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1

Water Resources Engineering First Edition  

E-print Network

Water Resources Engineering First Edition Larry W. Mays, Ph.D., P.E., P.H. Professor of Civil Cataloging in Publication Data: Mays, Larry W. Water Resources Engineering/Larry W. Mays. -- 1st ed. ISBN 0 the many students that I have taught over the years. Several of my past Ph.D. students have helped me

Mays, Larry W.

2

Ecological Engineering in Water Resources  

Microsoft Academic Search

Ecological engineering is a relatively unfamiliar; cost-effective strategy for tackling the “second generation” of water resource problems. It can be defined as the design, construction, operation, and management of landscape\\/aquatic structures and associated plant and animal communities to benefit humanity and nature. It is introduced by comparing it with “conventional” engineering, including case studies with cost and performance data. Ecological

Kirk R. Barrett

1999-01-01

3

Water and Environmental Resources Engineering  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Learn about careers, education, and research in water and environmental engineering from diverse undergraduate and graduate engineering students. See what excites them about their future careers. Learn what engineers do, observe first hand student research projects on cleaning up wastewater and oil spills. Gives advice to students from students about engineering careers and training. Answers the questions "Is engineering too hard?" and "Are engineers geeks?"

Lilly Boruszkowski

4

NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE 212 AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING BUILDING  

E-print Network

NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE 212 AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING BUILDING THE UNIVERSITY Nebraska Water Resources Research Institute University of Nebraska 212 Agricultural Engineering Lincoln OF NEBRASKA LINCOLN, NEBRASKA 68503 WATER RESOURCES NEWS ~ Volume 1 Number 8 IRRIGATION SHORT COURSE December

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

5

Economic Representation of Agricultural Activities in Water Resources Systems Engineering  

E-print Network

i Economic Representation of Agricultural Activities in Water Resources Systems Engineering Representation of Agricultural Activities in Water Resources Systems Engineering Abstract Water demands reflect with stochastic, linear, and quadratic optimization for simulating agricultural water decision and demands

Lund, Jay R.

6

Water Works! Water Resources Engineering and Turbine Energy  

E-print Network

Water Works! Water Resources Engineering and Turbine Energy Facilitators: Dr. Jairo Hernandez for society. Water can be a tremendous resource when it comes to generating energy and work. The reason for this, is because when water is moving it is a force. This force carries momentum. Momentum

Barrash, Warren

7

NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE 212 AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING BUILDING  

E-print Network

is Deputy Director for Water Resources Research. WASTE GUIDE ON THERMAL POLLUTION Copies of an "Industrial, Pacific Northwest Water Laboratory, Corvallis, Oregon, 97330, or Federal Water Pollution ControlNEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE 212 AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING BUILDING THE UNIVERSITY

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

8

Master of Science in Civil Engineering Environmental Engineering/Water Resources Engineering  

E-print Network

Master of Science in Civil Engineering Environmental Engineering/Water Resources Engineering of Physics I COMPUTER SCIENCE CE 1305 - Engineering Analysis Ic CIVIL ENGINEERING CE 2301 - Statics CE 3303 3342 - Mathematical Statistics for Engineers and Scientists a MATH 3350 ­ Differential Equationsb

Gelfond, Michael

9

NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE 212 AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING BUILDING  

E-print Network

NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE 212 AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING BUILDING THE UNIVERSITY OF NEBRASKA LINCOLN, NEBRASKA 68503 WATER RESOURCES NEWS E -- -'----2 , ~_---.J-- Volume 2 Number 6 OWRR TITLE II PROPOSALS INVITED June, Julv 1970 The Office of Water Resources Research, U. S. Department

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

10

Environmental, Water Resources, and Geotechnical Engineering Seminar Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering  

E-print Network

Environmental, Water Resources, and Geotechnical Engineering Seminar Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Yale University Membrane Distillation for Enhancing Sustainability at the Water and Environmental Engineering Wednesday, February 12, 2014, 4:30 ­ 5:30 PM 1670 Beyster Building (North Campus

Kamat, Vineet R.

11

Environmental and Water Resources Engineering Seminar Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering  

E-print Network

Environmental and Water Resources Engineering Seminar Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering Wednesday, January 8, 2014, 4:30 ­ 5:30 PM 1670 Beyster Building (North Campus) University in Environmental Engineering Infrastructure and Environment Research Division University of Glasgow Developing

Kamat, Vineet R.

12

Environmental and Water Resources Engineering Seminar Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering  

E-print Network

Environmental and Water Resources Engineering Seminar Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering Thursday, January 9, 2014, 4:30 ­ 5:30 PM 2315 GG Brown Building (North Campus) University. Microbial methods for water sampling are often designed to recover specific types of microbes from specific

Kamat, Vineet R.

13

Environmental, Water Resources, and Geotechnical Engineering Seminar Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering  

E-print Network

Environmental, Water Resources, and Geotechnical Engineering Seminar Department of Civil sequestration, geothermal energy, and eco-friendly construction materials. The understanding and prediction experimental and theoretical microporomechanic approach for assessing the microtexture and material invariant

Kamat, Vineet R.

14

M.Sc (Hydraulic Engineering & Water Resources Management) / M.Sc (Civil Engineering)  

E-print Network

NUS-TUD M.Sc (Hydraulic Engineering & Water Resources Management) / M.Sc (Civil Engineering) Double Degree Programme APPLICATION BOOKLET #12;Application Checklist Application materials include proof of change in name (if you had your name changed and your name in NRIC /Passport is not identical

Chaudhuri, Sanjay

15

Environmental and Water Resources Engineering Seminar Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering  

E-print Network

Environmental and Water Resources Engineering Seminar Department of Civil and Environmental and Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering University of Michigan Future Scenario Modeling to Evaluate the Environmental Impacts of a New Technology Abstract: Estimating environmental impacts of a system at an early

Kamat, Vineet R.

16

Environmental and Water Resources Engineering Seminar Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering  

E-print Network

Environmental and Water Resources Engineering Seminar Department of Civil and Environmental of Michigan Jonathan L. Goodall, Ph.D. Associate Professor, Civil and Environmental Engineering University of Virginia Integrated modeling of hydro-environmental and infrastructure systems Abstract: A trend in civil

Kamat, Vineet R.

17

U.S. Army Engineer Institute for Water Resources  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The U.S. Army Engineer Institute for Water Resources (IWR) was created "to provide forward-looking analysis and research in developing methodologies to aid the Civil Works program." Their website is well-organized, and the homepage features a "How Do I"" set of links that will swiftly direct visitors to areas about IWR history, contact information, projects, and publications. The "Latest News and Project Highlights" is a good place to start, as it contains information about recent workshop projects, new fact sheets on IWR projects, and recent policy statements. Policy types will want to click on the "Publications" area straight away to read reports on environmental investments, alternative dispute resolution, and dam safety. Other visitors may wish to look at the "Featured Projects" area, which includes dredging data materials, details on harbor maintenance, and their hydrologic modeling system.

18

Remote sensing programs and courses in engineering and water resources  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The content of typical basic and advanced remote sensing and image interpretation courses are described and typical remote sensing graduate programs of study in civil engineering and in interdisciplinary environmental remote sensing and water resources management programs are outlined. Ideally, graduate programs with an emphasis on remote sensing and image interpretation should be built around a core of five courses: (1) a basic course in fundamentals of remote sensing upon which the more specialized advanced remote sensing courses can build; (2) a course dealing with visual image interpretation; (3) a course dealing with quantitative (computer-based) image interpretation; (4) a basic photogrammetry course; and (5) a basic surveying course. These five courses comprise up to one-half of the course work required for the M.S. degree. The nature of other course work and thesis requirements vary greatly, depending on the department in which the degree is being awarded.

Kiefer, R. W.

1981-01-01

19

WATER RESOURCES NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE  

E-print Network

WATER RESOURCES NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE 212 AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING BUILDING Committee on Natioha1 Water Resources report in 1961 and the formation of the Committee on Water Resources in emphasis"and values regarding water resources' research. Interest has shifted from}J4ter supply

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

20

Environmental and Water Resources Engineering Seminar Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering  

E-print Network

Environmental and Water Resources Engineering Seminar Department of Civil and Environmental Scientist, Center for Sustainable Systems, SNRE University of Michigan Environmental Impacts of Coal Power this flexibility and operating them in such a manner may increase emissions and reduce the environmental benefits

Kamat, Vineet R.

21

Fountains, Golf Courses and Music: Design Projects in Water Resources Engineering Education  

E-print Network

Fountains, Golf Courses and Music: Design Projects in Water Resources Engineering Education Thomas engineering "to life." The students (working in groups of 3) designed a water feature (fountain) and a golf of designing a water feature (fountain) and a golf course water system for the proposed resort, "Le Reve

Piechota, Thomas C.

22

WATER RESOURCES NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE  

E-print Network

WATER RESOURCES NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE 212 AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING BUILDING.ROGRAM FOR THE 1972, I~TERDISCIPL1NARY SEMINAR ON WATER RESOURCES1 The Interdisciplinary Water Resources Seminar upper classmen,graduate stUdents, ~rofessiona1 persons, faculty, nd others interested 1n water topics

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

23

WATER RESOURCES NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE  

E-print Network

WATER RESOURCES NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE 212 AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING BUILDING OF THE DIRECTOR . . · Once again during the spring 1973 semester the Nebraska Water Resources Research Institute will sponsor an Interdisciplinary Water Resources Seminar. These seminars have been held for the past five

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

24

WATER RESOURCES NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE  

E-print Network

WATER RESOURCES NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE 212 AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING BUILDING,000,000 for the Sec. 101 matching grant program, and $2,000,000 for the Title II program. INTERDISCIPLINARY WATER RESOURCE SEMINAR An Interdisciplinary Water Resource Seminar will be offered during the 1970 Semeste

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

25

WATER RESOURCES NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE  

E-print Network

WATER RESOURCES NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE 212 AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING BUILDING LABLE FRm1 ~.~, VI I RI RI I · The Nebraska Water Resources Research Institute has recently issued a new. This publi- cation may be obtained by writing: Dr. Warren Viessman, Jr., Director, Nebraska Water Resources

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

26

WATER RESOURCES NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE  

E-print Network

WATER RESOURCES NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE 212 AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING BUILDING Research application is an educational activity. Its aim is to pro- duce a change in the water resource environment by producing a change in people who manage water resources. #12;-2- 6. Provide Readable Reports

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

27

Water Use in Agricultural Watersheds Derrel Martin, Professor, Irrigation and Water Resources Engineer, Dept. of Biological Systems  

E-print Network

Water Use in Agricultural Watersheds Derrel Martin, Professor, Irrigation and Water Resources Engineer, Dept. of Biological Systems Engineering, UNL Background Concerns about water use have intensified and Republican River Basins, and the implementation of LB 962. To understand water use it is helpful to consider

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

28

WATER RESOURCES NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE  

E-print Network

WATER RESOURCES NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE 212 AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING BUILDING of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969, water resources professionals squarely faced the fact that water has changed and improved the entire planning process so that it will ultimately serve water and other

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

29

Bridging Water Resources Policy and Environmental Engineering in the Classroom at Cornell University  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Current university undergraduate students in environmental sciences and engineering are the next generation of environmental protection practitioners. Recognizing this, Cornell's Biological and Environmental Engineering department has developed a popular class, Watershed Engineering (BEE 473), specifically designed to bridge the too-common gap between water resources policy and state-of-art science and technology. Weekly homework assignments are to design real-life solutions to actual water resources problems, often with the objective of applying storm water policies to local situations. Where appropriate, usually in conjunction with recent amendments to the Federal Clean Water Act, this course introduces water resource protection tools and concepts developed in the Cornell Soil and Water Lab. Here we present several examples of how we build bridges between university classrooms and the complex world of water resources policy.

Walter, M. T.; Shaw, S. B.; Seifert, S.; Schwarz, T.

2006-12-01

30

WATER RESOURCES NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE  

E-print Network

WATER RESOURCES NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE 212 AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING BUILDING ALLOTMENT PROJECT DEADLINE The Nebraska Water Resources Research Institute is now prepared to receive basicIe. LB-334, enacted by the 1969 Legislature, authorized the Nebraska Soil a~d Water Conservation

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

31

WATER RESOURCES AND CLIMATE  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Water resources engineers and managers routinely deal with changes in water availability, demand, and usage. The effects of climate change and variations on water resources represent an additional consideration among others. A book “Climate Change, Climate Variations and Water Resources Engineering...

32

Proceedings ASCE International Water Resources Engineering Conference August 8-12, 1999, Seattle, WA  

E-print Network

1 Proceedings ASCE International Water Resources Engineering Conference August 8-12, 1999, Seattle is a two-dimensional water quality and hydrodynamic code supported by the USACE Waterways Experiments Station (Cole and Buchak, 1995). This model has been widely applied to stratified surface water systems

Wells, Scott A.

33

WATER RESOURCES NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE  

E-print Network

WATER RESOURCES NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE 212 AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING BUILDING~ November 1973 Opportunities for cost effective research related to energy-water issues are abundant. Many. It would be impossible to list all fruitful avenues for energy-water research, but some important issues

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

34

WATER RESOURCES NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE  

E-print Network

WATER RESOURCES NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE 212 AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING BUILDING during precipitation-free periods and constitutes the principal source of fresh water for many arid local- ities. About 70-80 percent of the water used in Nebraska is from groundwater sources, while the national

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

35

Engineering Resources  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The American Society for Mechanical Engineers (ASME) was founded in 1880 by a small group of leading industrialists, and has grown since that time to include over 120,000 members in over 150 countries. This section of their website brings together a clutch of resources for those seeking to learn about career paths in the field. This page is a great way to get young people thinking about joining this noble profession.

36

NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE 212 AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING BUILDING  

E-print Network

and Hater Programs is placing more emphasis on water pollution control. EPA Administrator William D and water pollution control specialists. #12;have three divisions: data support, and (3) to give greater planning. ''If.Te are making these changes in order to water pollution control strategy and in wide cleanup

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

37

NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE 212 AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING BUILDING  

E-print Network

request. #12;-3- THERMAL POLLUTION Senator Tydings (d-Md) has introduced S.2768, which would require and operation of nuclear power plants. This bill would supplement s. 7, the Water Quality Improvement Act of 1969, which will require certification by the state water pollution control

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

38

Environmental and Water Resources Engineering Seminar Friday, March 21, 2012  

E-print Network

, North Campus The University of Michigan 4:00 ­ 5:00 PM Dr. Thanos Papanicolaou, Professor Civil with prevalent landscape features in intense agriculture watersheds, affect short-and long-term Soil Organic & Environmental Engineering The University of Iowa "Causes and Effects of Noise in Landscape Dynamics

Kamat, Vineet R.

39

ERTS program of the US Army Corps of Engineers. [water resources  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Army Corps of Engineers research and development efforts associated with the ERTS Program are confined to applications of investigation, design, construction, operation, and maintenance of water resource projects. Problems investigated covered: (1) resource inventory; (2) environmental impact; (3) pollution monitoring; (4) water circulation; (5) sediment transport; (6) data collection systems; (7) engineering; and (8) model verification. These problem areas were investigated in relation to bays, reservoirs, lakes, rivers, coasts, and regions. ERTS-1 imagery has been extremely valuable in developing techniques and is now being used in everyday applications.

Jarman, J. W.

1974-01-01

40

Environmental and Water Resources Engineering Seminar Wednesday, March 28, 2012  

E-print Network

as Incubators of Halogenated-Phenol Mediated Antibiotic Resistant Bacteria" Recent studies show that chlorinated phenolic compounds such as some disinfection by-products and commercial sanitizers can activate antibiotic resistant phenotypes in bacteria. It is a potential concern that conditions in point-of-use (PoU) water

Kamat, Vineet R.

41

WATER RESOURCES NEWS t'~EBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE  

E-print Network

WATER RESOURCES NEWS t'~EBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE 212 AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING.J~!GHIEEP. HlG STlJDF,~'T SELECTED FOR INSTITUTE DE WATER RESOURCES PLNm ING /\\HALYS ISAND REVIEl"1STIJDY Gary A studentjwho will work in 2-men teams with exneri- enced Corps of Engineers water resources planners

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

42

Water Resources  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Uses of ERTS-1 imagery and data for water resources surveys and management are summarized. Areas discussed are: (1) land use and geology; (2) flood plain and flood inundation mapping; (3) snow cover mapping; (4) glacier observations; (5) data collection systems; (6) surface waters; (7) wetlands mapping; (8) water quality; (9) soil mapping; (10) phreatophyte and riparian vegetation mapping; and (11) evapotranspiration.

Salomonson, V. V.

1973-01-01

43

Water resources  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The application of ERTS-1 imagery to the conservation and control of water resources is discussed. The effects of exisiting geology and land use in the water shed area on the hydrologic cycle and the general characteristics of runoff are described. The effects of floods, snowcover, and glaciers are analyzed. The use of ERTS-1 imagery to map surface water and wetland areas to provide rapid inventorying over large regions of water bodies is reported.

Salomonson, V. V.; Rango, A.

1973-01-01

44

Water Resources Engineering MSCE Option For thesis, report, or courses-only options, the core courses and four engineering or other appropriate electives must  

E-print Network

Water Resources Engineering MSCE Option For thesis, report, or courses-only options, the core courses and four engineering or other appropriate electives must be taken. One course in geographic Hydraulics (f) CE 5361 Surface Water Hydrology (s) CE 5362 Surface Water Modeling (s [CE 5360]) CE 5363

Gelfond, Michael

45

WATER RESOURCES NEWS NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE  

E-print Network

WATER RESOURCES NEWS NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE 212 AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING\\R PLN'~lFn The Nebraska Water Resources Research Instituie (NWRRI) is planning a two-day Seminar, enti of this conference is to acquaint water resources planners, managers, developers, researchers, and educators

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

46

WATER RESOURCES NEWS NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE  

E-print Network

WATER RESOURCES NEWS NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE 212 AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING INSTITUTES A SUCCESS The Water Resources Research Ins ti tute re cently sponsored two very successful one-week Summer Institutes. The titles of the Institutes were "Optimal Analysis of Water Resources Systems

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

47

WATER RESOURCES NEWS NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE  

E-print Network

WATER RESOURCES NEWS m NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE 212 AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING'f,R PLAmlEll The Nebraska Water Resources Research Institute (NWRRI) is planning a t wo-cday Seminar, entitled "Water Resources PlanninfT and Public Opinion", to be he Ld March 8,9, 1971 at the Nebraska Center

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

48

WATER RESOURCES NEWS NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE  

E-print Network

WATER RESOURCES NEWS NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE 212 AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING Water Resources Research Institute will once agai n sponsor a one-week Summer Insti tute.jlu ly 21-26, 1974. Thi s year's theme is "Quantitative Planning Techniques in Water Resources. II The objective

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

49

Arkansas Water Resources Center  

E-print Network

Keywords -- Agriculture / Pesticides / Water Quality / Poultry Waste / Surface Runoff / Solute TransportArkansas Water Resources Center EFFECT OF LAND APPLICATION OF POULTRY WASTE ON PESTICIDE LOSS June and Agricultural Engineering, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, Arkansas Publication No. PUB-158 Arkansas Water

Soerens, Thomas

50

WATER RESOURCES NEWS NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE  

E-print Network

WATER RESOURCES NEWS NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE 212 AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING OF THE DIRECTOR . . . April 1973 NEBRASKA AND THE NATIONAL WATER COMMISSION REPORT The National Water Commission grew out of con t r-ovc rey over water resource deve lopment in the Colorado River Basin. Rp

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

51

Scientific Allocation of Water Resources.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Oriented for higher education students, researchers, practicing engineers and planners, this book surveys the state of the art of water resources engineering. A broad spectrum of issues is embraced in the treatment of water resources: quantity aspects as well as quality aspects within a systems approach. Using a rational mode for water resources

Buras, Nathan

52

WATER RESOURCES NEWS NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE  

E-print Network

WATER RESOURCES NEWS NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE 212 AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING OF INTEREST 1. -:1-!at er Leve1 s in Ob servat ion l·reJ 1 s in lITebra s ka 196 8 ~l > Nebraska Water Survey of soil and water resources. When #12;-2- completely operational, the data bank should be a great asset

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

53

WATER RESOURCES NEWS NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE  

E-print Network

WATER RESOURCES NEWS NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE 212 AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING-Oriented Water Research Plan for Nebraska, II is by Dr. Harren ViessL~n, Jr. This publication rnay be obta ined by vrr i ting : Dr · Warren Viessrnan, Jr., Director, Nebraska water Resources Research Institute, 212

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

54

WATER RESOURCES NEWS NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE  

E-print Network

WATER RESOURCES NEWS NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE 212 AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING that the traditional acceptance of and fundin0 approach to extensive water resources development projects would change. The era of large public works projects for water development is over insofar as national parti- cipation

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

55

WATER RESOURCES NEWS NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE  

E-print Network

WATER RESOURCES NEWS NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE 212 AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING . . . July 1973 The final report of the National Water Commission entitled Water Policies for the Future has been issued. Because its con- cluslons -a-rid -re-commend-atlOnsmay have far-reaching effects on water

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

56

Reformulation of Engineering Education at Undergraduate Level in the Faculdad de Ingenieria y Ciencias Hidricas Universidad Nacional del Litoral--Water Resources and Engineering Degrees.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper explains the educational changes in the Water Resources Engineering program offered by the Universidad Nacional del Litoral in Santa Fe, Argentina, for the last 20 years at the undergraduate level. The need for modernizing the engineering teaching program occurred due to changes in the social system in which the concepts of development…

Theiler, Julio; Isla, Miguel; Arrillaga, Hugo; Ceirano, Eduardo; Lozeco, Cristobal

57

Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering CEE 691 Environmental and Water Resources Engineering Seminar  

E-print Network

Post-doctoral researcher Dept. of CEE, UMass Amherst How can we analyze couple natural- human complex Technical Manager, American Water 7-Oct Kevin Knuuti Technical Director, The US Army Cold Regions Research Lecturer Senior Vice President and Chief Technology Officer, CH2M HILL Since We Know What to Do, Why Aren

Mountziaris, T. J.

58

WATER RESOURCES .NEWS NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE  

E-print Network

WATER RESOURCES .NEWS NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE 212 AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING" DIRECTOR ... c---~ / --'-----::L.\\ ".~-' ~1arch 1973 Incrc~sinq demands on our water supolies dictate~at~ent processes are improved and the procurement and development of naturJl water sources becomes increasingly

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

59

WATER RESOURCES NEWS NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE  

E-print Network

WATER RESOURCES NEWS NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE 212 AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING BUilDING THE UNIVERSITY OF NEBRASKA LINCOLN, NEBRASKA 68503 Volume 2 Number 4 April 1970 INCREASED FUNDS FOR STATE WATER thus far include such educational and scientific organizations as the Universities Council on Water

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

60

Engineering and Mineral Resources  

E-print Network

News ????????????????? ® College of Engineering and Mineral Resources Winter 2008 table of contents. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 wvCROSSROADS DepartmentofCivilandEnvironmentalEngineering Civil engineering exchange program and environmental engineering with a focus in transportation will have the opportunity to study abroad as part

Mohaghegh, Shahab

61

Postgraduate Programmes on Environmental Water Resources Engineering and Management in Greek Universities  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The management of complex water problems is nowadays being practised through new ways and approaches. Therefore, water engineers, planners and managers should be appropriately educated through modern undergraduate curricula and by well-designed postgraduate specialisation programmes. Within this framework, a study of the specific characteristics…

Latinopoulos, Pericles; Angelidis, Panagiotis

2014-01-01

62

Resource Engineering MSc Programme  

E-print Network

materials can be recycled from waste. Beyond engineering, the programme also covers business economics of minerals and recycling technologies. The Resource Engineering programme focuses on practical applications the techniques that should be employed in order to recover valuable resources from waste streams. Metallurgy

Langendoen, Koen

63

The role of the United States Water Resources Engineering Community in responding to the water related needs of the developing world  

E-print Network

THK ROLE OF THK UNITED STATES WATER RESOURCES ENGINEERING COMMUNITY IN RESPONDING TO THE WATER- RELATED NEEDS OF THK DEVELOPING WORLD A Thesis by TIMOTHY PAUL ORMOND Submitted to thc Office of Graduate Studies of Texas AdtM Vnivcrsdy... both the perspechve of the developing world (asscssiug the needs) and from the perspective of the U. S. (identifying its resources and potential for increased involvement). The developing country perspective includes a comprehensive survey...

Ormond, Timothy Paul

1993-01-01

64

Water Resources Georgia  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Water Resources Georgia: From the USGS web site comes the Georgia Water Information Network (GWIN)which offers water information for thousands of surface-water, ground-water, and water-quality measurement sites in Georgia.

65

System International d'Unites: Metric Measurement in Water Resources Engineering.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This pamphlet gives definitions and symbols for the basic and derived metric units, prefixes, and conversion factors for units frequently used in water resources. Included are conversion factors for units of area, work, heat, power, pressure, viscosity, flow rate, and others. (BB)

Klingeman, Peter C.

66

Discrete-Time Optimal Control for Water Resources Engineering and Management  

Microsoft Academic Search

Rapid population growth and a rising public awareness concerning environmental issues over the last few decades have caused a demand for improved performance in water resources management. These demands will likely grow and evolve into increasingly severe constraints for managers throughout the 21 century. Unfortunately, decision makers will be less able to rely on previous experiences in adapting to these

John W. Nicklow

2000-01-01

67

Water Resources: Hydraulics and Hydrology  

E-print Network

Water Resources: Hydraulics and Hydrology Interview with Margaret S. Petersen #12;This manuscript. Greenwood's interviews to appear in the series Water Resowces: Hydraulics and Hydrology. The others were of History, Headquarters, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Alexandria, Virginia. MARGARET So PETERSEN WATER

US Army Corps of Engineers

68

Save Our Water Resources.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this booklet, developed as part of Project SOAR (Save Our American Resources), is to give Scout leaders some facts about the world's resources, the sources of water pollution, and how people can help in obtaining solutions. Among the topics discussed are the world's water resources, the water cycle, water quality, sources of water

Bromley, Albert W.

69

Water Resources of Alaska  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Water Resources of Alaska homepage is provided by the US Geological Survey. The goal of this project is to study and understand Alaska's hydrology (surface water, ground water, and water quality) for use and management of the nation's water resources. The site features a list of published reports and information about current projects as well as a vast amount of hydrologic data such as surface water, ground water, water quality, glaciers, water use, and hydrologic data reports.

Geological Survey (U.S.). Water Resources Division. Alaska District.

1999-01-01

70

Water resource systems group  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The 11th meeting of the Water Resource Systems Group was held at the University of Washington (Seattle), August 7-8, 1987. These systems group meetings, which are informal gatherings of professionals who have an interest in the educational and research aspects of water resources systems analysis, have usually been held on university campuses. The 30 attendees of the 1987 meeting represented a cross section of university faculty and graduate students, government managers and researchers, and engineering consultants.The meeting opened with short discussions by Steve Burges (University of Washington), Chuck Howard (CDD Howard and Associates, Victoria, Canada), David Dawdy (consultant, San Francisco, Calif.), and Jon Liebman (University of Illinois, Urbana) outlining their views of current issues in the water resources area. Burges emphasized the limitations and inadequacies of many of the models currently used in hydrology: rainfall runoff models may not adequately capture the physical characteristics of the movement of water into channels, vadose and saturated zone pollutant transport models are incapable of reproducing many of the features observed in the field, and many streamflow forecasting models used for reservoir operations have been constructed to reproduce average conditions but break down under the extreme conditions (floods and droughts) where they are most needed.

Stedinger, Jery R.; Lettenmaier, Dennis P.

71

Water Resources Water Quality and Water Treatment  

E-print Network

Water Resources TD 603 Lecture 1: Water Quality and Water Treatment CTARA Indian Institute of Technology, Bombay 2nd November, 2011 #12;OVERVIEW Water Quality WATER TREATMENT PLANTS WATER TREATMENT PLANTS WATER TREATMENT PLANTS WATER TRE OVERVIEW OF THE LECTURE 1. Water Distribution Schemes Hand Pump

Sohoni, Milind

72

Arkansas Water Resources Center  

E-print Network

to the Arkansas Soil and Water Conservation Commission By Marc A. Nelson Arkansas Water Resources Center Ron Redman Arkansas Soil and Water Conservation Commission L. Wade Cash Arkansas Water Resources Center G ROAD 76 BRIDGE ON BALLARD CREEK Submitted to: Arkansas Soil and Water Conservation Commission By: Marc

Soerens, Thomas

73

Water Resources Research Catalog, Volume 4.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Described are 4501 projects in progress during 1968 under the general headings: Nature of Water; Water Cycle; Water Supply Augmentation and Conservation; Water Quality Management and Control; Water Quality Management and Protection; Water Resources Planning; Resource Data; Engineering Works; and Manpower, Grants and Facilities. Each description…

Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC. Science Information Exchange.

74

Water, Ohio's Remarkable Resource.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Information on water and water resources in Ohio is presented in seven sections. Water from Ohio streams, water storage, lakes in Ohio, and ground water are discussed in the first section ("Water, A Part of the Earth"). A brief discussion on the ecosystem is provided in the second section ("Water and Life"). Topics discussed in the third section…

Groves, Carrie J.

