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1

TEKNISK VATTENRESURSLRA VVR 015 Water Resources Engineering  

E-print Network

. and Hammer, J R.: "Water and Wastewater Technology", (Third Edition) Prentice Hall, International EditionsTEKNISK VATTENRESURSL�RA VVR 015 Water Resources Engineering Antal poäng: 10.0. Kursansvarig: Rolf) Shaw, E.: "Hydrology in Practice", Chapman & Hall, 1994 (eller motsvrande). 3) Hammer Mark J

2

Water Works! Water Resources Engineering and Turbine Energy  

E-print Network

Water Works! Water Resources Engineering and Turbine Energy Facilitators: Dr. Jairo Hernandez for society. Water can be a tremendous resource when it comes to generating energy and work. The reason for this, is because when water is moving it is a force. This force carries momentum. Momentum

Barrash, Warren

3

Master of Science in Civil Engineering Environmental Engineering/Water Resources Engineering  

E-print Network

Master of Science in Civil Engineering Environmental Engineering/Water Resources Engineering of Physics I COMPUTER SCIENCE CE 1305 - Engineering Analysis Ic CIVIL ENGINEERING CE 2301 - Statics CE 3303

Gelfond, Michael

4

Economic Representation of Agricultural Activities in Water Resources Systems Engineering  

E-print Network

. Despite the variety of solutions proposed in the fields of water resources engineering and resource decisions faced by water users and the uncertainty in water supplies. This dissertation presents modeling water availability, and results demonstrate users' willingness to pay for increased water supply

Lund, Jay R.

5

Environmental and Water Resources Engineering Seminar Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering  

E-print Network

-fiber ultrafiltration for microbial water quality testing #12;Environmental and Water Resources Engineering Seminar Department of Civil and Environmental. Microbial methods for water sampling are often designed to recover specific types of microbes from specific

Kamat, Vineet R.

6

WATER RESOURCES NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE  

E-print Network

WATER RESOURCES NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE 212 AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING BUILDING Committee on Natioha1 Water Resources report in 1961 and the formation of the Committee on Water Resources in emphasis"and values regarding water resources' research. Interest has shifted from}J4ter supply

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

7

Water World and Environmental Resources Conference 2004, Environmental and Water Resources Institute of the American Society of Civil Engineers, Salt Lake City, Utah. May 27 June 1, 2004.  

E-print Network

1 Water World and Environmental Resources Conference 2004, Environmental and Water Resources Institute of the American Society of Civil Engineers, Salt Lake City, Utah. May 27 � June 1, 2004. The Role of Natural Resources, Madison, WI 3 Pacific Water Resources, Lake Oswego, OR Abstract The authors have been

Pitt, Robert E.

8

WATER RESOURCES NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE  

E-print Network

WATER RESOURCES NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE 212 AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING BUILDING.ROGRAM FOR THE 1972, I~TERDISCIPL1NARY SEMINAR ON WATER RESOURCES1 The Interdisciplinary Water Resources Seminar upper classmen,graduate stUdents, ~rofessiona1 persons, faculty, nd others interested 1n water topics

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

9

NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE 212 AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING BUILDING  

E-print Network

Planning and r~anagement 6. Evaluation of Economic Jmoortance of Various Uses of Water, Cost Allocation, Cost Sharing, Pricing and Repayment 7. Analysis and Evaluation of Water Resources Projects with Special, contract negotiation, and transmittal to the Congress for a 60-day period as required by Title II

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

10

Water Use in Agricultural Watersheds Derrel Martin, Professor, Irrigation and Water Resources Engineer, Dept. of Biological Systems  

E-print Network

Water Use in Agricultural Watersheds Derrel Martin, Professor, Irrigation and Water Resources Engineer, Dept. of Biological Systems Engineering, UNL Background Concerns about water use have intensified and Republican River Basins, and the implementation of LB 962. To understand water use it is helpful to consider

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

11

WATER RESOURCES NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE  

E-print Network

WATER RESOURCES NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE 212 AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING BUILDING Research application is an educational activity. Its aim is to pro- duce a change in the water resource environment by producing a change in people who manage water resources. #12;-2- 6. Provide Readable Reports

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

12

WATER RESOURCES NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE  

E-print Network

WATER RESOURCES NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE 212 AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING BUILDING LABLE FRm1 ~.~, VI I RI RI I · The Nebraska Water Resources Research Institute has recently issued a new. This publi- cation may be obtained by writing: Dr. Warren Viessman, Jr., Director, Nebraska Water Resources

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

13

WATER RESOURCES NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE  

E-print Network

WATER RESOURCES NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE 212 AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING BUILDING OF THE DIRECTOR . . · Once again during the spring 1973 semester the Nebraska Water Resources Research Institute will sponsor an Interdisciplinary Water Resources Seminar. These seminars have been held for the past five

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

14

WATER RESOURCES NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE  

E-print Network

WATER RESOURCES NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE 212 AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING BUILDING,000,000 for the Sec. 101 matching grant program, and $2,000,000 for the Title II program. INTERDISCIPLINARY WATER RESOURCE SEMINAR An Interdisciplinary Water Resource Seminar will be offered during the 1970 Semeste

