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Last update: November 12, 2013.
1

Hydrologic Engineering Methods for Water Resources Development. Volume 2. Hydrologic Data Management.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The volume is part of a 12-volume report entitled, 'Hydrologic Engineering Methods for Water Resources Development', prepared by The Hydrologic Engineering Center as part of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers' participation in the International Hydrological...

L. R. Beard

1972-01-01

2

Water resources  

Microsoft Academic Search

Describes aspects of water resource systems and the human agencies that affect them. Defines the basics of successful resource management, addresses problems that confront water resource managers, and identifies a range of solutions for more efficient and equitable resource control and use. Covers quality of water supply, flood control, hydroelectric power, national and regional water authorities, and international aspects, with

A. McDonald; D. Kay

1989-01-01

3

Reformulation of Engineering Education at Undergraduate Level in the Faculdad de Ingenieria y Ciencias Hidricas Universidad Nacional del Litoral--Water Resources and Engineering Degrees.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This paper explains the educational changes in the Water Resources Engineering program offered by the Universidad Nacional del Litoral in Santa Fe, Argentina, for the last 20 years at the undergraduate level. The need for modernizing the engineering teaching program occurred due to changes in the social system in which the concepts of development…

Theiler, Julio; Isla, Miguel; Arrillaga, Hugo; Ceirano, Eduardo; Lozeco, Cristobal

4

Water Resources: Corps of Engineers Management of 1986 Flooding in Northeastern Oklahoma.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The briefing report provides information on the efforts of the Corps of Engineers to deal with the flooding that occurred in September and October of 1986 in northeastern Oklahoma. Specifically, it addresses (1) whether the Corps released water from its r...

1987-01-01

5

System International d'Unites: Metric Measurement in Water Resources Engineering.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This pamphlet gives definitions and symbols for the basic and derived metric units, prefixes, and conversion factors for units frequently used in water resources. Included are conversion factors for units of area, work, heat, power, pressure, viscosity, flow rate, and others. (BB)|

Klingeman, Peter C.

6

Re-engineering the urban drainage system for resource recovery and protection of drinking water supplies.  

PubMed

The Harare metropolis in Zimbabwe, extending upstream from Manyame Dam in the Upper Manyame River Basin, consists of the City of Harare and its satellite towns: Chitungwiza, Norton, Epworth and Ruwa. The existing urban drainage system is typically a single-use-mixing system: water is used and discharged to "waste", excreta are flushed to sewers and eventually, after "treatment", the effluent is discharged to a drinking water supply source. Polluted urban storm water is evacuated as fast as possible. This system not only ignores the substantial value in "waste" materials, but it also exports problems to downstream communities and to vulnerable fresh-water sources. The question is how can the harare metropolis urban drainage system, which is complex and has evolved over time, be rearranged to achieve sustainability (i.e. water conservation, pollution prevention at source, protection of the vulnerable drinking water sources and recovery of valuable materials)? This paper reviews current concepts regarding the future development of the urban drainage system in line with the new vision of "Sustainable Cities of the Future". The Harare Metropolis in Zimbabwe is taken as a case, and philosophical options for re-engineering the drainage system are discussed. PMID:10842788

Gumbo, B

2000-01-01

7

Save Our Water Resources.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The purpose of this booklet, developed as part of Project SOAR (Save Our American Resources), is to give Scout leaders some facts about the world's resources, the sources of water pollution, and how people can help in obtaining solutions. Among the topics discussed are the world's water resources, the water cycle, water quality, sources of water

Bromley, Albert W.

8

Water Resources Research Catalog, Volume 4.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Described are 4501 projects in progress during 1968 under the general headings: Nature of Water; Water Cycle; Water Supply Augmentation and Conservation; Water Quality Management and Control; Water Quality Management and Protection; Water Resources Planning; Resource Data; Engineering Works; and Manpower, Grants and Facilities. Each description…

Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC. Science Information Exchange.

9

Hydrologic Engineering Methods for Water Resources Development. Volume 4, Hydrography Analysis.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This is Volume 4 of the 12 Volume report prepared by The Hydrologic Engineering Center of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers as a contribution to the International Hydrological Decade. This volume describes practical techniques for analyzing precipitation, ...

D. Burnett E. F. Hawkins K. Brooks W. Sharp

1973-01-01

10

Water Resources of Alaska  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Water Resources of Alaska homepage is provided by the US Geological Survey. The goal of this project is to study and understand Alaska's hydrology (surface water, ground water, and water quality) for use and management of the nation's water resources. The site features a list of published reports and information about current projects as well as a vast amount of hydrologic data such as surface water, ground water, water quality, glaciers, water use, and hydrologic data reports.

Geological Survey (U.S.). Water Resources Division. Alaska District.

1999-01-01

11

Water Resource Adaptation Program  

EPA Science Inventory

The Water Resource Adaptation Program (WRAP) contributes to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency?s (U.S. EPA) efforts to provide water resource managers and decision makers with the tools needed to adapt water resources to demographic and economic development, and future clim...

12

WATER SUPPLY AND WATER RESOURCES DIVISION - HOME PAGE  

EPA Science Inventory

The Water Supply and Water Resources Division (WSWRD) conducts research to help prepare the primary and secondary regulations for drinking water and to develop technologies and strategies for controlling waterborne contaminants. The program integrates chemistry, engineering, micr...

13

Water, Ohio's Remarkable Resource.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Information on water and water resources in Ohio is presented in seven sections. Water from Ohio streams, water storage, lakes in Ohio, and ground water are discussed in the first section ("Water, A Part of the Earth"). A brief discussion on the ecosystem is provided in the second section ("Water and Life"). Topics discussed in the third section…

Groves, Carrie J.

14

Water Resources of Wisconsin  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This U.S. Geological Survey (USGS)website provides water data, online publications, a list of USGS - Wisconsin publications, and links to water resource projects and studies in Wisconsin. The water data consists of real-time streamflow, quarterly streamflow reports, water levels measured by a ground-water observation network of 140 wells throughout Wisconsin, and NWISWeb (National Water Information System on the Web) data (consisting of real-time streamflow, ground level water, surface water and water quality data).

15

Water Resources of Utah  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This U.S. Geological Survey website provides real-time streamflow, surface-water, ground-water, and water-quality data; information on water resource programs of Utah such as the National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) study; maps and graphs of current U.S. water resource conditions; and USGS - Utah reports. The site also features a drought watch section for Utah containing drought definitions and more streamflow conditions; a section on the Upper Arkansas River Basin Toxic-Substances Hydrology Project; and information on contamination in ground water at Fry Canyon, Utah.

16

Splash! Water Resource Education.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This set of activities is designed to bring water resource education into the middle school classroom using an interdisciplinary approach. The packet contains timely, localized information about the water resources of west central Florida. Each activity is aligned to middle-school Sunshine State Standards. These hands-on, minds-on activities can…

Southwest Florida Water Management District, Brooksville.

17

Water Resources of Tennessee  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This site, from the U.S. Geological Survey, provides real-time, surface-water, ground-water and water-quality data; maps and graphs of current water resource conditions in the U.S. such as a daily streamflow conditions map; publications and product information; information on National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) programs of the Tennessee River Basin and Mobile River Basin; and information on water use in Tennessee.

18

Water Resources of Indiana  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This United States Geological Survey (USGS) page contains information about the water resources in the state of Indiana. The district staff measure streamflow and ground-water levels as well as collect water-quality data (pH and mercury levels) throughout the state. Information on this site includes daily streamflow conditions, Biological Resources Division research in the state, drought information, and studies of the Upper Illinois River basin and White River basin. There are links to other sites for additional information.

19

Water Resources Center  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Water Resources Center at the University of Minnesota was authorized by Congress as one of the nation's 54 water resources research institutes. The Center "provides leadership in freshwater management through cutting-edge research, educational opportunities for students and professionals, and community outreach." The center's homepage guides visitors through sections that include "Water Resources Science Graduate Program," "Publications," "News & Events," and "Research & Public Engagement." Members of the general public will want to look over the short publication "A Pocket Guide to Reducing Your Water Footprint." The guide helps individuals make smart water choices on a daily basis. Moving on, the "Publications" area contains the current issue of their quarterly newsletter, the "Minnegram," along with links to their biennial reports and research bulletins. Finally, visitors can wander through the "Water Links" area to look for information from other institutions, such as the Minnesota Geological Survey and the Environmental Protection Agency.

20

Protecting Our Water Resources.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Describes the watershed management approach for preserving water resources. Considers pollution sources ranging from industrial discharge to agricultural leachate and runoff and evaluates its impact on the total watershed environment. (JRH)|

Jewett, Jon

1996-01-01

21

Heavy Vehicle and Engine Resource Guide  

SciTech Connect

The Heavy Vehicle and Engine Resource Guide is a catalog of medium- and heavy-duty engines and vehicles with alternative fuel and advanced powertrain options. This edition covers model year 2003 engines and vehicles.

Not Available

2004-03-01

22

The Function of Social Behavior in Water Resource Development.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Many water resource engineers and planners have indicated that some of the most difficult problems in successful water resource development relate to social problems. Social value alternatives, such as conservation, aesthetics, and recreation, are involve...

W. H. Andrews D. C. Geersten

1970-01-01

23

California Water Teaching Resources  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

From Foothill College and the Using a Web-Based GIS to Teach Problem-Based Science in High School and College project, this document contains links to online resources on California's water issues and topographic maps. This document is intended to be used with the Introduction to Topographic Maps worksheet at: http://amser.org/index.php?P=FullRecord&ID=18138This is a helpful resource for the introductory GIS classroom.

2012-03-19

24

Urban Water Resources Management  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Urban Water Resources Management Web site is maintained by the Global Development Research Center. The center "carries out initiatives in education, research and practice, in the spheres of environment, urban, community, economy and information, and at scales that are effective." The site contains information and links to topics such as understanding the importance of water; organizations and institutions; documents and information repositories; initiatives, programs, and projects; and more.

25

Water resources law  

SciTech Connect

In the last decade, water resources have been a much discussed issue. Declining groundwater levels in the southern end of Ogallala formation have resulted in irrigated land being converted back to dry land farming. In the same area there is much emphasis on minimum economical irrigation requirements Water quality has become a buzz word in many parts of the country. Continued groundwater supplies from pesticides, fertilizers, animal wastes, petroleum products, heavy metals, etc. is attracting national attention. Pollution of surface water from eroding soil, animal feed lots, pesticides, improperly treated municipal and industrial wastewater, etc., is being addressed at all levels of government. These proceedings contain 25 articles.

Not Available

1986-01-01

26

A quarter century of Water Resources Research  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

On this twenty-fifth anniversary of Water Resources Research (WRR), I can well recall the circumstances of its founding. Prior to the 1950s, the chief professional homes for water scientists had been societies such as the American Society of Civil Engineers, the American Water Works Association, and the American Chemical Society, where water was secondary to the main theme of specific disciplines: engineering, public health, and chemistry. The American Geophysical Union (AGU), on the other hand, was a multidisciplinary grouping, where water scientists found a congenial environment in the AGU Hydrology Division. The division not only flourished but soon became the largest unit in AGU.

Davis, George H.

1990-01-01

27

Global Water Resource Issues  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The world's water resources are coming under increasing stress, a stress that will become critical globally sometime during the next century. This is due to the rapidly rising population demanding more and more water and an increasing level of affluence. The book discusses the background to this issue and the measures to be taken over the next 20-30 years to overcome some of the difficulties that can be foreseen, and the means of avoiding others, such as the hazard of floods. It looks at the water resource and its assessment and management in an integrated fashion. It deals with the requirements of agriculture and of rural and urban societies and to a lesser extent with those of industry and power, against the background of the needs of the natural environment. It presents a number of ways and means of improving the management of national and international affairs involving fresh water. It highlights the importance of fresh water as a major issue for the environment and for development.

Young, Gordon J.; Dooge, James C. I.; Rodda, John C.

2004-01-01

28

USGS Water Resources of Oklahoma  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

U.S. Geological Survey (USGS): Water Resources of Oklahoma contains hydrologic data; information on current state water-resource projects; USGS maps and aerial photo images; USGS publications and presentations; technical resources; and information on the general climate and water quality monitoring programs. There is also a form for making water data requests; a drought watch for Oklahoma; analysis of daily and monthly water conditions for Oklahoma; and a Water Science for Schools site.

29

USGS Water Resources of Oregon  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Water Resources of Oregon contains water data and maps of hydrologic conditions and current streamflow conditions; publications about water resources of Oregon; historical water data about surface-water, ground-water and water quality; geographic data; and forecasts and flood potential outlooks. There is information on a surface-water data collection program, hydrologic studies, and USGS programs and activities in Oregon.

30

International Symposium on Karst Water Resources  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The International Association of Hydrological Sciences (IAHS) and the International Association of Hydrogeologists (IAH) joined the Hacettepe University of Ankara, Turkey, in sponsoring the International Symposium on Karst Water Resources. The other sponsors of the symposium were the Karst Water Resources Research Center Project of Hacettepe University and the United Nations Development Program through the United Nations Department of Technical Cooperation for Development, in addition to the following government organizations of Turkey: Ministry of Energy and Natural Resources, State Hydraulic, Works (DSI), General Directorate of Mineral Research and Exploration (MTA), Electrical Power Resources Survey and Development Administration (EIE) and Geological Engineering Department of the Engineering Faculty and Karst Hydrogeology Research Group (KRG) at the Hacettepe University Earth Sciences Application and Research Center. Cooperating organizations included the Turkish National Committee of the International Hydrological Program, the United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization (UNESCO), and the International Water Resources Association (IWRA). The symposium was divided into two parts: a paper presentation session held at the new Turkish National Library in Ankara during July 7-12, 1985, and a field trip from Ankara through Konya and Antalya to Izmir during July 13-18. The symposium chairman was Gultekin Gunay of the Hydrogeological Engineering Department of Ankara's Hacettepe University, and the cochairman was A. Ivan Johnson, a water resources consultant from Denver, Colo., and editor of WaterWatch. Scientists from 27 countries were represented among the 200 or so participants in attendance.

Back, William

31

Engineering Resources: The Engineers Forum on Sustainability  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Cosponsored by three prominent engineering societies, the Engineers Forum on Sustainability was founded to "help promote the principles and practice of sustainability." The forum's newsletter can be viewed at this site. It contains information on worldwide activities and developments in the field of sustainability, including educational initiatives, environmental protection programs, international conferences, and more. The July 2003 issue features a special guest article written by the President of the World Federation of Engineering Societies, who touches on issues of sustainable development, technology transfer, and the role of engineers in developing countries. The newsletter is released roughly three times a year.

32

Redressing China's Strategy of Water Resource Exploitation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

China, with the confrontation of water-related problems as an element of its long history, has been investing heavily in water engineering projects over the past few decades based on the assumption that these projects can solve its water problems. However, the anticipated benefits did not really occur, or at least not as large as expected. Instead, the results involved additional frustrations, such as biodiversity losses and human-induced disasters (i.e., landslides and earthquakes). Given its inherent shortcomings, the present engineering-dominated strategy for the management of water resources cannot help solve China's water problems and achieve its goal of low-carbon transformation. Therefore, the present strategy for water resources exploitation needs to be reevaluated and redressed. A policy change to achieve better management of Chinese rivers is urgently needed.

Ran, Lishan; Lu, Xi Xi

2013-03-01

33

Water resources scientific information center  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Water Resources Scientific Information Center (WRSIC) acquires, abstracts and indexes the major water resources related literature of the world, and makes information available to the water resources community and the public. A component of the Water Resources Division of the US Geological Survey, the Center maintains a searchable computerized bibliographic data base, and publishers a monthly journal of abstracts. Through its services, the Center is able to provide reliable scientific and technical information about the most recent water resources developments, as well as long-term trends and changes. WRSIC was established in 1966 by the Secretary of the Interior to further the objectives of the Water Resources Research Act of 1964--legislation that encouraged research in water resources and the prevention of needless duplication of research efforts. It was determined the WRSIC should be the national center for information on water resources, covering research reports, scientific journals, and other water resources literature of the world. WRSIC would evaluate all water resources literature, catalog selected articles, and make the information available in publications or by computer access. In this way WRSIC would increase the availability and awareness of water related scientific and technical information. (Lantz-PTT)

Cardin, C. William; Campbell, J. T.

1986-01-01

34

California Department of Water Resources  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Created by the California Legislature in 1956, the California Department of Water Resources (DWR) was designed "to plan and guide" the development of the State's water resources. The site serves as an information hub covering recent news, state water projects, a listing of water conditions and reports, and monthly activity reports for the very curious. In addition to supplying general information on California's water resources, this site provides access to the CALFED Bay-Delta Program (CALFED), the California Data Exchange Center hydrologic data (CDEC), and the California Environmental Resources Evaluation System (CERES).

35

Environmental Engineering and Water Chemistry  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Students are introduced to the fundamentals of environmental engineering as well as the global air, land and water quality concerns facing today's environmental engineers. After a lesson and activity to introduce environmental engineering, students learn more about water chemistry aspects of environmental engineering. Specifically, they focus on groundwater contamination and remediation, including sources of contamination, adverse health effects of contaminated drinking water, and current and new remediation techniques. Several lab activities provide hands-on experiences with topics relevant to environmental engineering concerns and technologies, including removal efficiencies of activated carbon in water filtration, measuring pH, chromatography as a physical separation method, density and miscibility.

GK-12 Program,

36

Selected Water-Resources Abstracts  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Maintained by the USGS Water Web Server Team, the Selected Water-Resources Abstracts Web site was compiled from several sources on the subject of water resources since 1977. Users can search by report number, keyword, author, hydrologic unit, state, and year. The database gives researchers easy access to specific information among the vast array of publications distributed by the agency.

37

USGS Water Resources of Missouri  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Water Resources of Missouri contains real-time water data; USGS publications; information on the USGS in Missouri; and an education/outreach section. Hydrologic investigations include surface-water data and analysis, water-quality data and analysis, current studies and research, and hydrologic investigations of Kansas City. The data includes stage and streamflow data; ground water, surface water, water-quality and precipitation data; daily Missouri and national streamflow conditions maps; and current water resources conditions of Missouri.

38

Effect of social impact analysis on decisions allocating investments in water resources by US Army Corps of Engineers  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this study was to learn whether or not social impact analysis (SIA) has been effective in assuring a fuller accounting of the costs and benefits of actions exercised at the Federal level, focusing its interest on the US Army Corps of Engineers Civil Works Programs. The study employs a triangulated data gathering approach, using cross sectional survey

Manheim

1984-01-01

39

Environmental politics and water resources development: the case of the Army Corps of Engineers during the 1970s  

Microsoft Academic Search

This dissertation examines how the US Army Corps of Engineers responded to the environmental movement of the 1970s, most specifically by focusing on the relationship between the Corps and the major environmental organizations. Although environmental groups had little influence over the Corps prior to 1970, they gained significant leverage with the passage of the National Environmental Policy Act. Through review

Stine

1984-01-01

40

Indian Natural Resource, Science and Engineering Program.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The Indian Natural Resource, Science, and Engineering Program at California State University, Humboldt, offers a wide variety of courses related to working in natural-resource fields in indigenous communities and provides academic and personal support services to American Indian students in such fields. A program participant is profiled. (SV)|

Oros, Tia

1993-01-01

41

EAWAG: An Environmental Science and Engineering Resource.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Interviewed is the director of a Swiss research and teaching institute in the field of water resources, water pollution control, and waste management. Topics include lake studies, research programs and priorities, advisory services, and the organizational structure of EAWAG. (BT)|

Miller, Stanton

1980-01-01

42

Water Resources of New Jersey  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This website offers timely access to data and information provided by the New Jersey District of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), which collects basic hydrologic data and makes interpretive investigations of the water resources of New Jersey. There is information and data on ground water, surface water, water quality, and daily streamflow conditions. Links to online publications on water in New Jersey are also provided.

43

Water resources data, Louisiana, water year 2004  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Water resources data for the 2004 water year for Louisiana consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage, contents, and water quality of lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality of ground water. This report contains records for water discharge at 77 gaging stations; stage only for 86 gaging stations and 7 lakes; water quality for 60 surface-water stations (including 42 gaging stations) and 112 wells; and water levels for 304 observation wells. Also included are data for 158 crest-stage and flood-profile partial-record stations. Additional water data were collected at various sites not included in the systematic data-collection program, and are published as miscellaneous measurements. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating State and Federal agencies in Louisiana.

Baumann, Todd; Goree, B. B.; Lovelace, W. M.; Montogmery, P. A.; Resweber, J. C.; Ross, Garron B.; Ward, Aub N.; Walters, David J.

2005-01-01

44

Water resources data, Louisiana, water year 2003  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Water resources data for the 2003 water year for Louisiana consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage, contents, and water quality of lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality of ground water. This report contains records for water discharge at 76 gaging stations; stage only for 86 gaging stations and 7 lakes; water quality for 56 surface-water stations (including 44 gaging stations) and 142 wells; and water levels for 313 observation wells. Also included are data for 158 crest-stage and flood-profile partial-record stations. Additional water data were collected at various sites not included in the systematic data-collection program, and are published as miscellaneous measurements. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating Federal and State agencies in Louisiana.

Baumann, Todd; Goree, B. B.; Lovelace, W. M.; Montgomery, P. A.; Resweber, J. C.; Ross, Garron B.; Sasser, D. C., Jr.; Walters, D. J.

2004-01-01

45

Water Resources of West Virginia  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) website provides water data, reports on water use, and information on water resource programs and activities in West Virginia. The water data consists of real-time, old and historical data; National Weather Service stage data; and river basin real-time streamflow data. National Water Information System Website (NWISWeb) data includes surface-water, ground-water, water-quality and real-time data. There is also a drought watch section with more streamflow conditions and a link to acid rain information for West Virginia.

46

Water Resources Data - Wisconsin, Water Year 2003  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Water-resources data for the 2003 water year for Wisconsin include records of streamflow at gaging stations, partialrecord stations, and miscellaneous sites, records of precipitation, and records of chemical, biological, and physical characteristics of surface water. In addition, water levels in observation wells are reported. These data were collected by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with State and local agencies and other Federal agencies in Wisconsin.

Waschbusch, R. J.; Olson, D. L.; Ellefson, B. R.; Stark, P. A.

2004-01-01

47

Water Resources Data - Wisconsin, Water Year 2002  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Water-resources data for the 2002 water year for Wisconsin include records of streamflow at gaging stations, partial record stations, and miscellaneous sites, records of precipitation, and records of chemical, biological, and physical characteristics of surface water. In addition, water levels in observation wells are reported. These data were collected by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with State and local agencies and other Federal agencies in Wisconsin.

Waschbusch, R. J.; Olson, D. L.; Ellefson, B. R.; Stark P. A.

2003-01-01

48

Water Conservation Resource List.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Alarmed by the growing water shortage, the New Jersey State Office of Dissemination has prepared this annotated list of free or inexpensive instructional materials for teaching about water conservation, K-l2. A tipsheet for home water conservation is appended. (Editor/SJL)

NJEA Review, 1981

1981-01-01

49

Scientific basis of water-resource management  

SciTech Connect

This volume contains 11 reports regarding water-resource management. Topics include: long-term and large-scale problems of water management, such as groundwater contamination due to toxic and nuclear-waste disposal; nonpoint sources of pollution on our stream systems; impacts of changes in both flow and water quality on the aquatic ecosystem; the frequency, duration, and impacts of droughts including long-term trends toward desertification; long-term hydrologic budgets for assessing the adequacy of regional or national water resources; global geochemical cycles such as the fate of nitrogen and sulfur; and protection of engineered systems against hydrologic extrema. These macroscale and long-term problems, involving large investments and the health and well-being of much of the world's population, demand increasingly precise and accurate predictive statements. Individual reports are indexed separately on the energy data base.

Not Available

1982-01-01

50

USGS Water Resources of California  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Water Resources of California contains water data from the National Water Information System (NWIS) network, NWISWeb, such as daily streamflow conditions; reports from USGS projects in California; and an image archive. The water data from 1994 - 2001 are searchable by date, county, and keyword. There are also links to all of the current projects being run by the USGS in California.

51

USGS Water Resources of Montana  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

U.S. Geological Survey (USGS): Water Resources of Montana contains information on current activities such as data collection, investigations, and the National Water-Quality Assessment Program of the Northern Rockies and Yellowstone River. The hydrologic data includes realtime streamflow tables, Montana Flood-Frequency and Basin-Characteristic Data, and monthly water summaries. There is also a list of USGS water-related publications from the Montana district that can be ordered.

52

Water Resources Data, Utah, Water Year 2002  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Water-resources data for the 2002 water year for Utah consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage and contents of lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality of ground water. This report contains discharge records for 163 gaging stations; stage and contents for 10 lakes and reservoirs; water quality for 24 hydrologic stations, and 64 wells; water levels for 66 observation wells; and precipitation for 2 stations. Additional water data were collected at various sites not involved in the systematic data-collection program and are published as miscellaneous measurements. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System collected by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating State and Federal agencies in Utah.

Wilberg, D. E.; Tibbetts, J. R.; Enright, Michael

2003-01-01

53

Water resources data, Utah, water year 2004  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Water-resources data for the 2004 water year for Utah consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage and contents of lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality of ground water. This report contains discharge records for 156 gaging stations; stage and contents for 8 lakes and reservoirs; water quality for 16 hydrologic stations, and 29 wells; water levels for 67 observation wells; and precipitation for 3 stations. Additional water data were collected at various sites not involved in the systematic data-collection program and are published as miscellaneous measurements. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System collected by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating State and Federal agencies in Utah.

Enright, Michael; Wilberg, D. E.; Tibbetts, J. R.

2005-01-01

54

Water Resources of Rapides Parish  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Rapides Parish, located in central Louisiana, contains fresh groundwater and surface-water resources. In 2005, about 443 million gallons per day (Mgal/d) were withdrawn from water sources in Rapides Parish. About 92 percent (409 Mgal/d) was withdrawn from surface water, and 8 percent (34 Mgal/d) was withdrawn from groundwater. Withdrawals for power generation accounted for 91 percent (403 Mgal/d) of the total water withdrawn. Withdrawals for other uses included public supply (27 Mgal/d), irrigation (9 Mgal/d), and aquaculture (3 Mgal/d). Water withdrawals in the parish generally increased from 1960 to 1995 and decreased from 1995 to 2005. This fact sheet summarizes basic information on the water resources of Rapides Parish, La. Information on groundwater and surface-water availability, quality, development, use, and trends is based on previously published reports listed in the references section.

Griffith, J. M.

2009-01-01

55

ENGINEERING BULLETIN: SUPERCRITICAL WATER OXIDATION  

EPA Science Inventory

This engineering bulletin presents a description and status of supercritical water oxidation technology, a summary of recent performance tests, and the current applicability of this emerging technology. This information is provided to assist remedial project managers, contractors...

56

ENGINEERING BULLETIN: SUPERCRITICAL WATER OXIDATION  

EPA Science Inventory

This engineering bulletin presents a description and status of supercritical water oxidation technology, a summary of recent performance tests, and the current applicability of this emerging technology. his information is provided to assist remedial project managers, contractors ...

57

Water Recovery from Engine Exhaust.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The U.S. Army Tank Automotive Research, Development, and Engineering Center (TARDEC) and the Defense Advanced Project Agency (DARPA) are partnering to develop fundamentally new water technologies to reduce the logistics footprint and enable the developmen...

G. Kimber J. S. Dusenbury M. Jagtoyen T. H. Bagwell

2003-01-01

58

Sustainable water services and interaction with water resources in Europe and in Brazil  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The increasing interaction between large cities and nature makes "urban water" an issue: water resources and water services - including public water supply, sewage collection and treatment, and in large cities, storm water control -, which had become separate issues thanks to the process of water transport and treatment technologies, are now increasingly interfering with each other. We cannot take nature for granted anymore, and we need to protect water resources, if only to reduce the long term cost of transporting and treating water. In this paper, we compare the historical development of water industry technologies in European and Brazilian metropolitan areas, in their socio-economic and political context, tracing it through three "ages" of water technology and services which developed under civil engineering, sanitary engineering, and environmental engineering perspectives: the "quantity of water" and civil engineering paradigm was developed on the assumption that water should be drawn from natural environments far from the cities; in the "water quality" and chemical/sanitation engineering paradigm, water treatment was invented and allowed cities to take water from rivers closer to them and treat it, but also to reduce sewer discharge impacts; finally, the environmental engineering paradigm proposes to overcome the supply side perspective, by introducing demand side management, water conservation, water allocation flexibilisation, and an integrated approach to water services, water resources management, and land use policies.

Barraqué, B.; Formiga Johnsson, R. M.; Britto, A. L.

2007-09-01

59

Water Resources of Ouachita Parish  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Ouachita Parish, located in north-central Louisiana, contains fresh groundwater and surface-water resources. In 2005, about 152 million gallons per day (Mgal/d) were withdrawn from water sources in Ouachita Parish. About 84 percent (128 Mgal/d) was withdrawn from surface water, and 16 percent (24 Mgal/d) was withdrawn from groundwater. Power generation (87 Mgal/d) accounted for 58 percent of the total water withdrawn. Withdrawals for other uses included public supply (22 Mgal/d), industrial (24 Mgal/d), and irrigation (18 Mgal/d). This fact sheet summarizes basic information on the water resources of Ouachita Parish, La. Information on groundwater and surface-water availability, quality, development, use, and trends is based on previously published reports.

Tomaszewski, Dan J.; Lovelace, John K.; Griffith, Jason M.

2009-01-01

60

Water resources in the United Arab Emirates  

Microsoft Academic Search

The United Arab Emirates rely on non-conventional water resources, in addition to conventional resources, to meet the ever-increasing demands for water. Conventional water resources include seasonal floods, springs, falajes and groundwater. Non-conventional resources are the desalinated water and treated-sewage water. The existing conventional water resources in the United Arab Emirates include 125 Mm3\\/yr (million cubic meter per year) from seasonal

Abdulrahman S. Alsharhan

2003-01-01

61

Water resources of Bossier Parish  

USGS Publications Warehouse

In 2005, about 15.8 million gallons per day (Mgal/d) of water were withdrawn in Bossier Parish, Louisiana, including 4.12 Mgal/d from groundwater sources and about 11.7 Mgal/d from surface-water sources. Public-supply use accounted for about 78 percent (12.4 Mgal/d) of the total water withdrawn. Other categories of use included industry, rural domestic, livestock, rice irrigation, general irrigation, and aquaculture. Based on water-use data collected at 5-year intervals from 1960 to 2005, water withdrawals in the parish increased from 4.96 to 15.8 Mgal/d. This fact sheet summarizes basic information on the water resources of Bossier Parish, La. Information on groundwater and surface-water availability, quality, development, use, and trends is based on previously published reports listed in the Selected References section.

Prakken, Lawrence B.; Griffith, Jason M.

2011-01-01

62

Water resources of Vernon Parish  

USGS Publications Warehouse

In 2005, about 6.67 million gallons per day (Mgal/d) of water were withdrawn in Vernon Parish, Louisiana, including about 6.46 Mgal/d from groundwater sources and 0.21 Mgal/d from surface-water sources. Public-supply use accounted for about 76 percent (5.06 Mgal/d) of the total water withdrawn. Other categories of use included rural domestic, livestock, general irrigation, and aquaculture. Based on water-use data collected at 5-year intervals from 1960 to 2005, water withdrawals in the parish peaked in 1990 at about 10.4 Mgal/d. This fact sheet summarizes basic information on the water resources of Vernon Parish, La. Information on groundwater and surface-water availability, quality, development, use, and trends is based on previously published reports listed in the Selected References section.

Prakken, Lawrence B.; Griffith, Jason M.; Fendick, Robert B., Jr.

2012-01-01

63

Water Resources Renewability Assessment Based on TOPSIS  

Microsoft Academic Search

Water resources renewability has four types, i.e. natural renewability, social renewability, water quantity renewability and water quality recovery. In this paper, a general index system of renewability assessment of surface water resources in the Yellow River Basin is built based on the concept of water resources renewability, and then the TOPSIS model is applied to assess the renewability. The results

Chunhui Li

2009-01-01

64

Global Hydrological Cycles and World Water Resources  

Microsoft Academic Search

Water is a naturally circulating resource that is constantly recharged. Therefore, even though the stocks of water in natural and artificial reservoirs are helpful to increase the available water resources for human society, the flow of water should be the main focus in water resources assessments. The climate system puts an upper limit on the circulation rate of available renewable

Taikan Oki; Shinjiro Kanae

2006-01-01

65

Water Resources Outreach Program- Water Education Posters  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Users can choose to download or order six posters that depict water-resources topics and are drawn in a cartoon format. Written narrative on the back elaborates on the topic of each poster. They are available in color, or in black-and-white for coloring.

66

Scouting It Out: Interpreting Water Resources at the National Jamboree.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Federal natural-resource-management agencies combined efforts with volunteer scouting staff to develop a conservation area at the 1997 National Boy Scout Jamboree. Profiles the program, which adopted the theme of environmental stewardship, and focuses on how the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers interpreted water resources. The exhibit highlighted the…

Hays, Dave

1998-01-01

67

USGS Water Resources of North Carolina  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Water Resources of North Carolina provides water data, maps and graphs of current water resource conditions, information on research and scientific activities, and USGS publications. The water data includes surface water, real time, current streamflow, ground water, water quality, and precipitation data. There is also flood and drought information.

68

Water Resources Research supports water economics submissions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

AGU's international interdisciplinary journal Water Resources Research (WRR) publishes original contributions in hydrology; the physical, chemical, and biological sciences; and the social and policy sciences, including economics, systems analysis, sociology, and law. With the rising relevance of water economics and related social sciences, the editors of WRR continue to encourage submissions on economics and policy. WRR was originally founded in the mid 1960s by Walter Langbein and economist Allen Kneese. Several former WRR editors have been economists—including David Brookshire, Ron Cummings, and Chuck Howe—and many landmark articles in water economics have been published in WRR.

Griffin, Ronald C.

2012-09-01

69

Water Resources of Ascension Parish  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Ascension Parish, located along the banks of the Mississippi River in south-central Louisiana, contains fresh groundwater and surface-water resources. In 2005, about 202 million gallons per day (Mgal/d) were withdrawn from water sources in Ascension Parish. About 94 percent (190 Mgal/d) was withdrawn from surface water, and 6 percent (12 Mgal/d) was withdrawn from groundwater. Additional water is supplied to Ascension Parish for public-supply use from East Baton Rouge Parish. Withdrawals for industrial use accounted for 95 percent (192 Mgal/d) of the total water withdrawn. Withdrawals for other uses included public-supply (4 Mgal/d), rural-domestic (3 Mgal/d), and aquaculture (3 Mgal/d). Water withdrawals in the parish generally increased from 1960 to 1995 and decreased from 1995 to 2005. This fact sheet summarizes basic information on the water resources of Ascension Parish, La. Information on groundwater and surface-water availability, quality, development, use, and trends is based on previously published reports listed in the references section.

Griffith, J. M.; Fendick, R. B.

2009-01-01

70

Water from (waste)water--the dependable water resource.  

PubMed

Water reclamation and reuse provides a unique and viable opportunity to augment traditional water supplies. As a multi-disciplined and important element of water resources development and management, water reuse can help to close the loop between water supply and wastewater disposal. Effective water reuse requires integration of water and reclaimed water supply functions. The successful development of this dependable water resource depends upon close examination and synthesis of elements from infrastructure and facilities planning, wastewater treatment plant siting, treatment process reliability, economic and financial analyses, and water utility management. In this paper, fundamental concepts of water reuse are discussed including definitions, historical developments, the role of water recycling in the hydrologic cycle, categories of water reuse, water quality criteria and regulatory requirements, and technological innovations for the safe use of reclaimed water. The paper emphasizes the integration of this alternative water supply into water resources planning, and the emergence of modern water reclamation and reuse practices from wastewater to reclaimed water to repurified water. PMID:12019829

Asano, Takashi

2002-01-01

71

New England's Ground Water Resources  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This resource provides a detailed description of the ground water system in New England. Although it was written specifically for New England, most or all of it applies to other parts of the country also. The liberal use of diagrams helps to explain terms such as saturated and unsaturated zones, bedrock, water table, and zones of aeration and contribution. Types of aquifers are discussed as to their porosity, permeability and hydraulic conductivity. They include bedrock, soil, stratified drift, superficial deposits, unconsolidated materials, and confined aquifers along with discharge and recharge areas. There is also an explanation of a water budget including precipitation, evapotranspiration, infiltration and runoff.