75

Water Resource Adaptation Program  

EPA Science Inventory

The Water Resource Adaptation Program (WRAP) contributes to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency?s (U.S. EPA) efforts to provide water resource managers and decision makers with the tools needed to adapt water resources to demographic and economic development, and future clim...

76

Water Resources Policy & Economics  

E-print Network

Water Resources Policy & Economics FOR 4984 Selected Course Topics · Appropriative and riparian water institutions · Incentives for conservation · Water rights for in-stream environmental use · Surface water-groundwater management · Water quality regulations · Water markets · Economic and policy

Buehrer, R. Michael

77

Water Resources News  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Water Resources division of the US Geological Service provides this water news resource, tracking current water-related events and recent publications from across the US. Recent news items include: flooding in Texas, the impacts of Hurricane Bonnie, the release of a USGS report on water use in the US, and stream-flow data from Puerto Rico, to name a few.

78

Water Basins Civil Engineering  

E-print Network

Water Basins Civil Engineering Objective · Connect the study of water, water cycle, and ecosystems with engineering · Discuss how human impacts can effect our water basins, and how engineers lessen these impacts: · The basic concepts of water basins are why they are important · To use a topographic map · To delineate

Provancher, William

79

Resources on Engineering Education  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

On this website, Dr. Richard M. Felder, the Hoechst Celanese Professor Emeritus of Chemical Engineering at North Carolina State University, offers guidance, tips and resources for using techniques that he has found effective in teaching college level engineering courses. Numerous articles on learning styles, assessment, and instructional techniques are available here to download free of charge. Topics include active learning, cooperative learning and an Index of Learning Styles, which is "an on-line instrument used to assess preferences on four dimensions (active/reflective, sensing/intuitive, visual/verbal, and sequential/global) of a learning style model formulated by Richard M. Felder and Linda K. Silverman." Also posted here are some handouts for students with titles such as "How to Survive Engineering School" and "Tips on Test-Taking."

80

Water Resources of Idaho  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This United States Geological Survey (USGS) website highlights water resources in the state of Idaho. Details about hydrology programs in the state include ground water data, water quality information, water use in the state of Idaho, surface water, Idaho programs, reports, flood and drought information, and state projects on ice core research and various rivers. There are links to more sites for additional information.

81

Water Resources Milind Sohoni  

E-print Network

TD 603 Water Resources Milind Sohoni www.cse.iitb.ac.in/sohoni/ Lecture 9: Water in Agriculture () January 13, 2010 1 / 14 #12;Water in Agriculture Historically: Biggest consumer of water, in developed kilos of sugar. Though the source of water in all the three cases is usually different. Agriculture

Sohoni, Milind

82

Arkansas Water Resources Center  

E-print Network

Arkansas Water Resources Center LASER-PHOTOACOUSTIC DETECTION OF WATER POLLUTANTS PHASE I Principal. '. 18 #12;cor~PLETIONREPORT LASER-PHOTOACOUSTICDETECTIONOF WATER POLLUTANTS: PHASEI October ls 1977 their waters. Recognizing that water pollution can pose serious health hazards and unknown long term effects

Soerens, Thomas

83

Water Resources of Utah  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This U.S. Geological Survey website provides real-time streamflow, surface-water, ground-water, and water-quality data; information on water resource programs of Utah such as the National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) study; maps and graphs of current U.S. water resource conditions; and USGS - Utah reports. The site also features a drought watch section for Utah containing drought definitions and more streamflow conditions; a section on the Upper Arkansas River Basin Toxic-Substances Hydrology Project; and information on contamination in ground water at Fry Canyon, Utah.

84

Analyzing water resources  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Report on water resources discusses problems in water measurement demand, use, and availability. Also discussed are sensing accuracies, parameter monitoring, and status of forecasting, modeling, and future measurement techniques.

1979-01-01

85

Water Resources Milind Sohoni  

E-print Network

TD 603 Water Resources Milind Sohoni www.cse.iitb.ac.in/sohoni/ Building Numerical Models () August of surface flow of water and infiltration which may include time to flow, movement of solids etc. () August

Sohoni, Milind

86

Water Resources of Tennessee  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This site, from the U.S. Geological Survey, provides real-time, surface-water, ground-water and water-quality data; maps and graphs of current water resource conditions in the U.S. such as a daily streamflow conditions map; publications and product information; information on National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) programs of the Tennessee River Basin and Mobile River Basin; and information on water use in Tennessee.

87

Arkansas Water Resources Center  

E-print Network

/L,respectively). Nitrate levels in ground water for pike and Howard Counties were all below the 10 mg/L NO3-N drinkingArkansas Water Resources Center RECONNAISSANCE SURVEY OF NITRATE CONCENTRATIONS IN GROUND WATER caused concern regarding nitrate contamination of the ground water. In the study area of Pike and Howard

Soerens, Thomas

88

Water Resources Milind Sohoni  

E-print Network

TD 603 Water Resources Milind Sohoni www.cse.iitb.ac.in/sohoni/ Lecture 5: Aquifer () August 16 above and below the ground, which affect the water balance. surface features affect infiltration parameters related to water: Porosity, specific yield n, Sy : the maximum volume fraction of water

Sohoni, Milind

89

Water Resources Milind Sohoni  

E-print Network

TD 603 Water Resources Milind Sohoni www.cse.iitb.ac.in/sohoni/ Lecture 7: Regional Groundwater than the unit situations that we saw. Surface water/Groundwater interactions. lakes and streams springs (seepage) Ambient water-table movements Seasonal changes Inteference with other water end-users. Inherent

Sohoni, Milind

90

Water Resources Milind Sohoni  

E-print Network

TD 603 Water Resources Milind Sohoni www.cse.iitb.ac.in/sohoni/ Lecture 8: Wells () August 28, 2012 project, utilizing enhanced ground-water. Water lifted from storage, to accumulate overnight from aquifer. Water from shallow aquifer, of about 7-8m thickness. accounts for about 30% of irrigation Unique

Sohoni, Milind

91

Nebraska Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

-based concentrator-detection kit for monitoring emerging contaminants in recycled water; and (2) an innovativeNebraska Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report FY 2012 Nebraska Water Resources Center Engineering Department at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, took over as the interim director of the Water

92

NASA Water Resources Program  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

With increasing population pressure and water usage coupled with climate variability and change, water issues are being reported by numerous groups as the most critical environmental problems facing us in the 21st century. Competitive uses and the prevalence of river basins and aquifers that extend across boundaries engender political tensions between communities, stakeholders and countries. In addition to the numerous water availability issues, water quality related problems are seriously affecting human health and our environment. The potential crises and conflicts especially arise when water is competed among multiple uses. For example, urban areas, environmental and recreational uses, agriculture, and energy production compete for scarce resources, not only in the Western U.S. but throughout much of the U.S. and also in numerous parts of the world. Mitigating these conflicts and meeting water demands and needs requires using existing water resources more efficiently. The NASA Water Resources Program Element works to use NASA products and technology to address these critical water issues. The primary goal of the Water Resources is to facilitate application of NASA Earth science products as a routine use in integrated water resources management for the sustainable use of water. This also includes the extreme events of drought and floods and the adaptation to the impacts from climate change. NASA satellite and Earth system observations of water and related data provide a huge volume of valuable data in both near-real-time and extended back nearly 50 years about the Earth's land surface conditions such as precipitation, snow, soil moisture, water levels, land cover type, vegetation type, and health. NASA Water Resources Program works closely to use NASA and Earth science data with other U.S. government agencies, universities, and non-profit and private sector organizations both domestically and internationally. The NASA Water Resources Program organizes its projects under five functional themes. I) Streamflow and Flood Forecasting 2) Water Supply and Irrigation (includes evapotranspiration) 3) Drought 4) Water Quality 5) Climate and Water Resources. To maximize this activity NASA Water Resources Program works closely with other government agencies (e.g., the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA); the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA); the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS); the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), USAID, the Air Force Weather Agency (AFWA)), universities, non-profit national and international organizations, and the private sector. The NASA Water Resources program currently is funding 21 active projects under the functional themes (http://wmp.gsfc.nasa.gov & http://science.nasa.gov/earth-science/applied-sciences/).

Toll, David L.

2011-01-01

93

Water Resources of Wyoming  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This U.S Geological Survey (USGS) website contains water data including water quality samples and water use data, information on USGS projects, links to USGS educational sites, and a bibliography of USGS water resource publications. Projects and studies covered include: the Wyoming Drought Watch, which contains maps of daily streamflow conditions and historical streamflow data; algal-nutrient relations in the Yellowstone River; county water resource studies; estimating peak-streamflow characteristics at ungaged sites; the Integrating Aquatic Ecosystem Data project of the Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Program (EMAP); an aquifer; water-quality issues associated with irrigation drainage; watershed delineation; urban hydrology; and a pathogen indicator synoptic study.

94

Water Resources Penn.  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Water Resources Penn.: The Office of Water Management plans, directs and coordinates departmental programs associated with the management and protection of the CommonwealthÂ?s water resources; administers and oversees departmental programs involving surface and groundwater quantity and quality planning, and soil and water conservation; coordinates policies, procedures and regulations which influence public water supply withdrawals and quality, sewage facilities planning, point source municipal and industrial discharges, encroachments upon waterways and wetlands, dam safety, earth disturbance activities and control of storm water and nonpoint source pollution; and coordinates the planning, design and construction of flood protection and stream improvement projects.

95

Splash! Water Resource Education.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This set of activities is designed to bring water resource education into the middle school classroom using an interdisciplinary approach. The packet contains timely, localized information about the water resources of west central Florida. Each activity is aligned to middle-school Sunshine State Standards. These hands-on, minds-on activities can…

Southwest Florida Water Management District, Brooksville.

96

Water Resources Center Archives  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Founded in 1957, the Water Resources Center Archives (WRCA) of the University of California at Berkeley (UCB) maintains a collection of current and historic water-related materials. The searchable WRCA site provides information on the Center's collections, including Print, Archival, Photograph (sample photos are online -- and are spectacular!), Map, CD-ROM and Video collections. In addition, the site offers information about the WRCA's publications and services, links to relevant Internet resources, and other information. While access to Water Resources Abstracts is restricted to UCB faculty/staff/students, the site's broad coverage of historical and current water information has plenty to offer to other viewers.

97

Water Resource Management  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This portal, published by the University of Florida/Institute of Food and Agricultural Science (IFAS) Extension, offers a selection of links to information about water management issues. There is a 'Beginner's Guide to Water Management', which provides a basic introduction to the terminology and concepts used in water management. Other links access information on management in coastal waters, the impact of climate change on water resources, the use of stormwater as an alternative supply, wastewater management, and many others.

98

Proceedings ASCE International Water Resources Engineering Conference August 8-12, 1999, Seattle, WA  

E-print Network

and Columbia Rivers. It is a eutrophic water body susceptible to algae blooms and crashes and periods of high pH favorable to the growth of aquatic plants. The aquatic plants, or macrophytes, have increased water levels levels can be managed through weirs and pumping. Numerous culverts have been constructed which create

Wells, Scott A.

99

JOINT SEMINAR ANNOUNCEMENT CEE 880 Environmental and Water Resources Engineering Seminar  

E-print Network

Campus) The University of Michigan Refreshments served before and after the seminar Branko Kerkez, Ph.D. Assistant Professor Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering University of Michigan Building of the snowpack at the basin scale, and snowmelt processes are not well captured by existing hydrologic models. I

Kamat, Vineet R.

100

Water Resources of Indiana  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This United States Geological Survey (USGS) page contains information about the water resources in the state of Indiana. The district staff measure streamflow and ground-water levels as well as collect water-quality data (pH and mercury levels) throughout the state. Information on this site includes daily streamflow conditions, Biological Resources Division research in the state, drought information, and studies of the Upper Illinois River basin and White River basin. There are links to other sites for additional information.

101

Water Resources Milind Sohoni  

E-print Network

TD 603 Water Resources Milind Sohoni www.cse.iitb.ac.in/sohoni/ Lecture 6: Mathematics, z). velocity vx (x, y, z, t) : in the x-direction. vx = Kx h/x saturated/water- table. Continuity Equation What is vx x + vy y + vz z ? It is the rate of accumulation of water at the point (x, y

Sohoni, Milind

102

Water Resources Milind Sohoni  

E-print Network

TD 603 Water Resources Milind Sohoni www.cse.iitb.ac.in/sohoni/ Lecture 10: Minor Structures for Ground and Surface Water () March 23, 2010 1 / 31 #12;Classification by Purpose We may classify the velocity of water-flow (ii) increasing the infiltration coefficient (iii) explicit groundwater recharge

Sohoni, Milind

103

Water Resources Milind Sohoni  

E-print Network

TD 603 Water Resources Milind Sohoni www.cse.iitb.ac.in/sohoni/ Lecture 4: Groundwater () December in dried sample. Saturation: When these voids are fully filled with water. Specific Yield Sy : the ration of the colume of water that drains from a rock owing to gravity, to the total rock volumne. 00000000

Sohoni, Milind

104

Water Resources Milind Sohoni  

E-print Network

TD 603 Water Resources Milind Sohoni www.cse.iitb.ac.in/sohoni/ Analysis Framework for the 2009 / 16 #12;Vol II and Vol III Vol. II 1 Annexure I, Chap. 1: Bulk-water and tariffs-Principles. 2 Annexure I, Chap. 2: International Case Studies. 3 Annexure II: Report on water conservation technologies

Sohoni, Milind

105

Water Resources Research Center  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Visitors can access information on a variety of water issues in Arizona, including the Colorado River, riparian areas, water conservation, water rights, and recreation. The Arizona Water Resources Research Center (WRRC) provides FAQ’s, a stream gauge map and a directory of water-related agencies and organizations. Real-time temperature, precipitation, wind speed and direction, and humidity readouts are available via the new WRRC weather station. Other materials include news articles, research reports, presentations, and links to other water-related sites.

106

Arkansas Water Resources Center  

E-print Network

Arkansas Water Resources Center LANDSAT LINEAR TREND ANALYSIS A TOOL FOR GRONDWATER EXPLORATION depends on the delineation of high yield areas, a process that may be facilitated by linear trend analysis

Soerens, Thomas

107

Water - an inexhaustible resource?  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We have chosen to present the topic "Water", by illustrating problems that will give better opportunities for interdisciplinary work between Natural Science (Physics, Chemistry, Biology and Geology) teachers at first, but also English teachers and maybe others. Water is considered in general, in all its shapes and states. The question is not only about drinking water, but we would like to demonstrate that water can both be a fragile and short-lived resource in some ways, and an unlimited energy resource in others. Water exists on Earth in three states. It participates in a large number of chemical and physical processes (dissolution, dilution, biogeochemical cycles, repartition of heat in the oceans and the atmosphere, etc.), helping to maintain the homeostasis of the entire planet. It is linked to living beings, for which water is the major compound. The living beings essentially organized themselves into or around water, and this fact is also valid for human kind (energy, drinking, trade…). Water can also be a destroying agent for living beings (tsunamis, mud flows, collapse of electrical dams, pollution...) and for the solid earth (erosion, dissolution, fusion). I) Water, an essential resource for the human kind After having highlighted the disparities and geopolitical problems, the pupils will study the chemistry of water with its components and their origins (isotopes, water trip). Then the ways to make it drinkable will be presented (filtration, decantation, iceberg carrying…) II) From the origin of water... We could manage an activity where different groups put several hypotheses to the test, with the goal to understand the origin(s?) of water on Earth. Example: Isotopic signature of water showing its extraterrestrial origin.. Once done, we'll try to determine the origin of drinking water, as a fossil resource. Another use of isotopes will allow them to evaluate the drinking water age, to realize how precious it can be. III) Water as a sustainable energy resource Water is used to produce energy under different processes like ancient tamed energy such as water mills, locks or more recently tidal energy, marine current power, generators based on swell or osmotic gradients. The pupils will work in groups to present different techniques to the class. We could try to determine if all these energy resources could replace the actual major energy source in France: nuclear. Conclusion: Liquid water is probably the cradle of life. Since the birth of human kind, its history is closely linked to the presence of water: drinking, fishing, hygiene, and also transport or business is strictly depending on this resource. Described as a fragile and limited resource when it is used for human consumption, we realize that water is also an uneven resource of energy for the next generations. The challenge will then be to reconcile these different aspects: respecting this nourishing resource and preserving it from pollution, overexploitation or wasting, and at the same time, using water as energy for a world that has a growing population.

Le Divenah, C.; Esperou, E.

2012-04-01

108

Water Resources of Illinois  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This United States Geological Survey (USGS) website is dedicated to water resources and studies in the state of Illinois. It contains real-time and daily streamflow data for the state, historical data, precipitation data, flooding information, groundwater quality, radium and arsenic water pollution, and studies on the Illinois River basin and Illinois lakes. Links are provided for additional information.

109

Lunar Water Resource Demonstration  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In cooperation with the Canadian Space Agency, the Northern Centre for Advanced Technology, Inc., the Carnegie-Mellon University, JPL, and NEPTEC, NASA has undertaken the In-Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU) project called RESOLVE. This project is a ground demonstration of a system that would be sent to explore permanently shadowed polar lunar craters, drill into the regolith, determine what volatiles are present, and quantify them in addition to recovering oxygen by hydrogen reduction. The Lunar Prospector has determined these craters contain enhanced hydrogen concentrations averaging about 0.1%. If the hydrogen is in the form of water, the water concentration would be around 1%, which would translate into billions of tons of water on the Moon, a tremendous resource. The Lunar Water Resource Demonstration (LWRD) is a part of RESOLVE designed to capture lunar water and hydrogen and quantify them as a backup to gas chromatography analysis. This presentation will briefly review the design of LWRD and some of the results of testing the subsystem. RESOLVE is to be integrated with the Scarab rover from CMIJ and the whole system demonstrated on Mauna Kea on Hawaii in November 2008. The implications of lunar water for Mars exploration are two-fold: 1) RESOLVE and LWRD could be used in a similar fashion on Mars to locate and quantify water resources, and 2) electrolysis of lunar water could provide large amounts of liquid oxygen in LEO, leading to lower costs for travel to Mars, in addition to being very useful at lunar outposts.

Muscatello, Anthony C.

2008-01-01

110

Water Resources Research Center  

E-print Network

names or commercial products constitute their endorsement or recommendation for use by the United States by the United States Department of the Interior as authorized under the Water Research and Development ActWater Resources Research Center WASHINGTON, DISTRICT Of COLUMBIA #12;ASSESSMENT OF THE STATE

District of Columbia, University of the

111

California Water Teaching Resources  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

From Foothill College and the Using a Web-Based GIS to Teach Problem-Based Science in High School and College project, this document contains links to online resources on California's water issues and topographic maps. This document is intended to be used with the Introduction to Topographic Maps worksheet at: http://amser.org/index.php?P=FullRecord&ID=18138This is a helpful resource for the introductory GIS classroom.

112

Urban Water Resources Management  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Urban Water Resources Management Web site is maintained by the Global Development Research Center. The center "carries out initiatives in education, research and practice, in the spheres of environment, urban, community, economy and information, and at scales that are effective." The site contains information and links to topics such as understanding the importance of water; organizations and institutions; documents and information repositories; initiatives, programs, and projects; and more.

113

Arkansas Water Resources Center  

E-print Network

, and was instrumental in developing the lake ation index. The following Game and Fish Commission fisheries personnel in the United States have generated tremendous public interest and concern, particularly the past decadeArkansas Water Resources Center CLASSIFICATION AND RANKING OF SELECTED ARKANSAS LAKES For State

Soerens, Thomas

114

Training days: TWRI coordinates water resources training programs  

E-print Network

be used by the public.? Dr. Ralph Wurbs, associate director of engineering for the institute and a professor of water resources engineering in Zachry Department of Civil Engineering, agreed. ?Continuing education is essential to professional practice...

Jensen, Ric

2008-01-01

115

USGS Water Resources of Oregon  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Water Resources of Oregon contains water data and maps of hydrologic conditions and current streamflow conditions; publications about water resources of Oregon; historical water data about surface-water, ground-water and water quality; geographic data; and forecasts and flood potential outlooks. There is information on a surface-water data collection program, hydrologic studies, and USGS programs and activities in Oregon.

116

Graphic engine resource management  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Modern consumer-grade 3D graphic cards boast a computation/memory resource that can easily rival or even exceed that of standard desktop PCs. Although these cards are mainly designed for 3D gaming applications, their enormous computational power has attracted developers to port an increasing number of scientific computation programs to these cards, including matrix computation, collision detection, cryptography, database sorting, etc. As more and more applications run on 3D graphic cards, there is a need to allocate the computation/memory resource on these cards among the sharing applications more fairly and efficiently. In this paper, we describe the design, implementation and evaluation of a Graphic Processing Unit (GPU) scheduler based on Deficit Round Robin scheduling that successfully allocates to every process an equal share of the GPU time regardless of their demand. This scheduler, called GERM, estimates the execution time of each GPU command group based on dynamically collected statistics, and controls each process's GPU command production rate through its CPU scheduling priority. Measurements on the first GERM prototype show that this approach can keep the maximal GPU time consumption difference among concurrent GPU processes consistently below 5% for a variety of application mixes.

Bautin, Mikhail; Dwarakinath, Ashok; Chiueh, Tzi-cker

2008-01-01

117

WATER RESOURCES NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE  

E-print Network

in irrigation water on agriculture throughout Colorado River~s 1,400 mile long system was announced by Secretary in laws and values come slowly, and that rendering our priorities is difficult and complicated. II tvjore of Colorado State University at Ft. Collins, Colorado. Major efforts have only recently been directed toward

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

118

Water Resources Outreach Program - Water Education Posters  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This site contains a series of six posters all relating to water education: wetlands, water use, waste water, navigation, ground water, and water quality. Each poster includes information about the topic as well as related classroom activities. The objective of the water-resources education program is to stimulate interest in and provide a basic knowledge of water resources for students in grades K-12. This United States Geological Survey (USGS) website is part of the Water Resources Education Initiative (WREI), a program developed by the USGS in 1991.

119

Georgia Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

) Develop new research methods and scientific knowledge to support sustainable river basin planning is to foster the creation of partnerships, resources, and knowledge base necessary to address current water and management; b) Educate scientists, engineers, and water professionals in state-of-the-science methods

120

Color photographs for water resources studies  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Air-photo interpretation is very well suited to water resources studies where limited observations of hydrologic data must be extended to regional characteristics for large areas. It is also useful in monitoring the hydrologic regimen of an area to detect possible changes. Color aerial photography is generally superior to black-and-white photography for these water resources investigations. Depth penetration through water, and excellent discrimination of water indicators, such as vegetation, are its -main assets. Meaningful interpretation of the photography depends on adequate ground control data. Experiences of the Water Resources Division, U. S. Geological Survey, indicate that the best interpretation is done by professional personnel-engineers, geologists, and water chemists intimately associated with a particular water resources project for which the photography has been obtained.

Schneider, William J.

1968-01-01

121

Water Resources Competitive Grants Program  

E-print Network

Water Resources Competitive Grants Program Fiscal Year 2012 Request for Proposals Pursuant to Section 104 of the Water Resources Research Act of 1984, as Amended Closing Date 4:00 PM, Eastern Time, August 15, 2012 (Institutes) Institute for Water Resources National Institutes for U.S. Army Corps

Virginia Tech

122

Water Resources Working Group Report  

E-print Network

Water Resources Working Group Report This report provided content for the Wisconsin Initiative in February 2011. #12;Water Resources Working Group Wisconsin Initiative on Climate Change Impacts October 2010 #12;Water Resources Working Group Members ­ WICCI Tim Asplund (Co-Chair) - Wisconsin Department

Sheridan, Jennifer

123

Sixth Annual Water Resources Conference  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Sixth Annual Water Resources Conference will be held October 2630 at the Frontier Hotel in Las Vegas, Nevada. Over 100 papers have been received for the current technical sessions, which will be devoted to such themes as interbasin transfers, conjunctive operation of desalting plants, potentialities of using desalted water, social aspects of water resources, groundwater management, surface-water hydrology, hydrological

Anonymous

1970-01-01

124

USGS Water Resources of Pennsylvania  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Water Resources of Pennsylvania provides information on current hydrologic conditions in Pennsylvania, including streamflow, ground-water, lake and reservoir, and drought conditions. There is also project information on water resources investigations and a watershed assistance program; USGS publications such as hydrologic data reports; maps and GIS data; and educational water science links.

125

An algorithm for optimal water resources planning  

E-print Network

AN ALGORITEM FOR OPTIMAL WATER RESOURCES PLANNING A Thesis By INDI1iKRI V. S. RAJU Submitted to the Graduate College of the Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE January 1988... Major Subject: Industrial Engineering AN ALGORITHM FOR OPTIMAL WATER RESOURCES PLANNING A Thesis By INDUKURI V. S. RAJU Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of Committee) Head of Department) (Member) (Member) January 1968...

Raju, Indukuri Venkata Satyanarayana

1968-01-01

126

GROW: A National Civil Engineering Education Resource Library  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Geotechnical, Rock & Water (GROW) Digital Library consists of geotechnical, rock & water engineering resources harvested from the web and elsewhere, and resources developed by the GROW team. The items developed by the GROW team focus on interactive educational resources for active learning that are "story-booked" to emphasize active learning and provide a learning experience.

Muniram Budhu

2001-12-01

127

Redressing China's strategy of water resource exploitation.  

PubMed

China, with the confrontation of water-related problems as an element of its long history, has been investing heavily in water engineering projects over the past few decades based on the assumption that these projects can solve its water problems. However, the anticipated benefits did not really occur, or at least not as large as expected. Instead, the results involved additional frustrations, such as biodiversity losses and human-induced disasters (i.e., landslides and earthquakes). Given its inherent shortcomings, the present engineering-dominated strategy for the management of water resources cannot help solve China's water problems and achieve its goal of low-carbon transformation. Therefore, the present strategy for water resources exploitation needs to be reevaluated and redressed. A policy change to achieve better management of Chinese rivers is urgently needed. PMID:23314565

Ran, Lishan; Lu, Xi Xi

2013-03-01

128

Redressing China's Strategy of Water Resource Exploitation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

China, with the confrontation of water-related problems as an element of its long history, has been investing heavily in water engineering projects over the past few decades based on the assumption that these projects can solve its water problems. However, the anticipated benefits did not really occur, or at least not as large as expected. Instead, the results involved additional frustrations, such as biodiversity losses and human-induced disasters (i.e., landslides and earthquakes). Given its inherent shortcomings, the present engineering-dominated strategy for the management of water resources cannot help solve China's water problems and achieve its goal of low-carbon transformation. Therefore, the present strategy for water resources exploitation needs to be reevaluated and redressed. A policy change to achieve better management of Chinese rivers is urgently needed.

Ran, Lishan; Lu, Xi Xi

2013-03-01

129

Mathematical simulation of temperatures in deep impoundments: verification tests of the Water Resources Engineers, Inc. model - Horsetooth and Flaming Gorge Reservoirs  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Successful use of predictive mathematical models requires verification of the accuracy of the models by applying them to existing situations where the prediction can be compared with reality. A Corps of Engineers' modification of a deep reservoir thermal stratification model developed by Water Resources Engineers, Inc., was applied to two existing Bureau of Reclamation reservoirs for verification. Diffusion coefficients used for the Corps' Detroit Reservoir were found to apply to Horsetooth Reservoir in Colorado, for which very food computer input data were available. The Detroit diffusion coefficients gave a reasonable simulation of Flaming Gorge Reservoir in Wyoming and Utah, which has very complex and variable physical characteristics and for which only average-quality computer input data were available.

King, D.L.; Sartoris, Jim J.

1973-01-01

130

Water Resources of the Caribbean  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This branch of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) collects, compiles, analyzes, and distributes hydrologic information to promote best use and management of water resources for the benefit of the people and the natural environment. The water resources data includes real-time data of rainfall and streamflow, water level and discharge data, suspended sediment-discharge records, water-quality records, and ground-water-level records. The site also provides maps, water resources news, reports on USGS activities and projects in the Caribbean, a bibliographic reference search for the Caribbean region, and related USGS publications.

131

OFFICE OF WATER RESOURCE CENTER  

EPA Science Inventory

Resource Purpose: The Resource Center provides support to the management of the Immediate Office, Office of Groundwater and Drinking Water, Office of Science and Technology, Office of Wastewater Management, and Office of Wetlands, Oceans, and Watersheds. Support includes: ...

132

Arkansas Water Resources Center  

E-print Network

Submitted to the Washington County Conservation District and Arkansas Soil and Water Conservation Commission & WATER CONSERVATION COMMISSION INTRODUCTION In Northwest Arkansas, nutrients transported by surface water storage structures. In 1991, the Arkansas Soil and Water Conservation Commission (ASWCC) and the U. S

Soerens, Thomas

133

Arkansas Water Resources Center  

E-print Network

Submitted to the Arkansas Soil and Water Conservation Commission By M.A. Nelson L.W. Cash G.K. Trost to the Arkansas Soil and Water Conservation Commission M. A. Nelson, L. W. Cash, and G. K. Trost Arkansas Water Soil and Water Conservation Commission (ASWCC) and the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA

Soerens, Thomas

134

Arkansas Water Resources Center  

E-print Network

: ground water, geochemical evolution, arsenic, sediment/water interaction, alluvial aquifer, geochemical evolution of arsenic in ground water: tracking sources and sinks in the alluvial aquifer of southeastern Arkansas, USA Basic Information Title: Flow and hydrochemical evolution of arsenic in ground water

Soerens, Thomas

135

Water resources data, Louisiana, water year 2004  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Water resources data for the 2004 water year for Louisiana consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage, contents, and water quality of lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality of ground water. This report contains records for water discharge at 77 gaging stations; stage only for 86 gaging stations and 7 lakes; water quality for 60 surface-water stations (including 42 gaging stations) and 112 wells; and water levels for 304 observation wells. Also included are data for 158 crest-stage and flood-profile partial-record stations. Additional water data were collected at various sites not included in the systematic data-collection program, and are published as miscellaneous measurements. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating State and Federal agencies in Louisiana.