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

15

NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE 212 AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING BUILDING  

E-print Network

REDUCTION Hollow plastic balls assembled into floating mats are being tested by English engineers on freezing according to A.W.W.A. li THERMOL POLLUTION RESEARCH PROGRAM Research and demonstration grants and contracts are being awarded by the Federal Water Pollution Control Administration for projects relating

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

16

Engineering Resources  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The American Society for Mechanical Engineers (ASME) was founded in 1880 by a small group of leading industrialists, and has grown since that time to include over 120,000 members in over 150 countries. This section of their website brings together a clutch of resources for those seeking to learn about career paths in the field. There are several items here: "Mechanical Engineering A to Z," "ME and MET: Which Path Will You Take?," "What is a Mechanical Engineer?," and "Why Knot? A Little Fun With Mechanical Engineering." The first resource allows users to learn about the "A to Z" of this field via fun games, quizzes, and interactives having to do with mechanical engineering. The "What is a Mechanical Engineer?" pamphlet provides answers to this question by looking at how these professionals work on power stations, mobile phones, and complex movie cameras. Visitors won't want to miss the other two resources here, which round out a great way to get young people thinking about joining this noble profession.

2013-01-11

17

WATER RESOURCES NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE  

E-print Network

of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969, water resources professionals squarely faced the fact that water current pricing policies and legal structures. In analyzing energy-water relationships, wastefulWATER RESOURCES NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE 212 AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING BUILDING

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

18

Institute for Water Resources, US Army Corps of Engineers Australian National Committee on Large Dams  

E-print Network

Report to Institute for Water Resources, US Army Corps of Engineers and Australian National of the US Army Corps of Engineers, the Australian National Committee on Large Dams and many of its organizational members, the US Bureau of Reclamation (USBR), and the Utah Water Research Laboratory at Utah State

Bowles, David S.

19

WATER RESOURCES ,'JEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE  

E-print Network

WATER RESOURCES ,'JEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE 212 AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING BUILDING, 1973 Research in support of the state water resources planni n q proces s c a n 01" a highly productive actually be understood. It must also be understood that planning for the use and development of water

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

20

WATER RESOURCES NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE  

E-print Network

WATER RESOURCES NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE 212 AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING BUILDING ALLOTMENT PROJECT DEADLINE The Nebraska Water Resources Research Institute is now prepared to receive basicIe. LB-334, enacted by the 1969 Legislature, authorized the Nebraska Soil a~d Water Conservation

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

21

WATER RESOURCES NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE  

E-print Network

WATER RESOURCES NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE 212 AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING BUILDING~ November 1973 Opportunities for cost effective research related to energy-water issues are abundant. Many. It would be impossible to list all fruitful avenues for energy-water research, but some important issues

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

22

CEE 692 ENVIRONMENTAL AND WATER RESOURCES ENGINEERING SEMINAR SPRING 2011  

E-print Network

Application of an Electrochemically-Active Carbon Nanotube Filter for Water Purification Dr. Chad Vecitis Asst and Wastewater Management Dr. Caitlyn Butler Assistant Professor, Arizona State University, Mesa March 11 Utility April 1 Removal and recovery of phosphorus from wastewater by selective adsorbents Dr. Ki Young

Mountziaris, T. J.

23

Environmental and Water Resources Engineering Seminar Wednesday, March 13, 2013, 4:00 5:00 PM  

E-print Network

exposure conditions typical of drinking water treatment practice. In contrast, neither extracellular norCEE 880 Environmental and Water Resources Engineering Seminar Wednesday, March 13, 2013, 4:00 ­ 5 Engineering University of Washington Disinfection Processes as Barriers to the Dissemination of Bacterial

Kamat, Vineet R.

24

Water Resources  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Uses of ERTS-1 imagery and data for water resources surveys and management are summarized. Areas discussed are: (1) land use and geology; (2) flood plain and flood inundation mapping; (3) snow cover mapping; (4) glacier observations; (5) data collection systems; (6) surface waters; (7) wetlands mapping; (8) water quality; (9) soil mapping; (10) phreatophyte and riparian vegetation mapping; and (11) evapotranspiration.

Salomonson, V. V.

1973-01-01

25

A social-economic-engineering combined framework for decision making in water resources planning  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This study develops a social-economic-engineering combined framework for decision making in water resources planning. This framework consists of four parts which are to spatially identify the grades on hydrological vulnerability (potential streamflow depletion and potential water quality deterioration), to evaluate the monetary values of improvements on hydrological vulnerability grades using the choice experiment method, to derive an alternative evaluation index (AEI) to quantify the effectiveness of all alternatives, and to combine the derived willingness-to-pays (WTPs) with the AEI and do the cost-benefit analysis of feasible alternatives. This framework includes the stakeholder participation in order to quantify the preferences with regard to management objectives (water quantity and quality) and WTPs of alternatives. Finally, the economic values of each alternative can be estimated by this study which combines the WTPs for improvements on hydrologic vulnerability grades with the AEI. The proposed procedure is applied in the Anyangcheon watershed which has been highly urbanized for past thirty years. As a result, WTPs are 0.24~10.08/month-household for water quantity and 0.80~8.60/month-household for water quality and residents of the five regions among six have higher WTPs for water quality improvement. Finally, since three of ten alternatives have BC>0, they can be proposed to the decision makers. This systematic screening procedure will provide decision makers with the flexibility to obtain stakeholders' consensus for water resources planning.