72

Cost-effectiveness analysis for sustainable wastewater engineering and water resources management: a case study at Minho-Lima river basins (Portugal)  

Microsoft Academic Search

A cost-effectiveness integrated methodology applied in a water resources management and sanitation project in Minho and Lima's region (Portugal) is presented. First, environmental objectives and programmes of measures (PM) are established and priorities are identified using a cause-effect assessment matrix and a global effectiveness index. Aiming to achieve more demanding goals, some complementary actions are considered, including “decentralized low-energy wastewater

S. Costa; L. Coutinho; A. G. Brito; R. Nogueira; A. P. Machado; J. J. Salas; C. Póvoa

2009-01-01

73

Water Resources of Lafayette Parish  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Fresh groundwater and surface water resources are available in Lafayette Parish, which is located in south-central Louisiana. In 2005, more than 47 million gallons per day (Mgal/d) were withdrawn from water sources in Lafayette Parish. About 92 percent (43.7 Mgal/d) of withdrawals was groundwater, and 8 percent (3.6 Mgal/d) was surface water. Public-supply withdrawals accounted for nearly 49 percent (23 Mgal/d) of the total groundwater use, with the cities of Lafayette and Carencro using about 21 Mgal/d. Withdrawals for other uses included about 10.4 Mgal/d for rice irrigation and about 8.4 Mgal/d for aquaculture. Water withdrawals in Lafayette Parish increased from 33 Mgal/d in 1995 to about 47 Mgal/d in 2005. This fact sheet summarizes information on the water resources of Lafayette Parish, La. Information on groundwater and surface-water availability, quality, development, use, and trends is based on previously published reports listed in the references section.

Fendick, Robert B. Jr.; Griffith, Jason M.; Prakken, Lawrence B.

2011-01-01

74

Elementary soil and water engineering  

SciTech Connect

Between 1967-1975 the Northwest lost 325 acres per day of prime farmland, the Midwest (our nation's bread basket) 493 acres, and the Southwest 548 acres per day. We lost one million acres like this each year, three million for all rural land. Six problems affect our diminishing soil and water resources: erosion, drainage, irrigation, conservation of soil moisture, efficiency of water storage, floods. The first five problems are discussed in this book.

Schwab, G.O.; Frevert, R.K.

1985-01-01

75

Water Resources of Caddo Parish  

USGS Publications Warehouse

In 2005, about 72.9 million gallons per day (Mgal/d) of water were withdrawn in Caddo Parish, Louisiana, including about 7.70 Mgal/d from groundwater sources and 65.2 Mgal/d from surface-water sources. Public-supply use accounted for about 71 percent, and power generation accounted for about 19 percent of the total water withdrawn. Other categories of use included general irrigation, rural domestic, aquaculture, livestock, and industrial. Water-use data collected at 5-year intervals from 1960 to 2005 indicate water withdrawals in the parish peaked in 1965 and generally decreased afterwards, primarily because of reduced surface-water withdrawals for power generation. From 1965 to 2005, surface-water withdrawals for power generation declined from 419 to 14.2 Mgal/d. This fact sheet summarizes basic information on the water resources of Caddo Parish, La. Information on groundwater and surface-water availability, quality, development, use, and trends is based on previously published reports listed in the references section.

Prakken, Lawrence B.; Griffith, Jason M.

2011-01-01

76

Water resources of Webster Parish  

USGS Publications Warehouse

In 2005, about 9.52 million gallons per day (Mgal/d) of water were withdrawn in Webster Parish, Louisiana (fig. 1), including about 9.33 Mgal/d from groundwater sources and 0.19 Mgal/d from surface-water sources1 (table 1). Publicsupply use accounted for about 70 percent of the total water withdrawn. Other categories of use included industrial, rural domestic, livestock, general irrigation, and aquaculture (table 2). Water-use data collected at 5-year intervals from 1960 to 2005 indicate water withdrawals in Webster Parish decreased substantially from 1970 to 1980; surface-water withdrawals for industrial use decreased from about 37 to 0 Mgal/d because of a paper mill closure in 1979. From 1980 to 2000, total water withdrawals in the parish ranged from 7 to 8 Mgal/d (fig. 2). This fact sheet summarizes basic information on the water resources of Webster Parish, La. Information on groundwater and surface-water availability, quality, development, use, and trends is based on previously published reports listed in the Selected References section.

Prakken, Lawrence B.; Griffith, Jason M.

2011-01-01

77

Integration in Water Resource Management: Challenges, Concepts and Opportunities.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Recognition of similar objectives for meeting the challenges of water resource management led to the conduct of a forum involving the US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) and those participating in research in support of the European Union's (EU) Water Fram...

R. Kennedy M. Blind

2005-01-01

78

Water resources of Allen Parish  

USGS Publications Warehouse

In 2005, approximately 29.2 million gallons per day (Mgal/d) of water were withdrawn in Allen Parish, Louisiana, including about 26.8 Mgal/d from groundwater sources and 2.45 Mgal/d from surface-water sources. Rice irrigation accounted for 74 percent (21.7 Mgal/d) of the total water withdrawn. Other categories of use included public supply, industrial, rural domestic, livestock, general irrigation, and aquaculture. Water-use data collected at 5-year intervals from 1960 to 2005 indicate water withdrawals in the parish were greatest in 1960 (119 Mgal/d) and 1980 (98.7 Mgal/d). The substantial decrease in surface-water use between 1960 and 1965 is primarily attributable to rice-irrigation withdrawals declining from 61.2 to 6.74 Mgal/d. This fact sheet summarizes information on the water resources of Allen Parish, La. Information on groundwater and surface-water availability, quality, development, use, and trends is based on previously published reports listed in the Selected References section.

Prakken, Lawrence B.; Griffith, Jason M.; Fendick, Robert B., Jr.

2012-01-01

79

Environmental Evaluation of Water Resources Development.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Methodology for the utilization of LANDSAT-1 imagery and aerial photography on the environmental evaluation of water resources development is presented. Environmental impact statements for water resource projects were collected and reviewed for the variou...

W. P. James C. E. Woods R. E. Blanz

1976-01-01

80

Community Planning for Water Resources Management.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This guidebook provides a step-by-step method to help local officials and concerned citizens solve their water resources problems by developing a community water resources management plan. Five specific steps are outlined in the planning process (1) defin...

1979-01-01

81

Public Involvement in Natural Resource Development: A Review of Water Resource Planning  

Microsoft Academic Search

Water resources decisions are used to illustrate the role of citizen participation in policies that affect the environment. The historical development of local involvement is traced from the first canal and waterway development projects in the early 1800s. The relationship of the Corps of Engineers to the concept that water development growth is an inherent good is noted. The Corps

Gregory A Daneke

1977-01-01

82

International Center for Integrated Water Resources Management (ICIWRM)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The USACE Institute of Water Resources and the University of Arizona have signed a memorandum of understanding to promote the creation of an International Center for Integrated Water Resources Management (ICIWRM) that will, upon completion, create a virtual teaching and research center with academic institutions, government agencies and NGOs for integrated water resources management, interdisciplinary scientific research, and capacity-building/development for developing and emerging countries; and post-disaster/conflict nations and regions. Some of the topics in which the Center will be involved include: integrated water resources management and sustainable development in arid and semi-arid zones, infrastructure development and related engineering design standards and procedures, capacity building, development and training, water policy, governance and institutional aspects, water security, including within the context of the Millennium Development Goals. The new Center will also be working with multilateral organizations such as the UNESCO International Hydrology Program.

Stakhiv, E. Z.; Valdes, J. B.

2007-12-01

83

Summary Analysis [United States Water Resources Council].  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report contains a summary and analysis of public response to the Water Resources Council proposed principles and standards and its accompanying draft environmental impact statement for planning the use of water and related land resources as well as planning and evaluating water and related land resources programs and projects. Both written…

Roose, John B.; Cobb, Gary D.

84

Summary Analysis [United States Water Resources Council].  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This report contains a summary and analysis of public response to the Water Resources Council proposed principles and standards and its accompanying draft environmental impact statement for planning the use of water and related land resources as well as planning and evaluating water and related land resources programs and projects. Both written…

Roose, John B.; Cobb, Gary D.

85

Water Resources of Beauregard Parish  

USGS Publications Warehouse

In 2005, about 30.6 million gallons per day (Mgal/d) of water was withdrawn in Beauregard Parish, Louisiana, including about 30.4 Mgal/d from groundwater sources and 0.1 Mgal/d from surface water sources. Industrial use, primarily for wood products, accounted for about 72 percent (22.0 Mgal/d) of the total water withdrawn. Other categories of use included public supply, rural domestic, livestock, rice irrigation, general irrigation, and aquaculture. Water-use data collected at 5-year intervals from 1960 to 2005 indicate water withdrawals in the parish peaked at about 43.5 Mgal/d in 1985. The large increase in groundwater usage from 1970 to 1975 was primarily due to industrial withdrawals, which increased from 3.64 Mgl/d in 1970 to 29.0 Mgal/d in 1975. This fact sheet summarizes information on the water resources of Beauregard Parish, La. Information on groundwater and surface-water availability, quality, development, use, and trends is based on previously published reports listed in the Selected References section.

Prakken, Lawrence B.; Griffith, Jason M.; Fendick, Robert B., Jr.

2012-01-01

86

Economic-Engineering Optimization for California Water Management  

Microsoft Academic Search

An economic-engineering optimization model of California's major water supply system is presented. The model's develop- ment, calibration, limitations, and results are reviewed. The major methodological conclusions are that large-scale water resources optimization models driven by economic objective functions are both possible and practical; deterministic models are useful despite their limitations; and data management, reconciliation, and documentation are important benefits of

Andrew J. Draper; Marion W. Jenkins; Kenneth W. Kirby; Jay R. Lund; Richard E. Howitt

2003-01-01

87

Electric power engineering education resources 1993-94: IEEE Power Engineering Society Committee report  

Microsoft Academic Search

This subcommittee report is based on the thirteenth biennial survey of power engineering education resources in the US and Canada, eleven of which have bees previously published. This survey is conducted to determine the electric power engineering education resources available in ABET (Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology) accredited engineering programs in the US and Canada for the 1993-94 academic

R. L. King; M. E. El-Hawary; M. T. Glinkowski; C. Grigg; C. A. Gross; V. Rajagopalan; T. G. Schmehl; T. S. Sidhu; R. J. Thomas; D. O. Wiitanen; S. M. Yousif

1996-01-01

88

Water Resources Data for Michigan, Water Year 1992.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Water resources data for the 1992 water year for Michigan consists of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage and contents of lakes and reservoirs; and ground water levels. The report contains discharge records for 145 streamflow-...

S. P. Blumer T. E. Behrendt W. W. Larson R. J. Minnerick R. L. LeuVoy

1993-01-01

89

Multi-National Collaborative Modeling of Water Dependent Resources in the Tigris-Euphrates River Basin  

Microsoft Academic Search

A team of scientists and engineers from the Iraq Ministry of Water Resources, the Iraq Transition Assistance Office of the U.S. Department of State, UNESCO, and Sandia National Laboratories collaborated to build a systems model of Iraqi water resources and related systems, including transboundary water systems, surface water and reservoirs, agriculture, salinity, municipal and industrial uses, and issues related to

H. Passell; J. D. Roach; M. D. Reno; G. T. Klise; V. C. Tidwell

2010-01-01

90

Jewel Cave National Monument Water Resources Scoping Report.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This scoping report for water resources management was undertaken to provide an analysis of the water resources issues facing Jewel Cave National Monument and to assess the need for developing a full water resources management plan. The water resources of...

1994-01-01

91

Water Resources and Supply Adaptation: A paradigm Shifting for Future Climate?  

EPA Science Inventory

Climate change adds another layer of complexity in planning, engineering and management of water resources and urban water infrastructures. Yet our current practice is confined to the traditional approach that evaluates developmental scenarios and their sustainability mostly by a...

92

Water-Resources Manpower: Supply and Demand Patterns to 1980.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Relating the supply of scientific manpower to the educational potential of the general population and the productive capacity of the educational system, this study disaggregates independent projections of scientific manpower supply and demand to yield projections for water resources manpower. This supply of engineers, natural scientists, and…

Lewis, James E.

93

Water Resources Thesaurus, Second Edition, 1971.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This volume is a revision of the Water Resources Thesaurus published in November 1966. The scope of the thesaurus encompasses the broad research areas of water resources such as the hydrologic cycle, supply and demand for water, conservation and the best ...

1971-01-01

94

Water resources and freshwater ecosystems in Sudan  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sudan is a large country with varying standards of living, culture and climate. When this is superimposed on the multi-sectoral nature of water, coordination of activities in water resources planning, management and development becomes essential. The spirit of cooperation and close cooperation with countries sharing the same water resources should continue, preferably through an institutional cooperative framework for each shared

Abdeen Mustafa Omer

2008-01-01

95

Water Resources Data for Connecticut, Water Year 1983.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Water Resources Data for the 1983 water year for Connecticut consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage, contents, and water quality of lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality of ground-water wells. This v...

C. E. Thomas L. A. Weiss I. S. Gasperini J. W. Bingham

1985-01-01

96

Water Resources of the United States  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This is the homepage for the Water Resources Division of the United States Geological Survey. It offers links to a variety of issues concerning water resources. The main links include: news, features, water data, publications and products, technical resources, programs, local information, and contacts. Also featured are links to other divisions within the United States Geological Survey, and FirstGov, a clearinghouse for all branches of the federal government.

97

Large-scale regional water resources planning  

SciTech Connect

This book describes a large-scale multiobjective regional water resources planning study. The three objectives used are national income, environmental quality, and regional development. The environmental quality objective includes a detailed analysis of the visual and cultural effects of water resources development. The study described in this book, the North Atlantic Regional Water Resources Study (NAR), is a landmark not only for its contributions to multiobjective planning but also for its use of mathematical models.

Major, D.C. (Bureau of Water Supply and Wastewater Collection, NY (US)); Schwarz, H.E. (Clark Univ., Worcester, MA (USA))

1990-01-01

98

Sustainable Water Resources in Semiarid Agroecosystems  

Microsoft Academic Search

Developing sustainable water resources management in agroecosystems is difficult in semiarid regions with limited or sporadic water inputs and heavy reliance on irrigation. Sustainable water management needs to consider both water quantity and water quality. Conversion of natural ecosystems to rain-fed agroecosystems has increased groundwater recharge in many semiarid regions in Australia, SW US, and W. Africa; however, such changes

R. C. Reedy; G. Favreau; J. B. Gates; A. Mukherjee; B. R. Scanlon; C. Zheng

2009-01-01

99

SPEAR II The Security Protocol Engineering and Analysis Resource  

Microsoft Academic Search

Multi-dimensional security protocol engineering is effective in creating cryptographic protocols since it encompasses a variety of analysis techniques, thereby providing a higher security confidence than individual approaches. SPEAR, the Secu- rity Protocol Engineering and Analysis Resource, was a protocol engineering tool which focused on cryptographic protocols, with the specific aims of enabling secure and efficient protocol designs and support for

Elton Saul; Andrew Hutchison

1999-01-01

100

EngineeringJobs.com: A National Index of Engineering Jobs and Resources  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

EngineeringJobs.com is a wonderful resource for engineers seeking employment and employers looking for engineers. Job seekers can explore over 100 career databases and companies; post resumes; send a resume to special recruiters; research companies; or explore the engineering tools, references, societies, and organizations. Company pages are listed alphabetically. Employers can review posted resumes or list job openings.

1998-01-01

101

Water Resources Data for New Mexico, Water Year 2002.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Water-resources data for the 2002 water year for New Mexico consist of records of discharge and water quality of streams; stage, contents, and water quality of lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality in wells and springs. This report cont...

D. Byrd K. Lange L. Beal

2002-01-01

102

Water Resources Data for New Mexico, Water Year 1991.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Water-resources data for the 1991 water year for New Mexico consist of records of discharge and water quality of streams; stage, contents and water quality of lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality in wells and springs. The report contai...

D. Ortiz J. P. Borland R. K. DeWees R. L. Lepp R. L. McCracken

1992-01-01

103

Water Resources Data for Michigan, Water Year 1989.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Water resources data for the 1989 water year for Michigan consists of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage and contents of lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water temperature of ground water. The report contains discha...

S. P. Blumer J. C. Failing W. W. Larson C. R. Whited R. L. LeuVoy

1990-01-01

104

Water Resources Data for Michigan, Water Year 1990.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Water resources data for the 1990 water year for Michigan consists of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage and contents of lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water temperature of ground water. The report contains discha...

S. P. Blumer W. W. Larson R. J. Minnerick C. R. Whited R. L. LeuVoy

1991-01-01

105

Water Resources Data for Michigan, Water Year 2001.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Water resources data for the 2001 water year for Michigan consists of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage and contents of lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality of ground-water wells. This report contains dis...

J. M. Ellis R. J. Minnerick R. L. LeuVoy S. P. Blumer T. E. Behrendt

2002-01-01

106

REMOTE SENSING APPLICATIONS IN WATER RESOURCE PROTECTION  

Microsoft Academic Search

Remote sensing applications in water resource protection at Taipei Water Resource Management Commission (TWMC) has been pursued for more than 12 years. Remote sensing applications were not easy as it should be in the first several years because of satellite image resolution and limitations of computer software and hardware. Above all, remote sensing has to depend on its basic maps

Mu-Lin WU; Chiou-Hsiung CHEN; Specialist Hsiu-Lan HUANG

107

International Symposium on Karst Water Resources  

Microsoft Academic Search

The International Association of Hydrological Sciences (IAHS) and the International Association of Hydrogeologists (IAH) joined the Hacettepe University of Ankara, Turkey, in sponsoring the International Symposium on Karst Water Resources. The other sponsors of the symposium were the Karst Water Resources Research Center Project of Hacettepe University and the United Nations Development Program through the United Nations Department of Technical

William Back

1985-01-01

108

International cooperation in water resources  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Advancements in hydrology proceeded slowly until the late 1800's when new ventures created a surge of interest and accomplishment. Progress waned again until the middle 20th century when an International Hydrological Decade was conceived, eventually receiving wide multinational support from governmental agencies and nongovernmental institutions. Organized by UNESCO, the Decade program was launched January 1, 1965. Participation included 107 nations, six United Nations agencies, and more than a dozen international scientific organizations. The initial program emphasized scientific research, and international cooperation; the second half of the Decade, emphasized technical assistance and technology transfer, largerly through education, training and demonstration. The success of the Decade led to the establishment of the International Hydrological Program, again under the aegis of UNESCO, to continue the work of the Decade indefinitely. The five major program activities, now involving about 90 countries and several international organizations, include: the scientific program, the promotion of education and training, the enhancement of information exchange, support of technical assistance, and the enlargement of regional cooperation. A significant amount of activity related to hydrological data networks and forecasting is carried on in an Operational Hydrology Programme by the WMO, chiefly through its Commission for Hydrology. Other international governmental organizations with a strong interest in water include the UN, the UN Development Programme, the FAO, the WHO, the International Atomic Energy Agency, the UN Environment Programme, the International Standardization Organization, and developmental institutions such as the World Bank. The specialized interests of researchers outside of the governmental structure, are met through association in various scientific and technical organizations which are world wide in scope and membership. Notwithstanding a sometimes bewildering variety of organizations, there certainly exists, for any nation, group, or individual, a demonstrated mechanism for almost any conceivable form of international cooperation in hydrology and water resources. ?? 1979 Akademische Verlagsgesellschaft.

Jones, J. R.; Beall, R. M.; Giusti, E. V.

1979-01-01

109

Overview of the Environmental and Water Resources Institute's "Guidelines For Integrated Water Resources Management" Project  

SciTech Connect

Integrated Water Resources Management is a systematic approach to optimizing our understanding, control and management of water resources within a basin to meet multiple objectives. Recognition of the need for integrating water resources within basins is not unique to the Environmental and Water Resources Institute’s Integrated Water Resources Management Task Committee. Many individuals, governments and other organizations have attempted to develop holistic water resources management programs. In some cases, the results have been very effective and in other cases, valiant attempts have fallen far short of their initial goals. The intent of this Task Committee is to provide a set of guidelines that discusses the concepts, methods and tools necessary for integrating and optimizing the management of the physical resources and to optimize and integrate programs, organizations, infrastructure, and socioeconomic institutions into comprehensive water resources management programs.

Gerald Sehlke

2005-03-01

110

Water Resources Availability in Kabul, Afghanistan  

Microsoft Academic Search

The availability of water resources is vital to the rebuilding of Kabul, Afghanistan. In recent years, droughts and increased water use for drinking water and agriculture have resulted in widespread drying of wells. Increasing numbers of returning refugees, rapid population growth, and potential climate change have led to heightened concerns for future water availability. The U.S. Geological Survey, with support

A. M. Akbari; M. P. Chornack; T. B. Coplen; D. G. Emerson; D. W. Litke; T. J. Mack; N. Plummer; J. P. Verdin; I. M. Verstraeten

2008-01-01

111

Corps of Engineers Develops Water Supply Tools  

Microsoft Academic Search

The US Army Corps of Engineers has available a number of up-to-date publications that could assist water utilities and engineers with planning, design, and operational problems. The author includes a list of reports and manuals applicable to the drinking water industry. El Cuerpo de Ingenieros del Ejercito de los EEUU tiene disponibles varias publicaciones actualizadas que pueden ayudar a los

Thomas M. Walski

1985-01-01

112

Water Resources Data Arizona Water Year 2002  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Arizona District water data report includes records on both surface water and ground water in the State for water year 2002. Specifically, it contains: (1) discharge records for 201 streamflow-gaging stations, for 29 crest-stage, partial-record streamflow stations, and 48 miscellaneous sites; (2) stage and (or) content only records for 10 lakes and reservoirs; (3) water-quality records for 21 streamflow-gaging stations and 65 wells; and (4) water levels for 18 wells.

McCormack, H. F.; Fisk, G. G.; Duet, N. R.; Evans, D. W.; Roberts, W. P.; Castillo, N. K.

2003-01-01

113

Assessing Water and Carbon Footprints for Sustainable Water Resource Management  

EPA Science Inventory

The key points of this presentation are: (1) Water footprint and carbon footprint as two sustainability attributes in adaptations to climate and socioeconomic changes, (2) Necessary to evaluate carbon and water footprints relative to constraints in resource capacity, (3) Critical...

114

Water Resources: Agricultural and Environmental Issues  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This peer-reviewed resource from Bioscience journal investigate the increasing demands on water resources. The increasing demands placed on the global water supply threaten biodiversity and the supply of water for food production and other vital human needs. Water shortages already exist in many regions, with more than one billion people without adequate drinking water. In addition, 90% of the infectious diseases in developing countries are transmitted from polluted water. Agriculture consumes about 70% of fresh water worldwide; for example, approximately 1000 liters (L) of water are required to produce 1 kilogram (kg) of cereal grain, and 43,000 L to produce 1 kg of beef. New water supplies are likely to result from conservation, recycling, and improved water-use efficiency rather than from large development projects.

DAVID PIMENTEL, BONNIE BERGER, DAVID FILIBERTO, MICHELLE NEWTON, BENJAMIN WOLFE, ELIZABETH KARABINAKIS, STEVEN CLARK, ELAINE POON, ELIZABETH ABBETT, and SUDHA NANDAGOPAL (;)

2004-10-01

115

Comprehensive Water Resource Plan. Part 1. Data Summary: Inventory and Evaluation of Water Resource Data.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The report compiles basic water resource information and evaluates water factors pertinent to planning and management. Rainfall provides the source of all fresh water. The county experiences one pronounced wet season June-October which produces two-thirds...

D. B. Smith D. H. Scott R. Burke

1969-01-01

116

Water Resources of New Hampshire and Vermont  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Water Resources of New Hampshire and Vermont provides the latest information on drought conditions and rainfall data for the area; water data including streamflow and ground-water levels; and streamflow maps showing watersheds. There are also U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) publications, including reports on USGS projects; USGS news and events; and educational links.

117

Water Resource Protection by Riparian Buffer Zones  

Microsoft Academic Search

Growing switch-grass in a riparian buffer zone can be one of future best management practices in water resource protection. Switch-grass requires no fertilizers and less land and water. It was recently found to be a good source of biomass. In this study, Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) model was applied to a watershed to examine the effectiveness of buffer

Roy R. Gu; Mahesh K. Sahu

2010-01-01

118

Electric Power Engineering Educational Resources 1969-1970  

Microsoft Academic Search

This committee report covers results of a survey of electric power engineering educational resources at eighty-two ECPD (Engineers Council for Professional Development) accredited schools in the USA for the acedemic year 1969-1970. It includes a listing of faculty active during the subject year and their professional experience together with information on student enrollment and its composition. Also included is information

F. C. Fisher; L. S. Vanslyck; E. T. B. Gross; C. C. Mosher; H. B. Hamilton; J. R. Tudor

1972-01-01

119

A systems engineering management approach to resource management applications  

Microsoft Academic Search

Presents a program management response to the following question: how can the traditional practice of systems engineering management, including requirements specification, be adapted, enhanced, or modified to build future planning and scheduling systems for effective operations? The systems engineering management process, as traditionally practiced, is examined. Extensible resource management systems are discussed. It is concluded that extensible systems are a

R. S. Hornstein

1989-01-01

120

Fiscal Year 1988 Program Report: Louisiana Water Resources Research Institute.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The 1988 cooperative research program of the Louisiana Water Resources Research Institute addressed priority water resources problem areas. The water problems were: management of surface water supplies; ground water control and restoration; and wastewater...

M. Tittlebaum

1989-01-01

121

Water Resources Data for North Carolina, Water Year 1991.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Water resources data for the 1991 water year for North Carolina consists of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage and contents of lakes and reservoirs; and ground-water levels. The report contains discharge records for 157 gagin...

R. G. Barker B. C. Ragland J. F. Rhinehardt W. H. Eddins

1991-01-01

122

Water Resources Data for West Virginia, Water Year 1994.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Water-resource data for the 1994 water year for West Virginia consist of records of discharge and water quality of streams; contents of reservoirs; and water levels of observation wells. This report contains discharge records for 70 streamflow-gaging stat...

S. M. Ward B. C. Taylor M. V. Mathes

1995-01-01

123

Managing water resources for crop production  

PubMed Central

Increasing crop production to meet the food requirements of the world's growing population will put great pressure on global water resources. Given that the vast freshwater resources that are available in the world are far from fully exploited, globally there should be sufficient water for future agricultural requirements. However, there are large areas where low water supply and high human demand may lead to regional shortages of water for future food production. In these arid and semi-arid areas, where water is a major constraint on production, improving water resource management is crucial if Malthusian disasters are to be avoided. There is considerable scope for improvement, since in both dryland and irrigated agriculture only about one-third of the available water (as rainfall, surface, or groundwater) is used to grow useful plants. This paper illustrates a range of techniques that could lead to increased crop production by improving agricultural water use efficiency. This may be achieved by increasing the total amount of water available to plants or by increasing the efficiency with which that water is used to produce biomass. Although the crash from the Malthusian precipice may ultimately be inevitable if population growth is not addressed, the time taken to reach the edge of the precipice could be lengthened by more efficient use of existing water resources.

Wallace, J. S.; Batchelor, C. H.

1997-01-01

124

30 CFR 402.6 - Water-Resources Research Program.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Water-Resources Research Program. 402.6 Section...GEOLOGICAL SURVEY, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR WATER-RESOURCES RESEARCH PROGRAM AND THE WATER-RESOURCES TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM...

2013-07-01

125

National water summary on wetland resources  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This National Water Summary on Wetland Resources documents wetland resources in the United States. It presents an overview of the status of knowledge of wetlands at the present time-what they are, where they are found, why they are important, and the controversies surrounding them, with an emphasis on their hydrology. Wetland resources in each State, the District of Columbia (combined with Maryland), Puerto Rico, the U.S. Virgin Islands, and the western Pacific Islands are described.

compiled by Fretwell, J. D.; Williams, John S.; Redman, Phillip J.

1996-01-01

126

Digital Resource Package for Teaching Water Quality  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This digital resource package is a collection of online sources to help K-12 teachers create lessons on the Geology subject of water quality. Topics include Field Trips and Labs, Simulations and Media, Case Studies, Lesson Plans, and Reference Material.

Moin, Laura

127

Tenth Annual Report, Water Resources Research Center.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Minnesota Water Resources Research projects were concerned with: Monitoring the effects of stopping the flow of sewage on the productivity of Lake Minnetonka; determining whether optimum levels of investigations can be set for such groundwater reservo...

1974-01-01

128

Water Resources, Snow and Ice: Introduction.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Water resources and hydrological quantities in their local, regional and global aspects represent key applications in our present ecological and economic environment. Many remote sensing methods have been developed which indicate clearly their possibiliti...

H. Haefner H. Rott

1991-01-01

129

Elsevier's dictionary of water and hydraulic engineering  

SciTech Connect

This dictionary deals with water: water in relation to engineering projects designed to utilize it, to control it, or to defend us against it; water as a basic element of our environment, and water as the subject of a variety of physical phenomena. The dictionary comprises a basic table with 5,117 terms in English. Equivalents are given in French, Spanish, Dutch and German, keyed to the basic table by number. The aim of the dictionary is to promote better understanding and communication between people of different nationalities working in the field of hydraulics, water management and hydraulic engineering.

Van der Tuin, J.D.

1987-01-01

130

Water Resources of St. Tammany Parish  

USGS Publications Warehouse

St. Tammany Parish, located in southeastern Louisiana, contains fresh groundwater and surface-water resources. In 2005, about 22.8 million gallons per day (Mgal/d) were withdrawn from water sources in St. Tammany Parish. Almost 100 percent (22.7 Mgal/d) was withdrawn from groundwater, and less than 1 percent (0.06 Mgal/d) was withdrawn from surface water. Withdrawals for public supplies accounted for 70 percent (16 Mgal/d) of the total water withdrawn. Withdrawals for domestic use were 28 percent (6 Mgal/d). Generally, water withdrawals in the parish increased from 1960 to 1970, decreased from 1970 to 1985, and again increased from 1985 to 2005. This fact sheet summarizes basic information on the water resources of St. Tammany Parish, La. Information on ground?water and surface-water availability, quality, development, use, and trends is based on previously published reports listed in the references section.

Griffith, Jason M.

2009-01-01

131

USGS: its water resources research activity  

SciTech Connect

USGS research hydrologist Robert Baker is interviewed on past, present, and future research activities of the USGS Water Resources Div. (WRD). The first WRD research program was created in the late 1950's. Currently, WRD receives $200 million/yr to study a variety of topics including mathematical modeling for transfer and fate of organic pollutants in water resources; geochemical and groundwater research; sediment research; and the effects of chemicals on soils and subsurface strata. Programs are proposed for research on droughts, tidal fresh-water streams, lakes, water-use data applications, and hydrologic factors associated with volcanic activity. (1 photo)

Miller, S.

1981-02-01

132

Environmental resource document for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Volume 1  

SciTech Connect

This document contains information related to the environmental characterization of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The INEL is a major US Department of Energy facility in southeastern Idaho dedicated to nuclear research, waste management, environmental restoration, and other activities related to the development of technology. Environmental information covered in this document includes land, air, water, and ecological resources; socioeconomic characteristics and land use; and cultural, aesthetic, and scenic resources.

Irving, J.S.

1993-07-01

133

Environmental resource document for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Volume 2  

SciTech Connect

This document contains information related to the environmental characterization of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The INEL is a major US Department of Energy facility in southeastern Idaho dedicated to nuclear research, waste management, environmental restoration, and other activities related to the development of technology. Environmental information covered in this document includes land, air, water, and ecological resources; socioeconomic characteristics and land use; and cultural, aesthetic, and scenic resources.

Irving, J.S.

1993-07-01

134

Rocket Engine Jet Blast Attenuation in Water.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The investigation was conducted to determine the feasibility of launching missiles and superboosters from overwater sites. Information is needed to predict the depth of liquid-propellant rocket engine exhaust gas penetration into water. Methods will be re...

G. W. Leese

1967-01-01

135

Water Resources System Archetypes: Towards a Holistic Understanding of Persistent Water Resources Problems  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Water resources modeling, a well-established tool in water resources planning and management practice, facilitates understanding of the physical and socio-economic processes impacting the wellbeing of humans and ecosystems. While watershed models continue to become more holistic, there is a need for appropriate frameworks and tools for integrated conceptualization of problems to provide reliable qualitative and quantitative bases for policy selection. In recent decades, water resources professionals have become increasingly cognizant of important feedback relationships within water resources systems. We contend that a systems thinking paradigm is required to facilitate characterization of the closed-loop nature of these feedbacks. Furthermore, a close look at different water resources issues reveals that, while many water resources problems are essentially very similar in nature, they continuously appear in different geographical locations. In the systems thinking literature, a number of generic system structures known as system archetypes have been identified to describe common patterns of problematic behavior within systems. In this research, we identify some main system archetypes governing water resources systems, demonstrating their benefits for holistic understanding of various classes of persistent water resources problems. Using the eutrophication problem of Lake Allegan, Michigan, as a case study, we illustrate how the diagnostic tools of system dynamics modeling can facilitate identification of problematic feedbacks within water resources systems and provide insights for sustainable development.

Mirchi, A.; Watkins, D. W.; Madani, K.

2011-12-01

136

SMALL SYSTEM STUDIES (WATER SUPPLY AND WATER RESOURCES DIVISION)  

EPA Science Inventory

To support and help in the struggle to improve the quality of drinking water in the U.S. and abroad (China and South America), the National Risk Management Research Laboratory's Water Supply and Water Resources Division (WSWRD) uses the USEPA Test and Evaluation (T&E) Facility lo...

137

Water-Resources Investigations, Collier County, Florida.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Water-resources investigations in Collier County, Florida began in the early 1950's and were concerned with availability of ground-water supplies and the problem of saltwater intrusion in the Naples area on the Gulf of Mexico coast. With the advent of can...

1980-01-01

138

Climate change, water resources and child health  

Microsoft Academic Search

Climate change is occurring and has tremendous consequences for children's health worldwide. This article describes how the rise in temperature, precipitation, droughts, floods, glacier melt and sea levels resulting from human-induced climate change is affecting the quantity, quality and flow of water resources worldwide and impacting child health through dangerous effects on water supply and sanitation, food production and human

Elizabeth J Kistin; John Fogarty; Ryan Shaening Pokrasso; Michael McCally; Peter G McCornick

2010-01-01

139

Desalination and water resource management in Kuwait  

Microsoft Academic Search

In most arid countries the scarcity of conventional fresh water supplies infers a serious threat to sustainable and balanced socio-economic growth and development. This threat is clearly more pronounced in the less developed countries. However, the mining of non-conventional seawater and wastewater resources could provide an opportunity and a challenge to water supply sustainability. In Kuwait, the average rainfall is

Mohamed F. Hamoda

2001-01-01

140

Water Resources of New Mexico  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) site provides water data for New Mexico, a map of New Mexico basins, and publications. Descriptions of the following USGS investigations are provided: the Rio Grande National Water-Quality Assessment, the Middle Rio Grande Basin Study, USGS measurements of a century of floods, Rio Puerco Basin Studies, Monitoring of Piezometers in the Middle Rio Grande Basin, and Ground Water Monitoring and Pumpage in the Albuquerque Area. An education section includes general information on hydrology and a New Mexico fact sheet. There is a section monitoring drought conditions and a collection of photographs of drought.

141

Fiscal Year 1989 Program Report: Louisiana Water Resources Research Institute.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The 1989 cooperative research program of the Louisiana Water Resources Research Institute (LWRRI) addressed priority water resources problem areas identified for Louisiana - management of surface water supplies, ground water control and restoration, and w...