Baumann, Todd; Goree, B.B.; Lovelace, W.M.; Montogmery, P.A.; Resweber, J.C.; Ross, Garron B.; Ward, Aub N.; Walters, David J.

2005-01-01

136

Water Resources Data, Louisiana, Water Year 2000  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Water resources data for the 2000 water year for Louisiana consists of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage, contents, and water quality of lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality of ground water. This report contains records for water discharge at 66 gaging stations; stage only for 70 gaging stations and 7 lakes; water quality for 45 surface-water stations (including 25 gaging stations) and 108 wells; and water levels for 221 observation wells. Also included are data for 204 crest-stage and flood-profile partial-record stations. Additional water data were collected at various sites not included in the systematic data-collection program, and are published as miscellaneous measurements. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating State and Federal agencies in Louisiana.

Goree, B.B.; Lovelace, W.M.; Montgomery, P.A.; Resweber, J.C.; Sasser, D.C., Jr.; Walters, David J.

2001-01-01

137

Water Resources Data, Louisiana, Water Year 2001  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Water resources data for the 2001 water year for Louisiana consists of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage, contents, and water quality of lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality of ground water. This report contains records for water discharge at 71 gaging stations; stage only for 73 gaging stations and 7 lakes; water quality for 66 surface-water stations (including 39 gaging stations) and 92 wells; and water levels for 205 observation wells. Also included are data for 166 crest-stage and flood-profile partial-record stations. Additional water data were collected at various sites not included in the systematic data-collection program, and are published as miscellaneous measurements. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating State and Federal agencies in Louisiana.

Goree, B.B.; Lovelace, W.M.; Montgomery, P.A.; Resweber, J.C.; Sasser, D.C., Jr.; Walters, David J.

2002-01-01

138

Water resources data, Louisiana, water year 2003  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Water resources data for the 2003 water year for Louisiana consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage, contents, and water quality of lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality of ground water. This report contains records for water discharge at 76 gaging stations; stage only for 86 gaging stations and 7 lakes; water quality for 56 surface-water stations (including 44 gaging stations) and 142 wells; and water levels for 313 observation wells. Also included are data for 158 crest-stage and flood-profile partial-record stations. Additional water data were collected at various sites not included in the systematic data-collection program, and are published as miscellaneous measurements. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating Federal and State agencies in Louisiana.

Baumann, Todd; Goree, B.B.; Lovelace, W.M.; Montgomery, P.A.; Resweber, J.C.; Ross, Garron B.; Sasser, D.C., Jr.; Walters, D.J.

2004-01-01

139

Water Resources Data, Louisiana, Water Year 2002  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Water resources data for the 2002 water year for Louisiana consists of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage, contents, and water quality of lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality of ground water. This report contains records for water discharge at 85 gaging stations; stage only for 79 gaging stations and 7 lakes; water quality for 52 surface-water stations (including 40 gaging stations) and 104 wells; and water levels for 300 observation wells. Also included are data for 143 crest-stage and flood-profile partial-record stations. Additional water data were collected at various sites not included in the systematic data-collection program, and are published as miscellaneous measurements. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating State and Federal agencies in Louisiana.

Goree, B.B.; Lovelace, W.M.; Montgomery, P.A.; Resweber, J.C.; Labbe, Charles K.; Walters, David J.

2003-01-01

140

Arkansas Water Resources Center  

E-print Network

CONJUNCTIVE WATER MANAGEMENT BY TARGET APPROACHES PREPARED FOR: WINTHROP ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION CONJUNCTIVE WATER MANAGEMENT BY TARGET APPROACHES PREPARED FOR:, WINTHROP ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION AND;" c by the Winthrop Rockefeller Foundation. Little Rock. and the International Agricultural Programs Office (through

Soerens, Thomas

141

Arkansas Water Resources Center  

E-print Network

Submitted to the Arkansas Soil and Water Conservation Commission By Marc A. Nelson, Ph.D., P.E. L. Wade Cash of Moores Creek above Lincoln Lake 2003 Submitted to the Arkansas Soil and Water Conservation Commission M composting, and waste storage structures. In 1991, the Arkansas Soil and Water Conservation Commission (ASWCC

Soerens, Thomas

142

Water Conservation Resource List.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Alarmed by the growing water shortage, the New Jersey State Office of Dissemination has prepared this annotated list of free or inexpensive instructional materials for teaching about water conservation, K-l2. A tipsheet for home water conservation is appended. (Editor/SJL)

NJEA Review, 1981

1981-01-01

143

Managing & protecting our water resources  

Microsoft Academic Search

A number of factors have an impact on the quantity and quality of freshwater, particularly global population growth and economic development. In the U.S., the electric utility industry is a large consumer of water resources. Understanding the factors which affect water resource management is important for sustainable development as well as ecosystem management. The effects of past and anticipated legislation

S. Peck

1996-01-01

144

Water Resources of Washington State  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This site contains information and water resource data on rivers and streams, ground water, and water quality. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) operates a satellite network of stream-gaging stations in the state, many of which form the backbone of flood-warning systems, and conducts studies of water resources, such as watersheds and aquifers. These studies help define the quantity and quality of the water, conditions of ecological habitat, and relations to land use and natural features. The site features publications and reports about the data and information from these studies. There is information on USGS projects related to regional water issues such as salmon recovery and the Endangered Species Act; floods, droughts and other natural hazards; and water availability. The site also provides water resource news such as a drought watch section and earthquake news for Washington State.

145

Water Resources of West Virginia  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) website provides water data, reports on water use, and information on water resource programs and activities in West Virginia. The water data consists of real-time, old and historical data; National Weather Service stage data; and river basin real-time streamflow data. National Water Information System Website (NWISWeb) data includes surface-water, ground-water, water-quality and real-time data. There is also a drought watch section with more streamflow conditions and a link to acid rain information for West Virginia.

146

Water Resources Data  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This portal provides access to a large selection of real-time and archived data on stream flow and water quality for surface and groundwater. Links are provided to the National Water Information System Web Interface (NWISWeb), which accesses data collected at approximately 1.5 million sites in all 50 states, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico. Data categories include current conditions information transmitted from selected surface and groundwater sites; descriptive site information; water flow and levels in streams, lakes, and springs; groundwater levels in wells; and chemical and physical data for all water sources. There is also a link to the 'Waterwatch' site, an interactive map that displays real-time stream-flow compared to historical conditions for the day of the year, as well as a link to the National Water Quality Assessment (NAWQA) data warehouse. Other links access materials on water use, acid rain, suspended sediment, and the Hydro-Climatic Data Network (HCDN).

147

Water Resources of New Jersey  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This website offers timely access to data and information provided by the New Jersey District of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), which collects basic hydrologic data and makes interpretive investigations of the water resources of New Jersey. There is information and data on ground water, surface water, water quality, and daily streamflow conditions. Links to online publications on water in New Jersey are also provided.

148

Water resources data, Nebraska, water year 2004  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Nebraska water resources data report for water year 2004 includes records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; water elevation and/or contents of lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and quality of ground water in wells. This report contains records of stream stage for 3 stations; stream discharge for 101 continuous and 5 crest-stage gaging stations, and 6 miscellaneous sites; stream water quality for 7 gaging stations and 40 miscellaneous sites; water elevation and/or contents for 2 lakes and 1 reservoir; ground-water levels for 74 observation wells; and ground-water quality for 200 wells. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System collected in and near Nebraska by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating Federal, State, and local agencies.

Hitch, D. E., (compiler); Soensken, P.J.; Sebree, S.K.; Wilson, K.E.; Walczyk, V.C.; Drudik, R.A.; Miller, J.D.; Hull, S.H.

2005-01-01

149

Arkansas Water Resources Center  

E-print Network

the viability of alternate water supplies using abandoned, flooded coal mines for the City of Greenwood Laboratory in the Department of Crop, Soil, and Environmental Sciences provide support in developing GIS data decisions about water supply expansion #12;alternatives, implementation of appropriate and effective

Soerens, Thomas

150

Arkansas Water Resources Center  

E-print Network

Table 2 Comparison of Hydrochloric and Acetic Acids as Solvents for St. Joe Limestone Table 3 Comparison are relatively pure CaCO3 with Pitkin the purest, 93.4%. Calcium and acid soluble material values varied only 3 water contaminants be- cause they can enter the ground water when the limestone is dissolved by carbonic

Soerens, Thomas

151

Arkansas Water Resources Center  

E-print Network

and nondiscrimination, does not discriminate in the recruitment, admission and employment of students, faculty and staff of the drinking water for the major towns and cities, and several rural water systems. The watershed consists are city streets and rural roads. The soils in the watershed vary extensively and are quite complex due

Soerens, Thomas

152

Water resources of Manatee County, Florida. Water-resources investigations  

SciTech Connect

Rapid development of Manatee County in southwest Florida is creating water-resource problems. The report presents an evaluation of the water resources and potential effects of water-resource developments. Most streams in the county have small drainage basins and low yields. The principal aquifers are the surficial, minor artesian, and the Floridan. The Floridan aquifer is the major source of irrigation water in the county. The minor artesian aquifer is a highly developed source of water for small rural supplies. Withdrawals of 20 to 50 million gallons per day from the Floridan aquifer since the 1950's have caused declines in the potentiometric surface of about 20 to 50 feet. The quality of ground water is good except in the coastal and southern parts of the county.

Brown, D.P.

1983-03-01

153

Environmental Engineering and Water Chemistry  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Students are introduced to the fundamentals of environmental engineering as well as the global air, land and water quality concerns facing today's environmental engineers. After a lesson and activity to introduce environmental engineering, students learn more about water chemistry aspects of environmental engineering. Specifically, they focus on groundwater contamination and remediation, including sources of contamination, adverse health effects of contaminated drinking water, and current and new remediation techniques. Several lab activities provide hands-on experiences with topics relevant to environmental engineering concerns and technologies, including removal efficiencies of activated carbon in water filtration, measuring pH, chromatography as a physical separation method, density and miscibility.

2014-09-18

154

Arkansas Water Resources Center  

E-print Network

. The parameters measured in-situ were: air temperature, water temperature, pH and TDS. The parameters measured after sample collection using Hach test kits were dissolved oxygen, turbidity, nitrate-N, phosphate

Soerens, Thomas

155

Integrated management of water resources  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Water resources occupy an important place among other natural resources, water being the most widely large resource in the world. In different quantities, it can be found everywhere and play an important role in human life and environmental balance. Importance have a great freshwater resources, because all human activities and life itself are dependent on water, it not be substituted by other resources. Water resources of Romania are made up of surface waters - rivers, lakes, the Danube - and groundwater. The main water resource of Romania is an inside rivers. A basic feature of this type of resource is a very large variability in space: - mountain area, which makes half of the total elapsed; - variability specific environmental flow (1 l/s*km2 - in low areas up to 40 l/s*km2 - in high areas). Another feature is a very pronounced variability in time, so spring is important flood production, followed by prolonged drought. The river Danube, the second largest river in Europe, with a length of 2,850 km, of which 1,075 km within the territory of our country, with an average stock entering the country of 174 mild m3/year could be the most abundant source water. The international or impose certain limitations in the use of its waters and therefore the resource is considered only half the average volume multi elapsed on the Danube. Underground water resources consist of existing water storage in aquifer layers and layers of groundwater deep sea, assessing them difficult. Potential natural water resources in Romania is 137.8 bn m3/year of the Danube 87.8 billion m3/ year , inside rivers 40 billion m3/year and groundwater 10 billion m3/year Divided by the current population of the country, give a specific resource, in natural, cca.1840 m3/citizen.year, taking into consideration only the river intake inside situated our country, from this point of view, in the category of the country with reduced resources water as the average Europe 4700 which is m3/citizen.year

Mainerici, A. M.

2009-04-01

156

Policy Sciences in Water Resources Research  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

As the newly appointed Policy Sciences Editor for this journal, I would like to take this opportunity to introduce myself to WRR's readership as well as to offer a few comments concerning my views of policy sciences in water resources research. I am an economist working in the area of natural resources and environmental management. As such, I've spent a good part of my research career working with noneconomists. During 1969-1972, I worked in Mexico with hydrologists and engineers from Mexico's Water Resources Ministry in efforts to assess management/investment programs for reservoir systems and systems for interbasin water transfers. Between 1972 and 1975, while serving as Chairman of the Department of Resource Economics at the University of Rhode Island, my research involved collaborative efforts with biologists and soil scientists in studies concerning the conjunctive management of reservoirs for agricultural and lagoon systems and the control of salinity levels in soils and aquifers. Since 1975, at which time I joined the faculty at the University of New Mexico, I have worked with engineers at the Los Alamos National Laboratory in developing operation/management models for hot, dry rock geothermal systems and, more recently, with legal scholars and hydrologists in analyses of water rights issues. Thus I am comfortable with and appreciative of research conducted by my colleagues in systems engineering, operations research, and hydrology, as well as those in economics, law, and other social sciences.

Cummings, Ronald G.

1984-07-01

157

Water, Society and the future of water resources research (Invited)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The subject of water and society is broad, but at heart is the study of water as a resource, essential to human activities, a vital input to food and energy production, the sustaining medium for ecosystems and yet also a destructive hazard. Society demands, withdraws, competes, uses and wastes the resource in dynamic counterpart. The science of water management emerges from this interface, a field at the nexus of engineering and geoscience, with substantial influence from economics and other social sciences. Within this purview are some of the most pressing environmental questions of our time, such as adaptation to climate change, direct and indirect connections between water and energy policy, the continuing dependence of agriculture on depletion of the world's aquifers, the conservation or preservation of ecosystems within increasingly human-influenced river systems, and food security and poverty reduction for the earth's poorest inhabitants. This presentation will present and support the hypothesis that water resources research is a scientific enterprise separate from, yet closely interrelated to, hydrologic science. We will explore the scientific basis of water resources research, review pressing research questions and opportunities, and propose an action plan for the advancement of the science of water management. Finally, the presentation will propose a Chapman Conference on Water and Society: The Future of Water Resources Research in the spring of 2015.

Brown, C. M.

2013-12-01

158

USGS Water Resources of Montana  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

U.S. Geological Survey (USGS): Water Resources of Montana contains information on current activities such as data collection, investigations, and the National Water-Quality Assessment Program of the Northern Rockies and Yellowstone River. The hydrologic data includes realtime streamflow tables, Montana Flood-Frequency and Basin-Characteristic Data, and monthly water summaries. There is also a list of USGS water-related publications from the Montana district that can be ordered.

159

Water Quality Resources  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Here are some resources about the Malad River to help you build your argument. You will likely need more information than is provided here, but this should get you started. Normal 0 7.8 ? 0 2 false false false EN-US ZH-CN X-NONE ...

Malad River

2011-08-17

160

Virtual water trade and world water resources.  

PubMed

Global virtual water trade was quantitatively estimated and evaluated. The basic idea of how to estimate unit requirement of water resources to produce each commodity is introduced and values for major agricultural and stock products are presented. The concept of virtual water and the quantitative estimates can help in assessing a more realistic water scarcity index in each country, projecting future water demand for food supply, increasing public awareness on water, and identifying the processes wasting water in the production. Really required water in exporting countries is generally smaller than virtually required water in importing countries, reflecting the comparative advantage of water use efficiency, and it is estimated to be 680 km3/y for 2000. On the contrary the virtually required water for the same year is estimated to be 1,130 km3/y, and the difference of 450 km3/y is virtually saved by global trade. However, solely virtual water should not be used for any decision making since the idea of virtual water implies only the usage and influence of water and no concerns on social, cultural, and environmental implications. Virtual water trade also does not consider other limiting factors than water. PMID:15195440

Oki, T; Kanae, S

2004-01-01

161

Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

in water resources, including the management of water resources among competing uses; controlling pollution Quality Focus Category: Water Quality, Sediments, Non Point Pollution Descriptors: AgricultureWater Resources Center Annual Technical Report FY 2001 Introduction Research Program Research

162

Arkansas Water Resources Center  

E-print Network

Submitted to the Arkansas Soil and Water Conservation Commission By Marc A. Nelson, Ph.D., P.E. L. Wade Cash. High turbidity levels and excessive silt loads in the streams are problems in this watershed. The reason for high turbidity levels and silt loads are thought to be row crop agriculture. Accurate

Soerens, Thomas

163

Arkansas Water Resources Center  

E-print Network

The Illinois River Basin has experienced water quality impairment from non-point source pollution for many plant in the sub-watershed, and c) land user interest. The Upper Ballard Creek watershed met all base flow grab samples and four periphyton growth samples per year. During the period of time from July

Soerens, Thomas

164

Arkansas Water Resources Center  

E-print Network

experienced water quality impairment from non-point source pollution for many years. This fact was well plant in the sub-watershed, and c) land user interest. The Upper Ballard Creek watershed met all base flow grab samples and four periphyton growth samples per year. During the period of time from July

Soerens, Thomas

165

Arkansas Water Resources Center  

E-print Network

/monitoring site locations and de:;criptions. 3 Table 2. Lake sampling sites. 7 Table 3. Ini tia:L cost estimates. 9 Table 4. Annual cost estimates. 10 Table 5. Labora1:ory parameter analysis costs. 11 List coliform, iron, manganese, turbidity, and algae. The:se water quality problems are associated

Soerens, Thomas

166

Arkansas Water Resources Center  

E-print Network

with neutral pH values and lower organic matter levels. Microbial decomposition of the herbicide was slow under Data from this study will be usefUl in assessing the ramifi-ccmponent. cations of herbicides in aquatic ecosystems and provide a better under- standing of the reactions of herbicides in sediment-water systans

Soerens, Thomas

167

Arkansas Water Resources Center  

E-print Network

of antibiotic-resistant strains of bacteria and their subsequent release and spread in the environment. The danger to human and aquatic lives of transfer of the antibiotic-resistance to human pathogens may cause. Research Program #12;Occurrence of Animal Feed Additives in Northwest Arkansas Surface Water Basic

Soerens, Thomas

168

Effect of social impact analysis on decisions allocating investments in water resources by US Army Corps of Engineers  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this study was to learn whether or not social impact analysis (SIA) has been effective in assuring a fuller accounting of the costs and benefits of actions exercised at the Federal level, focusing its interest on the US Army Corps of Engineers Civil Works Programs. The study employs a triangulated data gathering approach, using cross sectional survey

Manheim

1984-01-01

169

GLOBAL CHANGE AND WATER RESOURCES  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

The influence of global change on future water resources is difficult to predict because various components are likely to be affected in opposing ways. Global warming would tend to increase evapotranspiration (ET) rates and irrigation water requirements, while increasing precipitation would both dec...

170

Water Resources Data, Mississippi, Water Year 2002  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Water resources data for the 2002 water year for Mississippi consist of records of surface water and ground water in the State. Specifically, it contains: (1) Discharge records for 91 streamflow-gaging stations, stage records for 22 of these gaging stations, discharge records for 91 partial-record stations or miscellaneous streamflow sites, including 13 flood hydrograph partial-record stations, 78 crest-stage partial-record stations, and 0 special study and miscellaneous sites; (2) stage only at 9 gaging stations; (3) water-quality records for 13 streamflow-gaging stations, 7 stage-only stations, and 3 water-quality monitor stations, 0 partial-record stations or miscellaneous sites, 97 short-term study sites, and 39 wells; and (4) water-level records for 18 observation wells. Records obtained from water-resources investigations are also included in special sections of the report. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey, and cooperating local, State, and Federal agencies in Mississippi.

Morris, F., III; Turnipseed, D.P.; Storm, J.B.

2003-01-01

171

Puerto Rico Water Resources & Environmetal Research Institute  

E-print Network

Puerto Rico Water Resources & Environmetal Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2013 Puerto Rico Water Resources & Environmetal Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 20131 #12;Introduction The Puerto Rico Water Resources and Environmental Research Institute (PRWRERI) is located

172

Puerto Rico Water Resources & Environmetal Research Institute  

E-print Network

Puerto Rico Water Resources & Environmetal Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2012 Puerto Rico Water Resources & Environmetal Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 20121 #12;Introduction The Puerto Rico Water Resources and Environmental Research Institute (PRWRERI) is located

173

Engineering & Technical Resources on the Internet.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Offers pointers on finding resources on the Internet that may be useful to engineers and scientists. Suggests steps that beginners can take to become acquainted with the Internet and defines common Internet terms. Presents a list of engineering Internet resources that include listservs, USENET groups, gophers, and World Wide Web sites. (Author/JMV)

Schwarzwalder, Robert

1996-01-01

174

Water Resources Research supports water economics submissions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

AGU's international interdisciplinary journal Water Resources Research (WRR) publishes original contributions in hydrology; the physical, chemical, and biological sciences; and the social and policy sciences, including economics, systems analysis, sociology, and law. With the rising relevance of water economics and related social sciences, the editors of WRR continue to encourage submissions on economics and policy. WRR was originally founded in the mid 1960s by Walter Langbein and economist Allen Kneese. Several former WRR editors have been economists—including David Brookshire, Ron Cummings, and Chuck Howe—and many landmark articles in water economics have been published in WRR.

Griffin, Ronald C.

2012-09-01

175

Water Resources Research National Competitive Grants Program  

E-print Network

Announcement No. G13AS00009 under Section 104(g) of the Water Resources Research Act of 1984, as Amended or call 970-226-9445. #12;i NATIONAL INSTITUTES FOR WATER RESOURCES U.S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY WATER RESOURCES of the Water Resources Research Act of 1984, as amended (http://water.usgs.gov/wrri/institutes.html). Proposals

176

WATER RESOURCES PLANNING ACT Q:\\COMP\\WATER1\\WRPA  

E-print Network

103 WATER RESOURCES PLANNING ACT Q:\\COMP\\WATER1\\WRPA December 29, 2000 #12;Q:\\COMP\\WATER1\\WRPA December 29, 2000 #12;105 WATER RESOURCES PLANNING ACT [As Amended Through P.L. 106­580, Dec. 29, 2000 planning of water and related land resources, through the establishment of a water resources council

US Army Corps of Engineers

177

University of Canterbury Department of Civil & Natural Resources Engineering  

E-print Network

` 1 University of Canterbury Department of Civil & Natural Resources Engineering 2010 Undergraduate ............................................................................. 13 2.5 Third Professional ­ Natural Resources Engineering.............................................................................................................. 41 4.8 Computer Resources

Hickman, Mark

178

Lunar Water Resource Demonstration (LWRD)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Lunar Water Resource Demonstration (LWRD) is part of RESOLVE (Regolith and Environment Science & Oxygen and Lunar Volatile Extraction). RESOLVE is an ISRU ground demonstration: (1) A rover to explore a permanently shadowed crater at the south or north pole of the Moon (2) Drill core samples down to 1 meter (3) Heat the core samples to 150C (4) Analyze gases and capture water and/or hydrogen evolved (5) Use hydrogen reduction to extract oxygen from regolith

Muscatello, Anthony C.

2009-01-01

179

GIS IN WATER RESOURCES CE 413/513, 3 credits  

E-print Network

GIS IN WATER RESOURCES CE 413/513, 3 credits Prerequisites: Senior or graduate in Engineering or one previous GIS course CE 413 Instructor: Tracy Arras CE 513 Instructor: Wayne Huber Office: Owen 238 Learning Objectives · Demonstrate the basic concepts and operation of GIS for water resources Data models

Wright, Dawn Jeannine

180

Ohio Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

Category: Water Quality, Surface Water, Non Point Pollution Descriptors: Principal Investigators: Dominic LOhio Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report FY 2010 Ohio Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report FY 2010 1 #12;Introduction Pursuant to the Water Resources Research Act of 1964, the Water

181

PUERTO RICO WATER RESOURCES AND ENVIRONMENTAL  

E-print Network

of water borne illness, effectiveness of water treatment processes. 3. Recycling and Reuse of Used WaterPUERTO RICO WATER RESOURCES AND ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH INSTITUTE REQUEST FOR PROPOSAL FY 2012 WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH GRANT STATE PROGRAM under Section 104B of the Water Resources Research Act of 1984

Gilbes, Fernando

182

PUERTO RICO WATER RESOURCES AND ENVIRONMENTAL  

E-print Network

of water borne illness, effectiveness of water treatment processes. 3. Recycling and Reuse of Used WaterPUERTO RICO WATER RESOURCES AND ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH INSTITUTE REQUEST FOR PROPOSAL FY 2011 WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH GRANT STATE PROGRAM under Section 104B of the Water Resources Research Act of 1984

Gilbes, Fernando

183

New England's Ground Water Resources  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This resource provides a detailed description of the ground water system in New England. Although it was written specifically for New England, most or all of it applies to other parts of the country also. The liberal use of diagrams helps to explain terms such as saturated and unsaturated zones, bedrock, water table, and zones of aeration and contribution. Types of aquifers are discussed as to their porosity, permeability and hydraulic conductivity. They include bedrock, soil, stratified drift, superficial deposits, unconsolidated materials, and confined aquifers along with discharge and recharge areas. There is also an explanation of a water budget including precipitation, evapotranspiration, infiltration and runoff.

184

Water resources data, Kentucky. Water year 1991  

SciTech Connect

Water resources data for the 1991 water year for Kentucky consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams and lakes; and water-levels of wells. This report includes daily discharge records for 115 stream-gaging stations. It also includes water-quality data for 38 stations sampled at regular intervals. Also published are 13 daily temperature and 8 specific conductance records, and 85 miscellaneous temperature and specific conductance determinations for the gaging stations. Suspended-sediment data for 12 stations (of which 5 are daily) are also published. Ground-water levels are published for 23 recording and 117 partial sites. Precipitation data at a regular interval is published for 1 site. Additional water data were collected at various sites not involved in the systematic data-collection program and are published as miscellaneous measurement and analyses. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the US Geological Survey and cooperation State and Federal agencies in Kentucky.

McClain, D.L.; Byrd, F.D.; Brown, A.C.

1991-12-31

185

Clean water: a fading resource  

Microsoft Academic Search

Fresh waters of the world are collectively experiencing markedly accelerating rates of qualitative and quantitative degradation. The primary types of degradation are reviewed in a historical manner to illustrate the technological and social responses, and the rates at which they can be applied, under different societal structures. Effective utilization of extant freshwater resources is complicated by distributions of humans and

Robert G. Wetzel

1992-01-01

186

Water resource and power generation  

Microsoft Academic Search

We propose a simple model of competition between a thermal station and a hydrostation for the production of energy. We show that, despite the static characteristics of the thermal cost function, the thermal output is determined by intertemporal considerations. This results from the scarcity of the water resource which is storable at zero operating cost. We analyze the combination of

Claude Crampes; Michel Moreaux

2001-01-01

187

Teach Engineering Resources for K-12  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Introducing engineering into the K-12 classroom. K-12 classroom connects science and math concepts to the everyday engineering that surrounds us. This teacher resource, TeachEngineering.org, helps teachers enhance learning, excite students and stimulate interest in science and math through the use of hands-on engineering. The TeachEngineering digital library provides teacher-tested, standards-based engineering content for K-12 teachers engineering content for K12 teachers to use in science and math classrooms. Engineering lessons connect real-world experiences with curricular content already taught in K-12 classrooms. Mapped to educational content standards, TeachEngineering's comprehensive curricula are hands-on, inexpensive, and relevant to children's daily lives.

188

Water resources of Webster Parish  

USGS Publications Warehouse

In 2005, about 9.52 million gallons per day (Mgal/d) of water were withdrawn in Webster Parish, Louisiana (fig. 1), including about 9.33 Mgal/d from groundwater sources and 0.19 Mgal/d from surface-water sources1 (table 1). Publicsupply use accounted for about 70 percent of the total water withdrawn. Other categories of use included industrial, rural domestic, livestock, general irrigation, and aquaculture (table 2). Water-use data collected at 5-year intervals from 1960 to 2005 indicate water withdrawals in Webster Parish decreased substantially from 1970 to 1980; surface-water withdrawals for industrial use decreased from about 37 to 0 Mgal/d because of a paper mill closure in 1979. From 1980 to 2000, total water withdrawals in the parish ranged from 7 to 8 Mgal/d (fig. 2). This fact sheet summarizes basic information on the water resources of Webster Parish, La. Information on groundwater and surface-water availability, quality, development, use, and trends is based on previously published reports listed in the Selected References section.

Prakken, Lawrence B.; Griffith, Jason M.

2011-01-01

189

Arkansas Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

with water quality of surface water and ground water, especially non-point source pollution and sensitive, ground water modeling and landuse mapping, erosion and pollution, water quality and ecosystem functionsArkansas Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report FY 2009 Arkansas Water Resources Center

190

USGS Water Resources of North Carolina  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Water Resources of North Carolina provides water data, maps and graphs of current water resource conditions, information on research and scientific activities, and USGS publications. The water data includes surface water, real time, current streamflow, ground water, water quality, and precipitation data. There is also flood and drought information.