Chung, E. S.; Lee, K. S.

2009-05-01

26

Scientific Allocation of Water Resources.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Oriented for higher education students, researchers, practicing engineers and planners, this book surveys the state of the art of water resources engineering. A broad spectrum of issues is embraced in the treatment of water resources: quantity aspects as well as quality aspects within a systems approach. Using a rational mode for water resources

Buras, Nathan

27

WATER RESOURCES NEWS NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE  

E-print Network

reasoned water resources development within a changing national policy framework. #12;-2- REGIONAL Two oneWATER RESOURCES NEWS NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE 212 AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING OF THE DIRECTOR . . . April 1973 NEBRASKA AND THE NATIONAL WATER COMMISSION REPORT The National Water Commission

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

28

WATER RESOURCES NEWS NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE  

E-print Network

of research that seeks solutions to urgent water problems throughout the Nation. 1:JATER RESOURCES RESEARCH treatment plants, storm sewer Gystems~ water supply and transmission systems, water treatment plantsWATER RESOURCES NEWS NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE 212 AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

29

Environmental, Water Resources, and Geotechnical Engineering Seminar Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering  

E-print Network

sequestration, geothermal energy, and eco-friendly construction materials. The understanding and prediction and Environmental Engineering Friday, February 21, 2014, 12:30 ­ 1:30 PM 2355 GG Brown (North Campus), University

Kamat, Vineet R.

30

Environmental and Water Resources Engineering Seminar Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering  

E-print Network

, and examine cellular response to photostress by measuring changes in mRNA abundance during sunlight exposure of Michigan Alexandria Boehm, Ph.D. Associate Professor, Civil and Environmental Engineering Stanford University Sunlight inactivation of enteric bacteria in seawater: Insights on rates and mechanisms from

Kamat, Vineet R.

31

Environmental and Water Resources Engineering Seminar Wednesday, April 3, 2013, 4:00 5:00 PM  

E-print Network

laboratory results and prototype unit testing, our approach has proven to be viable for the treatment of raw of measurable protein. Results of key laboratory investigations and the complementary field testing of actualCEE 880 Environmental and Water Resources Engineering Seminar Wednesday, April 3, 2013, 4:00 ­ 5

Kamat, Vineet R.

32

Water Resources: Hydraulics and Hydrology  

E-print Network

Water Resources: Hydraulics and Hydrology Interview with Margaret S. Petersen #12;This manuscript RESOURCES: HYDRAULICS AND HYDROLOGY #12;Approved for public release distribution IS unlimited. #12;Preface The United States Army Corps of Engineers significantly contributed to hydraulic and hydrologic engineering

US Army Corps of Engineers

33

System International d'Unites: Metric Measurement in Water Resources Engineering.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This pamphlet gives definitions and symbols for the basic and derived metric units, prefixes, and conversion factors for units frequently used in water resources. Included are conversion factors for units of area, work, heat, power, pressure, viscosity, flow rate, and others. (BB)

Klingeman, Peter C.

34

Arkansas Water Resources Center  

E-print Network

-800 Cooperating Agencies Arkansas Water Resources Center ARKANSAS SOIL & WATER CONSERVATION COMMISSION WASHINGTON COUNTY SOIL AND WATER CONSERVATION DISTRICT UNIVERSITY OF ARKANSAS Federal Assistance Project No. C Cooperating Agencies ARKANSAS WATER RESOURCES CENTER ARKANSAS SOIL & WATER CONSERVATION COMMISSION WASHINGTON

Soerens, Thomas

35

Save Our Water Resources.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this booklet, developed as part of Project SOAR (Save Our American Resources), is to give Scout leaders some facts about the world's resources, the sources of water pollution, and how people can help in obtaining solutions. Among the topics discussed are the world's water resources, the water cycle, water quality, sources of water

Bromley, Albert W.

36

Ground water resource assessment  

SciTech Connect

Table of Contents: Introduction to Ground Water Resource Assessment; Components of a Ground Water Resource Assessment; Approaches to Assessing Aquifer Sensitivity and Ground Water Vulnerability; Comprehensive State Ground Water Protection Program Priority-Setting Characteristics to be Addressed in Ground Water Resource Assessments; Case Studies on the Development and Use of Ground Water Resource Assessments at the State, Local, and Federal Level; Sources of Hydrogeological Information; and Glossary.

Not Available

1993-10-01

37

NATURAL RESOURCES CONSERVATION WATER RESOURCES  

E-print Network

NATURAL RESOURCES CONSERVATION WATER RESOURCES For students entering after 8/2010 Freshman Fall. & Mgt. 3 NRC 261 Wildlife Cons. 3 NRC 297F Fish Sampling & Ident. 1 Plant/Animal I.D. elective 2 1/2 BCT) 2. Plant/Animal I.D. elective ­ NRC 212 Forest Tree & Shrub I.D. (f), 211 Wildlife Sampling & I

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

38

Water Resources Research Catalog, Volume 4.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Described are 4501 projects in progress during 1968 under the general headings: Nature of Water; Water Cycle; Water Supply Augmentation and Conservation; Water Quality Management and Control; Water Quality Management and Protection; Water Resources Planning; Resource Data; Engineering Works; and Manpower, Grants and Facilities. Each description…

Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC. Science Information Exchange.