W. D. Constant

1990-01-01

142

Water Resources Availability in Kabul, Afghanistan  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The availability of water resources is vital to the rebuilding of Kabul, Afghanistan. In recent years, droughts and increased water use for drinking water and agriculture have resulted in widespread drying of wells. Increasing numbers of returning refugees, rapid population growth, and potential climate change have led to heightened concerns for future water availability. The U.S. Geological Survey, with support from the U.S. Agency for International Development, began collaboration with the Afghanistan Geological Survey and Ministry of Energy and Water on water-resource investigations in the Kabul Basin in 2004. This has led to the compilation of historic and recent water- resources data, creation of monitoring networks, analyses of geologic, geophysical, and remotely sensed data. The study presented herein provides an assessment of ground-water availability through the use of multidisciplinary hydrogeologic data analysis. Data elements include population density, climate, snowpack, geology, mineralogy, surface water, ground water, water quality, isotopic information, and water use. Data were integrated through the use of conceptual ground-water-flow model analysis and provide information necessary to make improved water-resource planning and management decisions in the Kabul Basin. Ground water is currently obtained from a shallow, less than 100-m thick, highly productive aquifer. CFC, tritium, and stable hydrogen and oxygen isotopic analyses indicate that most water in the shallow aquifer appears to be recharged post 1970 by snowmelt-supplied river leakage and secondarily by late winter precipitation. Analyses indicate that increasing withdrawals are likely to result in declining water levels and may cause more than 50 percent of shallow supply wells to become dry or inoperative particularly in urbanized areas. The water quality in the shallow aquifer is deteriorated in urban areas by poor sanitation and water availability concerns may be compounded by poor well construction practices and little planning. By 2050, the available water resources in the Kabul Basin may be reduced as a result of Central Asian climate changes. Increasing air temperatures associated with climate change are likely to lead to a decreasing snowpack and an earlier growing season, resulting in less recharge from river leakage. As a result, more than 60 percent of existing supply wells may become dry or inoperative. The impacts of climate change would likely be greatest in the agricultural regions in the western areas of the basin. Water resources in the in northern areas of the basin may meet future water needs. However, in other areas of the basin, particularly the more urbanized southern areas adjacent to and including the city of Kabul, water resources may be stressed. Ground water in deep aquifers, more than 100 m below land surface, is presently unused. Conceptual ground-water-flow simulations indicate that ground water in deep aquifers may be thousands of years old. The deep aquifer may sustain limited increases in municipal water use, but may not support increased agricultural use which is much greater than municipal use. However, the hydraulic feasibility and quality of deep ground-water extractions are not well known and are being investigated.

Akbari, A. M.; Chornack, M. P.; Coplen, T. B.; Emerson, D. G.; Litke, D. W.; Mack, T. J.; Plummer, N.; Verdin, J. P.; Verstraeten, I. M.

2008-12-01

143

Water resources: A new era of coordination  

SciTech Connect

Today, despite many efforts, the increasing needs for water supply, flood control and continued flows for irrigation, navigation and hydroelectric power are in conflict with the maintenance of wetlands and environmental habitat. Existing means of cooperation are inadequate for resolving these conflicts which often end in stalemate and expensive, prolonged litigation. While most current books give attention to the spectrum of needs in the field, this is the only book that attempts to synthesize the solutions. Whipple's approach stresses the need for coordination between both the current environmental regulations and water resources planning, and provides an integrated solution for 21st century water resource management.

Whipple, W. Jr.

1998-07-01

144

Glossary of Water Resource Terms.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The rapidly developing field of water pollution control already has stimulated its own special language through origination of new terminology and popularization of other vocabulary formerly reserved for highly technical study. Understanding of this langu...

O. A. Titelbaum

1970-01-01

145

Glossary of Water Resource Terms.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Twelve reference sources were used in the compilation of this glossary of water pollution control terminology. Definitions for 364 words, acronyms, and phrases are included with cross references. (KP)|

Titelbaum, Olga Adler

146

Resource Letter BE-1 on Biomedical Engineering  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Prepared at the request of the AAPT Committee on Resource Letters. This is one of a series of Resource Letters on various topics, intended to guide college physicists to literature and other teaching aids that may help them improve course content in specified fields of physics. No Resource Letter is meant to be exhaustive and complete. In time, there may be more than one letter on some of the main subjects of interest. Comments and suggestions concerning the content and arrangement of letters as well as suggestions for future topics will be welcomed and should be addressed to Professor Joel E. Gordon, Chairman, AAPT Committee on Resource Letters, Department of Physics, Amherst College, Amherst, Mass. 01002. Notation: The letter E after an item indicates elementary level, useful principally for high school and introductory college use; the letter I indicates intermediate (junior, senior) level; and the letter A indicates advanced material, principally suited for senior, graduate level. An asterisk (*) indicates items particularly recommended for introductory study.

Johnson, Curtis C.

1971-12-01

147

043 DEVELOPMENT OF RESOURCE WATER QUALI TY OBJECTIVES FOR POTABLE WATER TREATMENT AT UMGENI WATER  

Microsoft Academic Search

Umgeni Water abstracts raw water from rivers and dams for potable water treatment, and therefore quality of the water resource is vital for the sustainability of its business. Areas of concern regarding the quality of water resource in the Umgeni Water operational area include eutrophication (nutrient enrichment and associated threats including algal blooms and weed infestations); faecal contamination and pathogen

Felicia Tiba; Kim Hodgson

148

University of Wisconsin Extension: Water Resources Programs  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The University of Wisconsin Extension provides "information about water quality and natural resources education programs in Wisconsin." Users can find out about monitoring the water quality of streams, river cleanups, and other volunteer projects. Teachers can learn how to educate their students about runoff pollution through the construction of a watershed model. The website presents numerous water related initiatives including the Multi-Agency Land and Water Education Grant Program, Give Water a Hand for young people taking action in their community, and the Landowner Assessment and Project Evaluation (LOAPE) Program.

149

Conserving Water Resources Through Integrated Water Management  

Microsoft Academic Search

Today we face the challenges ofproviding goodfood, good air, and good water for a humanpopulation that is doubling every 40-50 years. The challenges are real and were evident enough during 1988 for Time magazine to dedicate its first 1989 issue to „Planet of the Year….Endangered Earth”.Great technological progress has been made over the past few years, enabling many industries and

David H. Paul

1989-01-01

150

Quantitative determination of engine water ingestion  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper describes a novel non-intrusive optical technique for determination of liquid mass flux in a droplet laden airstream. The technique was developed for quantitative determination of engine water ingestion resulting from heavy rain or wheel spray. Independent measurements of the liquid water content (LWC) of the droplet laden aircraft and of the droplet velocities were made at the simulated

P. Parikh; M. Hernan; V. Sarohia

1986-01-01

151

World Water Resources Assessment for 2050  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

nticipated water scarcity in the first half of this century is one of the most concerned international issues to be assessed adequately. However, even though the issue has an international impact and world wide monitoring is critical, there are limited number of global estimates at present. In this study, annual water availability was derived from annual runoff estimated by land surface models using Total Runoff Integrating Pathways (TRIP) with 0.5 degree by 0.5 degree longitude/latitude resolution globally. Global distribution of water withdrawal for each sector in the same horizontal spatial resolution was estimated based on country-base statistics of municipal water use, industrial water use, and agricultural intake, using global geographical information system with global distributions of population and irrigated crop land area. The total population under water stress estimated for 1995 corresponded very well with former estimates, however, the number is highly depend on how to assume the ratio how much water from upstream of the region can be considered as ``available'' water resources within the region. It suggests the importance of regional studies evaluating the the water quality deterioration in the upper stream, the real consumption of water resources in the upper stream, and the accessibility to water. The last factor should be closely related to how many large scale water withdrawal schemes are implemented in the region. Further studies by an integrated approach to improve the accuracy of future projections on both the natural and social sides of the water resources should be promoted. About the future projection of the global water resources assessment, population growth, climatic change, and the increase of water consumption per capita are considered. Population growth scenario follows the UN projection in each country. Change in annual runoff was estimated based on the climatic simulation by a general circulation model by the Center of Climate System Study, U of Tokyo, and the National Institute for Environmental Studies, coupled with TRIP. The increase in unit consumption of water was related to the predicted growth of GDP. With the increase of population only, future population under strong water scarcity, with water scarcity index is larger than 0.4, will increase by 90% in 2050 compared to the current situation in 1995. Consideration of the climatic change due to the global warming will relax this situation, and only 74% will be under the strong water scarcity according to the future projection used in this study.

Oki, T.; Agata, Y.; Kanae, S.; Musiake, K.; Saruhashi, T.

2003-04-01

152

SUSTAINABLE WATER RESOURCES MANAGEMENT IN NEOTECTONIC BASIN SYSTEMS  

Microsoft Academic Search

Facing the threat of water scarcity, numerous techniques and methods have been introduced, aiming at more effective water resources exploitation. A well promising way to cope with water shortage is to develop and apply combined management techniques for the existing surface water and groundwater resources. Natural resources management requires thorough understanding of the natural processes controlling each resource and human

I. MARIOLAKOS; I. FOUNTOULIS; E. SPYRIDONOS; E. CAPOURANI; E. ANDREADAKIS

153

18 CFR 701.76 - The Water Resources Council Staff.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

18 Ç Conservation of Power and Water Resources Ç 2 Ç 2013-04-01 Ç 2012-04-01 Ç true Ç The Water Resources Council Staff. Ç 701.76 Ç Section 701.76 Ç Conservation of Power and Water Resources Ç WATER RESOURCES COUNCIL Ç COUNCIL ORGANIZATION Ç Headquarters Organization Ç Â§ 701.76 Ç The...

2013-04-01

154

Architecture of a Federated Query Engine for Heterogeneous Resources  

PubMed Central

The Federated Utah Research and Translational Health e-Repository (FURTHeR) is a Utah statewide informatics platform for the new Center for Clinical and Translational Science at the University of Utah. We have been working on one of FURTHeR’s key components, a federated query engine for heterogeneous resources, that we believe has the potential to meet some of the fundamental needs of translational science to access and integrate diverse biomedical data and promote discovery of new knowledge. The architecture of the federated query engine for heterogeneous resources is described and demonstrated.

Bradshaw, Richard L.; Matney, Susan; Livne, Oren E.; Bray, Bruce E.; Mitchell, Joyce A.; Narus, Scott P.

2009-01-01

155

Population and water resources: a delicate balance.  

PubMed

Various avenues exist to minimize the effects of the current water crisis in some regions of the world and the more widespread problems that will threaten the world in the future. Active management of existing water resources and a reduction in population growth in water-scarce areas are needed to minimize the effects of the water crisis. National boundaries do not effect water systems. Cooperation and commitment of local, national, and international governments, institutions, and other organizations are needed to manage water systems. Development in each country must entail conscientious and effective balancing of unavoidable manipulations of the land and the unavoidable environmental impacts of those manipulations. The conditions of environmental sustainability must include protection of land productivity, ground water potability, and biodiversity. Humans must deal with these factors either by adopting methods to protect natural systems or by correcting existing damage and reducing future problems. They need to understand the demographic forces in each country so they can balance society's rising needs for clean water with the finite amount of water available. Factors affecting future needs at all levels include rapid rural-urban migration, high fertility, and changing patterns of international population movement. Given an increased awareness of global water systems, demographic trends, and active management of resources, the fragile balance between population and water can be maintained. PMID:12344702

Falkenmark, M; Widstrand, C

1992-11-01

156

Engineering Water Analysis Laboratory Activity.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purposes of water treatment in a marine steam power plant are to prevent damage to boilers, steam-operated equipment, and steam and condensate lives, and to keep all equipment operating at the highest level of efficiency. This laboratory exercise is designed to provide students with experiences in making accurate boiler water tests and to…

Schlenker, Richard M.

157

Engineering Water Analysis Laboratory Activity.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The purposes of water treatment in a marine steam power plant are to prevent damage to boilers, steam-operated equipment, and steam and condensate lives, and to keep all equipment operating at the highest level of efficiency. This laboratory exercise is designed to provide students with experiences in making accurate boiler water tests and to…

Schlenker, Richard M.

158

Water Resources Data for Alaska, Water Year 1996  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Water resources data for the 1996 water year for Alaska consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stages of lakes; and water levels and water quality of ground water. This volume contains records for water discharge at 85 gaging stations; stage or contents only at 5 gaging stations; water quality at 19 gaging stations; and water levels for 49 observation wells. Also included are data for 56 crest-stage partial-record stations and 2 lakes. Additional water data were collected at various sites not involved in the systematic data-collection program and are published as miscellaneous measurements and analyses. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating State and Federal agencies in Alaska.

Linn, K. R.; Shaw, S. K.; Swanner, W. C.; Rickman, R. L.; Schellekens, M. F.

1997-01-01

159

DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM RESEARCH (WATER SUPPLY AND WATER RESOURCES DIVISION)  

EPA Science Inventory

Two water distribution system simulators(DSSs)are now in operation at the USEPA Test and Evaluation (T&E) Facility in Cincinnati, OH. EPA's T&E Facility is a multifaceted research resource in which a wide variety of water treatment and other environmental protection technologies ...

160

WATER: Water Activities Teaching Environmental Responsibility: Teacher Resource, Environmental Science.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This activity book was developed as part of an effort to protect water quality of the Stillwater River, Ohio, through a Watershed Protection Project. It is designed to raise teachers' and students' awareness and trigger a sense of stewardship towards the preservation of water resources. The activities are generally appropriate for elementary age…

Kramer, Ed, Ed.; And Others

161

Water resources data, New Mexico, water year 2003  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Water-resources data for the 2003 water year for New Mexico consist of records of discharge and water quality of streams; stage, contents, and water quality of lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality in wells and springs. This report contains discharge records for 182 gaging stations; stage and contents for 24 lakes and reservoirs; water quality for 34 gaging stations, 83 wells, and 7 partial-record stations and miscellaneous sites; and water levels at 141 observation wells. Also included are 80 crest-stage, partial-record stations. Additional water data were collected at various sites not involved in the systematic data-collection program and are published as miscellaneous measurements. Two seepage investigations were made during the year. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System collected by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating Federal, State, and local agencies in New Mexico.

Byrd, Dave; Allen, Harriet R.; Montano, Mary

2004-01-01

162

Water resources data, New Mexico, water year 2004  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Water-resources data for the 2004 water year for New Mexico consist of records of discharge and water quality of streams; stage, contents, and water quality of lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality in wells and springs. This report contains discharge records for 185 gaging stations; stage and contents for 22 lakes and reservoirs; water quality for 39 gaging stations, 108 wells, and 9 partial-record stations and miscellaneous sites; and water levels at 128 observation wells. Also included are 80 crest-stage, partial-record stations. Additional water data were collected at various sites not involved in the systematic data-collection program and are published as miscellaneous measurements. Two seepage investigations were made during the year. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System collected by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating Federal, State, and local agencies in New Mexico.

Byrd, Dave; Allen, Harriet R.; Montano, Mary

2005-01-01

163

Water Resources Data, New Mexico, Water Year 1994  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Water-resources data for the 1994 water year for New Mexico consist of records of discharge and water quality of streams; stage, contents, and water quality of lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality in wells and springs. This report contains discharge records for 184 gaging stations; stage and contents for 26 lakes and reservoirs; water quality for 51 gaging stations and 72 wells; and water levels at 132 observation wells. Also included are 109 crest-stage partial-record stations. Additional water data were collected at various sites, not involved in the systematic data collection program, and are published as miscellaneous measurements. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System collected by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating State and Federal agencies in New Mexico.

Borland, J.P.; Ong, Kim

1995-01-01

164

Water Resources Data, New Mexico, Water Year 2000  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Water-resources data for the 2000 water year for New Mexico consist of records of discharge and water quality of streams; stage, contents, and water quality of lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality in wells and springs. This report contains discharge records for 185 gaging stations; stage and contents for 26 lakes and reservoirs; water quality for 34 gaging stations, 56 wells, and 41 partial-record stations and miscellaneous sites; and water levels at 136 observation wells. Also included are 79 crest-stage, partial-record stations. Additional water data were collected at various sites not involved in the systematic data-collection program and are published as miscellaneous measurements. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System collected by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating Federal, State, and local agencies in New Mexico.

Ortiz, David; Lange, Kathy; Beal, Linda

2001-01-01

165

Water resources data for New Mexico, water year 1978  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Water resources data for the 1978 water year for New Mexico consist of records of discharge and water quality of streams; stage, contents and water quality of lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality in wells and springs. This report contains discharge records for 229 gaging stations; stage and contents for 24 lakes and reservoirs; water quality for 89 gaging stations, 15 partial-record stations, 2 reservoir, 3 springs and 99 wells; and water levels for 96 observation wells. Also included are 144 crest-stage partial-record stations and 2 low-flow partial-record stations. Additional water data were collected at various sites, not part of the systematic data collection program, and are published as miscellaneous measurements. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U. S. Geological Survey and cooperating State and Federal agencies in New Mexico.

Geological Survey (U.S.)

1979-01-01

166

Water resources data, New Mexico, water year 2002  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Water-resources data for the 2002 water year for New Mexico consist of records of discharge and water quality of streams; stage, contents, and water quality of lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality in wells and springs. This report contains discharge records for 176 gaging stations; stage and contents for 24 lakes and reservoirs; water quality for 42 gaging stations, 108 wells, and 9 partial-record stations and miscellaneous sites; and water levels at 135 observation wells. Also included are 80 crest-stage, partial-record stations. Additional water data were collected at various sites not involved in the systematic data-collection program and are published as miscellaneous measurements. Two seepage investigations were made during the year. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System collected by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating Federal, State, and local agencies in New Mexico.

Byrd, F. Dave; Lange, Kathy M.; Beal, Linda V.

2003-01-01

167

Water resources data, New Mexico, water year 1986  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Water resources data for the 1986 water year for New Mexico consist of records of discharge and water quality of streams; stage, contents and water quality of lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality in wells and springs. This report contains discharge records for 166 gaging stations; stage and contents for 24 lakes and reservoirs; water quality for 64 gaging stations and 168 wells; and water levels at 111 observation wells. Also included are 135 crest-stage partial-record stations. Additional water data were collected at various sites, not involved in the systematic data collection program, and are published as miscellaneous measurements. Also, one seepage investigation is published this year. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System collected by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating State and Federal agencies in New Mexico.

Beal, Linda V.; Gold, Robert L.

1987-01-01

168

Water resources data, New Mexico, water year 1987  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Water resources data for the 198, water year for New Mexico consist of records of discharge and water quality of streams; stage, contents and water quality of lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality in wells and springs. This report contains discharge records for 165 gaging stations; stage and contents for 25 lakes and reservoirs; water quality for 67 gaging stations and 180 wells; and water levels at 100 observation wells. Also included are 108 crest-stage partial-record stations. Additional water data were collected at various sites) not involved in the systematic data collect-ion program, and are published as miscellaneous measurements. Also, one seepage investigation is published this year. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System collected by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating State and Federal agencies in New Mexico.

Beal, Linda V.; Gold, Robert L.

1988-01-01

169

Water resources data for New Mexico, water year 1979  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Water resources data for the 1979 water year for New Mexico consist of records of discharge and water quality of streams; stage", contents and water quality of lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality in wells and springs. This report contains discharge records for 229 gaging stations; stage and contents for 24 lakes and reservoirs; water quality for 97 gaging stations, 13 partial-record stations, 2 reservoir, 18 springs and 143 wells; and water levels for 86 observation wells. Also included are 126 crest-stage partial-record stations and 2 low-flow partial-record stations. Additional water data were collected at various sites, not part of the systematic data collection program, and are published as miscellaneous measurements. These data represent -that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U. S. Geological Survey and cooperating State and Federal agencies in New Mexico.

Geological Survey (U.S.)

1980-01-01

170

Water resources data for New Mexico, water year 1975  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Water resources data for the 1975 water year for New Mexico consist of records of discharge and water quality of streams; stage, contents and water quality of lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality in wells and springs. This report contains discharge records for 201 gaging stations; stage and contents far 23 lakes and reservoirs; water quality for 62 gaging stations, 77 partial-record flow stations, 1 reservoir, 47 springs and 197 wells; and water levels for 93 observation wells. Also included are 162 crest-stage partial-record stations and 2 low-flow partial-record stations. Additional water data were collected at various sites, not part of the systematic da,ta collection program, and are pu,blis"Q,ed as miscellaneous measurements. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating State and Federal agencies in New Mexico.

Geological Survey (U.S.)

1976-01-01

171

Water Resources Data, New Mexico, Water Year 1996  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Water resources data for the 1996 water year for New Mexico consist of records of discharge and water quality of streams; stage, contents, and water quality of lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality in wells and springs. This report contains discharge records for 172 gaging stations; stage and contents for 26 lakes and reservoirs; water quality for 51 gaging stations and 19 wells; and water levels at 126 observation wells. Also included are 82 crest-stage partial-record stations. Additional water data were collected at various sites not involved in the systematic data collection program, and are published as miscellaneous measurements. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System collected by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating State and Federal agencies in New Mexico.

Ortiz, David; Lange, K. M.

1997-01-01

172

Water Resources Data, New Mexico, Water Year 1997  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Water resources data for the 1997 water year for New Mexico consist of records of discharge and water quality of streams; stage, contents, and water quality of lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality in wells and springs. This report contains discharge records for 171 gaging stations; stage and contents for 27 lakes and reservoirs; water quality for 46 gaging stations and 19 wells; and water levels in 124 observation wells. Also included are 35 crest-stage, partial-record stations. Additional water data were collected at various sites not involved in the systematic data-collection program, and are published as miscellaneous measurements. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System collected by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating Federal, State, and local agencies in New Mexico.

Ortiz, David; Lange, Kathy; Beal, Linda

1998-01-01

173

Water Resources Data, New Mexico, Water Year 2001  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Water-resources data for the 2001 water year for New Mexico consist of records of discharge and water quality of streams; stage, contents, and water quality of lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality in wells and springs. This report contains discharge records for 173 gaging stations; stage and contents for 24 lakes and reservoirs; water quality for 37 gaging stations, 43 wells, and II partial-record stations and miscellaneous sites; and water levels at 136 observation well s. Also included are 84 creststage, partial-record stations. Additional water data were collected at various sites not involved in the systematic data-collection program and are published as miscellaneous measurements. One seepage investigation was made during the year. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System collected by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating Federal, State, and local agencies in New Mexico.

Byrd, Dave; Lange, Kathy; Beal, Linda

2002-01-01

174

Water resources data, New Mexico, water year 1988  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Water resources data for the 1988 water year for New Mexico consist of records of discharge and water quality of streams; stage, contents and water quality of lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality in wells and springs. This report contains discharge records for 165 gaging stations; stage and contents for 26 lakes and reservoirs; water quality for 64 gaging stations and 76 wells; and water levels at 105 observation wells. Also included are 108 crest-stage partial-record stations. Additional water data were collected at various sites, not involved in the systematic data collection program, and are published as miscellaneous measurements. Also, one seepage investigation is published this year. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System collected by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating State and Federal agencies in New Mexico.

Borland, John P.; Beal, Linda V.

1989-01-01

175

Fiscal Year 1990 Program Report: Louisiana Water Resources Research Institute.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The 1990 cooperative research program of the Louisiana Water Resources Research Institute (LWRRI) addressed priority water resources problem areas identified for Louisiana - management of surface water supplies, groundwater control and restoration, wastew...

W. D. Constant

1991-01-01

176

Oregon Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report, FY 2003.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

In 2003, Oregons Center for Water and Environmental Sustainability (CWESt) focused efforts on three programs: (1) The Water Resources Program administers interdisciplinary and multi-agency watershed education and water resources research programs in Orego...

2003-01-01

177

Fiscal Year 1987 Program Report: Oklahoma Water Resources Research Institute,  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The FY 1987 Oklahoma Water Resources Research Institute research program addressed the issues of surface and ground water quality and management of water resources. Research projects funded by the OWRRI to address these issues included: an investigation o...

E. M. McTernan N. N. Durham

1988-01-01

178

Storm water management for society and nature via service learning, ecological engineering and ecohydrology  

Microsoft Academic Search

A framework for urban storm?water management that moves beyond flood control to improve societal and ecological services will maximize the functions and benefits of water resources management. Theoretical constructs for such work originate from the integration of ecological engineering, ecohydrology and service learning paradigms. Implementation consists of simulating, monitoring and reporting how storm?water design decisions to infiltrate or directly discharge

Theodore A. Endreny

2004-01-01

179

Applying the Resource Description Framework to Web Engineering  

Microsoft Academic Search

. Generally, a multitude of tools is used for the management ofa Web application life cycle. It is highly desirable to provide an exchangeformat for such tools to enable interoperability. This paper presents aneXtensible Web Modeling Framework (Xwmf), which applies the ResourceDescription Framework (RDF) to Web engineering to provide aninteroperable exchange format. Our proposed framework makes use ofone and the

Reinhold Klapsing; Gustaf Neumann

2000-01-01

180

Semantics in Web Engineering: Applying the Resource Description Framework  

Microsoft Academic Search

The authors present an extensible Web modeling framework that applies the Resource Description Framework to Web engineering, providing an interoperable exchange format. The framework uses the same (meta) data model to specify a Web application's structure and content, to make statements about a Web application's elements, and to reason about the data and metadata

Reinhold Klapsing; Gustaf Neumann; Wolfram Conen

2001-01-01

181

Water resources data and information exchange in transboundary water treaties  

Microsoft Academic Search

Despite international calls for data and information sharing in transboundary waters and basin-specific evidence of its importance\\u000a to cooperative management, no systematic research has been undertaken to answer questions of where, how frequently, and which\\u000a water resources data and information are exchanged. This paper examines all available transboundary water agreements signed\\u000a between 1900 and 2007 to determine the degree to

Andrea K. GerlakJonathan; Jonathan Lautze; Mark Giordano

2011-01-01

182

GIS and Water Resources Modeling Workshop  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This site from Venkatesh Merwade of Purdue university offers tutorials relating to GIS and water resources modeling. Topic areas covered are hydraulic and hydrologic modeling, GIS and hydrologic modeling and downloading geospatial and temporal data for hydroloic/hydraulic modeling. All tutorials have links for necessary datasets.

Merwade, Venkatesh

2013-01-14

183

USGS Water Resources of North Dakota  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Water Resources of North Dakota contains current streamflow conditions and other hydrologic data, a drought watch section, publications, and an education section. There is information on: the connection between Lewis and Clark and the USGS; canoeing the rivers of North Dakota; and the Missouri River streamflow-gaging station and how the USGS collects streamflow data.

184

Emerging climate services for water resources planning  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

The author’s perspective on new or experimental forecasts and data products that may be important for water resource planning were shared. Everyone who lives and works with the consequences of weather and climate have known or suspected for years that climate is shifting, have been adapting, and wa...

185

Integrated Water Resources Management: A Reassessment  

Microsoft Academic Search

The concept of integrated water resources management (IWRM) has been around for some 60 years. It was rediscovered by some in the 1990s. While at a first glance, the concept of IWRM looks attractive, a deeper analysis brings out many problems, both in concept and implementation, especially for meso- to macro-scale projects. The definition of IWRM continues to be amorphous,

Asit K. Biswas

2004-01-01

186

Reorientation of Urban Water Resources Research.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The report is of a workshop held at Quail Roost, N.C. and of final conclusions by editing and steering committee, to develop an improved program of water resources research related primarily to problems in urban and urbanizing areas. The consensus was tha...

W. Whipple M. M. Hufschmidt B. B. Berger D. H. Howells L. D. James

1976-01-01

187

Ground water and surface water; a single resource  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The importance of considering ground water and surface water as a single resource has become increasingly evident. Issues related to water supply, water quality, and degradation of aquatic environments are reported on frequently. The interaction of ground water and surface water has been shown to be a significant concern in many of these issues. Contaminated aquifers that discharge to streams can result in long-term contamination of surface water; conversely, streams can be a major source of contamination to aquifers. Surface water commonly is hydraulically connected to ground water, but the interactions are difficult to observe and measure. The purpose of this report is to present our current understanding of these processes and activities as well as limitations in our knowledge and ability to characterize them.

Winter, Thomas C.; Harvey, Judson W.; Franke, O. Lehn; Alley, William M.

1998-01-01

188

Water Resources Data, South Carolina, Water Year 1999  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Water resources data for the 1999 water year for South Carolina consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage and contents of lakes and reservoirs; and ground-water levels. This report contains discharge records for 118 gaging stations; stage-only records for 38 gaging stations; stage and contents for 17 lakes and reservoirs; water quality for 42 gaging stations; and water levels for 54 observation wells. Also included are data for 53 crest-stage partial-record stations and discharge measurements at 6 miscellaneous sites. Additional water data were collected at various sites, not part of the systematic data collection program, and are published as miscellaneous investigations of water quality. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System collected by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating State and Federal agencies in South Carolina.

Cooney, T. W.; Drewes, P. A.; Ellisor, S. W.; Melendez, F.

1999-01-01

189

Water resources data, South Carolina, water year 2000  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Water resources data for the 2000 water year for South Carolina consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage and contents of lakes and reservoirs; and ground-water levels. This report contains discharge records for 120 gaging stations; stage-only records for 39 gaging stations; stage and contents for 15 lakes and reservoirs; water quality for 38 gaging stations; and water levels for 46 observation wells. Also included are data for 52 crest-stage partial-record stations and discharge measurements at 7 miscellaneous sites. Additional water data were collected at various sites, not part of the systematic data collection program, and are published as miscellaneous investigations of water quality. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System collected by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating State and Federal agencies in South Carolina.

Cooney, T. W.; Drewes, P. A.; Ellisor, S. W.; Melendez, F.

2001-01-01

190

Water resources data, South Carolina, water year 2001  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Water resources data for the 2001 water year for South Carolina consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage and contents of lakes and reservoirs; and ground-water levels. This report contains discharge records for 121 gaging stations; stage-only records for 44 gaging stations; stage and co ntents for 14 lakes and reservoirs; water quality for 47 gaging stations; and water levels for 43 observation wells. Als o included are data for 52 crest-stage partial-record stations and discharge measurements at 7 miscellaneous sites. Add itional water data were collected at various sites, not part of the systematic data collection program, and are publish ed as miscellaneous investigations of water quality. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System co llected by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating State and Federal agencies in South Carolina.

Cooney, T. W.; Drewes, P. A.; Ellisor, S. W.; Lanier, T. H.; Melendez, F.

2001-01-01

191

Water resources data, South Carolina, water year 2002  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Water Resources data for the 2002 water year for South Carolina consists of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage and contents of lakes and reservoirs; and levels of ground-water wells. This volume contains records for water discharge at 128 gaging stations, stage only at 32 gaging stations, stage and contents at 12 lakes and reservoirs, water-quality at 51 gaging stations and one observation well, water levels at 26 observation wells, and precipitation at 5 gaging stations. Also included are data for 57 crest-stage partial-record stations and discharge measurement information at 7 locations. Locations of these sites are shown on figures 3, 4, 5, 6, and 7. Additional water data were collected at various sites not involved in the systematic data-collection program. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System collected by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating State and Federal agencies in South Carolina.

Cooney, T. W.; Drewes, P. A.; Ellisor, S. W.; Lanier, T. H.; Melendez, F.

2003-01-01

192

Water resources data, New Mexico, water year 1980  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Water resources data for the 1980 water year for New Mexico consist of records of discharge and water quality of streams; stage, contents and water quality of lakes and reservoir s; and water levels and water quality in wells and springs. This report contains discharge records for 226 gaging stations; stage and contents for 24 lakes and reservoirs; water quality for 91 gaging stations, 97 observation wells. Also included are 138 crest-stage partial-record stations. Additional water data were collected at various sites, not involved in the systematic data collection program, and are published as miscellaneous measurements. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System collected by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating State and Federal agencies in New Mexico.

Geological Survey (U.S.)

1981-01-01

193

Water resources data, New Mexico, water year 1981  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Water resources data for the 1981 water year for New Mexico consist of records of discharge and water quality of streams; stage, contents and water quality of lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality in wells and springs. This report contains discharge records for 227 gaging stations; stage and contents for 25 lakes and reservoirs; water quality for 89 gaging stations, 91 observation wells. Also included are 135 crest-stage partial-record stations .. Additional water data were collected at various sites, not involved in the systematic data collection program, and are published as miscellaneous measurements .. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System collected by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating State and Federal agencies in New Mexico.

Geological Survey (U.S.)

1982-01-01

194

A Global Outlook for Water Resources to the Year 2025  

Microsoft Academic Search

With growing concerns for sustainable development world over, planners of natural resources are focussing their attention on vulnerability arising from availability and use of water resources. Past studies of water resource vulnerability have either been too aggregate, or have focussed on one single dimension of these issues. This study presents a comprehensive analysis of global (using national scope) water resource-based

Surendra N. Kulshreshtha

1998-01-01

195

Water Resources Data System State Climate Office  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Water Resources Data System is a "clearinghouse of hydrological and climatological data for the State of Wyoming" provided by the University of Wyoming. Online data include a water quality database, climatological data (such as snow depth and precipitation), and earthquake and landslide data. A water library link contains research briefs, publications, a reference shelf, newsletters, and other related documents. Additional links on the main page include US Geological Survey stream flow conditions, the state climatologist office, data clearinghouses, and other Wyoming-specific informational sites.

196

Fiscal Year 1990 Program Report: Delaware Water Resources Center.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The five projects of the fiscal year 1990 Delaware Water Research Institute Program focused on three critical water problems of the state and region: contamination of ground water, ground-water use, and water resources planning and management. Four projec...

R. D. Varrin

1991-01-01

197

Water resources of Assumption Parish, Louisiana  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Information concerning the availability, use, and quality of water in Assumption Parish, Louisiana, is critical for proper water-supply management. The purpose of this fact sheet is to present information that can be used by water managers, parish residents, and others for management of this vital resource. Information on the availability, past and current use, use trends, and water quality from groundwater and surface-water sources in the parish is presented. Previously published reports and data stored in the U.S. Geological Survey’s National Water Information System (http://waterdata.usgs.gov/nwis) are the primary sources of the information presented here. In 2010, about 21.4 million gallons per day (Mgal/d) of water were withdrawn in Assumption Parish, including about 12.4 Mgal/d from surface-water sources and 9.03 Mgal/d from groundwater sources. Withdrawals for industrial use accounted for about 16.4 Mgal/d or 76 percent of the total water withdrawn. Other categories of use included public supply, rural domestic, livestock, general irrigation, and aquaculture.Water-use data collected at 5-year intervals from 1960 to 2010 indicated that water withdrawals peaked in 2000 at about 29.7 Mgal/d.

Prakken, Lawrence B.; Lovelace, John K.

2013-01-01

198

Octanol-water distribution of engineered nanomaterials  

Microsoft Academic Search

The goal of this study was to examine the effects of pH and ionic strength on octanol-water distribution of five model engineered nanomaterials. Distribution experiments resulted in a spectrum of three broadly classified scenarios: distribution in the aqueous phase, distribution in the octanol, and distribution into the octanol-water interface. Two distribution coefficients were derived to describe the distribution of nanoparticles

Kiril D. Hristovski; Paul K. Westerhoff; Jonathan D. Posner

2011-01-01

199

Supercritical water oxidation: An engineering update  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper reviews the need for innovative treatment technologies and describes a wastewater treatment system capable of completely destroying toxic organic substances and biological sludges. The basic concepts of supercritical water oxidation (SCWO), associated engineering research, and technology development are examined. During the last few years a growing body of SCWO knowledge has been assembled. A number of universities, federal

E. F. Gloyna; Lixiong Li

1993-01-01

200

Are we overlooking the link between water and energy resources  

Microsoft Academic Search

Because of the large concern on the vexing problems of petroleum, not much attention has been paid to the intensifying demands on water resources. The Second National Water Assessment indicates that much of the U.S. has or will have problems with the quality and quantity of water resources. Problems involving water resources and energy problems are being handled separately. Apparently

1979-01-01

201

Fuzzy Evaluation of River Basin Water Resources Allocation  

Microsoft Academic Search

River basin water resources allocation is a complicated multi-scale system related to water resources, social economy and ecological environment. Water quantities allocated to living, industry, agriculture and ecology are chosen as the four indicators to evaluate the river basin water resources allocation's effect on social economic sustainable development in this paper. Making use of variable fuzzy evaluation method to evaluate

Haofang Wang; Wenyan Chen

2009-01-01

202

Index to water resources data for Illinois  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This index to water resources data for Illinois includes 1,275 sites where surface-water and ground-water data were collected through December 31, 1975. The index is the first comprehensive tabulation of data collected in Illinois by the U.S. Geological Survey; data collection began in 1903. Information included are the county code, drainage area, datum, type of data available, period of record, where data are filed, and the name of the current cooperating agency. The surface-water index is listed sequentially by station number and also alphabetically by station name. Station numbers for the ground-water index are grouped by counties. The hydrologic unit index shows all sites and is listed by the respective hydrologic boundaries. (Woodard-USGS)

Winget, D. E.

1976-01-01

203

Water resources of Plaquemines Parish, Louisiana  

USGS Publications Warehouse

In 2010, about 85.1 million gallons per day (Mgal/d) of water were withdrawn in Plaquemines Parish, Louisiana. Surface-water sources accounted for almost all withdrawals; groundwater sources accounted for only 0.04 Mgal/d. Industrial use accounted for about 92 percent of the total water withdrawn. Other categories of use included public supply, rural domestic, and livestock. Water-use data collected at 5-year intervals from 1960 to 2010 indicated that water withdrawals in Plaquemines Parish peaked at about 177 Mgal/d in 1975. The peak resulted primarily from an increase in industrial surface-water withdrawals from about 23.8 Mgal/d in 1970 to 171 Mgal/d in 1975. Since 1975, water withdrawals have ranged from about 157 to 85.1 Mgal/d, with industrial surface-water withdrawals accounting for most of the variation. This fact sheet summarizes basic information on the water resources of Plaquemines Parish. Information on groundwater and surface-water availability, quality, development, use, and trends is based on previously published reports listed in the Selected References section.

Prakken, Larry B.

2013-01-01

204

Water resources of St. Bernard Parish, Louisiana  

USGS Publications Warehouse

In 2010, about 261 million gallons per day (Mgal/d) of water were withdrawn in St. Bernard Parish, Louisiana, almost entirely from surface-water sources. Industrial use accounted for about 97 percent (253 Mgal/d) of the total water withdrawn. Other categories of use included public supply, rural domestic, and livestock. Water-use data collected at 5-year intervals from 1960 to 2010 indicated that total water withdrawals in the parish ranged from about 138 to 720 Mgal/d, with industrial use of surface water making up the bulk of water withdrawals. The large decline in surface-water withdrawals from 1980 to 1985 was largely attributable to a decrease in industrial use from 654 Mgal/d in 1980 to 127 Mgal/d in 1985. This fact sheet summarizes basic information on the water resources of St. Bernard Parish. Information on groundwater and surface-water availability, quality, development, use, and trends is based on previously published reports listed in the Selected References section.

Prakken, Larry B.

2013-01-01

205

Water resources review: Wheeler Reservoir, 1990  

SciTech Connect

Protection and enhancement of water quality is essential for attaining the full complement of beneficial uses of TVA reservoirs. The responsibility for improving and protecting TVA reservoir water quality is shared by various federal, state, and local agencies, as well as the thousands of corporations and property owners whose individual decisions affect water quality. TVA's role in this shared responsibility includes collecting and evaluating water resources data, disseminating water resources information, and acting as a catalyst to bring together agencies and individuals that have a responsibility or vested interest in correcting problems that have been identified. This report is one in a series of status reports that will be prepared for each of TVA's reservoirs. The purpose of this status report is to provide an up-to-date overview of the characteristics and conditions of Wheeler Reservoir, including: reservoir purposes and operation; physical characteristics of the reservoir and the watershed; water quality conditions: aquatic biological conditions: designated, actual, and potential uses of the reservoir and impairments of those uses; ongoing or planned reservoir management activities. Information and data presented here are form the most recent reports, publications, and original data available. 21 refs., 8 figs., 29 tabs.

Wallus, R.; Cox, J.P.

1990-09-01

206

Strain engineering water transport in graphene nanochannels  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Using equilibrium and nonequilibrium molecular dynamic simulations, we found that engineering the strain on the graphene planes forming a channel can drastically change the interfacial friction of water transport through it. There is a sixfold change of interfacial friction stress when the strain changes from -10% to 10%. Stretching the graphene walls increases the interfacial shear stress, while compressing the graphene walls reduces it. Detailed analysis of the molecular structure reveals the essential roles of the interfacial potential energy barrier and the structural commensurateness between the solid walls and the first water layer. Our results suggest that the strain engineering is an effective way of controlling the water transport inside nanochannels. The resulting quantitative relations between shear stress and slip velocity and the understanding of the molecular mechanisms will be invaluable in designing graphene nanochannel devices.

Xiong, Wei; Liu, Jefferson Zhe; Ma, Ming; Xu, Zhiping; Sheridan, John; Zheng, Quanshui

2011-11-01

207

Water resources of Natchitoches Parish, Louisiana  

USGS Publications Warehouse

In 2005, about 33.8 million gallons per day (Mgal/d) was withdrawn from water sources in Natchitoches Parish, Louisiana. Surface water sources accounted for about 86 percent (29.2 Mgal/d) of all withdrawals whereas groundwater sources accounted for about 14 percent (4.62 Mgal/d). Withdrawals for industrial use accounted for about 42 percent (14.1 Mgal/d) of the total water withdrawn (table 2). Other categories of use included public supply, rural domestic, livestock, rice irrigation, general irrigation, and aquaculture. The city of Natchitoches used almost 5.6 Mgal/d (about 5.2 Mgal/d of surface water and 0.4 Mgal/d of ground water) for public supply. Water-use data collected at 5-year intervals from 1960 to 2005 indicated that total water withdrawals increased from about 3.5 Mgal/d in 1960 to a peak of almost 35 Mgal/d in 2000. This fact sheet summarizes basic information on the water resources of Natchitoches Parish. Information on groundwater and surface-water availability, quality, development, use, and trends is based on previously published reports listed in the Selected References section.

Fendick, Robert B., Jr.; Prakken, Larry B.; Griffith, Jason M.

2013-01-01

208

Water resources data for New Mexico, water year 1964; Part I. Surface water records  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The surface-water records for the 1964 water year for gaging stations, partialrecord stations, and miscellaneous sites within the State of New Mexico are given in this report. For convenience there are also included records for a few pertinent gaging stations in bordering States. The records were collected and computed by the Water Resources Division of the U. S. Geological Survey, under the direction of W. L. Heckler, district engineer, Surface Water Branch. This report is the fourth in a series presenting, annually, basic data on surfacewater records by States. Through September 30, 1960, the records of discharge and stage of streams and contents and stage of lakes or reservoirs were published in an annual series of U. S. Geological Survey water-supply papers entitled "Surface Water Supply of the United States." Since 1951 there have been 20 volumes in the series; each volume covered an area whose boundaries coincided with those of certain natural drainage areas. The records in New Mexico were contained in Parts 7, 8, and 9 of that series. Beginning with the 1961 water year, streamflow records and related data will be released by the Geological Survey in annual reports on a State-boundary basis. Distribution of these basic-data reports will be limited and primarily for local needs. The records later will be published in Geological Survey water-supply papers at 5-year intervals. These 5-year water-supply papers will show daily discharge and will be compiled on the same geographical areas previously used for the annual series; however, some of the 14 parts of conterminous United States will be further subdivided.

U.S. Geological Survey

1965-01-01

209

Water Resources Data for Texas, Water Year 1998. Volume 4. Ground Water.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Water-resources data for the 1998 water year for Texas consists of records of state, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage and contents in lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality in wells. Volume 4 contains water levels for 820 o...

D. L. Barbie S. C. Gandara

1999-01-01

210

Water Resources Data for Texas, Water Year 1997. Volume 4. Ground-Water Data.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Water-resources data for the 1997 water year for Texas consists of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage and contents in lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality in wells. Volume 4 contains water levels for 790 o...

D. L. Barbie R. E. Jones S. C. Gandara

1997-01-01

211

Florida Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report, FY 2007.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The mission of the Florida Water Resources Research Center at the University of Florida is to facilitate communication and collaboration between Florida's Universities and the state agencies that are responsible for managing Florida's water resources. A p...

2007-01-01

212

Florida Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report, FY 2008.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The mission of the Florida Water Resources Research Center at the University of Florida is to facilitate communication and collaboration between Florida's Universities and the state agencies that are responsible for managing Florida's water resources. A p...

2008-01-01

213

Water Resources Management Plan. Curecanti National Recreation Area.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This Water Resources Management Plan describes the water resources of Curecanti National Recreation Area (Curecanti NRA) and the issues affecting them. This plan is a compilation of management actions in the form of project statements, summaries of comple...

L. Cudlip M. Malick M. Wondzell W. Jackson

1996-01-01

214

Theoretical and Applied Concepts of Water Resources for Social Welfare.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A discussion and interpretation of the Water Resources Council's (WRC) new principals and standards is followed by one empirical and two theoretical economic analyses of water resources. The empirical work centers around the economic effects of closing th...

D. R. Street

1973-01-01

215

Louisiana Water Resources Research Institute, Fiscal Year 1984 Program Report.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Water resources problems were addressed relating to flood technology, ground water, water treatment and hazardous waste contamination, such as oxidation of trace contaminants in drinking water investigated the use of potassium ferrate for decomposition of...

V. P. Singh

1985-01-01

216

Pricing policies for conservation of water resources and environment  

Microsoft Academic Search

An attempt is made in this study to integrate considerations regarding the quality of the environment and the optimal use of resources. Particular attention is paid to water resources and it is considered how a water environment may be realized where clean water flows abundantly through a public water basin. Several water environmental systems are constructed with characteristics pertaining both

K Hagihara; Y Hagihara

1986-01-01

217

Water--1970. Chemical Engineering Progress Symposium Series No. 107, Volume 67, 1971.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Due to the tremendous interest in all phases of environmental control, particularly with reference to water pollution control, the American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE) is attempting to provide the lay public with accurate information about water resources so they may react with proper knowledge and constructive activity. This…

Cecil, Lawrence K., Ed.

218

Sustainable Water Resources in Semiarid Agroecosystems  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Developing sustainable water resources management in agroecosystems is difficult in semiarid regions with limited or sporadic water inputs and heavy reliance on irrigation. Sustainable water management needs to consider both water quantity and water quality. Conversion of natural ecosystems to rain-fed agroecosystems has increased groundwater recharge in many semiarid regions in Australia, SW US, and W. Africa; however, such changes are not sustainable because rising water tables may ultimately reach the land surface and direct evaporation would cause salinization, as found in dryland salinity in Australia. In addition, increased recharge mobilizes pre-existing salt reservoirs that accumulated in soil profiles over millennia since the previous glaciation in Australia and the SW US. Increased recharge can also mobilize pre-existing nutrient reservoirs to underlying aquifers or create new reservoirs from soil organic nitrogen as in SW US and W. Africa. It is much more difficult to develop sustainable water management in irrigated agroecosystems as shown by water table declines of up to 1 m/yr in the north China Plain and up to 1.4 m/yr in the US High Plains. In addition to mobilizing pre-existing salts, irrigation also adds salts and nutrients to the system through irrigation water and fertilizers as seen in the US High Plains and Rajasthan, India. Various approaches are being considered to make agricultural water management more sustainable. Approaches include switching from rain-fed to groundwater fed irrigated agriculture in the US High Plains to prevent water tables from reaching the land surface, proposed expansion of irrigation with fresh groundwater in west Africa to reduce water tables, deficit irrigation and rotation of irrigation with rain-fed agriculture to reduce overexploitation of aquifers in irrigated areas in the US High Plains and parts of India, improved timing of fertilizer applications to reduce leaching, and consideration of nutrients in irrigation water and from soil organic nitrogen in recommended fertilizer application rates in the US High Plains and W. Africa. Quantification of increased recharge under agroecosystems relative to natural ecosystems can be used to estimate the level of irrigation that can be supported sustainably. Deficit irrigation in parts of the US High Plains has resulted in incipient soil salinization because of insufficient water to flush salts through the system. Proposed programs to achieve sustainability need to consider tradeoffs between water quantity and water quality.

Reedy, R. C.; Favreau, G.; Gates, J. B.; Mukherjee, A.; Scanlon, B. R.; Zheng, C.

2009-12-01

219

Water Resources Data - Texas Water Year 1999, Volume 6. Ground Water  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Water-resources data for the 1999 water year for Texas consists of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage and contents in lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality in wells. Volume 6 contains water levels for 759 observation wells and 146 water-quality data for monitoring wells. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating Federal, State, and local agencies in Texas.

Gandara, S. C.; Barbie, D. L.

2000-01-01

220

Water Resources Data, Texas Water Year 1998, Volume 4. Ground Water  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Water-resources data for the 1998 water year for Texas consists of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage and contents in lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality in wells. Volume 4 contains water levels for 759 observation wells and 146 water-quality data for monitoring wells. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating Federal, State, and local agencies in Texas.

Gandara, S. C.; Barbie, D. L.

1999-01-01

221

Water resources data - Texas water year 2001 : Volume 6. Ground water  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Water-resources data for the 2001 water year for Texas consists of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage and contents in lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality in wells. Volume 6 contains water levels for 908 observation wells and water-quality data for 155 monitoring wells. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating Federal, State, and local agencies in Texas.

Barbie, D. L.

2002-01-01

222

Water Resources Data - Texas Water Year 2000, Volume 6. Ground Water  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Water-resources data for the 2000 water year for Texas consists of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage and contents in lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality in wells. Volume 6 contains water levels for 898 observation wells and 145 water-quality data for monitoring wells. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating Federal, State, and local agencies in Texas.

Barbie, D. L.

2001-01-01

223

Water Resources Data - Texas, Water Year 2002, Volume 6. Ground Water  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Water-resources data for the 2002 water year for Texas consists of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage and contents in lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality in wells. Volume 6 contains water levels for 960 observation wells and water-quality data for 173 monitoring wells. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating Federal, State, and local agencies in Texas.

Barbie, D. L.

2003-01-01

224

INTERGRATING SOURCE WATER PROTECTION AND DRINKING WATER TREATMENT: U.S. ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY'S WATER SUPPLY AND WATER RESOURCES DIVISION  

EPA Science Inventory

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Water Supply and Water Resources Division (WSWRD) is an internationally recognized water research organization established to assist in responding to public health concerns related to drinking water supplies. WSWRD has evolved from...

225

INTEGRATING SOURCE WATER PROTECTION AND DRINKING WATER TREATMENT: U.S. ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY'S WATER SUPPLY AND WATER RESOURCES DIVISION  

EPA Science Inventory

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Water Supply and Water Resources Division (WSWRD) is an internationally recognized water research organization established to assist in responding to public health concerns related to drinking water supplies. WSWRD has evolved from...

226

Water resources inventory of northwest Florida  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Water resources of the 16 counties of the northwest Florida appear adequate unitl at least 2020. In the 4 westernmost counties, the sand-and-gravel aquifer and streams combined could provide 2,200 to 3,600 million gallons per day of water. Streams outside these counties could provide 5,600 million gallons per day. The Floridan aquifer could provide 220 million gallons per day. Generally, water of quality suitable for most purposes is available throughout the area, although water in smaller streams and in the sand-and-gravel aquifer is acidic and locally contains excessive iron. Water in the upper part of the Floridan aquifer is generally fresh, but saline at depth and in some coastal areas. The quantity of water available in the study area is about 8,020 to 9,420 million gallons per day and projected needs for the year 2020 range from 2,520 to 4,130 million gallons per day. ' Approximate method ' flood-prone area maps cover most of the area. (Woodard-USGS)

Dysart, J. E.; Pascale, C. A.; Trapp, Henry

1977-01-01

227

Water Resources Data for New Jersey, Water Year 2003. Volume 3. Water-Quality Data.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Water-resources data for the 2003 water year for New Jersey are presented in three volumes, and consists of records of stage, discharge, and water-quality of streams; stage and contents of lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water-quality of ground...

M. J. DeLuca H. L. Hoppe H. A. Heckathorn M. L. Riskin B. J. Gray

2004-01-01

228

Water Resources Council Proposed Principles and Standards for Planning Water and Related Land Resources. Notice of Public Review and Hearing.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Presented in this notice of a public review and hearing are the proposed Principles and Standards for planning water and related land resources of the United States. Developed by the Water Resources Council pursuant to the Water Resources Planning Act of 1965 (Public Law 89-80), the purpose is to achieve objectives, determined cooperatively,…

National Archives and Records Services (GSA), Washington, DC. Office of the Federal Register.

229

Water resources data, South Carolina, water year 2003  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Water Resources data for the 2003 water year for South Carolina consists of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage and contents of lakes and reservoirs; and levels of ground-water wells. This volume contains records for water discharge at 109 gaging stations, stage only at 32 gaging stations, stage and contents at 12 lakes and reservoirs, water-quality at 52 gaging stations and one observation well, water levels at 26 observation wells, and precipitation at 22 gaging stations. Also included are data for 60 crest-stage partial-record stations and discharge measurement information at 8 locations. Locations of these sites are shown on figures 4, 5, 6, 7, 8 and 9. Additional water data were collected at various sites not involved in the systematic data-collection program. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System collected by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating State and Federal agencies in South Carolina.

Cooney, T. W.; Drewes, P. A.; Ellisor, S. W.; Lanier, T. H.; Melendez, F.

2004-01-01

230

New Editors Appointed for Water Resources Research  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Praveen Kumar (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign), the newly appointed editor in chief of Water Resources Research (WRR), heads the new team of editors for the journal. The other editors are Tom Torgersen (University of Connecticut, Groton), who continues his editorship; Tissa Illangasekare (Colorado School of Mines, Golden); Graham Sander (Loughborough University, Loughborough, UK); and John Selker (Oregon State University, Corvallis). Hoshin Gupta (University of Arizona, Tucson) will join WRR at the end of 2009. The new editors will begin receiving submissions immediately. The incoming editorial board thanks outgoing editors Marc Parlange, Brian Berkowitz, Amilcare Porporato, and Scott Tyler, all of whom will assist during the transition.

2009-03-01

231

ISOTOPE HYDROLOGY LABORATORY (WATER QUALITY MANAGEMENT BRANCH, WATER SUPPLY AND WATER RESOURCES DIVISION, NRMRL)  

EPA Science Inventory

The mission of NRMRL's Water Supply and Water Resources Division's Isotope Hydrology Laboratory (IHL) is to resolve environmental hydrology problems through research and application of naturally occurring isotopes. The emergent field of isotope hydrology follows advances in anal...

232

Water resource management planning guide for Savannah River Plant  

SciTech Connect

The Water Resource Management Planning Guide provides an outline for the development of a Savannah River Plant Water Resource Management Plan (WRMP) to protect, manage, and monitor the site's water resources. The management plan is based on three principle elements: (1) protection of the water quality, (2) management of the water quantity, and (3) monitoring of the water quality and quantity. The plan will assure that changes in water quality and quantity are identified and that corrective action is implemented as needed. In addition, water management activities within and between Savannah River Plant (SRP) organizations and departments will be coordinated to ensure the proper management of water resources. This document is intended as a guide to suggest goals and objectives that will provide a basis for the development of a water resource plan for SRP. Planning should be flexible rather than rigid, and the plan outlines in this document was prepared to be modified or updated as conditions necessitate. 16 refs., 12 figs.

Hubbard, J.E.; Stephenson, D.E.; Steele, J.L. (Du Pont de Nemours (E.I.) and Co., Aiken, SC (USA). Savannah River Lab.); Gordon, D.E. (Du Pont de Nemours (E.I.) and Co., Aiken, SC (USA). Savannah River Plant)

1988-10-01

233

Groundwater measures in the context of integrated water resources management  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Japan is now facing water challenges caused by global scale climate problems. Climate change due to global warming will continue to have great impact on our water resources, which could result in instability in water availability. Because we recently have frequent droughts, we have learned to efficiently use and share our precious water, and we have developed various water technologies with a strong sense of thrift. Integrated water resources management must be explored as an instrument of constructive change in the scenario of sustainable water usage. In this paper, we introduce groundwater measures in the context of integrated water resources management.

Yamaguchi, Yoshikazu

234

Fiscal Year 1987 Program Report: Connecticut Institute of Water Resources,  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Connecticut's Institute of Water Resources 1987-88 research and information transfer projects focused on water quality management and protection, hydrologic cycle modeling, wetland restoration, acid precipitation, groundwater, lake management, and water a...

D. R. Miller

1988-01-01

235

Rhode Island Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report, FY 2008.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Rhode Island Water Resources Center has supported one information transfer project, 'Clean Drinking Water in Rhode Island,' and two research projects, 'Long-term, State-wide Analysis of the Relationship Between Water Quality and Demographic Changes in...

2008-01-01

236

Idaho Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report, FY 2001.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Idaho Water Resources Research Institute, University of Idaho is dedicated to supporting and promoting water and water-related applied investigations and solutions, education, and information transfer throughout Idaho. IWRRI collaborates with scientis...

2001-01-01

237

18 CFR 701.3 - Purpose of the Water Resources Council.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2013-04-01 2012-04-01 true Purpose of the Water Resources Council. 701.3 Section 701.3 Conservation of Power and Water Resources WATER RESOURCES COUNCIL COUNCIL...

2013-04-01

238

Water resources data, Maryland and Delaware, water year 2001, volume 2. ground-water data  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Water resources data for the 2001 water year for Maryland and Delaware consist of records of water levels and water quality of ground-water wells. This report (Volume 2. Ground-Water Data) contains water levels at 379 observation wells, discharge records for 5 springs, and water quality at 238 wells and 10 springs. Locations of ground-water level wells are shown on figures 5 and 6. Locations of groundwater- quality sites are shown on figure 7. The data in this report represent that part of the National Water Data System collected by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating State, local, and Federal agencies in Maryland and Delaware.

Smigaj, Michael J.; Saffer, Richard W.; Pentz, Robert H.; Marchand, Elizabeth H.

2002-01-01

239

Water Resources Management Issues in Turkey and Recommendations  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The prevailing trends towards rising population, increasing urbanization, spread of more water intensive life styles as well as widespread use of water intensive agriculture sweeping around the world are going to make water resources even scarcer especially in countries like Turkey with scarce water resources and high development and population growth rate, economic and social aspects of water resources become even more important. Turkey, like many countries today, faces challenges in efficiently developing and managing its limited water resources while maintaining water quality and protecting the environment. To add to the challenge, Turkey will need to continue to develop its water resources in order for its economic and social development to keep pace with its rapidly growing and urbanizing population. This article deals with water resources management problems in Turkey and provides recommendations on water resources management issues at the country level. Its objectives are to summarize key water resources management issues to review institutional and legal framework and to provide suggestions for effective water resources management in Turkey.

Emin Baris, Mehmet; Ayfer Karadag, Aybike

240

WEP: A Reference Model and the Portal of Web Engineering Resources  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper introduces the Web Engineering Resources Portal (shortly WEP), as a basic Reference Model and Guide for the Web Engineers. WEP provides a general classification of Web Engineering Resources under tech- nologies, research results and tools. It consists of a Reference Model and a Re- sources Portal. The objective of WEP Reference Model is to provide a common basic

Sotiris Christodoulou; Theodore Papatheodorou

2004-01-01

241

Water resources data, New Mexico, water year 1989  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Rico, and the Trust Territories. These records of streamflow, ground-water levels, and water quality provide the hydrologic information needed by Federal, State, and local agencies and the private sector for developing and managing our Nation's land and water resources. Hydrologic data for New Mexico are contained in this volume. This report is the culmination of a concerted effort by dedicated personnel of the u.S. Geological Survey who collected, compiled, analyzed, verified, and organized the data, and who typed, edited, and assembled the report. The authors had primary responsibility for assuring that the information contained herein is accurate, complete, and adheres to Geological Survey policy and established guidelines. The following individuals contributed significantly to the completion of the report: Linda V. Beal Harriet R. Allen K.M. Lange, M.F. Ortiz, and L.A. Watson processed the text of the report, and H.M. Grossman drafted the illustrations.

U.S. Geological Survey

1990-01-01

242

Water resources data, New Mexico, water year 1990  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Rico, and the Trust Territories. These records of streamflow, ground-water levels, and water quality provide the hydrologic information needed by Federal, State, and local. agencies and the private sector for developing and managing our Nation's land and water resources. Hydrologic data for New Mexico are contained in this volume. This report is the culmination of a concerted effort by dedicated personnel of the U.S. Geological Survey who collected, compiled, analyzed; verified, and organiZed the data, and who typed, edited, and assembled the report. The authors had primary responsibility for aSSUring that the information contained herein is accurate, complete, and adheres to Geological Survey policy and established guidelines. The following individuals contributed significantly to the completion of the report: Harriet R. Allen Mary Montano Cynthia J. Shattuck K.M. Lange, M.F. Ortiz, and L.A. Watson processed the text of the report, and H.M. Grossman drafted the illustrations.

U.S. Geological Survey

1991-01-01

243

Modeling the Dynamic Water Resource Needs of California's Coastal Watersheds  

Microsoft Academic Search

Many watersheds face formidable water supply challenges when it comes to managing water availability to meet diverse water supply and ecosystem management objectives. California's central coast watersheds are no exception, and both the scarcity of water resources during drier water years and mandates to establish minimum instream flows for salmon habitat have prompted interests in reassessing water management strategies for

C. Alford

2009-01-01

244

Water resources of Spink County, South Dakota  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Spink County, an agricultural area of about 1,505 square miles, is in the flat to gently rolling James River lowland of east-central South Dakota. The water resources are characterized by the highly variable flows of the James River and its tributaries and by aquifers both in glacial deposits of sand and gravel, and in sandstone in the bedrock. Glacial aquifers underlie about half of the county, and bedrock aquifers underlie most of the county. The James River is an intermittent prairie stream that drains nearly 8,900 square miles north of Spink County and has an average annual discharge of about 124 cubic feet per second where it enters the county. The discharge is augmented by the flow of Snake and Turtle Creeks, each of which has an average annual flow of about 25 to 30 cubic feet per second. Streamflow is unreliable as a water supply because precipitation, which averages 18.5 inches annually, is erratic both in volume and in distribution, and because the average annual potential evapotranspiration rate is 43 inches. The flow of tributaries generally ceases by summer, and zero flows are common in the James River in fall and winter. Aquifers in glacial drift deposits store nearly 3.3 million acre-feet of fresh to slightly saline water at depths of from near land surface to more than 500 feet below land surface beneath an area of about 760 square miles. Yields of properly developed wells in the more productive aquifers exceed 1,000 gallons per minute in some areas. Withdrawals from the aquifers, mostly for irrigation, totaled about 15,000 acre-feet of water in 1990. Water levels in observation wells generally have declined less than 15 feet over several decades of increasing pumpage for irrigation, but locally have declined nearly 30 feet. Water levels generally rose during the wet period of 1983-86. In Spink County, bedrock aquifers store more than 40 million acre-feet of slightly to moderately saline water at depths of from 80 to about 1,300 feet below land surface. Yields of properly developed wells range from 2 to 600 gallons per minute. The artesian head of the heavily used Dakota aquifer has declined about 350 feet in the approximately 100 years since the first artesian wells were drilled in the county, but water levels have stabilized locally as a result of decreases in the discharge of water from the wells. Initial flows of from 4 gallons per minute to as much as 30 gallons per minute of very hard water can be obtained in the southwestern part of the county, where drillers report artesian heads of nearly 100 feet above land surface. The quality of water from aquifers in glacial drift varies greatly, even within an aquifer. Concentrations of dissolved solids in samples ranged from 151 to 9,610 milligrams per liter, and hardness ranged from 84 to 3,700 milligrams per liter. Median concentrations of dissolved solids, sulfate, iron, and manganese in some glacial aquifers are near or exceed Secondary Maximum Contaminant Levels (SMCL's) established by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Some of the water from aquifers in glacial drift is suitable for irrigation use. Water samples from aquifers in the bedrock contained concentrations of dissolved solids that ranged from 1,410 to 2,670 milligrams per liter (sum of constituents) and hardness that ranged from 10 to 1,400 milligrams per liter; these concentrations generally are largest for aquifers below the Dakota aquifer. Median concentrations of dissolved solids, sulfate, iron, and manganese in Dakota wells either are near or exceed EPA SMCL's. Dissolved solids, sodium, and boron concentrations in water from bedrock aquifers commonly are too large for the water to be suitable for irrigation use.

Hamilton, L. J.; Howells, L. W.

1996-01-01

245

Bibliography of selected water-resources publications by the U.S. Geological Survey for North Carolina, 1886-1995  

USGS Publications Warehouse

More than 660 selected publications, written by scientists, engineers, and technicians of the U.S. Geological Survey during the period 1886-1995, compose the bulk of information about North Carolina?s water resources. The bibliography includes interpretive reports on water resources, ground water, surface water, water quality, and public-water supply and water use, as well as data reports on the same subjects. The interpretive reports are organized by geographic areas of the State. These areas include statewide, physiographic province, major river basin, and county. The data reports are listed by water-resource topic, and the introduction to each topic provides historical notes for data-collection and publication activities. Summary tables list Water-Supply Paper numbers for reports containing ground-water, surface-water, and water-quality data by calendar year or water year. A concluding section discusses the availability of U.S. Geological Survey publications.

Winner, M. D., Jr.

1996-01-01

246

Minnesota Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report, FY 2006.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Minnesota WRRI program is a component of the University of Minnesotas Water Resources Center (WRC). The WRC is a collaborative enterprise involving several colleges across the University, including the College of Food, Agriculture and Natural Resource...

2006-01-01

247

Minnesota Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report, FY 2001.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Minnesota WRRI program is administered by the University of Minnesota Water Resources Center (WRC), which is a collaborative enterprise involving several college-level units: the College of Natural Resources (CNR), College of Agricultural, Food & Envi...

2001-01-01

248

Minnesota Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report, FY 2004.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Minnesota WRRI program is a component of the University of Minnesotas Water Resources Center (WRC). The WRC is a collaborative enterprise involving several colleges across the University, including the College of Natural Resources (CNR), the College o...

2004-01-01

249

Minnesota Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report, FY 2007.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Minnesota WRRI program is a component of the University of Minnesota's Water Resources Center (WRC). The WRC is a collaborative enterprise involving several colleges across the University, including the College of Food, Agriculture and Natural Resourc...

2007-01-01

250

Minnesota Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report, FY 2003.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Minnesota WRRI program is a component of the University of Minnesotas Water Resources Center (WRC). The WRC is a collaborative enterprise involving several colleges across the University, including the College of Natural Resources (CNR), the College o...

2003-01-01

251

Total Water Management: The New Paradigm for Urban Water Resources Planning  

EPA Science Inventory

There is a growing need for urban water managers to take a more holistic view of their water resource systems as population growth, urbanization, and current resource management practices put different stresses on local water resources and urban infrastructure. Total Water Manag...

252

Acid mine water treatment using engineered wetlands  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

During the last two decades, the United States mining industry has greatly increased the amount it spends on pollution control. The application of biotechnology to mine water can reduce the industry's water treatment costs (estimated at over a million dollars a day) and improve water quality in streams and rivers adversely affected by acidic mine water draining from abandoned mines. Biological treatment of mine waste water is typically conducted in a series of small excavated ponds that resemble, in a superficial way, a small marsh area. The ponds are engineered to first facilitate bacterial oxidation of iron; ideally, the water then flows through a composted organic substrate that supports a population of sulfate-reducing bacteria. The latter process raises the pH. During the past four years, over 400 wetland water treatment systems have been built on mined lands as a result of research by the U.S. Bureau of Mines. In general, mine operators find that the wetlands reduce chemical treatment costs enough to repay the cost of wetland construction in less than a year. Actual rates of iron removal at field sites have been used to develop empirical sizing criteria based on iron loading and pH. If the pH is 6 or above, the wetland area (m2) required is equivalent to the iron load (grams/day) divided by 10. Theis requirement doubles at a pH of 4 to 5. At a pH below 4, the iron load (grams/day) should be divided by 2 to estimate the area required (m2).

Kleinmann, Robert L. P.

1990-03-01

253

Water resources of the Yap Islands  

SciTech Connect

The Yap Islands consist of four major islands, Yap, Gagil-Tamil, Maap, and Rumung. Of these, Yap Island has more than half the total land area, most of the population, and almost all of the economic development. The islands of Maap and Rumung together compose only 15% of the land area and population. Average annual rainfall over the Yap Islands amounts to 122 inches. Rainfall-runoff comparisons indicate that about half of the annual rainfall runs off to the ocean on Yap Island and Gagil-Tamil. Streams on Gagil-Tamil are perennial but streams on Yap Island are dry an average of 3 months per year due to geologic differences. Analyses of water samples from 23 sources show the good quality and the chemical similarity of surface and ground water. This report summarizes the hydrologic data collected and provides interpretations that can be used by the planning and public works officials of Yap to make decisions concerning development and management of their water resources. 33 refs., 35 figs., 81 tabs.

van der Brug, O.

1983-01-01

254

Water Resources Data - Texas, Water Year 2003, Volume 6. Ground Water  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Water-resources data for the 2003 water year for Texas consists of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage and contents in lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality in wells. Volume 6 contains water levels for 880 ground-water observation wells and water-quality data for 158 monitoring wells. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating Federal, State, and local agencies in Texas.

Barbie, D. L.

2003-01-01

255

Environmental Tracers for Determining Water Resource Vulnerability to Climate Change  

SciTech Connect

Predicted changes in the climate will have profound impacts on water availability in the Western US, but large uncertainties exist in our ability to predict how natural and engineered hydrological systems will respond. Most predictions suggest that the impacts of climate change on California water resources are likely to include a decrease in the percentage of precipitation that falls as snow, earlier onset of snow-pack melting, and an increase in the number of rain on snow events. These processes will require changes in infrastructure for water storage and flood control, since much of our current water supply system is built around the storage of winter precipitation as mountain snow pack. Alpine aquifers play a critical role by storing and releasing snowmelt as baseflow to streams long after seasonal precipitation and the disappearance of the snow pack, and in this manner significantly impact the stream flow that drives our water distribution systems. Mountain groundwater recharge and, in particular, the contribution of snowmelt to recharge and baseflow, has been identified as a potentially significant effect missing from current climate change impact studies. The goal of this work is to understand the behavior of critical hydrologic systems, with an emphasis on providing ground truth for next generation models of climate-water system interactions by implementing LLNL capabilities in environmental tracer and isotopic science. We are using noble gas concentrations and multiple isotopic tracers ({sup 3}H/{sup 3}He, {sup 35}S, {sup 222}Rn, {sup 2}H/{sup 1}H, {sup 18}O/{sup 16}O, and {sup 13}C/{sup 12}C) in groundwater and stream water in a small alpine catchment to (1) provide a snapshot of temperature, altitude, and physical processes at the time of recharge, (2) determine subsurface residence times (over time scales ranging from months to decades) of different groundwater age components, and (3) deconvolve the contribution of these different groundwater components to alpine stream baseflow. This research is showing that groundwater in alpine areas spends between a few years to several decades in the saturated zone below the surface, before feeding into streams or being pumped for use. This lag time may act to reduce the impact on water resources from extreme wet or dry years. Furthermore, our measurements show that the temperature of water when it reaches the water table during recharge is 4 to 9 degrees higher than would be expected for direct influx of snowmelt, and that recharge likely occurs over diffuse vegetated areas, rather than along exposed rock faces and fractures. These discoveries have implications for how alpine basins will respond to climate effects that lead to more rain than snow and earlier snow pack melting.

Singleton, M

2009-07-08

256

Global Water Resources Under Future Changes: Toward an Improved Estimation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Global water resources availability in the 21st century is going to be an important concern. Despite its international recognition, however, until now there are very limited global estimates of water resources, which considered the geographical linkage between water supply and demand, defined by runoff and its passage through river network. The available studies are again insufficient due to reasons like

M. Islam; Y. Agata; N. Hanasaki; S. Kanae; T. Oki

2005-01-01

257

Water resources management: case study of Sharkia governorate, Egypt  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Ministry of water resources and irrigation in Egypt is currently implementing projects that expand new cultivated area, and accordingly the supplies of Nile River to the Nile Delta will be negatively affected. So, Enormous interest toward water resources management has been taken in the Egyptian water sector. Conveyance infrastructure and irrigation technology has been gradually improved to ensure efficient distribution and utilization of scarce water resources. The present study is focused on the optimum utilization of water resources in Sharkia governorate, Egypt. Operational and planning distribution model is implemented on the selected case study (Sharkia governorate) to develop appropriate water plan. The gross revenue of all crops is correlated to surface water discharge, ground water discharge, surface water salinity, and ground water salinity. In addition, the effect of varying both surface and groundwater quantities and qualities on the gross revenue has been investigated. Moreover, the effect of limiting rice production on the gross revenue is allocated.

Mohamed, Y. A.; Rashad, M.

2012-06-01

258

Water resources data, North Carolina, water year 2003. Volume 1A: Surface-water records  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Water-resources data for the 2003 water year for North Carolina consist of records of stage, discharge, water quality for streams; stage and contents for lakes and reservoirs; precipitation; and ground-water levels and water quality of ground water. Volume 1 contains discharge records for 213 gaging stations; stage for 61 gaging stations; and continuous precipitation at 118 sites. Volume 2 contains ground-water-level data from 143 observation wells and ground-water-quality data from 72 wells. The collection of water-resources data in North Carolina is a part of the National Water-Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with State, municipal, and Federal agencies.

Ragland, B. C.; Walters, D. A.; Cartano, G. D.; Taylor, J. E.

2004-01-01

259

Fuzzy Comprehensive Evaluation for Carrying Capacity of Regional Water Resources  

Microsoft Academic Search

Evaluation of regional water resources capacity provides a scientific basis for further water resources utilization and social\\u000a economic sustainable development. This paper mainly studied on the case of Lanzhou City located in the western China. By using\\u000a the method of fuzzy comprehensive evaluation and basing on the historical datum of 40 years, this paper evaluated the current\\u000a situation of water resource

Li Gong; Chunling Jin

2009-01-01

260

Water - Essential Resource of the Southern Flint River Basin, Georgia  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Introduction Abundant water resources of the Flint River Basin have played a major role in the history and development of southwestern Georgia. The Flint River-along with its tributaries, wetlands, and swamps-and the productive aquifers of the river basin are essential components of the area's diverse ecosystems. These resources also are necessary for sustained agricultural, industrial, and municipal activities. Increasing, and in some cases conflicting, demand for water makes careful monitoring and wise planning and management of southwestern Georgia's water resources critical to the ecological and economic future of the area. This poster presents the major issues associated with increasing competition for water resources in the southern Flint River Basin.

Warner, Debbie; Norton, Virgil

2004-01-01

261

Water resources data Texas, water year 2004, volume 6. ground water  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Water-resources data for the 2004 water year for Texas consists of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage and contents in lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality in wells. Volume 6 contains water levels for 913 groundwater observation wells and water-quality data for 150 monitoring wells. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating Federal, State, and local agencies in Texas.

Barbie, Dana L.; Reece, Brian D.; Eames, Deanna R.

2005-01-01

262

WATERS Network: An Initiative of the U.S. National Science Foundation Engineering and Geosciences Directorates  

Microsoft Academic Search

Degradation of our nation's water resources is occurring at an unprecedented rate as a result of changes in the ways in which we interact with our environment. Unfortunately engineers, scientists, and policy makers have been hampered in their ability to respond to these rapid changes because we lack sufficient knowledge on the dynamics and spatial variability of environmental processes, and

J. L. Montgomery; B. Minsker; C. N. Haas; J. Schnoor; R. Hooper; W. Graham; K. Dressler; T. Harmon; D. Maidment; D. Reible; C. Welty; J. L. Wilson

2006-01-01

263

A stochastic optimization approach for integrated urban water resource planning.  

PubMed

Urban water is facing the challenges of both scarcity and water quality deterioration. Consideration of nonconventional water resources has increasingly become essential over the last decade in urban water resource planning. In addition, rapid urbanization and economic development has led to an increasing uncertain water demand and fragile water infrastructures. Planning of urban water resources is thus in need of not only an integrated consideration of both conventional and nonconventional urban water resources including reclaimed wastewater and harvested rainwater, but also the ability to design under gross future uncertainties for better reliability. This paper developed an integrated nonlinear stochastic optimization model for urban water resource evaluation and planning in order to optimize urban water flows. It accounted for not only water quantity but also water quality from different sources and for different uses with different costs. The model successfully applied to a case study in Beijing, which is facing a significant water shortage. The results reveal how various urban water resources could be cost-effectively allocated by different planning alternatives and how their reliabilities would change. PMID:23552255

Huang, Y; Chen, J; Zeng, S; Sun, F; Dong, X

2013-01-01

264

Water resources data for Alaska, water year 1991. Water-data report (Annual), 1 October 1990-30 September 1991  

Microsoft Academic Search

Water resources data for the 1991 water year for Alaska consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stages of lakes; and water levels and water quality of ground-water wells. The volume contains records for water discharge at 82 gaging stations; water quality at 24 gaging stations; water levels for 75 observation wells; and water quality analyses

R. D. Lamke; R. T. Kemnitz; M. R. Carr; D. S. Thomas; K. M. Novcaski

1992-01-01

265

Water resources development and environmental protection in Poyang Lake water system  

Microsoft Academic Search

The sustainable use of water resources has become an strategic issue involving economic and social development in China. This article presented the situation and characteristics of Poyang Lake water system in Jiangxi province, analyzed the existing problems in exploitation and utilization of water resources and put forward some countermeasures to water environmental protection in Poyang Lake Water System from the

Shuzhen Zou; Zhiqiang Wu; Biaohong Tao; Yingping Xiao

2010-01-01

266

Fiscal Year 1986 Program Report: Connecticut Institute of Water Resources,  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Connecticut's Institute of Water Resources 1986-87 research and information transfer projects focused on water quality management and protection, hydrologic cycle modeling, wetland restoration, and acid precipitation. Funded research projects included: de...

D. F. Squires

1987-01-01

267

Fiscal Year 1988 Program Report: Vermont Water Resources Research Center.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Both surface and groundwater issues were addressed in the FY88 Vermont Water Resources Research Center program. Two projects focused on ground water, with one assessing techniques for reducing nitrate contamination in agricultural areas and a second compa...

A. W. McIntosh

1989-01-01

268

Fiscal Year 1987 Program Report: Oregon Water Resources Research Institute,  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The FY 1987 Oregon Water Resources Research Institute program included six research projects addressing critical water problems in Oregon. Two projects advanced the understanding of groundwater protection: project 02, Laboratory Study of In-Situ Reclamati...

P. C. Klingeman

1988-01-01

269

Study on Water Quality Assessment of Hydraulic Engineering  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper discussed the content of water quality impact assessment about hydraulic engineering and analyzed the position of water quality impact in the whole water environmental impact. We used the method combining the standard index with integrated water quality index, and gave the quantitative calculation for the indicators of water quality impact. Taking Dayuandu navigation project as an example, we

Lifang Xie; Dong Zhang

2009-01-01

270

U.S. Geological Survey - Water Resources of Virginia  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Users can access information on Virginia water resources, including real-time streamflow and ground water data, water quality data, and water use data. Interactive streamflow and groundwater level maps allow the user to locate recent data on stream discharge, gage height,and water level. Annual surface water and ground water reports are available from 1995. Other materials include information on the Chesapeake Bay river input monitoring program, links to U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) publications and information on USGS projects in Virginia; and links to USGS outreach and educational resources. Weather information is also available.

271

Global Review of Resource and Environmental Policies: Water Resource Development and Management.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report reviews how 30 countries develop and manage their water resources. Because the focus of the report is on agriculture, particular attention is given to irrigation. The study found that differing climatic conditions, demand for water, and histor...

G. Vocke

1994-01-01

272

Assessment of Water Addition to Spark Ignition Engines.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report presents an assessment of water addition to spark ignition engines based on data available in the open literature and on information obtained through communication with university, industrial, and government personnel. Water addition technique...

R. R. Covey J. J. Donnelly

1982-01-01

273

Use of seasonal streamflow forecasts in water resources management  

Microsoft Academic Search

The interannual variability in streamflow presents challenges in managing the associated risks and opportunities of water resources systems. This paper investigates the use of seasonal streamflow forecasts to help manage three water resources systems in south-east Australia. The seasonal streamflow forecasts are derived from the serial correlation in streamflow and the relationship between El Nino\\/Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and streamflow. This

F. H. S. Chiew; S. L. Zhou; T. A. McMahon

2003-01-01

274

Fiscal Year 1988 program report: Rhode Island Water Resources Center  

Microsoft Academic Search

The State of Rhode Island is active in water resources planning, development, and management activities which include legislation, upgrading of wastewater treatment facilities, upgrading and implementing pretreatment programs, protecting watersheds and aquifers throughout the state. Current and anticipated state water problems are contamination and clean up of aquifers to protect the valuable groundwater resources; protection of watersheds by controlling non-point

Poon

1989-01-01

275

On the matter of sustainable water resources management  

EPA Science Inventory

This chapter attempts to develop the concept of sustainability and make it operational in the realm of water resources management. Water is unique in its primacy among natural resources as an essential component of life itself. Due to its equally unique chemical and physical prop...

276

Scientific and technological considerations in water resources policy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Most important domestic problems faced in the United States today are affected by policies for the management of our water resources. Energy, the environment, food production, regional economic development, even our international balance of trade, are all affected directly or indirectly by water resources management. Often there is too much or too little management, or it occurs in the wrong

William C. Ackermann; David J. Allee; Jaime Amorocho; Yacov Y. Haimes; Warren A. Hall; Elwood Mead; Richard A. Meserve; Ruth Patrick; Philip M. Smith

1978-01-01

277

Impact of gari consumption on the water resource of Nigeria  

Microsoft Academic Search

The consumption of gari (or roasted cassava granule) is connected to a chain of impacts on the water resource in the country where cassava crop is grown, processed and consumed. The aim of this paper is to assess the impact of gari consumption on the water resource of Nigeria. The paper elaborates on two types of impact: evaporation of infiltrated

O. Adeoti; T. A. Ayelegun; B. A. Oyewole

278

LAND ORIENTED WATER RESOURCES DATA SYSTEM IN NEJERSEY  

Microsoft Academic Search

In choosing New Jersey for developing an environmentally oriented data bank ? system and for evaluating extreme surface flows in smaller areas, there were several ? considerations. It was felt that efficient environmental resources planning needs ? interdisciplinary data gathering concentrated in water interaction on the natural ? environment. To succeed in developing a model for a land-oriented water resources

George J. Halasi-Kun

279

Engineered photocatalysts for detoxification of waste water  

SciTech Connect

This report describes progress on the development of engineered photocatalysts for the detoxification of water polluted with toxic organic compounds and heavy metals. We examined a range of different oxide supports (titania, alumina, magnesia and manganese dioxide) for tin uroporphyrin and investigated the efficacy of a few different porphyrins. A water-soluble octaacetic-acid-tetraphenylporphyrin and its derivatives have been synthesized and characterized in an attempt to design a porphyrin catalyst with a larger binding pocket. We have also investigated photocatalytic processes on both single crystal and powder forms of semiconducting SiC with an ultimate goal of developing a dual-semiconductor system combining TiO{sub 2} and SiC. Mathematical modeling was also performed to identify parameters that can improve the efficiency of SiC-based photocatalytic systems. Although the conceptual TiO{sub 2}/SiC photodiode shows some promises for photoreduction processes, SiC itself was found to be an inefficient photocatalyst when combined with TiO{sub 2}. Alternative semiconductors with bandgap and band potentials similar to SiC should be tested in the future for further development and a practical utilization of the dual photodiode concept.

Majumder, S.A.; Prairie, M.R.; Shelnutt, J.A. [Sandia National Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Khan, S.U.M. [Duquesne Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry and Biochemistry] [and others

1996-12-01

280

Review: Thermal water resources in carbonate rock aquifers  

Microsoft Academic Search

The current knowledge on thermal water resources in carbonate rock aquifers is presented in this review, which also discusses\\u000a geochemical processes that create reservoir porosity and different types of utilisations of these resources such as thermal\\u000a baths, geothermal energy and carbon dioxide (CO2) sequestration. Carbonate aquifers probably constitute the most important thermal water resources outside of volcanic areas.\\u000a Several processes

Nico Goldscheider; Judit Mádl-Szonyi; Anita Eross; Eva Schill

2010-01-01

281

The Global Climate Change Impact on Water Resources of Armenia  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a The global climate change impact on water resources of Armenia is shortly reviewed. The mountainous character of Armenia causes\\u000a the great differentiation in landscape types, as well as geological characteristics, climate, soils and water resources. The\\u000a present day Armenia is disposed to significant ecological risks and becomes a country which economy is based on the intensive\\u000a use of natural resources

Anahit Adanalyan; Suren Gevorgyan

282

Water resources data, New Mexico, water year 1991  

USGS Publications Warehouse

managing our Nation's land and water resources. Hydrologic data for New Mexico are contained in this volume. This report is the culmination of a concerted effort by dedicated personnel of the u.s. Geological Survey who collected, compiled, analyzed. verified, and organized the data. and who typed, edited, and assembled the report. The authors had primary responsibility for assuring that the information contained herein is accurate. complete, and adheres to Geological Survey policy and established guidelines. The following individuals contributed significantly to the completion of the "report: Deanne E. Kimball Cynthia J. Shattuck K.M. Lange, M.F. Ortiz,and K.L. Hamilton processed the text of the report, and B. J. Henson drafted the illustrations.

U.S. Geological Survey

1992-01-01

283

WATER RESOURCES AND AQUATIC BIODIVERSITY CONTRIBUTING SOCIOECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT OF BANGLADESH  

Microsoft Academic Search

Bangladesh is rich in water resources of 6564 square kilometer consisting running and closed freshwater in the main land and 5,518 square kilometer of estuarine water and open sea water of the Bay of Bengal to the south. Closed water reserved are haors, baors, lakes, ponds, deghees and ditches in plain land mass and Kaptai and Bogakine Lakes of the

Sohrab Uddin Sarker

284

Global Water Resources: Vulnerability from Climate Change and Population Growth  

Microsoft Academic Search

The future adequacy of freshwater resources is difficult to assess, owing to a complex and rapidly changing geography of water supply and use. Numerical experiments combining climate model outputs, water budgets, and socioeconomic information along digitized river networks demonstrate that (i) a large proportion of the world's population is currently experiencing water stress and (ii) rising water demands greatly outweigh

Charles J. Vörösmarty; Pamela Green; Joseph Salisbury; Richard B. Lammers

2000-01-01

285

The Wealth of Water: The Value of an Essential Resource  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Many students take water availability for granted and yet, by 2025, two-thirds of the world will not have access to clean drinking water. This case study is designed to encourage students to think about water as a limited natural resource and is used to highlight how the exploitation of water can have far-reaching social, political, and economic…

Rathburn, Melanie K.; Baum, Karina J.

2011-01-01

286

Competition for water resources of the Rio Guayas, Ecuador  

Microsoft Academic Search

Increasing demands on limited water resources have led to increased salt water intrusion hazards in many estuaries. A particular example from Ecuador is examined in this paper. Guayaquil obtains its water supply from the Rio Daule, one of the tributaries of the Rio Guayas. The river also supplies water for irrigation and other uses. Increasing use of the limited fresh

J. WAITE

287

History of the State Water Resources Research Institute Program  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The State Water Resources Research Institute Program, established in 1964, consists of 54 Water Resources Research Institutes located at land-grant universities in each of the 50 states and Puerto Rico, the District of Columbia, Guam, and the Virgin Islands. The program evolved from the Water Resources Research Act of 1964, as amended, the Water Research and Development Act of 1978, Public Law 94-457, and the Water Research and Development Act of 1984. These laws authorize the following components of the Institute Program: (1) the annual allotment and matching grants program for the institutes and (2) the additional and saline water research programs for organizations in addition to the State Water Resources Research Institutes. This report summarizes the legislative history, budget history, research program development, and program accomplishments. The State Water Resources Research Program has been administered to by the Office of Water Resources Research (OWRR) (1964-1974), the Office of Water Research and Technology (OWRT) (1974-1982), the Office of Water Policy (OWP) (1982-1983) , and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) (1983-present). (USGS)

Burton, J. S.

1984-01-01

288

Technologies for water resources management: an integrated approach to manage global and regional water resources  

SciTech Connect

Recent droughts in California have highlighted and refocused attention on the problem of providing reliable sources of water to sustain the State`s future economic development. Specific elements of concern include not only the stability and availability of future water supplies in the State, but also how current surface and groundwater storage and distribution systems may be more effectively managed and upgraded, how treated wastewater may be more widely recycled, and how legislative and regulatory processes may be used or modified to address conflicts between advocates of urban growth, industrial, agricultural, and environmental concerns. California is not alone with respect to these issues. They are clearly relevant throughout the West, and are becoming more so in other parts of the US. They have become increasingly important in developing and highly populated nations such as China, India, and Mexico. They are critically important in the Middle East and Southeast Asia, especially as they relate to regional stability and security issues. Indeed, in almost all cases, there are underlying themes of `reliability` and `sustainability` that pertain to the assurance of current and future water supplies, as well as a broader set of `stability` and `security` issues that relate to these assurances--or lack thereof--to the political and economic future of various countries and regions. In this latter sense, and with respect to regions such as China, the Middle East, and Southeast Asia, water resource issues may take on a very serious strategic nature, one that is most illustrative and central to the emerging notion of `environmental security.` In this report, we have identified a suite of technical tools that, when developed and integrated together, may prove effective in providing regional governments the ability to manage their water resources. Our goal is to formulate a framework for an Integrated Systems Analysis (ISA): As a strategic planning tool for managing regional water resources; As an evaluation tool for selecting appropriate remediation technologies for reclaiming water; and As an assessment tool for determining the effectiveness of implementing the remediation technologies. We have included a discussion on the appropriate strategy for LLNL to integrate its technical tools into the global business, geopolitical, and academic communities, whereby LLNL can form partnerships with technology proponents in the commercial, industrial, and public sectors.

Tao, W. C., LLNL

1998-03-23

289

U.S. Geological Survey: Water Resources of Alabama  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This website contains water data, publications, and links to current weather in Alabama and weather radar and satellite images. The water streamflow data includes daily streamflow conditions of the United States, national water conditions, current streamflow conditions, current rain gauges of Alabama Power, a current river summary, and current drought conditions in Alabama. The publications are about water-resource activities in Alabama, the J.B. Converse Lake Watershed Assessment, the National Water-Quality Assessment Programs for the Lower-Tennessee and Mobile river basins, and water resource programs of the USGS.

290

Experience in using the water resources of the Novosibirsk reservoir  

SciTech Connect

With the creation of the Novosibirsk hydrodevelopment a water-management complex was formed on its basis, which unites water users and water consumers such as hydropower, water transport, irrigation, municipal services, agriculture, forestry, and fishery. During the 30-year operation of the hydrodevelopment changes have occurred in the natural conditions on the stretch of the Ob river adjacent to the development which was the cause of the occurrence of a considerable shortage of water resources in years with a low runoff of the river. To increase the effectiveness of using water resources of the Novosibirsk reservoir, organizational and technical measures on providing the normal activities of the water-management complex under conditions of a water resource shortage have partially been and will be carried out in the near future.

Bityukov, V.P.

1988-07-01

291

Water resources data, North Carolina, water year 2002. Volume 1B: Surface-water records  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Water-resources data for the 2002 water year for North Carolina consist of records of stage, discharge, water quality for streams; stage and contents for lakes and reservoirs; precipitation; and ground-water levels and water quality of ground water. Volume 1 contains discharge records for 211 gaging stations; stage and contents for 62 lakes and reservoirs; stage for 20 gaging stations; water quality for 52 gaging stations and 7 miscellaneous sites, and continuous water quality for 30 sites; and continuous precipitation at 109 sites. Volume 2 contains ground-water-level data from 143 observation wells and ground-water-quality data from 72 wells. Additional water data were collected at 85 sites not involved in the systematic data-collection program, and are published as miscellaneous measurements in Volume 1. The collection of water-resources data in North Carolina is a part of the National Water-Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with State, municipal, and Federal agencies.

Ragland, B. C.; Barker, R. G.; Robinson, J. B.

2003-01-01

292

Evaluating participation in water resource management: A review  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Key documents such as the European Water Framework Directive and the U.S. Clean Water Act state that public and stakeholder participation in water resource management is required. Participation aims to enhance resource management and involve individuals and groups in a democratic way. Evaluation of participatory programs and projects is necessary to assess whether these objectives are being achieved and to identify how participatory programs and projects can be improved. The different methods of evaluation can be classified into three groups: (i) process evaluation assesses the quality of participation process, for example, whether it is legitimate and promotes equal power between participants, (ii) intermediary outcome evaluation assesses the achievement of mainly nontangible outcomes, such as trust and communication, as well as short- to medium-term tangible outcomes, such as agreements and institutional change, and (iii) resource management outcome evaluation assesses the achievement of changes in resource management, such as water quality improvements. Process evaluation forms a major component of the literature but can rarely indicate whether a participation program improves water resource management. Resource management outcome evaluation is challenging because resource changes often emerge beyond the typical period covered by the evaluation and because changes cannot always be clearly related to participation activities. Intermediary outcome evaluation has been given less attention than process evaluation but can identify some real achievements and side benefits that emerge through participation. This review suggests that intermediary outcome evaluation should play a more important role in evaluating participation in water resource management.

Carr, G.; BlöSchl, G.; Loucks, D. P.

2012-11-01

293

North Atlantic Regional Water Resources Study. Appendix L. Water Quality and Pollution.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Water resources of the NAR are presently being used for various and, in many instances, conflicting purposes. The use of these waters can generally be described within the following categories: municipal and industrial water supply, recreation, commer...

1972-01-01

294

Resources - a league of extraordinary women [engineering profession  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper describes a new program in the US that is designed to attract young women to engineering. Dubbed the Extraordinary Women Engineers Project, the program is driven by a nationwide coalition of professional engineering societies as well as universities and technology companies. The program aims to make the general public, especially girls, aware of the importance of engineering in

P. Patel-Predd

2005-01-01

295

Alternatives for growth: the engineering and economics of natural resources development. [proceedings  

Microsoft Academic Search

This proceedings of the Charles Carter Newman Symposium on Natural Resources Engineering resulted from a group of concerned and interested scholars, educators, scientists, and policymakers convened to review and discuss papers in the areas of natural resource use, development, and shortage. The authors' discussions deal with the social and economic, as well as technological aspects of resources utilization and conservation

H. J. McMains; L. Wilcox

1978-01-01

296

Water resources data, North Carolina, water year 2001. Volume 1A: Surface-water records  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Water-resources data for the 2001 water year for North Carolina consist of records of stage, discharge, water-quality for streams; stage and contents for lakes and reservoirs; precipitation; and ground water levels and water-quality of ground-water. Volume 1 contains discharge records for 209 gaging stations; stage and contents for 62 lakes and reservoirs; stage for 52 gaging stations; water quality for 101 gaging stations and 91 miscellaneous sites; continuous daily tide stage at 4 sites; and continuous precipitation at 98 sites. Volume 2 contains ground-water-level data from 136 observation wells and ground-water-quality data from 68 wells. Additional water data were collected at 84 sites not involved in the systematic data-collection program, and are published as miscellaneous measurements in Volume 1. The collection of water-resources data in North Carolina is a part of the National Water-Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with State, municipal, and Federal agencies.

Ragland, B. C.; Walters, D. A.; Cartano, G. D.; Taylor, J. E.

2002-01-01

297

Cooperative water resource allocation based on equitable water rights  

Microsoft Academic Search

A comprehensive methodology is developed to achieve equitable, efficient and sustainable water allocation in a river basin. Water allocation is carried out in two steps: (1) allocation of initial water rights to water stakeholders and users based on existing water rights systems or agreements; and (2) reallocation of water and net benefits through water transfers to promote equitable cooperation of

Lizhong Wang; Liping Fang; Keith W. Hipel

2003-01-01

298

Technical Guide to Managing Ground Water Resources.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Ground water is the Nation's principal reserve of fresh water and represents much of its potential future water supply. Ground water on the National Forest Service (NFS) lands is a major contributor to flow in many streams and rivers and has a strong infl...

J. Gauthier-Warriner J. Gurrieri J. Keely K. McCormack M. Wireman P. Summers P. Tucci S. Glasser

2007-01-01

299

Review of Water Resources and Desalination Technologies  

Microsoft Academic Search

Water shortages affect 88 developing countries that are home to half of the world's population. In these places, 80-90% of all diseases and 30% of all deaths result from poor water quality. Furthermore, over the next 25 years, the number of people affected by severe water shortages is expected to increase fourfold. Low cost methods to desalinate brackish water and

James E. Miller; JAMES E

2003-01-01

300

GEORGIA WATER RESOURCES: A COMPREHENSIVE LOOK  

Microsoft Academic Search

Action on the water front was relatively calm during the 2005-2006 Term of the Georgia General As- sembly. Compared to the previous term in which permit trading, interbasin transfers and water planning were among the most visible issues debated, there was less em- phasis on water-related legislation during this term. The creation of the Georgia Water Council and the effort

James E. Kundell

301

What about tomorrow. [Water resources and usage  

SciTech Connect

Our major national problems with water concern the distribution and use of water. Major conceptual plans to augment present water supplies are discussed, including the damming of Long Island Sound and towing icebergs from the Arctic. New and improved methods of irrigation are described, along with pricing incentives to encourage water conservation. The need for and general goals of a national water plan are outlined.

Tufty, B.

1984-08-01

302

Building New Water Resources Projects or Managing Existing Systems?  

Microsoft Academic Search

The planning of regional water resources systems and their subsequent management has to rest firmly on three foundations: availability of water of adequate quality, demand for water expressed quantitatively for specific periods of time, and direct, indirect, and externality costs. Mathematical models of hydrosystems represent only a segment of the real world. The basic science of hydrology is an empirical

Nathan Buras

2000-01-01

303

A WEB-BASED WATER RESOURCES SIMULATION AND OPTIMIZATION SYSTEM  

Microsoft Academic Search

Water is one of the controlling factors of regional development around the Eastern and Southern Mediterranean. Scarcity and conflict characterize water resource management in many countries and river basins. Rapid demographic and economic development especially of the coastal zone, urbanization, industrialization, tourism, and an often inefficient agricultural sector as the dominant water user contribute to the problem. Low availability of

Kurt Fedra; Nilgun Harmancioglu

304

Modelling blue and green water resources availability in Iran  

Microsoft Academic Search

Knowledge of the internal renewable water resources of a country is strategic information which is needed for long-term planning of a nation's water and food security, among many other needs. New modelling tools allow this quantification with high spatial and temporal resolution. In this study we used the program Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) in combination with the Sequential

Monireh Faramarzi; Karim C. Abbaspour; Rainer Schulin; Hong Yang

2009-01-01

305

Fiscal Year 1987 program report: Vermont Water Resources Research Center  

Microsoft Academic Search

Both surface and groundwater issues were addressed in the FY87 Vermont Water Resources Research Center program. Two projects focused on ground water, with one assessing techniques for reducing nitrate contamination in agricultural areas and a second comparing techniques for monitoring microbial contamination. A third project considered the role of acid deposition in the fate of aluminum in soils and water,

1988-01-01

306

Dissemination of Generalized Water Resources Models in the United States  

Microsoft Academic Search

Federal water agencies and other entities in the United States have invested extensive effort during the past three decades to develop generalized computer models for simulating water resources systems. A great deal of expertise, time, and expense was required to develop these models but they are now available to the professional water management community worldwide at nominal cost. With recent

Ralph A. Wurbs

1998-01-01

307

Water resources data, Maryland and Delaware, water year 1998, volume 1. surface-water data  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Water resources data for the 1998 water year for Maryland and Delaware consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage and contents of lakes and reservoirs. This volume (Volume 1. Surface-Water Data) contains records for water discharge at 105 gaging stations; stage and contents of 1 reservoir; and water quality at 16 gaging stations. Also included are stage and discharge for 3 creststage partial-record stations, discharge only for 9 low-flow partial-record stations, and stage only for 5 tidal crest-stage partial-record stations. Additional water data were collected at various sites not involved in the systematic data-collection program and are published as miscellaneous measurements. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating State, local, and Federal agencies in Maryland and Delaware.

James, Robert W., Jr.; Saffer, Richard W.; Tallman, Anthony

1999-01-01

308

Water resources data, Maryland and Delaware, water year 2001, volume 1. surface-water data  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Water resources data for the 2001 water year for Maryland and Delaware consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage and contents of lakes and reservoirs. This volume (Volume 1. Surface-Water Data) contains records for water discharge at 128 gaging stations; stage and contents of 1 reservoir; and water quality at 20 gaging stations. Also included are stage and discharge for 3 creststage partial-record stations and stage only for 10 tidal crest-stage partial-record stations. Additional water data were collected at various sites not involved in the systematic data-collection program and are published as miscellaneous measurements. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating State, local, and Federal agencies in Maryland and Delaware.

James, Robert W.; Saffer, Richard W.; Pentz, Robert H.; Tallman, Anthony J.

2002-01-01

309

Water resources data, Maryland and Delaware, water year 1999, Volume 1. surface-water data  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Water resources data for the 1999 water year for Maryland and Delaware consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage and contents of lakes and reservoirs. This volume (Volume 1. Surface-Water Data) contains records for water discharge at 111 gaging stations; stage and contents of 1 reservoir; and water quality at 17 gaging stations. Also included are stage and discharge for 3 creststage partial-record stations, discharge only for 27 low-flow partial-record stations, and stage only for 5 tidal crest-stage partial-record stations. Additional water data were collected at various sites not involved in the systematic data-collection program and are published as miscellaneous measurements. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating State, local, and Federal agencies in Maryland and Delaware.

James, Robert W.; Saffer, Richard W.; Tallman, Anthony J.

2000-01-01

310

Developing Technologies for Space Resource Utilization: Concept for a Planetary Engineering Research Institute  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

There are two principal factors that control the economics and ultimate utilization of space resources: 1) space transportation, and 2) space resource utilization technologies. Development of space transportation technology is driven by major government (military and civilian) programs and, to a lesser degree, private industry-funded research. Communication within the propulsion and spacecraft engineering community is aided by an effective independent professional organization, the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA). The many aerospace engineering programs in major university engineering schools sustain professional-level education in these fields. NASA does an excellent job of public education in space science and engineering at all levels. Planetary science, a precursor and supporting discipline for space resource utilization, has benefited from the establishment of the Lunar and Planetary Institute (LPI) which has served, since the early post-Apollo days, as a focus for both professional and educational development in the geosciences of the Moon and other planets. The closest thing the nonaerospace engineering disciplines have had to this kind of professional nexus is the sponsorship by the American Society of Civil Engineers of a series of space engineering conferences that have had a predominantly space resource orientation. However, many of us with long-standing interests in space resource development have felt that an LPI-like, independent institute was needed to focus and facilitate both research and education on the specific engineering disciplines needed to develop space resource utilization technologies on an on-going basis.

Blacic, J. D.; Dreesen, D.; Mockler, T.

2000-01-01

311

Historical review of the international water-resources program of the U.S. Geological Survey, 1940-70  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The review describes the history of the U.S. Geological Survey 's (USGS) activities in international water-resources investigations and institutional development as well as exchange in scientific and applied hydrology during 1940-70. The bulk of these activities has been carried out under the auspices of the U.S. Department of State, U.S. Agency for International Development and its predecessors, the United Nations and its specialized agencies, and the regional intergovernmental agencies. The central objectives of the USGS ' international water-resources activities have been to strengthen the administrative, staff, and operational functions of counterpart governmental hydrological and water-resources agencies; to improve the skills and capabilities of host-country scientific, engineering, and technical personnel; to exchange research specialists and publications in the sharing of advances in hydrological knowledge and methodology; and to participate in mutually beneficial international organizations, symposia, conferences, seminars, and special programs dedicated to various aspects of scientific and applied hydrology. Between 1940 and 1970, USGS hydrogeologists, water chemists, engineers, and hydrologists completed 340 short- and long-term project-oriented international assignments in some 80 host countries. During the same time more than 428 water scientists, engineers, and technicians from 60 countries have received academic and in-service training through USGS water-resources facilities in the United States. Also in this period some 336 reports of a technical and scientific nature have resulted from water-resources projects in the U.S bilateral program. (Woodard-USGS)

Taylor, George C., Jr.

1976-01-01

312

Water Resources Data for Arizona, Water Year 1990.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Water discharge data for the 1990 water year for Arizona consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage, contents, water quality of lakes and reservoirs; water levels of observation wells; and quality of ground water. The repo...

A. D. Konieczki F. C. Boner R. G. Davis

1991-01-01

313

Water Resources Data for Arizona, Water Year 1991.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Water discharge data for the 1991 water year for Arizona consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage, contents, water quality of lakes and reservoirs; water levels of observation wells; and quality of ground water. The repo...

F. C. Boner R. G. Davis N. R. Duet

1992-01-01

314

Water Resources Data for Arizona, Water Year 1988.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Water discharge data for the 1988 water year for Arizona consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage, contents, water quality of lakes and reservoirs; water levels of observation wells; and quality of ground water. The repo...

A. D. Konieczki F. C. Boner W. B. Garrett

1989-01-01

315

Water Resources Data for Arizona, Water Year 1992.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Water discharge data for the 1992 water year for Arizona consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage, contents, water quality of lakes and reservoirs; water levels of observation wells; and quality of ground water. The repo...

C. F. Smith F. C. Boner N. R. Duet P. D. Rigas R. G. Davis

1993-01-01

316

Water Resources Data for Arizona, Water Year 1989.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Water discharge data for the 1989 water year for Arizona consists of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage, contents, water quality of lakes and reservoirs; water levels of observation wells; and quality of ground water. The rep...

F. C. Boner C. F. Smith W. B. Garrett A. Konieczki

1990-01-01

317

A decisional procedure for water resources planning taking into account water quality constraints  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper describes an approach for water resources planning taking into account both quantity and quality aspects. A decisional procedure is proposed which consists of two phases. In the first phase, the water resources sharing problem is dealt with, taking into account the demands of the various water users and the requirement of a minimum flow in any section of

E. Avogadro; R. Minciardi; M. Paolucci

1997-01-01

318

Using NASA Products of the Water Cycle for Improved Water Resources Management  

Microsoft Academic Search

NASA Water Resources works within the Earth sciences and GEO community to leverage investments of space-based observation and modeling results including components of the hydrologic cycle into water resources management decision support tools for the goal towards the sustainable use of water. These Earth science hydrologic related observations and modeling products provide a huge volume of valuable data in both

D. L. Toll; B. Doorn; E. T. Engman; R. G. Lawford

2010-01-01

319

Fiscal Year 1986 Program Report: Indiana Water Resources Research Center,  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The 1986 program of the Indiana Water Resources Research Center, located at Purdue University, has revolved around 4 research projects and a technology transfer program. In addition to the research and technology transfer activities, the Center has propos...

J. H. Cushman

1987-01-01

320

Massachusetts Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report, FY 2003.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The 38th year of the Massachusetts Water Resources Research Center (WRRC) was another year of transition. Dr. David Reckhow continued in his role as Interim Director, but The Environmental Institute (TEI) Assistant Director Sharon Tracey took on a Special...

2003-01-01

321

Curecanti National Recreation Area Water Resource Scoping Report.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Curecanti National Recreation Area (Curecanti NRA), located near Gunnison, Colorado encompasses Blue Mesa, Morrow Point and Crystal reservoirs of the Colorado River Storage Project (CRSP). As Curecanti NRA's most important natural resource, water covers s...

L. Cudlip

1995-01-01

322

Fiscal Year 1988 Program Report: Rhode Island Water Resources Center.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The State of Rhode Island is active in water resources planning, development, and management activities which include legislation, upgrading of wastewater treatment facilities, upgrading and implementing pretreatment programs, protecting watersheds and aq...

C. P. C. Poon

1989-01-01

323

Recent US Geological Survey Publications On Water Resources in Alaska  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The United States Geological Survey has made available publications on Water Resources in Alaska. Although the actual reports need to be ordered, abstracts of papers on Alaska hydrology and glaciology are available at the Website.

324

Fiscal Year 1987 Program Report: Vermont Water Resources Research Center,  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Both surface and groundwater issues were addressed in the FY87 Vermont Water Resources Research Center program. Two projects focused on groundwater, with one assessing techniques for reducing nitrate contamination in agricultural areas and a second compar...

A. W. McIntosh

1988-01-01

325

Current water resources activities in Alabama, fiscal year 1986  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The purpose of this report is to describe the current (as of 1986) water resources activities of the U.S. Geological Survey in Alabama. The responsibilities and objectives of the Survey; organization of the Alabama District; sources of funding; current projects; hydrologic data program; and a selected bibliography of hydrologic reports are presented. Water resources projects are undertaken usually at the request of and with partial funding from another agency, provided: they are high priority problems and generally identified to fall within the mission of the Water Resources Division and they are consistent with the Program Management Plan developed by the Water Resources Division in Alabama to meet the long range plan for hydrologic data in the State. (USGS)

Slack, L. J.; Meadows, E. A.

1986-01-01

326

Minnesota Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report, FY 2005.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Minnesota WRRI program is a component of the University of Minnesotas Water Resources Center (WRC). The WRC is a collaborative enterprise involving several colleges across the University, including the newly created College of Food, Agriculture and Na...

2005-01-01

327

Introducing Water-Treatment Subjects into Chemical Engineering Education.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Proposes that inclusion of waste water treatment subjects within the chemical engineering curriculum can provide students with direct access to environmental issues from both a biotechnological and an ethical perspective. The descriptive details of water recycling at a copper plant and waste water stabilization ponds exemplify this approach from…

Caceres, L.; And Others

1992-01-01

328

Water Resources Data - New Jersey, Water Year 1998, Volume 1, Surface-Water Data  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This volume of the annual hydrologic data report of New Jersey is one of a series of annual reports that document hydrologic data gathered from the U.S. Geological Survey's surface- and ground-water data-collection networks in each State, Puerto Rico, and the Trust Territories. These records of streamflow, ground-water levels, and water quality provide the hydrologic information needed by state, local and federal agencies, and the private sector for developing and managing our Nation's land and water resources.

Reed, T.J.; Centinaro, G.L.; Dudek, J.F.; Corcino, V.; Stekroadt, G.C.; McTigure, R.C.

1999-01-01

329

The role of hydrology in water resources management  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Modern water resources management developed as a branch of science based engineering since the landmark publication of Mass et al. (1962&1967) which emerged from the Harvard Water Program. Clearly, water was managed much earlier, in fact since the early days of civilization, as evidenced by the publication of Vitruvius on architecture in the 1st Century BC, but the 1950s marked the advent of modeling enabled by computers, which transformed the field we call Water Resources Management (WRM). Since then, thousands of papers have been published and thousands of decisions and projects have been aided by WRM methodologies and model results. This presentation is not an historical review of water resources management, although it appears in a session titled The Evolution of WRM Paradigms. Instead, it is an attempt to discuss the role of hydrology as a feeder of information for the management domain. The issues faced by hydrologists who work to serve and support WRM will be discussed and elucidated by case studies. For hydrologists, some of the important points in this regard are: - Planning, design and operation are three interconnected "layers" of WRM. Planning is where the sources and consumers are identified, the overall "architecture" of a proposed system is laid out, including its topology and connectivity. Design is where sizes of facilities are fixed. Operational policy determines the operation of the system under a selected forecasted set of typical and/or critical conditions, while real-time operation means setting the operational variables for a defined time period ahead (hour, day, week, month, year). The three "layers" are inter-connected and inter-dependent, but still can be addressed differently. - Hydrological data of different types are required, according to the management issue being addressed. They range from short term now-casting/forecasting for real-time operation and response, e.g., for flood protection, to long-term time probabilistic series and ensembles for planning, which consider changing natural and anthropogenic drivers (land use, climate change). Since hydrology is a continuous process that is not divided internally according to the needs of management, the hydrological analysis must be geared to produce the suitable information for the different management issues. - Aggregation and disaggregation in space and time: selection of the level of detail in time and space should begin from the needs of the management issue being addressed, and dictate the monitoring, collection and processing. - Water quality: should receive more attention, as it is playing an ever increasing role in management, including its importance in ecological services. - Optimization, simulation and combining the two: optimization for WRM is used extensively. Some optimization models are able to address uncertainty internally, and further development continues. Simulation is easier to employ, but it merely produces "if-then" analysis. Combination of optimization and simulation is a common way to combine the advantages of the two. - Uncertainty, forecasting, ensembles: the uncertainties inherent in hydrological analysis and forecasting lead to the requirement for generating forecasts with a probabilistic characterization. This can be in the form of PDFs, time series, ensembles.

Shamir, U.

2011-12-01

330

Water resources of Taos County, New Mexico  

USGS Publications Warehouse

In Taos County, ground water generally is unconfined and moves toward the Rio Grande or perennial streams. Water quality is good except in some areas where water has high values of specific conductance and hardness and contains high concentrations of dissolved solids and fluoride. Most wells are completed in alluvial sediments of Quaternary and Tertiary age in the Costilla Plains. A few wells are completed in basalt of the Taos Plateau and in alluvium of stream channels in the Sangre de Cristo Mountains. Depths to water in wells range from less than 1 to 1,080 feet below land surface. Well yields range from 1 to 3,000 gallons per minute. Water levels in wells in Sunshine Valley dropped 5 to 50 feet between 1955 and 1970. Ground-water irrigation has since declined and water levels have risen. Surface-water records show the county is a net producer of water. The average discharge gained in the Rio Grande as it flows through the county was 271,700 acre-feet per year for water years 1931-89. The highest mean monthly discharge occurs in May or June due to snowmelt runoff. Water quality ranges from good in upstream reaches to fair in lower reaches. Surface water was the source for 93 percent of water withdrawn in 1990, but ground water was used for all public supply, domestic, and industrial purposes. The largest water use is irrigation. About 28,500 acres were irrigated in 1990; alfalfa, native pasture, and planted pasture accounted for 91 percent of this acreage.

Garrabraut, L. A.

1993-01-01

331

Basin-wide cooperative water resources allocation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Abstract The Cooperative Water Allocation Model,(CWAM) is designed,within a general mathematical,programming,frame- work,for modeling,equitable and,efficient water allocation among,competing,users at the basin level and,applied to a large-scale water allocation problem in the South Saskatchewan River Basin located in southern Alberta, Canada. This comprehensive,model,consists of two main steps: initial water rights allocation and subsequent,water and net benefits real- location. Two mathematical programming approaches,

Lizhong Wang; Liping Fang; Keith W. Hipel

2008-01-01

332

Scenario Development for Water Resources Planning and Management  

Microsoft Academic Search

The main objective of scenario development for water resources is to inform policy-makers about the implications of various policies to inform decision-making. Although there have been a number of studies conducted in the relatively-new and recent field of scenario analysis and development, very few of those have been explicitly applied to water resource issues. More evident is the absence of

S. Stewart; M. Mahmoud; Y. Liu; H. Hartman; T. Wagener; H. Gupta

2006-01-01

333

Water resources and the urban environment--98  

SciTech Connect

This report contains all the papers presented at the meeting. There are 25 sessions and one poster session in the document. The Sessions are: (1) Landfill gas/groundwater interactions; (2) Urban solids management; (3) Local issues; (4) Surface water quality studies 1; (5) Reductive treatment of hazardous wastes with zero-valent iron; (6) Water reuse 1; (7) Biosolids management; (8) GIS information systems 1; (9) Drinking water distribution; (10) Anaerobic treatment; (11) Water reuse 2; (12) Municipal wastewater treatment technology; (13) GIS information systems 2; (14) Drinking water treatment 1; (15) Risk-based site remediation; (16) Small urban watersheds; (17) Disinfection; (18) Air pollution control and risk assessment; (19) Drinking water treatment 2; (20) Biological wastewater treatment; (21) Wastewater treatment; (22) Decentralized small-scale alternative wastewater management systems; (23) General environmental issues; (24) Drinking water treatment 3; and (25) Groundwater remediation. Papers have been processed separately for inclusion on the database.

Wilson, T.E. [ed.

1998-07-01

334

Imaging as an educational tool in natural resources engineering  

Microsoft Academic Search

Application of engineering to design “real world” situations is the goal of most engineering design courses. Unfortunately, achieving this is easier said than done, particularly for situations including land use and engineering structures. Computer imaging provides one alternative that has potential for bridging the gap between an instructor's view of a situation and that of the student. Changing conditions are

J. C. Hayes; A. R. Overton

1995-01-01

335

Water Resources Data, New Jersey, Water Year 2002, Volume 1. Surface-Water Data  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Water-resources data for the 2002 Water Year for New Jersey are presented in three volumes, and consists of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage and contents of lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality of ground water. Volume 1 contains discharge records for 93 gaging stations; tide summaries at 31 gaging stations; and stage and contents at 39 lakes and reservoirs. Also included are stage and discharge for 104 crest-stage partial-record stations and stage-only at 31 tidal crest-stage gages. Locations of these sites are shown in figures 8-11. Additional water data were collected at various sites that are not part of the systematic data-collection program. Discharge measurements were made at 201 low-flow partial-record stations and 121 miscellaneous sites.

Reed, T. J.; White, B. T.; Centinaro, G. L.; Dudek, J. F.; Spehar, A. B.; Protz, A. R.; Shvanda, J. C.; Watson, A. F.; Holzer, G. K.

2003-01-01

336

Quantitative Assessment of Water Resources Adaptation Policies in Mediterranean Europe  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Many factors challenge water management in Southern Europe: scarce water resources, climate change, population growth, environmental concerns and economic development, among others. Water policy in the region is designed to ensure future sustainability of water resources under strong socioeconomic forcing while maintaining the strategic ecological and social services of water. Climate change is projected to intensify these conflicts, since most models agree that Southern Europe will show a significant drying trend, especially during the second half of the century. For this reason, there is a strong need to integrate climate change adaptation into implementation of the EU Water Framework Directive. From the policy perspective, there are many studies on how climate change might lead to changes in hydrologic regime, water demands, water quality or ecosystems, but there little knowledge on how much water demand might be met with future hydrologic regime. In water scarce regions, water demands are supplied by means of hydraulic infrastructure, which performs functions of storage, transportation and distribution, to overcome the spatio-temporal irregularities of hydrologic regime. Knowledge on the relationship between natural water resources, reservoir storage and water demands is essential to assess the effectiveness of alternative policy options to ensure adequate public water supply. In this paper we provide a simple way to account for the influence of socioeconomic factors (hydraulic infrastructure and water policy) on climate change impacts on water resources in the Mediterranean region. We present a methodology to identify and evaluate climate change adaptation policies in this context. The methodology is based on the application of the WAAPA (Water Availability and Adaptation Policy Assessment) model, which computes net water availability for consumptive use for a river basin taking into account the regulation capacity of its water supply system and a set of management standards defined through water policy. The model was applied to 47 River Basin Districts in Southern Europe to estimate water availability under different climate change projections and several adaptation policy scenarios. Climate change projections were taken from the results of the Regional Climate Models applied in the ENSEMBLES European project. The WAAPA model allows to obtain the maximum demand that could be supplied under certain conditions (demand seasonal distribution, water supply system management, reliability criteria) for different policy alternatives. Adaptation policy targets may be defined in terms of maintaining social services of water by comparison between water availability in current and future time horizons. Several possible options, like increasing the efficiency of water use or improving the management of water supply systems, were analyzed and compared in quantitative terms. It was found that, although significant reductions in water availability can be expected, the effectiveness of certain adaptation policies might mitigate the expected impacts to a large extent.

Garrote, L. M.; Mediero, L.; Martin-Carrasco, F.

2011-12-01

337

Water on Mars - Volatile history and resource availability  

SciTech Connect

An attempt is made to define the available deposits of water in the near-surface region of Mars which will be available to human exploration missions. The Martian seasonal water cycle is reviewed, and geochemical and geological constraints on the availability of water are examined. It is concluded that the only sure source of water in amounts significant as a resource are in the polar ice deposits. 43 refs.

Jakosky, B.M.

1990-01-01

338

Effects of Climate Change on Agriculture, Land Resources, Water Resources, and Biodiversity in the United States.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report provides an assessment of the effects of climate change on U.S. agriculture, land resources, water resources, and biodiversity. It is one of a series of 21 Synthesis and Assessment Products (SAP) that are being produced under the auspices of t...

A. Janetos D. Schimel P. Backlund

2008-01-01

339

Noesis: Ontology based Scoped Search Engine and Resource Aggregator for Atmospheric Science  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The goal for search engines is to return results that are both accurate and complete. The search engines should find only what you really want and find everything you really want. Search engines (even meta search engines) lack semantics. The basis for search is simply based on string matching between the user's query term and the resource database and the semantics associated with the search string is not captured. For example, if an atmospheric scientist is searching for "pressure" related web resources, most search engines return inaccurate results such as web resources related to blood pressure. In this presentation Noesis, which is a meta-search engine and a resource aggregator that uses domain ontologies to provide scoped search capabilities will be described. Noesis uses domain ontologies to help the user scope the search query to ensure that the search results are both accurate and complete. The domain ontologies guide the user to refine their search query and thereby reduce the user's burden of experimenting with different search strings. Semantics are captured by refining the query terms to cover synonyms, specializations, generalizations and related concepts. Noesis also serves as a resource aggregator. It categorizes the search results from different online resources such as education materials, publications, datasets, web search engines that might be of interest to the user.

Ramachandran, R.; Movva, S.; Li, X.; Cherukuri, P.; Graves, S.

2006-12-01

340

Water Resources Data for New Mexico, Calendar Year 1972. Part 2. Water Quality Records.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Water resources data for the 1972 calendar year for New Mexico consist of records of discharge and water quality of streams, and water quality of lakes and reservoirs. This report contains water quality for 62 gaging stations. Additional water data were c...

1973-01-01

341

Acid mine water treatment using engineered wetlands  

Microsoft Academic Search

During the last two decades, the United States mining industry has greatly increased the amount it spends on pollution control. The application of biotechnology to mine water can reduce the industry's water treatment costs (estimated at over a million dollars a day) and improve water quality in streams and rivers adversely affected by acidic mine water draining from abandoned mines.

Robert L. P. Kleinmann

1990-01-01

342

Studies in the Analysis of Metropolitan Water Resource Systems. Volume VII: Conflict and Choice: Multiobjective Water-Resources Planning.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The study deals with the application of mathematical modelling to multiobjective water resources planning. Such planning is seen as the selection and quantification of the various planning objectives, the formulation of technologically feasible plans whic...

D. A. Haith E. C. Donaldson

1973-01-01

343

USGS Ground-Water Resources Program  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This USGS page holds a collection of reports on regional studies of groundwater systems, multidisciplinary studies of critical groundwater issues, access to groundwater data, and research and methods development. Topics addressed by reports on this page include groundwater issues in the Southwest, saltwater intrusion on the Atlantic coast, land subsidence, and the sustainability of groundwater resources.

Usgs

344

Bringing ecosystem services into integrated water resources management.  

PubMed

In this paper we propose an ecosystem service framework to support integrated water resource management and apply it to the Murray-Darling Basin in Australia. Water resources in the Murray-Darling Basin have been over-allocated for irrigation use with the consequent degradation of freshwater ecosystems. In line with integrated water resource management principles, Australian Government reforms are reducing the amount of water diverted for irrigation to improve ecosystem health. However, limited understanding of the broader benefits and trade-offs associated with reducing irrigation diversions has hampered the planning process supporting this reform. Ecosystem services offer an integrative framework to identify the broader benefits associated with integrated water resource management in the Murray-Darling Basin, thereby providing support for the Government to reform decision-making. We conducted a multi-criteria decision analysis for ranking regional potentials to provide ecosystem services at river basin scale. We surveyed the wider public about their understanding of, and priorities for, managing ecosystem services and then integrated the results with spatially explicit indicators of ecosystem service provision. The preliminary results of this work identified the sub-catchments with the greatest potential synergies and trade-offs of ecosystem service provision under the integrated water resources management reform process. With future development, our framework could be used as a decision support tool by those grappling with the challenge of the sustainable allocation of water between irrigation and the environment. PMID:23900082

Liu, Shuang; Crossman, Neville D; Nolan, Martin; Ghirmay, Hiyoba

2013-07-27

345

Science to support the understanding of Ohio's water resources  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Ohio’s water resources support a complex web of human activities and nature—clean and abundant water is needed for drinking, recreation, farming, and industry, as well as for fish and wildlife needs. The distribution of rainfall can cause floods and droughts, which affects streamflow, groundwater, water availability, water quality, recreation, and aquatic habitats. Ohio is bordered by the Ohio River and Lake Erie and has over 44,000 miles of streams and more than 60,000 lakes and ponds (State of Ohio, 1994). Nearly all the rural population obtain drinking water from groundwater sources. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) works in cooperation with local, State, and other Federal agencies, as well as universities, to furnish decisionmakers, policymakers, USGS scientists, and the general public with reliable scientific information and tools to assist them in management, stewardship, and use of Ohio’s natural resources. The diversity of scientific expertise among USGS personnel enables them to carry out large- and small-scale multidisciplinary studies. The USGS is unique among government organizations because it has neither regulatory nor developmental authority—its sole product is reliable, impartial, credible, relevant, and timely scientific information, equally accessible and available to everyone. The USGS Ohio Water Science Center provides reliable hydrologic and water-related ecological information to aid in the understanding of use and management of the Nation’s water resources, in general, and Ohio’s water resources, in particular. This fact sheet provides an overview of current (2012) or recently completed USGS studies and data activities pertaining to water resources in Ohio. More information regarding projects of the USGS Ohio Water Science Center is available at http://oh.water.usgs.gov/.

Shaffer, Kimberly; Kula, Stephanie; Bambach, Phil; Runkle, Donna

2012-01-01

346

Water resources data for New Mexico, water year 1973; Part 1. Surface water records  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Surface-water records for the 1973 calendar year for New Mexico, including records of streamflow or reservoir storage at gaging stations, partial-record stations, and miscellaneous sites, are given in this report and their locations shown in figures 1, 2. Records for a 'few pertinent gaging stations in bordering States also are included. The records were collected and computed by the Water Resources Division of the US. Geological Survey under the direction of W. E. Hale, district chief. These data represent that portion of the National Water Data System collected by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating State and Federal agencies in New Mexico. Through September 30, 1960, the records of discharge and stage of streams and canals and contents and stage of lakes or reservoirs were published in an annual series of U.S. Geological Survey water supply papers entitled "Surface Water Supply of the United States" Beginning with the 1961 water year, surface-water records have been released by the Geological Survey in annual reports on a State boundary basis. Distribution of these reports is limited; they are designed primarily for rapid release of data shortly after the end of the water year to meet local needs. The discharge and reservoir storage records for 1961-65 also are published in a Geological Survey water supply paper series entitled "Surface Water Supply of the United States 1961-65." There will be a similar series of water-supply papers for the water years 1966-70.

U.S. Geological Survey

1974-01-01

347

Water resources data for Washington, water year 1994. Water-data report (Annual), 1 October 1993-30 September 1994  

Microsoft Academic Search

Water resources data for the 1994 water year for Washington consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage, contents, and water qualtiy of lakes and reservoirs; and water levels of wells. It includes: Water discharge for 226 gaging stations on streams, canals and drains; Stage only records for 4 sites; Discharge data for 87 partial-record or

W. D. Wiggins; G. P. Ruppert; R. R. Smith; L. L. Reed; L. E. Hubbard

1995-01-01

348

Sustainability of Ground-Water Resources  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This report provides an overview of the supply and uses of groundwater in the United States. Topics include general facts and concepts; the groundwater budget and its response to pumping; effects of groundwater development on surface water bodies and on storage; water quality factors; and sustainability of supplies. The report is available in a downloadable, printable version and can be ordered as a hardcopy.

Alley, W. M.; Reilly, T. E.; Franke, O. L.

2011-11-10

349

CHAPTER 9 DEVELOPMENT OF GROUND WATER RESOURCES  

Microsoft Academic Search

Current urban population growth rates present a challenge to municipalities across the United States and elsewhere and demand comprehensive strategies for ground water development. The planning and implementation of any ground water development project require a detailed assessment to ensure that the objectives of project are achieved within all economic, legal, and environmental constraints. Conducting such an assessment requires a

Zhuping Sheng; Jiang Li; J. Phillip King; William J. Miller

350

Global water resources: vulnerability from climate change and population growth.  

PubMed

The future adequacy of freshwater resources is difficult to assess, owing to a complex and rapidly changing geography of water supply and use. Numerical experiments combining climate model outputs, water budgets, and socioeconomic information along digitized river networks demonstrate that (i) a large proportion of the world's population is currently experiencing water stress and (ii) rising water demands greatly outweigh greenhouse warming in defining the state of global water systems to 2025. Consideration of direct human impacts on global water supply remains a poorly articulated but potentially important facet of the larger global change question. PMID:10894773

Vörösmarty, C J; Green, P; Salisbury, J; Lammers, R B

2000-07-14

351

Global Water Resources: Vulnerability from Climate Change and Population Growth  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The future adequacy of freshwater resources is difficult to assess, owing to a complex and rapidly changing geography of water supply and use. Numerical experiments combining climate model outputs, water budgets, and socioeconomic information along digitized river networks demonstrate that (i) a large proportion of the world's population is currently experiencing water stress and (ii) rising water demands greatly outweigh greenhouse warming in defining the state of global water systems to 2025. Consideration of direct human impacts on global water supply remains a poorly articulated but potentially important facet of the larger global change question.

Vörösmarty, Charles J.; Green, Pamela; Salisbury, Joseph; Lammers, Richard B.

2000-07-01

352

``Virtual water'': An unfolding concept in integrated water resources management  

Microsoft Academic Search

In its broadest sense, virtual water refers to the water required for the production of food commodities. Issues relating to virtual water have drawn much attention in scientific communities and the political sphere since the mid 1990s. This paper provides a critical review of major research issues and results in the virtual water literature and pinpoints the remaining questions and

Hong Yang; Alexander Zehnder

2007-01-01

353

“Virtual water”: An unfolding concept in integrated water resources management  

Microsoft Academic Search

In its broadest sense, virtual water refers to the water required for the production of food commodities. Issues relating to virtual water have drawn much attention in scientific communities and the political sphere since the mid 1990s. This paper provides a critical review of major research issues and results in the virtual water literature and pinpoints the remaining questions and

Hong Yang; Alexander Zehnder

2007-01-01

354

Sanitary Survey of Drinking Water Systems on Federal Water Resource Developments. A Pilot Study.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

For many years an increasing level of attention has been given to instream water quality and to a variety of environmental and public health factors in connection with water resources planning, development and operation. However, little attention has been...

1971-01-01

355

MX Siting Investigation. Water Resources Program. Volume I. Preliminary Water Management Report.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The preliminary water management planning information in this report represents the integration of over two years of intensive MX Water Resources Program activities in the Nevada-Utah siting area. (Author)

1981-01-01

356

Social learning: the key to integrated water resources management?  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article discusses social learning as a means to implement integrated water resources management (IWRM). Implementing IWRM requires cooperation between policy sectors, countries, government bodies, the civic sector and scientific disciplines. The social learning approach suggests several ingredients for such cooperation. First, water managers and the other stakeholders need to realize their dependence on each other. Second, they need to

E. Mostert; M. Craps; C. Pahl-Wostl

2008-01-01

357

Climate change impacts on water resources in the United States  

EPA Science Inventory

Climate change impacts on water resources in the U.S. are likely to be far-reaching and substantial, because the water sector spans many parts of the economy, from supply and demand for agriculture, industry, energy production, transportation and municipal use to damages from nat...

358

Water Resource Uses and Recreational Activities in Rural Nigeria.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study surveys rural Nigerian residents concerning local water resource uses and tourists' recreational activities with respect to scales of awareness, understanding, and incentive. Results indicate a public willingness to encourage and finance the rural development of water bodies for agricultural purposes exclusive of investment for tourism…

Adekoya, Adebola

1991-01-01

359

Acid mine water treatment using engineered wetlands  

Microsoft Academic Search

During the last two decades, the United States mining industry has greatly increased the amount it spends on pollution control.\\u000a The application of biotechnology to mine water can reduce the industry's water treatment costs (estimated at over a million\\u000a dollars a day) and improve water quality in streams and rivers adversely affected by acidic mine water draining from abandoned\\u000a mines.

Robert L. P. Kleinmann

1990-01-01

360

Water resources data for Florida water year 2004volume 1A. northeast Florida surface water  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Water resources data for the 2004 water year in Florida consist of continuous or daily discharge for 405 streams, periodic discharge for 12 streams, continuous or daily stage for 159 streams, periodic stage for 19 streams, peak stage and discharge for 30 streams; continuous or daily elevations for 14 lakes, periodic elevations for 23 lakes; continuous ground-water levels for 408 wells, periodic ground-water levels for 1,157 wells; quality-of-water data for 140 surface-water sites and 239 wells. The data for northeast Florida include continuous or daily discharge for 140 streams, periodic discharge for 4 streams, continuous or daily stage for 58 streams, periodic stage for 3 streams; peak stage and discharge for 0 streams; continuous or daily elevations for 10 lakes, periodic elevations for 20 lakes; continuous ground water levels for 50 wells, periodic ground-water levels for 522 wells; quality-of-water data for 40 surface-water sites and 66 wells. These data represent the National Water Data System records collected by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating local, State and Federal agencies in Florida.

Herrett, Thomas A.; Hess, Glen W.; House, Jon G.; Ruppert, Gregory P.; Courts, Mary-Lorraine

2005-01-01

361

Water resources in a changing climate: An Idaho research initiative  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A new initiative in Idaho funded by NSF EPSCoR will build state-wide research infrastructure to address how changes in future climatic conditions may impact water resources, as well as ecological and human systems. This project is supporting complementary field studies on a highly managed river system (Snake River Plain) and a relatively unmanaged system (Salmon River Basin). The project aims to fill a critical niche in hydrology by understanding the connection between surface flow and groundwater. Research capacity is being developed in three main areas: 1) hydroclimatology to improve modeling of water resources affected by climate change, 2) integration of hydrology and economic modeling in the Snake River basin, and 3) highly interdisciplinary research in the Salmon River basin involving climate, water, fire, insect infestations, geomorphology, and stream health. The project will also enhance outreach and educational experiences in climate change and water resources. A description of the new initiative and the activities associated with it will be given.

Walden, V. P.

2009-12-01

362

Water cooled scavenged crankcase type otto internal combustion engine  

SciTech Connect

In a system for a water cooled scavenged crankcase type two-cycle internal combustion engine comprising: a heat reclaimation system for extracting heat from an engine jacket for heating water supplied form an add-on reservoir via a heat exchanger located within the engine cylinder cooling system, the water being subsequently additionally heated by an exhaust pipe type heat exchanger to a superheated steam state and thence conveyed by a conduit to a steam lubricator for adjustably conveying in variably timed spaced succession intervals of regulated droplets of high viscous oil, fortified with adde graphite and tallow enrichment lubricant ingredients, and thence conveying such by steam at atmospheric pressure into an intake manifold which receives a carbureted air/fuel mixture into the crankcase via a manually operated auxiliary air intake device and way check valve and fire screen, due to suction effect of the piston up stroke action of the piston during engine operation.

Bidwell, H.

1988-10-25

363

Quality-assurance plan and field methods for quality-of-water activities, U.S. Geological Survey, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho  

Microsoft Academic Search

Water-quality activities at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) Project Office are part of the US Geological Survey`s (USGS) Water Resources Division (WRD) mission of appraising the quantity and quality of the Nation`s water resources. The purpose of the Quality Assurance Plan (QAP) for water-quality activities performed by the INEL Project Office is to maintain and improve the quality of

Mann

1996-01-01

364

An Evaluation of Streaming Digital Video Resources in On- and Off-Campus Engineering Management Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A recent television documentary on the Columbia space shuttle disaster was converted to streaming digital video format for educational use by on- and off-campus students in an engineering management study unit examining issues in professional engineering ethics. An evaluation was conducted to assess the effectiveness of this new resource. Use of…

Palmer, Stuart

2007-01-01

365

An Evaluation of Streaming Digital Video Resources in On- and Off-Campus Engineering Management Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|A recent television documentary on the Columbia space shuttle disaster was converted to streaming digital video format for educational use by on- and off-campus students in an engineering management study unit examining issues in professional engineering ethics. An evaluation was conducted to assess the effectiveness of this new resource. Use of…

Palmer, Stuart

2007-01-01

366

An evaluation of streaming digital video resources in on- and off-campus engineering management education  

Microsoft Academic Search

A recent television documentary on the Columbia space shuttle disaster was converted to streaming digital video format for educational use by on- and off-campus students in an engineering management study unit examining issues in professional engineering ethics. An evaluation was conducted to assess the effectiveness of this new resource. Use of the video was optional, and about half of the

Stuart Palmer

2007-01-01

367

The Use of Auxiliary Resources on Introductory Computing Courses for Engineering  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the present study we analyzed several resources that could be used as auxiliary tools on Introductory Computing courses, based on the course on this subject lectured at the Polytechnic School of the University of Sao Paulo (EPUSP\\/Brazil) to first-year undergraduate students. Programming courses develop abilities which will be useful to not only Electrical or Computing Engineers, but any engineer's

F. C. N. Campos; G. S. Olguin

368

Effect of Water Consumption in Irrigation on the Water Resources Management  

Microsoft Academic Search

The ever increasing demand for water resources and its temporal and spatial unavailability in terms of required quantity and quality necessitate its efficient use or management to provide economic, environmental and social benefits. Water resources management policies have been improved as to European Union approaches, global and regional developments, sustainability, present and future needs due to urbanization, industrialization and agricultural

Betül GÖÇMEN

2010-01-01

369

The Wealth of Water: The Value of an Essential Resource  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This case study, which focuses on the Cochabamba water revolt in Bolivia, is designed to encourage students to think about water as a limited natural resource. Students learn about the limited nature of freshwater and the impact that access to clean water has on people across all socioeconomic demographics. Designed for a course in global ecology, the case could also be used in courses in biology, environmental science, environmental policy, ethics, and international relations.

Rathburn, Melanie; Baum, Karina

370

Water resources data for New Mexico, water year 1974; Part 1, Surface water records  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Surface-water records for the 1974 calendar year for New Mexico, including records of streamflow or reservoir storage at gaging stations, partial-record stations, and miscellaneous sites, are given in this report and their locations shown in figures 1, 2. Records for a few pertinent gaging stations in bordering States also are included. The records were collected and computed by the Water Resources Division of the U.S, Geological Survey under the direction of W. E. Hale, district chief. These data represent that portion of the National Water Data System collected by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating State and Federal agencies in New Mexico. Records of discharge and stage of streams, and contents and stage of lakes and reservoirs are published in a series of U.S. Geological Survey water-supply papers entitled, "Surface Water Supply of the United States." Through September 30, 1960, these water-supply papers were in an annual series, and since then, are in a 5-year series. More information is given under heading, "Publications" on page 8. Beginning with the 1961 water year, surface-water records have been released by the Geological Survey in annual reports on a State boundary basis. Distribution of these reports is limited; they are designed primarily for rapid release of data shortly after the end of the water year to meet local needs. Beginning with the 1971 calendar year, surface water records have been released on a calendar year basis.

Geological Survey (U.S.)

1975-01-01

371

Water resources data, New Mexico, water year 1995  

USGS Publications Warehouse

for 26 lakes and reservoirs; water quality for 53 gaging stations and 112 wells; and water levels at 128 observation wells. Also included are 106 crest-stage partial-record stations. Additional water data were collected at various sites not involved in the systematic data collection program, and are published as miscellaneous measurements. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System collected by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating State and Federal agencies in New Mexico.

Ortiz, David; Lange, K. M.

1996-01-01

372

Problems in managing and planning of information resources persist at the Army Corps of Engineers  

Microsoft Academic Search

Weak planning and control have led to ineffective and inefficient management, acquisition, and use of information resources by the Army Corps of Engineers. These management problems have affected a major computer hardware replacement program, causing delays in obtaining needed computer resources. With an estimated life-cycle cost exceeding $1 billion over the next several years in this program, the Corps needs

Bowsher

1982-01-01

373

Urban water resources management for semi-arid region  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Due to the rapidly process of urbanization, the water consumption is increasing speedily in Beijing, the capital city of China, during recent decades. Despite great efforts have been done, the daily life of residents and economic construction is threatened continuous in the city. Because of the limitation of sound water management in Beijing the water resources exploitation and utilization are not rational, economically efficiency. The water environment has been degraded in vary levels. The aim of this study is improvement of water management in Beijing. An investigation and collection of the data related to the water management was carried out. The study has made appraisal on the amount of water available and water demands in the region. The reasonable policies, feasible alternatives and institutional management measures have been drawn out from the study for the water management strategies. They can be considered as a base of decision making and macroscopic management for the long-term planning of Beijing.

Guan, Huaimin; Ye, Qian; Liu, Zihui

2005-09-01

374

Guide to North Dakota's Ground-Water Resources  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Ground water, the water we pump from the Earth through wells or that which flows naturally from springs, is one of North Dakota's most valuable resources. More than 60 percent of the people living in the State use ground water for one purpose of another. It is the only source of water for thousands of farm families and their livestock. Almost all smaller cities and villages depend solely on groudn water as a source of supply. Increasingly, ground water is being used to irrigate crops and grasslands (fig. 1) during protracted dry spells so common in North Dakota. During recent years there has been a rapid development of rural water ditribution systems in which thousands of farms and rurals residences are connected via underground pipeline to a single water source, usually wells pumping ground water.

Paulson, Q. F.

1983-01-01

375

Assessing Water and Carbon Footprints for Green Water Resource Management  

EPA Science Inventory

This slide presentation will focus on the following points: (1) Water footprint and carbon footprint are two criteria evaluating the greenness in urban development, (2) Two cases are examined and presented: water footprints in energy productions and carbon footprints in water ...

376

Impact of the Regulating Drinking Water on Water Resources Management.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Costs of compliance with minimum standards for water quality in Connecticut mandated by the Safe Drinking Water Act have led some investor-owned water utility companies to attempt to dispose of what they argue are surplus land holdings. There is presently...

M. M. Huffmire

1979-01-01

377

Water use in Kentucky, 1990. Water resources investigation  

SciTech Connect

Water-use information for 1990 was collected and reported, by country, for eight major categories of use. Seven of the categories were offstream uses, which included public supply, commercial, domestic, industrial, mining, thermoelectric, and agricultural uses. The agricultural category was subdivided into irrigation and livestock water use. Instream water-use data also were collected for hydroelectric-power generation.

Sholar, C.J.; Wood, P.A.

1995-12-31

378

Water resources data for New Mexico, water year 1965; Part 1. Surface water records  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The surface-water records for the 1965 water year for gaging stations, partial-record stations, and miscellaneous sites within the State of New Mexico are given in this report. For convenience there are also Included records for a few pertinent gaging stations in bordering States. The records were collected and computed by the Water Resources Division of the U.S. Geological Survey, under the direction of W. E. Hale, District Chief, Water Resources Division. This report is the fifth In a series presenting, annually, basic data on surface-water records by States. Through September 30, 1960, the records of discharge and stage of streams and contents and stage of lakes or reservoirs were published in an annual series of U. S. Geological Survey water-supply papers entitled Surface Water Supply of the United States. Since 1951 there have been 20 volumes in the series; each volume covered an area whose boundaries coincided with those of certain natural drainage areas. The records in New Mexico were contained in Parts 7, 8 and 9 of that series. Beginning with the 1961 water year, streamflow records and related data will be released by the Geological Survey in annual reports on a State-boundary basis. Distribution of these basic-data reports will be limited and primarily for local needs. The records later will be published in Geological Survey water-supply papers at 5~year intervals. These 5-year water-supply papers will show daily discharge and will be compi led On the same geographical areas previously used for the annual series; however, some of the 14 parts of conterminous United States will be further subdivided.

U.S. Geological Survey

1966-01-01

379

Watershed Based, Institutional Approaches to Developing Clean Water Resources  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Access to clean and sufficient amounts of water is a critical problem in many countries. A watershed approach is vital in understanding pollution pathways affecting water resources and in developing participatory solutions. Such integration of information with participatory approaches can lead to more sustainable solutions than traditional "crisis-to-crisis" management approaches. This study aims at applying a watershed based joint action approach to manage water resources. Since most watersheds have urban and rural sources of pollution and a wide disparity in access to and use of water, alternative solutions need to take an integrated approach through cooperative actions. An institutional model was applied to seven subwatersheds in Honduras to evaluate various sources and effects of water contamination and water shortages. Two specific pathways of water resources degradation were studied (contamination from coffee pulp manufacturing and urban nonpoint sources) to develop alternative solutions that mitigate downstream impacts of access to clean water. A locally driven joint mechanism to reuse coffee pulp in farming systems is proposed. Such an institutional solution can maximize benefits to both farms and the coffee pulp industry. A combination of education and investment in sanitary facilities in urbanizing areas is proposed to minimize urban sources of water contamination.

Randhir, Timothy; Genge, Cole

2005-04-01

380

Water Resources Data for Oklahoma, Water Year 1976. Volume 2. Red River Basin.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Water resources data for the 1976 water year for Oklahoma consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage, contents, and water quality of lakes or reservoirs. Volumes 1 and 2 of this report contain discharge records for 122 gag...

1977-01-01

381

Water Foundations Teachers Guide. The Science of Florida's Water Resources: Lesson Plans for Teachers and Students.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This document features lesson plans for teachers and students on Florida's water resources. The guide is divided into four grade levels: K-2, 3-5, 6-8, and 9-12. Each grade level includes objectives, guides, and five lesson plans. K-2 lesson plans include: (1) "We Are Water"; (2) "Why Water is Extra Special"; (3) "Water's Changing Shapes"; (4)…

2001

382

Water Resources Data for Oklahoma, Water Year 1976. Volume 1. Arkansas River Basin.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Water resources data for the 1976 water year for Oklahoma consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage contents, and water quality of lakes or reservoirs. Volumes 1 and 2 of this report contain discharge records for 122 gagi...

1977-01-01

383

Clean option: Berkeley Pit water treatment and resource recovery strategy  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Technology Development, established the Resource Recovery Project (RRP) in 1992 as a five-year effort to evaluate and demonstrate multiple technologies for recovering water, metals, and other industrial resources from contaminated surface and groundwater. Natural water resources located throughout the DOE complex and the and western states have been rendered unusable because of contamination from heavy metals. The Berkeley Pit, a large, inactive, open pit copper mine located in Butte, Montana, along with its associated groundwater system, has been selected by the RRP for use as a feedstock for a test bed facility located there. The test bed facility provides the infrastructure needed to evaluate promising technologies at the pilot plant scale. Data obtained from testing these technologies was used to assess their applicability for similar mine drainage water applications throughout the western states and at DOE. The objective of the Clean Option project is to develop strategies that provides a comprehensive and integrated approach to resource recovery using the Berkeley Pit water as a feedstock. The strategies not only consider the immediate problem of resource recovery from the contaminated water, but also manage the subsequent treatment of all resulting process streams. The strategies also employ the philosophy of waste minimization to optimize reduction of the waste volume requiring disposal, and the recovery and reuse of processing materials.

Gerber, M.A.; Orth, R.J.; Elmore, M.R.; Monzyk, B.F.

1995-09-01

384

Water resources of Vilas County, Wisconsin  

SciTech Connect

The Pleistocene drift in Vilas County, Wisconsin, consists of three types of material: till, debris-flow sediment, and fluvial sediment. Hydraulic conductivity of the sand and gravel is on the order of 0.001 ft/sec but that of the till and debris-flow sediment is on the order of 0.0001 ft/sec. Calculations of transmissivity indicate that most sand and gravel deposits can yield sufficient quantities of potable water for domestic use, but the till and debris-flow deposits cannot. The water table is generally shallow and there is little water-level fluctuation throughout the county. Fifty-six wells had median depths to water of less than 20 ft. The range of fluctuations varied from 0.5 to 7.36 ft. Analysis of water samples collected from 50 observation wells indicate that calcium, magnesium, and bicarbonate are the major dissolved constituents. Alkalinity concentrations in Vilas County ranged from 2 to 152 mg/L and had a median concentration of 28 mg/L. The median concentration was lower than the 102 mg/L median for the surrounding area. The low alkalinity concentration in groundwater implies a limited capacity to neutralize acid; this may increase the potential for degradation of lakes by acid precipitation. Alkalinity data for surface water were used to classify 546 lakes according to their sensitivity to acid precipitation. Five lakes are classified as ultrasensitive, 108 lakes are classified as extremely sensitive, 185 lakes are classified as moderately sensitive, 89 lakes are classified as having low sensitivity, and 159 lakes are classified as not sensitive. 19 refs., 10 figs., 10 tabs.

Patterson, G.L.

1989-01-01

385

Water resources data, New Mexico, water year 1982  

USGS Publications Warehouse

lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality in wells and springs. This report contains discharge records for 197 gaging stations; stage and contents for 25 lakes and reservoirs; water quality for 99 gaging stations, and 89 observation wells. Also included are 140 crest-stage partial-record stations. Additional water data were collected at various sites, not involved in the systematic data collection program, and are published as miscellaneous measurements. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System collected by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating State and Federal agencies in New Mexico.

Geological Survey (U.S.)

1983-01-01

386

Some aspects of integrated water resources management in central Asia  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Two main tasks are to be implemented for elaboration of the governmental water distribution criteria in Central Asia: 1 -development of the common methodological basis for the intergovernmental water distribution; and 2 - to reopen and continue both theoretical and experimental researches of various aspects of the wastewater reuse. The prospects of socio economic development of all Central Asian countries are substantially defined by the water resources availability. The water resources of Central Asia belong, mainly, watersheds of the Syr-Darya and Amu Darya rivers. The basic flow of Amu Darya is formed in territory of Tajikistan. Then the Amu Darya river proceeds along border of Afghanistan with Uzbekistan, crosses Turkmenistan and again comes back to Uzbekistan and then runs into the Aral Sea. The Syr-Darya is second river on the water discharge and is first river on length in Central Asia. The basic flow of Syr Darya is formed in territory of Kyrgyzstan. Then the Syr-Darya river crosses of Uzbekistan and Tajikistan and runs into the Aral Sea in territory of Kazakhstan. During the Soviet Union the water resources of two river watersheds were divided among the Central Asian republics on the basis of the general plans developed by the center in Moscow. In the beginning of 90s years, after taking of sovereignty by the former Soviet republics, the unified control system of water resources management was abolished and the various approaches to its transformation caused by features of the national economy developing, elected models of transition from command to market mechanisms of economic activity, and also specificity of political and social processes in each of the states of region were planned. The distinctions of modern priorities of economic development of the states of region have generated the contradiction of interests in the intergovernmental water distribution that can in the long term become complicated even more in connection with the increasing of water requirement in Afghanistan. (In particular, there is a conflict of interests concerning the functioning of the Toktogul reservoir: Kazakhstan and Uzbekistan are interested in the irrigation regime of operations of reservoir; Kyrgyzstan and Tajikistan are interested in the energy conditions of its functioning.) In the national diagnostic reports the numerical parameters of the water resources use dynamics for previous years, and also estimation of water resources do not coincide, that complicates development of principles and criteria of the intergovernmental water distribution. It also indirectly influences the solution of the water cost problem. Discrepancy of the specified settlement data is explained, basically, differences of techniques and algorithms of accounts. In the principal theses of national water strategy of all Central Asian states developed in the end of 90s years, it was marked the necessity of development of the uniform methodical approaches for the strong water consumption rates. The perspective water requirements should be estimated proceeding from the national economic programs of each state. In this connection the coordination by all interested states of region both the uniform approach for estimations of the future water consumption and the uniform settlement base for the improving of models and procedures of the intergovernmental water distribution is admitted as an urgent need. One of the corner-stone tasks in the framework of the common methodological basis for the intergovernmental water distribution is development of the unified method for estimation of irrigation water requirements, because one of the main consumers of water resources in the Central Asian states is irrigation. Last years authors were conducting investigations on development of new modification of the Heat and Water Balances Model (HWBM) and its adaptation to estimation of irrigation water requirements in arid an semi-arid regions in the framework of the INCO-COPERNICUS project "Adaptation of Efficient Water Use Criteria in Marginal Regions of Europe and Middle

Khaydarova, V.; Penkova, N.; Pak, E.; Poberejsky, L.; Beltrao, J.

2003-04-01

387

The Sparta Aquifer: A Sustainable Water Resource?  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Introduction The Sparta aquifer is an aquifer of regional importance within the Mississippi embayment aquifer system. It consists of varying amounts of unconsolidated sand, inter-stratified with silt and clay lenses within the Sparta Sand of the Claiborne Group. It extends from south Texas, north into Louisiana, Arkansas, and Tennessee, and eastward into Mississippi and Alabama (fig. 1). On both the west and east sides of the Mississippi embayment, the Sparta aquifer is exposed at the surface (outcrops) and is locally unconfined; it becomes confined as it dips toward the axis of the embayment, (generally corresponding with the Mississippi River) and southward toward the Gulf of Mexico where it is deeply buried in the subsurface (Hosman, 1968). Generalized ground-water flow in the Sparta aquifer is from the outcrop areas to the axis (center) of the embayment (fig. 2). In Arkansas, the Sparta aquifer outcrops parallel to the Fall Line at the western extreme of the Mississippi embayment (the Fall Line is a line dividing the mountainous highlands of Arkansas from the lowland area); and the formation dips from its outcrop area to the southeast. The Sparta aquifer supplies water for municipalities, industries such as paper production, and to a lesser degree, irrigation of agricultural crops (fig. 3). This report highlights hydrologic conditions of the aquifer in Arkansas County as an example of how water use is affecting water levels.

McKee, Paul W.; Hays, Phillip D.

2002-01-01

388

Evaluating Cooperative Game Theory in water resources  

Microsoft Academic Search

Two empirical applications of Cooperative Game Theory concerned with regional cooperation in the use of irrigation water are presented. Both studies attempt to derive income maximizing solutions for the participants and the related income allocation schemes. Distinction is made between transferable and non-transferable utility situations. The reasonableness and the acceptability of the schemes derived are later critically evaluated. Main findings

Ariel Dinar; Aharon Ratner; Dan Yaron

1992-01-01

389

CLIMATIC SENSITIVITY OF CALIFORNIA WATER RESOURCES  

EPA Science Inventory

The possible effects of climate change on the combined Central Valley Project-California State Water Project (CVP/SWP) were evaluated using a three-stage approach. n the first stage, runoff from four headwater "study catchments" was simulated using rainfall/snowmelt-runoff models...

390

Protecting Water Resources with Smart Growth.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

How are zoning codes and building designs related to standards established by the Clean Water Act. How do transportation choices or the mix of uses in a district affect the quality and quantity of stormwater runoff. How are development patterns associated...

2004-01-01

391

Gallinaceous Guzzlers. Section 5.4.1, US Army Corps of Engineers Wildlife Resources Management Manual.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report was prepared as a guide to assist Corps biologists and resource managers in developing and implementing artificial watering systems for wildlife where water supply is a limiting factor. The gallinaceous guzzler is a permanent self-filling wate...

T. Johnson R. A. Jacobs

1986-01-01

392

Water resources development in Santa Clara Valley, California: insights into the human-hydrologic relationship  

SciTech Connect

Groundwater irrigation is critical to food production and, in turn, to humankind's relationship with its environment. The development of groundwater in Santa Clara Valley, California during the early twentieth century is instructive because (1) responses to unsustainable resource use were largely successful; (2) the proposals for the physical management of the water, although not entirely novel, incorporated new approaches which reveal an evolving relationship between humans and the hydrologic cycle; and (3) the valley serves as a natural laboratory where natural (groundwater basin, surface watershed) and human (county, water district) boundaries generally coincide. Here, I investigate how water resources development and management in Santa Clara Valley was influenced by, and reflective of, a broad understanding of water as a natural resource, including scientific and technological innovations, new management approaches, and changing perceptions of the hydrologic cycle. Market demands and technological advances engendered reliance on groundwater. This, coupled with a series of dry years and laissez faire government policies, led to overdraft. Faith in centralized management and objective engineering offered a solution to concerns over resource depletion, and a group dominated by orchardists soon organized, fought for a water conservation district, and funded an investigation to halt the decline of well levels. Engineer Fred Tibbetts authored an elaborate water salvage and recharge plan that optimized the local water resources by integrating multiple components of the hydrologic cycle. Informed by government investigations, groundwater development in Southern California, and local water law cases, it recognized the limited surface storage possibilities, the spatial and temporal variability, the relatively closed local hydrology, the interconnection of surface and subsurface waters, and the value of the groundwater basin for its storage, transportation, and treatment abilities. The proposal was typically described as complementing an already generous nature, not simply subduing it. Its implementation was limited by political tensions, and fifteen years later, a scaled-down version was constructed. Well levels recovered, but within a decade were declining due to increasing withdrawals. I assert that the approach in Santa Clara Valley was a forerunner to more recent innovations in natural resource management in California and beyond.

Reynolds, Jesse L.; Narasimhan, T.N.

2000-06-01

393

Water resources data for Wisconsin, Water Year 1988. Water-data report (Annual), 1 October 1987-30 September 1988  

SciTech Connect

Water-resources data for the 1988 Water Year for Wisconsin include records of streamflow at gaging stations, partial-record stations, and miscellaneous sites; records of chemical, biological, and physical characteristics of surface and ground water. Records of chemical analysis of precipitation, surface and ground water associated with acid deposition are included. In addition, water levels in observation wells are reported.

Holmstrom, B.K.; Kammerer, P.A.; Erickson, R.M.

1989-05-01

394

Water resources data for Oregon, water year 1992. Water-data report (Annual), 1 October 1991-30 September 1992  

Microsoft Academic Search

Water Resources Data for the 1992 water year for Oregon consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; and stage, contents, and water quality of lakes and reservoirs. The report contains discharge records for 190 gaging stations; stage only record for 5 gaging stations; stage and contents for 33 lakes and reservoirs; water quality for 51 stations,

L. E. Hubbard; T. A. Herrett; R. L. Kraus; G. P. Ruppert; M. L. Courts

1993-01-01

395

Water resources data for Oregon, water year 1993. Water-data report (Annual), 1 October 1992-30 September 1993  

Microsoft Academic Search

Water Resources Data for the 1993 water year for Oregon consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; and stage, contents, and water quality of lakes and reservoirs. The report contains discharge records for 199 gaging stations; stage only records for 5 gaging stations; stage and contents for 31 lakes and reservoirs; water quality for 53 stations,

L. E. Hubbard; T. A. Herrett; R. L. Kraus; G. P. Ruppert; M. L. Courts

1994-01-01

396

Water resources data for Washington, water year 1995. Water data report (Annual), 1 October 1994-30 September 1995  

Microsoft Academic Search

Water resources data for the 1995 water year for Washington consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage and contents of lakes and reservoirs; and water levels of wells. It includes: Water discharge for 223 gaging stations on streams, canals and drains; Stage only records for 3 sites; Discharge data for 31 partial-record or miscellaneous sites;

W. D. Wiggins; G. P. Ruppert; R. R. Smith; L. L. Reed; L. E. Hubbard

1996-01-01

397

Review of Water Resources and Desalination Technologies  

SciTech Connect

Water shortages affect 88 developing countries that are home to half of the world's population. In these places, 80-90% of all diseases and 30% of all deaths result from poor water quality. Furthermore, over the next 25 years, the number of people affected by severe water shortages is expected to increase fourfold. Low cost methods to desalinate brackish water and sea water can help reverse this destabilizing trend. Desalination has now been practiced on a large scale for more than 50 years. During this time continual improvements have been made, and the major technologies are now remarkably efficient, reliable, and inexpensive. For many years, thermal technologies were the only viable option, and multi-stage flash (MSF) was established as the baseline technology. Multi-effect evaporation (MEE) is now the state-of-the-art thermal technology, but has not been widely implemented. With the growth of membrane science, reverse osmosis (RO) overtook MSF as the leading desalination technology, and should be considered the baseline technology. Presently, RO of seawater can be accomplished with an energy expenditure in the range of 11-60 kJ/kg at a cost of $2 to $4 per 1000 gallons. The theoretical minimum energy expenditure is 3-7 kJ/kg. Since RO is a fairly mature technology, further improvements are likely to be incremental in nature, unless design improvements allow major savings in capital costs. Therefore, the best hope to dramatically decrease desalination costs is to develop ''out of the box'' technologies. These ''out of the box'' approaches must offer a significant advantage over RO (or MEE, if waste heat is available) if they are to be viable. When making these comparisons, it is crucial that the specifics of the calculation are understood so that the comparison is made on a fair and equivalent basis.

MILLER, JAMES E.

2003-03-01

398

Multiunit water resource systems management by decomposition, optimization and emulated evolution  

Microsoft Academic Search

Being one of the essential elements of almost any water resource system, reservoirs are indispensable in our struggle to harness, utilize and manage natural water resources. Consequently, the derivation of appropriate reservoir operating strategies draws significant attention in water resources planning and management. These operational issues become even more important with the ever increasing scale and complexity of water resource

D. Milutin

1998-01-01

399

Water resources of Red River Parish, Louisiana  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Red River Parish is on the eastern flank of the Sabine uplift in northwestern Louisiana. The 'area is underlain by lignitic clay and sand of Paleocene and Eocene age which dip to the east at the rate of about 30 feet per mile. The Red River is entrenched in these rocks in the western part of the parish. Alternating valley filling and erosion during the Quaternary period have resulted in the present lowland with flanking terraces. In the flood-plain area moderate to large quantities of very hard, iron-bearing water, suitable for irrigation, are available to wells in the alluvial sand and gravel of Quaternary age. The aquifer ranges in thickness from 20 to slightly more than 100 feet. It is recharged by downward seepage of rainfall through overlying clay and silt, by inflow from older sands adjacent to and beneath the entrenched valley, and by infiltration from the streams where the water table is below stream level during flood stages or as a result of pumping. Water levels are highest in the middle of the valley. Ground water moves mainly toward the Red River on the east and Bayou Pierre on the west, but small amounts move down the valley. Computations based on water-level and aquifer-test data indicate that the Quaternary alluvium contains more than 330 billion gallons of ground water in storage and that the maximum discharge of ground water to the streams is slightly more than 30 mgd (million gallons per day). At times of high river stage, surface water flows into the aquifer at a rate that depends in part upon the height and duration of the river stage. Moderate supplies of soft, iron-bearing water may be obtained from dissected Pleistocene terrace deposits that flank the flood plains of the Red River and Black Lake Bayou. However, the quantity of water that can be pumped from these deposits varies widely from place to place because of differences in the areal extent and saturated thickness of the segments of the deposits; this extent and thickness are governed in turn by the amount of erosion the deposits have undergone. Beds of fine-grained lignitic sands of Tertiary age contain water of generally good quality to depths of 150 to 450 feet. The thinness and low permeability of the sands restrict their development to low-yield wells. Water from these sands in the western part of the parish, where they lie beneath the alluvial valley, is more mineralized than that from the younger Tertiary sands exposed in the east-central area. Streamflow records have been collected on the principal streams in Red River Parish since 1939. Additional spot low-flow data were obtained on several small streams originating within the parish for a study made in connection with the preparation of this report. Quality-of-water data for streams in the parish were collected on an occasional spot-sampling basis prior to and during this investigation. The largest source of surface water in the parish is the Red River, which drains approximately 63,400 square miles upstream from the parish. The Red River has an average flow of about 13,100 cfs (cubic feet per second), or about 8,500 mgd. Many of the streams that drain the upland area are not dependable sources of supply because their flows are not well sustained during dry seasons. The average annual precipitation over the parish is about 52 inches, of which about 17 inches becomes runoff; this runoff is equivalent to a continuous flow of about 1.25 cfs per square mile. Seasonal and annual runoff varies, but no significant trends have been noticed. The principal surface-water problems in the parish pertain to flood control, drainage, irrigation, and navigation. Flood problems have been alleviated considerably by the operation of Denison Dam (Lake Texoma), the completion of levees on the Red River, channel improvements on Bayou Pierre, and the completion of Wallace Lake reservoir on Cypress Bayou. There are wet lands along the Red River that would be very productive if properly drained

Newcome, Roy; Page, Leland Vernon.

1963-01-01

400

Water resources data for New Mexico, water year 1968; Part 1. Surface water records  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The surface-water records for the 1968 water year for gaging stations, partial record stations, and miscellaneous sites within the State of New Mexico are given in this report. For convenience there are also included records for a few pertinent gaging stations in bordering States. The records were collected and computed by the Water Resources Division of the U. S. Geological Survey, under the direction of W. E. Hale, District Chief, Water Resources Division. This report is the eighth in a series presenting, annually, basic data on surfacewater records by States. Through September 30, 1960, "the records of discharge and stage of streams and contents and stage of lakes or reservoirs were published in an annual series of U. S. Geological Survey water-supply papers entitled "Surface Water Supply of the United States.!! Since 1951 there have been 20 volumes in the series; each volume covered an area whose boundaries coincided with those of certain natural drainage areas. The records in New Mexico were contained in Parts 7, 8, and 9 of that series. Beginning with the 1961 water year, streamflow records and related data have been released by the Geological Survey in annual reports on a State-boundary basis. Distribution of these basic-data reports is limited and primarily for local needs. The records will be published in Geological Survey water-supply papers at 5-year intervals. These 5-year water-supply papers will show daily discharge and will be compiled on the same geographical areas previously used for the annual series; however, some of the 14 parts of conterminous United States will be further subdivided.

U.S. Geological Survey

1969-01-01

401

Collection, storage, retrieval, and publication of water-resources data  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This publication represents a series of papers devoted to the subject of collection, storage, retrieval, and publication of hydrologic data. The papers were presented by members of the U.S. Geological Survey at the International Seminar on Organization and Operation of Hydrologic Services, Ottawa, Canada, July 15-16, 1976, sponsored by the World Meteorological Organization. The first paper, ' Standardization of Hydrologic Measurements, ' by George F. Smoot discusses the need for standardization of the methods and instruments used in measuring hydrologic data. The second paper, ' Use of Earth Satellites for Automation of Hydrologic Data Collection, ' by Richard W. Paulson discusses the use of inexpensive battery-operated radios to transmit realtime hydrologic data to earth satellites and back to ground receiving stations for computer processing. The third paper, ' Operation Hydrometeorological Data-Collection System for the Columbia River, ' by Nicholas A. Kallio discusses the operation of a complex water-management system for a large river basin utilizing the latest automatic telemetry and processing devices. The fourth paper, ' Storage and Retrieval of Water-Resources Data, ' by Charles R. Showen discusses the U.S. Geological Survey 's National Water Data Storage and Retrieval System (WATSTORE) and its use in processing water resources data. The final paper, ' Publication of Water Resources Data, ' by S. M. Lang and C. B. Ham discusses the requirement for publication of water-resources data to meet the needs of a widespread audience and for archival purposes. (See W78-09324 thru W78-09328) (Woodard-USGS)

Compiled by Showen, C. R.

1978-01-01

402

Water Quality Instructional Resources Information System (IRIS): A Compilation of Abstracts to Water Quality and Water Resources Materials. Supplement 32, 1987.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The Environmental Quality Instructional Resources Center in Columbus, Ohio, acquires, reviews, indexes, and announces both print (books, modules, units, etc.) and non-print (films, slides, video tapes, etc.) materials related to water quality and water resources education and instruction. In addition some materials related to pesticides,…

Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH. Information Reference Center for Science, Mathematics, and Environmental Education.

403

Water Quality Instructional Resources Information System (IRIS): A Compilation of Abstracts to Water Quality and Water Resources materials. Supplement 31, 1987.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The Environmental Quality Instructional Resources Center in Columbus, Ohio, acquires, reviews, indexes, and announces both print (books, modules, units, etc.) and non-print (films, slides, video tapes, etc.) materials related to water quality and water resources education and instruction. This publication contains abstracts and indexes to…

Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH. Information Reference Center for Science, Mathematics, and Environmental Education.

404

Water Quality Instructional Resources Information System (IRIS): A Compilation of Abstracts to Water Quality and Water Resources Materials. Supplement 33, 1988.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The Environmental Quality Instructional Resources Center in Columbus, Ohio, acquires, reviews, indexes, and announces both print (books, modules, units, etc.) and non-print (films, slides, video tapes, etc.) materials related to water quality and water resources education and instruction. In addition some materials related to hazardous materials,…

Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH. Information Reference Center for Science, Mathematics, and Environmental Education.

405

Water Quality Instructional Resources Information System (IRIS): A Compilation of Abstracts to Water Quality and Water Resources Materials, Supplement 30, 1987.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The Environmental Quality Instructional Resources Center acquires, reviews, indexes, and announces both print (books, modules, units, etc.) and non-print (films, slides, video tapes, etc.) materials related to water quality and water resources education and instruction. This publication contains abstracts and indexes to selected materials related…

Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH. Information Reference Center for Science, Mathematics, and Environmental Education.

406

Water resources planning in a strategic context: Linking the water sector to the national economy  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In many parts of the developing world investment in water resources takes a large proportion of the available public investment funds. As the conflicts for funds between the water and other sectors become more severe, the traditional ways of analyzing and planning water investments has to move away from project-by-project (or even a river basin-by-river basin) approaches to include the relationships of water investments to other sectors and to overall national development policies. Current approaches to water resources investments are too narrow. There is a need for ways to expand the strategic thinking of water sector managers. This paper develops a water resources planning methodology with the primary objective of giving insights into the linking of water sector investments and macroeconomic policies. The model optimizes the present value of investments for water resources development, while embedding a macroeconomic model into the framework to allow for an examination of the interactions between water investments, the growth in the agricultural sector, and the performance of the overall economy. A case study of Bangladesh is presented which shows how strategic thinking could lead to widely differing implications for water investments than would conventional water resources systems planning models.

Rogers, Peter; Hurst, Christopher; Harshadeep, Nagaraja

1993-07-01

407

Profiles-aeronautical\\/astronautical engineering: Human resources and funding  

Microsoft Academic Search

Attention is focused on the field of aeronautical\\/astronautical engineering. This report provides current and historical information on personnel, education, and funding for the field through the use of graphs and detailed statistical tables.

Mary V. Burke

1988-01-01

408

Cost Allocation in Water Resources Development  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Different methods for allocating the joint costs of water supply projects among users are compared on the basis of certain commonsense principles of equity. We contrast the separable costs-remaining benefits (SCRB) method with simple proportional allocation schemes and more sophisticated methods from cooperative game theory, including the Shapley value and variants of the core. Advantages and disadvantages of the methods in practice are examined using a regional water supply system in Sweden. It is argued that these principles provide a useful framework for choosing intelligently among methods. The appropriateness of a method depends on the context, especially on the reliability of information about costs and demands. The conclusion is that there is no one best method, although from a normative standpoint the SCRB method may be one of the worst.

Young, H. P.; Okada, N.; Hashimoto, T.

1982-06-01

409

Research on agrichemicals in water resources  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A plan to study the effects of agricultural systems on the occurrence of agricultural chemicals in ground and surface waters is being formulated by the U.S. Department of Agriculture and the U.S. Geological Survey. Initial research will focus on the herbicides atrazine and alachlor, the insecticide carbofuran, and plant nutrient, nitrate, in the midwest cornbelt. The cornbelt has uniquely similar agriculture over a large area. Many hydrologic and agronomic scientific disciplines from several federal and state agencies are being integrated to conduct research at several scales. The integration of information from this research is intended to lead to the identification of major processes affecting agrichemical fate and ultimately to development of farming systems that protect, improve, or remediate water quality.

Burkart, Michael R.; Onstad, Charles A.; Bubenzer, Gary D.

410

Water resources review: Ocoee reservoirs, 1990  

SciTech Connect

Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) is preparing a series of reports to make technical information on individual TVA reservoirs readily accessible. These reports provide a summary of reservoir purpose and operation; physical characteristics of the reservoir and watershed; water quality conditions; aquatic biological conditions; and designated, actual and potential uses of the reservoir and impairments of those use. This reservoir status report addressed the three Ocoee Reservoirs in Polk County, Tennessee.

Cox, J.P.

1990-08-01

411

Water resources review: Chatuge Reservoir, 1991  

SciTech Connect

TVA is preparing a series of reports that provide technical information on the characteristics and uses of individual TVA reservoirs. These reports present a summary of (1) reservoir purpose and operation; (2) physical characteristics of the reservoir and the watershed; (3) water quality conditions; (4) aquatic biological conditions; and (5) designated, actual, and potential uses of the reservoir and impairments of those uses. This report is for Chatuge Reservoir.

Cox, J.; Wallus, R.

1992-06-01

412

Water resources review: Melton Hill Reservoir, 1992  

SciTech Connect

TVA is preparing a series of reports that provide technical information on the characteristics and condition of individual TVA reservoirs. These reports present a summary of (1) reservoir purpose and operation; (2) physical characteristics of the reservoir and watershed; (3) water quality conditions; (4) aquatic biological conditions; and (5) designated, actual, and potential uses of the reservoir and impairments of those uses. This report is for Melton Hill Reservoir.

Tomljanovich, D.A.; Strunk, J.W.; Oxendine, L.B.

1992-07-01

413

Water resources data, New Mexico, water year 1985  

USGS Publications Warehouse

25 lakes and reservoirs; water quality for 65 gaging stations and 179 wells; and water levels at 111 observation wells. Also included are 138 crest-stage partial-record stations. Additional water data were collected at various sites, not involved in the systematic data collection program, and are published as miscellaneous measurements. Also, one seepage investigation is published this year. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System collected by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating State and Federal agencies in New Mexico.

Denis, Louis P.; Beal, Linda V.; Allen, Harriet R.

1986-01-01

414

The NLM Gateway: a metasearch engine for disparate resources.  

PubMed

The U.S. National Library of Medicine (NLM) has created a metasearch engine called the NLM Gateway at the URL "gateway.nlm.nih.gov". The Gateway allows the user to issue one search that takes place on multiple NLM retrieval engines. A composite result set is presented in several categories of information: journal citations; books, serials and audiovisuals; consumer health; meeting abstracts; and other collections. PMID:15360773

Kingsland, Lawrence C; Prettyman, Maureen F; Shooshan, Sonya E

2004-01-01

415

Using NASA Products of the Water Cycle for Improved Water Resources Management  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

NASA Water Resources works within the Earth sciences and GEO community to leverage investments of space-based observation and modeling results including components of the hydrologic cycle into water resources management decision support tools for the goal towards the sustainable use of water. These Earth science hydrologic related observations and modeling products provide a huge volume of valuable data in both near-real-time and extended back nearly 50 years. Observations of this type enable assessment of numerous water resources management issues including water scarcity, extreme events of drought and floods, and water quality. Examples of water cycle estimates make towards the contributions to the water management community include snow cover and snowpack, soil moisture, evapotranspiration, precipitation, streamflow and ground water. The availability of water is also contingent on the quality of water and hence water quality is an important part of NASA Water Resources. Water quality activities include both nonpoint source (agriculture land use, ecosystem disturbances, impervious surfaces, etc.) and direct remote sensing ( i.e., turbidity, algae, aquatic vegetation, temperature, etc.). . The NASA Water Resources Program organizes its projects under five functional themes: 1) stream-flow and flood forecasting; 2) water consumptive use and irrigation (includes evapotranspiration); 3) drought; 4) water quality; and 5) climate impacts on water resources. Currently NASA Water Resources is supporting 21 funded projects with 11 additional projects being concluded. To maximize the use of NASA water cycle measurements end to projects are supported with strong links with decision support systems. The NASA Water Resources Program works closely with other government agencies NOAA, USDA-FAS, USGS, AFWA, USAID, universities, and non-profit, international, and private sector organizations. International water cycle applications include: 1) Famine Early Warning System Network (FEWSNET) being expanded for famine relief to many developing nations of the world using a NASA Land Data Assimilation System (LDAS); 2) Air Force Weather Agency (AFWA) global hydrology mapping program that extends their global hydrology to much finer resolutions through use of an optimized LDAS; 3) 'SERVIR' a visualization and monitoring center of Earth science information in Central America and East Africa with plans for additional locations in developing countries of the world; 4) installing NASA Water Information System Platforms (WISPs) strategically located throughout the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) in partnerships with USAID and the World Bank; and 5) Latin American capacity building efforts within GEO.

Toll, D. L.; Doorn, B.; Engman, E. T.; Lawford, R. G.

2010-12-01

416

Water Resources Data: Hawaii and Other Pacific Areas, Water Year 2004. Volume 1. Hawaii  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Water resources data for the 2004 water year for Hawaii consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams and springs; water levels and quality of water wells; and rainfall totals. * Water discharge for 66 gaging stations on streams, springs, and ditches. * Water-quality data for 4 streams, and 1 well. * Water levels for 42 observation wells. * Rainfall data for 37 rainfall stations. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating Federal, State, and other local agencies in Hawaii.

Shimizu, B. H.; Nishimoto, D. C.; Taogoshi, R. I.; Teeters, P. C.

2005-01-01

417

Water Resources Data: Hawaii and Other Pacific Areas, Water Year 2002. Volume 1. Hawaii  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Water resources data for the 2002 water year for Hawaii consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams and springs; water levels and quality of water wells; and rainfall totals. * Water discharge for 71 gaging stations on streams, springs, and ditches. * Discharge data for 93 crest-stage partial-record stations. * Water-quality data for 5 streams, 28 partial-record stations, and 65 wells. * Water levels for 83 observation wells. * Rainfall data for 38 rainfall stations. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating Federal, State, and other local agencies in Hawaii.

Wong, M. F.; Nishimoto, D. C.; Teeters, P. C.; Taogoshi, R. I.

2003-01-01

418

Water Resources Data: Hawaii and Other Pacific Areas, Water Year 2001. Volume 1. Hawaii  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Water resources data for the 2001 water year for Hawaii consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams and springs; water levels and quality of water wells; and rainfall totals. * Water discharge for 71 gaging stations on streams, springs, and ditches. * Discharge data for 92 crest-stage partial-record stations. * Water-quality data for 5 streams, 24 partial-record stations, and 103 wells. * Water levels for 87 observation wells. * Rainfall data for 38 rainfall stations. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating Federal, State, and other local agencies in Hawaii.

Taogoshi, R. I.; Wong, M. F.; Nishimoto, D. C.; Teeters, P. C.

2001-01-01

419

Water Resources Data: Hawaii and Other Pacific Areas, Water Year 2003. Volume 1. Hawaii  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Water resources data for the 2003 water year for Hawaii consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams and springs; water levels and quality of water wells; and rainfall totals. * Water discharge for 70 gaging stations on streams, springs, and ditches. * Discharge data for 97 crest-stage partial-record stations. * Water-quality data for 6 streams, and 28 partial-record stations, and 10 wells. * Water levels for 88 observation wells. * Rainfall data for 38 rainfall stations. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating Federal, State, and other local agencies in Hawaii.

Teeters, P. C.; Taogoshi, R. I.; Nishimoto, D. C.; Shimizu, B. H.

2004-01-01

420

Operating Water Resources Systems Under Climate Change Scenarios  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Population and industrial growth has resulted in intense demands on the quantity and quality of water resources worldwide. Moreover, climate change/variability is making a growing percentage of the earth's population vulnerable to extreme weather events (drought and flood). The 1996 Saguenay flood, 1997 Red River flood, the 1998 ice storm, and recent droughts in prairies are few examples of extreme weather events in Canada. Rising economic prosperity, growth in urban population, aging infrastructure, and a changing climate are increasing the vulnerability of Canadians to even more serious impacts. This growing threat can seriously undermine the social and economic viability of the country. Our ability to understand the impacts of climate change/variability on water quantity, quality, and its distribution in time and space can prepare us for sustainable management of this precious resource. The sustainability of water resources, over the medium to long-term, is critically dependent on the ability to manage (plan and operate) water resource systems under a more variable and perhaps warmer future climate. Studying the impacts of climate change/variability on water resources is complex and challenging. It is further complicated by the fact that impacts vary with time and are different at different locations. This study deals with the impacts of climate change/variability on water resources in a portion of the Red River Basin in Canada, both in terms of change in quantity and spatial-temporal distribution. A System Dynamics model is developed to describe the operation of the Shellmouth Reservoir located on the Red River in Canada. The climate data from Canadian Global Coupled Model, CGCM1 is used. The spatial system dynamics approach, based on distributed parameter control theory, is used to model the impacts of climate change/variability on water resources in time and space. A decision support system is developed to help reservoir operators and decision makers in sustainable management of water resources. The decision support system helps in analyzing the impacts of different reservoir operation scenarios, under changing climate conditions, by exploring multiple- what-if- scenarios. Canadian study areas and data sets are used for the research. However, the proposed approach provides a general framework that can be used in other parts of the world.

Ahmad, S.

2002-12-01

421

North Atlantic Regional Water Resources Study. Appendix R. Water Supply.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

While the North Atlantic REgion's 41-inch average annual precipitation is more than adequate to meet both present and future water supply needs, there is a definite need for further development and management of water sources to keep abreast of the increa...

1972-01-01

422

Water resources data, New Mexico, water year 1984  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Additional water data were collected at various sites, not involved in the systematic data collection program, and are published as miscellaneous measurements. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System collected by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating State and Federal agencies in New Mexico.

Denis, L. P.; Beal, L. V.; Allen, H. R.

1985-01-01

423

Water You Engineering? An Activity to Develop Water-Quality Awareness  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Water is one of our most precious resources. However, for many in the United States, having fresh, safe drinking water is taken for granted, and due to this perceived lack of relevance, students may not fully appreciate the luxury of having safe running water--in the home. One approach to resolving water-quality issues in the United States may…

Riskowski, Jody; Todd, Carrie Davis

2009-01-01

424

Roadmap for sustainable water resources in southwestern North America.  

PubMed

The management of water resources in arid and semiarid areas has long been a challenge, from ancient Mesopotamia to the modern southwestern United States. As our understanding of the hydrological and climatological cycles has improved, and our ability to manipulate the hydrologic cycle has increased, so too have the challenges associated with managing a limited natural resource for a growing population. Modern civilization has made remarkable progress in water management in the past few centuries. Burgeoning cities now survive in desert regions, relying on a mix of simple and complex technologies and management systems to bring adequate water and remove wastewater. These systems have permitted agricultural production and urban concentrations to expand in regions previously thought to have inadequate moisture. However, evidence is also mounting that our current management and use of water is unsustainable. Physical, economic, and ecological limits constrain the development of new supplies and additional water withdrawals, even in regions not previously thought vulnerable to water constraints. New kinds of limits are forcing water managers and policy makers to rethink previous assumptions about population, technology, regional planning, and forms of development. In addition, new threats, especially the challenges posed by climatic changes, are now apparent. Sustainably managing and using water in arid and semiarid regions such as the southwestern United States will require new thinking about water in an interdisciplinary and integrated way. The good news is that a wide range of options suggest a roadmap for sustainable water management and use in the coming decades. PMID:21149725

Gleick, Peter H

2010-12-13

425

Water-gasoline fuels: their effect on spark ignition engine emissions and performance  

Microsoft Academic Search

Single-cylinder engine tests, an analytical engine cycle simulation, and automobile tests were employed to study the effects of supplementing gasoline with water for use in spark ignition engines. Factors examined include: the method of water addition (both water-in-gasoline emulsions and direct manifold water addition), antiknock characterisitics with water additione, MBT spark requirement, indicated engine efficiency, engine cooling requirement, exhaust emissions,

B. D. Peters; R. F. Stebar

1976-01-01

426

Monthly spatial distributed water resources assessment: a case study  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Water resource conservation is of utmost importance, especially for agriculture in developing countries. Frequent occurrences of water shortage have driven more social efforts in researching on water resources spatial distribution, as the land cover changes recently have shown positive influences. For the purpose of efficient water resources management, hydrological processes under different types of land covers and soil textures are supposed to be accurately analyzed and evaluated. Recently developed distributed hydrological mode (DHM) has been a strong hydro-cycle simulation tool for inferring variability and heterogeneity of water resources distribution. In this paper, a spatially distributed Water and Energy Transfer between Soil, Plants and Atmosphere under quasi Steady State (WetSpass) model was introduced in the distributed hydro-cycle simulation on upstream Han river basin. The simulation time-step of WetSpass model was modified from originally one season to currently one month. In addition, an experiential non-linear routing algorithm was integrated into WetSpass for discharge confluence. The study area was delineated into 12 upstream to downstream routing related catchments whose land covers and soil textures were investigated and illustrated. Model verification was completed through the calibration of simulated hydrograph against observation using eleven years of continuous precipitation and meteorological data. Moreover, four criteria were used to evaluate the model performance and the calibrated results of routing parameters were discussed. Furthermore, the distribution of surface runoff generation, evapotranspiration and groundwater recharge were illustrated and analyzed considering the spatial heterogeneity of land cover and soil texture. Results showed that water resource spatial distribution and hydrological processes were closely related to land cover and soil texture and the model had achieved a success in hydro-cycle modeling of upstream Han river basin.

Wang, Yuhui; Lei, Xiaohui; Liao, Weihong; Jiang, Yunzhong; Huang, Xiaomin; Liu, Jianshe; Song, Xinshan; Wang, Hao

2012-08-01

427

Fiscal Year 1990 program report: California Water Resources Center  

SciTech Connect

The report contains a synopsis of the results of research projects sponsored under Grant No. 14-08-00001-G1550, the 1990 Water Research Institute Program (WRIP) for the University of California Water Resources Center. Five projects investigating the following topic areas are: Mixing in Bay/Delta Flows, Dynamics of Selenium and Arsenic Oxidation in Water-Sediment Systems, Adaptive Grid Refinement for Groundwater Contaminant Transport Simulation, Salinity and Fish Effects on the Plankton and Benthos of the Salton Sea: Microcosm Experiment, and Effects of Global Climate Change and Increased Atmospheric CO2 on Water Use.

Not Available

1991-07-01

428

The Wealth of Water The Value of an Essential Resource  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Many students take the availability of water for granted. This case study, which focuses on the Cochabamba water revolt in Bolivia, is designed to encourage students to think about water as a limited natural resource. Students learn about the limited nature of freshwater and the impact that access to clean water has on people across all socioeconomic demographics. Designed for a non-majors course in global ecology, the case could also be used in non-majors and majors courses in biology, environmental science, environmental policy, ethics, and international relations, among others.

Rathburn, Melanie K.; Baum, Karina J.

2009-01-01

429

Evolving urban water and residuals management paradigms: water reclamation and reuse, decentralization, and resource recovery.  

PubMed

Population growth and improving standards of living, coupled with dramatically increased urbanization, are placing increased pressures on available water resources, necessitating new approaches to urban water management. The tradition linear "take, make, waste" approach to managing water increasingly is proving to be unsustainable, as it is leading to water stress (insufficient water supplies), unsustainable resource (energy and chemicals) consumption, the dispersion of nutrients into the aquatic environment (especially phosphorus), and financially unstable utilities. Different approaches are needed to achieve economic, environmental, and social sustainability. Fortunately, a toolkit consisting of stormwater management/rainwater harvesting, water conservation, water reclamation and reuse, energy management, nutrient recovery, and source separation is available to allow more closed-loop urban water and resource management systems to be developed and implemented. Water conservation and water reclamation and reuse (multiple uses) are becoming commonplace in numerous water-short locations. Decentralization, enabled by new, high-performance treatment technologies and distributed stormwater management/rainwater harvesting, is furthering this transition. Likewise, traditional approaches to residuals management are evolving, as higher levels of energy recovery are desired, and nutrient recovery and reuse is to be enhanced. A variety of factors affect selection of the optimum approach for a particular urban area, including local hydrology, available water supplies, water demands, local energy and nutrient-management situations, existing infrastructure, and utility governance structure. A proper approach to economic analysis is critical to determine the most sustainable solutions. Stove piping (i.e., separate management of drinking, storm, and waste water) within the urban water and resource management profession must be eliminated. Adoption of these new approaches to urban water and resource management can lead to more sustainable solutions, defined as financially stable, using locally sustainable water supplies, energy-neutral, providing responsible nutrient management, and with access to clean water and appropriate sanitation for all. PMID:19774858

Daigger, Glen T

2009-08-01

430

Integrating Green and Blue Water Management Tools for Land and Water Resources Planning  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The role of land use and land use change on the hydrological cycle is well known. However, the impacts of large scale land use change are poorly considered in water resources planning, unless they require direct abstraction of water resources and associated development of infrastructure e.g. Irrigation Schemes. However, large scale deforestation for the supply of raw materials, expansion of the areas of plantation forestry, increasing areas under food production and major plans for cultivation of biofuels in many developing countries are likely to result in extensive land use change. Given the spatial extent and temporal longevity of these proposed developments, major impacts on water resources are inevitable. It is imperative that managers and planners consider the consequences for downstream ecosystems and users in such developments. However, many popular tools, such as the vitual water approach, provide only coarse scale "order of magnitude" type estimates with poor consideration of, and limited usefulness, for land use planning. In this paper, a framework for the consideration of the impacts of large scale land use change on water resources at a range of temporal and spatial scales is presented. Drawing on experiences from South Africa, where the establishment of exotic commercial forest plantations is only permitted once a water use license has been granted, the framework adopts the "green water concept" for the identification of potential high impact areas of land use change and provides for integration with traditional "blue water" water resources planning tools for more detailed planning. Appropriate tools, ranging from simple spreadsheet solutions to more sophisticated remote sensing and hydrological models are described, and the application of the framework for consideration of water resources impacts associated with the establishment of large scale tectona grandis, sugar cane and jatropha curcas plantations is illustrated through examples in Mozambique and South Africa. Keywords: Land use change, water resources, green water, blue water, biofuels, developing countries

Jewitt, G. P. W.

2009-04-01

431

Multi-National Collaborative Modeling of Water Dependent Resources in the Tigris-Euphrates River Basin  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A team of scientists and engineers from the Iraq Ministry of Water Resources, the Iraq Transition Assistance Office of the U.S. Department of State, UNESCO, and Sandia National Laboratories collaborated to build a systems model of Iraqi water resources and related systems, including transboundary water systems, surface water and reservoirs, agriculture, salinity, municipal and industrial uses, and issues related to the restoration and maintenance of the southern Mesopotamian Marshes. The model is intended to assist scientists and planners in the government of Iraq in development of its long-term Strategy for Water and Land Resources. The model is a numerical simulation built in a system dynamics environment, is bounded spatially by the watershed of the Tigris-Euphrates river system, and operates on a monthly timestep from 1930-2047. Model results for the 78-year period from 1930-2007 are calibrated to historic data. The 40-year “scenario period” from 2008-2047 allows users to simulate various and competing future scenarios for water management, and management of related systems, in Iraq. The model shows the potential impact of development of reservoirs and agriculture in upstream countries Turkey, Syria and Iran, and the impact of changes in Iraq to reservoir operations, agricultural practices, municipal and industrial approaches, and marsh restoration efforts. The modeling project is part of Iraq’s long-term planning effort known as Strategy for Water and Land Resources in Iraq. Due to the political sensitivity of water issues in the Tigris and Euphrates River system, data used to drive this model, and specific model results are proprietary to the country of Iraq. As a result, this paper will not include quantitative results, but rather a qualitative description of the model building process, qualitative model results, and lessons learned from this multi-national and multi-cultural collaborative model building effort.

Passell, H.; Roach, J. D.; Reno, M. D.; Klise, G. T.; Tidwell, V. C.

2010-12-01

432

StreamStats: A Water Resources Web Application  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Streamflow statistics, such as the 1-percent flood, the mean flow, and the 7-day 10-year low flow, are used by engineers, land managers, biologists, and many others to help guide decisions in their everyday work. For example, estimates of the 1-percent flood (the flow that is exceeded, on average, once in 100 years and has a 1-percent chance of being exceeded in any year, sometimes referred to as the 100-year flood) are used to create flood-plain maps that form the basis for setting insurance rates and land-use zoning. This and other streamflow statistics also are used for dam, bridge, and culvert design; water-supply planning and management; water-use appropriations and permitting; wastewater and industrial discharge permitting; hydropower facility design and regulation; and the setting of minimum required streamflows to protect freshwater ecosystems. In addition, researchers, planners, regulators, and others often need to know the physical and climatic characteristics of the drainage basins (basin characteristics) and the influence of human activities, such as dams and water withdrawals, on streamflow upstream from locations of interest to understand the mechanisms that control water availability and quality at those locations. Knowledge of the streamflow network and downstream human activities also is necessary to adequately determine whether an upstream activity, such as a water withdrawal, can be allowed without adversely affecting downstream activities. Streamflow statistics could be needed at any location along a stream. Most often, streamflow statistics are needed at ungaged sites, where no streamflow data are available to compute the statistics. At U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) streamflow data-collection stations, which include streamgaging stations, partial-record stations, and miscellaneous-measurement stations, streamflow statistics can be computed from available data for the stations. Streamflow data are collected continuously at streamgaging stations. Streamflow measurements are collected systematically over a period of years at partial-record stations to estimate peak-flow or low-flow statistics. Streamflow measurements usually are collected at miscellaneous-measurement stations for specific hydrologic studies with various objectives. StreamStats is a Web-based Geographic Information System (GIS) application (fig. 1) that was created by the USGS, in cooperation with Environmental Systems Research Institute, Inc. (ESRI)1, to provide users with access to an assortment of analytical tools that are useful for water-resources planning and management. StreamStats functionality is based on ESRI's ArcHydro Data Model and Tools, described on the Web at http://support.esri.com/index.cfm?fa=downloads.dataModels.filteredGateway&dmid=15. StreamStats allows users to easily obtain streamflow statistics, basin characteristics, and descriptive information for USGS data-collection stations and user-selected ungaged sites. It also allows users to identify stream reaches that are upstream and downstream from user-selected sites, and to identify and obtain information for locations along the streams where activities that may affect streamflow conditions are occurring. This functionality can be accessed through a map-based user interface that appears in the user's Web browser (fig. 1), or individual functions can be requested remotely as Web services by other Web or desktop computer applications. StreamStats can perform these analyses much faster than historically used manual techniques. StreamStats was designed so that each state would be implemented as a separate application, with a reliance on local partnerships to fund the individual applications, and a goal of eventual full national implementation. Idaho became the first state to implement StreamStats in 2003. By mid-2008, 14 states had applications available to the public, and 18 other states were in various stages of implementation.

Ries, Kernell G., III; Guthrie, John G.; Rea, Alan H.; Steeves, Peter A.; Stewart, David W.

2008-01-01

433

Water Resources Data Ohio: Water year 1994. Volume 1, Ohio River Basin excluding Project Data  

SciTech Connect

The Water Resources Division of the US Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with State agencies, obtains a large amount of data each water year (a water year is the 12-month period from October 1 through September 30 and is identified by the calendar year in which it ends) pertaining to the water resources of Ohio. These data, accumulated during many years, constitute a valuable data base for developing an improved understanding of the water resources of the State. To make these data readily available to interested parties outside the USGS, they are published annually in this report series entitled ``Water Resources Data--Ohio.`` This report (in two volumes) includes records on surface water and ground water in the State. Specifically, it contains: (1) Discharge records for streamflow-gaging stations, miscellaneous sites, and crest-stage stations; (2) stage and content records for streams, lakes, and reservoirs; (3) water-quality data for streamflow-gaging stations, wells, synoptic sites, and partial-record sit -aid (4) water-level data for observation wells. Locations of lake-and streamflow-gaging stations, water-quality stations, and observation wells for which data are presented in this volume are shown in figures 8a through 8b. The data in this report represent that part of the National Water Data System collected by the USGS and cooperating State and Federal agencies in Ohio. This series of annual reports for Ohio began with the 1961 water year with a report that contained only data relating to the quantities of surface water. For the 1964 water year, a similar report was introduced that contained only data relating to water quality. Beginning with the 1975 water year, the report was changed to present (in two or three volumes) data on quantities of surface water, quality of surface and ground water, and ground-water levels.

NONE

1994-12-31

434

Water and related problems in coal-mine areas of Alabama. Water-resources investigations (interim)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Water-resource problems or potential problems in Alabama resulting from surface and subsurface coal mining include erosion and sedimentation, flooding, diversion of drainage, decline in water level, land subsidence, and the degradation of water quality. The degradation of water quality is the most serious and widespread coal-mine related problem in Alabama. The chemical quality of water in numerous streams draining coal-mine

A. L. Knight; J. G. Newton

1977-01-01

435

Water-resources optimization model for Santa Barbara, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A simulation-optimization model has been developed for the optimal management of the city of Santa Barbara's water resources during a drought. The model, which links groundwater simulation with linear programming, has a planning horizon of 5 years. The objective is to minimize the cost of water supply subject to: water demand constraints, hydraulic head constraints to control seawater intrusion, and water capacity constraints. The decision variables are montly water deliveries from surface water and groundwater. The state variables are hydraulic heads. The drought of 1947-51 is the city's worst drought on record, and simulated surface-water supplies for this period were used as a basis for testing optimal management of current water resources under drought conditions. The simulation-optimization model was applied using three reservoir operation rules. In addition, the model's sensitivity to demand, carry over [the storage of water in one year for use in the later year(s)], head constraints, and capacity constraints was tested.

Nishikawa, T.

1998-01-01

436

A Complex Adaptive Systems Approach to Simulate Sociotechnical Dynamics in Urban Water Resources Management  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The quality and availability of water resources depends on the dynamic interactions among natural, infrastructure, and social systems. Decentralized decisions regarding land and water use shape the hydrologic characteristics of a watershed and drive the need for infrastructure to meet water demands. Simultaneously, policy-makers can update zoning regulations and drought management strategies based on the availability of natural resources. Engineering management has conventionally considered these social processes and policy adaptations as static inputs, ignoring feedbacks and interactions among decision-makers and the water system. A new modeling framework that explores the interactions among the components of an urban water system and allows the simulation of dynamic management strategies can provide new insight to the influence of feedbacks on water sustainability. This research develops and demonstrates a new Complex Adaptive Systems approach to model the interactions among population growth, land use change, the hydrologic cycle, residential water use, and inter-basin transfers. Agent-based and cellular automata models, representing consumers and policy-makers who make land and water use decisions, are coupled with hydrologic models (Figure 1). The framework is applied to simulate the complexities of urbanization and water supply for an illustrative case study over a long-term planning horizon. Results indicate that interactions among the decentralized decisions of individual residents can significantly influence system-wide sustainability. In addition, as water management decisions become more tightly constrained due to stresses of population growth, land use change, and drought, adaptive operation rules may be developed to restrict the water use and land use of consumers as the availability of water decreases. These strategies are simulated and assessed based on their abilities to increase the sustainability of the water supply system.

Zechman, E. M.; Giacomoni, M. H.

2011-12-01

437

Be a Water Watcher: A Resource Guide for Water Conservation, K-12.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This is a resource guide (in response to the New York City water emergency) for grades K-12 on the subject of water conservation. Activities are suggested for science, industrial arts, social studies, and communications arts classes. A bibliography on water is also provided. (APM)

New York City Board of Education, Brooklyn, NY. Div. of Curriculum and Instruction.

438

Integrative Analysis of Water Quality and Physical Habitat in the Ecological Design of Water Resources Projects  

Microsoft Academic Search

Historical approaches to water quality control are finding new challenges as ecosystem issues are addressed in comprehensive water resources management programs. Important issues include the recognition that physical habitat conditions may be more important than water quality when ecosystem sustainability is the management objective. Although past emphasis has been on the control of continuous discharges, modern watershed management recognizes that

EDWIN E. HERRICKS; JIAN-PING SUEN

2006-01-01

439

THE CANADIAN WATER QUALITY INDEX: A TOOL FOR WATER RESOURCES MANAGEMENT  

Microsoft Academic Search

Since its development in 2001, the Canadian Council of Ministers of the Environment (CCME) Water Quality Index (WQI) has established itself as a valuable tool for water resources management. The CCME WQI model consists of three measures of variance from selected water quality objectives (Scope; Frequency; Amplitude). These three factors combine to produce a value between 0 and 100 that

HASEEN KHAN; AMIR ALI KHAN; SARAH HALL

2005-01-01

440

Water resources data for Wisconsin, water year 1995. Water-data report (Annual), 1 October 1994-30-September 1995  

SciTech Connect

Water-resources data for the 1995 water year for Wisconsin include records of streamflow at gaging stations, partial-record stations, and miscellaneous sites, records of precipitation, and records of chemical, biological, and physical characteristics of surface water. In addition, water levels in observation wells are reported.

Holmstrom, B.K.; Olson, D.L.; Ellefson, B.R.

1996-04-01

441

Water resources data, Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands, water year 2004  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Caribbean Water Science Center of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with local and Federal agencies obtains a large amount of data pertaining to the water resources of the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico and the Territory of the U.S. Virgin Islands each water year. These data, accumulated during many water years, constitute a valuable data base for developing an improved understanding of the water resources of the area. To make these data readily available to interested parties outside the U.S. Geological Survey, the data are published annually in this report series entitled 'Water Resources Data for Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands.' This report includes records on both surface and ground water. Specifically, it contains: (1) discharge records for 89 streamflow-gaging stations, daily sediment records for 13 sediment stations, stage records for 18 reservoirs, and (2) water-quality records for 20 streamflow-gaging stations, and for 38 ungaged stream sites, 13 lake sites, 2 lagoons, and 1 bay, and (3) water-level records for 72 observation wells. Water-resources data for Puerto Rico for calendar years 1958-67 were released in a series of reports entitled 'Water Records of Puerto Rico.' Water-resources data for the U.S. Virgin Islands for the calendar years 1962-69 were released in a report entitled 'Water Records of U.S. Virgin Islands.' Included were records of streamflow, ground-water levels, and water-quality data for both surface and ground water. Beginning with the 1968 calendar year, surface-water records for Puerto Rico were released separately on an annual basis. Ground-water level records and water-quality data for surface and ground water were released in companion reports covering periods of several years. Data for the 1973-74 reports were published under separate covers. Water-resources data reports for 1975 to 2003 water years consist of one volume each and contain data for streamflow, water quality, and ground water.

Figueroa-Alamo, Carlos; Aquino, Zaida; Guzman-Rios, Senen; Sanchez, Ana V.

2006-01-01

442

Use of the Delphi Method in Resolving Complex Water Resources Issues  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The tri-state river basins, shared by Georgia, Alabama, and Florida, are being modeled by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to help facilitate agreement in an acrimonious water dispute among these different state governments. Modeling of such basin reservoir operations requires parallel understanding of several river system components: hydropower production, flood control, municipal and industrial water use, navigation, and reservoir fisheries requirements. The Delphi method, using repetitive surveying of experts, was applied to determine fisheries' water and lake-level requirements on 25 reservoirs in these interstate basins. The Delphi technique allowed the needs and requirements of fish populations to be brought into the modeling effort on equal footing with other water supply and demand components. When the subject matter is concisely defined and limited, this technique can rapidly assess expert opinion on any natural resource issue, and even move expert opinion toward greater agreement.

Taylor, Jonathan G.; Ryder, Stephen D.

2003-02-01

443

Fiscal Year 1984 Program Report: Indiana Water Resources Research Center.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

In the Indiana Water Resources Research Center program (1984), Dr. Allan Konopka studied sulfate reduction by microbes as a means of neutralizing acid in lakes. His principal finding was that sulfate-reducing bacteria can metabolize at acidic pH at rates ...

J. H. Cushman

1985-01-01

444

NASA Remote Sensing Observations for Water Resource and Infrastructure Management  

Microsoft Academic Search

Decision support tools employed by water resource and infrastructure managers often utilize data products obtained from local sources or national\\/regional databases of historic surveys and observations. Incorporation of data from these sources can be laborious and time consuming as new products must be identified, cleaned and archived for each new study site. Adding remote sensing observations to the list of

S. L. Granger; L. Armstrong; T. Farr; G. Geller; E. Heath; J. Hyon; S. Lavoie; K. McDonald; V. Realmuto; T. Stough; K. Szana

2008-01-01

445

Environmental Research In Practice: Restoration And Protection Of Water Resources  

EPA Science Inventory

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is tasked to protect human health and the environment. To carry out this task, the EPA makes use of technical expertise within its Office of Research and Development. Restoration and protection of water resources is one area of tec...

446

Integrated system dynamics toolbox for water resources planning  

Microsoft Academic Search

Public mediated resource planning is quickly becoming the norm rather than the exception. Unfortunately, supporting tools are lacking that interactively engage the public in the decision-making process and integrate over the myriad values that influence water policy. In the pages of this report we document the first steps toward developing a specialized decision framework to meet this need; specifically, a

Marissa Devan Reno; Howard David Passell; Leonard A. Malczynski; William J. Peplinski; Vincent Carroll Tidwell; Don Coursey; Jason Hanson; Kristine Grimsrud; Jennifer Thacher; Craig Broadbent; David Brookshire; Janie Chemak; Kristan Cockerill; Carlos Aragon; Heather Hallett; Enrique Vivoni; Jesse Roach

2006-01-01

447

Remotely Sensed Crop Temperature for Water Resources Management.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The overall goal of the project was to evaluate the use of the crop temperature data as a tool in the management of water resources. The specific objectives of the study were: (1) to determine the crop temperature response of some major agronomic crops to...

B. R. Gardner D. G. Watts K. L. Clawson N. J. Rosenberg R. E. Maurer

1980-01-01

448

Knowledge and information management for integrated water resource management  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Watershed information systems that integrate data and analytical tools are critical enabling technologies to support Integrated Water Resource Management (IWRM) by converting data into information, and information into knowledge. Many factors bring people to the table to participate in an IWRM fra...

449

Interpretation of Thermal Infrared Imagery for Irrigation Water Resource Management.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Water resources play a major role in the character of agricultural development in the arid western United States. This case study shows how thermal infrared imagery, which is sensitive to radiant or heat energy, can be used to interpret crop moisture content and associated stress in irrigated areas. (RM)

Nellis, M. Duane

1985-01-01

450

Ground-Water Resources of Atascosa and Frio Counties, Texas.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

To evaluate the present and future ground-water resources of Atascosa and Frio Counties a comprehensive study of the area has been conducted. The economy of both counties is based on diversified agriculture and on the production of oil and gas. Ground wat...

W. H. Alexander D. E. White

1966-01-01

451

Flood Mitigation and Water Resources Development: Volume I.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Indo-U.S. Subcommission on Science and Technology in its meeting held in Nov. 1978, realizing the importance of flood mitigation and water resources enhancement, decided that collaborative research should be undertaken in this area by the scientists o...

M. C. Chaturvedi

1981-01-01

452

Sea-Level Rise: Implications for Water Resources Management  

Microsoft Academic Search

Globally, sea level has been rising for more than the last one hundred years, and is expected to do so into the foreseeable future, and at an accelerating rate. The direct influences of sea-level rise on water resources come principally from the following: new or accelerated coastal erosion; more extensive coastal inundation and higher levels of sea flooding; increases in

John E. Hay; Nobuo Mimura

2005-01-01

453

Optimization approach for water resources long term planning and management  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Integration of short-term operation and long-term planning is one of the challenges of development and management of water resources systems. This research is interested in an optimization algorithm consisting of a short-term time step dynamic programming (DP) formulation, coupled with a long-term time step expectation of the future benefit function of flows scenarios. The method takes into account the short-term variability or seasonality of the flow regime as well as long-term uncertainty of flows, which is actuated by either climate change or global climate variability associated with phases of oceanic and atmospheric phenomena. The DP is used to determine an optimum operating policy of flows scenarios for the short-term time step. The use of flows scenarios in optimization problem represents the stochastic aspect of flows, and transition between scenarios is done at long-term time step. This method could be used for water resources planning in the context of future hydrologic regime uncertainties or to evaluate climate change impacts on existing water resources systems. The algorithm was tested for optimum hydropower production of Manicouagan water resources system, Québec, Canada, with two hydropower plants with reservoir and three run-of-river plants, for a period of 90 years, from 2010 to 2099. Future climate weekly time step operating policy was produced with two time steps: annual time step for management of water resources in non-stational climate and a weekly time step for flow seasonality. Annual flows have been used to compute transition probabilities between flow scenarios. Results show that there will be an increase of hydropower production in the future climate thanks to the increase of seasonal and annual flows. However, climate change will reduce the efficiency of the existing hydropower system, with more unproductive spills. The algorithm permitted to evaluate the impact of climate change on water resources without taking any assumptions other than the climate change scenarios and it was able to adapt the operating policy to the climate seasonality and climate change uncertainties in the optimization problem. Key words: water resources, optimization, non-stational climate, flow regime, dynamic programming

Haguma, D.; Leconte, R.; Krau, S.; Côté, P.

2012-04-01

454

Climate change impacts on Central Asian water resources  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Central Asia is in large parts dominated by low precipitation and, consequentially, by low water availability. Therefore, changes of natural water resources induced by climate change are of high interest. The aim of this study is to analyse the potential impact of climate change on Central Asian water resources until the end of the 21st century and to point out the main affected regions. Thus, simulations with the large-scale hydrology model WaterGAP3 for the baseline and scenario periods were performed with outputs from three General Circulation Models (GCMs: ECHAM5, IPSL-CM4, and CNRM-CM3) and two IPCC-SRES emission scenarios (A2 and B1). The results show that mean modelled annual water availability increases for all scenarios and GCMs while CNRM-CM3 induces the wettest water situation for the 2085s and ECHAM5 the lowest water availability. Furthermore, robust trends to wetter or dryer conditions could be found for many basins. A seasonal shift of mean modelled water availability could be derived for ECHAM5 which does not show a second peak during summer. The application of daily input data showed no improvement of modelled monthly river discharges for most Central Asian basins compared to monthly input data.

Malsy, M.; Aus der Beek, T.; Eisner, S.; Flörke, M.

2012-12-01

455

Local water rights and local water user entities: the unsung heroines of water resource management in Tanzania  

Microsoft Academic Search

When considering water management, formal institutions tend to overshadow the local informal ones although the latter guide day-to-day interactions on water use. Conversely, Integrated Water Resources Management (IWRM) has demonstrated a bias toward the formal state-based institutions for water management. A study was carried out to examine how local water rights and local informal institutional arrangements influence water management in

Charles S. Sokile; Barbara van Koppen

2004-01-01

456

Geotechnical, Rock and Water Digital Library (GROW)  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

GROW emphasizes the areas of civil engineering that focus on geotechnical resources and rock and water resources engineering. GROW gathers resources that can be used to support learning in these topic areas. This includes learning units, modules, lectures, demonstrations etc.

457

Resources  

MedlinePLUS

... Depression - resources Diabetes - resources Digestive disease - resources Drug abuse - resources Eating disorders - resources Elder care - resources Epilepsy - resources Family troubles - resources Gastrointestinal ...

458

Water resources data for Texas, water year 1997. Volume 4. Ground-water data. Water-data report (Annual), 1 October 1996-30 September 1997  

SciTech Connect

Water-resources data for the 1997 water year for Texas consists of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage and contents in lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality in wells. Volume 4 contains water levels for 790 observation wells and 245 water-quality data for monitoring wells.

Gandara, S.C.; Jones, R.E.; Barbie, D.L.

1997-12-03

459

Water resources data for Texas, water year 1996. Volume 4. Ground-water data. Water-data report (Annual), 1 October 1995-30 September 1996  

SciTech Connect

Water-resources data for the 1996 water year for Texas consists of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage and contents in lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality in wells. Volume 4 contains water levels for 845 observation wells and 187 water-quality data for monitoring wells.

Gandara, S.C.; Jones, R.E.; Barbie, D.L.

1996-11-22

460

Water resources data for Texas, water year 1996. Volume 4. Ground-water data. Water-data report (Annual), 1 October 1995-30 September 1996  

Microsoft Academic Search

Water-resources data for the 1996 water year for Texas consists of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage and contents in lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality in wells. Volume 4 contains water levels for 845 observation wells and 187 water-quality data for monitoring wells.

S. C. Gandara; R. E. Jones; D. L. Barbie

1996-01-01

461

Water resources data for Texas, water year 1994. Volume 4. Ground-water data. Water-data report (Annual), 1 October 1993-30 September 1994  

Microsoft Academic Search

Water-resources data for the 1994 water year for Texas consists of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage and contents in lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality in wells. Volume 4 contains water levels for 698 observation wells and water-quality data for 97 monitoring wells.

S. C. Gandara; R. E. Jones

1994-01-01

462

Water resources data for Texas, water year 1997. Volume 4. Ground-water data. Water-data report (Annual), 1 October 1996-30 September 1997  

Microsoft Academic Search

Water-resources data for the 1997 water year for Texas consists of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage and contents in lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality in wells. Volume 4 contains water levels for 790 observation wells and 245 water-quality data for monitoring wells.

S. C. Gandara; R. E. Jones; D. L. Barbie

1997-01-01

463

Water resources data for Texas, water year 1993. Volume 4. Ground-water data. Water-data report (Annual), 1 October 1992-30 September 1993  

Microsoft Academic Search

Water-resources data for the 1993 water year for Texas consists of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage and contents in lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality in wells. Volume 4 contains water levels for 771 observation wells and water-quality data for 226 monitoring wells.

S. C. Gandara; R. E. Jones

1993-01-01

464

Water resources data for Texas, water year 1995. Volume 4. Ground-water data. Water-data report (Annual), 1 October 1994-30 September 1995  

Microsoft Academic Search

Water-resources data for the 1995 water year for Texas consists of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage and contents in lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality in wells. Volume 4 contains water levels for 919 observation wells and 226 water-quality data for monitoring wells.

S. C. Gandara; R. E. Jones

1995-01-01

465

WATER QUALITY CONTROL STUDY, MIDDLE SNAKE RIVER WATER RESOURCES DEVELOPMENT  

EPA Science Inventory

On February 5, 1964, the Federal Power Commission issued a license to Pacific Northwest Power Company for construction and operation of its proposed High Mountain Sheep Project on the Snake River (170602, 170501). This investigation by the Federal Water Pollution Control Adminis...

466

GLOBALIZATION AND WATER RESOURCES MANAGEMENT: THE CHANGING VALUE OF WATER  

Microsoft Academic Search

*** ABSTRACT: The Jordan River system, which is shared by Syria, Lebanon, Israel, Jordan and Palestine, is a major issue in the current Middle East peace negotiations. Although we believe that the International Water Law is the most suitable basis to solve the disputes between Arab countries and Israel, it is worthwhile developing multi- weighting approximation criteria for determining the

Bassam I. Sawalhi; Ziad A. Mimi; Amjad S. Aliewi

467

Water balance and water resources of the Aral sea basin and its man-induced changes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Presented natural-climatological characteristics of water resources forming conditions of the Aral sea basin. Analised flow variability correlation of Amy Darya and Syr Darya from the point of their influence on the sea level fluctuation.

A. V. Belyaev

1995-01-01

468

Re-refined locomotive engine oils and resource conservation  

Microsoft Academic Search

A brief review covers the historical background of re-refining in North America; engine oil contaminants and the role of additives; re-refining processes, including the (sulfuric) acid\\/clay process with its environmental problems associated with acid sludge disposal, the distillation\\/clay process, and the distillation\\/hydrofinishing process; the satisfactory physical, chemical, and performance characteristics of re-refined oils; and the legislative status of oil re-refining,

F. J. Blatz; R. F. Pedall

1979-01-01

469

Water resources data New York water year 2003, volume 2: Long Island  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Water resources data for the 2003 water year for Long Island New York consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage, contents, and water quality of lakes and reservoirs; stage and water quality of estuaries; and water levels and water quality of ground-water wells. This volume contains records for water discharge at 15 gaging stations; lake stage at 7 gaging stations; tide stage at 6 gaging stations; and water levels at 478 observation wells. Also included are data for 10 low-flow partial record stations. Additional water data were collected at various sites not involved in the systematic data-collection program, and are published as miscellaneous measurements and analyses. These data, together with the data in volumes 1 and 3 represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with State, Federal, and other agencies in New York.

Spinello, A. G.; Busciolano, R.; Pena-Cruz, G.; Winowitch, R. B.

2004-01-01

470

Water Resources Data New York Water Year 2004, Volume 2: Long Island  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Water resources data for the 2004 water year for Long Island New York consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage, contents, and water quality of lakes and reservoirs; stage and water quality of estuaries; and water levels an