191

Nebraska Water Conference Council's Annual Water and Natural Resources Tour  

E-print Network

Districts Nebraska Water Conference Council Nebraska Public Power District School of Natural Resources Buettner Central Nebraska Public Power & Irrigation District Michael Jess Water Center, UniversityNebraska Water Conference Council's Annual Water and Natural Resources Tour of The Middle Missouri

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

192

Increasing life expectancy of water resources literature  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In a study from 2008, Larivière and colleagues showed, for the field of natural sciences and engineering, that the median age of cited references is increasing over time. This result was considered counterintuitive: with the advent of electronic search engines, online journal issues and open access publications, one could have expected that cited literature is becoming younger. That study has motivated us to take a closer look at the changes in the age distribution of references that have been cited in water resources journals since 1965. Not only could we confirm the findings of Larivière and colleagues. We were also able to show that the aging is mainly happening in the oldest 10-25% of an average reference list. This is consistent with our analysis of top-cited papers in the field of water resources. Rankings based on total citations since 1965 consistently show the dominance of old literature, including text books and research papers in equal shares. For most top-cited old-timers, citations are still growing exponentially. There is strong evidence that most citations are attracted by publications that introduced methods which meanwhile belong to the standard toolset of researchers and practitioners in the field of water resources. Although we think that this trend should not be overinterpreted as a sign of stagnancy, there might be cause for concern regarding how authors select their references. We question the increasing citation of textbook knowledge as it holds the risk that reference lists become overcrowded, and that the readability of papers deteriorates.

Heistermann, M.; Francke, T.; Georgi, C.; Bronstert, A.

2014-06-01

193

Texas Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

Texas Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2007 Texas Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2007 1 #12;Introduction The Texas Water Resources Institute (TWRI), a unit of Texas AMAgriLife, and member of the National Institutes for Water Resources, provides leadership

194

Illinois Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

Illinois Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report FY 2013 Illinois Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report FY 2013 1 #12;Introduction The Illinois Water Resources Center (IWRC) serves the people of Illinois by providing science-based information and resources about the water research, policy

195

Water Resources Research National Competitive Grants Program  

E-print Network

Announcement No. G12AS20005 under Section 104(g) of the Water Resources Research Act of 1984, as Amended or call 970-226-9445. #12;i NATIONAL INSTITUTES FOR WATER RESOURCES U.S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY WATER RESOURCES established under the provisions of the Water Resources Research Act of 1984, as amended (http

Hanson, Stephen José

196

Water Resources Research National Competitive Grants Program  

E-print Network

Announcement No. 11HQPA0008 under Section 104(g) of the Water Resources Research Act of 1984, as Amended or call 970-226-9445. #12;i NATIONAL INSTITUTES FOR WATER RESOURCES U.S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY WATER RESOURCES Resources Research Act of 1984, as amended (http://water.usgs.gov/wrri/institutes.html). Proposals involving

Goodman, Robert M.

197

Georgia Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

of Natural Resources, water and power utilities, environmental organizations and citizen groups, and lakeGeorgia Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2010 Georgia Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2010 1 #12;Introduction The Georgia Water Resources Institute (GWRI) aims

198

Georgia Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

of Natural Resources, water and power utilities, environmental organizations and citizen groups, and lakeGeorgia Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2012 Georgia Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2012 1 #12;Introduction The Georgia Water Resources Institute (GWRI) engages

199

Institute of Water Resources Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

Pollution, Surface Water, Water Quality Descriptors: Bacteria, Suspended Sediments, Water Quality Monitoring Pollution, Surface Water, WInstitute of Water Resources Annual Technical Report FY 2002 Introduction In fiscal year 2002

200

ENGINEERING BULLETIN: SUPERCRITICAL WATER OXIDATION  

EPA Science Inventory

This engineering bulletin presents a description and status of supercritical water oxidation technology, a summary of recent performance tests, and the current applicability of this emerging technology. his information is provided to assist remedial project managers, contractors ...

201

ENGINEERING BULLETIN: SUPERCRITICAL WATER OXIDATION  

EPA Science Inventory

This engineering bulletin presents a description and status of supercritical water oxidation technology, a summary of recent performance tests, and the current applicability of this emerging technology. This information is provided to assist remedial project managers, contractors...

202

Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

contributes as much to a water allocation problem as water scarcity itself. To compound the situation, NewWater Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2007 Water Resources Research-June fiscal year rather than the March-February USGS Grant Award period. The New Mexico Water Resources

203

Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

contributes as much to a water allocation problem as water scarcity itself. To compound the situation, NewWater Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2010 Water Resources Research rather than the March-February USGS Grant Award period. The New Mexico Water Resources Research Institute

204

Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

contributes as much to a water allocation problem as water scarcity itself. To compound the situation, NewWater Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2008 Water Resources Research-June fiscal year rather than the March-February USGS Grant Award period. The New Mexico Water Resources

205

Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

contributes as much to a water allocation problem as water scarcity itself. To compound the situation, NewWater Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2009 Water Resources Research-June fiscal year rather than the March-February USGS Grant Award period. The New Mexico Water Resources

206

Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

/Non-Point/Runoff · Ocean Outfall Biomonitoring · General Marine Water Quality · Economics/Policy/Law · Climate. Subjects cover, in general, water resources sustainability, climate and climate change influence on waterWater Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2013 Water Resources Research Center

207

Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2003 Introduction The Florida Water for Wetlands and Water Resources Research in 1995. Historically, since 1964, the WRRC as a separate or combined center has been a university-wide focus for water-resources research and has served as the Water

208

Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report FY 2007 Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report FY 2007 1 #12;Introduction The Rhode Island Water Resources Center has supported one information transfer project, "Clean Drinking Water in Rhode Island" and one research project "Enhancing Drinking Water

209

Corrections for Water Resources Engineering  

E-print Network

In Vivo Treatment of Rabbit VX2 Tumor by Miniaturized Image-Ablate Ultrasound Arrays T. Douglas, Cincinnati, Ohio Abstract--In the preclinical studies reported here, VX2 cancer within rabbit liver has been

Mays, Larry W.

210

EAWAG: An Environmental Science and Engineering Resource.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Interviewed is the director of a Swiss research and teaching institute in the field of water resources, water pollution control, and waste management. Topics include lake studies, research programs and priorities, advisory services, and the organizational structure of EAWAG. (BT)

Miller, Stanton

1980-01-01

211

USGS Water Resources of Georgia  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Water Resources of Georgia contains a map of current streamflow conditions; Georgia HydroWatch, a portal to hydrologic data and related information for Georgia; a listing of projects being conducted by the USGS in Georgia; and publications such as abstracts and full reports for USGS projects in Georgia. The water data includes flood-frequency information, low-flow frequency statistics, a drought watch, information on the Chattahoochee BacteriALERT program, and a Flint River Flood tracking chart.

212

College of Earth Resource Sciences and Engineering (CERSE) Department of Petroleum Engineering  

E-print Network

College of Earth Resource Sciences and Engineering (CERSE) Department of Petroleum Engineering the satisfactory completion of a background investigation. #12;College of Earth Resource Sciences and Engineering

213

Arkansas Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

quality of surface water and ground water, especially non-point source pollution and sensitive ecosystems, ground water modeling and landuse mapping, erosion and pollution, water quality and ecosystem functionsArkansas Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report FY 2010 Arkansas Water Resources Center

214

Illinois Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

Illinois Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report FY 2004 Introduction The Illinois Water of Illinois water resources. In 2004, IWRC hosted Illinois Water, a biennial conference on water issues in the Midwest and the Illinois State Water Survey. MTAC began funding four new projects in 2003. These projects

215

Water Resources Division training catalog  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The National Training Center provides technical and management sessions nesessary for the conductance of the U.S. Geological Survey 's training programs. This catalog describes the facilities and staff at the Lakewood Training Center and describes Water Resources Division training courses available through the center. In addition, the catalog describes the procedures for gaining admission, formulas for calculating fees, and discussion of course evaluations. (USGS)

Hotchkiss, W.R.; Foxhoven, L.A.

1984-01-01

216

In press, Water Resources Research Optimization of Environmental Water Purchases with Uncertainty  

E-print Network

, as are operational and research recommendations. 1. INTRODUCTION Scarcity of water tends to create conflicts betweenIn press, Water Resources Research Optimization of Environmental Water Purchases with Uncertainty of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of California, Davis ABSTRACT Water managers are turning

Pasternack, Gregory B.

217

OVERVIEW OF USEPA'S WATER SUPPLY & WATER RESOURCES DIVISION PROGRAM  

EPA Science Inventory

The United States Environmental Protection Agency's (USEPA) Water Supply and Water Resources Division (WSWRD) conducts a wide range of research on regulated and unregulated contaminants in drinking water, water distribution systems, homeland security, source water protection, and...

218

Nebraska Water Conference Council's Annual Water & Natural Resources Tour  

E-print Network

- Water Center Coordinating Committee Tim Anderson . . . Central Nebraska Public Power & Irrigation . . . Nebraska Public Power District Steve Ress . . . Water Center, University of Nebraska #12;Nebraska WaterNebraska Water Conference Council's Annual Water & Natural Resources Tour A Year of Experience

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

219

Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

resources, including the management of water resources among competing uses; controlling pollution from preproposals were received by the Illinois Water Resources Center under the Water Resources Research Institutes were distributed for review by peers outside the state of Illinois. Based on the peer reviews

220

Arkansas Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

quality of surface water and groundwater, especially non-point source pollution and sensitive ecosystemsArkansas Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report FY 2013 Arkansas Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report FY 2013 1 #12;Introduction The Arkansas Water Resources Center is part

221

Illinois Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

Illinois Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report FY 2011 Illinois Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report FY 2011 1 #12;Introduction The Illinois Water Resources Center seeks to develop solutions to water challenges of importance to Illinois, the Midwest and the nation. The Center's mission

222

Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

including educational videos. #12;Research Program The Idaho Water Resources Research Institutes researchWater Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2002 Introduction The Idaho Water Resources Research Institute (IWRRI), University of Idaho is dedicated to supporting and promoting water

223

Water Resources Research National Competitive Grants Program  

E-print Network

Announcement No. G12AS20005 under Section 104(g) of the Water Resources Research Act of 1984, as Amended Collins, CO 80525 or call 970-226-9445. #12;i NATIONAL INSTITUTES FOR WATER RESOURCES U.S. GEOLOGICAL of the Water Resources Research Act of 1984, as amended (http://water.usgs.gov/wrri/institutes.html). Proposals

Gilbes, Fernando

224

Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2009 Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2009 1 #12;Introduction The major water science issue in Maryland, and information transfer projects of the Maryland Water Resources Research Center nearly all have a focus

225

Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2013 Water Resources Research Center of Agriculture and Life Sciences, the University of Arizona Water Resources Research Center (WRRC) has a mission to promote understanding of critical state and regional water management and policy issues through research

226

COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING & MINERAL RESOURCES TRANSFER REQUEST FORM  

E-print Network

COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING & MINERAL RESOURCES TRANSFER REQUEST FORM Name? ______ _____________________________________________________________________________________________ Could the College of Engineering and Mineral Resources have done anything to retain you as a student

Mohaghegh, Shahab

227

Nebraska Water Conference Council's Annual Water & Natural Resources Tour  

E-print Network

Association of Resources Districts Nebraska Water Conference Council Nebraska Public Power District SchoolNebraska Water Conference Council's Annual Water & Natural Resources Tour Focusing upon Wildlife Nebraska Public Power & Irrigation District Gateway Farm Expo Kearney Area Chamber of Commerce Nebraska

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

228

American Society of Civil Engineers: Teaching Resources  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Do you want to help train the next generation of civil engineers? This website provides a plethora of high-quality, hands-on activities for just that purpose. The site has resources for educators, parents, and engineers. The Educators section contains classroom resources that include ZOOM into Engineering and West Point Bridge Contest. The real interactive gems are in the Digital Media area. Visitors can take advantage of playful experiences like It's Cool to Be A Civil Engineer and Designing a Roller Coaster. The Parents area includes some very fun activities parents can do with their children. All told, there are seven such low-cost activities with instructions, including Paper Bridge and Newspaper Tower All in all, it's a lovely site and one that will inspire future engineers and create new connections between educators and their students.

229

Resource Estimation in Software Engineering  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents a comprehensive overview of the state of the art in software resource estimation. We describe common estimation methods and also provide an evaluation framework to systematically compare and assess alternative estimation methods. Though we have tried to be as precise and objective as possible, it is inevitable that such a comparison exercise be somewhat subjective. We however,

Lionel C. Briand; Isabella Wieczorek

2001-01-01

230

Arkansas Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

quality of surface water and groundwater, especially non-point source pollution and sensitive ecosystems wastewater disposal systems, ground water modeling and land use mapping, erosion and pollution, water qualityArkansas Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report FY 2012 Arkansas Water Resources Center

231

Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

areas of water supply and treatment. The first project "Water-Induced Pore Pressures in Remedial Caps of disinfecting water without the addition of chemicals such as chlorine. The information transfer projectWater Resources Center Annual Technical Report FY 2012 Water Resources Center Annual Technical

232

WATER RESOURCES NEWS NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE  

E-print Network

of Water Use; (2) Nonpoint Source Pollution; (3) Meeting Water Requirements; (4) Energy-Water Relationships development. (2) Water Pollution and Water Quality Control - Nonpoint Source Pollution Definition: Degradation of water quality from nonpoint source pollution. (3) Water Use Efficiency Definition: Minimize water use

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

233

Scouting It Out: Interpreting Water Resources at the National Jamboree.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Federal natural-resource-management agencies combined efforts with volunteer scouting staff to develop a conservation area at the 1997 National Boy Scout Jamboree. Profiles the program, which adopted the theme of environmental stewardship, and focuses on how the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers interpreted water resources. The exhibit highlighted the…

Hays, Dave

1998-01-01

234

Water resources investigations in New York, 1980  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report describes the water-resources investigations conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey in New York in 1980; many of these studies will continue into 1981 or longer. The Geological Survey began its water-resources studies in New York State in 1895 with a stream-gaging program in the Catskill Mountain region and entered its first cooperative program, with the Office of the State Engineer, in 1900. Since 1910, the Survey has maintained a District office in Albany to direct its water investigations within the State. A Long Island subdistrict office was established in 1932 to monitor and study the ground-water situation in this area of increasing urbanization. Subdistrict offices are also maintained in Ithaca and Albany to collect and interpret data from western and eastern New York, respectively. A field station is maintained in Potsdam to collect records in the northernmost part of the State. A bibliography of reports published or released in 1980 by the New York District is included. (USGS)

Finch, Anne J., (compiler)

1980-01-01

235

A DEMONSTRATION OF AREAWIDE WATER RESOURCES PLANNING  

EPA Science Inventory

The Metropolitan Washington Council of Governments Framework Water Resources Planning Model developed and tested under this study is a comprehensive analytical tool for use in areawide water resources management planning. The physical simulation portion was formed by linking comp...

236

Water Resource System Optimization by Geometric Programming  

E-print Network

of the applicability and usefulness of optimization methods in water resources analyses [38]. Linear programming [53], dynamic programming [41,40], and nonlinear programming [19] have been shown to be useful in water resource optimization problems. These techniques...

Meier, W. L.; Shih, C. S.; Wray, D. J.

237

Texas Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

Texas Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2011 Texas Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2011 1 #12;Introduction The Texas Water Resources Institute (TWRI), a unit of Texas AgriLife Research, Texas AgriLife Extension Service and the College of Agriculture and Life

238

Texas Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

Texas Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2010 Texas Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2010 1 #12;Introduction The Texas Water Resources Institute (TWRI), a unit of Texas AgriLife Research, Texas AgriLife Extension Service and the College of Agriculture and Life

239

Texas Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

Texas Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2009 Texas Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2009 1 #12;Introduction The Texas Water Resources Institute (TWRI), a unit of Texas AgriLife Research, Texas AgriLife Extension Service and the College of Agriculture and Life

240

Texas Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

Texas Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2008 Texas Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2008 1 #12;Introduction The Texas Water Resources Institute (TWRI), a unit of Texas AgriLife Research, Texas AgriLife Extension Service and the College of Agriculture and Life

241

Summary Analysis [United States Water Resources Council].  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report contains a summary and analysis of public response to the Water Resources Council proposed principles and standards and its accompanying draft environmental impact statement for planning the use of water and related land resources as well as planning and evaluating water and related land resources programs and projects. Both written…

Roose, John B.; Cobb, Gary D.

242

Illinois Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

Illinois Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report FY 2008 Illinois Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report FY 2008 1 #12;Introduction The Illinois Water Resources Center is located on the University of Illinois Campus in Urbana-Champaign and serves people throughout Illinois. The state spans from

243

Illinois Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

Illinois Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report FY 2007 Illinois Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report FY 2007 1 #12;Introduction The Illinois Water Resources Center (IWRC) is located on the University of Illinois campus in Urbana-Champaign and serves people throughout Illinois. The state spans from

244

Illinois Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

Illinois Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report FY 2009 Illinois Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report FY 2009 1 #12;Introduction The Illinois Water Resources Center is located on the University of Illinois Campus in Urbana-Champaign and serves people throughout Illinois. The state spans from

245

Georgia Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

, GWRI coordinated the Water Resources Sector National Assessment of Climate Change and Variability by potential climate changes, and to formulate a sustainable policy on this issue. At the international level - Improvement of Water Resources Management Due to Climate Forecasts (sponsored by NOAA); - Water Resources

246

Front Range Infrastructure Resources Project: water-resources activities  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Infrastructure, such as roads, buildings, airports, and dams, is built and maintained by use of large quantities of natural resources such as aggregate (sand and gravel), energy, and water. As urban area expand, local sources of these resource are becoming inaccessible (gravel cannot be mined from under a subdivision, for example), or the cost of recovery of the resource becomes prohibitive (oil and gas drilling in urban areas is costly), or the resources may become unfit for some use (pollution of ground water may preclude its use as a water supply). Governmental land-use decision and environmental mandates can further preclude development of natural resources. If infrastructure resources are to remain economically available. current resource information must be available for use in well-reasoned decisions bout future land use. Ground water is an infrastructure resource that is present in shallow aquifers and deeper bedrock aquifers that underlie much of the 2,450-square-mile demonstration area of the Colorado Front Range Infrastructure Resources Project. In 1996, mapping of the area's ground-water resources was undertaken as a U.S. Geological Survey project in cooperation with the Colorado Department of Natural Resources, Division of Water Resources, and the Colorado Water Conservation Board.

Robson, Stanley G.; Heiny, Janet S.

1998-01-01

247

Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 1999 Introduction WATER PROBLEMS AND ISSUES OF MISSOURI The water problems and issues in the State of Missouri can be separated into three general areas: 1) water quality, 2) water quantity, and 3) water policy. Each of Missouri's specific

248

Management of Water Resources. Bulk Water in Brazil  

Microsoft Academic Search

How to finance the infrastructure and service of bulk water supply, and how to use pricing to achieve efficient allocation and use of water as a resource are the central issues that emerge from discussions about bulk water pricing. Efficiency will lead to allocating water resources better, reducing water losses caused by poor maintenance of the supply systems, and increased

M. Asad; L. G. Azevedo; K. E. Kemper; L. D. Simpson

1999-01-01

249

Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

of water resources among competing uses; controlling pollution from nonpoint sources; recovering water in the five priorities above. In addition, in 1998, the Illinois Water Resources Center (IWRC) and the Illinois State Water Survey successfully competed in a national USEPA competition to establish regional

250

Texas Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

(1); water treatment (1); non-point pollution (1); and water quality (5). Note that several projectsTexas Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2003 Introduction The Mission of the Texas Water Resources Institute is to: (1) Provide leadership for Experiment Station and Extension

251

Arkansas Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

quality of surface water and groundwater, especially non-point source pollution and sensitive ecosystems modeling and landuse mapping, erosion and pollution, water quality and ecosystem functions. The CenterArkansas Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report FY 2011 Arkansas Water Resources Center

252

Illinois Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

Illinois Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report FY 2006 #12;Introduction The Illinois Water of Illinois water resources. In 2006, IWRC supported two continuing research projects with state funding with 104G money. We held the 2006 Illinois Water conference, a conference that showcases research

253

Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

contributes as much to a water allocation problem as water scarcity itself. To compound the situation, NewWater Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2005 Introduction This program report. The New Mexico Water Resources Research Institute (NMWRRI) was established in 1963 by the New Mexico State

254

Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

. Such widely varied precipitation is as much a water allocation problem as water scarcity itself. Like otherWater Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2001 Introduction This program report. The New Mexico Water Resources Research Institute (NMWRRI) was established in 1963 by the New Mexico State

255

Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

. Such widely varied precipitation is as much a water allocation problem as water scarcity itself. #12;ResearchWater Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2002 Introduction This program report. The New Mexico Water Resources Research Institute (NMWRRI) was established in 1963 by the New Mexico State

256

Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

precipitation is as much a water allocation problem as water scarcity itself. New Mexico, like much of the WestWater Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2004 Introduction This program report. The New Mexico Water Resources Research Institute (NMWRRI) was established in 1963 by the New Mexico State

257

Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

contributes as much to a water allocation problem as water scarcity itself. To compound the situation, NewWater Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2006 #12;Introduction This program. The New Mexico Water Resources Research Institute (NMWRRI) was established in 1963 by the New Mexico State

258

WATER MARKETS AND DECENTRALIZED WATER RESOURCES MANAGEMENT  

Microsoft Academic Search

Because of its importance and the perceived inability of private sector sources to meet water demands, many countries have depended on the public sector to provide water services for their populations. Yet this has resulted in many inefficient public water projects and in inadequate supplies of good quality and reliable water. Decentralization of water management, including the use of water

K. William Easter; Robert R. Hearne

1994-01-01

259

NASA Earth Resources Survey Symposium. Volume 1-D: Water resources  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Conference papers on water resources and management are summarized. Summaries cover land use, flood control and prediction, watersheds and the effects of snow melt, soil moisture content, and the usefulness of satellite remote sensors in detecting ground and surface water.

1975-01-01

260

Cost-effectiveness analysis for sustainable wastewater engineering and water resources management: a case study at Minho-Lima river basins (Portugal)  

Microsoft Academic Search

A cost-effectiveness integrated methodology applied in a water resources management and sanitation project in Minho and Lima's region (Portugal) is presented. First, environmental objectives and programmes of measures (PM) are established and priorities are identified using a cause-effect assessment matrix and a global effectiveness index. Aiming to achieve more demanding goals, some complementary actions are considered, including “decentralized low-energy wastewater

S. Costa; L. Coutinho; A. G. Brito; R. Nogueira; A. P. Machado; J. J. Salas; C. Póvoa

2009-01-01

261

International Center for Integrated Water Resources Management (ICIWRM)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The USACE Institute of Water Resources and the University of Arizona have signed a memorandum of understanding to promote the creation of an International Center for Integrated Water Resources Management (ICIWRM) that will, upon completion, create a virtual teaching and research center with academic institutions, government agencies and NGOs for integrated water resources management, interdisciplinary scientific research, and capacity-building/development for developing and emerging countries; and post-disaster/conflict nations and regions. Some of the topics in which the Center will be involved include: integrated water resources management and sustainable development in arid and semi-arid zones, infrastructure development and related engineering design standards and procedures, capacity building, development and training, water policy, governance and institutional aspects, water security, including within the context of the Millennium Development Goals. The new Center will also be working with multilateral organizations such as the UNESCO International Hydrology Program.

Stakhiv, E. Z.; Valdes, J. B.

2007-12-01

262

Adapting water accounting for integrated water resource management. The Júcar Water Resource System (Spain)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

An increase in water demands, exacerbated by climate change and the tightening of environmental requirements, leads to a reduction in available water resources for economic uses. This situation poses challenges for water resource planning and management. Water accounting has emerged as an appropriate tool to improve transparency and control in water management. There are multiple water accounting approaches, but they generally involve a very exhaustive list of accounted concepts. According to our findings in this research, one of the best water accounting methodologies is the Australian Water Accounting Standard. However, its implementation for integrated water resource planning and management purposes calls into questioning the amount of information and level of detail necessary for the users of water accounts. In this paper, we present a different method of applying the Australian Water Accounting Standard in relation to water resource management, which improves its utility. In order to compare the original approach and that proposed here, we present and discuss an application to the Júcar Water Resource System, in eastern Spain.

Momblanch, Andrea; Andreu, Joaquín; Paredes-Arquiola, Javier; Solera, Abel; Pedro-Monzonís, María

2014-11-01

263

Uncertainty Management in Urban Water Engineering Adaptation to Climate Change  

EPA Science Inventory

Current water resource planning and engineering assume a stationary climate, in which the observed historical water flow rate and water quality variations are often used to define the technical basis. When the non-stationarity is considered, however, climate change projection co...

264

Human Resources as Engineering Design Criteria.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The report summarizes the results of a number of studies which have been performed in an attempt to develop a technology for using human resources data as criteria in engineering design studies. Eight investigations conducted during the period 1966-1975 are briefly described. The results of the eight studies are integrated around six topics of:…

Askren, William B.

265

Contamination of water resources by pathogenic bacteria  

PubMed Central

Water-borne pathogen contamination in water resources and related diseases are a major water quality concern throughout the world. Increasing interest in controlling water-borne pathogens in water resources evidenced by a large number of recent publications clearly attests to the need for studies that synthesize knowledge from multiple fields covering comparative aspects of pathogen contamination, and unify them in a single place in order to present and address the problem as a whole. Providing a broader perceptive of pathogen contamination in freshwater (rivers, lakes, reservoirs, groundwater) and saline water (estuaries and coastal waters) resources, this review paper attempts to develop the first comprehensive single source of existing information on pathogen contamination in multiple types of water resources. In addition, a comprehensive discussion describes the challenges associated with using indicator organisms. Potential impacts of water resources development on pathogen contamination as well as challenges that lie ahead for addressing pathogen contamination are also discussed. PMID:25006540

2014-01-01

266

Contamination of water resources by pathogenic bacteria.  

PubMed

Water-borne pathogen contamination in water resources and related diseases are a major water quality concern throughout the world. Increasing interest in controlling water-borne pathogens in water resources evidenced by a large number of recent publications clearly attests to the need for studies that synthesize knowledge from multiple fields covering comparative aspects of pathogen contamination, and unify them in a single place in order to present and address the problem as a whole. Providing a broader perceptive of pathogen contamination in freshwater (rivers, lakes, reservoirs, groundwater) and saline water (estuaries and coastal waters) resources, this review paper attempts to develop the first comprehensive single source of existing information on pathogen contamination in multiple types of water resources. In addition, a comprehensive discussion describes the challenges associated with using indicator organisms. Potential impacts of water resources development on pathogen contamination as well as challenges that lie ahead for addressing pathogen contamination are also discussed. PMID:25006540

Pandey, Pramod K; Kass, Philip H; Soupir, Michelle L; Biswas, Sagor; Singh, Vijay P

2014-01-01

267

Water resources in unified accounting for natural resources  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The aim of this paper is to incorporate the water resources into the unified resources accounting based on scientific objectivity so as to present a brief portrait of the significance of water for the resource conversion and management of the national-scale society in a systems ecological perspective. The water resources in sustaining the human society are incorporated into the total exergy budget and national-scale social exergy accounting framework, not only by accounting the conventionally usable water flowing through society regarding seawater as reference environment, but also by introducing the evaporation exergy of freshwater as essential investment from the hydrological cycle. A case study of the Chinese society 2001-2005 is conducted, with the societal system broken down into seven sectors, i.e., extraction, conversion, agriculture, industry, transportation, tertiary and households sectors, to explore the resource utilization structure based on the proposed accounting method. Typical results for China 2005 showed that the total net input of the societal conventional resource exergy was 87.9 EJ, of which 75.4 EJ was from mineral resources and 22.6 EJ from other resources, while the water resource exergy input amounted to 105.1 EJ, which contributed 54.5% of the total resources exergy investment to the total society. Finally, the exergetic resource use intensities (RUIs) for six sectors were calculated, with the results that RUIs of agriculture and conversion sectors are much higher than those derived from conventional resource accounting.

Cai, Z. F.; Yang, Q.; Zhang, B.; Chen, H.; Chen, B.; Chen, G. Q.

2009-09-01

268

State of ISRAEL Water Resources Management  

E-print Network

. Water wells purification and aquifers water quality improvement. Increasing capacity of waste waterState of ISRAEL Water Resources Management Socio-Economic Perspective Tami Shor , Deputy Director (Regulation) Israel Water Authority April, 2010 #12;State of ISRAEL 2 Israel is situated at the edge

Einat, Aharonov

269

USGS Water Resources of South Dakota  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Water Resources of South Dakota site contains hydrologic data, including realtime streamflow, precipitation, and water use data. There are USGS water resources publications and information on projects such as the Black Hills Hydrology Study; the National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Volatile Organic Chemicals National Synthesis; the Belle Fourche Watershed Assessment Study; and the Sensitivity of Ground Water to Contamination project in Lawrence County, South Dakota.

270

Water Budgets: Foundations for Effective Water-Resources and  

E-print Network

Water Budgets: Foundations for Effective Water-Resources and Environmental Management U Survey3. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service4. U.S. Geological Survey5. #12;Water Budgets: Foundations for Effective Water-Resources and Environmental Management By Richard W. Healy, Thomas C. Winter, James W. La

271

Institute of Water Resources Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

Institute of Water Resources Annual Technical Report FY 2003 Introduction The Connecticut Institute of Water Resources is located at the University of Connecticut (UCONN) and reports to the head Resources. The Institute is headed by a Director, Dr. Glenn Warner, and administered by an Associate

272

California State Water Resources Control Board  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

From this website one can link to laws and regulations related to water and water issues in California, as well as to the state's nine regional control boards. Topics covered include water education, water quality and water rights, as well as various programs such as blue-green algae, environmental justice, irrigated agriculture, septic, and storm water, among others. This website is a good source of California-based policy on water resource issues.

State Water Resources Control Board

273

Illinois Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

Illinois Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report FY 2005 Introduction The Illinois Water of Illinois water resources. In 2005, IWRC supported two research projects with state funding and monitored four projects funded with 104G money. We co-sponsored the Governor's Conference on the Illinois River

274

forreading. Sustainability Index for Water Resources  

E-print Network

of environ- mental considerations, water scarcity, and climate change. Recently, strong emphasis has beenO nly forreading. D o notD ow nload. Sustainability Index for Water Resources Planning presents a water resources sustainability index that makes it possible to evaluate and compare different

Pasternack, Gregory B.

275

Water resource management: an Indian perspective.  

PubMed

Water is precious natural resource for sustaining life and environment. Effective and sustainable management of water resources is vital for ensuring sustainable development. In view of the vital importance of water for human and animal life, for maintaining ecological balance and for economic and developmental activities of all kinds, and considering its increasing scarcity, the planning and management of water resource and its optimal, economical and equitable use has become a matter of the utmost urgency. Management of water resources in India is of paramount importance to sustain one billion plus population. Water management is a composite area with linkage to various sectors of Indian economy including the agricultural, industrial, domestic and household, power, environment, fisheries and transportation sector. The water resources management practices should be based on increasing the water supply and managing the water demand under the stressed water availability conditions. For maintaining the quality of freshwater, water quality management strategies are required to be evolved and implemented. Decision support systems are required to be developed for planning and management of the water resources project. There is interplay of various factors that govern access and utilization of water resources and in light of the increasing demand for water it becomes important to look for holistic and people-centered approaches for water management. Clearly, drinking water is too fundamental and serious an issue to be left to one institution alone. It needs the combined initiative and action of all, if at all we are serious in socioeconomic development. Safe drinking water can be assured, provided we set our mind to address it. The present article deals with the review of various options for sustainable water resource management in India. PMID:25151722

Khadse, G K; Labhasetwar, P K; Wate, S R

2012-10-01

276

How predictable are water resources?  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Peter Mason, technical director of international dams and hydropower at MWH, explains how some water resources might be more predictable than generally supposed. Some years ago the writer examined the levels of Lake Victoria in east Africa as part of a major refurbishment project. This revealed a clear cyclic behavior in lake level and hence in discharges from the lake down the Nile system and up into Egypt. A recent study by the writer demonstrated that 20-year mean flows in the Kafue River in Zambia corresponded well to reconstructed rainfall records based on regional tree ring records. The Rio Parana has a catchment area of 3,100,000km 2 and a mean stream flow of 21,300m 3/sec. In the wider context an improved understanding of apparent periodicities in the natural record would seem to offer at least one planning scenario to be considered in terms of investment and even for the long term planning of aid and famine relief.

Mason, P.

2010-10-01

277

WATER RESOURCES NEWS NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE  

E-print Network

in the at no cost on request to the Middle activated sludge treatment process. Atlantic Regional Office, FWQA ACTION O~ MERCURY POLltiIloN The cost ~nd feasibility of reusing municipal waste waters is under study Water and Federal Water Quality Administraion. The study will develop a com- parative cost analysis

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

278

Water Resources of the United States  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This is the homepage for the Water Resources Division of the United States Geological Survey. It offers links to a variety of issues concerning water resources. The main links include: news, features, water data, publications and products, technical resources, programs, local information, and contacts. Also featured are links to other divisions within the United States Geological Survey, and FirstGov, a clearinghouse for all branches of the federal government.

279

Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

of Hawaii's offshore recreational waters and onshore potable-water resources. Both current and future aquaculture ultimately aiming at enhancing greater community self-reliance in aquaculture production while

280

Ground water: the hidden resource  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Ground water is water underground in saturated zones beneath the land surface. Contrary to popular belief, ground water does not form underground "rivers." It fills the pores and fractures in underground materials such as sand, gravel, and other rock. If ground water flows from rock materials or can be removed by pumping from the saturated rock materials In useful amounts, the rock materials are called aquifers. Ground water moves slowly, typically at rates of 7 to 60 centimeters per day in an aquifer. As a result, water could remain in an aquifer for hundreds or thousands of years. Ground water is the source of about 40 percent of water used for public supplies and about 38 percent of water used for agriculture in the United States.

Vandas, Stephen; Farrar, Frank, (artist)

1996-01-01

281

Water Resources, Development and Management Service  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The world\\'s food production depends on the availability of water, a precious but finite resource. Users can learn about the need for more efficient usage of water for irrigation, and about the activities of the Water Resources Development and Management Service, which is concerned with sustainable use and conservation of water in agriculture. Links to other sites related to irrigation practices and food production are also provided.

282

Water Resources, Development and Management Service  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The world's food production depends on the availability of water, a precious but finite resource. Users can learn about the need for more efficient usage of water for irrigation, and about the activities of the Water Resources Development and Management Service, which is concerned with sustainable use and conservation of water in agriculture. Links to other sites related to irrigation practices and food production are also provided.

2004-05-10

283

Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

Drinking Water Contamination in Pascoag, RI: A Tracer Test for Investigating the Fate and Transport Island Water Resources Center supported one research project; MTBE Drinking Water Contamination Aquifer. The MTBE contamination problem in Pascoag, which contaminated the only public drinking water well

284

Center for Water Resources Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

. Water is the life blood of California's economy. As such, water supply and quality for agricultural will intensify among agricultural, urban, and environmental users, with water being transferred from agriculture and water resources caused by pesticides, salinity, chemicals, animal wastes, nutrients, sediment

285

Texas Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

); environmental flows and estuarine function (1); ecosystem functions (1); water purification; (1) and the soil study for purification of water. Texas A&M University forest science graduate student, Xuesong ZhangTexas Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2005 Introduction The Texas Water

286

18 CFR 701.76 - The Water Resources Council Staff.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2013-04-01 2012-04-01 true The Water Resources Council Staff. 701.76 Section 701.76 Conservation of Power and Water Resources WATER RESOURCES COUNCIL...

2013-04-01

287

18 CFR 701.76 - The Water Resources Council Staff.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false The Water Resources Council Staff. 701.76 Section 701.76 Conservation of Power and Water Resources WATER RESOURCES COUNCIL...

2011-04-01

288

18 CFR 701.76 - The Water Resources Council Staff.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false The Water Resources Council Staff. 701.76 Section 701.76 Conservation of Power and Water Resources WATER RESOURCES COUNCIL...

2014-04-01

289

Virginia Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

. Assisting university researchers in initiating and executing water resources research. Education Advancing educational opportunities for students in water-resources fields by helping university researchers provideVirginia Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2009 Virginia Water Resources

290

Virginia Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

.· Assisting university researchers in initiating and executing water resources research.· Education Advancing educational opportunities for students in water-resources fields by helping university researchers provideVirginia Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2010 Virginia Water Resources

291

Water footprint as a tool for integrated water resources management  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In a context where water resources are unevenly distributed and, in some regions precipitation and drought conditions are increasing, enhanced water management is a major challenge to final consumers, businesses, water resource users, water managers and policymakers in general. By linking a large range of sectors and issues, virtual water trade and water footprint analyses provide an appropriate framework to find potential solutions and contribute to a better management of water resources. The water footprint is an indicator of freshwater use that looks not only at direct water use of a consumer or producer, but also at the indirect water use. The water footprint of a product is the volume of freshwater used to produce the product, measured over the full supply chain. It is a multi-dimensional indicator, showing water consumption volumes by source and polluted volumes by type of pollution; all components of a total water footprint are specified geographically and temporally. The water footprint breaks down into three components: the blue (volume of freshwater evaporated from surface or groundwater systems), green (water volume evaporated from rainwater stored in the soil as soil moisture) and grey water footprint (the volume of polluted water associated with the production of goods and services). Closely linked to the concept of water footprint is that of virtual water trade, which represents the amount of water embedded in traded products. Many nations save domestic water resources by importing water-intensive products and exporting commodities that are less water intensive. National water saving through the import of a product can imply saving water at a global level if the flow is from sites with high to sites with low water productivity. Virtual water trade between nations and even continents could thus be used as an instrument to improve global water use efficiency and to achieve water security in water-poor regions of the world. The virtual water trade together with the water footprint concept could thus provide an appropriate framework to support more optimal water management practices by informing production and trade decisions and the development and adoption of water efficient technology. In order to move towards better water governance however a further integration of water-related concerns into water-related sectoral policies is paramount. This will require a concerted effort by all stakeholders, the willingness to adopt a total resource view where water is seen as a key, cross-sectoral input for development and growth, a mix of technical approaches, and the courage to undertake and fund water sector reforms. We are convinced that the water footprint analysis can provide a sufficiently robust fact base for meaningful stakeholder dialogue and action towards solutions.

Aldaya, Maite; Hoekstra, Arjen

2010-05-01

292

Approaches to Planning Water Resources Jay R. Lund, Professor  

E-print Network

Engineering University of California, Davis jrlund@ucdavis.edu 31 March 2008 Abstract Water resource systems can be reduced with the development and application of a planning approach. This paper attempts circumstances (White 1969; Shad 1979; Kelley 1989; Lund 2006). Quantitative analysis and even economic thinking

Pasternack, Gregory B.

293

WATER RESOURCES NEWS NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE  

E-print Network

and water distribution systems.) - $100,000 Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado -- Water Law Change in Implementing the Big Blue River Basin vIater Plan." The effective- ness of communicating a river basin plan to the public via methods such as news media, speakers bureau, filmstrips, brochures

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

294

WATER RESOURCES NEWS NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE  

E-print Network

for construction of waste treatment facilities to control water pollu- tion, primarily for industrial, recreational cent of impurities in waste. In the mid '80's improved treatment could give many industries closed re- ing, University of Nebraska, Lincol~cycling s~sterns for waste and water Nebraska 68503

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

295

WATER RESOURCES NEWS NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE  

E-print Network

which would consolidate the Federal government's major air and water pollution control programs. So far. Par Pond in Aiken, South Caro- lina is a good example which receives the water discharged by a nuclear plant. The Wall Street Journal reports this: "T'her-rnaI pollution may be bad, but the fish in nearby

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

296

Climate Change and Water Resources Management: A Federal Perspective  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Many challenges, including climate change, face the Nation's water managers. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) has provided estimates of how climate may change, but more understanding of the processes driving the changes, the sequences of the changes, and the manifestation of these global changes at different scales could be beneficial. Since the changes will likely affect fundamental drivers of the hydrological cycle, climate change may have a large impact on water resources and water resources managers. The purpose of this interagency report prepared by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation), and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) is to explore strategies to improve water management by tracking, anticipating, and responding to climate change. This report describes the existing and still needed underpinning science crucial to addressing the many impacts of climate change on water resources management.

Brekke, Levi D.; Kiang, Julie E.; Olsen, J. Rolf; Pulwarty, Roger S.; Raff, David A.; Turnipseed, D. Phil; Webb, Robert S.; White, Kathleen D.

2009-01-01

297

Water Resources and Supply Adaptation: A paradigm Shifting for Future Climate?  

EPA Science Inventory

Climate change adds another layer of complexity in planning, engineering and management of water resources and urban water infrastructures. Yet our current practice is confined to the traditional approach that evaluates developmental scenarios and their sustainability mostly by a...

298

National water resources and problems  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Water problems exist in all parts of the United States. Furthermore, the problems are becoming more acute and widespread as population and industry grow. The need is pressing for wider appreciation of the nature of water problems. This requires a background of basic facts about the occurrence of water, its quantity and quality, and the manner in which it is used. This report records some of these basic facts. The facts are that the United States as a whole is well endowed with water. Many water problems (which exist in our country) are caused, however,by poor distribution of water in time and place. Because the nationwide supply of water is large, any given locality could be supplied with water sufficient in quantity and suitable in quality, provided that those who need the water can pay the cost. For the most part, then, water problems are basically social and economic. While management is needed, both locally and regionally, with flexibility to respond to broad geographic patterns of economic and social development.

Oltman, Roy E.; MacKichan, Kenneth A.; Mesnier, Glennon N.; Rainwater, Frank H.; Thomasson, Horace G.

1960-01-01

299

Texas Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

Texas Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2006 #12;Introduction The Texas Water Resources Institute (TWRI), a unit of the Texas Agricultural Experiment Station and Texas Cooperative. The institute maintains joint or collaborative projects with 15 Texas universities and 3 in other states; 11

300

Center for Water Resources Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

Center for Water Resources Annual Technical Report FY 2010 Center for Water Resources Annual, and Security California must address our challenges to ensure a high quality of life, a healthy environment's diverse clientele includes farm, nursery, ranch and rangeland, operators and managers; allied industry

301

Puerto Rico Water Resources & Environmetal Research Institute  

E-print Network

Puerto Rico Water Resources & Environmetal Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2011 Puerto Rico Water Resources & Environmetal Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 20111 #12;Introduction The PRWRERI is an integral part of the University of Puerto Rico at Mayaguez. As such, it acts

302

Climate Change and Water Resources in the  

E-print Network

Climate Change and Water Resources in the Tropical Andes Mathias Vuille Inter-American Development Bank Environmental Safeguards Unit TECHNICAL NOTE No. IDB-TN-515 March 2013 #12;Climate Change-American Development Bank Felipe Herrera Library Vuille, Mathias. Climate change and water resources in the tropical

Vuille, Mathias

303

Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 1999 Introduction 1999 New Mexico Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report Grant Award 1434-HQ-96- GR02687 Base Grant report provides the required information for projects funded with the 1999 base grant, required cost

304

Water Resources: Agricultural and Environmental Issues  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This peer-reviewed resource from Bioscience journal investigate the increasing demands on water resources. The increasing demands placed on the global water supply threaten biodiversity and the supply of water for food production and other vital human needs. Water shortages already exist in many regions, with more than one billion people without adequate drinking water. In addition, 90% of the infectious diseases in developing countries are transmitted from polluted water. Agriculture consumes about 70% of fresh water worldwide; for example, approximately 1000 liters (L) of water are required to produce 1 kilogram (kg) of cereal grain, and 43,000 L to produce 1 kg of beef. New water supplies are likely to result from conservation, recycling, and improved water-use efficiency rather than from large development projects.

DAVID PIMENTEL, BONNIE BERGER, DAVID FILIBERTO, MICHELLE NEWTON, BENJAMIN WOLFE, ELIZABETH KARABINAKIS, STEVEN CLARK, ELAINE POON, ELIZABETH ABBETT, and SUDHA NANDAGOPAL (; )

2004-10-01

305

Assessing Water and Carbon Footprints for Sustainable Water Resource Management  

EPA Science Inventory

The key points of this presentation are: (1) Water footprint and carbon footprint as two sustainability attributes in adaptations to climate and socioeconomic changes, (2) Necessary to evaluate carbon and water footprints relative to constraints in resource capacity, (3) Critical...

306

Overview of the Environmental and Water Resources Institute's "Guidelines For Integrated Water Resources Management" Project  

SciTech Connect

Integrated Water Resources Management is a systematic approach to optimizing our understanding, control and management of water resources within a basin to meet multiple objectives. Recognition of the need for integrating water resources within basins is not unique to the Environmental and Water Resources Institute’s Integrated Water Resources Management Task Committee. Many individuals, governments and other organizations have attempted to develop holistic water resources management programs. In some cases, the results have been very effective and in other cases, valiant attempts have fallen far short of their initial goals. The intent of this Task Committee is to provide a set of guidelines that discusses the concepts, methods and tools necessary for integrating and optimizing the management of the physical resources and to optimize and integrate programs, organizations, infrastructure, and socioeconomic institutions into comprehensive water resources management programs.

Gerald Sehlke

2005-03-01

307

Texas Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

Houston Water Supply Project Number: HQ-96-GR-02700-UH-002 Start Date: 3/1/2000 End Date: 2 Project Information Category Data Title Quality and Membrane Treatability of the Lake Houston Water SupplyTexas Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2000 Introduction The 2000 research

308

USGS Water Resources of South Carolina  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This site contains drought watch information, publications, and water data. There is information on programs such as bioremediation, the May River Project, and the National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Santee River Basin and Coastal Drainages Study Unit. An education section contains earth science, mapping, and water resources.

309

Water Availability and Management of Water Resources  

EPA Science Inventory

One of the most pressing national and global issues is the availability of freshwater due to global climate change, energy scarcity issues and the increase in world population and accompanying economic growth. Estimates of water supplies and flows through the world's hydrologic c...

310

USGS Water Resources of New York  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Water Resources of New York provides drought information for New York State, water reports and past news items, water data including streamflow and ground-water conditions, maps and publications, and an education section with water science links. There is also information on current water studies and research, including the National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) programs for the Hudson River Basin, Delaware River Basin, Lake Erie/Lake St. Clair Basin, and the Long Island-New Jersey coast.

311

2000 WATER RESOURCES SEMINARS "Cooperation and Tension  

E-print Network

, Holstein, Nebraska February 2: "Nebraska-Colorado South Platte River Compact (1923)" -- Forrest Leif, Engineer, Central Colorado Water Conservancy District, Greeley, Colorado February 9: "The Missouri River, Water Law Specialist, University of Nebraska-Lincoln March 1: WILLIAMS LECTURE: "Kansas v Colorado

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

312

Water resources data-Maine water year 2004  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Water Resources Dicipline of the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with State, Federal,and other local governmental agencies, obtains a large amount of data pertaining to the water resources of Maine each year. These data, accumulated during the many water years, constitute a valuable data base for developing an improved understanding of the water resources of the State. Water-resources data for the 2004 water year for Maine consists of records of stage, discharge, ground water levels, water quality of streams and ground-water wells, precipitation quantity, and snow quantity. This report contains discharge records for: 6 gage-height stations, 62 discharge gaging stations, stream water-quality data for 6 stations, water level for 23 ground-water wells, water-quality data for 24 ground-water wells, precipitation quantity data for 15 stations, and snow quantity data for 80 stations, Additional water data were collected at other sites, not part of the systematic data-collection program, and are published as special study and miscellaneous record sections.

Stewart, G.J.; Caldwell, J.M.; Cloutier, A.R.; Flight, L.E.

2005-01-01

313

Glossary of Water Resource Terms.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Twelve reference sources were used in the compilation of this glossary of water pollution control terminology. Definitions for 364 words, acronyms, and phrases are included with cross references. (KP)

Titelbaum, Olga Adler

314

Observing Changes in Water Resources  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this video segment adapted from the College of Menominee Nation, tribal members observe lower water levels in lakes and streams and call for global, collaborative solutions to address climate change.

2012-03-23

315

Graduate School of Creative Science and Engineering Department of Earth Sciences, Resources and Environmental Engineering  

E-print Network

Graduate School of Creative Science and Engineering Department of Earth Sciences, Resources and Engineering Department of Earth Sciences, Resources and Environmental Engineering Research Area Research/092015/04 1 #12; Graduate School of Creative Science and Engineering Department of Earth Sciences, Resources

Kaji, Hajime

316

Managing water resources for crop production  

PubMed Central

Increasing crop production to meet the food requirements of the world's growing population will put great pressure on global water resources. Given that the vast freshwater resources that are available in the world are far from fully exploited, globally there should be sufficient water for future agricultural requirements. However, there are large areas where low water supply and high human demand may lead to regional shortages of water for future food production. In these arid and semi-arid areas, where water is a major constraint on production, improving water resource management is crucial if Malthusian disasters are to be avoided. There is considerable scope for improvement, since in both dryland and irrigated agriculture only about one-third of the available water (as rainfall, surface, or groundwater) is used to grow useful plants. This paper illustrates a range of techniques that could lead to increased crop production by improving agricultural water use efficiency. This may be achieved by increasing the total amount of water available to plants or by increasing the efficiency with which that water is used to produce biomass. Although the crash from the Malthusian precipice may ultimately be inevitable if population growth is not addressed, the time taken to reach the edge of the precipice could be lengthened by more efficient use of existing water resources.

Wallace, J. S.; Batchelor, C. H.

1997-01-01

317

Resources for Small Water Systems in Texas  

E-print Network

This publication is a guide to finding the many resources available to help managers of small water systems in Texas. Details are provided about sources of financial assistance, tools for capacity building, training programs and educational...

Dozier, Monty; Theodori, Gene L.; Jensen, Ricard

2007-03-28

318

The National Park Service: Water Resources Division  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This portal provides access to a variety of materials on water resource programs in the National Park System (NPS). The homepage features links to news releases, announcements, and topics of current interest. Other links access information on various water resource issues, arranged by topic: fisheries, hydrology, laws and regulations, watersheds, wetlands, and many others. The documents pertaining to these topics include technical reports, fact sheets, planning documents, program information, and other webpages. Some of these items are available in downloadable, printable format (PDFs). The Water Quality page features the Environmental Contaminants Encyclopedia, a searchable reference on waterborne contaminants and their impacts on fish, wildlife, invertebrates, and other non-human living resources. There is also a page for students and teachers that provides access to information on volunteer projects and information about interpretative and educational activities involving water resources in the National Park system.

319

Digital Resource Package for Teaching Water Quality  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This digital resource package is a collection of online sources to help K-12 teachers create lessons on the Geology subject of water quality. Topics include Field Trips and Labs, Simulations and Media, Case Studies, Lesson Plans, and Reference Material.

Laura Moin

320

Ground Water and Surface Water- A Single Resource  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

As concerns over water resources and the environment grow, the importance of considering ground water and surface water as a single resource has become increasingly evident. The natural processes of groundwater-surface water interaction and human influences on this interaction are presented here, touching on natural ground-surface water interactions as part of the hydrologic cycle, chemical interactions, and the influences of different types of terrain upon these interactions. A discussion of human influences includes agricultural activity, urban development, modifications to drainages, and changes in the atmosphere.

Thomas Winter

1998-01-01

321

Water resources activities, Georgia District, 1986  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey, through its Water Resources Division , investigates the occurrence, quantity, quality, distribution, and movement of the surface and underground water that composes the Nation 's water resources. Much of the work is a cooperative effort in which planning and financial support are shared by state and local governments and other federal agencies. This report contains a brief description of the water-resources investigations in Georgia in which the Geological Survey participates, and a list of selected references. Water-resources data for the 1985 water year for Georgia consists of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage and contents of lakes and reservoirs; and groundwater levels. These data include discharge records for 108 gaging stations; water quality for 43 continuous stations, 109 periodic stations, and miscellaneous sites; peak stage and discharge only for 130 crest-stage partial-record stations and 44 miscellaneous sites; and water levels of 27 observation wells. Nineteen Georgia District projects are summarized. (Lantz-PTT)

Casteel, Carolyn A.; Ballew, Mary D.

1987-01-01

322

SMALL SYSTEM STUDIES (WATER SUPPLY AND WATER RESOURCES DIVISION)  

EPA Science Inventory

To support and help in the struggle to improve the quality of drinking water in the U.S. and abroad (China and South America), the National Risk Management Research Laboratory's Water Supply and Water Resources Division (WSWRD) uses the USEPA Test and Evaluation (T&E) Facility lo...

323

USGS Water Resources Maps and GIS Information  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This portal, sponsored by the United States Geological Survey (USGS), provides access to maps and Geographic Information Systems (GIS) datasets for water resources in the United States. There is an extensive selection of datasets on irrigation, groundwater resources and issues, surficial and subsurface geology, hydrology, water contaminants, stream flow, and many other topics. There are also links to the Geospatial Data Clearinghouse, the EarthExplorer Landsat imagery site, the National Map Seamless Server, and other mapping and data download sites.

324

Social Learning and Water Resources Management  

Microsoft Academic Search

Natural resources management in general, and water resources management in particular, are currently undergoing a major paradigm shift. Management practices have largely been developed and implemented by experts using technical means based on designing systems that can be predicted and controlled. In recent years, stakeholder involvement has gained increasing importance. Collaborative governance is considered to be more appropriate for integrated

C. Pahl-Wostl; M. Craps; A. Dewulf; E. Mostert; D. Tabara; T. Taillieu

2007-01-01

325

Social learning and water resources management  

Microsoft Academic Search

Natural resources management in general, and water resources management in particular, are currently undergoing a major paradigm shift. Management practices have largely been developed and implemented by experts using technical means based on designing systems that can be predicted and controlled. In recent years, stakeholder involvement has gained increasing importance. Collaborative governance is considered to be more appropriate for integrated

C. Pahl-Wostl; M. Craps; A. R. P. J. Dewulf; E. Mostert; D. Tabara; T. Taillieu

2007-01-01

326

Water Formatics Engineered formation of nanobubbles networks  

E-print Network

Water Formatics Engineered formation of nanobubbles networks in water and aqueous solutions We present the idea that the anomalous effects of rf-treatments of water and aqueous solution resulted from-bubble exchange interactions. These exchange interactions are mediated by the ordering of the water molecules

Jacob, Eshel Ben

327

Transient engine performance with water ingestion  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The immediate effects on the transient performance of a generic, high bypass ratio jet engine on account of water ingestion are discussed. The air compression subsystem has been analyzed with respect to four aerothermodynamic and mechanical processes associated with two-phase fluid flow and the engine simulation has been carried out under three limiting cases of interest in practice, one pertaining to draining of water at the end of compression and the other two, to partial evaporation at two different locations in the burner. General observations are made on engine operability as a function of engine and control design under various engine and (control input) sensor operating conditions, with various mass fractions of water in the air-water mixture entering the engine, during various pilot-initiated power demand changes.

Haykin, T.; Murthy, S. N. B.

1986-01-01

328

Climate change, water resources and child health  

Microsoft Academic Search

Climate change is occurring and has tremendous consequences for children's health worldwide. This article describes how the rise in temperature, precipitation, droughts, floods, glacier melt and sea levels resulting from human-induced climate change is affecting the quantity, quality and flow of water resources worldwide and impacting child health through dangerous effects on water supply and sanitation, food production and human

Elizabeth J Kistin; John Fogarty; Ryan Shaening Pokrasso; Michael McCally; Peter G McCornick

2010-01-01

329

Water resources management. World Bank policy paper  

Microsoft Academic Search

Water resources have been one of the most important areas of World Bank lending during the past three decades. Through its support for sector work and investments in irrigation, water supply, sanitation, flood control, and hydropower, the Bank has contributed to the development of many countries and helped provide essential services to many communities. Moreover, the Bank and governments have

K. W. Easter; G. Feder; G. Le Moigne; A. M. Duda; E. Forsyth

1993-01-01

330

Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

industry research even though the main impact is on municipal wastewater treatment systems. Estuaries; and 2) developing cost-effective ways for small drinking water systems to comply with the new stage 2Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2000 Introduction In the 36th year

331

University of Wisconsin Extension: Water Resources Programs  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The University of Wisconsin Extension provides "information about water quality and natural resources education programs in Wisconsin." Users can find out about monitoring the water quality of streams, river cleanups, and other volunteer projects. Teachers can learn how to educate their students about runoff pollution through the construction of a watershed model. The website presents numerous water related initiatives including the Multi-Agency Land and Water Education Grant Program, Give Water a Hand for young people taking action in their community, and the Landowner Assessment and Project Evaluation (LOAPE) Program.

332

Sustainability of ground-water resources  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The pumpage of fresh ground water in the United States in 1995 was estimated to be approximately 77 billion gallons per day (Solley and others, 1998), which is about 8 percent of the estimated 1 trillion gallons per day of natural recharge to the Nation's ground-water systems (Nace, 1960). From an overall national perspective, the ground-water resource appears ample. Locally, however, the availability of ground water varies widely. Moreover, only a part of the ground water stored in the subsurface can be recovered by wells in an economic manner and without adverse consequences.

Alley, William M.; Reilly, Thomas E.; Franke, O. Lehn

1999-01-01

333

Water Resources of Hawaii and the Pacific  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The mission of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) District Office in Honolulu, Hawaii is to assess water resources for the Hawaiian islands and the Western Pacific - the quality and quantity of surface-water and ground-water in this region. Information is provided about water use, streamflow, ground-water levels, well drilling, flood frequency, isotope hydrology, benthic invertebrates, contamination, the Iao aquifer on Maui island, rainfall amounts and storm monitoring. There is real-time data available as well as on-line reports and abstracts relating to hydrologic conditions in these areas.

334

COMMITTE REPORT: Climate change and water resources  

Microsoft Academic Search

Global climatic change—the greenhouse effect—is here to stay. Although uncertainties remain about the nature and extent of climatic changes that will occur, most among the scientific community believe changes in the hydrologic cycle and to water resource management systems will be significant. Water managers, policy-makers, and the public should begin to consider the implications of climatic change for long-term water

1997-01-01

335

Population and water resources: a delicate balance.  

PubMed

Various avenues exist to minimize the effects of the current water crisis in some regions of the world and the more widespread problems that will threaten the world in the future. Active management of existing water resources and a reduction in population growth in water-scarce areas are needed to minimize the effects of the water crisis. National boundaries do not effect water systems. Cooperation and commitment of local, national, and international governments, institutions, and other organizations are needed to manage water systems. Development in each country must entail conscientious and effective balancing of unavoidable manipulations of the land and the unavoidable environmental impacts of those manipulations. The conditions of environmental sustainability must include protection of land productivity, ground water potability, and biodiversity. Humans must deal with these factors either by adopting methods to protect natural systems or by correcting existing damage and reducing future problems. They need to understand the demographic forces in each country so they can balance society's rising needs for clean water with the finite amount of water available. Factors affecting future needs at all levels include rapid rural-urban migration, high fertility, and changing patterns of international population movement. Given an increased awareness of global water systems, demographic trends, and active management of resources, the fragile balance between population and water can be maintained. PMID:12344702

Falkenmark, M; Widstrand, C

1992-11-01

336

Water Resources Data, New Mexico, Water Year 1994  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Water-resources data for the 1994 water year for New Mexico consist of records of discharge and water quality of streams; stage, contents, and water quality of lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality in wells and springs. This report contains discharge records for 184 gaging stations; stage and contents for 26 lakes and reservoirs; water quality for 51 gaging stations and 72 wells; and water levels at 132 observation wells. Also included are 109 crest-stage partial-record stations. Additional water data were collected at various sites, not involved in the systematic data collection program, and are published as miscellaneous measurements. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System collected by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating State and Federal agencies in New Mexico.

Borland, J.P.; Ong, Kim

1995-01-01

337

Water Resources Data, Massachusetts and Rhode Island, Water Year 2003  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Water resources data for the 2003 water year for Massachusetts and Rhode Island consists of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; contents of lakes and reservoirs; and water levels of ground-water wells. This report contains discharge records for 108 gaging stations, stage records for 2 gaging stations, stage records for 3 ponds; monthend contents of 1 reservoir, precipitation totals at 8 gaging stations; water quality for 27 gaging stations, air temperature at 2 climatological stations; water levels for 129 observation wells, and ground-water quality for 15 wells. Miscellaneous hydrologic data were collected at various sites that were not a part of the systematic data-collection program and are published as miscellaneous discharge measurements and miscellaneous surface-water-quality data. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating State and Federal agencies in Massachusetts and Rhode Island.

Socolow, R.S.; Zanca, J.L.; Driskell, T.R.; Ramsbey, L.R.

2004-01-01

338

Electric power engineering education resources 1993-94: IEEE Power Engineering Society Committee report  

Microsoft Academic Search

This subcommittee report is based on the thirteenth biennial survey of power engineering education resources in the US and Canada, eleven of which have bees previously published. This survey is conducted to determine the electric power engineering education resources available in ABET (Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology) accredited engineering programs in the US and Canada for the 1993-94 academic

R. L. King; M. E. El-Hawary; M. T. Glinkowski; C. Grigg; C. A. Gross; V. Rajagopalan; T. G. Schmehl; T. S. Sidhu; R. J. Thomas; D. O. Wiitanen; S. M. Yousif

1996-01-01

339

043 DEVELOPMENT OF RESOURCE WATER QUALI TY OBJECTIVES FOR POTABLE WATER TREATMENT AT UMGENI WATER  

Microsoft Academic Search

Umgeni Water abstracts raw water from rivers and dams for potable water treatment, and therefore quality of the water resource is vital for the sustainability of its business. Areas of concern regarding the quality of water resource in the Umgeni Water operational area include eutrophication (nutrient enrichment and associated threats including algal blooms and weed infestations); faecal contamination and pathogen

Felicia Tiba; Kim Hodgson

340

Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

Engineering at the University of Rhode Island have been conducting research on the development of a low that are currently in use in many urbanized areas. 2 BACKGROUND The Rhode Island roadway runoff characterization, copper, lead, nickel, and zinc exceeded the National Recommended Water Quality Criteria (Thiem, Bade

341

Louisiana Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

Louisiana Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2002 Introduction This report presents a description of the activities of the Louisiana Water Resources Research Institute Pardue. The Louisiana Water Resources Research Institute (LWRRI) is unique among academic research

342

A DEMONSTRATION OF AREAWIDE WATER RESOURCES PLANNING. USERS MANUAL  

EPA Science Inventory

This report documents a demonstration of areawide water resources planning by the Metropolitan Washington, DC. Council of Governments (MWCOG). The MWCOG Framework Water Resources Planning Model is a comprehensive analytical tool for use in areawide water resources management plan...

343

18 CFR 701.76 - The Water Resources Council Staff.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-04-01 false The Water Resources Council Staff. 701.76 Section 701.76 Conservation...Organization § 701.76 The Water Resources Council Staff. The Water Resources Council Staff (hereinafter the Staff) serves the Council...

2010-04-01

344

30 CFR 402.6 - Water-Resources Research Program.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Water-Resources Research Program. 402.6 Section...GEOLOGICAL SURVEY, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR WATER-RESOURCES RESEARCH PROGRAM AND THE WATER-RESOURCES TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM...

2011-07-01

345

30 CFR 402.6 - Water-Resources Research Program.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Water-Resources Research Program. 402.6 Section...GEOLOGICAL SURVEY, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR WATER-RESOURCES RESEARCH PROGRAM AND THE WATER-RESOURCES TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM...

2010-07-01

346

30 CFR 402.6 - Water-Resources Research Program.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Water-Resources Research Program. 402.6 Section...GEOLOGICAL SURVEY, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR WATER-RESOURCES RESEARCH PROGRAM AND THE WATER-RESOURCES TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM...

2012-07-01

347

30 CFR 402.6 - Water-Resources Research Program.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Water-Resources Research Program. 402.6 Section...GEOLOGICAL SURVEY, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR WATER-RESOURCES RESEARCH PROGRAM AND THE WATER-RESOURCES TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM...

2014-07-01

348

30 CFR 402.6 - Water-Resources Research Program.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Water-Resources Research Program. 402.6 Section...GEOLOGICAL SURVEY, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR WATER-RESOURCES RESEARCH PROGRAM AND THE WATER-RESOURCES TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM...

2013-07-01

349

Water Intensity of Electricity from Geothermal Resources  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

BACKGROUND Electricity from geothermal resources could play a significant role in the United States over the next few decades; a 2006 study by MIT expects a capacity of 100GWe by 2050 as feasible; approximately 10% of total electricity generating capacity up from less than 1% today. However, there is limited research on the water requirements and impacts of generating electricity from geothermal resources - conventional as well as enhanced. To the best of our knowledge, there is no baseline exists for water requirements of geothermal electricity. Water is primarily required for cooling and dissipation of waste heat in the power plants, and to account for fluid losses during heat mining of enhanced geothermal resources. MODEL DESCRIPTION We have developed a model to assess and characterize water requirements of electricity from hydrothermal resources and enhanced geothermal resources (EGS). Our model also considers a host of factors that influence cooling water requirements ; these include the temperature and chemical composition of geothermal resource; installed power generation technology - flash, organic rankine cycle and the various configurations of these technologies; cooling technologies including air cooled condensers, wet recirculating cooling, and hybrid cooling; and finally water treatment and recycling installations. We expect to identify critical factors and technologies. Requirements for freshwater, degraded water and geothermal fluid are separately estimated. METHODOLOGY We have adopted a lifecycle analysis perspective that estimates water consumption at the goethermal field and power plant, and accounts for transmission and distribution losses before reaching the end user. Our model depends upon an extensive literature review to determine various relationships necessary to determine water usage - for example relationship between thermal efficiency and temperature of a binary power plant, or differences in efficiency between various ORC configurations, or differences in efficiency of a plant with a wet cooled system and one with dry cooled system. There are a number of factors that we do not consider; most of these factors are location specific. These include ambient temperature and humidity, specific design parameters of the power plant, and dissolved solids and chemical composition of freshwater withdrawn from ground or surface sources. Even for a specific plant, water intensity will vary over time due to fluctuations in ambient temperature and humidity, and in temperature of the geothermal fluid. Thus the model’s water usage estimates should be treated as “first order” or “preliminary” estimates. This paper is part of a series exploring the water footprint of future transportation fuels including biofuels and electricity. The paper's broader objective is to highlight limitations imposed by water shortages to achieve higher penetration of various alternative fuels.

Mishra, G. S.; Glassley, W. E.

2010-12-01

350

Native Waters: An American Indian Water Resource Education Project  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This community education initiative supports the efforts of Native American tribal leaders, educators, and students to develop contemporary, scientifically accurate, and culturally sensitive water education resources, programs, and networking opportunities. A traveling exhibit provides a Native American point of view on protection and conservation of water resources. A teachers' guide is provided to accompany the exhibit. Other materials include learning opportunities for students and educators, news articles, publications, scholarship information, and links to related information.

2004-01-01

351

Ground water and surface water; a single resource  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The importance of considering ground water and surface water as a single resource has become increasingly evident. Issues related to water supply, water quality, and degradation of aquatic environments are reported on frequently. The interaction of ground water and surface water has been shown to be a significant concern in many of these issues. Contaminated aquifers that discharge to streams can result in long-term contamination of surface water; conversely, streams can be a major source of contamination to aquifers. Surface water commonly is hydraulically connected to ground water, but the interactions are difficult to observe and measure. The purpose of this report is to present our current understanding of these processes and activities as well as limitations in our knowledge and ability to characterize them.

Winter, Thomas C.; Harvey, Judson W.; Franke, O. Lehn; Alley, William M.

1998-01-01

352

The National Park Service Water Resources Division  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This newly updated website details the National Park Service's (NPS) programs in water resources. Categorized into six sections, the site covers such topics as Water Quality and Groundwater Analysis, Wetlands, Water Rights, Fishery Programs, the National Water-Quality Assessment Program (NAWQA), and the National Wild and Scenic Rivers System. Within each category users will find research tools and fact sheets, including the newly released, searchable Environmental Contaminants Encyclopedia (discussed in the April 17, 1998 Scout Report). Although targeted at the general public, much of this information will be of use to educators and students.

United States. National Park Service. Water Resources Division.

353

Conference Topic: Integrated Water Resources and Coastal Areas Management National Water Information Systems: A Tool to Support Integrated Water Resources  

E-print Network

of natural disasters; and reduced water quality due to pollution from industrial, agricultural and municipalConference Topic: Integrated Water Resources and Coastal Areas Management National Water Information Systems: A Tool to Support Integrated Water Resources Management in the Caribbean Marie-Claire St

Barthelat, Francois

354

Linking water resources to food security through virtual water  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The largest use of global freshwater resources is related to food production. While each day we drink about 2 liters of water, we consume (eating) about 4000 liters of ''virtual water'', which represents the freshwater used to produce crop-based and livestock-based food. Considering human water consumption as a whole, most part originates from agriculture (85.8%), and only minor parts come from industry (9.6%) or households (4.6%). These numbers shed light on the great pressure of humanity on global freshwater resources and justify the increasing interest towards this form of environmental impact, usually known as ''water footprint''. Virtual water is a key variable in establishing the nexus between water and food. In fact, water resources used for agricultural production determine local food availability, and impact the international trade of agricultural goods. Trade, in turn, makes food commodities available to nations which are not otherwise self-sufficient, in terms of water resources or food, and it establishes an equilibrium between food demand and production at the global scale. Therefore, food security strongly relies on international food trade, but also on the use of distant and foreign water resources, which need to be acknowledged and investigated. Virtual water embedded in production and international trade follows the fate of food on the trade network, generating virtual flows of great magnitude (e.g., 2800 km3 in 2010) and defining local and global virtual water balances worldwide. The resulting water-food nexus is critical for the societal and economic development, and it has several implications ranging from population dynamics to the competing use of freshwater resources, from dietary guidelines to globalization of trade, from externalization of pollution to policy making and to socio-economic wealth. All these implications represent a great challenge for future research, not only in hydrology but in the many fields related to this interdisciplinary topic. Virtual water and water footprint accounting provide the tools for understanding such implications and to describe, quantify, and investigate the inextricable link existing between water resources and food security.

Tamea, Stefania

2014-05-01

355

Elsevier's dictionary of water and hydraulic engineering  

SciTech Connect

This dictionary deals with water: water in relation to engineering projects designed to utilize it, to control it, or to defend us against it; water as a basic element of our environment, and water as the subject of a variety of physical phenomena. The dictionary comprises a basic table with 5,117 terms in English. Equivalents are given in French, Spanish, Dutch and German, keyed to the basic table by number. The aim of the dictionary is to promote better understanding and communication between people of different nationalities working in the field of hydraulics, water management and hydraulic engineering.

Van der Tuin, J.D.

1987-01-01

356

Mississippi Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

include: water quality, surface and groundwater management, water quality management and water resources Category: Water Quality Focus Category: Wetlands, Water Quality, Management and Planning Descriptors; to assist state agencies in the development and maintenance of a state water management plan

357

INSTITUTE FOR WATER RESOURCES FY 2012 ANNUAL REPORT  

E-print Network

................................................................................................ 11 Adaptation to Climate Change ON CIVILWORKS ACTIVITIES FOR FY 2012 #12;INSTITUTE FOR WATER RESOURCES 43-1 INSTITUTE FOR WATER RESOURCES FY Activities

US Army Corps of Engineers

358

DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM RESEARCH (WATER SUPPLY AND WATER RESOURCES DIVISION)  

EPA Science Inventory

Two water distribution system simulators(DSSs)are now in operation at the USEPA Test and Evaluation (T&E) Facility in Cincinnati, OH. EPA's T&E Facility is a multifaceted research resource in which a wide variety of water treatment and other environmental protection technologies ...

359

WATER: Water Activities Teaching Environmental Responsibility: Teacher Resource, Environmental Science.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This activity book was developed as part of an effort to protect water quality of the Stillwater River, Ohio, through a Watershed Protection Project. It is designed to raise teachers' and students' awareness and trigger a sense of stewardship towards the preservation of water resources. The activities are generally appropriate for elementary age…

Kramer, Ed, Ed.; And Others

360

NASA's Applied Sciences for Water Resources  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Earth Systems Division within NASA has the primary responsibility for the Earth Science Applied Science Program and the objective to accelerate the use of NASA science results in applications to help solve problems important to society and the economy. The primary goal of the Earth Science Applied Science Program is to improve future and current operational systems by infusing them with scientific knowledge of the Earth system gained through space-based observation, assimilation of new observations, and development and deployment of enabling technologies, systems, and capabilities. This paper discusses one of the major problems facing water resources managers, that of having timely and accurate data to drive their decision support tools. It then describes how NASA?s science and space based satellites may be used to overcome this problem. Opportunities for the water resources community to participate in NASA?s Water Resources Applications Program are described.

Doorn, Bradley; Toll, David; Engman, Ted

2011-01-01

361

Thermal power installation for a water engine  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present the main principles for developing a water-jet thermal power installation that uses a propeller operating on jet thrust developed during the flashing of metastable water. The considerable advantages of using the proposed thermal power installation as a water jet propeller over existing marine engines constructed on the basis of screw propellers are shown.

Khlestkin, D. A.; Vinogradov, A. V.

2009-11-01

362

Geothermal Water Use: Life Cycle Water Consumption, Water Resource Assessment, and Water Policy Framework  

DOE Data Explorer

This report examines life cycle water consumption for various geothermal technologies to better understand factors that affect water consumption across the life cycle (e.g., power plant cooling, belowground fluid losses) and to assess the potential water challenges that future geothermal power generation projects may face. Previous reports in this series quantified the life cycle freshwater requirements of geothermal power-generating systems, explored operational and environmental concerns related to the geochemical composition of geothermal fluids, and assessed future water demand by geothermal power plants according to growth projections for the industry. This report seeks to extend those analyses by including EGS flash, both as part of the life cycle analysis and water resource assessment. A regional water resource assessment based upon the life cycle results is also presented. Finally, the legal framework of water with respect to geothermal resources in the states with active geothermal development is also analyzed.

Schroeder, Jenna N.

363

Geothermal Water Use: Life Cycle Water Consumption, Water Resource Assessment, and Water Policy Framework  

SciTech Connect

This report examines life cycle water consumption for various geothermal technologies to better understand factors that affect water consumption across the life cycle (e.g., power plant cooling, belowground fluid losses) and to assess the potential water challenges that future geothermal power generation projects may face. Previous reports in this series quantified the life cycle freshwater requirements of geothermal power-generating systems, explored operational and environmental concerns related to the geochemical composition of geothermal fluids, and assessed future water demand by geothermal power plants according to growth projections for the industry. This report seeks to extend those analyses by including EGS flash, both as part of the life cycle analysis and water resource assessment. A regional water resource assessment based upon the life cycle results is also presented. Finally, the legal framework of water with respect to geothermal resources in the states with active geothermal development is also analyzed.

Schroeder, Jenna N.

2014-06-10

364

Cooperative water resource technology transfer program  

SciTech Connect

This cooperative water resource technology transfer program sought to develop/present educational programs (conferences/seminars/workshops) and technology transfer brochures to enhance public awareness/appreciation of state water quality problems and to stress economic tradeoffs needed to resolve given problems. Accomplishments of this program for the different conferences held 1979-1981 are described (inland lake eutrophication: causes, effects, and remedies; contamination of groundwater supplies by toxic chemicals: causes, effects, and prevention; supplemental irrigation; stormwater management; cooperative research needs for renovation and reuse of municipal water in agriculture; selection and management of vegetation for slow rate and overland flow land application systems to treat municipal wastewater; effects of acid precipitation on ecological systems: Great Lakes region; water competition in Michigan; Michigan natural resources outlook.

D'itri, F.M.

1982-06-01

365

The Connotation and Extension of Agricultural Water Resources Security  

Microsoft Academic Search

The objective of this study is to define agricultural water resources security and its connotation and extension. The definitions of water security, water resources security, and water environment security were summarized, and their relationship was differentiated and analyzed. Based on these, the elements of the conception of agricultural water resources security were hashed and the conception was defined. Agricultural water

Bu-chun LIU; Xu-rong MEI; Yu-zhong LI; You-lu YANG

2007-01-01

366

Entropy, recycling and macroeconomics of water resources  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We propose a macroeconomic model for water quantity and quality supply multipliers derived by water recycling (Karakatsanis et al. 2013). Macroeconomic models that incorporate natural resource conservation have become increasingly important (European Commission et al. 2012). In addition, as an estimated 80% of globally used freshwater is not reused (United Nations 2012), under increasing population trends, water recycling becomes a solution of high priority. Recycling of water resources creates two major conservation effects: (1) conservation of water in reservoirs and aquifers and (2) conservation of ecosystem carrying capacity due to wastewater flux reduction. Statistical distribution properties of the recycling efficiencies -on both water quantity and quality- for each sector are of vital economic importance. Uncertainty and complexity of water reuse in sectors are statistically quantified by entropy. High entropy of recycling efficiency values signifies greater efficiency dispersion; which -in turn- may indicate the need for additional infrastructure for the statistical distribution's both shifting and concentration towards higher efficiencies that lead to higher supply multipliers. Keywords: Entropy, water recycling, water supply multipliers, conservation, recycling efficiencies, macroeconomics References 1. European Commission (EC), Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), International Monetary Fund (IMF), Organization of Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), United Nations (UN) and World Bank (2012), System of Environmental and Economic Accounting (SEEA) Central Framework (White cover publication), United Nations Statistics Division 2. Karakatsanis, G., N. Mamassis, D. Koutsoyiannis and A. Efstratiades (2013), Entropy and reliability of water use via a statistical approach of scarcity, 5th EGU Leonardo Conference - Hydrofractals 2013 - STAHY '13, Kos Island, Greece, European Geosciences Union, International Association of Hydrological Sciences, International Union of Geodesy and Geophysics 3. United Nations (UN) (2012), World Water Development Report 4, UNESCO Publishing

Karakatsanis, Georgios; Mamassis, Nikos; Koutsoyiannis, Demetris

2014-05-01

367

Utilization and conservation of USSR water resources  

Microsoft Academic Search

Conclusions  \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a 1. \\u000a \\u000a Difficulties in securing fresh water for certain regions of the country are beginning to hold back the normal increases of\\u000a production.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a 2. \\u000a \\u000a The studies of the integrated utilization and conservation of water resources in the USSR have demonstrated that the problem\\u000a of a guaranteed fresh water supply to industry, urban settlements, and rural and fishing economies, assuming the

N. V. Razin; G. G. Gangardt

1967-01-01

368

Water Resources Data System State Climate Office  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Water Resources Data System is a "clearinghouse of hydrological and climatological data for the State of Wyoming" provided by the University of Wyoming. Online data include a water quality database, climatological data (such as snow depth and precipitation), and earthquake and landslide data. A water library link contains research briefs, publications, a reference shelf, newsletters, and other related documents. Additional links on the main page include US Geological Survey stream flow conditions, the state climatologist office, data clearinghouses, and other Wyoming-specific informational sites.

369

Master of Science Chemical Engineering  

E-print Network

& Engineering Mechanical Engineering Mechatronics Offshore Technology Safety, Health and EnvironmentalMaster of Science Chemical Engineering Civil Engineering Electrical Engineering Environmental Engineering Geotechnical Engineering Hydraulic Engineering and Water Resources Management Industrial

Chaudhuri, Sanjay

370

Engineering aspects of water pollution control systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

The importance of proper engineering when providing pollution control systems is emphasized. Organization of engineering projects is described in detail. Included are discussions of: (1) collection and evaluation of available data; (2) establishment of survey and test program; (3) integration and evaluation of findings; (4) establishment of pollution control and water utilization systems; and (5) specification and detailed design preparation.

R. G. Dalbke; A. J. Turk

1967-01-01

371

GIS and Water Resources Modeling Workshop  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This site from Venkatesh Merwade of Purdue university offers tutorials relating to GIS and water resources modeling. Topic areas covered are hydraulic and hydrologic modeling, GIS and hydrologic modeling and downloading geospatial and temporal data for hydroloic/hydraulic modeling. All tutorials have links for necessary datasets.

Merwade, Venkatesh

372

Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

to solve these problems through research, education, and technology transfer activities. The objectives Goals and Objectives The Centers overall long-range goal is to assist in the sound management, sustained, and technology transfer are required; + assure recognition of capabilities of water resources research

373

Emerging climate services for water resources planning  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

The author’s perspective on new or experimental forecasts and data products that may be important for water resource planning were shared. Everyone who lives and works with the consequences of weather and climate have known or suspected for years that climate is shifting, have been adapting, and wa...

374

Texas Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

-state, international project. Elizabeth Edgerton, of Texas A&M University, studied invasive aquatic species in Texas on collaborations and partnerships and in fiscal year 2012 managed 26 active projects with $12,052,909 in funds Characterization for Texas under Climate Change, with Implications for Water Resources Planning and Management

375

USGS Water Resources of North Dakota  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Water Resources of North Dakota contains current streamflow conditions and other hydrologic data, a drought watch section, publications, and an education section. There is information on: the connection between Lewis and Clark and the USGS; canoeing the rivers of North Dakota; and the Missouri River streamflow-gaging station and how the USGS collects streamflow data.

376

Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2004 Introduction Population growth, and the third refined methods of differentiating sewage from non-point-source pollution. The fourth examined connections between culture, ecology and hydrology in reference to alien plant species. In addition

377

Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

projects, we have allocated other funds to supplement the 104(b) money. In the near future, if salaries resources management, hydrology, economics, culture, externalities Watershed planning and management the hydrologic cycle over a range of time and areal scales Risk assessment and management of water quality

378

Climate change and global water resources  

Microsoft Academic Search

By 2025, it is estimated that around 5 billion people, out of a total population of around 8 billion, will be living in countries experiencing water stress (using more than 20% of their available resources). Climate change has the potential to impose additional pressures in some regions. This paper describes an assessment of the implications of climate change for global

Nigel W. Arnell

1999-01-01

379

Water Intensity of Electricity from Geothermal Resources  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND Electricity from geothermal resources could play a significant role in the United States over the next few decades; a 2006 study by MIT expects a capacity of 100GWe by 2050 as feasible; approximately 10% of total electricity generating capacity up from less than 1% today. However, there is limited research on the water requirements and impacts of generating electricity

G. S. Mishra; W. E. Glassley

2010-01-01

380

Center for Water Resources Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

infiltration and the role of upland bedrock areas in recharge of adjacent valley basin-fill aquifers. As human of groundwater flow patterns. Assessment of seawater intrusion potential from sea level rise in coastal aquifers Department of Water Resources increased potential for salinity intrusion into coastal aquifers, where

381

Institute of Water Resources Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

Institute of Water Resources Annual Technical Report FY 1999 Introduction Eileen Jokinen, the Associate Director of the Institute, retired in August 1999. Dr. Patricia Bresnahan is the Institute's new Associate Director. Pat will spend half-time with the Institute and half-time as a Research Associate

382

Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

Resources Sciences graduate major which offers both MS and PhD degrees and includes faculty and students, Department of Ecology Evolution and Behavior 1) RESEARCH Introduction and study objectives In urban to surface waters. This project examines tracer techniques toward improved understanding of contributions

383

Integration of water resources within industrial sites  

SciTech Connect

Effective re-use and/or recycling of water within an industrial site for cooling is essentially the integration of water resources within a plant. This involves the consideration of the quality and quantity of the water and the determination of an appropriate monitoring and control strategy for critical parameters. Corrosion and deposition can cause significant impairment to a cooling system`s integrity when using recycled or reused water for cooling system makeup, due to a wide range of chemical and biological processes. When performing such an integration, the failure to adequately monitor the cooling system after changes in the plant`s water balance may result in significant long term costs to the plant.

Hartwick, D. [Grace Dearborn Inc., Mississauga, Ontario (Canada); Malm, A. [Grace Dearborn, Lake Zurich, IL (United States); Echarte, E. [Grace Argentina S.A., Buenos Aires (Argentina)

1996-08-01

384

Modeling U.S. water resources under climate change  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Water is at the center of a complex and dynamic system involving climatic, biological, hydrological, physical, and human interactions. We demonstrate a new modeling system that integrates climatic and hydrological determinants of water supply with economic and biological drivers of sectoral and regional water requirement while taking into account constraints of engineered water storage and transport systems. This modeling system is an extension of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Integrated Global System Model framework and is unique in its consistent treatment of factors affecting water resources and water requirements. Irrigation demand, for example, is driven by the same climatic conditions that drive evapotranspiration in natural systems and runoff, and future scenarios of water demand for power plant cooling are consistent with energy scenarios driving climate change. To illustrate the modeling system we select "wet" and "dry" patterns of precipitation for the United States from general circulation models used in the Climate Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP3). Results suggest that population and economic growth alone would increase water stress in the United States through mid-century. Climate change generally increases water stress with the largest increases in the Southwest. By identifying areas of potential stress in the absence of specific adaptation responses, the modeling system can help direct attention to water planning that might then limit use or add storage in potentially stressed regions, while illustrating how avoiding climate change through mitigation could change likely outcomes.

Blanc, Elodie; Strzepek, Kenneth; Schlosser, Adam; Jacoby, Henry; Gueneau, Arthur; Fant, Charles; Rausch, Sebastian; Reilly, John

2014-04-01

385

Resource reliability, accessibility and governance: pillars for managing water resources to achieve water security in Nepal  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

As one of the world's most water-abundant countries, Nepal has plenty of water yet resources are both spatially and temporally unevenly distributed. With a population heavily engaged in subsistence farming, whereby livelihoods are entirely dependent on rain-fed agriculture, changes in freshwater resources can substantially impact upon survival. The two main sources of water in Nepal come from monsoon precipitation and glacial runoff. The former is essential for sustaining livelihoods where communities have little or no access to perennial water resources. Much of Nepal's population live in the southern Mid-Hills and Terai regions where dependency on the monsoon system is high and climate-environment interactions are intricate. Any fluctuations in precipitation can severely affect essential potable resources and food security. As the population continues to expand in Nepal, and pressures build on access to adequate and clean water resources, there is a need for institutions to cooperate and increase the effectiveness of water management policies. This research presents a framework detailing three fundamental pillars for managing water resources to achieve sustainable water security in Nepal. These are (i) resource reliability; (ii) adequate accessibility; and (iii) effective governance. Evidence is presented which indicates that water resources are adequate in Nepal to sustain the population. In addition, aspects of climate change are having less impact than previously perceived e.g. results from trend analysis of precipitation time-series indicate a decrease in monsoon extremes and interannual variation over the last half-century. However, accessibility to clean water resources and the potential for water storage is limiting the use of these resources. This issue is particularly prevalent given the heterogeneity in spatial and temporal distributions of water. Water governance is also ineffective due to government instability and a lack of continuity in policy. Subsequently, with poor accessibility and poor governance, the threat to human water security remains high in Nepal. Nonetheless, the nation has great potential to better manage natural capital and harness reserves for improving livelihoods, such as river flows for generating hydropower. Suggested solutions for transboundary water cooperation are explored within a water-energy-food nexus framework.

Biggs, E. M.; Duncan, J.; Atkinson, P.; Dash, J.

2013-12-01

386

Water: a strategic resource. Student essay  

SciTech Connect

Availability of fresh water has been taken for granted throughout our history. In fact, the United States has been blessed with what was once thought to be a limitless natural resource, fresh water. The sources for this fresh water are precipitation, surface water, and ground water. Today, these sources are under relentless pressure from chronic pollution and over-usage. The federal government has begun the process of studying and doumenting the problems associated with our water supply but, to date, its efforts are far to little, too late. Budget constraints and funding projections only add to the already bleak picture. We are learning that water problems can't be contained and that they cross state, local, and private boundaries. This problem of area pollution has drawn considerable concern within the Department of Defense (DOD) as more and more of our installations are finding their water environment jeopardized. Solutions for the preservation cleansing and protection of our fresh-water systems are going to be expensive and technically complicated to accomplish and administer. Action is needed now.

Thornton, R.E.

1986-04-15

387

North Dakota Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

North Dakota Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2002 Introduction This report describes the activities of the North Dakota Water Resources Research Institute (ND WRRI) during Geological Survey. Section 104 of the Water Resources Research Act requires the North Dakota Water Resources

388

North Dakota Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

North Dakota Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2003 Introduction This report describes the activities of the North Dakota Water Resources Research Institute (ND WRRI) during Geological Survey. Section 104 of the Water Resources Research Act requires the North Dakota Water Resources

389

Impacts of climate change on water resources in Spain  

Microsoft Academic Search

Impacts on water resources produced by climate change can be exacerbated when occurring in regions already presenting low water resources levels and frequent droughts, and subject to imbalances between water demands and available resources. Within Europe, according to existing climate change scenarios, water resources will be severely affected in Spain. However, the detection of those effects is not simple, because

T. Estrela; M. A. Pérez-Martin; E. Vargas

2012-01-01

390

18 CFR 701.76 - The Water Resources Council Staff.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

18 ? Conservation of Power and Water Resources ? 2 ? 2012-04-01 ? 2012-04-01 ? false ? The Water Resources Council Staff. ? 701.76 ? Section 701.76 ? Conservation of Power and Water Resources ? WATER RESOURCES COUNCIL ? COUNCIL ORGANIZATION ? Headquarters Organization ? § 701.76 ? The...

2012-04-01

391

West Virginia Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

sprawl (water budgets, contaminants, flooding, ground-water recharge, storm water applications water research issues. Because the Advisory Committee understands future regulatory and economic driving) Evaluation of water resources (uses) Future Direction The following programs of the WVWRI are expected

392

Water resources review: Wheeler Reservoir, 1990  

SciTech Connect

Protection and enhancement of water quality is essential for attaining the full complement of beneficial uses of TVA reservoirs. The responsibility for improving and protecting TVA reservoir water quality is shared by various federal, state, and local agencies, as well as the thousands of corporations and property owners whose individual decisions affect water quality. TVA's role in this shared responsibility includes collecting and evaluating water resources data, disseminating water resources information, and acting as a catalyst to bring together agencies and individuals that have a responsibility or vested interest in correcting problems that have been identified. This report is one in a series of status reports that will be prepared for each of TVA's reservoirs. The purpose of this status report is to provide an up-to-date overview of the characteristics and conditions of Wheeler Reservoir, including: reservoir purposes and operation; physical characteristics of the reservoir and the watershed; water quality conditions: aquatic biological conditions: designated, actual, and potential uses of the reservoir and impairments of those uses; ongoing or planned reservoir management activities. Information and data presented here are form the most recent reports, publications, and original data available. 21 refs., 8 figs., 29 tabs.

Wallus, R.; Cox, J.P.

1990-09-01

393

Lunar Water Resource Demonstration (LWRD) Test Results  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

NASA has undertaken the In-Situ Resource Utilization (lSRU) project called RESOLVE (Regolith and Environment Science & Oxygen and Lunar Volatile Extraction). This project is an Earth-based lunar precursor demonstration of a system that could be sent to explore permanently shadowed polar lunar craters, where it would drill into regolith, quantify the volatiles that are present, and extract oxygen by hydrogen reduction of iron oxides. The RESOLVE chemical processing system was mounted within the CMU rover "Scarab" and successfully demonstrated on Hawaii's Mauna Kea volcano in November 2008. This technology could be used on Mars as well. As described at the 2008 Mars Society Convention, the Lunar Water Resource Demonstration (LWRD) supports the objectives of the RESOLVE project by capturing and quantifying water and hydrogen released by regolith upon heating. Field test results for the quantification of water using LWRD showed that the volcanic ash (tephra) samples contained 0.15-0.41% water, in agreement with GC water measurements. Reduction of the RH in the surge tank to near zero during recirculation show that the water is captured by the water beds as desired. The water can be recovered by heating the Water Beds to 230 C or higher. Test results for the capture and quantification of pure hydrogen have shown that over 90% of the hydrogen can be captured and 98% of the absorbed hydrogen can be recovered upon heating the hydride to 400 C and desorbing the hydrogen several times into the evacuated surge tank. Thus, the essential requirement of capturing hydrogen and recovering it has been demonstrated. ,

Muscatello, Anthony C.; Captain, Janine E.; Quinn, Jacqueline W.; Gibson, Tracy L.; Perusich, Stephen A.; Weis, Kyle H.

2009-01-01

394

College of Earth Resource Sciences and Engineering (CERSE) Department of Petroleum Engineering  

E-print Network

College of Earth Resource Sciences and Engineering (CERSE) Department of Petroleum Engineering School of Mines Petroleum Engineering Department invites applications for a full-time faculty position. The Petroleum Engineering Department has a world-class program in education and research and offers

395

College of Earth Resource Sciences and Engineering (CERSE) Department of Petroleum Engineering  

E-print Network

College of Earth Resource Sciences and Engineering (CERSE) Department of Petroleum Engineering of Mines Petroleum Engineering Department invites applications for a full-time faculty position. The Petroleum Engineering Department has a world-class program in education and research and offers

396

College of Earth Resource Sciences and Engineering (CERSE) Department of Petroleum Engineering  

E-print Network

College of Earth Resource Sciences and Engineering (CERSE) Department of Petroleum Engineering of a background investigation. Colorado School of Mines Petroleum Engineering Department invites applications. The Petroleum Engineering Department has a world-class program in education and research and offers

397

EngineeringJobs.com: A National Index of Engineering Jobs and Resources  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

EngineeringJobs.com is a wonderful resource for engineers seeking employment and employers looking for engineers. Job seekers can explore over 100 career databases and companies; post resumes; send a resume to special recruiters; research companies; or explore the engineering tools, references, societies, and organizations. Company pages are listed alphabetically. Employers can review posted resumes or list job openings.

398

Kansas Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

and support research on high priority water resource problems and objectives, as identified through the state and future water resource issues/problems as identified in the State Water Plan; dissemination proactive rather than reactive in addressing water resource problems of the state; -Involve the many water

399

Virginia Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

research on practical solutions to water resources problems; and facilitates timely transfer of water's statewide competitive grants program provides research funds to find practical solutions to water problemsVirginia Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2013 Virginia Water Resources

400

Kansas Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

District: 2nd District Research Category: Water Quality Focus Category: Waste Water, Agriculture, SurfaceKansas Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2003 Introduction The Kansas Water Resources Institute is part of a national network of water resource institutes in every state

401

Troubled waters: managing our vital resources.  

PubMed

Presented are articles from Global Issues, an electronic journal of the US Information Agency that focuses on managing the water resources of the world. The three main articles are as follows: 1) ¿The Quiet Revolution to Restore Our Aquatic Ecosystems¿, 2) ¿Charting a New Course to Save America's Waters¿, and 3) ¿Freshwater: Will the World's Future Needs be Met?¿ The journal also presents commentaries on the age-old water shortage in the Middle East; solutions to water waste on the farm and in cities; managing water scarcity in the driest region of the US; and a new approach to environmental management in the Bermejo River in Argentina and Bolivia. Furthermore, this issue contains statistics on water usage and supplies and a report that examines proposals for policies that could set the world on a better course for water management. Lastly, this issue provides a bibliography of books, documents, and articles on freshwater issues as well as a list of Internet sites offering further information on water quality, supplies, and conservation. PMID:12290381

1999-03-01

402

Water Woes - An Engineering Design Challenge  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This Engineering Design Challenge is intended to help students apply the concepts of evaporation and condensation from SC.3.P.9.1 as they build devices to evaporate salt water and collect the condensation for drinking water. It is not intended as an initial introduction to this benchmark."

Holly Mentillo

2012-07-31

403

Second Forum on Energy & Water Sustainability: Increasing Resource Productivity  

E-print Network

Second Forum on Energy & Water Sustainability: Increasing Resource Productivity April 10, 2009 on Energy & Water Sustainability in 2007 successfully brought together policy-makers, researchers, energy of energy and water sustainability, considering the important linkages between these two resources

Keller, Arturo A.

404

Teach Engineering: Resources for K-12  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This library features teacher-tested, standards-based engineering content for K-12 teachers to use in science and math classrooms. Engineering lessons connect real-world experiences with curricular content already taught in K-12 classrooms. The collection is searchable by keyword, grade level, or educational standard, and can be browsed by subject area, curricular unit, lessons or activities.

405

Water Resources Data Massachusetts and Rhode Island Water Year 1999  

USGS Publications Warehouse

INTRODUCTION The Water Resources Division of the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with State agencies, obtains a large amount of data pertaining to the water resources of Massachusetts and Rhode Island each water year. These data, accumulated during many water years, constitute a valuable data base for developing an improved understanding of the water resources of the States. To make these data readily available to interested parties outside the Geological Survey, the data are published annually in this report series entitled 'Water Resources Data-Massachusetts and Rhode Island.' Hydrologic data are also available through the Massachusetts-Rhode Island District Home Page on the world-wide web (http://ma.water.usgs.gov). Historical data and real-time data (for sites equipped with satellite gage-height telemeter) are also available. The home page also contains a link to the U.S. Geological Survey National Home Page where streamflow data from locations throughout the United States can be retrieved. This report series includes records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; contents of lakes and reservoirs; water levels of ground-water wells; and water quality of ground-water wells. This volume contains discharge records at 90 gaging stations; stage records at 2 gaging stations; monthend contents of 4 lakes and reservoirs; water quality at 31 gaging stations; water quality at 27 observation wells; and water levels for 139 observation wells. Locations of these sites are shown in figures 1 and 2. Short-term water-quality data were collected at 21 gaging stations and 27 observation wells and are shown in figure 3. Miscellaneous hydrologic data were collected at various sites that were not involved in the systematic data-collection program and are published as miscellaneous discharge measurements. The data in this report represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating State and Federal agencies in Massachusetts and Rhode Island. This series of annual reports for Massachusetts and Rhode Island began with the 1961 water year with a report that contained only data relating to the quantities of surface water. For the 1964 water year, a similar report was introduced that contained only data relating to water quality. Beginning with the 1975 water year, the report format was changed to present, in one volume, data on quantities of surface water, quality of surface and ground water, and ground-water levels. Prior to introduction of this series and for several water years concurrent with it, water-resources data for Massachusetts and Rhode Island were published in U.S. Geological Survey Water-Supply Papers. Data on stream discharge and stage and on lake or reservoir contents and stage, through September 1960, were published annually under the title 'Surface-Water Supply of the United States, Parts 1A and 1B.' For the 1961 through 1970 water years, the data were published in two 5-year reports. Data on chemical quality, temperature, and suspended sediment for the 1941 through 1970 water years were published annually under the title 'Quality of Surface Waters of the United States,' and water levels for the 1939 through 1974 water years were published under the title 'Ground-Water Levels in the United States.' The above mentioned Water-Supply Papers may be consulted in the libraries of the principal cities of the United States and may be purchased from U.S. Geological Survey, Information Services, Box 25286, Denver Federal Center, Box 25425, Denver, CO 80225-0286. Publications similar to this report are published annually by the Geological Survey for all States. These official Survey reports have an identification number consisting of the two-letter State abbreviation, the last two digits of the water year, and the volume number. For example, this volume is identified as 'U.S. Geological Survey Water-Data Report MARI-98-1.' For archiving and general d

Socolow, R.S.; Zanca, J.L.; Murino, Domenic, Jr.; Ramsbey, L.R.

2000-01-01

406

CALIFORNIA DROUGHT State of California The Resources Agency California Department of Water Resources  

E-print Network

CALIFORNIA DROUGHT AN UPDATE 2008 State of California · The Resources Agency · California Department of Water Resources #12;CALIFORNIA DROUGHT, AN UPDATE April 2008 DEPARTME NT OF WATER R ESOURCES ST for Resources The Resources Agency Lester A. Snow Director Department of Water Resources #12;CALIFORNIA DROUGHT

407

Quantitative water quality with ERTS-1. [Kansas water resources  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Analyses of ERTS-1 MSS computer compatible tapes of reservoir scenes in Kansas along with ground truth show that MSS bands and band ratios can be used for reliable prediction of suspended loads up to at least 900 ppm. The major reservoirs in Kansas, as well as in other Great Plains states, are playing increasingly important roles in flood control, recreation, agriculture, and urban water supply. Satellite imagery is proving useful for acquiring timely low cost water quality data required for optimum management of these fresh water resources.

Yarger, H. L.; Mccauley, J. R.; James, G. W.; Magnuson, L. M.; Marzolf, G. R.

1974-01-01

408

Climate change, water resources and child health.  

PubMed

Climate change is occurring and has tremendous consequences for children's health worldwide. This article describes how the rise in temperature, precipitation, droughts, floods, glacier melt and sea levels resulting from human-induced climate change is affecting the quantity, quality and flow of water resources worldwide and impacting child health through dangerous effects on water supply and sanitation, food production and human migration. It argues that paediatricians and healthcare professionals have a critical leadership role to play in motivating and sustaining efforts for policy change and programme implementation at the local, national and international level. PMID:20403822

Kistin, Elizabeth J; Fogarty, John; Pokrasso, Ryan Shaening; McCally, Michael; McCornick, Peter G

2010-07-01

409

Injected Water Augments Cooling In Turboshaft Engine  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Report describes experiments in which water injected into compressor-bleed cooling air of aircraft turboshaft engine. Injection of water previously suggested as way to provide additional cooling needed to sustain operation at power levels higher than usual. Involves turbine-inlet temperatures high enough to shorten lives of first-stage high-pressure turbine blades. Latent heat of vaporization of injected water serves as additional heat sink to maintain blades at design operating temperatures during high-power operation.

Biesiadny, Thomas J.; Berger, Brett; Klann, Gary A.; Clark, David A.

1989-01-01

410

Engineering Water Analysis Laboratory Activity.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purposes of water treatment in a marine steam power plant are to prevent damage to boilers, steam-operated equipment, and steam and condensate lives, and to keep all equipment operating at the highest level of efficiency. This laboratory exercise is designed to provide students with experiences in making accurate boiler water tests and to…

Schlenker, Richard M.

411

Ethos, equity, and the water resource  

SciTech Connect

The author uses two concepts, well known to ancient civilizations but latterly forgotten, in an analysis of some aspects of water resource use. First, democratic governance at the will of the people is effective and responsive as long as the exists an ethos in administration - a set of beliefs that guide decision making even though unwritten into law. Second, democrat guidance is effective when equity - fairness to all - is not submerged to private or narrow interests.

Leopold, L.B. (Univ. of California, Berkeley (USA))

1990-03-01

412

Water resources data, South Dakota, water year 2003  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Water-resources data for the 2003 water year for South Dakota consists of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage, contents, and water quality of lakes and reservoirs; precipitation; and water levels in wells. This report contains discharge records for 123 streamflow-gaging stations; stage and contents records for 10 lakes and reservoirs, stage for 15 streams and 3 lakes; water-quality records for 5 streamflow-gaging stations, 2 daily sediment stations, 3 wells, 11 ungaged stream sites, 2 lakes, 1 sewage lagoon, and 1 precipitation site; water levels for 6 wells; daily precipitation records at 4 sites; and 74 partial-record crest-stage gage sites. Additional water data were collected at various sites, not part of the systematic data-collection program, and are published as miscellaneous measurements and analyses. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating State and Federal agencies in South Dakota.

Burr, Michael J.; Teller, Ralph W.; Neitzert, Kathleen M.

2004-01-01

413

Water resources data, South Dakota, water year 2004  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Water-resources data for the 2004 water year for South Dakota consists of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage, contents, and water quality of lakes and reservoirs; precipitation; and water levels in wells. This report contains discharge records for 122 streamflow-gaging stations; stage and contents records for 10 lakes and reservoirs, stage for 13 streams and 3 lakes; water-quality records for 8 streamflow-gaging stations, 2 daily sediment stations, 3 wells, 14 ungaged stream sites, 2 lakes, 1 sewage lagoon, and 1 precipitation site; water levels for 8 wells; daily precipitation records at 4 sites; and 81 partial-record crest-stage gage sites. Additional water data were collected at various sites, not part of the systematic data-collection program, and are published as miscellaneous measurements and analyses. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating State and Federal agencies in South Dakota.

Burr, Michael J.; Teller, Ralph W.; Neitzert, Kathleen M.

2005-01-01

414

Water resources data, South Dakota, water year 2002  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Water-resources data for the 2002 water year for South Dakota consists of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage, contents, and water quality of lakes and reservoirs; precipitation; and water levels in wells. This report contains discharge records for 127 streamflow-gaging stations; stage and contents records for 10 lakes and reservoirs, stage for 14 streams and 3 lakes; water-quality records for 6 streamflow-gaging stations, 2 daily sediment stations, 3 wells, 10 ungaged stream sites, 6 lakes, 1 sewage lagoon, and 1 precipitation site; water levels for 7 wells; daily precipitation records at 4 sites; and 74 partial-record crest-stage gage sites. Additional water data were collected at various sites, not part of the systematic data-collection program, and are published as miscellaneous measurements and analyses. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating State and Federal agencies in South Dakota.

Burr, Michael J.; Teller, Ralph W.; Neitzert, Kathleen M.

2003-01-01

415

The nexus between integrated natural resources management and integrated water resources management in southern Africa  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The low productivity of smallholder farming systems and enterprises in the drier areas of the developing world can be attributed mainly to the limited resources of farming households and the application of inappropriate skills and practices that can lead to the degradation of the natural resource base. This lack of development, particularly in southern Africa, is of growing concern from both an agricultural and environmental perspective. To address this lack of progress, two development paradigms that improve land and water productivity have evolved, somewhat independently, from different scientific constituencies. One championed by the International Agricultural Research constituency is Integrated Natural Resource Management (INRM), whilst the second championed predominantly by Environmental and Civil Engineering constituencies is Integrated Water Resources Management (IWRM). As a result of similar objectives of working towards the millennium development goals of improved food security and environmental sustainability, there exists a nexus between the constituencies of the two paradigms, particularly in terms of appreciating the lessons learned. In this paper lessons are drawn from past INRM research that may have particular relevance to IWRM scientists as they re-direct their focus from blue water issues to green water issues, and vice-versa. Case studies are drawn from the management of water quality for irrigation, green water productivity and a convergence of INRM and IWRM in the management of gold panning in southern Zimbabwe. One point that is abundantly clear from both constituencies is that ‘one-size-fits-all’ or silver bullet solutions that are generally applicable for the enhancement of blue water management/formal irrigation simply do not exist for the smallholder rainfed systems.

Twomlow, Stephen; Love, David; Walker, Sue

416

Conservation of Water and Related Land Resources  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The author was quite clear about the purpose of this book and clearly achieved his intent. In his preface, the author states, “The purpose of this book is to acquaint the reader with a broad understanding of the topics relevant to the management of the nation's water and related land resources.” The book is a product of the author's 20 years of work as a teacher, consultant, researcher, and student of watershed management and hydrology and has served as a text for a course entitled Soil and Water Conservation, which the author has taught at the State University of New York, College of Environmental Science and Forestry at Syracuse, New York. But it was also written with the intent to be of use “to informal students of water and land related resources on the national level as well.” The objectives of Black's course at Syracuse and its larger purpose define the scope of the book which, again in the author's words, have been “(1) to acquaint students with principles of soil and water conservation; (2) to stimulate an appreciation for an integrated, comprehensive approach to land management; (3) to illustrate the influence of institutional, economic, and cultural forces on the practice of soil and water conservation; and (4) to provide information, methods, and techniques by which soil and water conservation measures are applied to land, as well as the basis for predicting and evaluating results.” The book is written in straightforward nontechnical language and provides the reader with a set of references, a table of cases, a list of abbreviations, and an adequate index. It impresses this reviewer as a very well edited piece of work.

Caldwell, Lynton K.

1984-04-01

417

North Dakota Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

North Dakota Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 1998 Introduction Research Program INTRODUCTION The North Dakota Water Resources Research Institute is one of 54 entities, information transfer, and education on water resources. The bulk of the North Dakota Institute's resources

418

New Jersey Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

and change on water resources VI. Socioeconomic and information transfer problems in water managementNew Jersey Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2001 Introduction The New Jersey Water Resources Research Institute is a Federally-funded program of research, training

419

Virginia Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

-135.7:8). Mission The VWRRC promotes research on practical solutions to water resources problems; provides research's statewide competitive grants program provides research funds to find practical solutions to water problemsVirginia Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2012 Virginia Water Resources

420

Connecticut Institute of Water Resources Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

Connecticut Institute of Water Resources Annual Technical Report FY 2009 Connecticut Institute of Water Resources Annual Technical Report FY 2009 1 #12;Introduction The Connecticut Institute of Water with all of Connecticut's water resource professionals, managers and academics to resolve state

421

Idaho Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

Idaho Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2007 Idaho Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2007 1 #12;Introduction The Idaho Water Resources Research Institute (IWRRI) is housed at the University of Idaho. IWRRI is dedicated to supporting and promoting water

422

Idaho Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

Idaho Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2013 Idaho Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2013 1 #12;Introduction The Idaho Water Resources Research Institute (IWRRI) is housed at the University of Idaho. IWRRI is dedicated to supporting and promoting water

423

Idaho Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

Idaho Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2009 Idaho Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2009 1 #12;Introduction The Idaho Water Resources Research Institute (IWRRI) is housed at the University of Idaho. IWRRI is dedicated to supporting and promoting water

424

Idaho Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

Idaho Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2012 Idaho Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2012 1 #12;Introduction The Idaho Water Resources Research Institute (IWRRI) is housed at the University of Idaho. IWRRI is dedicated to supporting and promoting water

425

Idaho Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

Idaho Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2011 Idaho Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2011 1 #12;Introduction The Idaho Water Resources Research Institute (IWRRI) is housed at the University of Idaho. IWRRI is dedicated to supporting and promoting water

426

Idaho Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

Idaho Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2010 Idaho Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2010 1 #12;Introduction The Idaho Water Resources Research Institute (IWRRI) is housed at the University of Idaho. IWRRI is dedicated to supporting and promoting water

427

Louisiana Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

Louisiana Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2011 Louisiana Water a description of the activities of the Louisiana Water Resources Research Institute for the period of March 1, 2011 to February 28, 2012 under the direction of Dr. John Pardue. The Louisiana Water Resources

428

Louisiana Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

Louisiana Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2013 Louisiana Water a description of the activities of the Louisiana Water Resources Research Institute for the period of March 1, 2013 to February 28, 2014 under the direction of Dr. John Pardue. The Louisiana Water Resources

429

Louisiana Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

Louisiana Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2007 Louisiana Water a description of the activities of the Louisiana Water Resources Research Institute for the period of March 1, 2007 to February 29, 2008 under the direction of Dr. John Pardue. The Louisiana Water Resources

430

Louisiana Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

Louisiana Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2008 Louisiana Water a description of the activities of the Louisiana Water Resources Research Institute for the period of March 1, 2008 to February 28, 2009 under the direction of Dr. John Pardue. The Louisiana Water Resources

431

Louisiana Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

Louisiana Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2012 Louisiana Water a description of the activities of the Louisiana Water Resources Research Institute for the period of March 1, 2012 to February 28, 2013 under the direction of Dr. John Pardue. The Louisiana Water Resources

432

Louisiana Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

Louisiana Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2010 Louisiana Water a description of the activities of the Louisiana Water Resources Research Institute for the period of March 1, 2010 to February 28, 2011 under the direction of Dr. John Pardue. The Louisiana Water Resources

433

Maryland Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

of sediments trapped by milldams of the mechanical-water-power era; the other launched an investigationMaryland Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2012 Maryland Water Resources Water Resources Research Center supported a variety of research and outreach activities that address

434

D.C. Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

years. We are in negotiation with BenTen Inc., a Japanese water purification system manufacturerD.C. Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2007 D.C. Water Resources Research of the District of Columbia (DC) Water Resources Research Institute (the Institute) for the period of March 1

435

Niche engineering reveals complementary resource use  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Greater resource use by diverse communities might result from species occupying different, complementary niches. Niche partitioning is difficult to directly demonstrate, however, because differences among species in the resources they use are often difficult to separate from other species-specific t...

436

INTERGRATING SOURCE WATER PROTECTION AND DRINKING WATER TREATMENT: U.S. ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY'S WATER SUPPLY AND WATER RESOURCES DIVISION  

EPA Science Inventory

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Water Supply and Water Resources Division (WSWRD) is an internationally recognized water research organization established to assist in responding to public health concerns related to drinking water supplies. WSWRD has evolved from...

437

INTEGRATING SOURCE WATER PROTECTION AND DRINKING WATER TREATMENT: U.S. ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY'S WATER SUPPLY AND WATER RESOURCES DIVISION  

EPA Science Inventory

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Water Supply and Water Resources Division (WSWRD) is an internationally recognized water research organization established to assist in responding to public health concerns related to drinking water supplies. WSWRD has evolved from...

438

Water Resources Research Institute of the University of North Carolina  

E-print Network

: Agriculture, Non Point Pollution, Waste Water Descriptors: chemical monitoring, endocrine active substances, erosion and sediment control/stormwater, nutrients and water quality, agriculture issues, waterWater Resources Research Institute of the University of North Carolina Annual Technical Report FY

439

Electric Power Engineering Education Resources - 1979-80  

Microsoft Academic Search

This sixth biennial (1,2,3,4,5,6) committee report compiles the results of a survey of Electric Power Engineering Education Resources at ECPD\\/ABET (Engineers Council for Professional Development\\/Accreditation Board for Engineering anid Technology) accredited universities in the United States of America for the academic year 1979-80. The report contains a list of faculty active during the subject year, their level of academic participation

1981-01-01

440

Electric Power Engineering Educational Resources 1969-1970  

Microsoft Academic Search

This committee report covers results of a survey of electric power engineering educational resources at eighty-two ECPD (Engineers Council for Professional Development) accredited schools in the USA for the acedemic year 1969-1970. It includes a listing of faculty active during the subject year and their professional experience together with information on student enrollment and its composition. Also included is information

F. C. Fisher; L. S. Vanslyck; E. T. B. Gross; C. C. Mosher; H. B. Hamilton; J. R. Tudor

1972-01-01

441

Water Exploration: An Online High School Water Resource Education Program  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Institute for Geophysics at The University of Texas at Austin and 4empowerment.com, a Texas-based for-profit educational enterprise, teamed up with the Texas Water Development Board to develop and implement a Web-based water resources education program for Texas high school students. The program, Water Exploration uses a project-based learning approach called the Legacy Cycle model to permit students to conduct research and build an understanding about water science and critical water-related issues, using the Internet and computer technology. The three Legacy Cycle modules in the Water Exploration curriculum are: Water Basics, Water-Earth Dynamics and People Need Water. Within each Legacy Cycle there are three different challenges, or instructional modules, laid out as projects with clearly stated goals for students to carry out. Each challenge address themes that map to the water-related “Big Ideas” and supporting concepts found in the new Earth Science Literacy Principles: The Big Ideas and Supporting Concepts of Earth Science. As students work through a challenge they follow a series of steps, each of which is associated (i.e., linked online) with a manageable number of corresponding, high quality, research-based learning activities and Internet resources, including scholarly articles, cyber tools, and visualizations intended to enhance understanding of the concepts presented. The culmination of each challenge is a set of “Go Public” products that are the students’ answers to the challenge and which serve as the final assessment for the challenge. The “Go Public” products are posted to a collaborative workspace on the Internet as the “legacy” of the students’ work, thereby allowing subsequent groups of students who take the challenge to add new products. Twenty-two science educators have been trained on the implementation of the Water Exploration curriculum. A graduate student pursuing a master’s degree in science education through The University of Texas’ UTEACH program is conducting research to track the teachers’ implementation of Water Exploration and assess their comfort with cyber-education through classroom observations, students and teacher surveys, and evaluation of students’ “Go Public” products.

Ellins, K. K.; McCall, L. R.; Amos, S.; McGowan, R. F.; Mote, A.; Negrito, K.; Paloski, B.; Ryan, C.; Cameron, B.

2010-12-01

442

Center for Water Resources Research Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

is providing input to the Committee on issues addressing water quality, wastewater treatment, and NPS pollution water resources, NPS pollution, and projected water needs. Future water-related issues assist the StateCenter for Water Resources Research Annual Technical Report FY 1999 Introduction Abstract In FY 99

443

New Mexico Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

contributes as much to a water allocation problem as water scarcity itself. To compound the situation, NewNew Mexico Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2013 New Mexico Water Water Resources Research Institute (NM WRRI) was established in 1963 by the New Mexico State University

444

New Mexico Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

contributes as much to a water allocation problem as water scarcity itself. To compound the situation, NewNew Mexico Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2011 New Mexico Water Water Resources Research Institute (NMWRRI) was established in 1963 by the New Mexico State University

445

New Mexico Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

contributes as much to a water allocation problem as water scarcity itself. To compound the situation, NewNew Mexico Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2012 New Mexico Water Water Resources Research Institute (NMWRRI) was established in 1963 by the New Mexico State University

446

Accelerated Capacity Development in Water Resources Education: the experiences of the Ethiopian Institute of Water Resources  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Ethiopia recently recognises that the water resources development is the major entry point in poverty alleviation and sustainable development. Water in Ethiopia plays a key role in the Water-Energy-Food-nexus. Over 98% of the electricity in the country is generated using hydropower and yet about 2000 MW has been developed. Out of the 3.5 Mha potentially irrigable land, only 0.25 Mha has been developed to date. Access to drinking water supply coverage is among the lowest in the world. One of the limiting factors in harnessing the resource base is the absence of water professionals to face the fast growing demand in education, research, development in the water sector. Recognising this, in collaboration with University of Connecticut of the United States, Addis Ababa University launched the Ethiopian Institute of Water Resources (EIWR) by enrolling 18 PhD and 24 MSc students. The program is unique in that much of the course instructors are coming from US and European Universities, but deliver courses together with Ethiopian collaborators. This is supposed to facilitate knowledge and experience transfer from the US/EU scientist to Ethiopian counterparts. The theses/dissertations are designed to focus on Ethiopia's immediate hydrological problems on selected basins, and will be coordinated by three advisors for each PhD - one from US/EU, one from Ethiopian Universities, and one water professional from the sector. We report here the lessons learned in setting up the EIWR institute and the education program.

Alamirew, T.; Mekonnen, G.; Viglione, A.

2012-04-01

447

Octanol-water distribution of engineered nanomaterials  

Microsoft Academic Search

The goal of this study was to examine the effects of pH and ionic strength on octanol-water distribution of five model engineered nanomaterials. Distribution experiments resulted in a spectrum of three broadly classified scenarios: distribution in the aqueous phase, distribution in the octanol, and distribution into the octanol-water interface. Two distribution coefficients were derived to describe the distribution of nanoparticles

Kiril D. Hristovski; Paul K. Westerhoff; Jonathan D. Posner

2011-01-01

448

Optimality versus stability in water resource allocation.  

PubMed

Water allocation is a growing concern in a developing world where limited resources like fresh water are in greater demand by more parties. Negotiations over allocations often involve multiple groups with disparate social, economic, and political status and needs, who are seeking a management solution for a wide range of demands. Optimization techniques for identifying the Pareto-optimal (social planner solution) to multi-criteria multi-participant problems are commonly implemented, although often reaching agreement for this solution is difficult. In negotiations with multiple-decision makers, parties who base decisions on individual rationality may find the social planner solution to be unfair, thus creating a need to evaluate the willingness to cooperate and practicality of a cooperative allocation solution, i.e., the solution's stability. This paper suggests seeking solutions for multi-participant resource allocation problems through an economics-based power index allocation method. This method can inform on allocation schemes that quantify a party's willingness to participate in a negotiation rather than opt for no agreement. Through comparison of the suggested method with a range of distance-based multi-criteria decision making rules, namely, least squares, MAXIMIN, MINIMAX, and compromise programming, this paper shows that optimality and stability can produce different allocation solutions. The mismatch between the socially-optimal alternative and the most stable alternative can potentially result in parties leaving the negotiation as they may be too dissatisfied with their resource share. This finding has important policy implications as it justifies why stakeholders may not accept the socially optimal solution in practice, and underlies the necessity of considering stability where it may be more appropriate to give up an unstable Pareto-optimal solution for an inferior stable one. Authors suggest assessing the stability of an allocation solution as an additional component to an analysis that seeks to distribute water in a negotiated process. PMID:24412983

Read, Laura; Madani, Kaveh; Inanloo, Bahareh

2014-01-15

449

Monty C. Dozier, Assistant Professor and Extension Water Resources Specialist  

E-print Network

. If the water is unsafe, use only bottled water, or boil or disinfect your water for cooking, cleaning or bathing. Until your water supply is tested and found to be safe, use only bottled, boiled or treated waterER-002 6-06 Monty C. Dozier, Assistant Professor and Extension Water Resources Specialist Courtney

450

Increasing Awareness of Sustainable Water Management for Future Civil Engineers  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

There are more than 1.2 billion people around the world that do not have access to drinking water. While there are plans under the United Nations Millennium Development Goals to halve this number by 2015, there are a number of regions that will be exposed to water scarcity in the coming future. Providing sufficient water for future development is a great challenge for planners and designers of water supply systems. In order to design sustainable water supplies for the future, it is important to learn how people consume water and how water consumption can be reduced. The education of future civil engineers should take into account not only technical aspects of the water supply but also the accompanying social and economical issues, and appreciated the strengths and weaknesses of traditional solutions. The Faculty of Civil Engineering, at the University of Rijeka, has begun incorporating a series of activities that engage undergraduate students and the local community to develop a mutual understanding of the future needs for sustainable management. We present one of the activities, collaboration with the Lancaster Environment Centre at Lancaster University in the UK through the field course Water and environmental management in Mediterranean context. The course, which is designed for the Lancaster University geography students, features a combination of field trips and visits to provide an understanding of the socio-economic and environmental context of water management in two counties (Istra and Primorsko-Goranska). Students from Lancaster visit the Croatian water authority and a regional water company, where they learn about current management practices and problems in managing water supplies and demand through the year. They make their own observations of current management practices in the field and learn about water consumption from the end users. One day field visit to a village in the area that is still not connected to the main water supply system is organised together with civil engineering students from the University of Rijeka. The aims of this field visit are: to learn about traditional water supply from an underground storage of rain water called cisterna; and to find out from inhabitants about their current water usage habits and expectations, and how these might change when they get water from the main water supply system. This joint activity has been beneficial for both groups of students. The engineering students become aware of the importance of the social aspects in designing the water supply system, while the geography students learn about the engineering challenges entailed. Both groups learn that water consumption increases with the provision of water through pipeline systems and that this needs to be taken into account in the design of water supply and management of water resources. Importantly, they learn the benefits of traditional sustainable water supply methods, which could be implemented as primary or additional sources of water supply in other areas.In summary, both groups of students develop their professional knowledge and skills as well as generic and transferable skills, which are very important for those who will continue to a career in the design and management of water systems.

Ilic, Suzana; Karleusa, Barbara; Deluka-Tibljas, Aleksandra

2010-05-01

451

AOIPS water resources data management system  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A geocoded data management system applicable for hydrological applications was designed to demonstrate the utility of the Atmospheric and Oceanographic Information Processing System (AOIPS) for hydrological applications. Within that context, the geocoded hydrology data management system was designed to take advantage of the interactive capability of the AOIPS hardware. Portions of the Water Resource Data Management System which best demonstrate the interactive nature of the hydrology data management system were implemented on the AOIPS. A hydrological case study was prepared using all data supplied for the Bear River watershed located in northwest Utah, southeast Idaho, and western Wyoming.

Merritt, E. S.; Shotwell, R. L.; Place, M. C.; Belknap, N. J.

1976-01-01

452

Achieving Integrated Water Resource Management: the mismatch in boundaries between water resources management and water supply  

Microsoft Academic Search

Central to the National Water Policy of South Africa and echoed in the National Water Act (Act 36 of 1998) and Water Services Act (Act 108 of 1997) is the devolution of water management and regulation to regional authorities that take the form of Water Services Authorities and Catchment Management Agencies. Our argument is that local government has a very

Sharon Pollard

453

A Report on the Effectiveness of Texas Water Resources  

E-print Network

A readership survey conducted in May 1977 found that readers of Texas Water Resources find it useful, attractive and informative. The bulletin is published by the Texas Water Resources Institute to generate public awareness and understanding...

Ruesink, L. E.

454

Water Resources Center, Desert Research Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

Water Resources Center, Desert Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2000 Introduction None. Unusual growth patterns based on year round food availability and spatially unpredictable food quality modeling, irrigation, algae Lead Institute: Water Resources Center, Desert Research Institute

455

ISOTOPE HYDROLOGY LABORATORY (WATER QUALITY MANAGEMENT BRANCH, WATER SUPPLY AND WATER RESOURCES DIVISION, NRMRL)  

EPA Science Inventory

The mission of NRMRL's Water Supply and Water Resources Division's Isotope Hydrology Laboratory (IHL) is to resolve environmental hydrology problems through research and application of naturally occurring isotopes. The emergent field of isotope hydrology follows advances in anal...

456

ANALYTICAL CAPABILITY - ISOTOPE HYDROLOGY LABORATORY (WATER QUALITY MANAGEMENT BRANCH, WATER SUPPLY AND WATER RESOURCES DIVISION, NRMRL)  

EPA Science Inventory

The mission of NRMRL's Water Supply and Water Resources Division's Isotope Hydrology Laboratory is to resolve environmental hydrology problems through research and application of naturally occurring isotopes. Analytical capabilities at IHL include light stable isotope radio mass...

457

Strain engineering water transport in graphene nanochannels  

Microsoft Academic Search

Using equilibrium and nonequilibrium molecular dynamic simulations, we found that engineering the strain on the graphene planes forming a channel can drastically change the interfacial friction of water transport through it. There is a sixfold change of interfacial friction stress when the strain changes from -10% to 10%. Stretching the graphene walls increases the interfacial shear stress, while compressing the

Wei Xiong; Jefferson Zhe Liu; Ming Ma; Zhiping Xu; John Sheridan; Quanshui Zheng

2011-01-01

458

[Water resources deterioration and its impact on human health].  

PubMed

The objective of the study is to analyse the actual availability of water resources and its impact on human health deterioration. The following aspects were studied: (a) human activities and environmental deterioration; (b) statistics on the availability and demand of water resources; (c) urban and industry wastes as sources of water resources contamination; and (d) deleterious effect of contaminated water on human health. Statistical data on the impact of contaminated water on human health and the increasing demand of water resources are alarming. It is paramount that modern generations develop an environmental awareness to avoid overstressing water systems, as predicted to come about in the very near future. PMID:12131979

Moraes, Danielle Serra de Lima; Jordao, Berenice Quinzani

2002-06-01

459

Environmental resource document for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Volume 2  

SciTech Connect

This document contains information related to the environmental characterization of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The INEL is a major US Department of Energy facility in southeastern Idaho dedicated to nuclear research, waste management, environmental restoration, and other activities related to the development of technology. Environmental information covered in this document includes land, air, water, and ecological resources; socioeconomic characteristics and land use; and cultural, aesthetic, and scenic resources.

Irving, J.S.

1993-07-01

460

Environmental resource document for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Volume 1  

SciTech Connect

This document contains information related to the environmental characterization of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The INEL is a major US Department of Energy facility in southeastern Idaho dedicated to nuclear research, waste management, environmental restoration, and other activities related to the development of technology. Environmental information covered in this document includes land, air, water, and ecological resources; socioeconomic characteristics and land use; and cultural, aesthetic, and scenic resources.

Irving, J.S.

1993-07-01

461

Louisiana Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

Louisiana Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2000 Introduction This report presents a description of the activities of the Louisiana Water Resources Research Institute for the period of March 1, 2000 to February 28, 2001. The Louisiana Water Resources Research Institute (LWRRI

462

California Institute for Water Resources Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

California Institute for Water Resources Annual Technical Report FY 2013 California Institute for Water Resources Annual Technical Report FY 2013 1 #12;Introduction The California Institute for Water Resources (CIWR) is a special program within the University of California's (UC) Division of Agriculture

463

California Institute for Water Resources Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

California Institute for Water Resources Annual Technical Report FY 2012 California Institute for Water Resources Annual Technical Report FY 2012 1 #12;Introduction The California Institute for Water Resources (CIWR) is a special program within the University of California's Division of Agriculture

464

Puerto Rico Water Resources and Environmental Research Institute  

E-print Network

Puerto Rico Water Resources and Environmental Research Institute http://prwreri.uprm.edu Puerto Rico Water Resources and Environmental Research Institute, PO Box 9040, Mayaguez, PR 00681Puerto Rico://prwreri.uprm.edu Email: prwreri@uprm.eduURL: http://prwreri.uprm.edu Email: prwreri@uprm.edu Puerto Rico Water Resources

Gilbes, Fernando

465

Puerto Rico Water Resources and Environmental Research Institute  

E-print Network

Section 104 of the Water Resources Research Act of 1984, as Amended ANNOUNCEMENT 11HQPA0002 Revised Centre Avenue Fort Collins, CO 80525 or call 970-226-9445. #12;PUERTO RICO WATER RESOURCES under the provisions of section 104 of the Water Resources Research Act of 1984 (Public Law 98

Gilbes, Fernando

466

Maryland Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

Maryland Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2013 Maryland Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2013 1 #12;Introduction During Funding Year 2013, the Maryland With 104B funding, the Maryland Water Resources Research Center supported three new research projects

467

North Dakota Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

North Dakota Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2013 North Dakota Water the activities of the North Dakota Water Resources Research Institute (NDWRRI) during the period of March 1, 2013 and Conservation Sciences program of North Dakota State University (NDSU), Natural Resources Management program

468

North Dakota Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

North Dakota Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2010 North Dakota Water the activities of the North Dakota Water Resources Research Institute (NDWRRI) during the period of March 1, 2010 and Conservation Sciences program of North Dakota State University (NDSU), Natural Resources Management program

469

North Dakota Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

North Dakota Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2011 North Dakota Water describes the activities of the North Dakota Water Resources Research Institute (NDWRRI) during the period with the Environmental and Conservation Sciences program of North Dakota State University (NDSU), Natural Resources

470

North Dakota Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

North Dakota Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2012 North Dakota Water the activities of the North Dakota Water Resources Research Institute (NDWRRI) during the period of March 1, 2012 and Conservation Sciences program of North Dakota State University (NDSU), Natural Resources Management program

471

North Dakota Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

North Dakota Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2008 North Dakota Water the activities of the North Dakota Water Resources Research Institute (NDWRRI) during the period of March 1, 2008 and Conservation Sciences program of North Dakota State University (NDSU), Natural Resources Management program

472

North Dakota Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

North Dakota Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2009 North Dakota Water the activities of the North Dakota Water Resources Research Institute (NDWRRI) during the period of March 1, 2009 and Conservation Sciences program of North Dakota State University (NDSU), Natural Resources Management program

473

Power and Water Resources Pooling Authority NOTICE OF SPECIAL MEETING  

E-print Network

Power and Water Resources Pooling Authority NOTICE OF SPECIAL MEETING Notice is hereby given that a special meeting of the Board of Directors of the Power and Water Resources Pooling Authority (PWRPA or service at least 3 days before the meeting. Requests should be sent to: Power and Water Resources Pooling

474

Connecticut Institute of Water Resources Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

Connecticut Institute of Water Resources Annual Technical Report FY 2008 Connecticut Institute of Water Resources Annual Technical Report FY 2008 1 #12;Introduction The Connecticut Institute of Water Resources is located at the University of Connecticut (UCONN) and reports to the head of the Department

475

D.C. Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

D.C. Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2012 D.C. Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2012 1 #12;Introduction This report is a summary of the activities of the District of Columbia (DC) Water Resources Research Institute (WRRI) for the period of March

476

D.C. Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

D.C. Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2013 D.C. Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2013 1 #12;Introduction This report is a summary of the activities of the District of Columbia (DC) Water Resources Research Institute (WRRI) for the period - March

477

Puerto Rico Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

Puerto Rico Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2008 Puerto Rico Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2008 1 #12;Introduction This report covers, technical reports, quarterly newsletter and a web site are used by the Institute to keep the water resources

478

Uncertainty Management in Urban Water Engineering Adaptation to Climate Change - abstract  

EPA Science Inventory

Current water resource planning and engineering assume a stationary climate, in which the observed historical water flow rate and water quality variations are often used to define the technical basis. When the non-stationarity is considered, however, climate change projection co...

479

Missouri Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

Technical Report FY 2012-2013 WATER PROBLEMS AND ISSUES OF MISSOURI The water problems and issues) water policy. Each of Missouri's specific problems usually requires knowledge in these three areas Missouri Water Resources Research Center WATER PROBLEMS AND ISSUES OF MISSOURI The water problems

480

Alabama Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

-situ Capable Method for Detecting Pathogenic Bacteria in the Alabama Water Supplies Project Number: 2010AL87B for Detecting Pathogenic Bacteria in the Alabama Water Supplie1 #12;1 Project Report for Water Resources, and outreach expertise to address water use, water quality, and water supply issues in the state, the Southeast

481

Center for Water Resources Research Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

with specific water resources problems. In FY 06, the UWRL expended a total of approximately $9 million in water of this total. These funds were used for research addressing water and wastewater management problems, outreachCenter for Water Resources Research Annual Technical Report FY 2006 #12;Introduction The Utah

482

Puerto Rico Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

Puerto Rico Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2009 Puerto Rico Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2009 1 #12;Introduction The Puerto Rico Water of Puerto Rico. The Institute is one of 54 water research centers established throughout the United States

483

Puerto Rico Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

Puerto Rico Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2010 Puerto Rico Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2010 1 #12;Introduction The Puerto Rico Water of Puerto Rico. The Institute is one of 54 water research centers established throughout the United States

484

D.C. Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

to identify city water and environmental resources and problems and contribute to their solution. In recent to water infrastructure and resource management, climate change, water and energy efficiency, public health to water quantity and quality and related ecosystems. DC Universities have a unique role to play

485

North Dakota Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

North Dakota Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2005 Introduction This report describes the activities of the North Dakota Water Resources Research Institute (NDWRRI) during water agencies in North Dakota: State Water Commission, State Department of Health, and the USGS North

486

New York State Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

) Novel outreach methods that enhance the communication and impact of science-based innovation to water awareness of emerging water resources issues and to develop and assess new water management technologies information transfer on water resources management and technologies to educators, managers, policy makers

487

Understanding Water Conservation in Williamstown: Protecting a "Plentiful" Resource  

E-print Network

Understanding Water Conservation in Williamstown: Protecting a "Plentiful" Resource, an international organization committed to water conservation practice and advocacy, the global population tripled's quote embodies one of the greatest difficulties facing the contemporary movement for water conservation

Aalberts, Daniel P.

488

Colbeck appointed Editor of Water Resources Research  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Samuel Colbeck will begin a four-year term as editor of Water Resources Research, beginning January 1,1997. He succeeds George Hornberger of the University of Virginia.Colbeck has been an active member of AGU, and a Fellow since 1992. Colbeck received AGU's Horton Award in 1980. He is also a participant on several National Academy of Sciences committees, the International Association of Hydrological Sciences (IAHS), and the International Glaciological Society. His service ranges from his participation on the Hydrological Section Executive Committee (1992-1993) to his chairmanship of the IAHS' Working Group on Snow Classification, International Commission on Snow and Ice (1986-1990). Most recently, Colbeck chaired the Union's Budget and Finance Committee (1944-1996). He is also a founding member of the American Association of Avalanche Professionals.

489

Environmental Tracers for Determining Water Resource Vulnerability to Climate Change  

SciTech Connect

Predicted changes in the climate will have profound impacts on water availability in the Western US, but large uncertainties exist in our ability to predict how natural and engineered hydrological systems will respond. Most predictions suggest that the impacts of climate change on California water resources are likely to include a decrease in the percentage of precipitation that falls as snow, earlier onset of snow-pack melting, and an increase in the number of rain on snow events. These processes will require changes in infrastructure for water storage and flood control, since much of our current water supply system is built around the storage of winter precipitation as mountain snow pack. Alpine aquifers play a critical role by storing and releasing snowmelt as baseflow to streams long after seasonal precipitation and the disappearance of the snow pack, and in this manner significantly impact the stream flow that drives our water distribution systems. Mountain groundwater recharge and, in particular, the contribution of snowmelt to recharge and baseflow, has been identified as a potentially significant effect missing from current climate change impact studies. The goal of this work is to understand the behavior of critical hydrologic systems, with an emphasis on providing ground truth for next generation models of climate-water system interactions by implementing LLNL capabilities in environmental tracer and isotopic science. We are using noble gas concentrations and multiple isotopic tracers ({sup 3}H/{sup 3}He, {sup 35}S, {sup 222}Rn, {sup 2}H/{sup 1}H, {sup 18}O/{sup 16}O, and {sup 13}C/{sup 12}C) in groundwater and stream water in a small alpine catchment to (1) provide a snapshot of temperature, altitude, and physical processes at the time of recharge, (2) determine subsurface residence times (over time scales ranging from months to decades) of different groundwater age components, and (3) deconvolve the contribution of these different groundwater components to alpine stream baseflow. This research is showing that groundwater in alpine areas spends between a few years to several decades in the saturated zone below the surface, before feeding into streams or being pumped for use. This lag time may act to reduce the impact on water resources from extreme wet or dry years. Furthermore, our measurements show that the temperature of water when it reaches the water table during recharge is 4 to 9 degrees higher than would be expected for direct influx of snowmelt, and that recharge likely occurs over diffuse vegetated areas, rather than along exposed rock faces and fractures. These discoveries have implications for how alpine basins will respond to climate effects that lead to more rain than snow and earlier snow pack melting.

Singleton, M

2009-07-08

490

Water You Engineering? An Activity to Develop Water-Quality Awareness  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Water is one of our most precious resources. However, for many in the United States, having fresh, safe drinking water is taken for granted, and due to this perceived lack of relevance, students may not fully appreciate the luxury of having safe running water—in the home. One approach to resolving water-quality issues in the United States may reside in providing education that presents accurate information in a meaningful way. Accordingly, this article describes a unit designed to emphasize the importance of water-quality testing and purification and to introduce students to local water-quality issues. The engineering-based module of this eighth-grade science activity is particularly important due to the design-build-test component.

Jodi Riskowski

2009-04-01

491

Scientific Basis of Water Resource Management  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The least that one can say about the report is that it is very enjoyable reading. Every chapter has been carefully written, and the literary merit of some chapters is outstanding (particularly those by Klemes, ‘Empirical and Causal Models in Hydrology,’ and by Baker, ‘Geology, Determinism, and Risk Assessment’). The best that one can say about the report is that it does meet its stated objectives of (1) evaluation of the adequacy of present hydrologic knowledge and of the appropriateness of present research programs to provide information for decision making and (2) description of the impact of hydrologic knowledge on the planning and management of water resources. The worst that one can say about the report is that it is not particularly original and that there are few really fresh new arguments developed in it. One notable exception is provided in Chapter 11, by Matalas, Landwehr, and Wolman, which challenges the traditional (implicit) assumption that ‘human activity is an external perturbation of the hydrologic cycle.’ Though not the explicit intent of chapter 4, by Bredehoeft, Papadopulos, and Cooper, with the explosion of the water-budget myth in groundwater, this chapter illustrates clearly the profound interaction of man (through wells) in the hydrologic cycle, a situation that cannot be comprehended from a study of the system free from human influence.

Morel-Seytoux, H. J.

492

A systems engineering management approach to resource management applications  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The author presents a program management response to the following question: How can the traditional practice of systems engineering management, including requirements specification, be adapted, enhanced, or modified to build future planning and scheduling systems for effective operations? The systems engineering management process, as traditionally practiced, is examined. Extensible resource management systems are discussed. It is concluded that extensible systems are a partial solution to problems presented by requirements that are incomplete, partially immeasurable, and often dynamic. There are positive indications that resource management systems have been characterized and modeled sufficiently to allow their implementation as extensible systems.

Hornstein, Rhoda Shaller

1989-01-01

493

Multi-agent Water Resources Management  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Increasing environmental awareness and emerging trends such as water trading, energy market, deregulation and democratization of water-related services are challenging integrated water resources planning and management worldwide. The traditional approach to water management design based on sector-by-sector optimization has to be reshaped to account for multiple interrelated decision-makers and many stakeholders with increasing decision power. Centralized management, though interesting from a conceptual point of view, is unfeasible in most of the modern social and institutional contexts, and often economically inefficient. Coordinated management, where different actors interact within a full open trust exchange paradigm under some institutional supervision is a promising alternative to the ideal centralized solution and the actual uncoordinated practices. This is a significant issue in most of the Southern Alps regulated lakes, where upstream hydropower reservoirs maximize their benefit independently form downstream users; it becomes even more relevant in the case of transboundary systems, where water management upstream affects water availability downstream (e.g. the River Zambesi flowing through Zambia, Zimbabwe and Mozambique or the Red River flowing from South-Western China through Northern Vietnam. In this study we apply Multi-Agent Systems (MAS) theory to design an optimal management in a decentralized way, considering a set of multiple autonomous agents acting in the same environment and taking into account the pay-off of individual water users, which are inherently distributed along the river and need to coordinate to jointly reach their objectives. In this way each real-world actor, representing the decision-making entity (e.g. the operator of a reservoir or a diversion dam) can be represented one-to-one by a computer agent, defined as a computer system that is situated in some environment and that is capable of autonomous action in this environment in order to meet its design objectives. The proposed approach is numerically tested on a synthetic case study, characterized by two multi-purpose reservoirs in cascade, two diversion dams and four different conflicting water uses: hydropower energy production, drinking supply, flooding prevention along the reservoir shores and irrigation supply. The system is therefore composed by four agents: the two operators of the diversion dams, which are purely reactive agents since they simply respond directly to the environment, and the operators of the two reservoirs, which are more complex agents because they have an internal state and their decisions are taken according to a closed-loop control scheme. In particular, the set of agents can act considering only their own objectives or they can coordinate to jointly reach better compromise solutions. Different interaction scenarios between the two extreme behaviours of centralized management and completely non-cooperation are simulated and analysed.

Castelletti, A.; Giuliani, M.

2011-12-01

494

Water resources data, Maryland and Delaware, water year 1997, volume 2. ground-water data  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Water Resources Division of the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with State agencies, obtains a large amount of data pertaining to the water resources of Maryland and Delaware each water year. These data, accumulated during many water years, constitute a valuable data base for developing an improved understanding of the water resources of the State. To make these data readily available to interested parties outside the U.S. Geological Survey, the data are published annually in this report series entitled 'Water Resources Data - Maryland and Delaware.' This series of annual reports for Maryland and Delaware began with the 1961 water year with a report that contained only data relating to the quantities of surface water. For the 1964 water year, a similar report was introduced that contained only data relating to water quality. Beginning with the l975 water year, the report format was changed to present, in one volume, data on quantities of surface water, quality of surface and ground water, and ground-water levels. In the 1989 water year, the report format was changed to two volumes. Both volumes contained data on quantities of surface water, quality of surface and ground water, and ground-water levels. Volume 1 contained data on the Atlantic Slope Basins (Delaware River thru Patuxent River) and Volume 2 contained data on the Monongahela and Potomac River basins. Beginning with the 1991 water year, Volume 1 contains all information on quantities of surface water and surface- water-quality data and Volume 2 contains ground-water levels and ground-water-quality data. This report is Volume 2 in our 1998 series and includes records of water levels and water quality of ground-water wells and springs. It contains records for water levels at 397 observation wells, discharge data for 6 springs, and water quality at 107 wells. Location of ground-water level wells are shown on figures 3 and 4. The location for the ground-water-quality sites are shown on figures 5. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System collected by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating State and Federal agencies in Maryland and Delaware. Prior to introduction of this series and for several water years concurrent with it, water resources data for Maryland and Delaware were published in U.S. Geological Survey Water-Supply Papers. Data on water levels for the 1935 through 1974 water years were published under the title 'Ground-Water Levels in the United States.' The above mentioned Water-Supply Papers may be consulted in the libraries of the principal cities of the United States and may be purchased from the Branch of Information Services, Federal Center, Bldg. 41, Box 25286, Denver, CO 80225-0286. Publications similar to this report are published annually by the Geological Survey for all States. These official Survey reports have an identification number consisting of the two-letter State abbreviation, the last two digits of the water year, and the volume number. For example, this volume is identified as 'U.S. Geological Survey Water-Data Report MD-DE-98-2.' For archiving and general distribution, the reports for l971- 74 water years also are identified as water data reports. These water-data reports are for sale in paper copy or in microfiche by the National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, Springfield, VA 22161. Additional information, including current prices, for ordering specific reports may be obtained from the District Chief at the address given on the back of the title page or by telephone (410)238-4200.

Smigaj, Michael J.; Saffer, Richard W.; Starsoneck, Roger J.; Tegeler, Judith L.

1998-01-01

495

Mississippi Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

users in a form that encourages quick comprehension and direct application to water related problems water agencies' missions with research on problems encountered and expected, · Provides water planningMississippi Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2012 Mississippi Water

496

Mississippi Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

users in a form that encourages quick comprehension and direct application to water related problems water agencies' missions with research on problems encountered and expected, * Provides water planningMississippi Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2011 Mississippi Water

497

Puerto Rico Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

of pollution that make waters fail to meet state water quality standards, and to develop Water Cleanup Plans to address those pollutants. The Water Cleanup Plan (TMDL) establishes limits on pollutants that canPuerto Rico Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2004 Introduction

498

Puerto Rico Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

of pollution that make waters fail to meet state water quality standards, and to develop Water Cleanup Plans to address those pollutants. The Water Cleanup Plan (TMDL) establishes limits on pollutants that canPuerto Rico Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2005 Introduction

499

Mississippi Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

include: water quality, surface and groundwater management, water quality management and water resources, Water Quality, Management and Planning Descriptors: Principal Investigators: Todd Tietjen, Gary N. Ervin; to assist state agencies in the development and maintenance of a state water management plan

500

Management Strategy to Reduce Tastes and Odors In Phoenix's Water Supply Lawrence A. Baker (Water Resources Center, U. of Minnesota), Paul Westerhoff (Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering, ASU),  

E-print Network

, and occasionally using Colorado River water directly (bypassing L. Pleasant), MIB levels in the CAP Canal were), and Milton Sommerfeld (Dept.of Plant Biology, ASU) BACKGROUND Phoenix had a severe problem with "tastes, ASU and the City of Phoenix started a three-year project (1999-2002) to reduce the T&O problem Key

Hall, Sharon J.