39

Water Resources of Alaska  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Water Resources of Alaska homepage is provided by the US Geological Survey. The goal of this project is to study and understand Alaska's hydrology (surface water, ground water, and water quality) for use and management of the nation's water resources. The site features a list of published reports and information about current projects as well as a vast amount of hydrologic data such as surface water, ground water, water quality, glaciers, water use, and hydrologic data reports.

Geological Survey (U.S.). Water Resources Division. Alaska District.

1999-01-01

40

Arkansas Water Resources Center  

E-print Network

Specialist G. Keith Trost, Research Associate Jennifer Purtle, Research Assistant Arkansas Water Resource G. Keith Trost, Research Associate Jennifer Purtle, Research Assistant Arkansas Water Resources and analyzed every two weeks. This report details the results f

Soerens, Thomas

41

Water Basins Civil Engineering  

E-print Network

Water Basins Civil Engineering Objective · Connect the study of water, water cycle, and ecosystems with engineering · Discuss how human impacts can effect our water basins, and how engineers lessen these impacts: · The basic concepts of water basins are why they are important · To use a topographic map · To delineate

Provancher, William

42

Water Resource Adaptation Program  

EPA Science Inventory

The Water Resource Adaptation Program (WRAP) contributes to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency?s (U.S. EPA) efforts to provide water resource managers and decision makers with the tools needed to adapt water resources to demographic and economic development, and future clim...

43

Water, Ohio's Remarkable Resource.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Information on water and water resources in Ohio is presented in seven sections. Water from Ohio streams, water storage, lakes in Ohio, and ground water are discussed in the first section ("Water, A Part of the Earth"). A brief discussion on the ecosystem is provided in the second section ("Water and Life"). Topics discussed in the third section…

Groves, Carrie J.

44

Water Resources Water Quality and Water Treatment  

E-print Network

Water Resources TD 603 Lecture 1: Water Quality and Water Treatment CTARA Indian Institute of Technology, Bombay 2nd November, 2011 #12;OVERVIEW Water Quality WATER TREATMENT PLANTS WATER TREATMENT PLANTS WATER TREATMENT PLANTS WATER TRE OVERVIEW OF THE LECTURE 1. Water Distribution Schemes Hand Pump

Sohoni, Milind

45

Water Resources News  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Water Resources division of the US Geological Service provides this water news resource, tracking current water-related events and recent publications from across the US. Recent news items include: flooding in Texas, the impacts of Hurricane Bonnie, the release of a USGS report on water use in the US, and stream-flow data from Puerto Rico, to name a few.

46

Arkansas Water Resources Center  

E-print Network

Arkansas Water Resources Center ATRAZINE DEGRADATION, SORPTION AND BIOCONCENTRATION IN WATER degradation, sorption, and bioconcentration in water- The results indicated that sediments with lower p SYSTEMS PREPARED BY: Duane C. Wolf And Ramon L. Jackson MSC-83B August 1982 ARKANSAS WATER RESOURCES

Soerens, Thomas

47

WATER SUPPLY AND WATER RESOURCES DIVISION - HOME PAGE  

EPA Science Inventory

The Water Supply and Water Resources Division (WSWRD) conducts research to help prepare the primary and secondary regulations for drinking water and to develop technologies and strategies for controlling waterborne contaminants. The program integrates chemistry, engineering, micr...

48

Proceedings ASCE International Water Resources Engineering Conference August 8-12, 1999, Seattle, WA  

E-print Network

and Columbia Rivers. It is a eutrophic water body susceptible to algae blooms and crashes and periods of high p dynamics creating an environment more conducive to eutrophication. A hydrodynamic and water quality model and flood control. Eutrophic conditions are caused by increased water temperatures due to lack of shading

Wells, Scott A.

49

Arkansas Water Resources Center  

E-print Network

cancer, of arsenic (As) in drinking water, the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPAArkansas Water Resources Center Submitted to the U.S. Geological Survey ANNUAL TECHNICAL REPORT FISCAL YEAR 2005 For the Period 03/01/05-02/28/06 Publication No. MSC-102.2005 Arkansas Water Resources

Soerens, Thomas

50

Arkansas Water Resources Center  

E-print Network

as a primary drinking water source and the Alluvial Aquifer is used for irrigation purposes. ChlorideArkansas Water Resources Center Submitted to the U.S. Geologcial Survey ANNUAL TECHNICAL REPORT FISCAL YEAR 2000 For The Period 03/01/00 ­ 02/28/01 Publication No. MSC-280.2000 Arkansas Water Resources

Soerens, Thomas

51

Developing Our Water Resources  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Only very recently developed as a refined scientific discipline, hydrology has to cope with a complexity of problems concerning the present and future management of a vital natural resource, water. This article examines available water supplies and the problems and prospects of water resource development. (Author/MA)

Volker, Adriaan

1977-01-01

52

Arkansas Water Resources Center  

E-print Network

Arkansas Water Resources Center LASER-PHOTOACOUSTIC DETECTION OF WATER POLLUTANTS PHASE I Principal. '. 18 #12;cor~PLETIONREPORT LASER-PHOTOACOUSTICDETECTIONOF WATER POLLUTANTS: PHASEI October ls 1977 their waters. Recognizing that water pollution can pose serious health hazards and unknown long term effects

Soerens, Thomas

53

Water Resources Policy & Economics  

E-print Network

Water Resources Policy & Economics FOR 4984 Selected Course Topics · Appropriative and riparian · Surface water-groundwater management · Water quality regulations · Water markets · Economic and policy policies and laws that govern water use as well as economic and policy analysis tools that can be used

Buehrer, R. Michael

54

Arkansas Water Resources Center  

E-print Network

Arkansas Water Resources Center RECONNAISSANCE SURVEY OF NITRATE CONCENTRATIONS IN GROUND WATER caused concern regarding nitrate contamination of the ground water. In the study area of Pike and Howard water nitrate. In response to these concerns, a study of n1trate concentrations in rural water wells

Soerens, Thomas

55

Water Resources Milind Sohoni  

E-print Network

TD 603 Water Resources Milind Sohoni www.cse.iitb.ac.in/sohoni/ Building Numerical Models () August of surface flow of water and infiltration which may include time to flow, movement of solids etc. () August

Sohoni, Milind

56

ENGINEERING CAREER RESOURCES INFORMATION SESSION  

E-print Network

& SERVICES � General guidance in technical career explora2on and decision- making � Assistance decisions about your career path based on real workplace experience � Gain technicalENGINEERING CAREER RESOURCES INFORMATION SESSION Fall 2010 #12;OUR PROGRAMS

57

Arkansas Water Resources Center  

E-print Network

Arkansas Water Resources Center CLASSIFICATION AND RANKING OF SELECTED ARKANSAS LAKES For State Preparation Field Team September 1981 Publication No. MSC-23 Arkansas Water Resources Center 112 Ozark Hall.owledged. We are deeply grateful to Mr. Mark Schram for the genesis of the zooplankton species inventory which

Soerens, Thomas

58

Splash! Water Resource Education.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This set of activities is designed to bring water resource education into the middle school classroom using an interdisciplinary approach. The packet contains timely, localized information about the water resources of west central Florida. Each activity is aligned to middle-school Sunshine State Standards. These hands-on, minds-on activities can…

Southwest Florida Water Management District, Brooksville.

59

Water Resources Milind Sohoni  

E-print Network

soil conditions and on all crops. () January 13, 2010 8 / 14 #12;FIM vs. DIM source: A. NarayanamoorthyTD 603 Water Resources Milind Sohoni www.cse.iitb.ac.in/sohoni/ Lecture 9: Water in Agriculture () January 13, 2010 1 / 14 #12;Water in Agriculture Historically: Biggest consumer of water, in developed

Sohoni, Milind

60

Water Resources Milind Sohoni  

E-print Network

TD 603 Water Resources Milind Sohoni www.cse.iitb.ac.in/sohoni/ Lecture 5: Aquifer () August 16 above and below the ground, which affect the water balance. surface features affect infiltration parameters related to water: Porosity, specific yield n, Sy : the maximum volume fraction of water

Sohoni, Milind

61

Water Resources Milind Sohoni  

E-print Network

TD 603 Water Resources Milind Sohoni www.cse.iitb.ac.in/sohoni/ Lecture 2: Water cycle, stocks and flows () July 28, 2013 1 / 30 #12;The basic movement of water source: USGS. () July 28, 2013 2 / 30 #12, humidity and air flow. Formation of liquid-water in the Atmosphere-Cloud-Formation Coming Down Rain

Sohoni, Milind

62

Water Resources Milind Sohoni  

E-print Network

TD 603 Water Resources Milind Sohoni www.cse.iitb.ac.in/sohoni/ Lecture 8: Wells () August 28, 2012 project, utilizing enhanced ground-water. Water lifted from storage, to accumulate overnight from aquifer. Water from shallow aquifer, of about 7-8m thickness. accounts for about 30% of irrigation Unique

Sohoni, Milind

63

Water Resources Milind Sohoni  

E-print Network

TD 603 Water Resources Milind Sohoni www.cse.iitb.ac.in/sohoni/ Lecture 7: Regional Groundwater than the unit situations that we saw. Surface water/Groundwater interactions. lakes and streams springs (seepage) Ambient water-table movements Seasonal changes Inteference with other water end-users. Inherent

Sohoni, Milind

64

Arkansas Water Resources Center  

E-print Network

Arkansas Water Resources Center NITRATE CONCENTRATIONS OF GROUND WATER BENTON COUNTY, ARKANSAS potential sources of contaminants, especially nitrate. A suJrvey of ground water nitrate conc4entrations of Arkansas Fayetteville, Arkansas 72701 And Kenneth F. Steele, Principal Investigator Arkansas Water

Soerens, Thomas

65

Water Resources Research Center  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Visitors can access information on a variety of water issues in Arizona, including the Colorado River, riparian areas, water conservation, water rights, and recreation. The Arizona Water Resources Research Center (WRRC) provides FAQâs, a stream gauge map and a directory of water-related agencies and organizations. Real-time temperature, precipitation, wind speed and direction, and humidity readouts are available via the new WRRC weather station. Other materials include news articles, research reports, presentations, and links to other water-related sites.

66

Water Resources of Tennessee  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This site, from the U.S. Geological Survey, provides real-time, surface-water, ground-water and water-quality data; maps and graphs of current water resource conditions in the U.S. such as a daily streamflow conditions map; publications and product information; information on National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) programs of the Tennessee River Basin and Mobile River Basin; and information on water use in Tennessee.

67

Water Resources Penn.  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Water Resources Penn.: The Office of Water Management plans, directs and coordinates departmental programs associated with the management and protection of the CommonwealthÃÂs water resources; administers and oversees departmental programs involving surface and groundwater quantity and quality planning, and soil and water conservation; coordinates policies, procedures and regulations which influence public water supply withdrawals and quality, sewage facilities planning, point source municipal and industrial discharges, encroachments upon waterways and wetlands, dam safety, earth disturbance activities and control of storm water and nonpoint source pollution; and coordinates the planning, design and construction of flood protection and stream improvement projects.

2008-09-22

68

Water Resources of Wyoming  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This U.S Geological Survey (USGS) website contains water data including water quality samples and water use data, information on USGS projects, links to USGS educational sites, and a bibliography of USGS water resource publications. Projects and studies covered include: the Wyoming Drought Watch, which contains maps of daily streamflow conditions and historical streamflow data; algal-nutrient relations in the Yellowstone River; county water resource studies; estimating peak-streamflow characteristics at ungaged sites; the Integrating Aquatic Ecosystem Data project of the Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Program (EMAP); an aquifer; water-quality issues associated with irrigation drainage; watershed delineation; urban hydrology; and a pathogen indicator synoptic study.

69

Water Resources of Indiana  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This United States Geological Survey (USGS) page contains information about the water resources in the state of Indiana. The district staff measure streamflow and ground-water levels as well as collect water-quality data (pH and mercury levels) throughout the state. Information on this site includes daily streamflow conditions, Biological Resources Division research in the state, drought information, and studies of the Upper Illinois River basin and White River basin. There are links to other sites for additional information.

70

Water Resource Management  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This portal, published by the University of Florida/Institute of Food and Agricultural Science (IFAS) Extension, offers a selection of links to information about water management issues. There is a 'Beginner's Guide to Water Management', which provides a basic introduction to the terminology and concepts used in water management. Other links access information on management in coastal waters, the impact of climate change on water resources, the use of stormwater as an alternative supply, wastewater management, and many others.

71

Water Resources Milind Sohoni  

E-print Network

TD 603 Water Resources Milind Sohoni www.cse.iitb.ac.in/sohoni/ Lecture 10: Minor Structures for Ground and Surface Water () March 23, 2010 1 / 31 #12;Classification by Purpose We may classify the velocity of water-flow (ii) increasing the infiltration coefficient (iii) explicit groundwater recharge

Sohoni, Milind

72

Water Resources Milind Sohoni  

E-print Network

TD 603 Water Resources Milind Sohoni www.cse.iitb.ac.in/sohoni/ Lecture 6: Mathematics, z). velocity vx (x, y, z, t) : in the x-direction. vx = Kx h/x saturated/water- table. Continuity Equation What is vx x + vy y + vz z ? It is the rate of accumulation of water at the point (x, y

Sohoni, Milind

73

WATER SAFETY RESOURCE GUIDE  

E-print Network

never consume alcoholic beverages or do drugs when partaking in water-based recreational activitiesii WATER SAFETY RESOURCE GUIDE #12;1 "Captain Alcohol" TOPIC/SUBJECT: Alcohol and water safety simulated effects of drinking too much alcohol. You could also select a second volunteer who will remain

US Army Corps of Engineers

74

Arkansas Water Resources Center  

E-print Network

, Research Specialist Keith Trost, Research Associate And Jennifer Purtle, Research Assistant Arkansas Water, Research Associate and Jennifer Purtle, Research Assistant Arkansas Water Resources Center Water Quality the trigger level. Grab samples were taken every two weeks. The data collected at this site was used

Soerens, Thomas

75

Arkansas Water Resources Center  

E-print Network

, Research Specialist G. Keith Trost, Research Associate Jennifer Purtle, Research Assistant Arkansas Water Nelson, Wade Cash, Keith Trost and Jennifer Purtle Arkansas Water Resources Center Water Quality Lab. There will be grab samples collected every two weeks at the Portland as well as one per storm event, which

Soerens, Thomas

76

Arkansas Water Resources Center  

E-print Network

, SOYBEANS,AND COTTON FOR ARKANSAS BY AWRPA 20 IV-B. IRRIGATED CROPWATERREQUIREMENTSFOR ARKANSAS BY AWRPA 22Arkansas Water Resources Center PROJECTED WATER REQUIREMENTS AND SURFACE WATER AVAILABILITY FOR ARKANSAS Robert N. Shulstad, Assistant Agricultural Economist, Arkansas Agricultural Experiment Station

Soerens, Thomas

77

Resource Engineering MSc Programme  

E-print Network

, a kilogram of discarded mobile telephones contains more gold than does a kilogram of gold ore. Accordingly. The programme offers the following three specialisations: Mining Engineering: Within this specialisation, you as the newest mining methods for underground, surface and deep-sea mining. Special attention is paid

Langendoen, Koen

78

Engineering and Mineral Resources  

E-print Network

this message, the construction noise just outside my 6th floor office window reminds me that new East Addition of the Engineering Sciences Building will soon be completed. The new addition will provide modern teaching and research space including an atrium for receptions, an auditorium style classroom, new high tech teaching

Mohaghegh, Shahab

79

Water resources in Nigeria  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

With the limited data available, the components of the hydrologic cycle of which Nigeria's water resources form a part cannot be adequately quantified. However, some assessment of the water “reserves” of the surface and underground water sources indicate that there are large supplies that can be developed in Nigeria. The exploitation of Nigeria's water resources is in an early stage. Despite the progress that has been made in water supply development since the first waterworks in Nigeria was commissioned in Lagos in 1915, many Nigerians still have no access to a modern water supply. Water shortages exist periodically in almost every major town and are present in many rural areas of the country much of each year. New water laws are needed, as is the definition of the powers of the different water authorities, viz., the Federal Ministry of Water Resources, the River Basin Authorities, and the States' Water Boards. The goals of the water policy must be to make available enough good quality water for domestic uses and to exploit enough water for the use of rapidly growing industries and the year-round needs of agriculture, thereby lessening the adverse effect of the dry season.

Oteze, G. E.

1981-07-01

80

Arkansas Water Resources Center  

E-print Network

Arkansas Water Resources Center ALGAL GROWTH POTENTIALS AND HEAVY METAL CONCENTRATIONS Assay Bottle Test (AABT) and heavy metal analysis. In general, AABTresults indicated) demonstrated the probable inhibition of algal growth potential by heavy metals in upper Beaver Lake. Upper

Soerens, Thomas

81

Arkansas Water Resources Center  

E-print Network

the splendid cooperation provided by Richard Sniegocki and Matt Broom of the Water Resources Division, USGS collection. #12;ABSTRACT Intelligent development of groundwater resources is a process that requires a thorough understanding of the avail- ability and movement of groundwater. In northern Arkansas knowledge

Soerens, Thomas

82

Reformulated Neural Network (ReNN): a New Alternative for Data-driven Modelling in Hydrology and Water Resources Engineering  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Reformulated Neural Network (ReNN) has been recently developed as an efficient and more effective alternative to feedforward multi-layer perceptron (MLP) neural networks [Razavi, S., and Tolson, B. A. (2011). "A new formulation for feedforward neural networks." IEEE Transactions on Neural Networks, 22(10), 1588-1598, DOI: 1510.1109/TNN.2011.2163169]. This presentation initially aims to introduce the ReNN to the water resources community and then demonstrates ReNN applications to water resources related problems. ReNN is essentially equivalent to a single-hidden-layer MLP neural network but defined on a new set of network variables which is more effective than the traditional set of network weights and biases. The main features of the new network variables are that they are geometrically interpretable and each variable has a distinct role in forming the network response. ReNN is more efficiently trained as it has a less complex error response surface. In addition to the ReNN training efficiency, the interpretability of the ReNN variables enables the users to monitor and understand the internal behaviour of the network while training. Regularization in the ReNN response can be also directly measured and controlled. This feature improves the generalization ability of the network. The appeal of the ReNN is demonstrated with two ReNN applications to water resources engineering problems. In the first application, the ReNN is used to model the rainfall-runoff relationships in multiple watersheds in the Great Lakes basin located in northeastern North America. Modelling inflows to the Great Lakes are of great importance to the management of the Great Lakes system. Due to the lack of some detailed physical data about existing control structures in many subwatersheds of this huge basin, the data-driven approach to modelling such as the ReNN are required to replace predictions from a physically-based rainfall runoff model. Unlike traditional MLPs, the ReNN does not necessarily require an independent set of data for validation as the ReNN has the capability to control and verify the network degree of regularization. As such, the ReNN can be very beneficial in this case study as the data available in this case study is limited. In the second application, ReNN is fitted on the response function of the SWAT hydrologic model to act as a fast-to-run response surface surrogate (i.e., metamodel) of the original computationally intensive SWAT model. Besides the training efficiency gains, the ReNN applications demonstrate how the ReNN interpretability could help users develop more reliable networks which perform predictably better in terms of generalization.

Razavi, S.; Tolson, B.; Burn, D.; Seglenieks, F.

2012-04-01

83

Water - an inexhaustible resource?  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We have chosen to present the topic "Water", by illustrating problems that will give better opportunities for interdisciplinary work between Natural Science (Physics, Chemistry, Biology and Geology) teachers at first, but also English teachers and maybe others. Water is considered in general, in all its shapes and states. The question is not only about drinking water, but we would like to demonstrate that water can both be a fragile and short-lived resource in some ways, and an unlimited energy resource in others. Water exists on Earth in three states. It participates in a large number of chemical and physical processes (dissolution, dilution, biogeochemical cycles, repartition of heat in the oceans and the atmosphere, etc.), helping to maintain the homeostasis of the entire planet. It is linked to living beings, for which water is the major compound. The living beings essentially organized themselves into or around water, and this fact is also valid for human kind (energy, drinking, trade…). Water can also be a destroying agent for living beings (tsunamis, mud flows, collapse of electrical dams, pollution...) and for the solid earth (erosion, dissolution, fusion). I) Water, an essential resource for the human kind After having highlighted the disparities and geopolitical problems, the pupils will study the chemistry of water with its components and their origins (isotopes, water trip). Then the ways to make it drinkable will be presented (filtration, decantation, iceberg carrying…) II) From the origin of water... We could manage an activity where different groups put several hypotheses to the test, with the goal to understand the origin(s?) of water on Earth. Example: Isotopic signature of water showing its extraterrestrial origin.. Once done, we'll try to determine the origin of drinking water, as a fossil resource. Another use of isotopes will allow them to evaluate the drinking water age, to realize how precious it can be. III) Water as a sustainable energy resource Water is used to produce energy under different processes like ancient tamed energy such as water mills, locks or more recently tidal energy, marine current power, generators based on swell or osmotic gradients. The pupils will work in groups to present different techniques to the class. We could try to determine if all these energy resources could replace the actual major energy source in France: nuclear. Conclusion: Liquid water is probably the cradle of life. Since the birth of human kind, its history is closely linked to the presence of water: drinking, fishing, hygiene, and also transport or business is strictly depending on this resource. Described as a fragile and limited resource when it is used for human consumption, we realize that water is also an uneven resource of energy for the next generations. The challenge will then be to reconcile these different aspects: respecting this nourishing resource and preserving it from pollution, overexploitation or wasting, and at the same time, using water as energy for a world that has a growing population.

Le Divenah, C.; Esperou, E.

2012-04-01

84

Graphic engine resource management  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Modern consumer-grade 3D graphic cards boast a computation/memory resource that can easily rival or even exceed that of standard desktop PCs. Although these cards are mainly designed for 3D gaming applications, their enormous computational power has attracted developers to port an increasing number of scientific computation programs to these cards, including matrix computation, collision detection, cryptography, database sorting, etc. As more and more applications run on 3D graphic cards, there is a need to allocate the computation/memory resource on these cards among the sharing applications more fairly and efficiently. In this paper, we describe the design, implementation and evaluation of a Graphic Processing Unit (GPU) scheduler based on Deficit Round Robin scheduling that successfully allocates to every process an equal share of the GPU time regardless of their demand. This scheduler, called GERM, estimates the execution time of each GPU command group based on dynamically collected statistics, and controls each process's GPU command production rate through its CPU scheduling priority. Measurements on the first GERM prototype show that this approach can keep the maximal GPU time consumption difference among concurrent GPU processes consistently below 5% for a variety of application mixes.

Bautin, Mikhail; Dwarakinath, Ashok; Chiueh, Tzi-cker

2008-01-01

85

Water Resources of Illinois  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This United States Geological Survey (USGS) website is dedicated to water resources and studies in the state of Illinois. It contains real-time and daily streamflow data for the state, historical data, precipitation data, flooding information, groundwater quality, radium and arsenic water pollution, and studies on the Illinois River basin and Illinois lakes. Links are provided for additional information.

86

Water resources, summary  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The application of remote sensing products to the development and understanding of water resources problems is considered. Geology and hydrogeology, analysis of watersheds, snow and ice, prediction of runoff from snowmelt, hydrologic land use classifications, soil moisture, evapotranspiration, flood hazards, and water quality surveys are among the topics discussed. Suggestions for further use of remotely sensed data are given along with increased user requirements.

Simons, D. B.

1975-01-01

87

Arkansas Water Resources Center  

E-print Network

. The parameters measured in-situ were: air temperature, water temperature, pH and TDS. The parameters measured after sample collection using Hach test kits were dissolved oxygen, turbidity, nitrate-N, phosphateArkansas Water Resources Center Kings River Quality Assurance Project Final Report Marc Nelson, Ph

Soerens, Thomas

88

GROW: A National Civil Engineering Education Resource Library  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Geotechnical, Rock & Water (GROW) Digital Library consists of geotechnical, rock & water engineering resources harvested from the web and elsewhere, and resources developed by the GROW team. The items developed by the GROW team focus on interactive educational resources for active learning that are "story-booked" to emphasize active learning and provide a learning experience.

Budhu, Muniram

2001-12-01

89

Water Resources Milind Sohoni  

E-print Network

TD 603 Water Resources Milind Sohoni www.cse.iitb.ac.in/sohoni/ Lecture 3: Watershed and Maps () July 23, 2013 1 / 18 #12;Domain Decomposition p1 p2 p3 p5 p4 surface water A1 A2 A3 A4 A5 salinity ingress water table q W(q) W(p2) The watershed W (x) of a point x is W (x) = {all points y from where

Sohoni, