense and local law enforcement, and the public. The paper presents examples from the extreme flash flood event of 18 September 2007 which cost over 200 M Euro in damages to roads, homes, and other infrastructure in the mountains west of Ljubljana. Results from NASA's Global Land Data Assimilation System - Land Surface Model show the precipitation, runoff, and soil moisture simulated in this extreme local flood event highlighting the limitations of coarse grid ¼ degree grid and 1 km grid spacing models. Drought simulations over Southeastern Europe also provide examples of model capabilities for drought management decision-making focusing on soil moisture, soil temperature, and precipitation simulations from GLDAS. Extreme snowfall events also pose a serious problem for emergency managers, ski industry and transportation managers. An example of GLDAS simulations of a heavy snow event in the Alps shows the capabilities of GLDAS, and contrasts results from the SLF snow and avalanche research. We seek to build on existing partnerships with EU scientific teams that represent a cross-section of individual and networked NWRs, EWRs and DSTs from government, private, and academic domains, that will enable us to quickly establish an operational solutions network, entrain more partner nodes and networks, and move WaterNet toward self-sustainability in the US and EU. EU projects like AWARE, and the flood and drought forecasting research efforts (DMCSEE) and GMES projects are potential projects that may directly benefit from this WaterNet networking. Specific goals and objectives, methods of communication,

  11. Theoretical investigation of solar energy conversion and water oxidation catalysis

    E-print Network

    Wang, Lee-Ping

    2011-01-01

    Solar energy conversion and water oxidation catalysis are two great scientific and engineering challenges that will play pivotal roles in a future sustainable energy economy. In this work, I apply electronic structure ...

  12. Anodic oxidation of phenol for waste water treatment

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ch. Comninellis; C. Pulgarin

    1991-01-01

    The electrochemical oxidation of phenol for waste water treatment was studied at a platinum anode. Analysis of reaction intermediates and a carbon balance has shown that the reaction occurs by two parallel pathways; chemical oxidation with electrogenerated hydroxyl radicals and direct combustion of adsorbed phenol or\\/and its aromatic intermediates to CO2.

  13. Supercritical water oxidation data acquisition testing. Final report, Volume I

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1996-11-01

    This report discusses the phase one testing of a data acquisition system for a supercritical water waste oxidation system. The system is designed to destroy a wide range of organic materials in mixed wastes. The design and testing of the MODAR Oxidizer is discussed. An analysis of the optimized runs is included.

  14. Strongly improved electrochemical cycling durability by adding iridium to electrochromic nickel oxide films.

    PubMed

    Wen, Rui-Tao; Niklasson, Gunnar A; Granqvist, Claes G

    2015-05-13

    Anodically colored nickel oxide (NiO) thin films are of much interest as counter electrodes in tungsten oxide based electrochromic devices such as "smart windows" for energy-efficient buildings. However, NiO films are prone to suffering severe charge density degradation upon prolonged electrochemical cycling, which can lead to insufficient device lifetime. Therefore, a means to improve the durability of NiO-based films is an important challenge at present. Here we report that the incorporation of a modest amount of iridium into NiO films [Ir/(Ir + Ni) = 7.6 atom %] leads to remarkable durability, exceeding 10000 cycles in a lithium-conducting electrolyte, along with significantly improved optical modulation during extended cycling. Structure characterization showed that the face-centered-cubic-type NiO structure remained after iridium addition. Moreover, the crystallinity of these films was enhanced upon electrochemical cycling. PMID:25919917

  15. A Review of RedOx Cycling of Solid Oxide Fuel Cells Anode

    PubMed Central

    Faes, Antonin; Hessler-Wyser, Aïcha; Zryd, Amédée; Van Herle, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Solid oxide fuel cells are able to convert fuels, including hydrocarbons, to electricity with an unbeatable efficiency even for small systems. One of the main limitations for long-term utilization is the reduction-oxidation cycling (RedOx cycles) of the nickel-based anodes. This paper will review the effects and parameters influencing RedOx cycles of the Ni-ceramic anode. Second, solutions for RedOx instability are reviewed in the patent and open scientific literature. The solutions are described from the point of view of the system, stack design, cell design, new materials and microstructure optimization. Finally, a brief synthesis on RedOx cycling of Ni-based anode supports for standard and optimized microstructures is depicted. PMID:24958298

  16. Process for treating effluent from a supercritical water oxidation reactor

    DOEpatents

    Barnes, C.M.; Shapiro, C.

    1997-11-25

    A method for treating a gaseous effluent from a supercritical water oxidation reactor containing entrained solids is provided comprising the steps of expanding the gas/solids effluent from a first to a second lower pressure at a temperature at which no liquid condenses; separating the solids from the gas effluent; neutralizing the effluent to remove any acid gases; condensing the effluent; and retaining the purified effluent to the supercritical water oxidation reactor. 6 figs.

  17. Process for treating effluent from a supercritical water oxidation reactor

    DOEpatents

    Barnes, Charles M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Shapiro, Carolyn (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1997-01-01

    A method for treating a gaseous effluent from a supercritical water oxidation reactor containing entrained solids is provided comprising the steps of expanding the gas/solids effluent from a first to a second lower pressure at a temperature at which no liquid condenses; separating the solids from the gas effluent; neutralizing the effluent to remove any acid gases; condensing the effluent; and retaining the purified effluent to the supercritical water oxidation reactor.

  18. Life cycle assessment for sustainable metropolitan water systems planning.

    PubMed

    Lundie, Sven; Peters, Gregory M; Beavis, Paul C

    2004-07-01

    Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) is useful as an information tool for the examination of alternative future scenarios for strategic planning. Developing a life cycle assessment for a large water and wastewater system involves making methodological decisions about the level of detail which is retained through different stages of the process. In this article we discuss a methodology tailored to strategic planning needs which retains a high degree of model segmentation in order to enhance modeling of a large, complex system. This is illustrated by a case study of Sydney Water, which is Australia's largest water service provider. A prospective LCA was carried out to examine the potential environmental impacts of Sydney Water's total operations in the year 2021. To our knowledge this is the first study to create an LCA model of an integrated water and wastewater system with this degree of complexity. A "base case" system model was constructed to represent current operating assets as augmented and upgraded to 2021. The base case results provided a basis for the comparison of alternative future scenarios and for conclusions to be drawn regarding potential environmental improvements. The scenarios can be roughly classified in two categories: (1) options which improve the environmental performance across all impact categories and (2) options which improve one indicator and worsen others. Overall environmental improvements are achieved in all categories by the scenarios examining increased demand management, energy efficiency, energy generation, and additional energy recovery from biosolids. The scenarios which examined desalination of seawater and the upgrades of major coastal sewage treatment plants to secondary and tertiary treatment produced an improvement in one environmental indicator but deteriorations in all the other impact categories, indicating the environmental tradeoffs within the system. The desalination scenario produced a significant increase in greenhouse gas emissions due to coal-fired electricity generation for a small increase in water supply. Assessment of a greenfield scenario incorporating water demand management, on-site treatment, local irrigation, and centralized biosolids treatment indicates significant environmental improvements are possible relative to the assessment of a conventional system of corresponding scale. PMID:15296294

  19. Effect of Cycle Frequency on High-Temperature Oxidation Behavior of Alumina-Forming Alloys

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. A. Pint; P. F. Tortorelli; I. G. Wright

    2002-01-01

    Cycle frequency affects both high-temperature oxidation behavior and the method in which the cyclic test is conducted. Several issues are discussed using examples taken from results for Ni-base and Fe-base, alumina-forming alloys. For alloys that form adherent scales, cycle frequency has little effect on results over extended test times ( =500 hr). When an alloy forms a less adherent scale,

  20. Diurnal cycle of liquid water path over the subtropical and tropical oceans

    E-print Network

    Wood, Robert

    Diurnal cycle of liquid water path over the subtropical and tropical oceans R. Wood, C. S.1029/ 2002GL015371, 2002. 1. Introduction [2] The diurnal cycle of cloud cover and liquid water has important; revised 26 June 2002; accepted 11 July 2002; published XX Month 2002. [1] The diurnal cycle of liquid

  1. Trends and seasonal cycles in the isotopic composition of nitrous oxide since 1940

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, S.; Croteau, P.; Boering, K. A.; Etheridge, D. M.; Ferretti, D.; Fraser, P. J.; Kim, K.-R.; Krummel, P. B.; Langenfelds, R. L.; van Ommen, T. D.; Steele, L. P.; Trudinger, C. M.

    2012-04-01

    The atmospheric nitrous oxide mixing ratio has increased by 20% since 1750 (ref. ). Given that nitrous oxide is both a long-lived greenhouse gas and a stratospheric ozone-depleting substance, this increase is of global concern. However, the magnitude and geographic distribution of nitrous oxide sources, and how they have changed over time, is uncertain. A key unknown is the influence of the stratospheric circulation, which brings air depleted in nitrous oxide to the surface. Here, we report the oxygen and intramolecular nitrogen isotopic compositions of nitrous oxide in firn air samples from Antarctica and archived air samples from Cape Grim, Tasmania, spanning 1940-2005. We detect seasonal cycles in the isotopic composition of nitrous oxide at Cape Grim. The phases and amplitudes of these seasonal cycles allow us to distinguish between the influence of the stratospheric sink and the oceanic source at this site, demonstrating that isotope measurements can help in the attribution and quantification of surface sources in general. Large interannual variations and long-term decreasing trends in isotope composition are also apparent. These long-term trends allow us to distinguish between natural and anthropogenic sources of nitrous oxide, and confirm that the rise in atmospheric nitrous oxide levels is largely the result of an increased reliance on nitrogen-based fertilizers.

  2. High-temperature oxidation and thermal cycling of aluminum-electroplated stainless steels

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. A. Capuano; A. Dang; U. Bernabai; F. Felli

    1993-01-01

    An alumina coating, produced from the oxidation of an aluminum-electroplated deposit, improved the oxidation resistance in air of a ferritic, AISI-type 446 stainless steel, Fe-24Cr-1.2Al containing 0.15% of mischmetal, and an austenitic AISI 321 stainless steel containing 0.53% Ti, at least up to 1100°C. In thermal-cycling tests from 1000°C to room temperature, the alumina coating was adherent on the ferritic

  3. Reservoir in Global Water Cycle: Macro Scale Hydrologic Modeling for Water Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, T.; Nijssen, B.; Haddeland, I.; Gao, H.; Lettenmaier, D. P.

    2014-12-01

    Man-made reservoirs play a key role in the terrestrial water system. They support purposes, such as irrigation, hydropower generation, and flood control, which can substantially change water fluxes at the land surface and redistribute the storage of surface water in space and time. Although most developed countries have sophisticated observing systems for many variables in the natural surface water cycle, long-term and consistent records that focus on water management and human impacts on the global water cycle are much more limited, and most land surface models ignore water management activities. We describe a continental-scale model of reservoir storage, which is combined with a soil moisture deficit-based irrigation scheme within the Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) macro-scale hydrological model to simulate the effects of water management in the major river basins of the world. The model is forced with merged NCEP/NCAR and satellite meteorological data at a spatial resolution of 0.25 degrees latitude-longitude, for the period 1948 to 2010. A total of 167 of the largest reservoirs in the world with a total storage capacity around 3900 km3 (nearly 60% of the global total reservoir storage) are simulated. We successfully predict the monthly reservoir storage time series for most of a set of 23 global reservoirs for which observed storage is available either via in situ or satellite remote sensing measurements. We evaluate, on a continental and global basis, the magnitude of inter-seasonal and inter-annual reservoir storage variations in comparison with other terms in the land surface water cycle, including Snow Water Equivalent (SWE) and soil moisture.

  4. Diel cycles of hydrogen peroxide in marine bathing waters in Southern California, USA: in situ surf zone measurements.

    PubMed

    Clark, Catherine D; De Bruyn, Warren J; Hirsch, Charlotte M; Aiona, Paige

    2010-12-01

    Hydrogen peroxide is photochemically produced in natural waters. It has been implicated in the oxidative-induced mortality of fecal indicator bacteria (FIB), a microbial water quality measure. To assess levels and cycling of peroxide in beach waters monitored for FIB, diel studies were carried out in surf zone waters in July 2009 at Crystal Cove State Beach, Southern California, USA. Maximum concentrations of 160-200 nM were obtained within 1h of solar noon. Levels dropped at night to 20-40 nM, consistent with photochemical production from sunlight. Day-time production and night-time dark loss rates averaged 16 ± 3 nM h(-1) and 12 ± 4 nM h(-1) respectively. Apparent quantum yields averaged 0.07 ± 0.02. Production was largely dominated by sunlight, with some dependence on chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) levels in waters with high absorption coefficients. Peroxide levels measured here are sufficient to cause oxidative-stress-induced mortality of bacteria, affect FIB diel cycling and impact microbial water quality in marine bathing waters. PMID:20739035

  5. Failure and Life Cycle Evaluation of Watering Valves

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, David M; Graciano, Sandy J; Karlstad, John; Leblanc, Mathias; Clark, Tom; Holmes, Scott; Reuter, Jon D

    2011-01-01

    Automated watering systems provide a reliable source of ad libitum water to animal cages. Our facility uses an automated water delivery system to support approximately 95% of the housed population (approximately 14,000 mouse cages). Drinking valve failure rates from 2002 through 2006 never exceeded the manufacturer standard of 0.1% total failure, based on monthly cage census and the number of floods. In 2007, we noted an increase in both flooding and cases of clinical dehydration in our mouse population. Using manufacturer's specifications for a water flow rate of 25 to 50 mL/min, we initiated a wide-scale screening of all valves used. During a 4-mo period, approximately 17,000 valves were assessed, of which 2200 failed according to scoring criteria (12.9% overall; 7.2% low flow; 1.6% no flow; 4.1% leaky). Factors leading to valve failures included residual metal shavings, silicone flash, introduced debris or bedding, and (most common) distortion of the autoclave-rated internal diaphragm and O-ring. Further evaluation revealed that despite normal autoclave conditions of heat, pressure, and steam, an extreme negative vacuum pull caused the valves’ internal silicone components (diaphragm and O-ring) to become distorted and water-permeable. Normal flow rate often returned after a ‘drying out’ period, but components then reabsorbed water while on the animal rack or during subsequent autoclave cycles to revert to a variable flow condition. On the basis of our findings, we recalibrated autoclaves and initiated a preventative maintenance program to mitigate the risk of future valve failure. PMID:22330720

  6. Our Environment in Hot Water: Comparing Water Heaters, A Life Cycle Approach Comparing Tank and Tankless Water Heaters in California

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Alison; McMahon, James; Masanet, Eric; Lutz, Jim

    2008-08-13

    Residential water heating is a large source of energy use in California homes. This project took a life cycle approach to comparing tank and tankless water heaters in Northern and Southern California. Information about the life cycle phases was calculated using the European Union?s Methodology study for EcoDesign of Energy-using Products (MEEUP) and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory?s Life Cycle Inventory (NREL LCI) database. In a unit-to-unit comparison, it was found that tankless water heaters would lessen impacts of water heating by reducing annual energy use by 2800 MJ/year (16% compared to tank), and reducing global warming emissions by 175 kg CO2 eqv./year (18% reduction). Overall, the production and combustion of natural gas in the use phase had the largest impact. Total waste, VOCs, PAHs, particulate matter, and heavy-metals-to-air categories were also affected relatively strongly by manufacturing processes. It was estimated that tankless water heater users would have to use 10 more gallons of hot water a day (an increased usage of approximately 20%) to have the same impact as tank water heaters. The project results suggest that if a higher percentage of Californians used tankless water heaters, environmental impacts caused by water heating would be smaller.

  7. Energetic basis of catalytic activity of layered nanophase calcium manganese oxides for water oxidation

    PubMed Central

    Birkner, Nancy; Nayeri, Sara; Pashaei, Babak; Najafpour, Mohammad Mahdi; Casey, William H.; Navrotsky, Alexandra

    2013-01-01

    Previous measurements show that calcium manganese oxide nanoparticles are better water oxidation catalysts than binary manganese oxides (Mn3O4, Mn2O3, and MnO2). The probable reasons for such enhancement involve a combination of factors: The calcium manganese oxide materials have a layered structure with considerable thermodynamic stability and a high surface area, their low surface energy suggests relatively loose binding of H2O on the internal and external surfaces, and they possess mixed-valent manganese with internal oxidation enthalpy independent of the Mn3+/Mn4+ ratio and much smaller in magnitude than the Mn2O3-MnO2 couple. These factors enhance catalytic ability by providing easy access for solutes and water to active sites and facile electron transfer between manganese in different oxidation states. PMID:23667149

  8. NEWS Climatology Project: The State of the Water Cycle at Continental to Global Scales

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodell, Matthew; LEcuyer, Tristan; Beaudoing, Hiroko Kato; Olson, Bill

    2011-01-01

    NASA's Energy and Water Cycle Study (NEWS) program fosters collaborative research towards improved quantification and prediction of water and energy cycle consequences of climate change. In order to measure change, it is first necessary to describe current conditions. The goal of the NEWS Water and Energy Cycle Climatology project is to develop "state of the global water cycle" and "state of the global energy cycle" assessments based on data from modern ground and space based observing systems and data integrating models. The project is a multiinstitutional collaboration with more than 20 active contributors. This presentation will describe results of the first stage of the water budget analysis, whose goal was to characterize the current state of the water cycle on mean monthly, continental scales. We examine our success in closing the water budget within the expected uncertainty range and the effects of forcing budget closure as a method for refining individual flux estimates.

  9. Nitric oxide alleviates aluminum-induced oxidative damage through regulating the ascorbate-glutathione cycle in roots of wheat.

    PubMed

    Sun, Chengliang; Liu, Lijuan; Yu, Yan; Liu, Wenjing; Lu, Lingli; Jin, Chongwei; Lin, Xianyong

    2015-06-01

    The possible association with nitric oxide (NO) and ascorbate-glutathione (AsA-GSH) cycle in regulating aluminum (Al) tolerance of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) was investigated using two genotypes with different Al resistance. Exposure to Al inhibited root elongation, and triggered lipid peroxidation and oxidation of AsA to dehydroascorbate and GSH to glutathione disulfide in wheat roots. Exogenous NO significantly increased endogenous NO levels, and subsequently alleviated Al-induced inhibition of root elongation and oxidation of AsA and GSH to maintain the redox molecules in the reduced form in both wheat genotypes. Under Al stress, significantly increased activities and gene transcriptional levels of ascorbate peroxidase, glutathione reductase, and dehydroascorbate reductase, were observed in the root tips of the Al-tolerant genotype Jian-864. Nitric oxide application enhanced the activity and gene transcriptional level of these enzymes in both wheat genotypes. ?-Glutamylcysteine synthetase was not significantly affected by Al or NO, but NO treatments increased the activity of glutathione peroxidase and glutathione S-transferase to a greater extent than the Al-treated wheat seedlings. Proline was significantly decreased by Al, while it was not affected by NO. These results clearly suggest that NO protects wheat root against Al-induced oxidative stress, possibly through its regulation of the AsA-GSH cycle. PMID:25319364

  10. Rare earth element partitioning between hydrous ferric oxides and acid mine water during iron oxidation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Verplanck, P.L.; Nordstrom, D.K.; Taylor, H.E.; Kimball, B.A.

    2004-01-01

    Ferrous iron rapidly oxidizes to Fe (III) and precipitates as hydrous Fe (III) oxides in acid mine waters. This study examines the effect of Fe precipitation on the rare earth element (REE) geochemistry of acid mine waters to determine the pH range over which REEs behave conservatively and the range over which attenuation and fractionation occur. Two field studies were designed to investigate REE attenuation during Fe oxidation in acidic, alpine surface waters. To complement these field studies, a suite of six acid mine waters with a pH range from 1.6 to 6.1 were collected and allowed to oxidize in the laboratory at ambient conditions to determine the partitioning of REEs during Fe oxidation and precipitation. Results from field experiments document that even with substantial Fe oxidation, the REEs remain dissolved in acid, sulfate waters with pH below 5.1. Between pH 5.1 and 6.6 the REEs partitioned to the solid phases in the water column, and heavy REEs were preferentially removed compared to light REEs. Laboratory experiments corroborated field data with the most solid-phase partitioning occurring in the waters with the highest pH. ?? 2004 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. An improvement in the use of plutonium in pressurized water reactors; The subassembly mixed-oxide fuel management concept

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. Bangil; G. Gambier; M. Soldevila

    1989-01-01

    An unconventional mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel management concept for a pressurized water reactor core is proposed. Subassembly management (SAM) is an in-out reloading scheme applied within MOX assemblies that are reconstructed'' at each end of cycle. The SAM concept needs only one kind of MOX fuel pin instead of the three pins necessary in the standard MOX fuel management concept; it

  12. The Urban Water Cycle and how it Modulates the Microclimate and the Energy Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bou-Zeid, E.; Wang, Z.; Ramamurthy, P.; Li, D.; Sun, T.; Smith, J. A.

    2012-12-01

    Urbanization is the land-use modification with the largest and most manifest impacts on hydrologic storage and fluxes. This perturbation of the water cycle also has considerable ramifications on the surface energy budget and the microclimatology in built terrain: reducing the potential for water storage and subsequent evaporation reduces the fraction of incoming radiative energy dissipated through surface evaporation, and consequently increases the sensible heating of the urban atmosphere and solid surfaces (buildings, roads, …). However, the complexity of the involved physical processes and their interactions have so far been oversimplified, leading to considerable biases in model output when compared to observations. Using novel sensing techniques that include wireless sensor networks, this study seeks to build a better understanding of the Urban Water Cycle. Our findings indicate that "impervious surfaces" in urban area are not really impervious and not always dry. The role of evaporation from gravel-covered roofs and from concrete, brick, stone and asphalt surfaces can be considerable, leading to lower sensible heating. In addition, the different thermal properties of the various urban materials lead to extreme spatial heterogeneity in surface conditions that is much higher than over natural terrain. Building on this understanding, an improved urban canopy model is developed that includes much better representation of surface heterogeneity and of hydrological and thermal storage and transport processes, including analytical solutions of the heat equation and numerical solutions of the Richards equation in the urban surface. The model development will be detailed and applications focusing on the role of evaporation in mitigating summer building cooling needs and urban heat island effects will be presented.

  13. Infiltrated Phlogopite Micas with Superior Thermal Cycle Stability as Compressive Seals for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, Y S.; Stevenson, Jeffry W.

    2005-03-01

    Thermal cycle stability is one of the most stringent requirements for sealants in solid oxide fuel cell stacks. The sealants have to survive several hundreds to thousands of thermal cycles during lifetime operation in stationary and transportation applications. Recently, researchers at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory have developed a novel method to infiltrate the mica flakes with a wetting or liquid forming material such that the leak path will be reduced from 3-D to 2-D and achieve good thermal cycle stability with low leak rates.

  14. Copper as a robust and transparent electrocatalyst for water oxidation.

    PubMed

    Du, Jialei; Chen, Zuofeng; Ye, Shengrong; Wiley, Benjamin J; Meyer, Thomas J

    2015-02-01

    Copper metal is in theory a viable oxidative electrocatalyst based on surface oxidation to Cu(III) and/or Cu(IV) , but its use in water oxidation has been impeded by anodic corrosion. The in?situ formation of an efficient interfacial oxygen-evolving Cu catalyst from Cu(II) in concentrated carbonate solutions is presented. The catalyst necessitates use of dissolved Cu(II) and accesses the higher oxidation states prior to decompostion to form an active surface film, which is limited by solution conditions. This observation and restriction led to the exploration of ways to use surface-protected Cu metal as a robust electrocatalyst for water oxidation. Formation of a compact film of CuO on Cu surface prevents anodic corrosion and results in sustained catalytic water oxidation. The Cu/CuO surface stabilization was also applied to Cu nanowire films, which are transparent and flexible electrocatalysts for water oxidation and are an attractive alternative to ITO-supported catalysts for photoelectrochemical applications. PMID:25581365

  15. ARSENIC CYCLING WITHIN THE WATER COLUMN OF A SMALL LAKE RECEIVING CONTAMINATED GROUND WATER DISCHARGE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The fate of arsenic discharged from contaminated ground water to a small, shallow lake at a hazardous waste site is controlled, in part, by the rate of ferrous iron oxidation-precipitation and arsenic sorption occurring near the lake chemocline. Laboratory experiments were condu...

  16. Rate law analysis of water oxidation on a hematite surface.

    PubMed

    Le Formal, Florian; Pastor, Ernest; Tilley, S David; Mesa, Camilo A; Pendlebury, Stephanie R; Grätzel, Michael; Durrant, James R

    2015-05-27

    Water oxidation is a key chemical reaction, central to both biological photosynthesis and artificial solar fuel synthesis strategies. Despite recent progress on the structure of the natural catalytic site, and on inorganic catalyst function, determining the mechanistic details of this multiredox reaction remains a significant challenge. We report herein a rate law analysis of the order of water oxidation as a function of surface hole density on a hematite photoanode employing photoinduced absorption spectroscopy. Our study reveals a transition from a slow, first order reaction at low accumulated hole density to a faster, third order mechanism once the surface hole density is sufficient to enable the oxidation of nearest neighbor metal atoms. This study thus provides direct evidence for the multihole catalysis of water oxidation by hematite, and demonstrates the hole accumulation level required to achieve this, leading to key insights both for reaction mechanism and strategies to enhance function. PMID:25936408

  17. Rate Law Analysis of Water Oxidation on a Hematite Surface

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Water oxidation is a key chemical reaction, central to both biological photosynthesis and artificial solar fuel synthesis strategies. Despite recent progress on the structure of the natural catalytic site, and on inorganic catalyst function, determining the mechanistic details of this multiredox reaction remains a significant challenge. We report herein a rate law analysis of the order of water oxidation as a function of surface hole density on a hematite photoanode employing photoinduced absorption spectroscopy. Our study reveals a transition from a slow, first order reaction at low accumulated hole density to a faster, third order mechanism once the surface hole density is sufficient to enable the oxidation of nearest neighbor metal atoms. This study thus provides direct evidence for the multihole catalysis of water oxidation by hematite, and demonstrates the hole accumulation level required to achieve this, leading to key insights both for reaction mechanism and strategies to enhance function. PMID:25936408

  18. Destruction of environmental organic pollutants by supercritical water oxidation.

    PubMed

    Williams, P T; Onwudili, J A

    2006-08-01

    The supercritical water oxidation of two environmental pollutants in the form of diesel fuel and two waste landfill leachate samples have been examined in relation to sub-critical and supercritical water oxidation conditions. Supercritical water oxidation involves reactions in an aqueous fluid phase under conditions below and around the critical point of water (T(c) = 374 degrees C, P(c) = 22.1 MPa). Experiments were carried out using a batch autoclave reactor at temperatures between 300 degrees C and 380 degrees C corresponding to pressures between 10.5 MPa and 22.8 MPa. The oxidative decomposition of the diesel fuel, which was loaded onto a sand matrix to simulate a contaminated land sample, was determined in relation to process conditions. The results showed that almost complete destruction of the components of the diesel fuel could be achieved. In addition, intermediate oxygenated compounds were formed and identified. The level of loading of the diesel fuel onto the sand matrix influenced the level of compound decomposition and the amount of intermediate oxygenated compounds formed. The characteristics of the waste landfill leachates were determined and were shown to be highly chemically complex. The high chloride concentration of the leachate resulted in significant corrosion of the reactor. However, almost complete oxidation of the organic components of the leachate could be achieved under supercritical water oxidation conditions. PMID:16972378

  19. Combinations of solid oxide fuel cell and several enhanced gas turbine cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuchonthara, Prapan; Bhattacharya, Sankar; Tsutsumi, Atsushi

    Combined power generation systems with combinations of solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) and various enhanced gas turbine (GT) cycles were evaluated. In the GT part, steam injected gas turbine (STIG) cycle, GT/steam turbine (ST) combined cycle, and humid air turbine (HAT) cycle were considered. Moreover, additional recuperation was considered by means of air preheating (APH) in the STIG cycle. Effects of operating turbine inlet temperature (TIT) and pressure ratio (PR) on overall system performance were assessed. Although the SOFC-HAT system shows the lowest specific work output compared to other systems, its highest thermal efficiency presents a significant advantage. Furthermore, at high TITs and PRs the SOFC-HAT system gives the best performance in terms of both thermal efficiency and specific work. Results indicate that energy recuperative features in the HAT promote the positive effect of increasing TIT by means of enhancing GT efficiency, leading to the improvement in thermal efficiency of the overall system.

  20. Efficient and Sustained Photoelectrochemical Water Oxidation by Cobalt Oxide/Silicon Photoanodes with Nanotextured Interfaces

    E-print Network

    Javey, Ali

    Efficient and Sustained Photoelectrochemical Water Oxidation by Cobalt Oxide/Silicon Photoanodes photoanodes that operate in alkaline conditions is vital to achieve an efficient solar-to-fuel system. Silicon aqueous conditions, particularly at high pH. In recent years, strategies for stabilizing photoanodes

  1. Coupled cycles of dissolved oxygen and nitrous oxide in rivers along a trophic gradient in southern Ontario, Canada.

    PubMed

    Rosamond, Madeline S; Thuss, Simon J; Schiff, Sherry L; Elgood, Richard J

    2011-01-01

    Diel (24-h) cycling of dissolved O2 (DO) in rivers is well documented, but evidence for coupled diel changes in DO and nitrogen cycling has only been demonstrated in hypereutrophic systems where DO approaches zero at night. Here, we show diel changes in N2O and DO concentration at several sites across a trophic gradient. Nitrous oxide concentration increased at night at all but one site in spring and summer, even when gas exchange was rapid and minimum water column DO was well above hypoxic conditions. Diel N2O curves were not mirror images of DO curves and were not symmetrical about the mean. Although inter- and intrasite variation was high, N2O peaked around the time of lowest DO at most of the sites. These results suggest that N2O must be measured several times per diel period to characterize curve shape and timing. Nitrous oxide concentration was not significantly correlated with NO3- concentration, contrary to studies in agricultural streams and to the current United Nations Intergovernmental Panel for Climate Change protocols for N2O emission estimation. The strong negative correlation between N2O concentration and daily minimum DO concentration suggested that N2O production was limited by DO. This is consistent with N2O produced by nitrite reduction. The ubiquity of diel N2O cycling suggests that most DO and N2O sampling strategies used in rivers are insufficient to capture natural variability. Ecosystem-level effects of microbial processes, such as denitrification, are sensitive to small changes in redox conditions in the water column even in low-nutrient oxic rivers, suggesting diel cycling of redox-sensitive compounds may exist in many aquatic systems. PMID:21488515

  2. Biomimetic metal oxides for the extraction of nanoparticles from water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallampati, Ramakrishna; Valiyaveettil, Suresh

    2013-03-01

    Contamination of nanomaterials in the environment will pose significant health risks in the future. A viable purification method is necessary to address this problem. Here we report the synthesis and application of a series of metal oxides prepared using a biological template for the removal of nanoparticles from the aqueous environment. A simple synthesis of metal oxides such as ZnO, NiO, CuO, Co3O4 and CeO2 employing eggshell membrane (ESM) as a biotemplate is reported. The morphology of the metal oxide powders was characterized using electron microscopes and the lattice structure was established using X-ray diffraction methods. Extraction of nanoparticles from water was carried out to compare the efficiency of metal oxides. NiO showed good extraction efficiency in removing gold and silver nanoparticles from spiked water samples within an hour. Easy access and enhanced stability of metal oxides makes them interesting candidates for applications in industrial effluent treatments and water purifications.Contamination of nanomaterials in the environment will pose significant health risks in the future. A viable purification method is necessary to address this problem. Here we report the synthesis and application of a series of metal oxides prepared using a biological template for the removal of nanoparticles from the aqueous environment. A simple synthesis of metal oxides such as ZnO, NiO, CuO, Co3O4 and CeO2 employing eggshell membrane (ESM) as a biotemplate is reported. The morphology of the metal oxide powders was characterized using electron microscopes and the lattice structure was established using X-ray diffraction methods. Extraction of nanoparticles from water was carried out to compare the efficiency of metal oxides. NiO showed good extraction efficiency in removing gold and silver nanoparticles from spiked water samples within an hour. Easy access and enhanced stability of metal oxides makes them interesting candidates for applications in industrial effluent treatments and water purifications. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: XRD and EDS analysis of the prepared metal oxides, EDS analysis of nanoparticles adsorbed on the surface of metal oxides and SEM micrographs of metal oxides are included. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr34221b

  3. Oxidation of arsenate(III) with manganese oxides in water treatment

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Wolfgang Driehaus; Reiner Seith; Martin Jekel

    1995-01-01

    Arsenate(III) is the more toxic form of inorganic arsenic and its removal from drinking water is less effective as compared to arsenate(V). Arsenate(III) persists in aerated water, even at high pH, but is easily oxidized by managanese dioxides. The oxidation of As(III) follows a second order rate law with respect to As(III). The reaction rate is effected by the initial

  4. Water Decontamination With New Porous Oxide Photocatalysts

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Zarei Chaleshtori; G. B. Saupe

    2008-01-01

    Water pollution is major environmental problem worldwide. Many common industrial organic compounds that make their way into water systems can be carcinogenic at trace levels and are difficult and costly to remove completely with conventional technologies. Heterogeneous photocatalysts like titanium dioxide have the potential to completely mineralize organic compounds in water under ultraviolet light. We are proposing to develop new

  5. Thaumarchaeal ammonium oxidation and evidence for a nitrogen cycle in a subsurface radioactive thermal spring in the Austrian Central Alps.

    PubMed

    Gerbl, Friedrich W; Weidler, Gerhard W; Wanek, Wolfgang; Erhardt, Angelika; Stan-Lotter, Helga

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies had suggested the presence of ammonium oxidizing Thaumarchaeota as well as nitrite oxidizing Bacteria in the subsurface spring called Franz Josef Quelle (FJQ), a slightly radioactive thermal mineral spring with a temperature of 43.6-47°C near the alpine village of Bad Gastein, Austria. The microbiological consortium of the FJQ was investigated for its utilization of nitrogen compounds and the putative presence of a subsurface nitrogen cycle. Microcosm experiments made with samples from the spring water, containing planktonic microorganisms, or from biofilms, were used in this study. Three slightly different media, enriched with vitamins and trace elements, and two incubation temperatures (30 and 40°C, respectively) were employed. Under aerobic conditions, high rates of conversion of ammonium to nitrite, as well as nitrite to nitrate were measured. Under oxygen-limited conditions nitrate was converted to gaseous compounds. Stable isotope probing with (15)NH4Cl or ((15)NH4)2SO4as sole energy sources revealed incorporation of (15)N into community DNA. Genomic DNA as well as RNA were extracted from all microcosms. The following genes or fragments of genes were successfully amplified, cloned and sequenced by standard PCR from DNA extracts: Ammonia monooxygenase subunit A (amoA), nitrite oxidoreductase subunits A and B (nxrA and nxrB), nitrate reductase (narG), nitrite reductase (nirS), nitric oxide reductases (cnorB and qnorB), nitrous oxide reductase (nosZ). Reverse transcription of extracted total RNA and real-time PCR suggested the expression of each of those genes. Nitrogen fixation (as probed with nifH and nifD) was not detected. However, a geological origin of NH(+) 4 in the water of the FJQ cannot be excluded, considering the silicate, granite and gneiss containing environment. The data suggested the operation of a nitrogen cycle in the subsurface environment of the FJQ. PMID:24904540

  6. CP12-mediated protection of Calvin-Benson cycle enzymes from oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Marri, Lucia; Thieulin-Pardo, Gabriel; Lebrun, Régine; Puppo, Rémy; Zaffagnini, Mirko; Trost, Paolo; Gontero, Brigitte; Sparla, Francesca

    2014-02-01

    Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) and phosphoribulokinase (PRK) are two energy-consuming enzymes of the Calvin-Benson cycle, whose regulation is crucial for the global balance of the photosynthetic process under different environmental conditions. In oxygen phototrophs, GAPDH and PRK regulation involves the redox-sensitive protein CP12. In the dark, oxidized chloroplast thioredoxins trigger the formation of a GAPDH/CP12/PRK complex in which both enzyme activities are down-regulated. In this report, we show that free GAPDH (A4-isoform) and PRK are also inhibited by oxidants like H2O2, GSSG and GSNO. Both in the land plant Arabidopsis thaliana and in the green microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, both enzymes can be glutathionylated as shown by biotinylated-GSSG assay and MALDI-ToF mass spectrometry. CP12 is not glutathionylated but homodisulfides are formed upon oxidant treatments. In Arabidopsis but not in Chlamydomonas, the interaction between oxidized CP12 and GAPDH provides full protection from oxidative damage. In both organisms, preformed GAPDH/CP12/PRK complexes are protected from GSSG or GSNO oxidation, and in Arabidopsis also from H2O2 treatment. Overall, the results suggest that the role of CP12 in oxygen phototrophs needs to be extended beyond light/dark regulation, and include protection of enzymes belonging to Calvin-Benson cycle from oxidative stress. PMID:24211189

  7. THE FORMATION OF PB(IV) OXIDES IN CHLORINATED WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recent research has shown that Pb(IV) oxides can play an important geochemical role in drinking water distribution systems. The basis of most guidance for lead control in drinking water, however, presumes that Pb(II) solids control lead solubility. Therefore, it is important that...

  8. Aircraft Water Vapor Measurements Utilizing an Aluminum Oxide Hygrometer

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ernest Hilsenrath

    1974-01-01

    A hygrometer for water vapor measurements from an aircraft was developed. An aluminum oxide hygrometer mounted in an aircraft Rosemount air temperature scoop was flown on the NASA Convair 990 and on a USAF B-57 aircraft. Water vapor measurements from the Convair 990 were conducted up to 40,000 ft with penetration into the stratosphere. Good agreement was obtained with simultaneously

  9. Transpiring wall supercritical water oxidation test reactor design report

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. L. Haroldsen; D. Y. Ariizumi; B. E. Mills; B. G. Brown; D. C. Rousar

    1996-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories is working with GenCorp, Aerojet and Foster Wheeler Development Corporation to develop a transpiring wall supercritical water oxidation reactor. The transpiring wall reactor promises to mitigate problems of salt deposition and corrosion by forming a protective boundary layer of pure supercritical water. A laboratory scale test reactor has been assembled to demonstrate the concept. A 1\\/4 scale

  10. Iron oxide-decorated carbon for supercapacitor anodes with ultrahigh energy density and outstanding cycling stability.

    PubMed

    Guan, Cao; Liu, Jilei; Wang, Yadong; Mao, Lu; Fan, Zhanxi; Shen, Zexiang; Zhang, Hua; Wang, John

    2015-05-26

    Supercapacitor with ultrahigh energy density (e.g., comparable with those of rechargeable batteries) and long cycling ability (>50000 cycles) is attractive for the next-generation energy storage devices. The energy density of carbonaceous material electrodes can be effectively improved by combining with certain metal oxides/hydroxides, but many at the expenses of power density and long-time cycling stability. To achieve an optimized overall electrochemical performance, rationally designed electrode structures with proper control in metal oxide/carbon are highly desirable. Here we have successfully realized an ultrahigh-energy and long-life supercapacitor anode by developing a hierarchical graphite foam-carbon nanotube framework and coating the surface with a thin layer of iron oxide (GF-CNT@Fe2O3). The full cell of anode based on this structure gives rise to a high energy of ?74.7 Wh/kg at a power of ?1400 W/kg, and ?95.4% of the capacitance can be retained after 50000 cycles of charge-discharge. These performance features are superior among those reported for metal oxide based supercapacitors, making it a promising candidate for the next generation of high-performance electrochemical energy storage. PMID:25868870

  11. Free amino acids in marine rains: evidence for oxidation and potential role in nitrogen cycling

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kenneth Mopper; Rod G. Zika

    1987-01-01

    Previous studies of dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) in precipitation have addressed various aspects of nutrient transport and global nitrogen cycling1. In most of these studies however, the detailed chemical composition of DON was not determined. Analyses of specific organic nitrogen compounds within precipitation can yield new information about sources and transformations of DON as well as about heterogeneous oxidative processes

  12. Energy analysis of a trigeneration plant based on solid oxide fuel cell and organic Rankine cycle

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Fahad A. Al-Sulaiman; Ibrahim Dincer; Feridun Hamdullahpur

    2010-01-01

    In this study, energy analysis of a trigeneration plant based on solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) and organic Rankine cycle (ORC) is conducted. The physical and thermodynamic elements of the plant include an SOFC, an ORC, a heat exchanger for the heating process and a single-effect absorption chiller for cooling. The results obtained from this study show that there is

  13. Nano-sized manganese oxides as biomimetic catalysts for water oxidation in artificial photosynthesis: a review

    PubMed Central

    Najafpour, Mohammad Mahdi; Rahimi, Fahimeh; Aro, Eva-Mari; Lee, Choon-Hwan; Allakhverdiev, Suleyman I.

    2012-01-01

    There has been a tremendous surge in research on the synthesis of various metal compounds aimed at simulating the water-oxidizing complex (WOC) of photosystem II (PSII). This is crucial because the water oxidation half reaction is overwhelmingly rate-limiting and needs high over-voltage (approx. 1 V), which results in low conversion efficiencies when working at current densities required for hydrogen production via water splitting. Particular attention has been given to the manganese compounds not only because manganese has been used by nature to oxidize water but also because manganese is cheap and environmentally friendly. The manganese–calcium cluster in PSII has a dimension of about approximately 0.5 nm. Thus, nano-sized manganese compounds might be good structural and functional models for the cluster. As in the nanometre-size of the synthetic models, most of the active sites are at the surface, these compounds could be more efficient catalysts than micrometre (or bigger) particles. In this paper, we focus on nano-sized manganese oxides as functional and structural models of the WOC of PSII for hydrogen production via water splitting and review nano-sized manganese oxides used in water oxidation by some research groups. PMID:22809849

  14. Climatically induced sedimentary cycles in Pliocene deep-water carbonates

    SciTech Connect

    Gardulski, A.F. (Tufts Univ., Medford, MA (United States))

    1991-03-01

    Two DSDP sites (86 and 94) on the Campeche ramp in the southern Gulf of Mexico penetrated more than 100 m of Pliocene pelagic ooze. The ooze is primarily carbonate, with a much smaller volcanic ash component than occurs in some Pleistocene sediments at these sites. Cores recovered from these holes display variations in carbonate mineralogy as well as total carbonate and sand abundances that are correlated with the oxygen isotope stratigraphy. Diagenetic loss of Mg-calcite is complete by the base of the Pleistocene, but aragonite, especially high-Sr aragonite forming algal needles that were transported off the shelf to the slope, persists through upper Pliocene cores. Variations in oxygen isotope ratios in planktonic foraminifera occur throughout the Pliocene, although the amplitude of those cycles is smaller than for the Pleistocene, with its more dramatic glacial-interglacial contrasts. As in overlying Pleistocene slope sediments, cooler intervals correspond with greater abundances of aragonite in the upper Pliocene section, reflecting a shift of the shallow, productive shelf seaward across the ramp surface during times of relatively low sea level. However, the aragonite abundances in the Pliocene are reduced on average compared to the Pleistocene. This difference is due in part to diagenetic loss, but also it likely reflects the overall higher sea level that apparently characterized Pliocene oceans, trapping more algal aragonite landward. Although sea level and climatic fluctuations were indeed less extreme in the Pliocene, they were still sufficient to generate sedimentary cycles in deep-water carbonates.

  15. Oxidation of aluminum particles in the presence of water.

    PubMed

    Schoenitz, Mirko; Chen, Chi-Mon; Dreizin, Edward L

    2009-04-16

    Oxidation of spherical aluminum powder was investigated in mixed argon-oxygen-steam atmospheres by thermogravimetric measurements at heating rates between 1 and 20 K/min and up to 1100 degrees C. The observed oxidation behavior in the presence of steam differs markedly from oxidation in dry oxygen. Oxidation in steam is complete near 1000 degrees C vs 1500 degrees C in dry oxygen. Furthermore, in steam, a stepwise weight change is observed at the melting point of aluminum, while no such step can be distinguished in dry oxygen. The complete oxidation observed at a lower temperature in steam as compared to dry oxygen is explained by the stabilization of the gamma polymorph of the surface oxide in the presence of water so that a denser and slower growing alpha-alumina does not form until higher temperatures. Experiments in mixed oxygen/steam oxidizers showed that the size of the oxidation step observed upon aluminum melting only correlates with the concentration of steam in the atmosphere. This may be interpreted as the effect of transient porosity, the degree of which is controlled by the steam concentration, or the surface oxide stressed by the expanding melting metal core may behave as a semipermeable membrane where hydrous species have significantly higher diffusion rates than oxygen. A clear distinction cannot be drawn, and further research is warranted. Preliminary results on isoconversion processing of the oxidation kinetics are presented. PMID:19309144

  16. Thermophysical properties of copper compounds in copper–chlorine thermochemical water splitting cycles

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. Zamfirescu; I. Dincer; G. F. Naterer

    2010-01-01

    This paper examines the relevant thermophysical properties of compounds of copper that are used in thermochemical water splitting cycles. There are four variants of such Cu–Cl cycles that use heat and electricity to split the water molecule and produce H2 and O2. Since the energy input is mainly in the form of thermal energy, the Cu–Cl water splitting cycle is

  17. Cobalt, nickel/iron, and titanium oxide electrodes for water oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selloni, Annabella

    2014-03-01

    Water splitting on metal oxide surfaces has attracted enormous interest for more than forty years. While a great deal of work has focused on titanium dioxide (TiO2) , recently cobalt and mixed Ni-Fe oxides have also emerged as promising electrocatalysts for water oxidation due to their low cost and high activity. In this talk I shall discuss various aspects of water oxidation on cobalt (hydro-)oxides, pure and mixed nickel and iron (hydro-)oxides, and TiO2\\ surfaces. Using DFT +U calculations, I shall examine the composition and structure of cobalt and Ni-Fe oxides under electrochemical conditions, and present studies of the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) on the relevant stable compounds. I shall also present hybrid functional calculations of the first proton-coupled-electron transfer at the water/TiO2 interface in the presence of a photoexcited hole. Our results provide evidence that the proton and electron transfers are not concerted but rather represent two sequential processes. They also suggest that the OER is faster at higher pH, as indeed observed experimentally. This work was supported by DoE-BES, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences and Biosciences under Award DE-FG02-12ER16286.

  18. Processing: Exploring the water cycle with a Processing program Peabody Charter 5th

    E-print Network

    Wood, Zoë J.

    is to practice modeling ellipses and triangles to create a specified picture to the particles. #12; Name:__________________________________________ Water Cycle sea or lake)? __________________________________________ #12;

  19. Plumbing the global carbon cycle: Integrating inland waters into the terrestrial carbon budget

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cole, J.J.; Prairie, Y.T.; Caraco, N.F.; McDowell, W.H.; Tranvik, L.J.; Striegl, R.G.; Duarte, C.M.; Kortelainen, P.; Downing, J.A.; Middelburg, J.J.; Melack, J.

    2007-01-01

    Because freshwater covers such a small fraction of the Earth's surface area, inland freshwater ecosystems (particularly lakes, rivers, and reservoirs) have rarely been considered as potentially important quantitative components of the carbon cycle at either global or regional scales. By taking published estimates of gas exchange, sediment accumulation, and carbon transport for a variety of aquatic systems, we have constructed a budget for the role of inland water ecosystems in the global carbon cycle. Our analysis conservatively estimates that inland waters annually receive, from a combination of background and anthropogenically altered sources, on the order of 1.9 Pg C y-1 from the terrestrial landscape, of which about 0.2 is buried in aquatic sediments, at least 0.8 (possibly much more) is returned to the atmosphere as gas exchange while the remaining 0.9 Pg y-1 is delivered to the oceans, roughly equally as inorganic and organic carbon. Thus, roughly twice as much C enters inland aquatic systems from land as is exported from land to the sea. Over prolonged time net carbon fluxes in aquatic systems tend to be greater per unit area than in much of the surrounding land. Although their area is small, these freshwater aquatic systems can affect regional C balances. Further, the inclusion of inland, freshwater ecosystems provides useful insight about the storage, oxidation and transport of terrestrial C, and may warrant a revision of how the modern net C sink on land is described. ?? 2007 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.

  20. Long-term thermal cycling of Phlogopite mica-based compressive seals for solid oxide fuel cells

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yeong-Shyung Chou; Jeffry W. Stevenson

    2005-01-01

    Planar solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) require sealants to function properly in harsh environments at elevated temperatures. The SOFC stacks are expected to experience multiple thermal cycles (perhaps thousands of cycles for some applications) during their lifetime service in stationary or transportation applications. As a result, thermal cycle stability is considered a top priority for SOFC sealant development. In previous

  1. Sensitivity Analysis of Reprocessing Cooling Times on Light Water Reactor and Sodium Fast Reactor Fuel Cycles

    SciTech Connect

    R. M. Ferrer; S. Bays; M. Pope

    2008-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to quantify the effects of variations of the Light Water Reactor (LWR) Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) and fast reactor reprocessing cooling time on a Sodium Fast Reactor (SFR) assuming a single-tier fuel cycle scenario. The results from this study show the effects of different cooling times on the SFR’s transuranic (TRU) conversion ratio (CR) and transuranic fuel enrichment. Also, the decay heat, gamma heat and neutron emission of the SFR’s fresh fuel charge were evaluated. A 1000 MWth commercial-scale SFR design was selected as the baseline in this study. Both metal and oxide CR=0.50 SFR designs are investigated.

  2. Stoichiometry of Reducing Equivalents and Splitting of Water in the Citric Acid Cycle.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Madeira, Vitor M. C.

    1988-01-01

    Presents a solution to the problem of finding the source of extra reducing equivalents, and accomplishing the stoichiometry of glucose oxidation reactions. Discusses the citric acid cycle and glycolysis. (CW)

  3. Global operational hydrological forecasts through eWaterCycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van de Giesen, Nick; Bierkens, Marc; Donchyts, Gennadii; Drost, Niels; Hut, Rolf; Sutanudjaja, Edwin

    2015-04-01

    Central goal of the eWaterCycle project (www.ewatercycle.org) is the development of an operational hyper-resolution hydrological global model. This model is able to produce 14 day ensemble forecasts based on a hydrological model and operational weather data (presently NOAA's Global Ensemble Forecast System). Special attention is paid to prediction of situations in which water related issues are relevant, such as floods, droughts, navigation, hydropower generation, and irrigation stress. Near-real time satellite data will be assimilated in the hydrological simulations, which is a feature that will be presented for the first time at EGU 2015. First, we address challenges that are mainly computer science oriented but have direct practical hydrological implications. An important feature in this is the use of existing standards and open-source software to the maximum extent possible. For example, we use the Community Surface Dynamics Modeling System (CSDMS) approach to coupling models (Basic Model Interface (BMI)). The hydrological model underlying the project is PCR-GLOBWB, built by Utrecht University. This is the motor behind the predictions and state estimations. Parts of PCR-GLOBWB have been re-engineered to facilitate running it in a High Performance Computing (HPC) environment, run parallel on multiple nodes, as well as to use BMI. Hydrological models are not very CPU intensive compared to, say, atmospheric models. They are, however, memory hungry due to the localized processes and associated effective parameters. To accommodate this memory need, especially in an ensemble setting, a variation on the traditional Ensemble Kalman Filter was developed that needs much less on-chip memory. Due to the operational nature, the coupling of the hydrological model with hydraulic models is very important. The idea is not to run detailed hydraulic routing schemes over the complete globe but to have on-demand simulation prepared off-line with respect to topography and parameterizations. This allows for very detailed simulations at hectare to meter scales, where and when this is needed. At EGU 2015, the operational global eWaterCycle model will be presented for the first time, including forecasts at high resolution, the innovative data assimilation approach, and on-demand coupling with hydraulic models.

  4. Water oxidation by manganese oxides, a new step towards a complete picture: simplicity is the ultimate sophistication.

    PubMed

    Najafpour, Mohammad Mahdi; Sedigh, Davood Jafarian

    2013-09-14

    We, for the first time, report that many Mn oxides (Mn3O4, ?-Mn2O3, ?-MnO2, CaMnO3, Ca2Mn3O8, CaMn3O6 and CaMn4O8) in the presence of cerium(IV) ammonium nitrate, in the water oxidation, convert to layered Mn oxide. This layered Mn oxide is an efficient water oxidizing catalyst. PMID:23838901

  5. The interaction between zinc oxide and titanium dioxide in water

    Microsoft Academic Search

    L. H. Princen; Marilyn J. DeVena

    1962-01-01

    A mechanism is proposed for the reaction between zinc oxide and titanium dioxide in water. Between certain limits of weight\\u000a ratios of zinc oxide and titanium dioxide definite increases in viscosity, pH, and sedimentation volumes with time have been\\u000a observed which support the belief that tridimensional structures are formed from the individual particles. The same mechanism\\u000a may be responsible for

  6. Treatment of gasoline-contaminated waters by advanced oxidation processes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Elaine Regina Lopes Tiburtius; Patricio Peralta-Zamora; Alexandre Emmel

    2005-01-01

    In this study, the efficiency of advanced oxidative processes (AOPs) was investigated toward the degradation of aqueous solutions containing benzene, toluene and xylenes (BTX) and gasoline-contaminated waters. The results indicated that BTX can be effectively oxidized by near UV-assisted photo-Fenton process. The treatment permits almost total degradation of BTX and removal of more than 80% of the phenolic intermediates at

  7. Subcritical and supercritical water oxidation of CELSS model wastes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takahashi, Y.; Wydeven, T.; Koo, C.

    1989-01-01

    A mixture of ammonium hydroxide with acetic acid and a slurry of human feces, urine, and wipes were used as CELSS model wastes to be wet-oxidized at temperatures from 250 to 500 C, i.e. below and above the critical point of water (374 C and 218 kg/sq cm or 21.4 MPa). The effects of oxidation temperature ( 250-500 C) and residence time (0-120 mn) on carbon and nitrogen and on metal corrosion from the reactor material were studied. Almost all of the organic matter in the model wastes was oxidized in the temperature range from 400 to 500 C, above the critical conditions for water. In contrast, only a small portion of the organic matter was oxidized at subcritical conditions. A substantial amount of nitrogen remained in solution in the form of ammonia at temperatures ranging from 350 to 450 C suggesting that, around 400 C, organic carbon is completely oxidized and most of the nitrogen is retained in solution. The Hastelloy C-276 alloy reactor corroded during subcritical and supercritical water oxidation.

  8. SHORTER MENSTRUAL CYCLES ASSOCIATED WITH CHLORINATION BY-PRODUCTS IN DRINKING WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Shorter Menstrual Cycles Associated with Chlorination by-Products in Drinking Water. Gayle Windham, Kirsten Waller, Meredith Anderson, Laura Fenster, Pauline Mendola, Shanna Swan. California Department of Health Services. In previous studies of tap water consumption we...

  9. What Are the Oxidation States of Manganese Required To Catalyze Photosynthetic Water Oxidation?

    PubMed Central

    Kolling, Derrick R.J.; Cox, Nicholas; Ananyev, Gennady M.; Pace, Ron J.; Dismukes, G. Charles

    2012-01-01

    Photosynthetic O2 production from water is catalyzed by a cluster of four manganese ions and a tyrosine residue that comprise the redox-active components of the water-oxidizing complex (WOC) of photosystem II (PSII) in all known oxygenic phototrophs. Knowledge of the oxidation states is indispensable for understanding the fundamental principles of catalysis by PSII and the catalytic mechanism of the WOC. Previous spectroscopic studies and redox titrations predicted the net oxidation state of the S0 state to be (MnIII)3MnIV. We have refined a previously developed photoassembly procedure that directly determines the number of oxidizing equivalents needed to assemble the Mn4Ca core of WOC during photoassembly, starting from free MnII and the Mn-depleted apo-WOC complex. This experiment entails counting the number of light flashes required to produce the first O2 molecules during photoassembly. Unlike spectroscopic methods, this process does not require reference to synthetic model complexes. We find the number of photoassembly intermediates required to reach the lowest oxidation state of the WOC, S0, to be three, indicating a net oxidation state three equivalents above four MnII, formally (MnIII)3MnII, whereas the O2 releasing state, S4, corresponds formally to (MnIV)3MnIII. The results from this study have major implications for proposed mechanisms of photosynthetic water oxidation. PMID:22853909

  10. In vitro antimicrobial activity of Medilox® super-oxidized water

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Aim Super-oxidized water is one of the broad spectrum disinfectants, which was introduced recently. There are many researches to find reliable chemicals which are effective, inexpensive, easy to obtain and use, and effective for disinfection of microorganisms leading hospital infections. Antimicrobial activity of super-oxidized water is promising. The aim of this study was to investigate the in-vitro antimicrobial activity of different concentrations of Medilox® super-oxidized water that is approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) as high level disinfectant. Material and methods In this study, super-oxidized water obtained from Medilox® [Soosan E & C, Korea] device, which had been already installed in our hospital, was used. Antimicrobial activities of different concentrations of super-oxidized water (1/1, 1/2, 1/5, 1/10, 1/20, 1/50, 1/100) at different exposure times (1, 2, 5, 10, 30 min) against six ATCC strains, eight antibiotic resistant bacteria, yeasts and molds were evaluated using qualitative suspension test. Dey-Engley Neutralizing Broth [Sigma-Aldrich, USA] was used as neutralizing agent. Results Medilox® was found to be effective against all standard strains (Acinetobacter baumannii 19606, Escherichia coli 25922, Enterococcus faecalis 29212, Klebsiella pneumoniae 254988, Pseudomonas aeruginosa 27853, Staphylococcus aureus 29213), all clinical isolates (Acinetobacter baumannii, Escherichia coli, vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilis, Myroides spp.), and all yeastsat 1/1 dilution in ??1 minute. It was found to be effective on Aspergillus flavus at 1/1 dilution in ??2 minutes and on certain molds in ??5 minutes. Conclusion Medilox® super-oxidized water is a broad spectrum, on-site producible disinfectant, which is effective on bacteria and fungi and can be used for the control of nosocomial infection. PMID:25023905

  11. Oxidation and Volatilization of Silica-Formers in Water Vapor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Opila, E. J.; Gray, Hugh R. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    At high temperatures SiC and Si3N4 react with water vapor to form a silica scale. Silica scales also react with water vapor to form a volatile Si(OH)4 species. These simultaneous reactions, one forming silica and the other removing silica, are described by paralinear kinetics. A steady state, in which these reactions occur at the same rate, is eventually achieved, After steady state is achieved, the oxide found on the surface is a constant thickness and recession of the underlying material occurs at a linear rate. The steady state oxide thickness, the time to achieve steady state, and the steady state recession rate can all be described in terms of the rate constants for the oxidation and volatilization reactions. In addition, the oxide thickness, the time to achieve steady state, and the recession rate can also be determined from parameters that describe a water vapor-containing environment. Accordingly, maps have been developed to show these steady state conditions as a function of reaction rate constants, pressure, and gas velocity. These maps can be used to predict the behavior of silica formers in water-vapor containing environments such as combustion environments. Finally, these maps are used to explore the limits of the paralinear oxidation model for SiC and Si3N4

  12. The Use of Water Vapor as a Refrigerant: Impact of Cycle Modifications on Commercial Viability

    SciTech Connect

    Brandon F. Lachner, Jr.; Gregory F. Nellis; Douglas T. Reindl

    2004-08-30

    This project investigated the economic viability of using water as the refrigerant in a 1000-ton chiller application. The most attractive water cycle configuration was found to be a flash-intercooled, two-stage cycle using centrifugal compressors and direct contact heat exchangers. Component level models were developed that could be used to predict the size and performance of the compressors and heat exchangers in this cycle as well as in a baseline, R-134a refrigeration cycle consistent with chillers in use today. A survey of several chiller manufacturers provided information that was used to validate and refine these component models. The component models were integrated into cycle models that were subsequently used to investigate the life-cycle costs of both an R-134a and water refrigeration cycle. It was found that the first cost associated with the water as a refrigerant cycle greatly exceeded the savings in operating costs associated with its somewhat higher COP. Therefore, the water refrigeration cycle is not an economically attractive option to today's R-134a refrigeration system. There are a number of other issues, most notably the requirements associated with purging non-condensable gases that accumulate in a direct contact heat exchanger, which will further reduce the economic viability of the water cycle.

  13. Alternative water sources: Desalination model provides life-cycle costs of facility 

    E-print Network

    Supercinski, Danielle

    2009-01-01

    Story by Danielle Supercinski tx H2O | pg. 8 Alternative water sourcees Desalination model provides life-cycle costs of facility platform and design standards as DESAL ECONOMICS?, but created to analyze con- ventional surface water treatment... to determine the economic and financial life-cycle costs of building and operating four water treatment facilities in South Texas. One facility was the Southmost Regional Water Authority Regional Desalination Plant near Brownsville. Sturdi- vant said...

  14. Aircraft water vapor measurements utilizing an aluminum oxide hygrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilsenrath, E.

    1974-01-01

    A hygrometer for water vapor measurements from an aircraft was developed. An aluminum oxide hygrometer mounted in an aircraft Rosemount air temperature scoop was flown on the NASA Convair 990 and on a USAF B-57 aircraft. Water vapor measurements from the Convair 990 were conducted up to 40,000 ft with penetration into the stratosphere. Good agreement was obtained with simultaneously flown remote sounders of water vapor. During transcontinental flights the hygrometer demonstrated adequate response to measure the natural variability of water vapor near the tropopause. Rapid response was demonstrated in pursuit of the jet wake of an F-104 at 35,000 ft.

  15. Aircraft water vapor measurements utilizing an aluminum oxide hygrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilsenrath, E.

    1973-01-01

    A hygrometer for water vapor measurements from an aircraft has been developed. An aluminum oxide hygrometer mounted in an aircraft Rosemount air temperature scoop was flown on NASA and USAF aircraft. Water vapor measurements were conducted up to 40,000 feet with penetration into the stratosphere. Good agreement was obtained with simultaneously flown remote sounders of water vapor. During transcontinental flights the hygrometer demonstrated adequate response to measure the natural variability of water vapor near the tropopause. Rapid response was demonstrated in pursuit of the jet wake of an F-104 at 35,000 feet.

  16. Methane concentrations and oxidation in nearshore waters of the Lena River Delta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joye, S. B.; Samarkin, V.; Shakhova, N. E.; Semiletov, I. P.

    2014-12-01

    The Arctic is warming dramatically, with potentially catastrophic impacts on climate change through rapid mobilization of labile carbon reservoirs sequestered presently in permafrost. Increasingly, Arctic feedbacks are recognized as key contributors to climate change, including cycles associated with the powerful greenhouse gas methane, whose atmospheric concentration has more than doubled since the pre-industrial epoch. Sustained methane release to the atmosphere from thawing Arctic permafrost and delivery to the coastal ocean through groundwater or riverine discharge or expulsion from the seabed is a positive and likely highly significant feedback to climate warming. Microbially-mediated methane oxidation provides a key sink and effective biofilter that can limit methane fluxes from coastal environments to the atmosphere. We examined methane dynamics on the East Siberian Arctic Shelf by determining concentrations and oxidation rates at a series of stations near the Lena River Delta and moving offshore. Methane concentrations and oxidation rates were highly elevated in and near the river mouth compared to offshore waters, except when the offshore waters were impacted by seabed methane seepage. The regulation of methane oxidation in Arctic waters appears two-fold: first, rates are strongly related to methane availability and second, in the presence of methane, nutrient availability strongly regulates methane consumption. Along the Lena river delta, elevated concentrations of both nutrients and methane create ideal conditions to support high rates of pelagic methanotrophy. Offshore, where nutrient concentrations are lower and more limiting, methane oxidation rates are considerably lower. These data suggest that, at present, nearshore waters are fairly efficient methane sinks while in offshore waters, pelagic methanotrophy is inefficient, allowing methane to escape to the atmosphere.

  17. Size-dependent subnanometer Pd cluster (Pd4, Pd6, and Pd17) water oxidation electrocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Gihan; Ferguson, Glen A; Heard, Christopher J; Tyo, Eric C; Yin, Chunrong; DeBartolo, Janae; Seifert, Sönke; Winans, Randall E; Kropf, A Jeremy; Greeley, Jeffrey; Johnston, Roy L; Curtiss, Larry A; Pellin, Michael J; Vajda, Stefan

    2013-07-23

    Water oxidation is a key catalytic step for electrical fuel generation. Recently, significant progress has been made in synthesizing electrocatalytic materials with reduced overpotentials and increased turnover rates, both key parameters enabling commercial use in electrolysis or solar to fuels applications. The complexity of both the catalytic materials and the water oxidation reaction makes understanding the catalytic site critical to improving the process. Here we study water oxidation in alkaline conditions using size-selected clusters of Pd to probe the relationship between cluster size and the water oxidation reaction. We find that Pd4 shows no reaction, while Pd6 and Pd17 deposited clusters are among the most active (in terms of turnover rate per Pd atom) catalysts known. Theoretical calculations suggest that this striking difference may be a demonstration that bridging Pd-Pd sites (which are only present in three-dimensional clusters) are active for the oxygen evolution reaction in Pd6O6. The ability to experimentally synthesize size-specific clusters allows direct comparison to this theory. The support electrode for these investigations is ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD). This material is thin enough to be electrically conducting and is chemically/electrochemically very stable. Even under the harsh experimental conditions (basic, high potential) typically employed for water oxidation catalysts, UNCD demonstrates a very wide potential electrochemical working window and shows only minor evidence of reaction. The system (soft-landed Pd4, Pd6, or Pd17 clusters on a UNCD Si-coated electrode) shows stable electrochemical potentials over several cycles, and synchrotron studies of the electrodes show no evidence for evolution or dissolution of either the electrode material or the clusters. PMID:23799858

  18. Caffeinated nitric oxide-releasing lozenge improves cycling time trial performance.

    PubMed

    Lee, J; Kim, H T; Solares, G J; Kim, K; Ding, Z; Ivy, J L

    2015-02-01

    Boosting nitric oxide production during exercise by various means has been found to improve exercise performance. We investigated the effects of a nitric oxide releasing lozenge with added caffeine (70?mg) on oxygen consumption during steady-state exercise and cycling time trial performance using a double-blinded randomized, crossover experimental design. 15 moderately trained cyclists (7 females and 8 males) were randomly assigned to ingest the caffeinated nitric oxide lozenge or placebo 5?min before exercise. Oxygen consumption and blood lactate were assessed at rest and at 50%, 65% and 75% maximal oxygen consumption. Exercise performance was assessed by time to complete a simulated 20.15?km cycling time-trial course. No significant treatment effects for oxygen consumption or blood lactate at rest or during steady-state exercise were observed. However, time-trial performance was improved by 2.1% (p<0.01) when participants consumed the nitric oxide lozenge (2,424±69?s) compared to placebo (2,476±78?s) and without a significant difference in rating of perceived exertion. These results suggest that acute supplementation with a caffeinated nitric oxide releasing lozenge may be a practical and effective means of improving aerobic exercise performance. PMID:25285468

  19. Emerging contaminants of public health significance as water quality indicator compounds in the urban water cycle.

    PubMed

    Pal, Amrita; He, Yiliang; Jekel, Martin; Reinhard, Martin; Gin, Karina Yew-Hoong

    2014-10-01

    The contamination of the urban water cycle (UWC) with a wide array of emerging organic compounds (EOCs) increases with urbanization and population density. To produce drinking water from the UWC requires close examination of their sources, occurrence, pathways, and health effects and the efficacy of wastewater treatment and natural attenuation processes that may occur in surface water bodies and groundwater. This paper researches in details the structure of the UWC and investigates the routes by which the water cycle is increasingly contaminated with compounds generated from various anthropogenic activities. Along with a thorough survey of chemicals representing compound classes such as hormones, antibiotics, surfactants, endocrine disruptors, human and veterinary pharmaceuticals, X-ray contrast media, pesticides and metabolites, disinfection-by-products, algal toxins and taste-and-odor compounds, this paper provides a comprehensive and holistic review of the occurrence, fate, transport and potential health impact of the emerging organic contaminants of the UWC. This study also illustrates the widespread distribution of the emerging organic contaminants in the different aortas of the ecosystem and focuses on future research needs. PMID:24972248

  20. Water oxidation catalysis by birnessite@iron oxide core-shell nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Elmaci, Gökhan; Frey, Carolin E; Kurz, Philipp; Zümreo?lu-Karan, Birgül

    2015-03-16

    In this work, magnetic nanocomposite particles were prepared for water oxidation reactions. The studied catalysts consist of maghemite (?-Fe2O3), magnetite (Fe3O4), and manganese ferrite (MnFe2O4) nanoparticles as cores coated in situ with birnessite-type manganese oxide shells and were characterized by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, thermal, chemical, and surface analyses, and magnetic measurements. The particles were found to be of nearly spherical core-shell architectures with average diameter of 150 nm. Water oxidation catalysis was examined using Ce(4+) as the sacrificial oxidant. All core-shell particles were found to be active water oxidation catalysts. However, the activity was found to depend on a variety of factors like the type of iron oxide core, the structure and composition of the shell, the coating characteristics, and the surface properties. Catalysts containing magnetite and manganese ferrite as core materials displayed higher catalytic activities per manganese ion (2650 or 3150 mmolO2 molMn(-1) h(-1)) or per mass than nanoiron oxides (no activity) or birnessite alone (1850 mmolO2 molMn(-1) h(-1)). This indicates synergistic effects between the MnOx shell and the FeOx core of the composites and proves the potential of the presented core-shell approach for further catalyst optimization. Additionally, the FeOx cores of the particles allow magnetic recovery of the catalyst and might also be beneficial for applications in water-oxidizing anodes because the incorporation of iron might enhance the overall conductivity of the material. PMID:25710557

  1. A simple analytical method for evaluation of limit-cycle oscillation amplitude in boiling water reactors

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kengo Hashimoto; Tadafumi Sano; Akitoshi Hotta; Toshikazu Takeda

    1998-01-01

    An analytical method to obtain the amplitude of limit-cycle inphase oscillation in boiling water reactors is proposed, which is applicable to small-amplitude limit cycles actually observed in various stability tests. The expression of a zero-power transfer function including the limit-cycle amplitude can be derived by considering higher-order nonlinear interaction between neutron density and feedback reactivity. In a limit-cycle oscillation, the

  2. Nitrous Oxide Cycling in the Eastern Tropical South Pacific as Inferred from Isotopic and Isotopomeric Data.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vedamati, J.; Chang, B. X.; Peters, B. D.; Forbes, M. S.; Mordy, C.; Warner, M. J.; Devol, A.; Ward, B. B.; Casciotti, K. L.

    2014-12-01

    Marine sources of nitrous oxide (N2O), an important greenhouse gas, account for up to 25% of global emissions, out of which 25-75% originates from oxygen minimum zones (OMZs). The Eastern Tropical South Pacific (ETSP) OMZ is characterized by low to undetectable oxygen concentrations within the water column and is known to be a region of intense N2O cycling. However, the balance of processes regulating N2O production and emissions is still uncertain. The isotopic composition of dissolved N2O is a tracer of its production, transport, and consumption processes in the ocean. Here we use concentration, isotopic and isotopomeric measurements of dissolved N2O collected during cruise NBP1305 to the ETSP in 2013 to examine the processes affecting the distribution of N2O throughout the water column. Dissolved N2O concentrations ranged between 42-65 nmol/L at the edges of the oxycline while ranging between 6 -20 nmol/L at the core of the OMZ. The nitrogen and oxygen isotopic composition of dissolved N2O (reported as ?15N vs air N2 and ?18O vs VSMOW in units of ‰, respectively) displayed maxima coincident with the OMZ core. ?15N of N2O ranged between 14 - 22‰, ?18O of N2O ranged between 68 - 100‰ while site preference of N2O ranged between 39 - 60‰ at the OMZ core. Based on the T-S plot and N2O concentration profiles, there appears to be a strong correlation between N2O and water mass features within the OMZ. Thus, the differences in ?15N and ?18O of N2O along the north- south transect within the OMZ core may be related to differences in N2O production-consumption mechanisms along with N2O transport. Within the OMZ, the ?18O: ?15N relationship is also much lower than the 2.5:1 ratio expected for N2O consumption via denitrification, leading us to believe that both production and consumption processes are likely to be at play.

  3. Electrochemical Water-Splitting Based on Hypochlorite Oxidation.

    PubMed

    Macounová, Kate?ina Minhová; Simic, Nina; Ahlberg, Elisabet; Krtil, Petr

    2015-06-17

    Effective catalytic water-splitting can be electrochemically triggered in an alkaline solution of sodium hypochlorite. Hypochlorite oxidation on polycrystalline platinum yields ClO· radicals, which initiate a radical-assisted water-splitting, yielding oxygen, hydrogen peroxide, and protons. The efficiency of the O2 production corresponds to about two electrons per molecule of the produced O2 and is controlled primarily by the hypochlorite concentration and pH. PMID:26030185

  4. Biological water oxidation: Lessons from Nature Mohammad Mahdi Najafpour a,b,

    E-print Network

    Govindjee

    . An efficient system for water oxidation exists in the water oxidizing complex in cyanobacteria, algae been considered as an ideal fuel for the future [9­18]. Water is the source of both oxygen and hydrogen already evolved in cya- nobacteria, algae and plants [19­35]. The biological water oxidation

  5. The diel cycle of water vapor in west Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopec, B. G.; Lauder, A. M.; Posmentier, E. S.; Feng, X.

    2014-08-01

    We present a study of the dynamics of small-scale (~100 km) atmospheric circulation in west Greenland which is dominated by interactions of marine and continental air masses. Water vapor concentration and isotopic ratios measured continuously over a 25 day period in Kangerlussuaq, Greenland were used to monitor the convergence of easterly katabatic winds and westerly sea breezes that form a front between the dry, isotopically depleted, glacial air mass and the moist, isotopically enriched, marine air mass. During the latter 16 days of the measurement period, an interval with no large-scale synoptic interference, the inland penetration of the sea breeze controlled the largest day-to-day humidity and vapor isotopic variations. Kangerlussuaq experienced sea breezes in the afternoon on 9 days, consistent with the long-term average of such occurrences on 56% of days in July and August. The inland position of the sea breeze front is controlled by the katabatic wind strength, which is stronger during times of reduced cloud coverage and/or higher-pressure gradient between the coast and the Greenland ice sheet. The position and movement of the front will likely respond to changes in the general atmospheric circulation and regional radiation balance resulting from global warming, which will, in turn, impact the local hydrological cycle and ecosystem processes.

  6. Biomimetic metal oxides for the extraction of nanoparticles from water.

    PubMed

    Mallampati, Ramakrishna; Valiyaveettil, Suresh

    2013-04-21

    Contamination of nanomaterials in the environment will pose significant health risks in the future. A viable purification method is necessary to address this problem. Here we report the synthesis and application of a series of metal oxides prepared using a biological template for the removal of nanoparticles from the aqueous environment. A simple synthesis of metal oxides such as ZnO, NiO, CuO, Co3O4 and CeO2 employing eggshell membrane (ESM) as a biotemplate is reported. The morphology of the metal oxide powders was characterized using electron microscopes and the lattice structure was established using X-ray diffraction methods. Extraction of nanoparticles from water was carried out to compare the efficiency of metal oxides. NiO showed good extraction efficiency in removing gold and silver nanoparticles from spiked water samples within an hour. Easy access and enhanced stability of metal oxides makes them interesting candidates for applications in industrial effluent treatments and water purifications. PMID:23471156

  7. Mobility of Water on Oxide Surfaces Studied by QENS

    SciTech Connect

    Mamontov, Eugene [ORNL

    2007-01-01

    Although neutron scattering is often considered a bulk probe, we demonstrate that the mobility of surface water on oxide nano-powders can be investigated using quasielastic neutron scattering. We discuss how the reduced number of hydrogen bonds per water molecule associated with surface confinement leads to a qualitative modification of single-particle translational dynamics compared to bulk water. The mobility of surface water in zirconium oxide with two hydration layers present is discussed in detail. The outer hydration layer exhibits translational dynamics on the time scale of tens of picoseconds, and thus can be studied using time-of-flight neutron spectrometry. The translational dynamics of the inner hydration layer in the range of hundreds of picoseconds can be assessed with backscattering neutron spectrometry. Interestingly, despite being slower by two orders of magnitude, the translational motion of the molecules of the inner hydration layer may share more common traits with bulk water compared to the motion of the outer hydration layer, the dynamics of which is slower than that of bulk water by just one order of magnitude. Similar to bulk water, the temperature dependence of the residence time for the water molecules of the inner hydration layer is non-Arrhenius, and can be described by a Vogel-Fulcher-Tammann (VFT) law. On the other hand, the molecules of the outer hydration layer demonstrate Arrhenius-type temperature dependence indicative of thermally activated surface jump diffusion. Our recent study of surface water on cerium oxide, which exhibits faster dynamics compared to water on zirconium oxide, has ventured into the low-temperature region (down to 200 K). Below 215 K, we have found a deviation from the VFT temperature dependence for the residence time indicative of a surprise "fragile"-to-"strong" transition in the surface water. While "fragile"-to-"strong" transition has been predicted in supercooled bulk water, there has been no prediction of such a transition in surface water. We discuss the links between our results and recent work on hydration water in carbon nanotubes and proteins.

  8. Bark Beetles and Watersheds Workshop: Impacts to the Hydrologic Cycle and Water

    E-print Network

    Tipple, Brett

    Bark Beetles and Watersheds Workshop: Impacts to the Hydrologic Cycle and Water A. Ray Olpin Assessment Tim Bardsley, Western Water Assessment Utah Liaison Overview of WWA's work on bark beetles and water Eric Gordon, Western Water Assessment 9:30am--The Beetle Epidemic in Utah: Where are We

  9. The effect of caffeine ingestion on human neutrophil oxidative burst responses following time-trial cycling

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gary J. Walker; Anneliese Dziubak; Laurence Houghton; Ciaran Prendergast; Laura Lim; Nicolette C. Bishop

    2008-01-01

    Following fixed-duration exercise of submaximal intensity, caffeine ingestion is associated with an attenuation of the exercise-induced decline in N-formyl-methionyl-phenyl-alanine (f-MLP) stimulated neutrophil oxidative burst. However, the response following high-intensity exhaustive exercise is unknown. Nine endurance-trained male cyclists ingested 6 mg caffeine or placebo per kilogram of body mass 60 min before cycling for 90 min at 70% of maximal oxygen consumption ([Vdot]O2max) and

  10. Bacterial Oxidation of Iron in Olivine: Implications for the Subsurface Biosphere, Global Chemical Cycles, and Life on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisk, M. R.; Popa, R.; Smith, A. R.; Popa, R.; Boone, J.

    2011-12-01

    We isolated 21 species of bacteria from subseafloor and terrestrial basalt environments and which thrive on olivine at neutral pH. Cell numbers increase four to five orders of magnitude over three weeks in media where the only metabolic energy comes from the oxidation of Fe(II) in olivine. The subseafloor bacteria were isolated from a borehole on the flank of Juan de Fuca Ridge in the northeast Pacific basin where the temperature ranged from 4 up to 64 °C over four years. Terrestrial isolates originated from the basalt-ice boundary in a lava tube on the flank of Newberry Caldera in the Cascades of Oregon. The borehole water was either seawater or seawater plus subseafloor formation water and the lava tube ice was frozen meteoric or ground water. Although microorganisms capable of oxidizing iron for growth are known, microbes that oxidize iron from silicate minerals at neutral pH have not previously been cultured. The 21 species in this study are the first neutrophilic, iron-oxidizing bacteria (nFeOB) to be isolated and cultured that grow on olivine. These nFeOB are primary producers and we believe that they are a widespread component of the subsurface biosphere. In addition to their ability use iron from olivine, these microbes assimilate carbon from bicarbonate in solution and can grow when oxygen pressures are low. They also use nitrate as an alternative electron acceptor to oxygen in anaerobiosis. Since basalt is the most common rock in the Earth's crust and iron is the fourth most abundant element in the crust, we believe nFeOB are likely to be a significant portion of the subsurface biosphere. They are likely to affect, and perhaps in some environments control, the weathering rate of olivine and possibly of pyroxene and basalt glass. Olivine is a component of Mars's surface and it is present on other rocky bodies in the solar system. The ability of these bacteria to use Fe(II) from olivine, to assimilate carbon, to grow at low temperature, and to use low levels of oxygen and nitrate as oxidants would allow them to survive below the surface of Mars. These cultured organisms, which are the first known to oxidize iron from olivine at neutral pH, may be a major component of the subsurface biosphere, may affect global chemical cycles of elements in basalt, and could potentially, live in the Martian subsurface.

  11. THE FORMATION OF PB (IV) OXIDES IN CHLORINATED WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The foundation for lead control in drinking water distribution systems is based on Pb(II) chemistry. In recent years, however, Pb(IV) oxides have been identified in distribution systems, suggesting that they may be important relative to predicting and controlling lead concentrat...

  12. Modeling of the Oxidation of Organic Compounds in Supercritical Water

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Ermakova; V. I. Anikeev

    2004-01-01

    A system for oxidation of organic impurities in supercritical water is proposed. Models are formulated and calculations are performed to determine the characteristics of the main apparatuses of the system, namely, heat exchangers, a chemical reactor, and a separator. The models take into account specific features of processes under supercritical conditions, specifically, the changes in the thermodynamic properties (enthalpy, specific

  13. Electrophotolysis oxidation system for measurement of organic concentration in water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winkler, H. E. (inventor)

    1981-01-01

    Methods and apparatus for determining organic carbon in aqueous solution are described. The method comprises subjecting the aqueous solution to electrolysis, for generating oxygen from water, and simultaneously to ultraviolet radiation, for oxidation of substantially all organic carbon to carbon dioxide. The carbon dioxide is measured and the value is related to the concentration of organic carbon in the aqueous solution.

  14. High temperature water electrolysis in solid oxide cells

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Annabelle Brisse; Josef Schefold; Mohsine Zahid

    2008-01-01

    Hydrogen production via high temperature steam electrolysis is a promising technology as it involves less electrical energy consumption compared to conventional low temperature water electrolysis, as consequence of the more favourable thermodynamic and electrochemical kinetic conditions for the reaction. This paper reports on the Solid Oxide Electrolyser Cell (SOEC) performance as function of the operating parameters temperature, humidity and current

  15. Sirt3 promotes the urea cycle and fatty acid oxidation during dietary restriction

    PubMed Central

    Hallows, William C.; Yu, Wei; Smith, Brian C.; Devries, Mark K.; Ellinger, James J.; Someya, Shinichi; Shortreed, Michael R.; Prolla, Tomas; Markley, John L.; Smith, Lloyd M.; Zhao, Shimin; Guan, Kun-Liang; Denu, John M.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Emerging evidence suggests that protein acetylation is a broad-ranging regulatory mechanism. Here we utilize acetyl-peptide arrays and metabolomic analyses to identify substrates of mitochondrial deacetylase Sirt3. We identified ornithine transcarbamoylase (OTC) from the urea cycle, and enzymes involved in ?-oxidation. Metabolomic analyses of fasted mice lacking Sirt3 (sirt3?/?) revealed alterations in ?-oxidation and the urea cycle. Biochemical analysis demonstrated that Sirt3 directly deacetylates OTC and stimulates its activity. Mice under caloric restriction (CR) increased Sirt3 protein levels, leading to deacetylation and stimulation of OTC activity. In contrast, sirt3?/? mice failed to deacetylate OTC in response to CR. Inability to stimulate OTC under CR led to a failure to reduce orotic acid levels, a known outcome of OTC deficiency. Thus, Sirt3 directly regulates OTC activity and promotes the urea cycle during CR, and the results suggest that under low energy input, Sirt3 modulates mitochondria by promoting amino-acid catabolism and ?-oxidation. PMID:21255725

  16. Reduced Water Density in a Poly(ethylene oxide) Brush

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Hoyoung; Kim, Dae Hwan; Park, Hae-Woong; Mahynski, Nathan A.; Kim, Kyungil; Meron, Mati; Lin, Binhua; Won, You-Yeon (Purdue); (UC)

    2012-09-05

    A model poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) brush system, prepared by spreading a poly(ethylene oxide)-poly(n-butyl acrylate) (PEO-PnBA) amphiphilic diblock copolymer onto an air-water interface, was investigated under various grafting density conditions by using the X-ray reflectivity (XR) technique. The overall electron density profiles of the PEO-PnBA monolayer in the direction normal to the air-water interface were determined from the XR data. From this analysis, it was found that inside of the PEO brush, the water density is significantly lower than that of bulk water, in particular, in the region close to the PnBA-water interface. Separate XR measurements with a PnBA homopolymer monolayer confirm that the reduced water density within the PEO-PnBA monolayer is not due to unfavorable contacts between the PnBA surface and water. The above result, therefore, lends support to the notion that PEO chains provide a hydrophobic environment for the surrounding water molecules when they exist as polymer brush chains.

  17. Seasonal variations of gene expression biomarkers in Mytilus galloprovincialis cultured populations: temperature, oxidative stress and reproductive cycle as major modulators.

    PubMed

    Jarque, Sergio; Prats, Eva; Olivares, Alba; Casado, Marta; Ramón, Montserrat; Piña, Benjamin

    2014-11-15

    The blue mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis has been used as monitoring organism in many biomonitoring programs because of its broad distribution in South European sea waters and its physiological characteristics. Different pollution-stress biomarkers, including gene expression biomarkers, have been developed to determine its physiological response to the presence of different pollutants. However, the existing information about basal expression profiles is very limited, as very few biomarker-based studies were designed to reflect the natural seasonal variations. In the present study, we analyzed the natural expression patterns of several genes commonly used in biomonitoring, namely ferritin, metallothionein, cytochrome P450, glutathione S-transferase, heat shock protein and the kinase responsive to stress KRS, during an annual life cycle. Analysis of mantle-gonad samples of cultured populations of M. galloprovincialis from the Delta del Ebro (North East Spain) showed natural seasonal variability of these biomarkers, pointing to temperature and oxidative stress as major abiotic modulators. In turn, the reproductive cycle, a process that can be tracked by VCLM7 expression, and known to be influenced by temperature, seems to be the major biotic factor involved in seasonality. Our results illustrate the influence of environmental factors in the physiology of mussels through their annual cycle, a crucial information for the correct interpretation of responses under stress conditions. PMID:25203829

  18. Destruction of energetic materials by supercritical water oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Beulow, S.J.; Dyer, R.B.; Harradine, D.M.; Robinson, J.M.; Oldenborg, R.C.; Funk, K.A.; McInroy, R.E.; Sanchez, J.A.; Spontarelli, T.

    1993-10-01

    Supercritical water oxidation is a relatively low-temperature process that can give high destruction efficiencies for a variety of hazardous chemical wastes. Results are presented examining the destruction of high explosives and propellants in supercritical water and the use of low temperature, low pressure hydrolysis as a pretreatment process. Reactions of cyclotrimethylene trinitramine (RDX), cyclotetramethylene tetranitramine (HMX), nitroguanidine (NQ), pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN), and 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) are examined in a flow reactor operated at temperatures between 400{degrees}C and 650{degrees}C. Explosives are introduced into the reactor at concentrations below the solubility limits. For each of the compounds, over 99.9% is destroyed in less than 30 seconds at temperatures above 600{degrees}C. The reactions produce primarily N{sub 2}, N{sub 2}O,CO{sub 2}, and some nitrate and nitrite ions. The distribution of reaction products depends on reactor pressure, temperature, and oxidizer concentration. Kinetics studies of the reactions of nitrate and nitrite ions with various reducing reagents in supercritical water show that they can be rapidly and completely destroyed at temperatures above 525{degrees}C. The use of slurries and hydrolysis to introduce high concentrations of explosives into a supercritical water reactor is examined. For some compounds the rate of reaction depends on particle size. The hydrolysis of explosives at low temperatures (<100{degrees}C) and low pressures (<1 atm) under basic conditions produces water soluble, non-explosive products which are easily destroyed by supercritical water oxidation. Large pieces of explosives (13 cm diameter) have been successfully hydrolyzed. The rate, extent, and products of the hydrolysis depend on the type and concentration of base. Results from the base hydrolysis of triple base propellant M31A1E1 and the subsequent supercritical water oxidation of the hydrolysis products are presented.

  19. Oxidation behavior of a ferritic stainless steel Crofer22 APU with thermal cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, MyoungYoup; Duong, Anh T.; Mumm, Daniel R.

    2013-01-01

    Crofer22 APU specimens were prepared by grinding with grit 80 and 120 SiC grinding papers and were thermally cycled. The variation in oxidation behavior with thermal cycling was then investigated. Observation of microstructure, measurement of area specific resistance (ASR), analysis of the atomic percentages of the elements by EDX, and XRD analysis were performed. XRD patterns showed that the (Cr, Mn)3O4 spinel phase grew on the surface of the Crofer22 APU samples ground with grit 120. For the samples ground with grit 80, the ASR increased as the number of thermal cycles increased. Plots of ln (ASR/T) vs. 1/T for the samples ground with grit 80 after n = 4, 20 and 40 exhibited good linearity, and the apparent activation energies were between 63.7 kJ/mole and 76.3 kJ/mole.

  20. Peracetic acid oxidation of saline waters in the absence and presence of H ?O ?: secondary oxidant and disinfection byproduct formation.

    PubMed

    Shah, Amisha D; Liu, Zheng-Qian; Salhi, Elisabeth; Höfer, Thomas; von Gunten, Urs

    2015-02-01

    Peracetic acid (PAA) is a disinfectant considered for use in ballast water treatment, but its chemical behavior in such systems (i.e., saline waters) is largely unknown. In this study, the reactivity of PAA with halide ions (chloride and bromide) to form secondary oxidants (HOCl, HOBr) was investigated. For the PAA-chloride and PAA-bromide reactions, second-order rate constants of (1.47 ± 0.58) × 10(-5) and 0.24 ± 0.02 M(-1) s(-1) were determined for the formation of HOCl or HOBr, respectively. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), which is always present in PAA solutions, reduced HOCl or HOBr to chloride or bromide, respectively. As a consequence, in PAA-treated solutions with [H2O2] > [PAA], the HOBr (HOCl) steady-state concentrations were low with a limited formation of brominated (chlorinated) disinfection byproducts (DBPs). HOI (formed from the PAA-iodide reaction) affected this process because it can react with H2O2 back to iodide. H2O2 is thus consumed in a catalytic cycle and leads to less efficient HOBr scavenging at even low iodide concentrations (<1 ?M). In PAA-treated solutions with [H2O2] < [PAA] and high bromide levels, mostly brominated DBPs are formed. In synthetic water, bromate was formed from the oxidation of bromide. In natural brackish waters, bromoform (CHBr3), bromoacetic acid (MBAA), dibromoacetic acid (DBAA), and tribromoacetic acid (TBAA) formed at up to 260, 106, 230, and 89 ?g/L, respectively for doses of 2 mM (ca. 150 mg/L) PAA and [H2O2] < [PAA]. The same brackish waters, treated with PAA with [H2O2] ? [PAA], similar to conditions found in commercial PAA solutions, resulted in no trihalomethanes and only low haloacetic acid concentrations. PMID:25611970

  1. A Study of Junior High Students' Perceptions of the Water Cycle

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Orit Ben-zvi-Assarf

    This study explores junior high school students' perceptions of the water cycle. Data were collected from 1,000 7th and 9th grade students in Israel using a series of quantitative and qualitative research tools that were specifically developed for the study. The findings indicated that the students understood some of the processes involved, but most lacked the dynamic, cyclic, and systemic perceptions of the system. Moreover, they possessed an incomplete picture of the water cycle including many preconceptions and misconceptions about it. Most of the students were aware of the atmospheric part of the water cycle, but ignored its groundwater part. Moreover, those who included part of the underground system in the water cycle perceived the underground water as static, subsurface lakes which reflect the traditional teaching of the subject of water in the science curricula.

  2. Water isotopes in CCSM for studying water cycles in the climate system David Noone* (dcn@caltech.edu)

    E-print Network

    Noone, David

    the ocean and stratiform precipitation) the isotopic waters are in total equilibrium. When condensation in convection * Better use of cloud liquid and ice in fractionation * Better treatment of sea ice isotopesWater isotopes in CCSM for studying water cycles in the climate system David Noone* (dcn

  3. Water-mediated proton hopping on an iron oxide surface.

    PubMed

    Merte, Lindsay R; Peng, Guowen; Bechstein, Ralf; Rieboldt, Felix; Farberow, Carrie A; Grabow, Lars C; Kudernatsch, Wilhelmine; Wendt, Stefan; Lægsgaard, Erik; Mavrikakis, Manos; Besenbacher, Flemming

    2012-05-18

    The diffusion of hydrogen atoms across solid oxide surfaces is often assumed to be accelerated by the presence of water molecules. Here we present a high-resolution, high-speed scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) study of the diffusion of H atoms on an FeO thin film. STM movies directly reveal a water-mediated hydrogen diffusion mechanism on the oxide surface at temperatures between 100 and 300 kelvin. Density functional theory calculations and isotope-exchange experiments confirm the STM observations, and a proton-transfer mechanism that proceeds via an H(3)O(+)-like transition state is revealed. This mechanism differs from that observed previously for rutile TiO(2)(110), where water dissociation is a key step in proton diffusion. PMID:22605771

  4. Reaction of catalytic oxidation by liquid water and its application to waste water purification

    SciTech Connect

    Ioffe, I.I. [All-Union Inst. of Pulp and Paper Industry, Leningrad (Russian Federation)] [All-Union Inst. of Pulp and Paper Industry, Leningrad (Russian Federation); Rubinskaya, E.V. [All-Union Inst. of Petrochemical Processes, Leningrad (Russian Federation)] [All-Union Inst. of Petrochemical Processes, Leningrad (Russian Federation)

    1997-06-01

    In this paper the results of experiments and some considerations of theoretical and practical problems devoted to a new type of chemical reaction--oxidation of organic substances by liquid water with the aid of noble metal catalyst--are given. Some problems of application such as reaction to self-purification of industrial waste waters are also considered.

  5. Natural streamflow cycles and effects on water supply reliability

    E-print Network

    Felden, Fabrice

    2002-01-01

    gauging stations in the Brazos River Basin are implemented in order to detect long-term or step-wise trends and cycles. An attempt to explain the behavior of specific cycles is also made by correlating them to the past ENSO events that have occurred during...

  6. Ground Water Sampling at ISCO Sites - Residual Oxidant Impact on Sample Quality and Sample Preservation Guideline

    EPA Science Inventory

    In-situ chemical oxidation (ISCO) involves the delivery of a chemical oxidant into the subsurface where oxidative reactions transform ground water contaminants into less toxic or harmless byproducts. Due to oxidant persistence, ground water samples collected at hazardous waste si...

  7. The influence of thermal cycling on the oxidation and oxide spallation of a 1%Cr–0.5%Mo low-carbon steel

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. Rolls; M. Nematollahi

    1983-01-01

    The oxidation and oxide spallation of 1%Cr–0.5%Mo low carbon steel disks in dry oxygen was studied isothermally at 800°C (1073 K) and in thermal cycling between 800 and 600°C (1073 and 873K) followed by cooling at rates from 3 to 100°C\\/min. Mostly parabolic oxidation kinetics were observed. Thin scales (10 µ) were more prone to spalling than thicker scales (20

  8. NASA Contributions to Improve Understanding of Extreme Events in the Global Energy and Water Cycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lapenta, William M.

    2008-01-01

    The U.S. Climate Change Science Program (CCSP) has established the water cycle goals of the Nation's climate change program. Accomplishing these goals will require, in part, an accurate accounting of the key reservoirs and fluxes associated with the global water and energy cycle, including their spatial and temporal variability. through integration of all necessary observations and research tools, To this end, in conjunction with NASA's Earth science research strategy, the overarching long-term NASA Energy and Water Cycle Study (NEWS) grand challenge can he summarized as documenting and enabling improved, observationally based, predictions of water and energy cycle consequences of Earth system variability and change. This challenge requires documenting and predicting trends in the rate of the Earth's water and energy cycling that corresponds to climate change and changes in the frequency and intensity of naturally occurring related meteorological and hydrologic events, which may vary as climate may vary in the future. The cycling of water and energy has obvious and significant implications for the health and prosperity of our society. The importance of documenting and predicting water and energy cycle variations and extremes is necessary to accomplish this benefit to society.

  9. Teaching the Krebs Cycle.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akeroyd, F. Michael

    1983-01-01

    Outlines a simple but rigorous treatment of the Krebs Cycle suitable for A-level Biology students. The importance of the addition of water molecules in various stages of the cycle is stressed as well as the removal of hydrogen atoms by the oxidizing enzymes. (JN)

  10. Degradation of pesticides in water using solar advanced oxidation processes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Margarita Hincapié Pérez; Gustavo Peñuela; Manuel I. Maldonado; Octavio Malato; Pilar Fernández-Ibáñez; Isabel Oller; Wolfgang Gernjak; Sixto Malato

    2006-01-01

    Alachlor, atrazine and diuron dissolved in water at 50, 25 and 30mg\\/L, respectively were photodegraded by Fe2+\\/H2O2, Fe3+\\/H2O2, TiO2 and TiO2\\/Na2S2O8 treatments driven by solar energy at pilot-plant scale using a compound parabolic collector (CPC) photoreactor. All the advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) employed mainly compared the TOC mineralisation rate to evaluate treatment effectiveness. Parent compound disappearance, anion release and oxidant

  11. Nickel oxide functionalized silicon for efficient photo-oxidation of water Namseok Park,a

    E-print Network

    Wang, Deli

    -type silicon (n-Si) as a photoanode for efficient photo-oxidation of water under neutral pH condition. The Ni thermodynamics discussed above, the other critical problem with the n-Si photoanode is associated, research focused on using the n-Si photoanode by means of altering charge transfer kinetics

  12. Origin and role of water ice clouds in the Martian water cycle as inferred from a general circulation model

    Microsoft Academic Search

    F. Montmessin; F. Forget; P. Rannou; M. Cabane; R. M. Haberle

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, we present the results obtained by the general circulation model developed at the Laboratoire de Météorologie Dynamique which has been used to simulate the Martian hydrological cycle. Our model, which employs a simplified cloud scheme, reproduces the observed Martian water cycle with unprecedented agreement. The modeled seasonal evolution of cloudiness, which also compares well with data, is

  13. Life-cycle analysis on biodiesel production from microalgae: Water footprint and nutrients balance

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jia Yang; Ming Xu; Xuezhi Zhang; Qiang Hu; Milton Sommerfeld; Yongsheng Chen

    2011-01-01

    This research examines the life-cycle water and nutrients usage of microalgae-based biodiesel production. The influence of water types, operation with and without recycling, algal species, geographic distributions are analyzed. The results confirm the competitiveness of microalgae-based biofuels and highlight the necessity of recycling harvested water and using sea\\/wastewater as water source. To generate 1kg biodiesel, 3726kg water, 0.33kg nitrogen, and

  14. Evaluation of the Analysis Influence on Transport inEvaluation of the Analysis Influence on Transport inEvaluation of the Analysis Influence on Transport in Reanalysis Regional Water CyclesReanalysis Regional Water CyclesReanalysis Regional Water Cycles

    E-print Network

    Innovations and Sonde Profiler Air Craft 1. Motivation Evaluating MERRA and Interim global and Gridded.077 K 0.88 0.62 0.71 0.27 0.52 0.46 0.35 0.27 Evaluating MERRA and Interim global and regional water cycles, Trenberth et al. (2011) Observations (GIO) The MERRA GIO collection of data includes

  15. Chapter 8 TiO 2Based Advanced Oxidation Nanotechnologies for Water Purification and Reuse

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hyeok Choi; Souhail R. Al-Abed; Dionysios D. Dionysiou; Elias Stathatos; Panagiotis Lianos

    2010-01-01

    Advanced oxidation technologies (AOTs) produce highly reactive radical species, which readily attack and decompose organic pollutants in water eventually mineralizing them to water, carbon dioxide, and other simple inorganic species. AOTs involve nonselective oxidizing species and are among the most efficient chemical oxidation processes for the treatment of water contaminated with biologically toxic and nondegradable chemicals. Among such technologies, TiO2

  16. Futile cycling of intermediates of fatty acid biosynthesis toward peroxisomal beta-oxidation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Marchesini, Silvia; Poirier, Yves

    2003-08-29

    The flux of fatty acids toward beta-oxidation was analyzed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by monitoring polyhydroxyalkanoate synthesis in the peroxisome from the polymerization, by a bacterial polyhydroxyalkanoate synthase, of the beta-oxidation intermediates 3-hydroxyacyl-CoAs. Synthesis of polyhydroxyalkanoate was dependent on the beta-oxidation enzymes acyl-CoA oxidase and enoyl-CoA hydratase/3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase multifunctional protein, which are involved in generating 3-hydroxyacyl-CoAs, and on the peroxin PEX5, which is involved in the import of proteins into the peroxisome. In wild type cells grown in media containing fatty acids, the polyhydroxyalkanoate monomer composition was largely influenced by the nature of the external fatty acid, such that even-chain monomers are generated from oleic acid and odd-chain monomers are generated from heptadecenoic acid. In contrast, polyhydroxyalkanoate containing predominantly 3-hydroxyoctanoate, 3-hydroxydecanoate, and 3-hydroxydodecanoate was synthesized in a mutant deficient in the peroxisomal 3-ketothiolase (fox3 Delta 0) growing either on oleic acid or heptadecenoic acid as well as in wild type and fox3 Delta 0 mutants grown on glucose or raffinose, indicating that 3-hydroxyacyl-CoAs used for polyhydroxyalkanoate synthesis were generated from the degradation of intracellular short- and medium-chain fatty acids by the beta-oxidation cycle. Inhibition of fatty acid biosynthesis with cerulenin blocked the synthesis of polyhydroxyalkanoate from intracellular fatty acids but still enabled the use of extracellular fatty acids for polymer production. Mutants affected in the synthesis of lipoic acid showed normal polyhydroxyalkanoate synthesis capacity. Together, these results uncovered the existence of a substantial futile cycle whereby short- and medium-chain intermediates of the cytoplasmic fatty acid biosynthetic pathway are directed toward the peroxisomal beta-oxidation pathway. PMID:12819196

  17. Effects of microbial redox cycling of iron on cast iron pipe corrosion in drinking water distribution systems.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haibo; Hu, Chun; Zhang, Lili; Li, Xiaoxiao; Zhang, Yu; Yang, Min

    2014-11-15

    Bacterial characteristics in corrosion products and their effect on the formation of dense corrosion scales on cast iron coupons were studied in drinking water, with sterile water acting as a reference. The corrosion process and corrosion scales were characterized by electrochemical and physico-chemical measurements. The results indicated that the corrosion was more rapidly inhibited and iron release was lower due to formation of more dense protective corrosion scales in drinking water than in sterile water. The microbial community and denitrifying functional genes were analyzed by pyrosequencing and quantitative polymerase chain reactions (qPCR), respectively. Principal component analysis (PCA) showed that the bacteria in corrosion products played an important role in the corrosion process in drinking water. Nitrate-reducing bacteria (NRB) Acidovorax and Hydrogenophaga enhanced iron corrosion before 6 days. After 20 days, the dominant bacteria became NRB Dechloromonas (40.08%) with the protective corrosion layer formation. The Dechloromonas exhibited the stronger corrosion inhibition by inducing the redox cycling of iron, to enhance the precipitation of iron oxides and formation of Fe3O4. Subsequently, other minor bacteria appeared in the corrosion scales, including iron-respiring bacteria and Rhizobium which captured iron by the produced siderophores, having a weaker corrosion-inhibition effect. Therefore, the microbially-driven redox cycling of iron with associated microbial capture of iron caused more compact corrosion scales formation and lower iron release. PMID:25150521

  18. Observation of isotopes in the water cycle—the Swiss National Network (NISOT)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Marc Schürch; Ronald Kozel; Ulrich Schotterer; Jean-Pierre Tripet

    2003-01-01

    The Swiss National Network for the Observation of Isotopes in the Water Cycle (NISOT) includes eleven precipitation, seven surface water (river) and three groundwater stations, where tritium, deuterium and oxygen-18 are monthly measured in composite samples. The network provides a good overview of the characteristic isotope signatures in recharge waters in Switzerland and of the relations between isotopes and altitude,

  19. Intensification of the water cycle: Scenarios, processes and extremes (HyClim) PI: Martin Wild, Co-PI: Christoph Schr

    E-print Network

    Richner, Heinz

    23 P 2.1 Intensification of the water cycle: Scenarios, processes and extremes (HyClim) PI: Martin of the water cycle from about 1850 to the end of the 21th century, and how are they reproduced in the surface radiation balance (global dimming/brightening) affect the global energy and water cycles? How

  20. Diurnal cycle of water vapor as documented by a dense GPS network in a coastal area during

    E-print Network

    Boyer, Edmond

    Diurnal cycle of water vapor as documented by a dense GPS network in a coastal area during ESCOMPTE used for the analysis of the diurnal cycle of water vapor over Marseille, France during the second to the advection of marine moist air by these sea breeze circulations. However, the diurnal cycle of water vapor

  1. Water-oxidation catalysis by synthetic manganese oxides--systematic variations of the calcium birnessite theme.

    PubMed

    Frey, Carolin E; Wiechen, Mathias; Kurz, Philipp

    2014-03-21

    Layered manganese oxides from the birnessite mineral family have been identified as promising heterogeneous compounds for water-oxidation catalysis (WOC), a key reaction for the conversion of renewable energy into storable fuels. High catalytic rates were especially observed for birnessites which contain calcium as part of their structures. With the aim to systematically improve the catalytic performance of such oxide materials, we used a flexible synthetic route to prepare three series of calcium birnessites, where we varied the calcium concentrations, the ripening times of the original precipitates and the temperature of the heat treatment following the initial synthetic steps (tempering) during the preparation process. The products were carefully analysed by a number of analytical techniques and then probed for WOC activity using the Ce(4+)-system. We find that our set of twenty closely related manganese oxides shows large, but somewhat systematic alterations in catalytic rates, indicating the importance of synthesis parameters for maximum catalytic performance. The catalyst of the series for which the highest water-oxidation rate was found is a birnessite of medium calcium content (Ca?:?Mn ratio 0.2?:?1) that had been subjected to a tempering temperature of 400 °C. On the basis of the detailed analysis of the results, a WOC reaction scheme for birnessites is proposed to explain the observed trends in reactivity. PMID:24225769

  2. Water vapor measurements in the mesosphere from Mauna Loa over solar cycle 23

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nedoluha, Gerald E.; Gomez, R. Michael; Hicks, Brian C.; Wrotny, Jonathan E.; Boone, Chris; Lambert, Alyn

    2009-12-01

    The Water Vapor Millimeter-wave Spectrometer (WVMS) system has been making measurements from the Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change site at Mauna Loa, Hawaii (19.5°N, 204.4°E), since 1996, covering nearly the complete period of solar cycle 23. The WVMS measurements are compared with Halogen Occultation Experiment (HALOE) (1992-2005), Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) (2004 to present), and Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (ACE) Fourier transform spectrometer (2004 to present) measurements in the mesosphere. In the upper mesosphere Lyman ? radiation photodissociates water vapor; hence, water vapor in the upper mesosphere varies with the solar cycle. We calculate fits to the WVMS and HALOE water vapor data in this region using the Lasp Interactive Solar Irradiance Datacenter Lyman ? data set. This is, to our knowledge, the only published validation of the sensitivity of HALOE water vapor measurements to the solar cycle, and the HALOE and WVMS water vapor measurements show a very similar sensitivity to the solar cycle. Once the solar cycle variations are taken into account, the primary water vapor variations at all of these altitudes from 1992 to the present are an increase from 1992 to 1996, a maximum in water vapor in 1996, and small changes from 1997 to the present. Measurements from 2004 to 2008, which are available from WVMS, MLS, and ACE, show not only good agreement in interannual variations but also excellent agreement in their absolute measurements (to within better than 3%) of the water vapor mixing ratio from 50 to 80 km.

  3. Treatment of gasoline-contaminated waters by advanced oxidation processes.

    PubMed

    Tiburtius, Elaine Regina Lopes; Peralta-Zamora, Patricio; Emmel, Alexandre

    2005-11-11

    In this study, the efficiency of advanced oxidative processes (AOPs) was investigated toward the degradation of aqueous solutions containing benzene, toluene and xylenes (BTX) and gasoline-contaminated waters. The results indicated that BTX can be effectively oxidized by near UV-assisted photo-Fenton process. The treatment permits almost total degradation of BTX and removal of more than 80% of the phenolic intermediates at reaction times of about 30 min. Preliminary investigations using water contaminated by gasoline suggest a good potentiality of the process for the treatment of large volumes of aqueous samples containing these polluting species. Heterogeneous photocatalysis and H2O2/UV system show lower degradation efficiency, probably due to the heterogeneous character of the TiO2-mediated system and lost of photonic efficiency of the H2O2/UV system in the presence of highly colored intermediated. PMID:16051429

  4. High-temperature thermochemical water splitting cycle fusion reactor design considerations

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E. T. Cheng; C. P. C. Wong; K. H. McCorkle Jr.; P. W. Trester; K. R. Schultz

    1980-01-01

    The design considerations were explored for the adaptation of the high-temperature General Atomic sulfur-iodine thermochemical water splitting cycle to a fusion reactor heat source. This high-temperature cycle modification was found to have a good heat line match to the fusion heat source with an attractive possibility of process simplification compared to the reference HTGR-adapted cycle. The cost improvement due to

  5. Conversion of hazardous materials using supercritical water oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Rofer, C.K.; Buelow, S.J.; Dyer, R.B.; Wander, J.D.

    1991-03-29

    A process for destruction of hazardous materials in a medium of supercritical water without the addition of an oxidant material. The hazardous material is converted to simple compounds which are relatively benign or easily treatable to yield materials which can be discharged into the environment. Treatment agents may be added to the reactants in order to bind certain materials, such as chlorine, in the form of salts or to otherwise facilitate the destruction reactions.

  6. Catalytic Water Oxidation on Derivatized nanoITO

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Zuofeng; Concepcion, Javier J; Hull, Jonathan Frazer; Hoertz, Paul G.; Meyer, Thomas J.

    2010-01-01

    Electrocatalytic water oxidation occurs on high surface area, nanocrystalline ITO (nanoITO) surface-derivatized by phosphonate-binding of the catalyst [Ru(Mebimpy)(4,4?-((HO){sub 2}OPCH{sub 2}){sub 2}bpy)(OH{sub 2})]{sup 2+} (Mebimpy is 2,6-bis(1-methylbenzimidazol-2-yl)pyridine; bpy is 2,2?-bipyridine). With nanoITO, spectral data can be acquired on electrochemically generated intermediates and voltammograms monitored spectrophotometrically.

  7. Destruction of representative submarine food waste using supercritical water oxidation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shiying; Qu, Xuan; Zhang, Rong; Bi, Jicheng

    2015-03-01

    In this study, 13 types of organic materials were oxidized using H2O2 in a continuous flow reactor under the condition of supercritical water. The effect of the operational parameters on the conversion of total organic carbon (TOC) and total nitrogen (TN) was investigated, and the resulting quality of treated water was analyzed. It was found that these materials were easily oxidized with a TOC conversion achieving 99% at temperature of 460 °C and TN conversion reaching 94% at temperature of 500 °C. Rice decomposition was rapid, with TOC and TN decomposition rates of 99% obtained within residence of 100 s at temperature of 460 °C. At temperature of 460 °C, pressure of 24 MPa, residence time of 100 s, and excess oxygen of 100%, the quality of treated water attained levels commensurate with China's Standards for Drinking Water Quality. Reaction rate equation parameters were obtained by fitting the experimental data to the differential equation obtained using the Runge-Kutta algorithm. The decrease of the TOC in water samples exhibited reaction orders of 0.95 for the TOC concentration and 0.628 for the oxygen concentration. The activation energy was 83.018 kJ/mol. PMID:25315932

  8. Nonstoichiometric Titanium Oxides via Pulsed Laser Ablation in Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Chang-Ning; Bow, Jong-Shing; Zheng, Yuyuan; Chen, Shuei-Yuan; Ho, New Jin; Shen, Pouyan

    2010-06-01

    Titanium oxide compounds TiO, Ti2O3, and TiO2 with a considerable extent of nonstoichiometry were fabricated by pulsed laser ablation in water and characterized by X-ray/electron diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and electron energy loss spectroscopy. The titanium oxides were found to occur as nanoparticle aggregates with a predominant 3+ charge and amorphous microtubes when fabricated under an average power density of ca. 1 × 108 W/cm2 and 1011 W/cm2, respectively followed by dwelling in water. The crystalline colloidal particles have a relatively high content of Ti2+ and hence a lower minimum band gap of 3.4 eV in comparison with 5.2 eV for the amorphous state. The protonation on both crystalline and amorphous phase caused defects, mainly titanium rather than oxygen vacancies and charge and/or volume-compensating defects. The hydrophilic nature and presumably varied extent of undercoordination at the free surface of the amorphous lamellae accounts for their rolling as tubes at water/air and water/glass interfaces. The nonstoichiometric titania thus fabricated have potential optoelectronic and catalytic applications in UV-visible range and shed light on the Ti charge and phase behavior of titania-water binary in natural shock occurrence.

  9. Nonstoichiometric Titanium Oxides via Pulsed Laser Ablation in Water.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chang-Ning; Bow, Jong-Shing; Zheng, Yuyuan; Chen, Shuei-Yuan; Ho, Newjin; Shen, Pouyan

    2010-01-01

    Titanium oxide compounds TiO,Ti2O3, and TiO2 with a considerable extent of nonstoichiometry were fabricated by pulsed laser ablation in water and characterized by X-ray/electron diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and electron energy loss spectroscopy. The titanium oxides were found to occur as nanoparticle aggregates with a predominant 3+ charge and amorphous microtubes when fabricated under an average power density of ca. 1 × 108W/cm2 and 1011W/cm2, respectively followed by dwelling in water. The crystalline colloidal particles have a relatively high content of Ti2+ and hence a lower minimum band gap of 3.4 eV in comparison with 5.2 eV for the amorphous state. The protonation on both crystalline and amorphous phase caused defects, mainly titanium rather than oxygen vacancies and charge and/or volume-compensating defects. The hydrophilic nature and presumably varied extent of undercoordination at the free surface of the amorphous lamellae accounts for their rolling as tubes at water/air and water/glass interfaces. The nonstoichiometric titania thus fabricated have potential optoelectronic and catalytic applications in UV-visible range and shed light on the Ti charge and phase behavior of titania-water binary in natural shock occurrence. PMID:20672115

  10. Concept of an innovative water management system with decentralized water reclamation and cascading material-cycle for agricultural areas.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, T

    2012-01-01

    Unlike in urban areas where intensive water reclamation systems are available, development of decentralized technologies and systems is required for water use to be sustainable in agricultural areas. To overcome various water quality issues in those areas, a research project entitled 'Development of an innovative water management system with decentralized water reclamation and cascading material-cycle for agricultural areas under the consideration of climate change' was launched in 2009. This paper introduces the concept of this research and provides detailed information on each of its research areas: (1) development of a diffuse agricultural pollution control technology using catch crops; (2) development of a decentralized differentiable treatment system for livestock and human excreta; and (3) development of a cascading material-cycle system for water pollution control and value-added production. The author also emphasizes that the innovative water management system for agricultural areas should incorporate a strategy for the voluntary collection of bio-resources. PMID:22828292

  11. Tunable water desalination across Graphene Oxide Framework membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Nicolai, Adrien [Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI)] [Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI); Sumpter, Bobby G [ORNL] [ORNL; Meunier, V. [Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI)] [Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI)

    2014-01-01

    The performance of graphene oxide framework (GOF) membranes for water desalination is assessed using classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The coupling between water permeability and salt rejection GOF membranes is studied as a function of linker concentration n, thickness h and applied pressure DP. The simulations reveal that water permeability in GOF-(n,h) membranes can be tuned from 5 (n = 32 and h = 6.5 nm) to 400 L/cm2/day/MPa (n = 64 and h = 2.5 nm) and follows the law Cnh an . For a given pore size (n = 16 or 32), water permeability of GOF membranes increases when the pore spacing decreases, whereas for a given pore spacing (n = 32 or 64), water permeability increases by up to two orders of magnitude when the pore size increases. Furthermore, for linker concentrations n 32, the high water permeability corresponds to a 100% salt rejection, elevating this type of GOF membrane as an ideal candidate for water desalination. Compared to experimental performance of reverse osmosis membranes, our calculations suggest that under the same conditions of applied pressure and characteristics of membranes (DP 10 MPa and h 100 nm), one can expect a perfect salt rejection coupled to a water permeability two orders of magnitude higher than existing technologies, i.e., from a few cL/cm2/day/MPa to a few L/cm2/day/MPa.

  12. Tunable water desalination across graphene oxide framework membranes.

    PubMed

    Nicolaï, Adrien; Sumpter, Bobby G; Meunier, Vincent

    2014-05-14

    The performance of graphene oxide framework (GOF) membranes for water desalination is assessed using classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The coupling between water permeability and salt rejection of GOF membranes is studied as a function of linker concentration n, thickness h and applied pressure ?P. The simulations reveal that water permeability in GOF-(n,h) membranes can be tuned from ?5 (n = 32 and h = 6.5 nm) to 400 L cm(-2) day(-1) MPa(-1) (n = 64 and h = 2.5 nm) and follows a Cnh(-?n) law. For a given pore size (n = 16 or 32), water permeability of GOF membranes increases when the pore spacing decreases, whereas for a given pore spacing (n = 32 or 64), water permeability increases by up to two orders of magnitude when the pore size increases. Furthermore, for linker concentrations n ? 32, the high water permeability corresponds to a 100% salt rejection, elevating this type of GOF membrane as an ideal candidate for water desalination. Compared to experimental performance of reverse osmosis membranes, our calculations suggest that under the same conditions of applied pressure and characteristics of membranes (?P ? 10 MPa and h ? 100 nm), one can expect a perfect salt rejection coupled to a water permeability two orders of magnitude higher than existing technologies, i.e., from a few cL cm(-2) day(-1) MPa(-1) to a few L cm(-2) day(-1) MPa(-1). PMID:24675972

  13. Partially Oxidized Sub-10 nm MnO Nanocrystals with High Activity for Water Oxidation Catalysis

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Kyoungsuk; Chu, Arim; Park, Jimin; Jeong, Donghyuk; Jerng, Sung Eun; Sim, Uk; Jeong, Hui-Yun; Lee, Chan Woo; Park, Yong-Sun; Yang, Ki Dong; Kumar Pradhan, Gajendra; Kim, Donghun; Sung, Nark-Eon; Hee Kim, Sun; Nam, Ki Tae

    2015-01-01

    The oxygen evolution reaction (OER) is considered a major bottleneck in the overall water electrolysis process. In this work, highly active manganese oxide nano-catalysts were synthesized via hot injection. Facile surface treatment generated Mn(III) species on monodisperse 10?nm MnO nanocrystals (NCs). Size dependency of MnO NCs on OER activity was also investigated. Surprisingly, the partially oxidized MnO NCs only required 530?mV @ 5?mA?cm?2 under near neutral conditions. PMID:25998696

  14. Method of water level control for a combined cycle power plant and control system therefor

    Microsoft Academic Search

    1982-01-01

    A method and system for controlling water level of a drum of a heat recovery steam generator for a combined cycle power plant is provided. The combined cycle power plant includes gas and steam turbines and the steam generator for recovering heat in exhaust gases from the gas turbine and for using the recovered heat to produce and supply steam

  15. Life cycle assessment of wastewater treatment technologies treating petroleum process waters

    Microsoft Academic Search

    N. Vlasopoulos; F. A. Memon; D. Butler; R. Murphy

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes the implementation of life cycle assessment to investigate the environmental impact of 20 technologies suitable for treating extensive volumes of water produced during the oil and gas extraction processes. Data on the physical and operational attributes of technologies under consideration were assembled and their life cycle environmental impacts estimated over 15 year time period. The results were

  16. Hydrogen vehicular fuel storage as a step in a water splitting cycle

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. S. Rudman

    1976-01-01

    The paper shows that a unique refueling cycle is possible for hydrogen produced in a thermochemical water-splitting cycle, where fuel production for hydrogen vehicular refueling is an integral part of the refueling loop. Chemical reactions of hydrogen release for fuel storage are identified and discussed, along with acceptance criteria for fuel storage systems. Merits and short-comings of such a hydrogen

  17. Role of mechanical loads in inducing in-cycle tensile stress in thermally grown oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Diaz, R.; Jansz, M.; Mossaddad, M.; Raghavan, S.; Okasinski, J.S.; Almer, J.D.; Perez, H.P.; Imbrie, P. (X-Ray Science Division); (University of Central Florida); (Purdue University)

    2012-01-01

    Experimental in situ synchrotron x-ray diffraction results tracking the strain behavior of the various layers during a cycle, under thermo-mechanical conditions are presented in this work. The quantitative strain measurements here show that the thermally grown oxide briefly experiences in-plane tensile stress ({sigma}{sub 22} = +36.4 MPa) with increased mechanical loading during ramp-up in the thermal cycle. These findings are the first in situ experimental observations of these strains under thermo-mechanical conditions, envisaged to serve as a catalyst for crack initiation. The depth resolved measurements of strain taken during applied thermal and mechanical load in this work are a significant step towards achieving realistic testing conditions.

  18. Combined cycle with low-quality heat integration and water injection into the compressed air

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nikos Aronis; Reinhard Leithner

    2004-01-01

    The water injection after the compressor into the combustion air of a gas turbine and its evaporation by low-quality heat was analysed for different types of low-temperature heat sources and water-vapour contents of the pressurised air. To integrate low-quality heat—for example solar heat—into a conventional combined cycle efficiently and economically, the cycle must be changed in such a way that

  19. An analysis of hydrogen production via closed-cycle schemes. [thermochemical processings from water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, R. E.; Cox, K. E.

    1975-01-01

    A thermodynamic analysis and state-of-the-art review of three basic schemes for production of hydrogen from water: electrolysis, thermal water-splitting, and multi-step thermochemical closed cycles is presented. Criteria for work-saving thermochemical closed-cycle processes are established, and several schemes are reviewed in light of such criteria. An economic analysis is also presented in the context of energy costs.

  20. Acid-base model for thy--mochemical water splitting. Results of experimental tests on manganese-based thermochemical cycles

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, P.R.; Kilyk, J. Jr.

    1980-01-01

    An acid-base model for thermochemical water splitting cycles is described, together with the results of its application to cycles based upon reactions of manganese oxides. Experiments confirmed that at least 12 acids-HCl, H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/, H/sub 3/PO/sub 4/, MoO/sub 3/, NaPO/sub 3/, Na/sub 4/P/sub 2/O/sub 7/, SiO/sub 2/, Cr/sub 2/O/sub 3/, TiO/sub 2/, Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/, SnO/sub 2/, and Fe/sub 2/Onumber-drive the thermal decomposition of NaMnO/sub 2/ at temperatures below 1400/sup 0/K. Only rather strong bases-NaOH, LiOH, BaO, Li/sub 2/CO/sub 3/, Na/sub 2/CO/sub 3/-can drive the steam oxidation of Mn(II) below 1300/sup 0/K. In accord with the model, the acids HCl, H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/, H/sub 3/PO/sub 4/, and MoO/sub 3/ are too strong to be used in Mn(III)/(II) cycles, because their Na, Li, and Ba salts are too stable. Cycles were demonstrated with the other 8 acids and either NaOH or Na/sub 2/CO/sub 3/. Because such cycles evolve O/sub 2(g)/ in the presence of air, solar furnaces are appropriate sources of thermal energy for them.

  1. The climate is changing and world popula4on is growing. These are increasing demands on the Earth's water resources and uncertainty on water availability. Advances in water cycle

    E-print Network

    these challenges. With this in mind, JPL's Center for Climate Sciences February to May 2012 at JPL. A separate workshop on Water Resource Management water cycle science ques4ons; - integrate water cycle science across JPL

  2. Internal reforming solid oxide fuel cell-gas turbine combined cycles (IRSOFC-GT): Part A -- Cell model and cycle thermodynamic analysis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. F. Massardo; F. Lubelli

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this work is to investigate the performance of internal reforming solid oxide fuel cell (IRSOFC) and gas turbine (GT) combined cycles. To study complex systems involving IRSOFC a mathematical model has been developed that simulates the fuel cell steady-state operation. The model, tested with a data available in literature, has been used for a complete IRSOFC parametric

  3. SUPERCRITICAL WATER OXIDATION (SCWO) OF CHEMICAL AGENT HYDROLYSATES AND ENERGETICS HYDROLYSATE

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Downey Kevin; Noel Wheatley

    Supercritical Water Oxidation (SCWO) is an advanced hazardous waste treatment technology that makes use of the unique properties of water at conditions above its thermodynamic critical point of 705°F (374°C) and 3,206 psia (22.1 MPa). At these supercritical conditions, most organic materials, oxidation reactants, and oxidation products are miscible in water, thus allowing complete oxidation reactions to take place in

  4. Climate Change and Expected Impacts on the Global Water Cycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rind, David; Hansen, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    How the elements of the global hydrologic cycle may respond to climate change is reviewed, first from a discussion of the physical sensitivity of these elements to changes in temperature, and then from a comparison of observations of hydrologic changes over the past 100 million years. Observations of current changes in the hydrologic cycle are then compared with projected future changes given the prospect of global warming. It is shown that some of the projections come close to matching the estimated hydrologic changes that occurred long ago when the earth was very warm.

  5. Calcium manganese(IV) oxides: biomimetic and efficient catalysts for water oxidation.

    PubMed

    Najafpour, Mohammad Mahdi; Pashaei, Babak; Nayeri, Sara

    2012-04-28

    CaMnO(3) and Ca(2)Mn(3)O(8) were synthesized and characterized by SEM, XRD, FTIR and BET. Both oxides showed oxygen evolution activity in the presence of oxone, cerium(IV) ammonium nitrate and H(2)O(2). Oxygen evolution from water during irradiation with visible light (? > 400 nm) was also observed upon adding these manganese oxides to an aqueous solution containing tris(2,2'-bipyridyl) ruthenium(II), as photosensitizer, and chloro pentaammine cobalt(III) chloride, as electron acceptor, in an acetate buffer. The amounts of dissolved manganese and calcium from CaMnO(3) and Ca(2)Mn(3)O(8) in the oxygen evolving reactions were reported and compared with other (calcium) manganese oxides. Proposed mechanisms of oxygen evolution and proposed roles for the calcium ions are also considered. PMID:22382465

  6. [Environment effects of algae-caused black spots: impacts on Fe-Mn-S cycles in water-sediment interface].

    PubMed

    Liu, Guo-Feng; He, Jun; Fan, Cheng-Xin; Zhang, Lei; Shen, Qiu-Shi; Zhong, Ji-Cheng; Yan, Shao-Hua

    2010-11-01

    The driving effects of algal cells settlement in the water-sediment interface on Fe, Mn, S biogeochemistry in laboratory through static cultivation device. Results showed that dissolved oxygen would be exhausted by algae cells in 50 min after the cyanobacteria cells settled to the sediment surface. Soon the water-sediment interface formed the severe anoxia and Fe-Mn oxides and sulfides were deoxidized quickly in the strong reducing environment. The Fe2+, Mn2+ content in interface increased to the summit at the 4th day and their concentrations were 4.40 mg/L and 2.35 mg/L, respectively. When it comes to the end of the experiment, the Fe2+ content had a little reduction and Mn2+ reduced quickly, their concentrations were 3.37 mg/L and 0.97 mg/L at the end of experiment. However, S2- concentration in interface reached the highest at the 2nd day and its content was 0.63 mg/L, and its concentration was only 0.12 mg/L at the end since it has been reduced. The ORP was--150 mV in the sediment surface and indicated that the sediment environment was a strong reducing environment. Phenomenon of algal cells induced black spots in water bodies was the main driving factors on Fe/Mn oxides and sulfides biogeochemistry cycle, and also the extreme anoxia environment would have great harm on the water body's ecology. PMID:21250447

  7. Water-table height and microtopography control biogeochemical cycling in an Arctic coastal tundra ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipson, D. A.; Zona, D.; Raab, T. K.; Bozzolo, F.; Mauritz, M.; Oechel, W. C.

    2012-01-01

    Drained thaw lake basins (DTLB's) are the dominant land form of the Arctic Coastal Plain in northern Alaska. The presence of continuous permafrost prevents drainage and so water tables generally remain close to the soil surface, creating saturated, suboxic soil conditions. However, ice wedge polygons produce microtopographic variation in these landscapes, with raised areas such as polygon rims creating more oxic microenvironments. The peat soils in this ecosystem store large amounts of organic carbon which is vulnerable to loss as arctic regions continue to rapidly warm, and so there is great motivation to understand the controls over microbial activity in these complex landscapes. Here we report the effects of experimental flooding, along with seasonal and spatial variation in soil chemistry and microbial activity in a DTLB. The flooding treatment generally mirrored the effects of natural landscape variation in water-table height due to microtopography. The flooded portion of the basin had lower dissolved oxygen, lower oxidation-reduction potential (ORP) and higher pH, as did lower elevation areas throughout the entire basin. Similarly, soil pore water concentrations of organic carbon and aromatic compounds were higher in flooded and low elevation areas. Dissolved ferric iron (Fe(III)) concentrations were higher in low elevation areas and responded to the flooding treatment in low areas, only. The high concentrations of soluble Fe(III) in soil pore water were explained by the presence of siderophores, which were much more concentrated in low elevation areas. All the aforementioned variables were correlated, showing that Fe(III) is solubilized in response to anoxic conditions. Dissolved carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) concentrations were higher in low elevation areas, but showed only subtle and/or seasonally dependent effects of flooding. In anaerobic laboratory incubations, more CH4 was produced by soils from low and flooded areas, whereas anaerobic CO2 production only responded to flooding in high elevation areas. Seasonal changes in the oxidation state of solid phase Fe minerals showed that net Fe reduction occurred, especially in topographically low areas. The effects of Fe reduction were also seen in the topographic patterns of pH, as protons were consumed where this process was prevalent. This suite of results can all be attributed to the effect of water table on oxygen availability: flooded conditions promote anoxia, stimulating dissolution and reduction of Fe(III), and to some extent, methanogenesis. However, two lines of evidence indicated the inhibition of methanogenesis by alternative e- acceptors such as Fe(III) and humic substances: (1) ratios of CO2:CH4 evolved from anaerobic soil incubations and dissolved in soil pore water were high; (2) CH4 concentrations were negatively correlated with the oxidation state of the soluble Fe pool in both topographically high and low areas. A second set of results could be explained by increased soil temperature in the flooding treatment, which presumably arose from the increased thermal conductivity of the soil surface: higher N mineralization rates and dissolved P concentrations were observed in flooded areas. Overall, these results could have implications for C and nutrient cycling in high Arctic areas where warming and flooding are likely consequences of climate change.

  8. The persistence of oceans on Earth-like planets: insights from the deep-water cycle

    E-print Network

    Schaefer, Laura

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we present a series of models for the deep water cycle on super-Earths experiencing plate tectonics. The deep water cycle can be modeled through parameterized convection models coupled with a volatile recycling model. The convection of the silicate mantle is linked to the volatile cycle through the water-dependent viscosity. Important differences in surface water content are found for different parameterizations of convection. Surface oceans are smaller and more persistent for single layer convection, rather than convection by boundary layer instability. Smaller planets have initially larger oceans but also return that water to the mantle more rapidly than larger planets. Super-Earths may therefore be less habitable in their early years than smaller planets, but their habitability (assuming stable surface conditions), will persist much longer.

  9. Status report on sulfur iodine thermochemical water-splitting cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Besenbruch, G.E.; Brown, L.C.; Yoshimoto, M.; Norman, J.H.; O'Keefe, D.R.; Endo, M.; Allen, C.L.; Kelly, M.L.; Trester, P.W.

    1981-11-01

    Major process improvements which had been identified in an earlier phase of this program were investigated and their feasibility demonstrated. The engineering process flowsheet was revised to incorporate the newest process improvements. It is now being used for an estimate of hydrogen production cost from the General Atomic Company (GAC) cycle. An energy storage cycle for a solar adaptation of the sulfur-iodine cycle has been identified and is being evaluated along with features particularly concerning the availability and level of insolation and how it affects engineering design of the chemical plant. Efforts are also underway with Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to design the sulfur-iodine cycle around the Tandem Mirror Fusion Reactor. Potential systems for HI purification are being investigated which could eliminate the need for the present phosphoric acid treatment completely and could result in significant savings in capital cost for this part of the process. Potential catalysts for the liquid HI decomposition step were evaluated. Noble metals appear to have highest activity; however, attrition of the catalyst occurs.

  10. Efficient water oxidation at carbon nanotube-polyoxometalate electrocatalytic interfaces.

    PubMed

    Toma, Francesca M; Sartorel, Andrea; Iurlo, Matteo; Carraro, Mauro; Parisse, Pietro; Maccato, Chiara; Rapino, Stefania; Gonzalez, Benito Rodriguez; Amenitsch, Heinz; Da Ros, Tatiana; Casalis, Loredana; Goldoni, Andrea; Marcaccio, Massimo; Scorrano, Gianfranco; Scoles, Giacinto; Paolucci, Francesco; Prato, Maurizio; Bonchio, Marcella

    2010-10-01

    Water is the renewable, bulk chemical that nature uses to enable carbohydrate production from carbon dioxide. The dream goal of energy research is to transpose this incredibly efficient process and make an artificial device whereby the catalytic splitting of water is finalized to give a continuous production of oxygen and hydrogen. Success in this task would guarantee the generation of hydrogen as a carbon-free fuel to satisfy our energy demands at no environmental cost. Here we show that very efficient and stable nanostructured, oxygen-evolving anodes are obtained by the assembly of an oxygen-evolving polyoxometalate cluster (a totally inorganic ruthenium catalyst) with a conducting bed of multiwalled carbon nanotubes. Our bioinspired electrode addresses the one major challenge of artificial photosynthesis, namely efficient water oxidation, which brings us closer to being able to power the planet with carbon-free fuels. PMID:20861897

  11. Efficient water oxidation at carbon nanotube-polyoxometalate electrocatalytic interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toma, Francesca M.; Sartorel, Andrea; Iurlo, Matteo; Carraro, Mauro; Parisse, Pietro; Maccato, Chiara; Rapino, Stefania; Gonzalez, Benito Rodriguez; Amenitsch, Heinz; da Ros, Tatiana; Casalis, Loredana; Goldoni, Andrea; Marcaccio, Massimo; Scorrano, Gianfranco; Scoles, Giacinto; Paolucci, Francesco; Prato, Maurizio; Bonchio, Marcella

    2010-10-01

    Water is the renewable, bulk chemical that nature uses to enable carbohydrate production from carbon dioxide. The dream goal of energy research is to transpose this incredibly efficient process and make an artificial device whereby the catalytic splitting of water is finalized to give a continuous production of oxygen and hydrogen. Success in this task would guarantee the generation of hydrogen as a carbon-free fuel to satisfy our energy demands at no environmental cost. Here we show that very efficient and stable nanostructured, oxygen-evolving anodes are obtained by the assembly of an oxygen-evolving polyoxometalate cluster (a totally inorganic ruthenium catalyst) with a conducting bed of multiwalled carbon nanotubes. Our bioinspired electrode addresses the one major challenge of artificial photosynthesis, namely efficient water oxidation, which brings us closer to being able to power the planet with carbon-free fuels.

  12. Solar-thermal Water Splitting Using the Sodium Manganese Oxide Process & Preliminary H2A Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Todd M. Francis, Paul R. Lichty, Christopher Perkins, Melinda Tucker, Peter B. Kreider, Hans H. Funke, Allan Lewandowski, and Alan W. Weimer

    2012-10-24

    There are three primary reactions in the sodium manganese oxide high temperature water splitting cycle. In the first reaction, Mn2O3 is decomposed to MnO at 1,500°C and 50 psig. This reaction occurs in a high temperature solar reactor and has a heat of reaction of 173,212 J/mol. Hydrogen is produced in the next step of this cycle. This step occurs at 700°C and 1 atm in the presence of sodium hydroxide. Finally, water is added in the hydrolysis step, which removes NaOH and regenerates the original reactant, Mn2O3. The high temperature solar�driven step for decomposing Mn2O3 to MnO can be carried out to high conversion without major complication in an inert environment. The second step to produce H2 in the presence of sodium hydroxide is also straightforward and can be completed. The third step, the low temperature step to recover the sodium hydroxide is the most difficult. The amount of energy required to essentially distill water to recover sodium hydroxide is prohibitive and too costly. Methods must be found for lower cost recovery. This report provides information on the use of ZnO as an additive to improve the recovery of sodium hydroxide.

  13. Net charge oscillation and proton release during water oxidation in photosynthesis. An electrochromic band shift study at pH 5.5–7.0

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. Kretschmann; E. Schlodder; H. T. Witt

    1996-01-01

    In the S-state cycle of water oxidation, a local electric field was measured in states S2 and S3. This was indicated by the strongly retarded reduction kinetics of the oxidized primary electron donor of PS II in these states (Brettel, K., Schlodder, E. and Witt, H.T. (1984) Biochim. Biophys. Acta 766, 403–415) as well as by electrochromic band shifts in

  14. Acid-Base Mechanism for Ruthenium-Based Water Oxidation Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, L.P.; Wu, Q.; Van Voorhis, T.

    2010-05-17

    We present a detailed theoretical study of the pathway for water oxidation in synthetic ruthenium-based catalysts. As a first step, we consider a recently discovered single center catalyst, where experimental observations suggest a purely single-center mechanism. We find low activation energies (<5 kcal/mol) for each rearrangement in the catalytic cycle. In the crucial step of O-O bond formation, a solvent water acts as a Lewis base and attacks a highly oxidized Ru{sup V} = O. Armed with the structures and energetics of the single-center catalyst, we proceed to consider a representative Ru-dimer which was designed to form O{sub 2} via coupling between the two centers. We discover a mechanism that proceeds in analogous fashion to the monomer case, with all the most significant steps occurring at a single catalytic center within the dimer. This acid-base mechanism suggests a new set of strategies for the rational design of multicenter catalysts: rather than coordinating the relative orientations of the subunits, one can focus on coordinating solvation-shell water molecules or tuning redox potentials.

  15. An evaluation of China's water cycle in the MetUM-GC2 coupled model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, Jose; Marzin, Charline

    2015-04-01

    There is a general consensus in climate projections that the global hydrological cycle is likely to experience significant changes in the future, in response to increased concentrations of greenhouse gases. At the regional scale, model simulations show large variations in the predictions of changes in the components of the water cycle. Increasing confidence in regional prediction of the water cycle is at the top of the NWP and climate research agenda, requiring a comprehensive evaluation of the physical processes which may play an important role. Here we present preliminary results of an evaluation of the capacity of the MetUM-GC2 coupled model to reproduce the characteristics of the water cycle in the region of China. Using water budget techniques in the atmospheric and terrestrial branches we test the water cycle components and the model's ability to replicate the climatological annual cycle and its interannual variability. Recent drought and flood events are evaluated and various metrics are employed to compare the role played by the atmospheric general circulation including the boreal summer and winter monsoon regimes and soil moisture feedback in model and observations.

  16. Microbial dissimilatory sulfur cycle in acid mine water

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. H. Tuttle; P. R. Dugan; C. B. MacMillan; C. I. Randles

    1969-01-01

    Ferric, sulfate, and hydrogen ions are produced from pyritic minerals associated with a coal as a result of autotrophic bacterial metabolism. Water carrying these ions accumulated behind a porous dam composed of wood dust originating at a log-cutting mill. As water seeped through the porous dam, it was enriched in organic nutrients which then supported growth and metabolism of heterotrophic

  17. The Global Enery and Water Cycle Experiment Science Strategy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chahine, M. T.

    1997-01-01

    The distribution of water in the atmosphere and at the surface of the Earth is the most influential factor regulating our environment, not only because water is essential for life but also because through phase transitions it is the main energy source that control clouds and radiation and drives the global circulation of the atmosphere.

  18. Electrochemical investigation of Mn4O4-cubane water-oxidizing clustersw Robin Brimblecombe,ab

    E-print Network

    Lawson, Catherine L.

    of the most important catalysts found in nature, the water-oxidizing complex of photosystem II. We describe the attachment of the catalysts to conductive surfaces for direct electrochemical oxidation or to photoanodes. In a recent study, we described the sustained, catalytic, light- driven electro-oxidation of water by a bio

  19. Oxidation of phenolics in supercritical water. Quarterly technical progress report, March 1, 1994May 31, 1994

    Microsoft Academic Search

    1994-01-01

    An environmental hazard associated with coal liquefaction and gasification is the generation of aqueous waste streams containing phenolics and carcinogenic organics such as polynuclear aromatics. Oxidation in supercritical water (SCW) is an emerging technology for the ultimate destruction of phenolics and other organics in waste water streams. SCW oxidation involves the oxidation of organics in an aqueous medium at temperatures

  20. RESIDUAL OXIDANT DECAY AND BROMATE FORMATION IN CHLORINATED AND OZONATED SEA-WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Oxidant decay and bromate formation were studied under light and dark conditions in 5, 15 and 30% artificial sea-water and approximately equal to 5% natural estuarine water following ozonation or chlorination. For both oxidants, light exposure accelerated the residual oxidant dec...

  1. [Nitrogen and water cycling of typical cropland in the North China Plain].

    PubMed

    Pei, Hong-wei; Shen, Yan-jun; Liu, Chang-ming

    2015-01-01

    Intensive fertilization and irrigation associated increasing grain production has led to serious groundwater depletion and soil/water pollution in the North China Plain (NCP). Intensive agriculture changes the initial mass and energy balance, and also results in huge risks to the water/soil resources and food security regionally. Based on the research reports on the nitrogen cycle and water cycle in typical cropland (winter wheat and summer corn) in the NCP during the past 20 years, and the meteorological data, field experiments and surveys, we calculated the nitrogen cycle and water-cycle for this typical cropland. Annual total nitrogen input were 632 kg N . hm-2, including 523 kg N . hm-2 from commercial fertilizer, 74 kg N . hm-2 from manure, 23 kg N . hm-2 from atmosphere, and 12 kg N . hm-2 from irrigation. All of annual outputs summed to 532 kg N . hm-2 including 289 kg N . hm-2 for crop, 77 kg N . hm-2 staying in soil profile, leaching 104 kg N . hm-2, 52 kg N . hm-2 for ammonia volatilization, 10 kg N . hm-2 loss in nitrification and denitrification. Uncertainties of the individual cases and the summary process lead to the unbalance of nitrogen. For the dominant parts of the field water cycle, annual precipitation was 557 mm, irrigation was 340 mm, while 762 mm was for evapotranspiration and 135 mm was for deep percolation. Considering uncertainties in the nitrogen and water cycles, coupled experiments based on multi-disciplines would be useful for understanding mechanisms for nitrogen and water transfer processes in the soil-plant-atmosphere-continuum (SPAC) , and the interaction between nitrogen and water, as well as determining the critical threshold values for sustainability of soil and water resources in the NCP. PMID:25985681

  2. An Anaerobic-Type ?-Ketoglutarate Ferredoxin Oxidoreductase Completes the Oxidative Tricarboxylic Acid Cycle of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Baughn, Anthony D.; Garforth, Scott J.; Vilchèze, Catherine; Jacobs, William R.

    2009-01-01

    Aerobic organisms have a tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle that is functionally distinct from those found in anaerobic organisms. Previous reports indicate that the aerobic pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis lacks detectable ?-ketoglutarate (KG) dehydrogenase activity and drives a variant TCA cycle in which succinyl-CoA is replaced by succinic semialdehyde. Here, we show that M. tuberculosis expresses a CoA-dependent KG dehydrogenase activity, albeit one that is typically found in anaerobic bacteria. Unlike most enzymes of this family, the M. tuberculosis KG: ferredoxin oxidoreductase (KOR) is extremely stable under aerobic conditions. This activity is absent in a mutant strain deleted for genes encoding a previously uncharacterized oxidoreductase, and this strain is impaired for aerobic growth in the absence of sufficient amounts of CO2. Interestingly, inhibition of the glyoxylate shunt or exclusion of exogenous fatty acids alleviates this growth defect, indicating the presence of an alternate pathway that operates in the absence of ?-oxidation. Simultaneous disruption of KOR and the first enzyme of the succinic semialdehyde pathway (KG decarboxylase; KGD) results in strict dependence upon the glyoxylate shunt for growth, demonstrating that KG decarboxylase is also functional in M. tuberculosis intermediary metabolism. These observations demonstrate that unlike most organisms M. tuberculosis utilizes two distinct TCA pathways from KG, one that functions concurrently with ?-oxidation (KOR-dependent), and one that functions in the absence of ?-oxidation (KGD-dependent). As these pathways are regulated by metabolic cues, we predict that their differential utilization provides an advantage for growth in different environments within the host. PMID:19936047

  3. Economic Input-Output Life Cycle Assessment of Water Reuse Strategies in Residential Buildings

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper evaluates the environmental sustainability and economic feasibility of four water reuse designs through economic input-output life cycle assessments (EIO-LCA) and benefit/cost analyses. The water reuse designs include: 1. Simple Greywater Reuse System for Landscape Ir...

  4. Supercritical-pressure, Once-through Cycle Light Water Cooled Reactor Concept

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yoshiaki OKA; Seiichi KOSHIZUKA

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to develop new reactor concepts for the innovation of light water reactors (LWR) and fast reactors. Concept of the once-through coolant cycle, supercritical-pressure light water cooled reactor was developed. Major aspects of reactor design and safety were analysed by the computer codes which were developed by ourselves. It includes core design of thermal and

  5. GLOWA-DANUBE: INTEGRATIVE MODELLING OF GLOBAL CHANGE EFFECTS ON THE WATER CYCLE -THE GROUNDWATER PERSPECTIVE

    E-print Network

    Cirpka, Olaf Arie

    .mauser@iggf.geo.uni-muenchen.de Abstract. GLOWA (Global Change of the Water Cycle, www.glowa.org), funded by the German Ministry by the German Ministry of Research and Education (BMBF)), the Upper Danube watershed was selected of experts combining water-related competence in the fields of engineering, natural and social sciences

  6. GLOWA-DANUBE: INTEGRATIVE MODELLING OF GLOBAL CHANGE EFFECTS ON THE WATER CYCLE - THE GROUNDWATER PERSPECTIVE

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Roland Barthel; Juergen Braun; Wolfram Mauser

    GLOWA (Global Change of the Water Cycle, www.glowa.org), funded by the German Ministry of Research and Education, addresses the manifold consequences of Global Change on regional water resources in a variety of medium sized watersheds. The Upper Danube Basin (A ~ 77.000 km²) represents a mountain-foreland situation in the temperate mid-latitudes. The major goal of \\

  7. Sea Surface Salinity Understanding the Interactions Between the Global Water Cycle, Ocean Circulation and Climate

    E-print Network

    Waliser, Duane E.

    Sea Surface Salinity Understanding the Interactions Between the Global Water Cycle, Ocean Circulation and Climate Aquarius will provide unprecedented global maps of surface sea water salinity?" Sea surface salinity is the primary surface tracer of freshwater input and output to the ocean

  8. Carbon and water cycling in lake-rich landscapes: Landscape connections, lake hydrology, and biogeochemistry

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jeffrey A. Cardille; Stephen R. Carpenter; Michael T. Coe; Jonathan A. Foley; Paul C. Hanson; Monica G. Turner; Julie A. Vano

    2007-01-01

    Lakes are low-lying connectors of uplands and wetlands, surface water and groundwater, and though they are often studied as independent ecosystems, they function within complex landscapes. One such highly connected region is the Northern Highland Lake District (NHLD), where more than 7000 lakes and their watersheds cycle water and carbon through mixed forests, wetlands, and groundwater systems. Using a new

  9. Natural streamflow cycles and effects on water supply reliability 

    E-print Network

    Felden, Fabrice

    2002-01-01

    The Texas Natural Resource Conservation Commission, its partner agencies, and contractors are conducting a statewide Water Availability Modeling (WAM) Project pursuant to Senate Bill 1 enacted by the Texas Legislature in ...

  10. A new copper species based on an azo-compound utilized as a homogeneous catalyst for water oxidation.

    PubMed

    Yu, Wei-Bin; He, Qing-Ya; Ma, Xiu-Fang; Shi, Hua-Tian; Wei, Xianwen

    2015-01-01

    A new azo-complex [(L)Cu(II)(NO3)] [L = (E)-3-(pyridin-2-yldiazenyl)naphthalen-2-ol (HL)], was prepared via a one-pot synthetic method at 60 °C and was structurally characterized by IR, EA, PXRD and single crystal X-ray diffraction. In addition, TGA studies indicated that the complex was stable in air. The redox properties were determined by cyclic voltammetry, which revealed that the complex could be utilized as a catalyst for water oxidation under mild conditions. Subsequently, the complex was employed as a catalyst to take part in water oxidation reaction in the presence of a Ce(IV) salt utilized as an oxidant at pH 11 in PBS (Phosphate Buffered Saline) solution. The results suggested that the catalyst exhibited a high stability and activity toward water oxidation reaction under these conditions with an initial TOF of 4.0 kPa h(-1). Calculation methodology was performed to study the mechanism of the reaction, which revealed that in this catalytic process, the initial oxidation of Cu(II) to Cu(III) occurred by the formation of an intermediate "Cu(III)-O-O-Cu(III)". The formation of this intermediate, resulted in a release of oxygen and closing of the catalytic cycle. PMID:25382024

  11. Triggering a Wet Climate on Mars: The Role of Outflow Channels in Martian Water Cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santiago, D.; Asphaug, E. I.; Colaprete, A.

    2011-12-01

    The triggering of a robust water cycle on Mars has been hypothesized to be caused by gigantic flooding events evidenced by outflow channels. Here we use the Ames Mars General Circulation Model (MGCM) to study how these presumably abrupt eruptions of water (Carr,1996) affected the climate of Mars. We model where the water ultimately went as part of a transient hydrologic cycle. Chryse Planitia, east of Tharsis, has evidence for multiple water outflow channels. One of the largest channels is Ares Valles, which was carved by floods with estimated water volumes of order 10^5 km^2 (Andrews-Hanna, 2007 & Carr, 1996). Outflow discharge rate estimates range from 10^6 to 10^7 m^3/seconds or greater (Andrews-Hanna & Phillips, 2007, Harrison & Grimm, 2008). Studies suggest that outflow channels formed with smaller, successive floods instead of a single large flood (Wilson, et al.,2004). Warner et al. (2009) suggest up to six outflow events for the formation of Ares Valles, while estimates for another large outflow, Kasei Valles, might have been flooded by over two thousand floods with a total water volume of 5.5 x 10^5 km^3 (Harrison & Grimm, 2008). By adding water to the surface of Mars at the given outflow rate, as an expanding one-layer lake, we are able to study quantitatively how these outflow events influenced Mars climate, particularly the hydrologic cycle. In particular: Could sudden introductions of large amounts of water on the Martian surface lead to a new equilibrated water cycle? Can we tie certain fluvial surface features to transient or sustained water cycles? What are the roles of water vapor and water ice clouds to sudden changes in the water cycle on Mars? How are radiative feedbacks involved with this? What is the ultimate fate of the outflow water? This work uses the NASA Ames MGCM version 2.1 and other schemes that are part of the NASA Ames MGCM suite of tools. Various versions of the MGCM developed at Ames have been used extensively to examine dust and volatile distributions on Mars (e.g., Kahre et al., 2006, 2008). The MGCM 2.1 currently has a well-developed water ice cloud formation scheme (Montmessin et al., 2002, 2004a), which includes calculation of cloud particle concentrations, nucleation, growth, and gravitational sedimentation. For examining the effect of a large water outflow on the climate of Mars, we include water tracers, with an advanced cloud particle scheme Preliminary results suggest that water may have been transported globally for years post-outflow. Post-outflow water cloud formation increases dramatically, with water ice clouds and water vapor potentially transporting water globally. The global mass of water vapor and of water ice clouds increases substantially, with the post-outflow patterns settling into annual cycles, with increasing water entering the atmosphere from the surface over time. Future work will examine the radiative effects of the water vapor and water ice clouds, and the longer-term persistence of a new hydrological or climate regime Detailed comparisons of post-outflow precipitation locations with fluvial features on Mars will be done.

  12. Interactions of Water Vapor with Oxides at Elevated Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, Nathan; Opila, Elizabeth; Copland, Evan; Myers, Dwight

    2003-01-01

    Many volatile metal hydroxides form by reaction of the corresponding metal oxide with water vapor. These reactions are important in a number of high temperature corrosion processes. Experimental methods for studying the thermodynamics of metal hydroxides include: gas leak Knudsen cell mass spectrometry, free jet sampling mass spectrometry, transpiration and hydrogen-oxygen flame studies. The available experimental information is reviewed and the most stable metal hydroxide species are correlated with position in the periodic table. Current studies in our laboratory on the Si-O-H system are discussed.

  13. Electro-assembly of a chromophore-catalyst bilayer for water oxidation and photocatalytic water splitting.

    PubMed

    Ashford, Dennis L; Sherman, Benjamin D; Binstead, Robert A; Templeton, Joseph L; Meyer, Thomas J

    2015-04-13

    The use of electropolymerization to prepare electrocatalytically and photocatalytically active electrodes for water oxidation is described. Electropolymerization of the catalyst Ru(II)(bda)(4-vinylpyridine)2 (bda=2,2'-bipyridine-6,6'-dicarboxylate) on planar electrodes results in films containing semirigid polymer networks. In these films there is a change in the water oxidation mechanism compared to the solution analogue from bimolecular to single-site. Electro-assembly construction of a chromophore-catalyst structure on mesoporous, nanoparticle TiO2 films provides the basis for a dye-sensitized photoelectrosynthesis cell (DSPEC) for sustained water splitting in a pH?7 phosphate buffer solution. Photogenerated oxygen was measured in real-time by use of a two-electrode cell design. PMID:25707676

  14. Nanostructured Titanium Oxide Film- And Membrane-Based Photocatalysis For Water Treatment

    EPA Science Inventory

    Titanium Oxide (TiO2) photocatalysis, one of the ultraviolet (UV)-based advanced oxidation technologies (AOTs) and nanotechnologies (AONs), has attracted great attention for the development of efficient water treatment and purification systems due to the effectiveness ...

  15. Photoelectrochemical water splitting for hydrogen production with metal oxide (hematite and cupric oxide) based photocatalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Houwen

    Solar hydrogen is one ideal energy source to replace fossil fuel, as it is sustainable and environmentally friendly. Solar hydrogen can be generated in a number of ways. Photoelectrochemical (PEC) water splitting is one of the most promising methods for solar-to-chemical energy conversion. In this research project, metal oxide-based photocatalysts, especially hematite (?-Fe 2O3) and cupric oxide (CuO), were investigated for use as electrodes in PEC water splitting for solar hydrogen production. In our research project of hematite-based electrodes, we started with the incorporation of transition metal, particularly titanium (Ti), in hematite thin films to modify the valence and conduction band edges of hematite. We found that Ti impurities improve the electron conductivity of hematite and consequently lead to significantly enhanced photocurrents. We further investigated the Ti and Mg co-alloyed hematite. In this case, Ti is the donor and Mg is the acceptor in hematite. The co-alloying approach enhanced the solubility of Mg and Ti, which led to reduced electron effective mass and therefore increased electron mobility. Also, co-alloying tunes the carrier density and therefore allows the optimization of electrical conductivity. The densities of charged defects were found to be reduced, and therefore carrier recombinations were reduced. As a result, the Ti and Mg co-alloyed hematite thin films exhibited much improved performance in PEC water splitting as compared to pure hematite thin films. For the study of cupric oxide-based electrodes, we first investigated the possibility of reducing the electrode corrosion of cupric oxide in aqueous solutions by incorporating Ti as an electrode corrosion inhibitor. We found that Ti alloying can enhance the stability of cupric oxide in base solutions at the cost of reducing its crystallinity and optical absorption, and consequently lowering its photon-to-electron conversion efficiency. In order to balance the stability and the generated photocurrent, we developed a two-layer structure in which a thin layer of Cu-Ti-O was deposited on bare CuO thin film as a protective layer. Our experimental results indicated that this two-layer structure has an ideal thickness for the protection layer and is suitable for high-performance and long-term application for PEC water splitting.

  16. Water and the Oxidation State of Subduction Zone Magmas

    SciTech Connect

    Kelley, K.; Cottrell, E

    2009-01-01

    Mantle oxygen fugacity exerts a primary control on mass exchange between Earth's surface and interior at subduction zones, but the major factors controlling mantle oxygen fugacity (such as volatiles and phase assemblages) and how tectonic cycles drive its secular evolution are still debated. We present integrated measurements of redox-sensitive ratios of oxidized iron to total iron (Fe{sup 3+}/{Sigma}Fe), determined with Fe K-edge micro-x-ray absorption near-edge structure spectroscopy, and pre-eruptive magmatic H{sub 2}O contents of a global sampling of primitive undegassed basaltic glasses and melt inclusions covering a range of plate tectonic settings. Magmatic Fe{sup 3+}/{Sigma}Fe ratios increase toward subduction zones (at ridges, 0.13 to 0.17; at back arcs, 0.15 to 0.19; and at arcs, 0.18 to 0.32) and correlate linearly with H{sub 2}O content and element tracers of slab-derived fluids. These observations indicate a direct link between mass transfer from the subducted plate and oxidation of the mantle wedge.

  17. Effect of mixing water magnetic activation cycle on cement stone structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kugaevskaya, S. A.; Abzaev, Yu A.; Safronov, V. N.; Sarkisov, Yu S.; Gorlenko, N. P.; Ermilova, T. A.

    2015-01-01

    The paper presents results of investigations of hydration processes and structure formation of the cement paste matrix mixed with water activated by magneto static field using water treatment cycle technology. It is shown that crystallization of phases occurs in the cement-water system at different rates, and phase redistribution in the structure of the cement paste matrix is described before and after magnetic activation of mixing water. Also, modeling of the cement-water system and calculations of amorphous and crystalline phases using the Rietveld refinement method before and after magnetic activation show that strength properties of the cement paste matrix depend not only on quantitative but also qualitative relationship between phases.

  18. The Role of Topography on Continental Water Cycling and Water Stable Isotope Compositions over Geological Time Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poulsen, C. J.; Feng, R.; Fiorella, R.

    2014-12-01

    The rise and collapse of orogens through geologic time has been a major forcing on terrestrial climate and water cycling. Orogens substantially affect the type, amount, and distribution of precipitation on continents through their influence on atmospheric dynamics and circulation, vapor transport, and precipitation processes. Stable isotope compositions (?18O/?D) of authigenic minerals can preserve a record of ancient meteoric waters and, in this way, offer a glimpse into past water cycles and their response to topographic evolution. In practice, however, stable isotope records can be difficult to interpret, both due to the complex response of the water cycle to topographic change and due to coeval climate change. Isotope-enabled global climate models (GCMs) provide a tool for quantifying the response of water isotopes to topography and climate, and can be used in collaboration with proxy records to refine our understanding of long-term paleoclimate change. Our previous work using isotope-enabled GCMs has demonstrated that Cenozoic uplift of the Andes and the North American Cordillera had a large and complicated influence on the water cycle and stable isotope compositions. In this talk, we report on a series of experiments simulating surface uplift of the Tibetan Plateau and Himalayas using an isotope-enabled GCM (ECHAM5-wiso), and compare stable isotope and water cycle responses to those resulting from uplift of the Andean and North American orogens. Our preliminary results indicate that as in the central Andes and western North America the response to surface uplift is regionally large, spatially heterogeneous, and nonlinear. In contrast to the Andes and North American Cordillera however, surface uplift of the Tibetan Plateau and Himalayas has a more widespread influence on stable isotope compositions that extends across the Northern Hemisphere.

  19. Long-Term Thermal Cycling of Phlogopite Mica-Based Compressive Seals for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, Y S.; Stevenson, Jeffry W.

    2005-03-01

    Reliable sealants are one of the toughest challenges in advancing solid oxide fuel cell technologies. One of the most stringent requirements for sealants is the thermal cycle stability. The sealants have to survive multiple thermal cycles during operation in stationary and transportation applications. Recently, researchers at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory have developed a hybrid mica-based compressive seal with which leak rates were reduced...

  20. A novel marine nitrite-oxidizing Nitrospira species from Dutch coastal North Sea water

    PubMed Central

    Haaijer, Suzanne C. M.; Ji, Ke; van Niftrik, Laura; Hoischen, Alexander; Speth, Daan; Jetten, Mike S. M.; Damsté, Jaap S. Sinninghe; Op den Camp, Huub J. M.

    2013-01-01

    Marine microorganisms are important for the global nitrogen cycle, but marine nitrifiers, especially aerobic nitrite oxidizers, remain largely unexplored. To increase the number of cultured representatives of marine nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB), a bioreactor cultivation approach was adopted to first enrich nitrifiers and ultimately nitrite oxidizers from Dutch coastal North Sea water. With solely ammonia as the substrate an active nitrifying community consisting of novel marine Nitrosomonas aerobic ammonia oxidizers (ammonia-oxidizing bacteria) and Nitrospina and Nitrospira NOB was obtained which converted a maximum of 2 mmol of ammonia per liter per day. Switching the feed of the culture to nitrite as a sole substrate resulted in a Nitrospira NOB dominated community (approximately 80% of the total microbial community based on fluorescence in situ hybridization and metagenomic data) converting a maximum of 3 mmol of nitrite per liter per day. Phylogenetic analyses based on the 16S rRNA gene indicated that the Nitrospira enriched from the North Sea is a novel Nitrospira species with Nitrospira marina as the next taxonomically described relative (94% 16S rRNA sequence identity). Transmission electron microscopy analysis revealed a cell plan typical for Nitrospira species. The cytoplasm contained electron light particles that might represent glycogen storage. A large periplasmic space was present which was filled with electron dense particles. Nitrospira-targeted polymerase chain reaction analyses demonstrated the presence of the enriched Nitrospira species in a time series of North Sea genomic DNA samples. The availability of this new Nitrospira species enrichment culture facilitates further in-depth studies such as determination of physiological constraints, and comparison to other NOB species. PMID:23515432

  1. Evaluation of the effects of ozone oxidation on redox-cycling activity of two-stroke engine exhaust particles.

    PubMed

    McWhinney, Robert D; Gao, Shawna S; Zhou, Shouming; Abbatt, Jonathan P D

    2011-03-15

    The effect of oxidation on the redox-cycling activity of engine exhaust particles is examined. Particles obtained from a two-stroke gasoline engine were oxidized in a flow tube with ozone on a one-minute time scale both in the presence and absence of substantial gas-phase exhaust components. Whereas ozone concentrations were high, the ozone exposures were approximately equivalent to 60 ppb ozone for 2-8 h. Oxidation led to substantial increases in redox-cycling of aqueous extracts of filtered particles, as measured using the dithiothreitol (DTT) assay. Increases in redox activity when the entire exhaust was oxidized were primarily driven by deposition of redox-active secondary organic aerosol (SOA), resulting in an upper-limit DTT activity of 8.6 ± 2.0 pmol DTT consumed per min per microgram of particles, compared to 0.73 ± 0.60 pmol min(-1) ?g(-1) for fresh, unoxidized exhaust particles. Redox-cycling activity reached higher levels when VOC denuded exhaust was oxidized, with the highest DTT activity observed being 16.7 ± 1.6 pmol min(-1) ?g(-1) with no upper limit reached for the range of ozone exposures used in this study. Our results provide laboratory support for the hypothesis that the toxicity of engine combustion particles due to redox-cycling may increase as they age in the atmosphere. PMID:21341691

  2. SUPERCRITICAL WATER PARTIAL OXIDATION G.T. Hong and M.H. Spritzer

    E-print Network

    water content of the medium is effective for gasification of hydrogen-poor materials such as coal water content of the medium is effective for gasification of hydrogen-poor materials such as coal Oxidation (SWPO), a gasification process involving oxidative reactions in a supercritical water environment

  3. The Effect of Oxidant and Redox Potential on Metal Corrosion in Drinking Water

    EPA Science Inventory

    Future drinking water regulatory action may require some water utilities to consider additional and/or alternative oxidation and disinfection practices. There is little known about the effect of oxidant changes on the corrosion of drinking water distribution system materials and ...

  4. Environmental assessment of supercritical water oxidation and other sewage sludge handling options.

    PubMed

    Svanström, Magdalena; Fröling, Morgan; Olofsson, Mattias; Lundin, Margareta

    2005-08-01

    Sustainable development relies on the eco-efficient use of all flows in society; more value created out of each resource unit. Supercritical water oxidation (SCWO) can be used for treatment of wet organic waste. The technology has been under development for over 20 years but has not yet been fully commercialized. SCWO allows for complete oxidation of all organics in sewage sludge and almost complete recovery of the inherent energy, essentially without harmful emissions. In this paper, a life-cycle assessment (LCA) of sewage sludge SCWO (Aqua-Critox) is presented and the results are compared with LCA results for other sludge handling options: agricultural use, co-incineration with municipal solid waste, incineration with subsequent phosphorus extraction (Bio-Con) and sludge fractionation with phosphorus recovery (Cambi-KREPRO). For SCWO, beneficial utilization of the heat of reaction is of crucial importance for the outcome. The electricity consumed by pumping and the nitrous oxide produced are other important parameters. The best sludge handling option from an environmental point of view depends on what aspect is considered more important in the impact assessment. Regarding global warming, the energy recovery methods perform better than agricultural use. PMID:16200986

  5. Efficient solar water oxidation using photovoltaic devices functionalized with earth-abundant oxygen evolving catalysts.

    PubMed

    Cristino, Vito; Berardi, Serena; Caramori, Stefano; Argazzi, Roberto; Carli, Stefano; Meda, Laura; Tacca, Alessandra; Bignozzi, Carlo Alberto

    2013-08-21

    Indium tin oxide (ITO) surfaces of triple junction photovoltaic cells were functionalized with oxygen evolving catalysts (OECs) based on amorphous hydrous earth-abundant metal oxides (metal = Fe, Ni, Co), obtained by straightforward Successive Ionic Layer Adsorption and Reaction (SILAR) in an aqueous environment. Functionalization with Fe(iii) oxides gave the best results, leading to photoanodes capable of efficiently splitting water, with photocurrent densities up to 6 ± 1 mA cm(-2) at 0 V vs. the reversible hydrogen electrode (RHE) under AM 1.5 G simulated sunlight illumination. The resulting Solar To Hydrogen (STH) conversion efficiencies, measured in two electrodes configuration, were in the range 3.7-5%, depending on the counter electrode that was employed. Investigations on the stability showed that these photoanodes were able to sustain 120 minutes of continuous illumination with a < 10% photocurrent loss at 0 V vs. RHE. Pristine photoanodic response of the cells could be fully restored by an additional SILAR cycle, evidencing that the observed loss is due to the detachment of the more weakly surface bound catalyst. PMID:23820552

  6. A fully coupled model for water-gas-heat reactive transport with methane oxidation in landfill covers.

    PubMed

    Ng, C W W; Feng, S; Liu, H W

    2015-03-01

    Methane oxidation in landfill covers is a complex process involving water, gas and heat transfer as well as microbial oxidation. The coupled phenomena of microbial oxidation, water, gas, and heat transfer are not fully understood. In this study, a new model is developed that incorporates water-gas-heat coupled reactive transport in unsaturated soil with methane oxidation. Effects of microbial oxidation-generated water and heat are included. The model is calibrated using published data from a laboratory soil column test. Moreover, a series of parametric studies are carried out to investigate the influence of microbial oxidation-generated water and heat, initial water content on methane oxidation efficiency. Computed and measured results of gas concentration and methane oxidation rate are consistent. It is found that the coupling effects between water-gas-heat transfer and methane oxidation are significant. Ignoring microbial oxidation-generated water and heat can result in a significant difference in methane oxidation efficiency by 100%. PMID:25489976

  7. Long-term Thermal Cycling of Phlogopite Mica-based Compressive Seals for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, Y S.; Stevenson, Jeffry W.

    2005-02-02

    Planar solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) require sealants to function properly in harsh environments at elevated temperatures. The SOFC stacks are expected to experience multiple thermal cycles (perhaps thousands of cycles for some applications) during their life time service in stationary or transportation applications. As a result, thermal cycle stability is considered a top priority for SOFC sealant development. In previous work, we have developed a hybrid mica-based compressive seal with very low leak rates of 2-4 x 10-2 to 10-3 sccm/cm at 800 C, and showed stable leak rates over limited thermal cycles In this paper we present results of long-term thermal cycle testing (> 1000 thermal cycles) of Phlogopite mica-based compressive seals. Open circuit voltage (OCV) was measured on a 2? x 2? 8-YSZ plate with the hybrid Phlogopite mica seals during thermal cycling in a dual environment (2.75% H2/Ar vs. air). During two long-term cycling tests, the measured OCVs were found to be consistent with the calculated Nernst voltages. The hybrid mica seal showed excellent thermal cycle stability over 1000 thermal cycles and can be considered a strong candidate for SOFC applications.

  8. INVESTIGATIONS ON THE IMPACTS OF LAND-COVER CHANGES AND/OR INCREASED CO2 CONCENTRATIONS ON FOUR REGIONAL WATER CYCLES

    E-print Network

    Moelders, Nicole

    REGIONAL WATER CYCLES AND THEIR INTERACTIONS WITH THE GLOBAL WATER CYCLE By Zhao Li RECOMMENDED-COVER CHANGES AND/OR INCREASED CO2 CONCENTRATIONS ON FOUR REGIONAL WATER CYCLES AND THEIR INTERACTIONS WITH THE GLOBAL WATER CYCLE A THESIS Presented to the Faculty of the University of Alaska Fairbanks In Partial

  9. Iron oxide hydroxide nanoflower assisted removal of arsenic from water

    SciTech Connect

    Raul, Prasanta Kumar, E-mail: prasanta.drdo@gmail.com [Defence Research Laboratory, Post Bag No. 2, Tezpur 784001, Assam (India); Devi, Rashmi Rekha; Umlong, Iohborlang M. [Defence Research Laboratory, Post Bag No. 2, Tezpur 784001, Assam (India); Thakur, Ashim Jyoti [Department of Chemical Sciences, Tezpur University, Napaam, Tezpur 784028, Assam (India); Banerjee, Saumen; Veer, Vijay [Defence Research Laboratory, Post Bag No. 2, Tezpur 784001, Assam (India)

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Non-magnetic polycrystalline iron oxide hydroxide nanoparticle with flower like morphology is found to play as an effective adsorbent media to remove As(III) from 300 ?g L{sup ?1} to less than 10 ?g L{sup ?1} from drinking water over wide range of pH. TEM image clearly reveals that the nanoparticle looks flower like morphology with average particle size less than 20 nm. The maximum sorption capacity of the sorbent is found to be 475 ?g g{sup ?1} for arsenic at room temperature and the data fitted to different isotherm models indicate the heterogeneity of the adsorbent surface. The material can be regenerated up to 70% using dilute hydrochloric acid and it would be utilized for de-arsenification purposes. - Highlights: • The work includes synthesis of iron oxide hydroxide nanoflower and its applicability for the removal of arsenic from water. • The nanoparticle was characterized using modern instrumental methods like FESEM, TEM, BET, XRD, etc. • The maximum sorption capacity of the sorbent is found to be 475 ?g g{sup ?1} for arsenic at room temperature. • The sorption is multilayered on the heterogeneous surface of the nano adsorbent. • The mechanism of arsenic removal of IOH nanoflower follows both adsorption and ion-exchange. - Abstract: Non-magnetic polycrystalline iron oxide hydroxide nanoparticle with flower like morphology is found to play as an effective adsorbent media to remove As(III) from 300 ?g L{sup ?1} to less than 10 ?g L{sup ?1} from drinking water over wide range of pH. The nanoparticle was characterized by X-ray powder diffraction analysis (XRD), BET surface area, FTIR, FESEM and TEM images. TEM image clearly reveals flower like morphology with average particle size less than 20 nm. The nanoflower morphology is also supported by FESEM images. The maximum sorption capacity of the sorbent is found to be 475 ?g g{sup ?1} for arsenic and the data fitted to different isotherm models indicate the heterogeneity of the adsorbent surface. Study on adsorption kinetics shows that adsorption of arsenic onto iron oxide hydroxide nanoflower follows pseudo-second order kinetic. The material can be regenerated up to 70% using dilute hydrochloric acid and it would be utilized for de-arsenification purposes.

  10. Carbon and Water Cycling in a Texas Hill Country Woodland

    E-print Network

    Kamps, Ray Herbert

    2014-12-11

    , as illustrated in Miller (2009) for Blue oaks (Q. douglasii). However, Eggemeyer and Schwinning (2009) showed that neither the more deeply rooted mesquite nor the more shallowly rooted juniper have access to a stable supply of water in the Texas Hill Country...

  11. Earth Science (A Process Approach), Section 1: The Water Cycle.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, K. C.; And Others

    Included is a collection of earth science laboratory activities, which may provide the junior or senior high school science teacher with ideas for activities in his program. The included 48 experiments are grouped into these areas: properties of matter; evaporation; atmospheric moisture and condensation; precipitation; moving water, subsurface…

  12. Microbial dissimilatory sulfur cycle in acid mine water.

    PubMed

    Tuttle, J H; Dugan, P R; Macmillan, C B; Randles, C I

    1969-02-01

    Ferric, sulfate, and hydrogen ions are produced from pyritic minerals associated with coal as a result of autotrophic bacterial metabolism. Water carrying these ions accumulated behind a porous dam composed of wood dust originating at a log-cutting mill. As water seeped through the porous dam, it was enriched in organic nutrients which then supported growth and metabolism of heterotrophic bacteria in the water downstream from the dam. The heterotrophic microflora within and below the sawdust dam included dissimilatory sulfate-reducing anaerobic bacteria which reduce sulfate to sulfide. The sulfide produced caused the chemical reduction of ferric to ferrous ion, and black FeS precipitate was deposited on the pond bottom. A net increase in the pH of the lower pond water was observed when compared to the upper pond water. Microbial activity in the wood dust was demonstrated, and a sequence of cellulose degradation processes was inferred on the basis of sugar accumulation in mixed cultures in the laboratory, ultimately yielding fermentation products which serve as nutrients for sulfate-reducing bacteria. Some of the microorganisms were isolated and characterized. The biochemical and growth characteristics of pure culture isolates were generally consistent with observed reactions in the acidic environment, with the exception of sulfate-reducing bacteria. Mixed cultures which contained sulfate-reducing bacteria reduced sulfate at pH 3.0 in the laboratory with sawdust as the only nutrient. Pure cultures of sulfate-reducing bacteria isolated from the mixed cultures did not reduce sulfate below pH 5.5. PMID:5773013

  13. Roles of Oxygen and Water Vapor in the Oxidation of Halogen Terminated Ge(111) Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Shiyu; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Sun, Yun; Liu, Zhi; Lee, Dong-Ick; Pianette, Piero; /SLAC, SSRL

    2006-12-18

    The initial stage of the oxidation of Cl and Br terminated Ge(111) surfaces is studied using photoelectron spectroscopy. The authors perform controlled experiments to differentiate the effects of different factors in oxidation, and find that water vapor and oxygen play different roles. Water vapor effectively replaces the halogen termination layers with the hydroxyl group, but does not oxidize the surfaces further. In contrast, little oxidation is observed for Cl and Br terminated surfaces with dry oxygen alone. However, with the help of water vapor, oxygen oxidizes the surface by breaking the Ge-Ge back bonds instead of changing the termination layer.

  14. Optimization of the oxidant supply system for combined cycle MHD power plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juhasz, A. J.

    1982-01-01

    An in-depth study was conducted to determine what, if any, improvements could be made on the oxidant supply system for combined cycle MHD power plants which could be reflected in higher thermal efficiency and a reduction in the cost of electricity, COE. A systematic analysis of air separation process varitions which showed that the specific energy consumption could be minimized when the product stream oxygen concentration is about 70 mole percent was conducted. The use of advanced air compressors, having variable speed and guide vane position control, results in additional power savings. The study also led to the conceptual design of a new air separation process, sized for a 500 MW sub e MHD plant, referred to a internal compression is discussed. In addition to its lower overall energy consumption, potential capital cost savings were identified for air separation plants using this process when constructed in a single large air separation train rather than multiple parallel trains, typical of conventional practice.

  15. Effects of Gravity on Supercritical Water Oxidation (SCWO) Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hegde, Uday; Hicks, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The effects of gravity on the fluid mechanics of supercritical water jets are being studied at NASA to develop a better understanding of flow behaviors for purposes of advancing supercritical water oxidation (SCWO) technologies for applications in reduced gravity environments. These studies provide guidance for the development of future SCWO experiments in new experimental platforms that will extend the current operational range of the DECLIC (Device for the Study of Critical Liquids and Crystallization) Facility on board the International Space Station (ISS). The hydrodynamics of supercritical fluid jets is one of the basic unit processes of a SCWO reactor. These hydrodynamics are often complicated by significant changes in the thermo-physical properties that govern flow behavior (e.g., viscosity, thermal conductivity, specific heat, compressibility, etc), particularly when fluids transition from sub-critical to supercritical conditions. Experiments were conducted in a 150 ml reactor cell under constant pressure with water injections at various flow rates. Flow configurations included supercritical jets injected into either sub-critical or supercritical water. Profound gravitational influences were observed, particularly in the transition to turbulence, for the flow conditions under study. These results will be presented and the parameters of the flow that control jet behavior will be examined and discussed.

  16. Comparative assessment of nuclear fuel cycles. Light-water reactor once-through, classical fast breeder reactor, and symbiotic fast breeder reactor cycles

    SciTech Connect

    Hardie, R.W.; Barrett, R.J.; Freiwald, J.G.

    1980-06-01

    The object of the Alternative Nuclear Fuel Cycle Study is to perform comparative assessments of nuclear power systems. There are two important features of this study. First, this evaluation attempts to encompass the complete, integrated fuel cycle from mining of uranium ore to disposal of waste rather than isolated components. Second, it compares several aspects of each cycle - energy use, economics, technological status, proliferation, public safety, and commercial potential - instead of concentrating on one or two assessment areas. This report presents assessment results for three fuel cycles. These are the light-water reactor once-through cycle, the fast breeder reactor on the classical plutonium cycle, and the fast breeder reactor on a symbiotic cycle using plutonium and /sup 233/U as fissile fuels. The report also contains a description of the methodology used in this assessment. Subsequent reports will present results for additional fuel cycles.

  17. Improving Representation of the Nitrous Oxide Cycle in Ocean Biogeochemical Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suntharalingam, P.; Buitenhuis, E.; Le Quere, C.; O'Meara, S.; Nevison, C. D.; Bange, H. W.; Butler, J. H.; Elkins, J. W.

    2011-12-01

    The processes governing the marine nitrous oxide cycle, oceanic distribution, and flux to the atmosphere display distinct heterogeneity. The primary pathway for N2O production in the oxygenated open ocean is believed to be nitrification during the oxidation of ammonium to nitrate. However, mechanisms of marine N2O production and consumption display significant sensitivity to local oxygen concentration. Oxygen minimum zones such as the Arabian Sea and Eastern Equatorial Pacific are characterized by large gradients in sub-surface N2O, and high rates of N2O turnover that significantly exceed those observed in the open ocean. A range of processes is believed to govern N2O formation in these regions, including enhanced nitrification, and a coupling of nitrification and denitrification pathways. N2O is also depleted via denitrification in anoxic zones. This spatial heterogeneity presents challenges to the development of effective model parameterizations for ocean N2O; i.e., parameterizations that also display reliable predictive capability under conditions of changing ocean circulation, productivity, and oxygen distribution. In this analysis we use the ocean biogeochemistry model NEMO-PlankTOM to evaluate a range of recent empirical parameterizations for marine N2O formation. We contrast these parameterizations with a recently developed process-based model of oceanic N2O. Simulations are evaluated using a global database of oceanic N2O measurements. Evaluation metrics include surface concentrations, depth profiles, and regional averages. We also discuss the challenges of developing a successful representation of the marine N2O cycle, given specific limitations of the present generation of global ocean biogeochemistry models.

  18. cGMP-independent nitric oxide signaling and regulation of the cell cycle

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Xiaolin; Zhang, Jianhua; Ma, Penglin; Myers, Daniela E; Goldberg, Ilana G; Sittler, Kelly J; Barb, Jennifer J; Munson, Peter J; Cintron, Ana del Pilar; McCoy, J Philip; Wang, Shuibang; Danner, Robert L

    2005-01-01

    Background Regulatory functions of nitric oxide (NO•) that bypass the second messenger cGMP are incompletely understood. Here, cGMP-independent effects of NO• on gene expression were globally examined in U937 cells, a human monoblastoid line that constitutively lacks soluble guanylate cyclase. Differentiated U937 cells (>80% in G0/G1) were exposed to S-nitrosoglutathione, a NO• donor, or glutathione alone (control) for 6 h without or with dibutyryl-cAMP (Bt2cAMP), and then harvested to extract total RNA for microarray analysis. Bt2cAMP was used to block signaling attributable to NO•-induced decreases in cAMP. Results NO• regulated 110 transcripts that annotated disproportionately to the cell cycle and cell proliferation (47/110, 43%) and more frequently than expected contained AU-rich, post-transcriptional regulatory elements (ARE). Bt2cAMP regulated 106 genes; cell cycle gene enrichment did not reach significance. Like NO•, Bt2cAMP was associated with ARE-containing transcripts. A comparison of NO• and Bt2cAMP effects showed that NO• regulation of cell cycle genes was independent of its ability to interfere with cAMP signaling. Cell cycle genes induced by NO• annotated to G1/S (7/8) and included E2F1 and p21/Waf1/Cip1; 6 of these 7 were E2F target genes involved in G1/S transition. Repressed genes were G2/M associated (24/27); 8 of 27 were known targets of p21. E2F1 mRNA and protein were increased by NO•, as was E2F1 binding to E2F promoter elements. NO• activated p38 MAPK, stabilizing p21 mRNA (an ARE-containing transcript) and increasing p21 protein; this increased protein binding to CDE/CHR promoter sites of p21 target genes, repressing key G2/M phase genes, and increasing the proportion of cells in G2/M. Conclusion NO• coordinates a highly integrated program of cell cycle arrest that regulates a large number of genes, but does not require signaling through cGMP. In humans, antiproliferative effects of NO• may rely substantially on cGMP-independent mechanisms. Stress kinase signaling and alterations in mRNA stability appear to be major pathways by which NO• regulates the transcriptome. PMID:16269079

  19. Nitrogen cycling in different types of sediments from Danish waters

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. H. Blackburn; K. Henridsen

    1983-01-01

    Variations in sediment N:C ratios were correlated with water depth and season. ¹⁴NHâ\\/sup +\\/ was used to measure the rates of NHâ\\/sup +\\/ production (d) and incorporation into bacterial cells (i) in sediments from different stations, at different seasons. The validity of the rates d and i was indicated by the predicted correlation of d:i ratios with N:C ratios of

  20. Quantifying and Reducing Uncertainty in the Large-Scale Response of the Water Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Gill M.

    2014-05-01

    Despite their obvious environmental, societal and economic importance, our understanding of the causes and magnitude of the variations in the global water cycle is still unsatisfactory. Uncertainties in hydrological predictions from the current generation of models pose a serious challenge to the reliability of forecasts and projections across time and space scales. This paper provides an overview of the current issues and challenges in modelling various aspects of the Earth's hydrological cycle. These include: the global water budget and water conservation, the role of model resolution and parametrisation of precipitation-generating processes on the representation of the global and regional hydrological cycle, representation of clouds and microphysical processes, rainfall variability, the influence of land-atmosphere coupling on rainfall patterns and their variability, monsoon processes and teleconnections, and ocean and cryosphere modelling. We conclude that continued collaborative activity in the areas of model development across timescales, process studies and climate change studies will provide better understanding of how and why the hydrological cycle may change, and better estimation of uncertainty in model projections of changes in the global water cycle.

  1. Supercritical water oxidation for wastewater treatment Preliminary study of urea destruction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Timberlake, S. H.; Hong, G. T.; Simson, M.; Modell, M.

    1982-01-01

    Supercritical water oxidation is being investigated as a method of treating spacecraft wastewater for recycle. In this process, oxidation is conducted in an aqueous phase maintained above the critical temperature (374 C) and pressure (215 bar) of water. Organic materials are oxidized with efficiencies greater than 99.99 percent in residence times of less than 1 minute. This paper presents preliminary results for urea destruction. Above 650 C, urea can be completely broken down to nitrogen gas, carbon dioxide and water by supercritical water oxidation, without the use of a specific catalyst.

  2. Transgenic Introduction of a Glycolate Oxidative Cycle into A. thaliana Chloroplasts Leads to Growth Improvement

    PubMed Central

    Maier, Alexandra; Fahnenstich, Holger; von Caemmerer, Susanne; Engqvist, Martin K. M.; Weber, Andreas P. M.; Flügge, Ulf-Ingo; Maurino, Veronica G.

    2012-01-01

    The photorespiratory pathway helps illuminated C3-plants under conditions of limited CO2 availability by effectively exporting reducing equivalents in form of glycolate out of the chloroplast and regenerating glycerate-3-P as substrate for RubisCO. On the other hand, this pathway is considered as probably futile because previously assimilated CO2 is released in mitochondria. Consequently, a lot of effort has been made to reduce this CO2 loss either by reducing fluxes via engineering RubisCO or circumventing mitochondrial CO2 release by the introduction of new enzyme activities. Here we present an approach following the latter route, introducing a complete glycolate catabolic cycle in chloroplasts of Arabidopsis thaliana comprising glycolate oxidase (GO), malate synthase (MS), and catalase (CAT). Results from plants bearing both GO and MS activities have already been reported (Fahnenstich et al., 2008). This previous work showed that the H2O2 produced by GO had strongly negative effects. These effects can be prevented by introducing a plastidial catalase activity, as reported here. Transgenic lines bearing all three transgenic enzyme activities were identified and some with higher CAT activity showed higher dry weight, higher photosynthetic rates, and changes in glycine/serine ratio compared to the wild type. This indicates that the fine-tuning of transgenic enzyme activities in the chloroplasts seems crucial and strongly suggests that the approach is valid and that it is possible to improve the growth of A. thaliana by introducing a synthetic glycolate oxidative cycle into chloroplasts. PMID:22639647

  3. Life Cycle Water Consumption and Wastewater Generation Impacts of a Marcellus Shale Gas Well

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    This study estimates the life cycle water consumption and wastewater generation impacts of a Marcellus shale gas well from its construction to end of life. Direct water consumption at the well site was assessed by analysis of data from approximately 500 individual well completion reports collected in 2010 by the Pennsylvania Department of Conservation and Natural Resources. Indirect water consumption for supply chain production at each life cycle stage of the well was estimated using the economic input–output life cycle assessment (EIO-LCA) method. Life cycle direct and indirect water quality pollution impacts were assessed and compared using the tool for the reduction and assessment of chemical and other environmental impacts (TRACI). Wastewater treatment cost was proposed as an additional indicator for water quality pollution impacts from shale gas well wastewater. Four water management scenarios for Marcellus shale well wastewater were assessed: current conditions in Pennsylvania; complete discharge; direct reuse and desalination; and complete desalination. The results show that under the current conditions, an average Marcellus shale gas well consumes 20?000 m3 (with a range from 6700 to 33?000 m3) of freshwater per well over its life cycle excluding final gas utilization, with 65% direct water consumption at the well site and 35% indirect water consumption across the supply chain production. If all flowback and produced water is released into the environment without treatment, direct wastewater from a Marcellus shale gas well is estimated to have 300–3000 kg N-eq eutrophication potential, 900–23?000 kg 2,4D-eq freshwater ecotoxicity potential, 0–370 kg benzene-eq carcinogenic potential, and 2800–71?000 MT toluene-eq noncarcinogenic potential. The potential toxicity of the chemicals in the wastewater from the well site exceeds those associated with supply chain production, except for carcinogenic effects. If all the Marcellus shale well wastewater is treated to surface discharge standards by desalination, $59?000–270?000 per well would be required. The life cycle study results indicate that when gas end use is not considered hydraulic fracturing is the largest contributor to the life cycle water impacts of a Marcellus shale gas well. PMID:24380628

  4. Glutamate Utilization Couples Oxidative Stress Defense and the Tricarboxylic Acid Cycle in Francisella Phagosomal Escape

    PubMed Central

    Ramond, Elodie; Gesbert, Gael; Rigard, Mélanie; Dairou, Julien; Dupuis, Marion; Dubail, Iharilalao; Meibom, Karin; Henry, Thomas; Barel, Monique; Charbit, Alain

    2014-01-01

    Intracellular bacterial pathogens have developed a variety of strategies to avoid degradation by the host innate immune defense mechanisms triggered upon phagocytocis. Upon infection of mammalian host cells, the intracellular pathogen Francisella replicates exclusively in the cytosolic compartment. Hence, its ability to escape rapidly from the phagosomal compartment is critical for its pathogenicity. Here, we show for the first time that a glutamate transporter of Francisella (here designated GadC) is critical for oxidative stress defense in the phagosome, thus impairing intra-macrophage multiplication and virulence in the mouse model. The gadC mutant failed to efficiently neutralize the production of reactive oxygen species. Remarkably, virulence of the gadC mutant was partially restored in mice defective in NADPH oxidase activity. The data presented highlight links between glutamate uptake, oxidative stress defense, the tricarboxylic acid cycle and phagosomal escape. This is the first report establishing the role of an amino acid transporter in the early stage of the Francisella intracellular lifecycle. PMID:24453979

  5. The oxidative stress in response to routine incremental cycling exercise in healthy sedentary subjects.

    PubMed

    Jammes, Yves; Steinberg, Jean Guillaume; Brégeon, Fabienne; Delliaux, Stéphane

    2004-11-30

    The kinetics of blood markers of the oxidative stress during and after an incremental exercise until the maximal performances is not documented in healthy sedentary subjects. We studied subjects of both sexes cycling on an ergometer until or near the V(O)(2)(max) measurement, and we measured during exercise and a 30-min recovery period the plasma concentration of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) which explored the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and two antioxidants (plasma reduced ascorbic acid (RAA) and erythrocyte reduced glutathione (GSH)). Despite we noted inter-individual differences in the instants of maximal variations of TBARS, GSH, and RAA, they were all measured within the first 20 min of the post-exercise recovery period, and at the 30th min of recovery, the three ROS blood markers tended to recover their pre-exercise levels. The maximal TBARS increase was positively correlated with V(O)(2)(max) and negatively correlated with the magnitude of RAA consumption. Our results indicate the existence of an early post-exercise oxidative stress in healthy sedentary volunteers. They also show that the ROS production is proportional to the maximal aerobic power and inversely related to the consumption of plasma antioxidants. PMID:15522705

  6. Oxidation of Ultra High Temperature Ceramics in Water Vapor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, QuynhGiao N.; Opila, Elizabeth J.; Robinson, Raymond C.

    2004-01-01

    Ultra High Temperature Ceramics (UHTCs) including HfB2 + 20v/0 SiC (HS), ZrB2 + 20v/0 SiC (ZS), and ZrB2 + 30v/0 C + 14v/0 SiC (ZCS) have been investigated for use as potential aeropropulsion engine materials. These materials were oxidized in water vapor (90 percent) using a cyclic vertical furnace at 1 atm. The total exposure time was 10 h at temperatures of 1200, 1300, and 1400 C. CVD SiC was also evaluated as a baseline for comparison. Weight change, X-ray diffraction analyses, surface and cross-sectional SEM and EDS were performed. These results are compared with tests ran in a stagnant air furnace at temperatures of 1327 C for 100 min, and with high pressure burner rig (HPBR) results at 1100 and 1300 C at 6 atm for 50 h. Low velocity water vapor does not make a significant contribution to the oxidation rates of UHTCs when compared to stagnant air. The parabolic rate constants at 1300 C, range from 0.29 to 16.0 mg(sup 2)cm(sup 4)/h for HS and ZCS, respectively, with ZS results between these two values. Comparison of results for UHTCs tested in the furnace in 90 percent water vapor with HPBR results was difficult due to significant sample loss caused by spallation in the increased velocity of the HPBR. Total recession measurements are also reported for the two test environments.

  7. Sulfur speciation and sulfide oxidation in the water column of the Black Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luther, George W., III; Church, Thomas M.; Powell, David

    We have applied sulfur speciation techniques to understand the chemistry and cycling of sulfur in Black Sea waters. The only reduced dissolved inorganic sulfur species detected (above the low minimum detection limits of the voltammetric methods employed) in the water column was hydrogen sulfide. The maximum concentration of sulfide (423 ?M) is similar to previous reports. Using a cathodic stripping square wave voltammetry (CSSWV) method for nanomolar levels of sulfide, we determined the precise boundary between the "free" hydrogen sulfide (sulfidic) zone and the upper (oxic/suboxic) water column at the two stations studied. This boundary has apparently moved up by about 50 m in the past 20 years. Our results help demonstrate three chemically distinct zones of water in the central basin of the Black Sea: (1) the oxic [0-65 m], (2) the anoxic/nonsulfidic [65-100 m] and (3) the sulfidic [>100 m]. Sulfide bound to metals ("complexed" sulfide) is observed in both the oxic and anoxic/nonsulfidic zones of the water column. This supports previous studies on metal sulfide forms. From the electrochemical data, it is possible to estimate the strength of the complexation of sulfide to metals (log K = 10 to 11). Thiosulfate and sulfite were below our minimum detectable limit (MDL) of 50 nM using CSSWV. Elemental sulfur (MDL 5 nM) was detected below the onset of the hydrogen sulfide zone (90-100 m) with a maximum of 30-60 nM near 120 m. The sulfur speciation results for the Black Sea are lower by one order of magnitude or more than other marine systems such as the Cariaco Trench and salt marshes. New HPLC techniques were applied to detect thiols at submicromolar levels. The presence of thiols (2-mercaptoethylamine, 2-mercaptoethanol, N-acetylcysteine and glutathione) is correlated with the remineralization of organic matter at the oxic and anoxic/nonsulfidic interface. Water samples collected from the upper 50 m of the sulfidic zone showed significant sulfide oxidation on storage onboard ship even though they were filtered (0.2 ?m) and handled to exclude oxygen contamination. Chemical additives such as formaldehyde, glutaraldehyde, hydroxylamine and ascorbic acid prevented or retarded the sulfide loss. Thiosulfate and azide did not inhibit sulfide loss. These studies suggest an anaerobic chemical oxidation of sulfide rather than a biological oxidation on stored and filtered samples.

  8. Destruction of explosives and rocket fuels by supercritical water oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Dyer, R.B.; Buelow, S.J.; Harradine, D.M.; Robinson, J.M.; Foy, B.R.; Atencio, J.H.; Dell`Orco, P.C.; Funk, K.A.; McInroy, R.E.; Rofer, C.K.; Counce, D.A.; Trujillo, P.E. Jr. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Wander, J.D. [Hq. AFB Civil Engineering Support Agency, Tyndall AFB, FL (United States)

    1992-09-01

    Traditional methods for disposing of PEPs have been open burning or open detonation (OB/OD); however, regulatory agencies are likely to prohibit OB/OD because of the uncontrolled air emissions and soil contaminations. Likewise, controlled incineration carries a liability for air pollution because large quantities of NO{sub x} are produced in the conventional combustion chemistry of PEPS. Soil and ground water have already been contaminated with PEPs through normal operations at manufacturing plants and military bases. Incineration can be used for decontamination of these soils, with the associated liability for air pollution, but few satisfactory and economic methods exist for ground water decontamination. A clear need exists for improved disposal and destruction methods. The destruction of energetic materials, including propellants, explosives and pyrotechnics (PEPS) by oxidation in supercritical water is described. The focus is on the chemistry of the process. The destruction efficiencies and products of reaction contained in the aqueous and gaseous effluents of several representative PEPs are reported.

  9. Destruction of explosives and rocket fuels by supercritical water oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Dyer, R.B.; Buelow, S.J.; Harradine, D.M.; Robinson, J.M.; Foy, B.R.; Atencio, J.H.; Dell'Orco, P.C.; Funk, K.A.; McInroy, R.E.; Rofer, C.K.; Counce, D.A.; Trujillo, P.E. Jr. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)); Wander, J.D. (Hq. AFB Civil Engineering Support Agency, Tyndall AFB, FL (United States))

    1992-01-01

    Traditional methods for disposing of PEPs have been open burning or open detonation (OB/OD); however, regulatory agencies are likely to prohibit OB/OD because of the uncontrolled air emissions and soil contaminations. Likewise, controlled incineration carries a liability for air pollution because large quantities of NO{sub x} are produced in the conventional combustion chemistry of PEPS. Soil and ground water have already been contaminated with PEPs through normal operations at manufacturing plants and military bases. Incineration can be used for decontamination of these soils, with the associated liability for air pollution, but few satisfactory and economic methods exist for ground water decontamination. A clear need exists for improved disposal and destruction methods. The destruction of energetic materials, including propellants, explosives and pyrotechnics (PEPS) by oxidation in supercritical water is described. The focus is on the chemistry of the process. The destruction efficiencies and products of reaction contained in the aqueous and gaseous effluents of several representative PEPs are reported.

  10. Removal of acridine orange from water by graphene oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiallos, D. Coello; Gómez, C. Vacacela; Usca, G. Tubón; Pérez, D. Cid; Tavolaro, P.; Martino, G.; Caputi, L. S.; Tavolaro, A.

    2015-02-01

    Dyes are usually used in textile manufacturing and are one of the major contaminations in water. Thus, from an environmental point of view, the removal of dyes is of great concern, and recent applications using carbon-based materials showed high adsorption ability. In this work we use graphene oxide (GO) produced by improved Hummer's method, for adsorption of acridine orange dye (AO) in water. GO is a material containing functional groups such as carboxyl, epoxy, ketone, and hydroxyl, that can adsorb cationic dyes. Factors such as initial concentration of dye, the amount of GO, temperature and contact time were evaluated. Results show that the adsorption equilibrium, with the removal of 40% of the dye, is reached in approximately 1 hour, and that the adsorption capacity increases at higher initial concentrations. The highest value of AO adsorbed was 229.8 mg/g equivalent to 92% removal percentage by using AO initial concentration 0.10 mg/mL. FT-IR analysis of GO with adsorbed AO shows changes in the stretching vibrational bands, which corroborate the AO/GO interaction due to the functional groups present in GO. Furthermore, AO adsorbed on GO does not desorb back into water. Our results show that GO is an effective adsorbent and could be used to treat effluents contaminated with dyes.

  11. Coevolution in water resource development: The vicious cycle of water supply and demand in Athens, Greece

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Giorgos Kallis

    2010-01-01

    This paper adopts a coevolutionary perspective to criticize the dominant narratives of water resource development. Such narratives of progress portray a sequence of improving water technologies that overcame environmental constraints, supplying more water to satisfy the demands of growing populations for better living. Water supply appears as the response to an insatiable demand, exogenous to the water system. Instead, as

  12. Water Cycle Science Initiatives: a Response to Rising Concerns about the Availability of Safe Water

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. G. Lawford

    2001-01-01

    As a result of increasing pressures on water resources in different parts of the world there is an growing awareness of the need to address water problems through new national and international science programs. The pressures on water resources arise from limited supplies, growing demands for water, uncoordinated water usage and distribution, and industrial activities that degrade the quality of

  13. Cobalt-phosphate-assisted photoelectrochemical water oxidation by arrays of molybdenum-doped zinc oxide nanorods.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yan-Gu; Hsu, Yu-Kuei; Chen, Ying-Chu; Lee, Bing-Wei; Hwang, Jih-Shang; Chen, Li-Chyong; Chen, Kuei-Hsien

    2014-09-01

    We report the first demonstration of cobalt phosphate (Co-Pi)-assisted molybdenum-doped zinc oxide nanorods (Zn(1-x)Mo(x)O NRs) as visible-light-sensitive photofunctional electrodes to fundamentally improve the performance of ZnO NRs for photoelectrochemical (PEC) water splitting. A maximum photoconversion efficiency as high as 1.05% was achieved, at a photocurrent density of 1.4?mA?cm(-2). More importantly, in addition to achieve the maximum incident photon to current conversion efficiency (IPCE) value of 86%, it could be noted that the IPCE of Zn(1-x)Mo(x)O photoanodes under monochromatic illumination (450?nm) is up to 12%. Our PEC performances are comparable to those of many oxide-based photoanodes in recent reports. The improvement in photoactivity of PEC water splitting may be attributed to the enhanced visible-light absorption, increased charge-carrier densities, and improved interfacial charge-transfer kinetics due to the combined effect of molybdenum incorporation and Co-Pi modification, contributing to photocatalysis. The new design of constructing highly photoactive Co-Pi-assisted Zn(1-x)Mo(x)O photoanodes enriches knowledge on doping and advances the development of high-efficiency photoelectrodes in the solar-hydrogen field. PMID:25044962

  14. Ruthenium or osmium complexes and their uses as catalysts for water oxidation

    DOEpatents

    Concepcion Corbea, Javier Jesus; Chen, Zuofeng; Jurss, Jonah Wesley; Templeton, Joseph L; Hoertz, Paul; Meyer, Thomas J

    2014-10-28

    The present invention provides ruthenium or osmium complexes and their uses as a catalyst for catalytic water oxidation. Another aspect of the invention provides an electrode and photo-electrochemical cells for electrolysis of water molecules.

  15. Ruthenium or osmium complexes and their uses as catalysts for water oxidation

    DOEpatents

    Corbea, Javier Jesus Concepcion; Chen, Zuofeng; Jurss, Jonah Wesley; Templeton, Joseph L.; Hoertz, Paul; Meyer, Thomas J.

    2013-09-03

    The present invention provides ruthenium or osmium complexes and their uses as a catalyst for catalytic water oxidation. Another aspect of the invention provides an electrode and photo-electrochemical cells for electrolysis of water molecules.

  16. An investigation of corrosion mechanisms of constructional alloys in supercritical water oxidation (SCWO) systems

    E-print Network

    Kim, Hojong, 1974-

    2004-01-01

    Supercritical water oxidation (SCWO) is a technology that can effectively destroy aqueous organic waste above the critical point of pure water. These waste feed streams are very aggressive and pose material performance ...

  17. Electrocatalytic water oxidation by a monomeric amidate-ligated Fe(III)-aqua complex.

    PubMed

    Coggins, Michael K; Zhang, Ming-Tian; Vannucci, Aaron K; Dares, Christopher J; Meyer, Thomas J

    2014-04-16

    The six-coordinate Fe(III)-aqua complex [Fe(III)(dpaq)(H2O)](2+) (1, dpaq is 2-[bis(pyridine-2-ylmethyl)]amino-N-quinolin-8-yl-acetamido) is an electrocatalyst for water oxidation in propylene carbonate-water mixtures. An electrochemical kinetics study has revealed that water oxidation occurs by oxidation to Fe(V)(O)(2+) followed by a reaction first order in catalyst and added water, respectively, with ko = 0.035(4) M(-1) s(-1) by the single-site mechanism found previously for Ru and Ir water oxidation catalysts. Sustained water oxidation catalysis occurs at a high surface area electrode to give O2 through at least 29 turnovers over an 15 h electrolysis period with a 45% Faradaic yield and no observable decomposition of the catalyst. PMID:24670044

  18. Life cycle assessment of water reuse systems in an industrial park.

    PubMed

    Tong, Le; Liu, Xin; Liu, Xuewei; Yuan, Zengwei; Zhang, Qiong

    2013-11-15

    The rapid development of industrial parks in China has resulted in large resource consumption and pollutant emissions, especially freshwater use and wastewater discharge. Water reuse has attracted much attention from governments because of its potential to conserve freshwater and reduce pollutant emissions. However, water reuse usually means adding advanced treatment which consumes chemicals, materials and energy. Is the water reuse beneficial for the environment from a life cycle perspective? To answer this question, we quantified the environmental impacts of reusing treated wastewater at industrial parks under different scenarios through a comparative life-cycle assessment (LCA). Four scenarios are assessed: wastewater is treated and discharged, 20% and 99% of wastewater is treated and reused as industrial process water, and treated wastewater is used for horticulture. Inventory data were mainly obtained from a facility which manages the wastewater treatment and reuse system of an industrial park in Jiangsu Province. Environmental impacts were evaluated using the CML2001 method built into the GaBi version 4.3 database. The results show the water reuse is beneficial and the reuse rate significantly affects environmental performance of the system. It is also found that using the reclaimed water for higher value applications results in larger environmental credit. Decision makers in water management should consider both water quantity and quality and associated environmental impacts for different water reuse applications. PMID:24012874

  19. An Iridium(IV) Species, [Cp*Ir(NHC)Cl]+, Related to a Water-Oxidation Catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Brewster, Timothy P; Blakemore, James D; Schley, Nathan D; Incarvito, Christopher D; Hazari, Nilay; Brudvig, Gary W; Crabtree, Robert H

    2011-01-01

    The Ir precatalyst (3) contains both a Cp* and a ?{sup 2}C{sup 2},C{sup 2?}-1,3-diphenylimidazol-2-ylidene ligand, a C?C chelate, where one C donor is the NHC and the other is a cyclometalated N-phenyl wingtip group. The structure of 3 was confirmed by X-ray crystallography. Like our other recently described Cp*Ir catalysts, this compound is a precursor to a catalyst that can oxidize water to dioxygen. Electrochemical characterization of the new compound shows that it has a stable iridium(IV) oxidation state, [Cp*Ir{sup IV}(NHC)Cl]{sup +}, in contrast with the unstable Ir(IV) state seen in our previous cyclometalated [Cp*Ir{sup III}(2-pyridyl-2?-phenyl)Cl] catalyst. The new iridium(IV) species has been characterized by EPR spectroscopy and has a rhombic symmetry, a consequence of the ligand environment. These results both support previous studies which suggest that Cp*Ir catalysts can be advanced through the relevant catalytic cycle(s) in one-electron steps and help clarify the electrochemical behavior of this class of water-oxidation catalysts.

  20. An Iridium(IV) Species, [Cp*Ir(NHC)Cl]{sup +}, Related to a Water-Oxidation Catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Brewster, Timothy P; Blakemore, James D; Schley, Nathan D; Incarvito, Christopher D; Hazari, Nilay; Brudvig, Gary W; Crabtree, Robert H

    2011-03-14

    The Ir precatalyst (3) contains both a Cp* and a ?{sup 2}C{sup 2},C{sup 2?}-1,3-diphenylimidazol-2-ylidene ligand, a C?C chelate, where one C donor is the NHC and the other is a cyclometalated N-phenyl wingtip group. The structure of 3 was confirmed by X-ray crystallography. Like our other recently described Cp*Ir catalysts, this compound is a precursor to a catalyst that can oxidize water to dioxygen. Electrochemical characterization of the new compound shows that it has a stable iridium(IV) oxidation state, [Cp*Ir{sup IV}(NHC)Cl]{sup +}, in contrast with the unstable Ir(IV) state seen in our previous cyclometalated [Cp*Ir{sup III}(2-pyridyl-2?-phenyl)Cl] catalyst. The new iridium(IV) species has been characterized by EPR spectroscopy and has a rhombic symmetry, a consequence of the ligand environment. These results both support previous studies which suggest that Cp*Ir catalysts can be advanced through the relevant catalytic cycle(s) in one-electron steps and help clarify the electrochemical behavior of this class of water-oxidation catalysts.

  1. Pharmaceutical Contaminants in Urban Water Cycles: A Discussion of Novel Concepts for Environmental Risk Assessment

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Stefan Scholz; Kristin Schirmer; Rolf Altenburger

    \\u000a Urban water cycles are threatened in many ways by human activities, including the discharge of chemicals by industrial and\\u000a household effluents. Since more than a decade it has been recognised that the active ingredients of human pharmaceuticals\\u000a contribute to the chemical contamination of urban surface waters and may pose a serious risk to the environment. Pharmaceuticals\\u000a reach the aquatic environment

  2. Vapor compression CuCl heat pump integrated with a thermochemical water splitting cycle

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. Zamfirescu; G. F. Naterer; I. Dincer

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, the feasibility of using cuprous chloride (CuCl) as a working fluid in a new high temperature heat pump with vapor compression is analyzed. The heat pump is integrated with a copper–chlorine (Cu–Cl) thermochemical water splitting cycle for internal heat recovery, temperature upgrades and hydrogen production. The minimum temperature of heat supply necessary for driving the water splitting

  3. Diffusion Limited Supercritical Water Oxidation (SCWO) in Microgravity Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hicks, M. C.; Lauver, R. W.; Hegde, U. G.; Sikora, T. J.

    2006-01-01

    Tests designed to quantify the gravitational effects on thermal mixing and reactant injection in a Supercritical Water Oxidation (SCWO) reactor have recently been performed in the Zero Gravity Facility (ZGF) at NASA s Glenn Research Center. An artificial waste stream, comprising aqueous mixtures of methanol, was pressurized to approximately 250 atm and then heated to 450 C. After uniform temperatures in the reactor were verified, a controlled injection of air was initiated through a specially designed injector to simulate diffusion limited reactions typical in most continuous flow reactors. Results from a thermal mapping of the reaction zone in both 1-g and 0-g environments are compared. Additionally, results of a numerical model of the test configuration are presented to illustrate first order effects on reactant mixing and thermal transport in the absence of gravity.

  4. Techniques for determining total body water using deuterium oxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bishop, Phillip A.

    1990-01-01

    The measurement of total body water (TBW) is fundamental to the study of body fluid changes consequent to microgravity exposure or treatment with microgravity countermeasures. Often, the use of radioactive isotopes is prohibited for safety or other reasons. It was selected and implemented for use by some Johnson Space Center (JCS) laboratories, which permitted serial measurements over a 14 day period which was accurate enough to serve as a criterion method for validating new techniques. These requirements resulted in the selection of deuterium oxide dilution as the method of choice for TBW measurement. The development of this technique at JSC is reviewed. The recommended dosage, body fluid sampling techniques, and deuterium assay options are described.

  5. Global climate modeling of the Martian water cycle with improved microphysics and radiatively active water ice clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navarro, T.; Madeleine, J.-B.; Forget, F.; Spiga, A.; Millour, E.; Montmessin, F.; Määttänen, A.

    2014-07-01

    Water ice clouds play a key role in the radiative transfer of the Martian atmosphere, impacting its thermal structure, its circulation, and, in turn, the water cycle. Recent studies including the radiative effects of clouds in global climate models (GCMs) have found that the corresponding feedbacks amplify the model defaults. In particular, it prevents models with simple microphysics from reproducing even the basic characteristics of the water cycle. Within that context, we propose a new implementation of the water cycle in GCMs, including a detailed cloud microphysics taking into account nucleation on dust particles, ice particle growth, and scavenging of dust particles due to the condensation of ice. We implement these new methods in the Laboratoire de Météorologie Dynamique GCM and find satisfying agreement with the Thermal Emission Spectrometer observations of both water vapor and cloud opacities, with a significant improvement when compared to GCMs taking into account radiative effects of water ice clouds without this implementation. However, a lack of water vapor in the tropics after Ls = 180° is persistent in simulations compared to observations, as a consequence of aphelion cloud radiative effects strengthening the Hadley cell. Our improvements also allow us to explore questions raised by recent observations of the Martian atmosphere. Supersaturation above the hygropause is predicted in line with Spectroscopy for Investigation of Characteristics of the Atmosphere of Mars observations. The model also suggests for the first time that the scavenging of dust by water ice clouds alone fails to fully account for the detached dust layers observed by the Mars Climate Sounder.

  6. Kinetic study of magnesium oxide/water chemical heat pump

    SciTech Connect

    Kato, Yukitaka; Inoue, Shinzo; Nanmoku, Wataru; Yoshizawa, Yoshio [Tokyo Inst. of Technology (Japan). Research Lab. for Nuclear Reactors

    1995-12-31

    A laboratory scale system of magnesium oxide/water chemical heat pump was designed for the heat output of 100W class, and the performance of the system was demonstrated. The fraction of magnesium oxide reacted and the heat output were measured directly and simultaneously in the experiment. The former was performed by measuring weight change with a load cell. The latter was measured with a heating tube installed in the reactor. It was shown that the system was able to store thermal energy at about 400 C and to supply thermal energy at 75--120 C, and that the thermal power exceeded 50--100W per 1 kilogram of initial magnesium hydroxide during the first 60 minutes. The profile of reaction rate and heat transfer in the reactor were simulated by two-dimensional numerical analysis. The results of the experiments and the simulations showed that the heat pump had enough thermal storage capacity and thermal power as a commercial system.

  7. Electrochemically Reduced Water Protects Neural Cells from Oxidative Damage

    PubMed Central

    Hamasaki, Takeki; Kinjo, Tomoya; Nakamichi, Noboru; Teruya, Kiichiro; Kabayama, Shigeru

    2014-01-01

    Aging-related neurodegenerative disorders are closely associated with mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stresses and their incidence tends to increase with aging. Brain is the most vulnerable to reactive species generated by a higher rate of oxygen consumption and glucose utilization compared to other organs. Electrochemically reduced water (ERW) was demonstrated to scavenge reactive oxygen species (ROS) in several cell types. In the present study, the protective effect of ERW against hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and nitric oxide (NO) was investigated in several rodent neuronal cell lines and primary cells. ERW was found to significantly suppress H2O2 (50–200??M) induced PC12 and SFME cell deaths. ERW scavenged intracellular ROS and exhibited a protective effect against neuronal network damage caused by 200??M H2O2 in N1E-115 cells. ERW significantly suppressed NO-induced cytotoxicity in PC12 cells despite the fact that it did not have the ability to scavenge intracellular NO. ERW significantly suppressed both glutamate induced Ca2+ influx and the resulting cytotoxicity in primary cells. These results collectively demonstrated for the first time that ERW protects several types of neuronal cells by scavenging ROS because of the presence of hydrogen and platinum nanoparticles dissolved in ERW. PMID:25383141

  8. Oxidation of Slurry Aluminide Coatings on Cast Stainless Steel Alloy CF8C-Plus at 800oC in Water Vapor

    SciTech Connect

    Haynes, James A [ORNL; Armstrong, Beth L [ORNL; Dryepondt, Sebastien N [ORNL; Kumar, Deepak [ORNL; Zhang, Ying [Tennessee Technological University

    2013-01-01

    A new, cast austenitic stainless steel, CF8C-Plus, has been developed for a wide range of high temperature applications, including diesel exhaust components, turbine casings and turbocharger housings. CF8C-Plus offers significant improvements in creep rupture life and creep rupture strength over standard CF8C steel. However, at higher temperatures and in more aggressive environments, such as those containing significant water vapor, an oxidation-resistant protective coating will be necessary. The oxidation behavior of alloys CF8C and CF8C-Plus with various aluminide coatings were compared at 800oC in air plus 10 vol% water vapor. Due to their affordability, slurry aluminides were the primary coating system of interest, although chemical vapor deposition (CVD) and pack cementation coatings were also compared. Additionally, a preliminary study of the low cycle fatigue behavior of aluminized CF8C-Plus was conducted at 800oC. Each type of coating provided substantial improvements in oxidation behavior, with simple slurry aluminides showing very good oxidation resistance after 4,000 h testing in water vapor. Preliminary low cycle fatigue results indicated that thicker aluminide coatings degraded high temperature fatigue properties of CF8C-Plus, whereas thinner coatings did not. Results suggest that appropriately designed slurry aluminide coatings are a viable option for economical, long-term oxidation protection of austenitic stainless steels in water vapor.

  9. Advanced Fuel Cycle Economic Analysis of Symbiotic Light-Water Reactor and Fast Burner Reactor Systems

    SciTech Connect

    D. E. Shropshire

    2009-01-01

    The Advanced Fuel Cycle Economic Analysis of Symbiotic Light-Water Reactor and Fast Burner Reactor Systems, prepared to support the U.S. Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) systems analysis, provides a technology-oriented baseline system cost comparison between the open fuel cycle and closed fuel cycle systems. The intent is to understand their overall cost trends, cost sensitivities, and trade-offs. This analysis also improves the AFCI Program’s understanding of the cost drivers that will determine nuclear power’s cost competitiveness vis-a-vis other baseload generation systems. The common reactor-related costs consist of capital, operating, and decontamination and decommissioning costs. Fuel cycle costs include front-end (pre-irradiation) and back-end (post-iradiation) costs, as well as costs specifically associated with fuel recycling. This analysis reveals that there are large cost uncertainties associated with all the fuel cycle strategies, and that overall systems (reactor plus fuel cycle) using a closed fuel cycle are about 10% more expensive in terms of electricity generation cost than open cycle systems. The study concludes that further U.S. and joint international-based design studies are needed to reduce the cost uncertainties with respect to fast reactor, fuel separation and fabrication, and waste disposition. The results of this work can help provide insight to the cost-related factors and conditions needed to keep nuclear energy (including closed fuel cycles) economically competitive in the U.S. and worldwide. These results may be updated over time based on new cost information, revised assumptions, and feedback received from additional reviews.

  10. [Variation of particulate heavy metals in coastal water over the course of tidal cycle in estuary].

    PubMed

    Bi, Chun-Juan; Chen, Zhen-Lou; Xu, Shi-Yuan; He, Bao-Gen; Li, Li-Na; Chen, Xiao-Feng

    2006-01-01

    Variation characteristics and its mechanism of particulate heavy metals in coastal water over the course of tidal cycle on the eastern coast of Chongming Island in Yangtze Estuary were studied. Concentrations of Cu, Pb, Fe, Mn, Zn, Cr and Al in suspended particles in bottom water were respectively 184%, 99%, 56%, 62%, 147%, 50% and 45% higher than those in surface sediments influenced by particle size. The concentrations of the reducible Cu, Pb, Fe, Mn, Zn and Al in suspended particles of bottom water were also two to three times of those in surface sediments, but percentages of the reducible fraction of the above-mentioned elements in total metal concentrations in suspended particles were similar to those in surface sediments. High concentrations of particulate heavy metals occurred at the beginning of the food-tide, around the slack water and latter of the ebb tide over the course of five tidal cycles, which was mainly caused by the hydrodynamic conditions. When current velocity increased, the particulate heavy metals resuspended from bottom sediments diluted the perpetual suspended particles in water to a large extent. Environmental factors such as salt, dissolved oxygen and pH in water have little influence on the variations of particulate heavy metals over the course of tidal cycle. PMID:16599135

  11. Kinetics of oxidation of food wastes with H 2O 2 in supercritical water

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Fang-Ming Jin; Atsushi Kishita; Takehiko Moriya; Heiji Enomoto

    2001-01-01

    In this study, supercritical water oxidation (SCWO) of carrots and beef suet was carried out in a batch reactor system with an H2O2 oxidant, at a temperature between 400 and 450°C and reaction times from 10 s to 10 min. The results showed that the oxidative decomposition of carrots and beef suet proceeded rapidly and a high total organic carbon

  12. Trends in particle-phase liquid water during the Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, T. K. V.; Petters, M. D.; Suda, S. R.; Guo, H.; Weber, R. J.; Carlton, A. G.

    2014-10-01

    We present in situ measurements of particle-phase liquid water. Measurements were conducted from 3 June to 15 July 2013 during the Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS) in the southeastern US. The region is photochemically active, humid, dominated by biogenic emissions, impacted by anthropogenic pollution, and known to contain high concentrations of organic aerosol mass. Measurements characterized mobility number size distributions of ambient atmospheric aerosols in three states: unperturbed, dry, and dry-humidified. Unperturbed measurements describe the aerosol distribution at ambient temperature and relative humidity. For the dry state, the sample was routed through a cold trap upstream of the inlet then reheated, while for the dry-humidified state the sample was rehumidified after drying. The total volume of water and semi-volatile compounds lost during drying was quantified by differencing dry and unperturbed volumes from the integrated size spectra, while semi-volatile volumes lost during drying were quantified differencing unperturbed and dry-humidified volumes. Results indicate that particle-phase liquid water was always present. Throughout the SOAS campaign, median water mass concentrations at the relative humidity (RH) encountered in the instrument typically ranged from 1 to 5 ?g m-3 but were as high as 73 ?g m-3. On non-raining days, morning time (06:00-09:00) median mass concentrations exceeded 15 ?g m-3. Hygroscopic growth factors followed a diel cycle and exceed 2 from 07:00 to 09:00 local time. The hygroscopicity parameter kappa ranged from 0.14 to 0.46 and hygroscopicity increased with increasing particle size. An observed diel cycle in kappa is consistent with changes in aerosol inorganic content and a dependency of the hygroscopicity parameter on water content. Unperturbed and dry-humidified aerosol volumes did not result in statistically discernible differences, demonstrating that drying did not lead to large losses in dry particle volume. We anticipate that our results will help improve the representation of aerosol water content and aqueous-phase-mediated partitioning of atmospheric water-soluble gases in photochemical models.

  13. Effect of Pressure Cycles and Dissolved Air on the Viscosity of Water

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Kestin; J. H. Whitelaw

    1966-01-01

    Relative measurements on deaerated and air-saturated water with a sensitivity of about 0.1% show that its viscosity is unaffected by pressure cycles (absence of long-time relaxation) or the dissolution of air in it, the effect, if any, being less than the sensitivity of the instrument.

  14. Pleistocene water cycle and eastern boundary current processes along the California continental margin

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mitchell Lyle; Linda Heusser; Christina Ravelo; Dyke Andreasen; Annette Olivarez Lyle; Noah Diffenbaugh

    2010-01-01

    Coastal marine sediments contain mixtures of terrestrial and marine paleoclimate proxies that record how the coastal water cycle has behaved over long time frames. We explore a 600 kyr marine record from ODP Site 1018, located due west of Santa Cruz, California, to identify coastal wet and dry periods and to associate them with oceanographic processes. Wet periods in central

  15. Water, carbon and nitrogen cycling in a rendzina soil cropped with winter oilseed rape

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Short note Water, carbon and nitrogen cycling in a rendzina soil cropped with winter oilseed rape: the Châlons Oilseed Rape Database Ghislain Gosse Pierre Cellier Pascal Denoroy Benoit Gabriellea Patricia January 1999) Abstract - The Châlons Oilseed Rape Database holds the results of a comprehensive experiment

  16. Carbon and water cycling in a Bornean tropical rainforest under current and future climate scenarios

    E-print Network

    Katul, Gabriel

    Carbon and water cycling in a Bornean tropical rainforest under current and future climate in an Asian tropical rainforest, using a combination of field measurements, simplified hydrological and car in a trop- ical rainforest in Sarawak, Malaysia under current climate conditions. On the basis of this model

  17. Potential impacts of emerald ash borer invasion on biogeochemical and water cycling in residential

    E-print Network

    Weiblen, George D

    Potential impacts of emerald ash borer invasion on biogeochemical and water cycling in residential could threaten those services, with unknown environmental consequences. The outbreak of emerald ash borer is an imminent threat to the ash population in North America. In the Minneapolis­Saint Paul

  18. Production and Cycling of Methylated Mercury Species in Arctic Marine Waters

    Microsoft Academic Search

    I. Lehnherr; V. L. St. Louis; H. Hintelmann

    2009-01-01

    Monomethyl mercury (MMHg), a vertebrate neurotoxin which bioaccumulates through foodwebs, is found in some Arctic marine mammals at levels that may be harmful to northern peoples consuming them as food. Unfortunately, sources of MMHg to polar marine food webs remain unknown, in part due to the complex nature of Hg cycling in polar marine waters. Since 2005, we have been

  19. Safety System Design Concept and Performance Evaluation for a Long Operating Cycle Simplified Boiling Water Reactor

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kenji Arai; Seijiro Suzuki; Mikihide Nakamaru; Hideaki Heki

    2003-01-01

    The long operating cycle simplified boiling water reactor is a reactor concept that pursues both safety and the economy by employing a natural circulation reactor core without a refueling, a passive decay heat removal, and an integrated building for the reactor and turbine. Throughout the entire spectrum of the design basis accident, the reactor core is kept covered by the

  20. Modeling the Seasonal Water Cycle on Mars: Implications for Sources and Sinks (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haberle, R. M.; NASA/Ames Mars Circulation Modeling Group, , General

    2010-12-01

    Water vapor in the Martian atmosphere varies in space and time. These variations are the result of the complex interplay of atmospheric transport, cloud microphysical processes, and exchange with surface and subsurface reservoirs. General circulation models (GCMs) can help interpret the relative contributions of these processes if they successfully simulate the observed behavior. This talk focuses on the efforts of the Ames Mars GCM group at simulating the present seasonal water cycle. The ultimate goal of these efforts is to identify the nature and distribution of surface sources and sinks. An obvious source of atmospheric water is the north polar residual cap (NPRC), which is a vast deposit of water ice that is exposed during summer. The question we seek to answer with the model is: Are other sources of water needed to explain the observations? Previous modeling studies have shown that most of the main features of the observed water cycle can be explained without the need for additional sources and indeed, we find similar results. However, there are at least two elements of these modeling studies that render this conclusion tentative. The first is the representation of the NPRC itself. The models generally assume that the NPRC is a continuous ice sheet that exists everywhere poleward of ~ 80N (depending on resolution). In reality, the NPRC is not continuous as there are outliers, longitudinal variations, and sizeable dark lanes interspersed throughout. Thus, the models do not accurately represent the area of exposed ice. The second concern with the models is how they treat clouds. Clouds, though a minor reservoir for water, can have a significant effect on the meridional transport and overall abundance of water in the atmosphere. Yet, as for Earth, they are very difficult to model for two reasons: cloud microphysics is complicated, and clouds are radiatively active. The Ames GCM now includes a non-uniform representation of the NPRC, a fairly sophisticated cloud microphysics package, and the option to allow clouds to interact with solar and infrared radiation. Not surprisingly the non-uniform representation of the NPRC tends to dry out the water cycle, though we need to carefully compare our predicted ice temperatures with observations to have confidence in this result. Our cloud microphysics scheme predicts particle sizes somewhat larger than previous models, particularly for low level polar clouds, and this too tends to dry out the water cycle though only by modest amounts. However, the biggest impact on the simulated water cycle occurs when the clouds are radiatively active. In these simulations the water cycle dries out by more than a factor of two. Thus, all three of these model improvements lead to a drier water cycle. By far the most important of these is the radiative effects of clouds. There are several reasons radiatively active clouds dry out the water cycle, but the main one is the formation of optically thick low-level clouds over the NPRC that increase reflected sunlight, cool the surface, and reduce sublimation. Other GCMs get similar results so this effect is not model dependent. Since observations do not show optically thick clouds over the NPRC during summer, it is clear that the models are missing some process. Until this issue is resolved, we cannot yet answer the question posed above.

  1. The water cycle at large scale over West Africa: an updated view from the AMMA project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bock, Olivier; Guichard, Françoise

    2010-05-01

    The large-scale water cycle of West Africa results from the interplay of various coupled ocean-atmosphere-land surface processes. The efficiency of these processes in controlling the advection of atmospheric humidity and its transformation into precipitation, and the destiny of rain water over land, are crucial aspects of the West African monsoon (WAM). Before AMMA, only few studies focused specifically on the water cycle of the WAM. These studies revealed satisfactorily basic elements of the seasonal cycle of precipitation and the main atmospheric circulation features that govern moisture transport. However, little was known about the mechanisms involved and the scales at which they operate. Also, the few studies that had evaluated water budgets at regional scale found very contrasting results, which led to contrasting interpretations on the functioning of the hydrological cycle at this scale. A major reason for this lack of consensus was the variety and composite nature of data sources used. Considerable effort was spent during AMMA at collecting new and pertinent observations at a broad range of spatial and temporal scales, running various state-of-the art atmospheric and land surface models, and analysing this huge amount of data in the framework of a coordinated FP6 European project. This paper gives an overview of the large-scale continental water cycle studies conducted in AMMA. It covers mainly the intra-seasonal to inter-annual timescales of the atmospheric water budget using several different approaches. First, a new hybrid dataset was developed which took great benefit from the AMMA Land surface Model Intercomparison Project (ALMIP). This approach provided an advanced, comprehensive atmospheric water budget dataset, including estimates of evapo-transpiration, rainfall, atmospheric moisture flux convergence (determined as a residual), together with surface fluxes, runoff, soil moisture tendency, and net radiation over the period 2002-2007. From this dataset, the hydrological cycle could be investigated with an unprecedented accuracy. It revealed that West Africa is a moisture source region during the dry season and a sink region during the wet season. Several limiting and controlling factors of the regional water cycle are highlighted, suggesting strong sensitivity to atmospheric dynamics and surface radiation. Some insight is also given into the underlying smaller-scale processes. The relationship between evapo-transpiration and precipitation is shown to be very different between the Sahel and the regions more to the South and partly controlled by net surface radiation. Strong correlations are found between precipitation and moisture flux convergence over the whole region from daily to interannual time-scales. Second, several NWP model reanalyses have been used and inter-compared for water budget. Realizing that radiosondes in Africa had large humidity biases, a special reanalysis was also run at ECMWF in which a new radiosonde humidity bias correction method was applied and many additional offline data at high vertical resolution were assimilated. This reanalysis provided improved water budgets in comparison to previous NWP products. However, overall, significant deficiencies were revealed in the water cycle modelled by all NWP systems which are linked with problems in the models and with the lack of data assimilated over this region. The work in AMMA allowed diagnosing a number of problems in the models with greater confidence. Hypotheses are proposed about their origins and further improvements are foreseen. The water cycle over the oceanic compartment of West Africa was also investigated. Usually, only satellite products are available over the ocean, but thanks to the PIRATA programme, many in-situ observations were collected during AMMA. These were used to evaluate sea surface temperature (SST) and heat fluxes from satellite products and atmospheric models. The link between SST and variability of the major weather systems over West Africa (mostly those that produce rainfall) was evaluated with different a

  2. Indium Oxide Atomic Layer Deposition Facilitated by the Synergy between Oxygen and Water

    SciTech Connect

    Libera, J.A.; Hryn, J.N.; Elam, Jeffrey W.

    2011-01-01

    This paper explores the atomic layer deposition (ALD) of indium oxide (In{sub 2}O{sub 3}) films using cyclopentadienyl indium (InCp) and combinations of both molecular oxygen and water as the co-reactants. When either O{sub 2} or H{sub 2}O were used individually as the oxygen source the In{sub 2}O{sub 3} growth was negligible over the temperature range 100?250 °C. However, when oxygen and water were used in combination either as a simultaneous exposure or supplied sequentially, In{sub 2}O{sub 3} films were deposited at growth rates of 1.0?1.6 Å/cycle over the full range of deposition temperatures. In situ quadrupole mass spectrometry and quartz crystal microbalance measurements revealed that water serves the function of releasing ligands from the surface while oxygen performs the role of oxidizing the indium. Since both processes are necessary for sustained growth, both O{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O are required for the In{sub 2}O{sub 3} ALD. The electrical resistivity, mobility, and carrier concentration of the In{sub 2}O{sub 3} films varied dramatically with both the deposition temperature and co-reactant sequence and correlated to a crystallization occurring at ?140 °C observed by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. Using this new process we successfully deposited ALD In{sub 2}O{sub 3} films over large area substrates (12 in. × 18 in.) with very high uniformity in thickness and resistivity.

  3. Contemporary Variability and Projected Changes in the North Eurasian Water Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiklomanov, A. I.; Lammers, R. B.; Shiklomanov, I. A.; Proussevitch, A. A.

    2010-12-01

    The Water Systems Analysis Group at the University of New Hampshire, USA in close collaboration with international partners has recently developed a new regional monitoring and analysis system for northern Eurasia to facilitate integration between water related projects involved in North Eurasian Earth Science Partnership Initiative (NEESPI). The system, along with new data from the State Hydrological Institute, Russia, were used to analyze historical and contemporary changes in major water cycle components across northern Eurasia. Significant changes in various components of the hydrological regime were found over the last few decades in different regions. Specifically, the hydroclimatic conditions of the dry and warm summer of 2010 in European Russia were analyzed along with historical characteristics to demonstrate unique and anomalous nature of this summer. To evaluate potential future patterns of change in the northern Eurasian water cycle we used projections of climate change simulated by eight coupled atmosphere-ocean general circulation models. Future simulations of hydrological regime from the UNH Water Balance and Water Transport Models (WBM/WTM), incorporating irrigation and reservoir effects, were analyzed to assess potential effects of climate and water management on various hydrological characteristics. All data can be found at the Northern Eurasian Earth Science Partnership Initiative Water Center website (http://NEESPI.sr.unh.edu).

  4. Life cycle assessment of water treatment technologies: wastewater and water-reuse in a small town

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Ortiz; R. G. Raluy; L. Serra

    2007-01-01

    This paper consists on a global environmental analysis of a waste water treatment (Conventional Activate Sludge System, CAS, designed for 13,200 population equivalent) and some possible additional tertiary treatments allowing water reuse to that purified waters (UF and immersed and external Membrane Biological Reactors, MBR). The environmental assessment of these water treatment technologies has been realized by means of the

  5. Total organic carbon disappearance kinetics for the supercritical water oxidation of monosubstituted phenols

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Christopher J. Martino; Phillip E. Savage

    1999-01-01

    Supercritical water oxidation (SCWO) is a process technology for destroying organic compounds present in aqueous waste streams. The authors oxidized phenols bearing single -CHâ, -CâHâ, -COCHâ, -CHO, -OH, -OCHâ, and -NOâ substituents in supercritical water at 460 C and 25.3 MPa. The observed effects of the concentrations of total organic carbon (TOC) and oxygen on the global disappearance rates for

  6. Oxygen Kinetic Isotope Effects upon Catalytic Water Oxidation by a Monomeric Ruthenium Complex

    E-print Network

    Roth, Justine P.

    Oxygen Kinetic Isotope Effects upon Catalytic Water Oxidation by a Monomeric Ruthenium Complex isotope fractionation is applied for the first time to probe the catalytic oxidation of water using,2;6,2-terpyridine). Competitive oxygen-18 kinetic isotope effects (18 O KIEs) derived from the ratio of 16,16 O2

  7. A computational model for supercritical water oxidation of organic toxic wastes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ning Zhou; Anantha Krishnan; Frédéric Vogel; William A Peters

    2000-01-01

    A computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model was proposed to simulate the supercritical water oxidation (SCWO) process for organic wastes. The SUPERTRAPP code (by NIST) for thermodynamic and transport properties of hydrocarbon mixtures was incorporated into the commercialized general purpose CFD code CFD-ACE for flow under supercritical pressure. The global kinetic models for supercritical water oxidation of methanol and methane (developed

  8. Water column methane oxidation adjacent to an area of active hydrate dissociation, Eel river Basin

    Microsoft Academic Search

    DAVID L. VALENTINE; Douglas C Blanton; WILLIAM S. REEBURGH; Miriam Kastner

    2001-01-01

    The role of methane clathrate hydrates in the global methane budget is poorly understood because little is known about how much methane from decomposing hydrates actually reaches the atmosphere. In an attempt to quantify the role of water column methanotrophy (microbial methane oxidation) as a control on methane release, we measured water column methane profiles (concentration and ?13C) and oxidation

  9. Water Solubility in Ceria and Zirconia Doped with Rare Earth Oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inami, Shigeru; Yamaguchi, Shu; Yokokawa, Harumi; Sakai, Natsuko; Horita, Teruhisa; Yamaji, Katsuhiko

    2002-12-01

    In order to understand the solubility of proton in oxides by a new approach using basicity of oxides, the water solubility in ceria and zirconia has been determined by SIMS and FT-IR measurements. From dopant-concentration depending of water solubility, the validity of hydroxyl capacity has been discussed.

  10. Rapid and continuous hydrothermal crystallization of metal oxide particles in supercritical water

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tadafumi Adschiri; Katsuhito Kanazawa; Kunio Arai

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports on hydrolysis of 10 metal salt aqueous solutions of 6 metal oxides that was conducted in supercritical water. Continuous and rapid production of metal oxide fine particles was achieved by mixing a metal salt aqueous solution with preheated water fed from another line. The reaction time required was less than 2 min. Particle size, morphology, and crystal

  11. Application of solar hot water and geothermal principles to closed-cycle aquaculture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanzito, R. A.

    1981-04-01

    The design of an underground silo where warm water food fish could be raised to market size under controlled conditions. The building and solar concept analysis for the closed cycle aquaculture system are described. Energy conservation features of the design include Earth berming and insulation of the production silo and enclosure, a waste water reclaim system and a solar heating system. Much of the water surface area is covered with removable plants to minimize evaporative heat losses. An energy conservation analysis is also reported and the F-Chart computer program is described. The system chosen utilizes single glazed flat plate collectors in a closed loop antifreeze system. Makeup water is introduced during an 8 hour period each day. Solar energy is transferred from the antifreeze solution to the makeup water after it leaves the waste water heat exchanger.

  12. Possible Links Between Biomass Burning And The Water Cycle In Northern Sub-Saharan Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichoku, C. M.; Gatebe, C. K.; Lee, J.; Wang, J.; Bolten, J. D.; Policelli, F.; Wilcox, E. M.; Adegoke, J. O.; Habib, S.

    2012-12-01

    The northern sub-Saharan African (NSSA) region, bounded on the north and south by the Sahara and the Equator, respectively, and stretching East-West across Africa, is very vulnerable because of the highly active environmental and meteorological processes associated with its unique location and human activities that potentially impact the regional water cycle. Over the years, this region has suffered frequent severe droughts that have caused tremendous hardship and loss of life to millions of its inhabitants due to the rapid depletion of the regional water resources, as exemplified by the dramatic drying of Lake Chad. On the other hand, the NSSA region shows one of the highest biomass-burning rates per unit land area among all regions of the world. Because of the high concentration and frequency of fires in this region, with the associated abundance of heat release and gaseous and particulate smoke emissions, biomass-burning activity is believed to be one of the drivers of the regional carbon and energy cycles, with serious implications for the water cycle. An interdisciplinary research effort sponsored by NASA is presently being focused on the NSSA region, to better understand possible connections between the intense biomass burning observed from satellite year after year across the region and the water cycle, through associated changes in land-cover, albedo, soil moisture, evapotranspiration, emissions, atmospheric processes, precipitation, surface runoff, and groundwater recharge. A combination of remote sensing and modeling approaches is being utilized to investigate these multiple processes to clarify possible links between them. We are finding significant covariance (positive or negative) between them, although we are yet to establish cause-and-effect relationships. In this presentation, we will discuss interesting results as well as the path toward improved understanding of the interrelationships and feedbacks between the water cycle components and the environmental change dynamics due to biomass burning and related processes in the NSSA region.

  13. Sea-urchin-like iron oxide nanostructures for water treatment.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyun Uk; Lee, Soon Chang; Lee, Young-Chul; Vrtnik, Stane; Kim, Changsoo; Lee, Sanggap; Lee, Young Boo; Nam, Bora; Lee, Jae Won; Park, So Young; Lee, Sang Moon; Lee, Jouhahn

    2013-11-15

    To obtain adsorbents with high capacities for removing heavy metals and organic pollutants capable of quick magnetic separation, we fabricated unique sea-urchin-like magnetic iron oxide (mixed ?-Fe2O3/Fe3O4 phase) nanostructures (called u-MFN) with large surface areas (94.1m(2) g(-1)) and strong magnetic properties (57.9 emu g(-1)) using a simple growth process and investigated their potential applications in water treatment. The u-MFN had excellent removal capabilities for the heavy metals As(V) (39.6 mg g(-1)) and Cr(VI) (35.0 mg g(-1)) and the organic pollutant Congo red (109.2 mg g(-1)). The u-MFN also displays excellent adsorption of Congo red after recycling. Because of its high adsorption capacity, fast adsorption rate, and quick magnetic separation from treated water, the u-MFN developed in the present study is expected to be an efficient magnetic adsorbent for heavy metals and organic pollutants in aqueous solutions. PMID:24021165

  14. Water Injection on Commercial Aircraft to Reduce Airport Nitrogen Oxides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daggett, David L.; Hendricks, Robert C.; Fucke, Lars; Eames, David J. H.

    2010-01-01

    The potential nitrogen oxide (NO(x) reductions, cost savings, and performance enhancements identified in these initial studies of waterinjection technology strongly suggest that it be further pursued. The potential for engine maintenance cost savings from this system should make it very attractive to airline operators and assure its implementation. Further system tradeoff studies and engine tests are needed to answer the optimal system design question. Namely, would a low-risk combustor injection system with 70- to 90-percent NO(x) reduction be preferable, or would a low-pressure compressor (LPC) misting system with only 50-percent NO(x) reduction but larger turbine inlet temperature reductions be preferable? The low-pressure compressor injection design and operability issues identified in the report need to be addressed because they might prevent implementation of the LPC type of water-misting system. If water-injection technology challenges are overcome, any of the systems studied would offer dramatic engine NO(x) reductions at the airport. Coupling this technology with future emissions-reduction technologies, such as fuel-cell auxiliary power units will allow the aviation sector to address the serious challenges of environmental stewardship, and NO(x) emissions will no longer be an issue at airports.

  15. Dispersion-precipitation synthesis of nanosized magnetic iron oxide for efficient removal of arsenite in water.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Wei; Xu, Jing; Wang, Yajie; Wu, Feng; Xu, Xiuyan; Li, Jinjun

    2015-05-01

    Nanosized magnetic iron oxide was facilely synthesized by a dispersion-precipitation method, which involved acetone-promoted precipitation of colloidal hydrous iron oxide nanoparticles and subsequent calcination of the precipitate at 250°C. Characterization by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, nitrogen sorption, and vibrating-sample magnetometry revealed that the material was a composite of ?-Fe2O3 and ?-Fe2O3 with primary particle size of 15-25 nm and specific surface area of 121 m(2)/g, as well as superparamagnetic property. The material was used as adsorbent for the removal of arsenite in water. Batch experiments showed that the adsorption isotherms at pH 3.0-11.0 fit the Langmuir equation and the adsorption obeys pseudo-second-order kinetics. Its maximum sorption capability for arsenite is 46.5 mg/g at pH 7.0. Coexisting nitrate, carbonate, sulfate, chloride, and fluoride have no significant effect on the removal efficiency of arsenite, while phosphate and silicate reduce the removal efficiency to some extent. The As(III) removal mechanism is chemisorption through forming inner-sphere surface complexes. The efficiency of arsenic removal is still maintained after five cycles of regeneration-reuse. PMID:25612934

  16. Biological iron oxidation by Gallionella spp. in drinking water production under fully aerated conditions.

    PubMed

    de Vet, W W J M; Dinkla, I J T; Rietveld, L C; van Loosdrecht, M C M

    2011-11-01

    Iron oxidation under neutral conditions (pH 6.5-8) may be a homo- or heterogeneous chemically- or a biologically-mediated process. The chemical oxidation is supposed to outpace the biological process under slightly alkaline conditions (pH 7-8). The iron oxidation kinetics and growth of Gallionella spp. - obligatory chemolithotrophic iron oxidizers - were assessed in natural, organic carbon-containing water, in continuous lab-scale reactors and full-scale groundwater trickling filters in the Netherlands. From Gallionella cell numbers determined by qPCR, balances were made for all systems. The homogeneous chemical iron oxidation occurred in accordance with the literature, but was retarded by a low water temperature (13 °C). The contribution of the heterogeneous chemical oxidation was, despite the presence of freshly formed iron oxyhydroxides, much lower than in previous studies in ultrapure water. This could be caused by the adsorption of natural organic matter (NOM) on the iron oxide surfaces. In the oxygen-saturated natural water with a pH ranging from 6.5 to 7.7, Gallionella spp. grew uninhibited and biological iron oxidation was an important, and probably the dominant, process. Gallionella growth was not even inhibited in a full-scale filter after plate aeration. From this we conclude that Gallionella spp. can grow under neutral pH and fully aerated conditions when the chemical iron oxidation is retarded by low water temperature and inhibition of the autocatalytic iron oxidation. PMID:21889183

  17. Mercury Cycling in Agricultural and Non-agricultural Wetlands in the Yolo Bypass Wildlife Area, California: Water Column Processes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. A. Fleck; C. N. Alpers; B. D. Downing; J. Saraceno; M. Stephenson; G. R. Aiken; B. A. Bergamaschi; C. Stricker

    2007-01-01

    Organic matter (OM) plays a significant role in mercury (Hg) cycling. For instance, aromatic dissolved OM can enhance Hg solubility leading to greater cycling in the water column whereas bioavailable forms of OM may enhance Hg methylation by increasing the microbial activity of Hg-methylating bacteria. Differences in wetland management (e.g. fertilization, plant residue, water depth and movement) can influence the

  18. The Seasonal Cycle of Water Vapour on Mars from Assimilation of Thermal Emission Spectrometer Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steele, Liam J.; Lewis, Stephen R.; Patel, Manish R.; Montmessin, Franck; Forget, Francois; Smith, Michael D.

    2014-01-01

    We present for the first time an assimilation of Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) water vapour column data into a Mars global climate model (MGCM). We discuss the seasonal cycle of water vapour, the processes responsible for the observed water vapour distribution, and the cross-hemispheric water transport. The assimilation scheme is shown to be robust in producing consistent reanalyses, and the global water vapour column error is reduced to around 2-4 pr micron depending on season. Wave activity is shown to play an important role in the water vapour distribution, with topographically steered flows around the Hellas and Argyre basins acting to increase transport in these regions in all seasons. At high northern latitudes, zonal wavenumber 1 and 2 stationary waves during northern summer are responsible for spreading the sublimed water vapour away from the pole. Transport by the zonal wavenumber 2 waves occurs primarily to the west of Tharsis and Arabia Terra and, combined with the effects of western boundary currents, this leads to peak water vapour column abundances here as observed by numerous spacecraft. A net transport of water to the northern hemisphere over the course of one Mars year is calculated, primarily because of the large northwards flux of water vapour which occurs during the local dust storm around L(sub S) = 240-260deg. Finally, outlying frost deposits that surround the north polar cap are shown to be important in creating the peak water vapour column abundances observed during northern summer.

  19. Increase and seasonal cycles of nitrous oxide in the earth's atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khalil, M. A. K.; Rasmussen, R. A.

    1983-01-01

    It is determined that nitrous oxide (N2O) is increasing at about 0.9 ppb/yr in the northern hemisphere and at about 0.7 ppb/yr in the southern hemisphere, based on about 9000 ground-level measurements at Cape Meares, Oregon (45 deg N), and Cape Grim, Tasmania (42 deg S), spanning a three-year period. It is also shown that the N2O concentrations vary with season in the northern hemisphere, where the concentrations are 0.8 ppbv higher during April, May, and June compared to the rest of the year, and in the southern hemisphere where the concentrations are about 0.5 ppbv lower during March, April, and May compared to the rest of the year. An explanation of this increase as a sizeable anthropogenically-controlled land-based source is presented, based on an examination of the existing estimates of natural and anthropogenic sources of N2O. Mass-balance calculations are also presented which suggest that a natural land-based source, peaking in spring, would explain the main features of the observed seasonal cycle. A growth model is employed to extrapolate the observed increase of N2O into the future and the results are compared with exponential extrapolations.

  20. On the relevance of the methane oxidation cycle to ozone hole chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, Rolf; Crutzen, Paul J.

    1994-01-01

    High concentrations of active chlorine are clearly responsible for the observed ozone depletion during the Antarctic polar spring. However, the mechanism behind the activation of chlorine from the reservoirs species HCl and ClONO2 and the maintenance of extremely high levels of active chlorine after polar sunrise is less well understood. Here, we focus on the influence of the methane oxidation cycle on 'ozone hole' chemistry through its effect on HOx and ClOx radicals. We demonstrate the great potential importance of the heterogeneous reaction HCl + HOCl yields Cl2 + H2O and the gasphase reaction ClO + CH3O2 yields ClOO + CH3O under sunlight conditions in polar spring. Under these conditions, the heterogeneous reaction is the main sink for HOx radicals. Through this channel, the HCl reservoir may be almost completely depleted. The gas phase reaction may control the levels of the CH3O2 radical, provided that high levels of ClO exist. Otherwise this radical initiates a sequence of reactions leading to a considerable loss of active chlorine. Moreover, the production of HOx radicals is reduced, and thereby the efficiency of the heterogeneous reaction limited. The two reactions together may accomplish the complete conversion of HCl into active chlorine, thereby leading to a rapid destruction of ozone.

  1. Catalytic activity of NiMnO3 for visible light-driven and electrochemical water oxidation.

    PubMed

    Hong, Dachao; Yamada, Yusuke; Nomura, Akifumi; Fukuzumi, Shunichi

    2013-11-28

    NiMnO3 was found to be an efficient catalyst for light-driven water oxidation using [Ru(bpy)3](2+) and S2O8(2-) as a photosensitiser and a sacrificial oxidant, respectively. NiMnO3 exhibited remarkably high catalytic activity in comparison with manganese oxides and nickel oxide. For electrochemical water oxidation, the highest catalytic current was also obtained with NiMnO3 among the manganese oxides. PMID:24113542

  2. Estimates of the Global Water Budget and Its Annual Cycle Using Observational and KEVIN E. TRENBERTH, LESLEY SMITH, TAOTAO QIAN, AIGUO DAI, AND JOHN FASULLO

    E-print Network

    Dai, Aiguo

    Estimates of the Global Water Budget and Its Annual Cycle Using Observational and Model Data KEVIN A brief review is given of research in the Climate Analysis Section at NCAR on the water cycle. Results the freshwater into the oceans, thereby completing the global water cycle (Fig. 1). Associated with this water

  3. Water at Metal Oxide Interfaces: To Dissociate or Not to Dissociate?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newberg, J. T.; Arble, C.; Goodwin, C.; Boscoboinik, A.; Tong, X.; Ferrari, A.; Giordano, L.

    2014-12-01

    Metal oxides are a major component of suspended aerosol particulate matter. The molecular level understanding of metal oxide surfaces has important implications in trace gas adsorption and/or chemical processing in atmospheric aerosol chemistry. The extent to which water molecularly adsorbs and/or dissociates at metal oxide interfaces under ambient conditions is becoming increasingly recognized through fundamental studies via spectroscopy and microscopy tools. We will be presenting recent efforts to understand the interfacial chemistry of metal oxide single crystal and thin film surfaces exposed to ambient water vapor conditions using in-vacuo X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS), ambient pressure XPS, scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), and computer simulations. Results highlight the importance of surface chemistry, metal oxide crystal termination, and external humidity conditions on the interfacial dynamics and chemistry of water at metal oxide interfaces.

  4. Water-level fluctuation and its implication on the hydrologic cycle in the Gwangneung Supersite, Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Y.; Woo, N.; Hong, T.; Kim, J.

    2007-12-01

    For effective assessment and management of water resources, it is important to understand and quantify each component of the hydrologic cycle. A careful and detailed analysis of spatio-temporal variations in water levels in aquifers could reveal useful information on the groundwater system. This study is objected to understand the reasons and mechanisms of fluctuations. As a part of an interdisciplinary research project, HydroKorea, to ascertain the water cycle quantitatively, water levels have been monitored from shallow monitoring wells(G1, G4) with less than 1-m in depths and a deep well enclosing three monitoring wells (ft1, ft2 and ft3 screened at depths of 102m, 45m and 6m below ground surface, respectively). Monitoring wells are located in the Gwangneung Supersite, Korea. Water levels used in this study were monitored by 10-min interval from February to May in 2007. Water levels compensated for air pressure were analyzed using a Fast Fourier Transform(FFT) technique for power spectral analysis. Results show periodic variations in 11.38, 12.19, 21.33, 24.38, and 28.44 hours, indicating strong influence of diurnal and semidiurnal tidal components. The diurnal components of the water levels from G1 and G4 in summer had greater power than those in winter, implying that the water table is affected by not only earth tides but evapotranspiration. However, those of the water levels from ft1, ft2 and ft3 do not show seasonal characteristics indicating that evapotranspiration has no influence in water levels of deep monitoring wells.

  5. Evaluating the Amazon water cycle components using ED model against GRACE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, E.; Han, S. C.; Yeo, I. Y.; Longo, M.; Swann, A. L. S.; Knox, R. G.; Briscoe, J.; Moorcroft, P. R.

    2014-12-01

    Changes in the water cycle components of the Amazon and its surrounding regions are a key to assessing regional impacts of climate and land-cover changes, as they may affect rain-fed agriculture and hydroelectric power generation in Brazil. A comprehensive validation of the modeled water budget, therefore, is a necessary part of understanding the region's hydroclimatology. We evaluate the water cycle components from Ecosystem Demography (ED) model both as a stand-alone model and a coupled model to the Brazilian Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (BRAMS). Model results are compared with satellite-driven observations and a flux tower measurement in central Amazon. Our results indicate that the modeled EDBRAMS precipitation over Amazonia replicates the observed patterns of the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) from 2001 to 2009. Total Water Storage Change (TWSC) anomalies from the ED model at the Paraná River basin shows a better agreement with the Gravity Recovery And Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellite observation from 2002 to 2008, as compared to the Global Land Data Assimilation System (GLDAS)/NOAH model. The Nash-Sutcliff model efficiency coefficient improved from 0.50 (GLDAS/NOAH vs. GRACE) to 0.65 (ED vs. GRACE). We also evaluate the modeled evapotranspiration (ET) against the flux tower measurement. Our study affirms the capabilities of the ED model in simulating the Amazon hydrological cycle, which helps investigate its sustainable thresholds with various land-cover and climate change scenarios.

  6. Efficient chemical and visible-light-driven water oxidation using nickel complexes and salts as precatalysts.

    PubMed

    Chen, Gui; Chen, Lingjing; Ng, Siu-Mui; Lau, Tai-Chu

    2014-01-01

    Chemical and visible-light-driven water oxidation catalyzed by a number of Ni complexes and salts have been investigated at pH 7-9 in borate buffer. For chemical oxidation, [Ru(bpy)3](3+) (bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine) was used as the oxidant, with turnover numbers (TONs) >65 and a maximum turnover frequency (TOFmax) >0.9 s(-1). Notably, simple Ni salts such as Ni(NO3 )2 are more active than Ni complexes that bear multidentate N-donor ligands. The Ni complexes and salts are also active catalysts for visible-light-driven water oxidation that uses [Ru(bpy)3](2+) as the photosensitizer and S2 O8 (2-) as the sacrificial oxidant; a TON>1200 was obtained at pH 8.5 by using Ni(NO3)2 as the catalyst. Dynamic light scattering measurements revealed the formation of nanoparticles in chemical and visible-light-driven water oxidation by the Ni catalysts. These nanoparticles aggregated during water oxidation to form submicron particles that were isolated and shown to be partially reduced ?-NiOOH by various techniques, which include SEM, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, XRD, and IR spectroscopy. These results suggest that the Ni complexes and salts act as precatalysts that decompose under oxidative conditions to form an active nickel oxide catalyst. The nature of this active oxide catalyst is discussed. PMID:24155063

  7. Environmental controls for higher temperature direct-cycle light water reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, John A.; Pathania, Raj; Hettiarachchi, Samson

    2009-07-01

    Radiolysis modeling is used to estimate the minimum hydrogen concentration to activate platinum catalysts and reduce the electrochemical corrosion potential in light water reactors. Platinum catalysts are used in boiling water reactors to catalyze hydrogen and oxygen recombination, which reduces the corrosion potential and the susceptibility of austenitic structural materials to intergranular stress corrosion cracking. Two environmental challenges for material performance in higher temperature light water reactors are the increased susceptibility of austenitic materials to stress corrosion cracking and the higher production rate of oxidizing radiolytic species. For a reference supercritical water reactor, a hydrogen addition rate of 2 standard cubic feet per minute is needed to significantly reduce the susceptibility of austenitic materials to stress corrosion cracking. Also, for a reference higher temperature boiling water reactor, a hydrogen addition rate of 10 standard cubic feet per minute of hydrogen reduces the stress corrosion crack susceptibility of austenitic materials located in the lower portion of the reactor vessel.

  8. Life cycle water consumption for shale gas and conventional natural gas.

    PubMed

    Clark, Corrie E; Horner, Robert M; Harto, Christopher B

    2013-10-15

    Shale gas production represents a large potential source of natural gas for the nation. The scale and rapid growth in shale gas development underscore the need to better understand its environmental implications, including water consumption. This study estimates the water consumed over the life cycle of conventional and shale gas production, accounting for the different stages of production and for flowback water reuse (in the case of shale gas). This study finds that shale gas consumes more water over its life cycle (13-37 L/GJ) than conventional natural gas consumes (9.3-9.6 L/GJ). However, when used as a transportation fuel, shale gas consumes significantly less water than other transportation fuels. When used for electricity generation, the combustion of shale gas adds incrementally to the overall water consumption compared to conventional natural gas. The impact of fuel production, however, is small relative to that of power plant operations. The type of power plant where the natural gas is utilized is far more important than the source of the natural gas. PMID:24004382

  9. Formation of chemical bonds with visible light: The sensitized oxidation of iodide and water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardner, James M.

    This thesis reports on visible light sensitized oxidation chemistry that drives the formation of I-I and O-O bonds in solution and at surfaces. Chapter 1 introduces the reader to a general overview of the fundamental iodine redox chemistry related to the making and breaking of I-I bonds. The relevance of I-I bonds to the functionality to dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) is discussed. In Chapter 2, the importance of strong photo-oxidants for solar water splitting and the transient generation of free iodine atoms are examined. The synthesis of the photo-oxidants was completed by Jovan Giaimuccio. Chapter 3 further expands on the formation of iodine atoms from potent photo-oxidants and the cleaving of I-I bonds from the direct photochemistry of I3-. Maria Abrahamsson is gratefully acknowledged for assistance with low temperature measurements. Chapter 4 addresses the mechanistic details of iodide oxidation and concerted I-I bond formation as compared with sequential oxidation and bond forming steps. The synthesis of the photo-catalysts was completed by Andras Marton. A limitation for producing functional water oxidation photocatalysts is the generation of significant concentrations of oxidizing equivalents to drive the multi-electron water oxidation chemistry necessary to form O-O bonds. The design of visible light absorbing, high surface area semiconductors with minimized distances for hole diffusion to the solution interface could improve water oxidation efficiency and are discussed in Chapter 5. Su Kim is acknowledged for assistance in assembling high surface area semiconductor electrodes for water splitting. Within Appendix 1 we discuss the synthesis and characterization of the rutile, anatase, and brookite phase nanoparticles of TiO2, which are known to be photo-oxidants capable of oxidizing water to O2. David Reyes-Coronado is gratefully acknowledged for the synthesis of TiO2 nanoparticles during an extended research collaboration with our laboratories.

  10. Performance calculations and research direction for a water enhanced regenerative gas turbine cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, L. H.; Archer, D. H.

    A cycle has been conceived that combines compressor cooling, humidification, and regenerative air heating with the added enhancement of direct injection of water into the air flow. In this cycle it is proposed that a fine mist of water be injected into the compressor air stream and a spray or film of water into the regenerator air stream. Water injection into the compressor air flow realizes several benefits: it cools the air flow, reducing the power required for compression and increasing the potential for exhaust heat recovery; it adds mass to the air stream, increasing the power produced by expansion; and it reduces the amount of cooling bleed air required by increasing the specific heat and decreasing the temperature of the cooling air stream. The greatest benefit would be derived from spraying a fine mist of water directly into the existing air flow into or before the compressor so that cooling and compression would occur simultaneously. This may be accomplished by entraining the water droplets in the inlet air flow or by introducing the water in stages during compression. An alternative and less technically challenging approach is to extract the air stream to a saturation chamber and then reintroduce the air stream into the compressor. This approach is not as desirable because it would increase the equipment cost and add a significant pressure drop penalty. The second use of water in this cycle is in water-assisted regeneration. The heat capacity of the hot stream in regenerators is greater than the heat capacity of the cool stream because of the increased mass flow and specific heat of the combustion products. This imbalance leads to a less than ideal exhaust heat recovery since the cool air stream is unable to absorb all of the available heat. If water is injected into the cool stream in the regenerator, some of the available heat is used to vaporize the water, allowing additional heat recovery and also adding mass to the air flow. Also, the effectiveness of the heat exchanger can be increased, and the cost reduced, by injecting the water as early as possible in the flow, keeping the cool stream temperature low and thus maximizing the temperature difference across the regenerator.

  11. Comparison of nano-sized Mn oxides with the Mn cluster of photosystem II as catalysts for water oxidation.

    PubMed

    Najafpour, Mohammad Mahdi; Ghobadi, Mohadeseh Zarei; Haghighi, Behzad; Tomo, Tatsuya; Shen, Jian-Ren; Allakhverdiev, Suleyman I

    2015-02-01

    "Back to Nature" is a promising way to solve the problems that we face today, such as air pollution and shortage of energy supply based on conventional fossil fuels. A Mn cluster inside photosystem II catalyzes light-induced water-splitting leading to the generation of protons, electrons and oxygen in photosynthetic organisms, and has been considered as a good model for the synthesis of new artificial water-oxidizing catalysts. Herein, we surveyed the structural and functional details of this cluster and its surrounding environment. Then, we review the mechanistic findings concerning the cluster and compare this biological catalyst with nano-sized Mn oxides, which are among the best artificial Mn-based water-oxidizing catalysts. PMID:25461976

  12. Impact of phytoplankton on the biogeochemical cycling of iron in subantarctic waters southeast of New Zealand during FeCycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKay, R. M. L.; Wilhelm, S. W.; Hall, J.; Hutchins, D. A.; Al-Rshaidat, M. M. D.; Mioni, C. E.; Pickmere, S.; Porta, D.; Boyd, P. W.

    2005-12-01

    During austral summer 2003, we tracked a patch of surface water infused with the tracer sulfur hexafluoride, but without addition of Fe, through subantarctic waters over 10 days in order to characterize and quantify algal Fe pools and fluxes to construct a detailed biogeochemical budget. Nutrient profiles characterized this patch as a high-nitrate, low-silicic acid, low-chlorophyll (HNLSiLC) water mass deficient in dissolved Fe. The low Fe condition was confirmed by several approaches: shipboard iron enrichment experiments and physiological indices of Fe deficiency (Fv/Fm < 0.25, Ferredoxin Index < 0.2). During FeCycle, picophytoplankton (0.2-2 ?m) and nanophytoplankton (2-20 ?m) each contributed >40% of total chlorophyll. Whereas the picophytoplankton accounted for ˜50% of total primary production, they were responsible for the majority of community iron uptake in the mixed layer. Thus ratios of 55Fe:14C uptake were highest for picophytoplankton (median: 17 ?mol:mol) and declined to ˜5 ?mol:mol for the larger algal size fractions. A pelagic Fe budget revealed that picophytoplankton were the largest pool of algal Fe (>90%), which was consistent with the high (˜80%) phytoplankton Fe demand attributed to them. However, Fe regenerated by herbivory satisfied only ˜20% of total algal Fe demand. This iron regeneration term increased to 40% of algal Fe demand when we include Fe recycled by bacterivory. As recycled, rather than new, iron dominated the pelagic iron budget (Boyd et al., 2005), it is highly unlikely that the supply of new Fe would redress the imbalance between algal Fe demand and supply. Reasons for this imbalance may include the overestimation of algal iron uptake from radiotracer techniques, or a lack of consideration of other iron regeneration processes. In conclusion, it seems that algal Fe uptake cannot be supported solely by the recycling of algal iron, and may require an Fe "subsidy" from that regenerated by heterotrophic pathways.

  13. Insights into high-temperature nitrogen cycling from studies of the thermophilic ammonia-oxidizing archaeon Nitrosocaldus yellowstonii. (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de la Torre, J. R.

    2010-12-01

    Our understanding of the nitrogen cycle has advanced significantly in recent years with the discovery of new metabolic processes and the recognition that key processes such as aerobic ammonia oxidation are more broadly distributed among extant organisms and habitat ranges. Nitrification, the oxidation of ammonia to nitrite and nitrate, is a key component of the nitrogen cycle and, until recently, was thought to be mediated exclusively by the ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB). The discovery that mesophilic marine archaea, some of the most abundant microorganisms on the planet, are capable of oxidizing ammonia to nitrite fundamentally changed our perception of the global nitrogen cycle. Ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) are now thought to be significant drivers of nitrification in many marine and terrestrial environments. Most studies, however, have focused on the contribution of AOA to nitrogen cycling in mesophilic environments. Our recent discovery of a thermophilic AOA, Nitrosocaldus yellowstonii, has expanded the role and habitat range of AOA to include high temperature environments. Numerous studies have shown that AOA are widely distributed in geothermal habitats with a wide range of temperature and pH. The availability of multiple AOA genome sequences, combined with metagenomic studies from mesophilic and thermophilic environments gives us a better understanding of the physiology, ecology and evolution of these organisms. Recent studies have proposed that the AOA represent the most deeply branching lineage within the Archaea, the Thaumarchaeota. Furthermore, genomic comparisons between AOA and AOB reveal significant differences in the proposed pathways for ammonia oxidation. These genetic differences likely explain fundamental physiological differences such as the resistance of N. yellowstonii and other AOA to the classical nitrification inhibitors allylthiourea and acetylene. Physiological studies suggest that the marine AOA are adapted to oligotrophic environments. Our studies, however, point to a greater metabolic versatility in N. yellowstonii, including the ability to utilize alternative sources of energy. Understanding the biology of N. yellowstonii, the most deeply branching cultivated AOA to date, gives us a better understanding of the ecological and evolutionary significance of these organisms and sheds new light on nitrogen cycling at high temperature.

  14. 5-Hydroxyindoles compounds and nitric oxide voltammetric detection in the rat brain: changes occurring throughout the sleep-wake cycle

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. Cespuglio; S. Burlet; H. Faradji-Prevautel

    1998-01-01

    Summary.   The release of serotonin may occur throughout the sleep-wake cycle according to 2 different modalities: – by the axonal nerve\\u000a endings during waking; – by the dendrites and\\/or the soma of the nucleus raphe dorsalis (nRD) during sleep. Neuronal nitric\\u000a oxide (NO), synthesised by constitutive NO synthase (NOS), is colocalized with neurotransmitters such as GABA, acethylcholine,\\u000a somatostatine, serotonin, etc.

  15. Cadmium causes oxidative stress in mung bean by affecting the antioxidant enzyme system and ascorbate-glutathione cycle metabolism

    Microsoft Academic Search

    N. A. Anjum; S. Umar; M. Iqbal; N. A. Khan

    2011-01-01

    Ascorbate (AsA)-glutathione (GSH) cycle metabolism is an essential mechanism for the resistance of plants under stress conditions.\\u000a In a greenhouse pot experiment, the influence of cadmium (Cd) (25, 50, and 100 mg\\/kg soil) on plant dry weight and leaf area,\\u000a photosynthetic parameters (net photosynthetic rate (PN) and chlorophyll (Chl) content) and oxidative stress, and the possible protective role of AsA-GSH

  16. Exergy analysis of an integrated solid oxide fuel cell and organic Rankine cycle for cooling, heating and power production

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Fahad A. Al-Sulaiman; Ibrahim Dincer; Feridun Hamdullahpur

    2010-01-01

    The study examines a novel system that combined a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) and an organic Rankine cycle (ORC) for cooling, heating and power production (trigeneration) through exergy analysis. The system consists of an SOFC, an ORC, a heat exchanger and a single-effect absorption chiller. The system is modeled to produce a net electricity of around 500kW. The study

  17. Water cycling between ocean and mantle: Super-earths need not be waterworlds

    SciTech Connect

    Cowan, Nicolas B. [Center for Interdisciplinary Exploration and Research in Astrophysics (CIERA), Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Road, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States); Abbot, Dorian S., E-mail: n-cowan@northwestern.edu [Department of the Geophysical Sciences, University of Chicago, 5734 South Ellis Avenue, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States)

    2014-01-20

    Large terrestrial planets are expected to have muted topography and deep oceans, implying that most super-Earths should be entirely covered in water, so-called waterworlds. This is important because waterworlds lack a silicate weathering thermostat so their climate is predicted to be less stable than that of planets with exposed continents. In other words, the continuously habitable zone for waterworlds is much narrower than for Earth-like planets. A planet's water is partitioned, however, between a surface reservoir, the ocean, and an interior reservoir, the mantle. Plate tectonics transports water between these reservoirs on geological timescales. Degassing of melt at mid-ocean ridges and serpentinization of oceanic crust depend negatively and positively on seafloor pressure, respectively, providing a stabilizing feedback on long-term ocean volume. Motivated by Earth's approximately steady-state deep water cycle, we develop a two-box model of the hydrosphere and derive steady-state solutions to the water partitioning on terrestrial planets. Critically, hydrostatic seafloor pressure is proportional to surface gravity, so super-Earths with a deep water cycle will tend to store more water in the mantle. We conclude that a tectonically active terrestrial planet of any mass can maintain exposed continents if its water mass fraction is less than ?0.2%, dramatically increasing the odds that super-Earths are habitable. The greatest source of uncertainty in our study is Earth's current mantle water inventory: the greater its value, the more robust planets are to inundation. Lastly, we discuss how future missions can test our hypothesis by mapping the oceans and continents of massive terrestrial planets.

  18. Simulation of tubular solid oxide fuel cell behavior for integration into gas turbine cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haynes, Comas Lamar

    Models have been developed and validated for the characterization of tubular solid oxide fuel cells (TSOFCs) and a corresponding fuel cell/gas turbine (FC/GT) power cycle. This promising area of technology is expected to attain near-term commercialization (most notably the SiemensWestinghouse "SureCell" initiative). There is a need for continued conceptual design research in order for the full potential of these systems to be realized. Parametric studies were performed to delineate the impact of cell stack operating conditions on power generation, cell stack thermal management, independent cell load-following and performance quality. The diverse operating conditions included variations in physical cell design, stack pressure, operating voltage, stoichiometric number and stack fuel utilization. A number of novel findings are reported throughout the thesis. As an example, it has been shown that lowering cell stack fuel utilization has a number of benefits for both the simple TSOFC arrangement and the hybrid TSOFC/ GT scenario. The cell stack produces more power at lower fuel utilizations, because fuel supply to the stack actually increases. Additionally, fuel depletion issues (i.e., Nernst potential decrease and smaller limiting currents) are not as influential. A gas turbine bottoming engine would also increase in power production, at lower stack fuel utilizations, because a greater amount of fuel would then fire it. Note that power generation expense is measured per unit rating (e.g., $/kW). Increasing power capacity may then be a means of lowering cost, which is the key obstacle to commercialization. Another cost reduction may stein from the greater contribution of turbomachinery to system power generation, when stack fuel utilization is lowered. FC/GT system efficiency remains stable across a wide domain of cell stack fuel utilizations. This is a result of both the indirect internally reforming (IIR) fuel processor efficiency and Brayton cycle regeneration increasing at lower stack fuel utilizations. Engineering thermodynamic design principles were also incorporated within the fuel cell analyses. These considerations revealed insights that would not have been realized if the investigation was limited to traditional indices-of-performance. An example is the unaccounted for thermal exergy that leaves the high temperature cells as by-product heat, when utilizing electrochemical efficiencies.

  19. Black Carbon in the Soil Carbon Cycle: Is it an Oxidation Resistant End-Product?

    E-print Network

    Fischlin, Andreas

    ;1 Introduction Soils represent a large carbon pool in the global carbon cycle. Estimates suggest that this pool is twice as large as the atmospheric pool. But its role in the global carbon cycle remains unclear

  20. Foxp1 Regulates the Proliferation of Hair Follicle Stem Cells in Response to Oxidative Stress during Hair Cycling

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jianzhi; Li, Hanjun; Zhou, Rujiang; Ma, Gang; Dekker, Joseph D.; Tucker, Haley O.; Yao, Zhengju; Guo, Xizhi

    2015-01-01

    Hair follicle stem cells (HFSCs) in the bugle circularly generate outer root sheath (ORS) through linear proliferation within limited cycles during anagen phases. However, the mechanisms controlling the pace of HFSC proliferation remain unclear. Here we revealed that Foxp1, a transcriptional factor, was dynamically relocated from the nucleus to the cytoplasm of HFSCs in phase transitions from anagen to catagen, coupled with the rise of oxidative stress. Mass spectrum analyses revealed that the S468 phosphorylation of Foxp1 protein was responsive to oxidative stress and affected its nucleocytoplasmic translocation. Foxp1 deficiency in hair follicles led to compromised ROS accrual and increased HFSC proliferation. And more, NAC treatment profoundly elongated the anagen duration and HFSC proliferation in Foxp1-deficient background. Molecularly, Foxp1 augmented ROS levels through suppression of Trx1-mediated reductive function, thereafter imposing the cell cycle arrest by modulating the activity of p19/p53 pathway. Our findings identify a novel role for Foxp1 in controlling HFSC proliferation with cellular dynamic location in response to oxidative stress during hair cycling. PMID:26171970

  1. Spatial and Temporal Alterations on Carbon and Water Cycles Due to Grazing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maksimowicz, M. M.; Brunsell, N. A.; Ham, J. M.

    2009-05-01

    Grasslands are vital in the carbon cycle, as large amounts of carbon are stored in the soils of the prairie. As climate change affects the carbon cycle, it is essential for the agricultural communities to understand the impacts of these changes on farming practices such as grazing and meat production. The objective of this study is to determine the effect of grazing on the carbon cycle by characterizing the surface boundary layer of both a grazed field and an ungrazed field. Data were collected from open path eddy covariance systems over Rannells Flint Hills Prairie Preserve in north-central Kansas, one over an ungrazed field and one over a grazed field. Cospectra of fluxes of CO2, heat, water, and momentum for July 2007 were compared to assess the size of eddies contributing energy to each field. For CO2, the cospectra for both the ungrazed and the ungrazed field were similar. For all of the other fluxes, lower frequency eddies contributed more energy in the grazed field than the ungrazed field. By using a footprint model, the contributing source areas were determined for fluxes from May through October of 2007. The grazed field had a larger distance of contribution in both stable and unstable atmospheric conditions. Implications of this study include the alterations on fields and impacts on the carbon and water cycles as a result of grazing.

  2. Metal cycling during sediment early diagenesis in a water reservoir affected by acid mine drainage.

    PubMed

    Torres, E; Ayora, C; Canovas, C R; García-Robledo, E; Galván, L; Sarmiento, A M

    2013-09-01

    The discharge of acid mine drainage (AMD) into a reservoir may seriously affect the water quality. To investigate the metal transfer between the water and the sediment, three cores were collected from the Sancho Reservoir (Iberian Pyrite Belt, SW Spain) during different seasons: turnover event; oxic, stratified period; anoxic and under shallow perennially oxic conditions. The cores were sliced in an oxygen-free atmosphere, after which pore water was extracted by centrifugation and analyzed. A sequential extraction was then applied to the sediments to extract the water-soluble, monosulfide, low crystallinity Fe(III)-oxyhydroxide, crystalline Fe(III)-oxide, organic, pyrite and residual phases. The results showed that, despite the acidic chemistry of the water column (pH<4), the reservoir accumulated a high amount of autochthonous organic matter (up to 12 wt.%). Oxygen was consumed in 1mm of sediment due to organic matter and sulfide oxidation. Below the oxic layer, Fe(III) and sulfate reduction peaks developed concomitantly and the resulting Fe(II) and S(II) were removed as sulfides and probably as S linked to organic matter. During the oxic season, schwertmannite precipitated in the water column and was redissolved in the organic-rich sediment, after which iron and arsenic diffused upwards again to the water column. The flux of precipitates was found to be two orders of magnitude higher than the aqueous one, and therefore the sediment acted as a sink for As and Fe. Trace metals (Cu, Zn, Cd, Pb, Ni, Co) and Al always diffused from the reservoir water and were incorporated into the sediments as sulfides and oxyhydroxides, respectively. In spite of the fact that the benthic fluxes estimated for trace metal and Al were much higher than those reported for lake and marine sediments, they only accounted for less than 10% of their total inventory dissolved in the column water. PMID:23747557

  3. Correction: Enhanced photoelectrochemical water oxidation via atomic layer deposition of TiO2 on fluorine-doped tin oxide nanoparticle films.

    PubMed

    Cordova, Isvar A; Peng, Qing; Ferrall, Isa L; Rieth, Adam J; Hoertz, Paul G; Glass, Jeffrey T

    2015-07-28

    Correction for 'Enhanced photoelectrochemical water oxidation via atomic layer deposition of TiO2 on fluorine-doped tin oxide nanoparticle films' by Isvar A. Cordova, et al., Nanoscale, 2015, 7, 8584-8592. PMID:26134090

  4. Carbon and Nitrogen Cycling Pursuant to the Great Oxidation Event: Evidence from the Paleoproterozoic of Fennoscandia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kump, L.; Junium, C. K.; Arthur, M. A.; Brasier, A.; Fallick, A. E.; Melezhik, V.; Lepland, A.; Crne, A.; Luo, G.; Far-Deep Drilling Team

    2010-12-01

    A key goal of FAR-DEEP (Fennoscandia Arctic Russia - Drilling Early Earth Project) is to document the development of an aerobic biosphere following the Great Oxidation Event (GOE, ~2.4 Ga). Toward that end, we present an analysis of C and N cycling during this critical interval, based on preliminary C and N isotope analysis of archival FAR-DEEP samples. A prolonged interval of high ?13C in the ocean / atmosphere system characterizes the Paleoproterozoic from approximately 2.3 to 2.06 billion years ago. The event is known as the Lomagundi-Jatuli event (LJE). The initiation of the LJE occurs at as evidence for non-mass dependent fractionation of sulfur isotopes disappear, suggesting a relationship to the GOE. Sediments deposited during the event are notably devoid of organic matter (Corg). Moreover, Corg-rich sedimentary rocks are found which have been thought to postdate the LJE; in Fennoscandia these rocks are associated with the Zaonega Formation, with Corg contents approaching 60%. Zaonega Formation shales containing Corg-rich deposits were penetrated by three FAR-DEEP holes in the Paleoproterozoic Onega Basin, Karelia Russia. Low in the section, ?13Corg values increase gradually from ~ -28‰ to -24 ‰, then increase markedly to ~ -18 ‰, before beginning a gradual decline for much of the rest of the studied interval. ?13Ccarb values follow a parallel trend, although low in the section they have anomalously light values (~ -10‰), rising abruptly to +4‰ as ?13Corg reaches its peak value. Both ?13Ccarb and ?13Corg then decline by 15-20‰ as one proceeds up-section. In the same interval, ?15Norg values shift from relatively light values of ~ +2‰ to +4‰ to heavier values of ~ +8‰ to +9‰. ?13Ccarb values increase by +10‰ toward the top of the cored interval, while ?15Norg fluctuate between +5 to +9 ‰. Petrographic evidence shows that some of the carbonates with lowest ?13Ccarb values are diagenetic concretions, and some of the Cor has been re-mobilized as it occurs in cross-cutting pyrobitumen veinlets. The initial isotopic signatures of both Corg and Ccarb may have therefore been modified in some intervals during post-depositional alteration. However, the strong correlation between ?13Ccarb and ?13Corg through much of the sampled interval, especially during the negative shift, leads us to tentatively interpret it as the end of the LJE and a transformation in basin characteristics from anoxic (and possibly sulfidic) to oxygenated. Highly negative ?13Ccarb values at the end of the event may be correlated with observed 13C-depletion in the time-equivalent Houtenbek Formation in southern Africa. Nitrogen isotopes reflect an apparent reduction in the role of nitrogen fixation at the close of the LJE and an increase in the oxidative cycling of N.

  5. Water vapor measurements at ALOMAR over a solar cycle compared with model calculations by LIMA

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. Hartogh; G. R. Sonnemann; M. Grygalashvyly; Li Song; U. Berger; F.-J. Lübken

    2010-01-01

    Microwave water vapor measurements between 40 and 80 km altitude over a solar cycle (1996-2006) were carried out in high latitudes at Arctic Lidar Observatory for Middle Atmosphere Research (ALOMAR) (69.29°N, 16.03°E), Norway. Some smaller gaps and three interruptions of monitoring in the winters 1996\\/1997 and 2005\\/2006 and from spring 2001 to spring 2002 occurred during this period. The observations

  6. Water vapor measurements at ALOMAR over a solar cycle compared with model calculations by LIMA

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. Hartogh; G. R. Sonnemann; M. Grygalashvyly; Li Song; U. Berger; F.-J. Lübken

    2010-01-01

    Microwave water vapor measurements between 40 and 80 km altitude over a solar cycle (1996–2006) were carried out in high latitudes at Arctic Lidar Observatory for Middle Atmosphere Research (ALOMAR) (69.29°N, 16.03°E), Norway. Some smaller gaps and three interruptions of monitoring in the winters 1996\\/1997 and 2005\\/2006 and from spring 2001 to spring 2002 occurred during this period. The observations

  7. Boiling Water Reactor Fuel Cycle Optimization for Prevention of Channel-Blade Interference

    SciTech Connect

    Kropaczek, David J.; Karve, Atul A.; Oyarzun, Christian C.; Asgari, Mehdi [Global Nuclear Fuel - Americas, P.O. Box 780, M/C F12, Wilmington, N.C. 28402 (United States); Tusar, James J. [Exelon Corporation, 200 Exelon Way, KSA 2-N, Kennett Square, PA 19348 (United States)

    2006-07-01

    A formal optimization method for eliminating the potential of Boiling Water Reactor channel-blade interference is presented within the context of fuel cycle design. The method is based on the use of threshold constraints on blade force as penalty terms within an objective function that are employed as part of a search algorithm. Results demonstrate the effectiveness of the constraint formulation in eliminating channel-blade interference as part of the design of the core loading and operational strategy. (authors)

  8. A pressurized water reactor design for plutonium incineration: Fuel cycle options

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Galperin; G. Raizes

    1997-01-01

    The possibility exists of utilizing pressurized water reactor (PWR) power plants of current technology for efficient and cost-competitive incineration of excess plutonium. Several plutonium-based fuel cycle options were considered, i.e., pure ²³⁹Pu or reactor-grade plutonium as a fissile component and natural uranium or thorium as a fertile component of the fuel. A typical PWR was chosen as the base for

  9. Hydrological consistency using multi-sensor remote sensing data for water and energy cycle studies

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. F. McCabe; E. F. Wood; R. Wójcik; M. Pan; J. Sheffield; H. Gao; H. Su

    2008-01-01

    A multi-sensor\\/multi-platform approach to water and energy cycle prediction is demonstrated in an effort to understand the variability and feedback of land surface and atmospheric processes over large space and time scales. Remote sensing-based variables including soil moisture (from AMSR-E), surface heat fluxes (from MODIS) and precipitation rates (from TRMM) are combined with North American Regional Reanalysis derived atmospheric components

  10. Data Reconciliation in the Steam-Turbine Cycle of a Boiling Water Reactor

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Svein Sunde; Oivind Berg; Lennart Dahlberg; Nils-Olof Fridqvist

    2003-01-01

    A mathematical model for a boiling water reactor steam-turbine cycle was assembled by means of a configurable, steady-state modeling tool TEMPO. The model was connected to live plant data and intermittently fitted to these by minimization of a weighted least-squares object function. The improvement in precision achieved by this reconciliation was assessed from quantities calculated from the model equations linearized

  11. Exercise-induced oxidative stress influences the motor control during maximal incremental cycling exercise in healthy humans.

    PubMed

    Gravier, Gilles; Steinberg, Jean Guillaume; Lejeune, Pierre Jean; Delliaux, Stephane; Guieu, Regis; Jammes, Yves

    2013-05-01

    We hypothesized that the changes in blood oxidant/antioxidant status during incremental maximal cycling exercise could affect the motor drive to leg muscles. Indeed, the oxygen free radicals activate the metabosensitive muscle afferents which are suspected to elicit an adaptive motor response delaying fatigue. Fifteen healthy subjects performed an incremental cycling exercise reaching the maximal oxygen uptake (VO2) during which venous blood was repeatedly sampled to measure a marker of lipid peroxidation (TBARS), an antioxidant (reduced ascorbic acid, RAA), and the ischaemia-modified albumin (IMA). The surface EMG of rectus femoris was recorded and the median frequency (MF) of power spectrum was computed. Our main results are: 1) TBARS increased in 7/15 subjects, RAA decreased in 7/15 and IMA increased in 13/15 at VO2max; 4) the MF decrease was correlated to maximal end-exercise IMA increase and RAA decrease. During maximal cycling exercise, the adaptive motor response to cycling closely depends on the magnitude of exercise-induced oxidative stress. PMID:23473925

  12. Isotopes in the Water Cycle: Past, present and future of a developing science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aggarwal, Pradeep K.; Gat, Joel R.; Froehlich, Klaus F.

    Environmental isotope and nuclear techniques provide unmatched insights into the processes governing the water cycle and its variability under past and present climates. This monograph is recommended to advanced students and specialists and presents historical perspective, state of the art applications and new developments of isotopes in hydrology, environmental disciplines and climate change studies. The spectrum of isotope applications addressed in this monograph ranges from the assessment of groundwater resources in terms of recharge and flow regime, identification of palaeogroundwater, water balance of river basins and lakes, to studies of the past and present global environmental and climate changes.

  13. Nuclear Systems Enhanced Performance Program, Maintenance Cycle Extension in Advanced Light Water Reactor Design

    SciTech Connect

    Professor Neill Todreas

    2001-10-01

    A renewed interest in new nuclear power generation in the US has spurred interest in developing advanced reactors with features which will address the public's concerns regarding nuclear generation. However, it is economic performance which will dictate whether any new orders for these plants will materialize. Economic performance is, to a great extent, improved by maximizing the time that the plant is on-line generating electricity relative to the time spent off-line conducting maintenance and refueling. Indeed, the strategy for the advanced light water reactor plant IRIS (International Reactor, Innovative and Secure) is to utilize an eight year operating cycle. This report describes a formalized strategy to address, during the design phase, the maintenance-related barriers to an extended operating cycle. The top-level objective of this investigation was to develop a methodology for injecting component and system maintainability issues into the reactor plant design process to overcome these barriers. A primary goal was to demonstrate the applicability and utility of the methodology in the context of the IRIS design. The first step in meeting the top-level objective was to determine the types of operating cycle length barriers that the IRIS design team is likely to face. Evaluation of previously identified regulatory and investment protection surveillance program barriers preventing a candidate operating PWR from achieving an extended (48 month) cycle was conducted in the context of the IRIS design. From this analysis, 54 known IRIS operating cycle length barriers were identified. The resolution methodology was applied to each of these barriers to generate design solution alternatives for consideration in the IRIS design. The methodology developed has been demonstrated to narrow the design space to feasible design solutions which enable a desired operating cycle length, yet is general enough to have broad applicability. Feedback from the IRIS design team indicates that the proposed solutions to the investigated operating cycle length barriers are both feasible and consistent with sound design practice.

  14. The Mars water cycle at other epochs - Recent history of the polar caps and layered terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakosky, B. M.; Henderson, B. G.; Mellon, M. T.

    1993-04-01

    A numerical model is presented of the integrated role of seasonal water cycle on the evolution of polar deposits on Mars over the last 10 million years. From the model, it is concluded that the only major difference between the polar caps which affects their long-term behavior is ultimately the difference in their elevations. Because of that difference, there is a preference for CO2 frost to stay longer on the northern polar cap. The average difference in sublimation at the caps results in a net south-to-north transport of water ice over long time scales. Superimposed on any long-term behavior is a transfer of water ice between the caps on the 10 exp 5 - 10 exp 6 yr time scales. The amount of water exchanged is small compared to the total ice content of the polar deposits.

  15. Improving evaluation of climate change impacts on the water cycle by remote sensing ET-retrieval

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García Galiano, S. G.; Olmos Giménez, P.; Ángel Martínez Pérez, J.; Diego Giraldo Osorio, J.

    2015-05-01

    Population growth and intense consumptive water uses are generating pressures on water resources in the southeast of Spain. Improving the knowledge of the climate change impacts on water cycle processes at the basin scale is a step to building adaptive capacity. In this work, regional climate model (RCM) ensembles are considered as an input to the hydrological model, for improving the reliability of hydroclimatic projections. To build the RCMs ensembles, the work focuses on probability density function (PDF)-based evaluation of the ability of RCMs to simulate of rainfall and temperature at the basin scale. To improve the spatial calibration of the continuous hydrological model used, an algorithm for remote sensing actual evapotranspiration (AET) retrieval was applied. From the results, a clear decrease in runoff is expected for 2050 in the headwater basin studied. The plausible future scenario of water shortage will produce negative impacts on the regional economy, where the main activity is irrigated agriculture.

  16. Solvent-Induced Proton Hopping at a Water-Oxide Interface Gabriele Tocci and Angelos Michaelides*

    E-print Network

    Alavi, Ali

    Solvent-Induced Proton Hopping at a Water-Oxide Interface Gabriele Tocci and Angelos MichaelidesO(1010) might be a highly suitable system for investigating proton hopping in interfacial water. However, the key issue of how proton hopping occurs in this system and how it relates to the aqueous water

  17. Kinetics and mechanism of advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) in degradation of ciprofloxacin in water

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Taicheng An; Hai Yang; Guiying Li; Weihua Song; William J. Cooper; Xiangping Nie

    2010-01-01

    Fluoroquinolones and their metabolites are found in surface and ground waters, indicating their ineffective removal by conventional water treatment technologies. Advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) are alternatives to traditional water treatments. They utilize free radical reactions to directly degrade fluoroquinolones. This work reports absolute rate constants for the reaction of ciprofloxacin with several free radicals, OH, N3 and SO4? as well

  18. Life-cycle assessment as an environmental management tool in the production of potable water.

    PubMed

    Friedrich, E

    2002-01-01

    The environmental life cycle assessment (LCA) methodology was used in this study to calculate and compare the environmental burdens resulting from two different methods employed in the production of potable water in South Africa. One method employs conventional processes for the treatment of water and the other one is based on membrane filtration. All inputs (raw materials and energy) and outputs (products, by-products and emissions to air, water and soil) from the two methods were listed and quantified. These inputs and outputs cause different environmental impacts (global warming, ozone depletion, smog formation, acidification, nutrient enrichment, ecotoxicity and human toxicity) and the contribution of each method to each of these impact categories has been quantified, resulting in a score. The ISO (International Organisation for Standardisation) methodological framework for life cycle assessments guided this study. By using these methodologies and by tracing all the processes involved in the production of potable water to the interface with the environment, it was found that the main contributor to the overall environmental burden is the generation of electricity. This conclusion is valid for both methods investigated and in order to increase the environmental performance in the production of potable water the energy efficiency of waterworks should be increased. PMID:12448449

  19. Water loss control using pressure management: life-cycle energy and air emission effects.

    PubMed

    Stokes, Jennifer R; Horvath, Arpad; Sturm, Reinhard

    2013-10-01

    Pressure management is one cost-effective and efficient strategy for controlling water distribution losses. This paper evaluates the life-cycle energy use and emissions for pressure management zones in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and Halifax, Nova Scotia. It compares water savings using fixed-outlet and flow-modulated pressure control to performance without pressure control, considering the embedded electricity and chemical consumption in the lost water, manufacture of pipe and fittings to repair breaks caused by excess pressure, and pressure management. The resulting energy and emissions savings are significant. The Philadelphia and Halifax utilities both avoid approximately 130 million liters in water losses annually using flow-modulated pressure management. The conserved energy was 780 GJ and 1900 GJ while avoided greenhouse gas emissions were 50 Mg and 170 Mg a year by Philadelphia and Halifax, respectively. The life-cycle financial and environmental performance of pressure management systems compares favorably to the traditional demand management strategy of installing low-flow toilets. The energy savings may also translate to cost-effective greenhouse gas emission reductions depending on the energy mix used, an important advantage in areas where water and energy are constrained and/or expensive and greenhouse gas emissions are regulated as in California, for example. PMID:23869434

  20. Regulation of Methane Oxidation in a Freshwater Wetland by Water Table Changes and Anoxia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roslev, Peter; King, Gary M.

    1996-01-01

    The effects of water table fluctuations and anoxia on methane emission and methane oxidation were studied in a freshwater marsh. Seasonal aerobic methane oxidation rates varied between 15% and 76% of the potential diffusive methane flux (diffusive flux in the absence of aerobic oxidation). On an annual basis, approximately 43% of the methane diffusing into the oxic zone was oxidized before reaching the atmosphere. The highest methane oxidation was observed when the water table was below the peat surface. This was confirmed in laboratory experiments where short-term decreases in water table levels increased methane oxidation but also net methane emission. Although methane emission was generally not observed during the winter, stems of soft rush (Juncus effusus) emitted methane when the marsh was ice covered. Indigenous methanotrophic bacteria from the wetiand studied were relatively anoxia tolerant. Surface peat incubated under anoxic conditions maintained 30% of the initial methane oxidation capacity after 32 days of anoxia. Methanotrophs from anoxic peat initiated aerobic methane oxidation relatively quickly after oxygen addition (1-7 hours). These results were supported by culture experiments with the methanotroph Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b. This organism maintained a greater capacity for aerobic methane oxidation when starved under anoxic compared to oxic conditions. Anoxic incubation of M. trichosporium OB3b in the presence of sulfide (2 mM) and a low redox potential (-110 mV) did not decrease the capacity for methane oxidation relative to anoxic cultures incubated without sulfide. The results suggest that aerobic methane oxidation was a major regulator of seasonal methane emission front the investigated wetland. The observed water table fluctuations affected net methane oxidation presumably due to associated changes in oxygen gradients. However, changes from oxic to anoxic conditions in situ had relatively little effect on survival of the methanotrophic bacteria and thus on methane oxidation potential per se.

  1. Ozone decomposition and benzene oxidation catalysts based on iron and manganese oxides as industrial wastes from water decontamination by ozone treatment

    Microsoft Academic Search

    L. A. Zaloznaya; S. N. Tkachenko; G. V. Egorova; I. S. Tkachenko; A. V. Sobolev; E. Z. Golosman; V. A. Troshina; V. V. Lunin

    2009-01-01

    Effective ozone decomposition catalysts were created on the basis of iron oxides as side products from natural water treated\\u000a with ozone at water treatment plants. Iron oxide catalysts doped with manganese oxide are by 40% more active in benzene oxidation.\\u000a These iron-manganese catalysts can be recommended for industrial manufacture by the designed technologies and application\\u000a in ozone decomposition and benzene

  2. Active trans-plasma membrane water cycling in yeast is revealed by NMR.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yajie; Poirier-Quinot, Marie; Springer, Charles S; Balschi, James A

    2011-12-01

    Plasma membrane water transport is a crucial cellular phenomenon. Net water movement in response to an osmotic gradient changes cell volume. Steady-state exchange of water molecules, with no net flux or volume change, occurs by passive diffusion through the phospholipid bilayer and passage through membrane proteins. The hypothesis is tested that plasma membrane water exchange also correlates with ATP-driven membrane transport activity in yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae). Longitudinal (1)H(2)O NMR relaxation time constant (T(1)) values were measured in yeast suspensions containing extracellular relaxation reagent. Two-site-exchange analysis quantified the reversible exchange kinetics as the mean intracellular water lifetime (?(i)), where ?(i)(-1) is the pseudo-first-order rate constant for water efflux. To modulate cellular ATP, yeast suspensions were bubbled with 95%O(2)/5%CO(2) (O(2)) or 95%N(2)/5%CO(2) (N(2)). ATP was high during O(2), and ?(i)(-1) was 3.1 s(-1) at 25°C. After changing to N(2), ATP decreased and ?(i)(-1) was 1.8 s(-1). The principal active yeast ion transport protein is the plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase. Studies using the H(+)-ATPase inhibitor ebselen or a yeast genetic strain with reduced H(+)-ATPase found reduced ?(i)(-1), notwithstanding high ATP. Steady-state water exchange correlates with H(+)-ATPase activity. At volume steady state, water is cycling across the plasma membrane in response to metabolic transport activity. PMID:22261073

  3. Active Trans-Plasma Membrane Water Cycling in Yeast Is Revealed by NMR

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yajie; Poirier-Quinot, Marie; Springer, Charles S.; Balschi, James A.

    2011-01-01

    Plasma membrane water transport is a crucial cellular phenomenon. Net water movement in response to an osmotic gradient changes cell volume. Steady-state exchange of water molecules, with no net flux or volume change, occurs by passive diffusion through the phospholipid bilayer and passage through membrane proteins. The hypothesis is tested that plasma membrane water exchange also correlates with ATP-driven membrane transport activity in yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae). Longitudinal 1H2O NMR relaxation time constant (T1) values were measured in yeast suspensions containing extracellular relaxation reagent. Two-site-exchange analysis quantified the reversible exchange kinetics as the mean intracellular water lifetime (?i), where ?i?1 is the pseudo-first-order rate constant for water efflux. To modulate cellular ATP, yeast suspensions were bubbled with 95%O2/5%CO2 (O2) or 95%N2/5%CO2 (N2). ATP was high during O2, and ?i?1 was 3.1 s?1 at 25°C. After changing to N2, ATP decreased and ?i?1 was 1.8 s?1. The principal active yeast ion transport protein is the plasma membrane H+-ATPase. Studies using the H+-ATPase inhibitor ebselen or a yeast genetic strain with reduced H+-ATPase found reduced ?i?1, notwithstanding high ATP. Steady-state water exchange correlates with H+-ATPase activity. At volume steady state, water is cycling across the plasma membrane in response to metabolic transport activity. PMID:22261073

  4. DOI: 10.1002/cctc.201200050 Catalytic NO Oxidation Pathways and Redox Cycles on

    E-print Network

    Iglesia, Enrique

    of Rhodium and Cobalt Brian M. Weiss,[a, c] Nancy Artioli,[a, d] and Enrique Iglesia*[a, b] Introduction leading to lower vacancy concentrations on small clusters. NO oxidation has also been catalyzed by Rh the turnover The elementary steps and site requirements for the oxidation of NO on Rh and Co and the oxidation

  5. Photocatalytic oxidation of grey water over titanium dioxide suspensions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Sanchez; M. J. Rivero; I. Ortiz

    2010-01-01

    Grey water reuse is an attractive alternative to the sustainable management of water especially under water scarcity situations. In this work, photocatalysis over titanium dioxide particles has been applied as a novel alternative to already studied treatments of grey waters such as filtration, biological processes, disinfection and\\/or coagulation technologies. Grey waters coming from two different sources, a hotel and a

  6. Enhanced sensing response of oxidized graphene formed by UV irradiation in water.

    PubMed

    Mitoma, Nobuhiko; Nouchi, Ryo; Tanigaki, Katsumi

    2015-03-13

    A small amount of defects (less than 0.01%) were introduced into graphene by irradiating it with ultraviolet (UV) light in water. The chemisorbed oxygen species caused a limited amount of degradation in the charge carrier mobility, while the physisorbed water molecules caused both a reduction in the mobility and hole doping. The oxidation was nonuniform, owing to variations in the potential caused by the metal contacts. Raman spectroscopy measurements revealed that UV irradiation in water promoted mild oxidation of graphene's basal plane, which enhanced the electrical sensing response of the adsorption of water molecules. The enhanced electrical response was achieved by the high binding energy of the water molecules at the oxidized sites and the near-zero Dirac point voltage, easily obtained by desorbing the physisorbed water molecules. PMID:25682976

  7. Enhanced sensing response of oxidized graphene formed by UV irradiation in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitoma, Nobuhiko; Nouchi, Ryo; Tanigaki, Katsumi

    2015-03-01

    A small amount of defects (less than 0.01%) were introduced into graphene by irradiating it with ultraviolet (UV) light in water. The chemisorbed oxygen species caused a limited amount of degradation in the charge carrier mobility, while the physisorbed water molecules caused both a reduction in the mobility and hole doping. The oxidation was nonuniform, owing to variations in the potential caused by the metal contacts. Raman spectroscopy measurements revealed that UV irradiation in water promoted mild oxidation of graphene’s basal plane, which enhanced the electrical sensing response of the adsorption of water molecules. The enhanced electrical response was achieved by the high binding energy of the water molecules at the oxidized sites and the near-zero Dirac point voltage, easily obtained by desorbing the physisorbed water molecules.

  8. Anticipated changes in the global atmospheric water cycle This article has been downloaded from IOPscience. Please scroll down to see the full text article.

    E-print Network

    Allan, Richard P.

    Anticipated changes in the global atmospheric water cycle This article has been downloaded from Anticipated changes in the global atmospheric water cycle Richard P Allan Department of Meteorology Associates, Redmond, WA, USA liepert@nwra.com The atmospheric branch of the water cycle, although containing

  9. Adsorption of dissolved organics in lake water by aluminum oxide. Effect of molecular weight

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Davis, J.A.; Gloor, R.

    1981-01-01

    Dissolved organic compounds in a Swiss lake were fractionated into three molecular size classes by gel exclusion chromatography, and adsorption of each fraction on colloidal alumina was studied as a function of pH. Organic compounds with molecular weight (Mr) greater than 1000 formed strong complexes with the alumina surface, but low molecular weight compounds were weakly adsorbed. Electrophoretic mobility measurements indicated that alumina particles suspended in the original lake water were highly negatively charged because of adsorbed organic matter. Most of the adsorbed organic compounds were in the Mr range 1000 < Mr < 3000. Adsorption of these compounds during the treatment of drinking water by alum coagulation may be responsible for the preferential removal of trihalomethane precursors. Adsorption may also influence the molecular-weight distribution of dissolved organic material in lakes. surface, the present work will focus on the influence of molecular size and pH on the adsorption behavior of dissolved organic material of a Swiss lake. From a geochemical point of view, it is important to know the molecular-weight distribution of adsorbed organic matter so that we may better assess its reactivity with trace elements. The study also serves as a first step in quantifying the role of adsorption in the geochemical cycle of organic carbon in lacustrine environments. For water-treatment practice, we need to determine whether molecular weight fractionation occurs during adsorption by aluminum oxide. Such a fractionation could be significant in the light of recent reports that chloroform and other organochlorine compounds are preferentially produced by particular molecular-weight fractions (25-27). ?? 1981 American Chemical Society.

  10. The effect of metal ions on lipid oxidation, colour and physicochemical properties of cuttlefish ( Sepia pharaonis) subjected to multiple freeze–thaw cycles

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Amonrat Thanonkaew; Soottawat Benjakul; Wonnop Visessanguan; Eric A. Decker

    2006-01-01

    The effects of different metal ions at various concentrations (0, 5, 25ppm) on lipid oxidation, discolouration and physicochemical properties of muscle protein in cuttlefish (Sepia pharaonis) subjected to multiple freeze–thaw cycles, were investigated. Lipid oxidation of all treatments increased as the freeze–thaw cycle increased. However, the rate of the TBARS increases varied, depending on concentration, type and valency of the

  11. Preparation of nano-copper oxide modified glassy carbon electrode by a novel film plating\\/potential cycling method and its characterization

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Wen-Zhi Le; You-Qin Liu

    2009-01-01

    An electrochemical sensor for H2O2 determination was prepared by electrodepositing nano-copper oxide on glassy carbon electrode by a novel film plating\\/potential cycling method. A copper film was first cathodically deposited on the surface of GC in CuCl2 solution at ?0.4V, then a nano-copper oxide film was in situ deposited on the surface of GC by potential cycling at ?0.5 to

  12. Development of a Water Based, Critical Flow, Non-Vapor Compression cooling Cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Hosni, Mohammad H.

    2014-03-30

    Expansion of a high-pressure liquid refrigerant through the use of a thermostatic expansion valve or other device is commonplace in vapor-compression cycles to regulate the quality and flow rate of the refrigerant entering the evaporator. In vapor-compression systems, as the condensed refrigerant undergoes this expansion, its pressure and temperature drop, and part of the liquid evaporates. We (researchers at Kansas State University) are developing a cooling cycle that instead pumps a high-pressure refrigerant through a supersonic converging-diverging nozzle. As the liquid refrigerant passes through the nozzle, its velocity reaches supersonic (or critical-flow) conditions, substantially decreasing the refrigerant’s pressure. This sharp pressure change vaporizes some of the refrigerant and absorbs heat from the surrounding conditions during this phase change. Due to the design of the nozzle, a shockwave trips the supersonic two-phase refrigerant back to the starting conditions, condensing the remaining vapor. The critical-flow refrigeration cycle would provide space cooling, similar to a chiller, by running a secondary fluid such as water or glycol over one or more nozzles. Rather than utilizing a compressor to raise the pressure of the refrigerant, as in a vapor-cycle system, the critical-flow cycle utilizes a high-pressure pump to drive refrigerant liquid through the cooling cycle. Additionally, the design of the nozzle can be tailored for a given refrigerant, such that environmentally benign substances can act as the working fluid. This refrigeration cycle is still in early-stage development with prototype development several years away. The complex multi-phase flow at supersonic conditions presents numerous challenges to fully understanding and modeling the cycle. With the support of DOE and venture-capital investors, initial research was conducted at PAX Streamline, and later, at Caitin. We (researchers at Kansas State University) have continued development of the cycle and have gained an in-depth understanding of the governing fundamental knowledge, based on the laws of physics and thermodynamics and verified with our testing results. Through this research, we are identifying optimal working fluid and operating conditions to eventually demonstrate the core technology for space cooling or other applications.

  13. WORKSHOP ON MONITORING OXIDATION-REDUCTION PROCESSES FOR GROUND-WATER RESTORATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Redox conditions are among the most important parameters for controlling contaminant transport and fate in ground-water systems. Oxidation-reduction (redox) reactions mediate the chemical behavior of both inorganic and organic chemical constituents by affecting solubility, rea...

  14. Feasibility of breeding in hard spectrum boiling water reactors with oxide and nitride fuels

    E-print Network

    Feng, Bo, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2011-01-01

    This study assesses the neutronic, thermal-hydraulic, and fuel performance aspects of using nitride fuel in place of oxides in Pu-based high conversion light water reactor designs. Using the higher density nitride fuel ...

  15. A nano-sized manganese oxide in a protein matrix as a natural water-oxidizing site.

    PubMed

    Najafpour, Mohammad Mahdi; Ghobadi, Mohadeseh Zarei; Haghighi, Behzad; Tomo, Tatsuya; Carpentier, Robert; Shen, Jian-Ren; Allakhverdiev, Suleyman I

    2014-08-01

    The purpose of this review is to present recent advances in the structural and functional studies of water-oxidizing center of Photosystem II and its surrounding protein matrix in order to synthesize artificial catalysts for production of clean and efficient hydrogen fuel. PMID:24560883

  16. Selection of organic process and source indicator substances for the anthropogenically influenced water cycle.

    PubMed

    Jekel, Martin; Dott, Wolfgang; Bergmann, Axel; Dünnbier, Uwe; Gnirß, Regina; Haist-Gulde, Brigitte; Hamscher, Gerd; Letzel, Marion; Licha, Tobias; Lyko, Sven; Miehe, Ulf; Sacher, Frank; Scheurer, Marco; Schmidt, Carsten K; Reemtsma, Thorsten; Ruhl, Aki Sebastian

    2015-04-01

    An increasing number of organic micropollutants (OMP) is detected in anthropogenically influenced water cycles. Source control and effective natural and technical barriers are essential to maintain a high quality of drinking water resources under these circumstances. Based on the literature and our own research this study proposes a limited number of OMP that can serve as indicator substances for the major sources of OMP, such as wastewater treatment plants, agriculture and surface runoff. Furthermore functional indicators are proposed that allow assessment of the proper function of natural and technical barriers in the aquatic environment, namely conventional municipal wastewater treatment, advanced treatment (ozonation, activated carbon), bank filtration and soil aquifer treatment as well as self-purification in surface water. These indicator substances include the artificial sweetener acesulfame, the anti-inflammatory drug ibuprofen, the anticonvulsant carbamazepine, the corrosion inhibitor benzotriazole and the herbicide mecoprop among others. The chemical indicator substances are intended to support comparisons between watersheds and technical and natural processes independent of specific water cycles and to reduce efforts and costs of chemical analyses without losing essential information. PMID:25563167

  17. Mechanism of water oxidation by [Ru(bda)(L)?]: The return of the "blue dimer"

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Concepcion, Javier J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Zhong, Diane K. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Szalda, David J. [Baruch College, New York, NY (United States); Muckerman, James T. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Fujita, Etsuko [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2015-01-01

    We describe here a combined solution-surface-DFT calculations study for complexes of the type [Ru(bda)(L)?] including X-ray structure of intermediates, their reactivity, as well as pH-dependent electrochemistry and spectroelectrochemistry. These studies shed light on the mechanism of water oxidation by [Ru(bda)(L)?], revealing key features unavailable from solution studies with sacrificial oxidants.

  18. Destruction of OPA from Munitions Demilitarization in Supercritical Water Oxidation: Kinetics of Total Organic Carbon Disappearance

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bambang Veriansyah; Jae-Duck Kim; Jong-Chol Lee; Deasik Hong

    2006-01-01

    The destruction of OPA from munitions demilitarization has been accomplished in supercritical water oxidation (SCWO) with oxygen as oxidant in an isothermal continuous-flow reactor. The experiments were conducted at a temperature of 689–887 K and a fixed pressure of 25 MPa, with a residence time that ranged from 7 s to 14 s. The destruction efficiency was measured by total

  19. Synthesis and characterization of a mesoporous hydrous zirconium oxide used for arsenic removal from drinking water

    SciTech Connect

    Bortun, Anatoly; Bortun, Mila; Pardini, James [MELChemicals Inc, 500 Barbertown Point Breeze Road, Flemington, NJ 08822 (United States)] [MELChemicals Inc, 500 Barbertown Point Breeze Road, Flemington, NJ 08822 (United States); Khainakov, Sergei A. [Departamento de Quimica Organica e Inorganica, Universidad de Oviedo, 33006 Oviedo (Spain)] [Departamento de Quimica Organica e Inorganica, Universidad de Oviedo, 33006 Oviedo (Spain); Garcia, Jose R., E-mail: jrgm@uniovi.es [Departamento de Quimica Organica e Inorganica, Universidad de Oviedo, 33006 Oviedo (Spain)

    2010-02-15

    Powder (20-50 {mu}m) mesoporous hydrous zirconium oxide was prepared from a zirconium salt granular precursor. The effect of some process parameters on product morphology, porous structure and adsorption performance has been studied. The use of hydrous zirconium oxide for selective arsenic removal from drinking water is discussed.

  20. Oxygen transfer rate estimation in oxidation ditches from clean water measurements

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. A. A. Abusam; K. J. Keesman; K. Meinema; G. van Straten

    2001-01-01

    Standard methods for the determination of oxygen transfer rate are based on assumptions that are not valid for oxidation ditches. This paper presents a realistic and simple new method to be used in the estimation of oxygen transfer rate in oxidation ditches from clean water measurements. The new method uses a loop-of-CSTRs model, which can be easily incorporated within control

  1. SOIL ORGANIC MATTER OXIDATION POTENTIAL WITH FLUCTUATING WATER TABLE UNDER SUGARCANE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Histosols in the Everglades Agricultural Area are subsiding primarily from aerobic microbial oxidation. Flooding reduces soil subsidence. An experiment was set up in lysimeters with sugarcane growing in muck soil to determine oxidation potential under varying water-table levels after flood. Treatmen...

  2. THE STRUCTURE OF OXIDE FILMS ON ALUMINUM AFTER EXPOSURE TO HIGH-TEMPERATURE PURE WATER

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. H. Greenblatt

    1962-01-01

    The structure of the oxide films formed on aluminum after exposure to ; high-temperature pure water over the temperature range 150-350 deg C was examined ; after periods of exposure varyinig from 1 min to 7 hr. The technique used to ; prepare samples for examination showed up the different structural zones in the ; oxide by intensifying the contrast

  3. Advanced oxidation processes (AOP) for water purification and recovery

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Roberto Andreozzi; Vincenzo Caprio; Amedeo Insola; Raffaele Marotta

    1999-01-01

    All advanced oxidation processes (AOP) are characterised by a common chemical feature: the capability of exploiting the high reactivity of HO radicals in driving oxidation processes which are suitable for achieving the complete abatement and through mineralization of even less reactive pollutants. The different AOP are considered and critically presented according to their specific features with reference, whenever possible, to

  4. Sensitivity of the water cycle over the Indian Ocean and Maritime Continent to parameterized physics in a regional model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulate, Marcela; Dudhia, Jimy; Zhang, Chidong

    2014-12-01

    A regional model was used to simulate the water cycle over the Indian Ocean (IO) and Maritime Continent (MC). Sixteen 92 day simulations were performed using different combinations of eight cumulus parameterization schemes and three planetary boundary-layer (PBL) parameterization schemes. The strength of the water cycle in the IO and MC, measured by its domain mean precipitation and precipitable water, differs substantially among the simulations. The large spread of water cycle strength is mainly toward dry biases in comparison to global data assimilation products. The simulated water cycle, its spread, and biases differ between the IO and MC. Influences of PBL schemes can penetrate into the upper troposphere and those by cumulus schemes into the boundary layer. Dry biases in the simulations are produced mainly because of feedbacks among erroneously low diabatic heating peaks, shallow moisture convergence layers, dry lower troposphere, and weak surface evaporation. There is no single type of parameterization scheme that can be identified to be the main sources of the dry biases. It is the combination of errors from three types of parameterization schemes, namely, cumulus, PBL, and microphysics, that makes the simulated water cycle unrealistic. The lesson learned is that the tropical water cycle can be better simulated only by improving parameterization schemes of different processes all together as a package.

  5. Water-gas shift activity of Cu surfaces and Cu nanoparticles supported on metal oxides

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. A. Rodriguez; P. Liu; X. Wang; W. Wen; J. Hanson; J. Hrbek; M. Pérez; J. Evans

    2009-01-01

    Oxide supported Cu catalysts show significant activity for the water-gas shift reaction (WGS, CO+H2O?H2+CO2) but their performance is not fully understood and is highly dependent on the synthesis conditions or the nature of the oxide support. This article describes a series of new studies examining the water-gas shift activity of Cu\\/MgO(100) surfaces and compares it to the activities found for

  6. Photoassisted oxidation of oil films on water. Final performance report, January 1, 1990--March 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Heller, A.

    1994-04-19

    The objective of the project has been the development of a technology for cleaning up oil spills on water through their photocatalytic oxidation. The photocatalyst used was titanium dioxide. Nanocrytalline TiO{sub 2}, of anatase or anatase/rutile phase, was bound to hollow ceramic microspheres of sufficiently low density to be buoyant on water. In the presence of these, under sunlight, oil films were photocatalytically oxidized by dissolved oxygen.

  7. Parameterizing soil emission and atmospheric oxidation-reduction in a model of the global biogeochemical cycle of mercury.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Tetsuro; Ikemoto, Hisatoshi; Takahashi, Katsuyuki; Hasome, Hisashi; Ueda, Hiromasa

    2013-01-01

    Using the GEOS-Chem atmosphere-land-ocean coupled mercury model, we studied the significances of two processes, soil emission and atmospheric oxidation-reduction, in the global biogeochemical cycling of mercury and their parametrization to improve model performance. Implementing an empirical equation for soil emission flux (Esoil) including soil mercury concentration, solar radiation, and surface air temperature as parameters enabled the model to reproduce the observed seasonal variations of Esoil, whereas the default setting, which uses only the former two parameters, failed. The modified setting of Esoil also increased the model-simulated atmospheric concentration in the summertime surface layer of the lower- and midlatitudes and improved the model reproducibility for the observations in Japan and U.S. in the same period. Implementing oxidation of atmospheric gaseous elemental mercury (Hg(0)) by ozone with an updated rate constant, as well as the oxidation by bromine atoms (Br) in the default setting, improved the model reproducibility for the dry deposition fluxes observed in Japan. This setting, however, failed to reproduce the observed seasonal variations of atmospheric concentrations in the Arctic sites due to the imbalance between oxidation and reduction, whereas the model with Br as the sole Hg(0) oxidant in the polar atmosphere could capture the variations. PMID:24053722

  8. Misses during Water Oxidation in Photosystem II Are S State-dependent*

    PubMed Central

    Han, Guangye; Mamedov, Fikret; Styring, Stenbjörn

    2012-01-01

    The period of four oscillation of the S state intermediates of the water oxidizing complex in Photosystem II (PSII) is commonly analyzed by the Kok parameters. The important miss factor determines the efficiency for each S transition. Commonly, an equal miss factor has been used in the analysis. We have used EPR signals which probe all S states in the same sample during S cycle advancement. This allows, for the first time, to measure directly the miss parameter for each S state transition. Experiments were performed in PSII membrane preparations from spinach in the presence of electron acceptor at 1 °C and 20 °C. The data show that the miss parameter is different in different transitions and shows different temperature dependence. We found no misses at 1 °C and 10% misses at 20 °C during the S1?S2 transition. The highest miss factor was found in the S2?S3 transition which decreased from 23% to 16% with increasing temperature. For the S3?S0 transition the miss parameter was found to be 7% at 1 °C and decreased to 3% at 20 °C. For the S0?S1 transition the miss parameter was found to be approximately 10% at both temperatures. The contribution from the acceptor side in the form of recombination reactions as well as from the donor side of PSII to the uneven misses is discussed. It is suggested that the different transition efficiency in each S transition partly reflects the chemistry at the CaMn4O5 cluster. That consequently contributes to the uneven misses during S cycle turnover in PSII. PMID:22374999

  9. Ecohydrology underground: how root attributes influence water, carbon, and nutrient cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, R. B.; McElrone, A. J.; Bleby, T. M.; Piñeiro, G.; Jobbágy, E. G.

    2007-05-01

    Through the depth and volume of the soil that they explore, plants strongly influence the cycling of water, carbon, and nutrients. This talk combines data from two experimental systems in North and South America to demonstrate such interactions. One is a gradient of sites in the southwestern U.S. where we are examining the ecohydrology associated with woody plant encroachment, including a unique cave system that allows us to measure water uptake by plants meters, even tens of meters, underground. Another is a network of plantations that provides sites with contrasting water, carbon, and nutrient use that we compare to adjacent native vegetation, particularly grasslands. We combine field results from these systems with remote sensing observations and model simulations to examine similar ecohydrological/nutrient interactions in other regions of the world.

  10. Earth Observations of the Water and Energy Cycle and the GEWEX Regional Hydroclimate Projects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benedict, S.; van Oevelen, P. J.

    2012-12-01

    In order to predict and manage changes in our environment it is necessary to make accurate observations of the energy and water cycle at various scales. Changes will have direct impacts on our natural and social environment e.g. for our water resources. Within GEWEX, the Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment of the World Climate Research Programme (WCRP), the global energy and water cycle is a main focus of attention. Changes at the global scale will have consequences at the regional scale and vice versa. To better discern the various processes over the entire range of spatial and temporal scales the Regional Hydroclimate Projects (RHP's) are established as the part of the GEWEX Hydroclimatology Panel that links the regional observations and process understanding to the global scale. This is done through exchange of observations, data, modeling, transferability studies etc. In this presentation an overview is given of the various RHP's, the reasons for their establishment and how they are likely to evolve in the future. Each of the RHP's is a collection of individual researchers, research institutes, academia and national agencies which have a common goal related to our environment and in which association with GEWEX helps to reach that goal. In the next few years the emphasis will be placed on stronger collaboration between the various RHP's as well as the intercomparison and evaluation of the GEWEX global datasets with the regional data sets. Crucial to success in this endeavor is the linkage between in-situ observations, modeling data and earth observational data.

  11. Disinfection byproduct formation during biofiltration cycle: Implications for drinking water production.

    PubMed

    Delatolla, R; Séguin, C; Springthorpe, S; Gorman, E; Campbell, A; Douglas, I

    2015-10-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate the potential of biofiltration to reduce the formation potential of disinfection byproducts (DBPs). Particularly, the work investigates the effect of the duration of the filter cycle on the formation potential of total trihalomethanes (TTHM) and five species of haloacetic acids (HAA5), dissolved oxygen (DO), organic carbon, nitrogen and total phosphorous concentrations along with biofilm coverage of the filter media and biomass viability of the attached cells. The study was conducted on a full-scale biologically active filter, with anthracite and sand media, at the Britannia water treatment plant (WTP), located in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. The formation potential of both TTHMs and HAA5s decreased due to biofiltration. However the lowest formation potentials for both groups of DBPs and or their precursors were observed immediately following a backwash event. Hence, the highest percent removal of DBPs was observed during the early stages of the biofiltration cycle, which suggests that a higher frequency of backwashing will reduce the formation of DBPs. Variable pressure scanning electron microscopy (VPSEM) analysis shows that biofilm coverage of anthracite and sand media increases as the filtration cycle progressed, while biomass viability analysis demonstrates that the percentage of cells attached to the anthracite and sand media also increases as the filtration cycle progresses. These results suggest that the development and growth of biofilm on the filters increases the DPB formation potential. PMID:26002158

  12. Highly Efficient Bioinspired Molecular Ru Water Oxidation Catalysts with Negatively Charged Backbone Ligands.

    PubMed

    Duan, Lele; Wang, Lei; Li, Fusheng; Li, Fei; Sun, Licheng

    2015-07-21

    The oxygen evolving complex (OEC) of the natural photosynthesis system II (PSII) oxidizes water to produce oxygen and reducing equivalents (protons and electrons). The oxygen released from PSII provides the oxygen source of our atmosphere; the reducing equivalents are used to reduce carbon dioxide to organic products, which support almost all organisms on the Earth planet. The first photosynthetic organisms able to split water were proposed to be cyanobacteria-like ones appearing ca. 2.5 billion years ago. Since then, nature has chosen a sustainable way by using solar energy to develop itself. Inspired by nature, human beings started to mimic the functions of the natural photosynthesis system and proposed the concept of artificial photosynthesis (AP) with the view to creating energy-sustainable societies and reducing the impact on the Earth environments. Water oxidation is a highly energy demanding reaction and essential to produce reducing equivalents for fuel production, and thereby effective water oxidation catalysts (WOCs) are required to catalyze water oxidation and reduce the energy loss. X-ray crystallographic studies on PSII have revealed that the OEC consists of a Mn4CaO5 cluster surrounded by oxygen rich ligands, such as oxyl, oxo, and carboxylate ligands. These negatively charged, oxygen rich ligands strongly stabilize the high valent states of the Mn cluster and play vital roles in effective water oxidation catalysis with low overpotential. This Account describes our endeavors to design effective Ru WOCs with low overpotential, large turnover number, and high turnover frequency by introducing negatively charged ligands, such as carboxylate. Negatively charged ligands stabilized the high valent states of Ru catalysts, as evidenced by the low oxidation potentials. Meanwhile, the oxygen production rates of our Ru catalysts were improved dramatically as well. Thanks to the strong electron donation ability of carboxylate containing ligands, a seven-coordinate Ru(IV) species was isolated as a reaction intermediate, shedding light on the reaction mechanisms of Ru-catalyzed water oxidation chemistry. Auxiliary ligands have dramatic effects on the water oxidation catalysis in terms of the reactivity and the reaction mechanism. For instance, Ru-bda (H2bda = 2,2'-bipyridine-6,6'-dicarboxylic acid) water oxidation catalysts catalyze Ce(IV)-driven water oxidation extremely fast via the radical coupling of two Ru(V)?O species, while Ru-pda (H2pda = 1,10-phenanthroline-2,9-dicarboxylic acid) water oxidation catalysts catalyze the same reaction slowly via water nucleophilic attack on a Ru(V)?O species. With a number of active Ru catalysts in hands, light driven water oxidation was accomplished using catalysts with low catalytic onset potentials. The structures of molecular catalysts could be readily tailored to introduce additional functional groups, which favors the fabrication of state-of-the-art Ru-based water oxidation devices, such as electrochemical water oxidation anodes and photo-electrochemical anodes. The development of efficient water oxidation catalysts has led to a step forward in the sustainable energy system. PMID:26131964

  13. Oxidation of phenolics in supercritical water. Quarterly technical progress report, June 1, 1993--August 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Savage, P.E.

    1993-12-31

    An environmental hazard associated with coal liquefaction and gasification is the generation of aqueous waste streams containing phenolics and carcinogenic organics such as polynuclear aromatics. Oxidation in supercritical water (SCW) is an emerging technology for the ultimate destruction of phenolics and other organics in waste water streams. SCW oxidation involves the oxidation of organics in an aqueous medium at temperatures between 400--650{degree}C and pressures around 250 atm. These conditions exceed the thermodynamic critical point of water, hence the water is said to be supercritical. Wastes can be converted by SCWO to benign products: carbon is converted to CO{sub 2}, hydrogen to H{sub 2}O, and nitrogen to N{sub 2} or N{sub 2}O (but not NO{sub x}). The objective of this project is to oxidize selected phenolics in SCW and then determine the reaction kinetics (rate constants, reaction orders, activation energies) and the reaction pathways. These reaction fundamentals can then be used to evaluate, design, optimize, and control coal-conversion waste water treatment processes based on SCW oxidation. Our work to date has focused on the oxidation of o-cresol in SCW. We have explored the effects of temperature, pressure, and the concentrations of cresol, oxygen and water.

  14. The impact of land cover change on carbon and water cycling in the US Central Plains grasslands

    E-print Network

    Buck, Tyler

    2010-07-30

    Using the eddy covariance technique, the impact of land cover variability on carbon and water cycling was examined at three different grasslands in Northeast Kansas. One site 8 km north of Lawrence, Kansas at the Nelson Environmental Study Area...

  15. Supercritical water oxidation of colored smoke, dye, and pyrotechnic compositions. Final report: Pilot plant conceptual design

    SciTech Connect

    LaJeunesse, C.A.; Chan, Jennifer P.; Raber, T.N.; Macmillan, D.C.; Rice, S.F.; Tschritter, K.L.

    1993-11-01

    The existing demilitarization stockpile contains large quantities of colored smoke, spotting dye, and pyrotechnic munitions. For many years, these munitions have been stored in magazines at locations within the continental United States awaiting completion of the life-cycle. The open air burning of these munitions has been shown to produce toxic gases that are detrimental to human health and harmful to the environment. Prior efforts to incinerate these compositions have also produced toxic emissions and have been unsuccessful. Supercritical water oxidation (SCWO) is a rapidly developing hazardous waste treatment method that can be an alternative to incineration for many types of wastes. The primary advantage SCWO affords for the treatment of this selected set of obsolete munitions is that toxic gas and particulate emissions will not occur as part of the effluent stream. Sandia is currently designing a SCWO reactor for the US Army Armament Research, Development & Engineering Center (ARDEC) to destroy colored smoke, spotting dye, and pyrotechnic munitions. This report summarizes the design status of the ARDEC reactor. Process and equipment operation parameters, process flow equations or mass balances, and utility requirements for six wastes of interest are developed in this report. Two conceptual designs are also developed with all process and instrumentation detailed.

  16. Pseudonegative thermal expansion and the state of water in graphene oxide layered assemblies.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jian; Andres, Christine M; Xu, Jiadi; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy; Tsotsis, Thomas; Kotov, Nicholas A

    2012-09-25

    Unraveling the complex interplay between thermal properties and hydration is a part of understanding the fundamental properties of many soft materials and very essential for many applications. Here we show that graphene oxide (GO) demonstrates a highly negative thermal expansion (NTE) coefficient owing to unique thermohydration processes related with fast transport of water between the GO sheets, the amphiphilic nature of nanochannels, and close-to-zero intrinsic thermal expansion of GO. The humidity-dependent NTE of GO layered assemblies, or "pseudonegative thermal expansion" (PNTE), differs from that of other hygroscopic materials due to its relatively fast and highly reversible expansion/contraction cycles and occurrence at low humidity levels while bearing similarities to classic NTE. Thermal expansion of polyvinyl alcohol/GO composites is easily tunable with additional intricacy of thermohydration effects. PNTE combined with isotropy, nontoxicity, and mechanical robustness is an asset for applications of actuators, sensors, MEMS devices, and memory materials and crucial for developing methods of thermal/photopatterning of GO devices. PMID:22861527

  17. Advanced mixed oxide fuel assemblies with higher plutonium contents for pressurized water reactors

    Microsoft Academic Search

    F. Burtak; L. Hetzelt; W. Stach

    1996-01-01

    Optimizing fuel cycle costs by increasing the final burnup leads to reduced generation of plutonium. Under properly defined boundary conditions thermal recycling in mixed oxide (MOX) fuel assemblies (FAs) reduces further the amount of plutonium which has to be disposed of in final storage. Increasing the final burnup requires higher initial enrichments of uranium fuel to be matched by an

  18. Impact of doubled CO 2 on the interaction between the global and regional water cycles in four study regions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Zhao Li; Uma S. Bhatt; Nicole Mölders

    2008-01-01

    Results from a suite of 30-year simulations (after spin-up) of the fully coupled Community Climate System Model version 2.0.1\\u000a are analyzed to examine the impact of doubling CO2 on interactions between the global water cycle and the regional water cycles of four similar-size, but hydrologically and\\u000a thermally different study regions (the Yukon, Ob, St Lawrence, and Colorado river basins and

  19. Conservation of water cycle on land via restoration of natural closed-canopy forests: implications for regional landscape planning

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Anastassia M. Makarieva; Victor G. Gorshkov; Bai-Lian Li

    2006-01-01

    Investigating the role of forests for maintenance of the water cycle on land is critically important in the current situation\\u000a of rapid global elimination of the natural vegetation cover. In this paper we contribute to the on-going discussion of the\\u000a issue with two aspects. (1) Theoretical consideration of the water cycle on land reveals the importance of correct identification\\u000a of

  20. Importance of long-term cycles for predicting water level dynamics in natural lakes.

    PubMed

    García Molinos, Jorge; Viana, Mafalda; Brennan, Michael; Donohue, Ian

    2015-01-01

    Lakes are disproportionately important ecosystems for humanity, containing 77% of the liquid surface freshwater on Earth and comprising key contributors to global biodiversity. With an ever-growing human demand for water and increasing climate uncertainty, there is pressing need for improved understanding of the underlying patterns of natural variability of water resources and consideration of their implications for water resource management and conservation. Here we use Bayesian harmonic regression models to characterise water level dynamics and study the influence of cyclic components in confounding estimation of long-term directional trends in water levels in natural Irish lakes. We found that the lakes were characterised by a common and well-defined annual seasonality and several inter-annual and inter-decadal cycles with strong transient behaviour over time. Importantly, failing to account for the longer-term cyclic components produced a significant overall underestimation of the trend effect. Our findings demonstrate the importance of contextualising lake water resource management to the specific physical setting of lakes. PMID:25757071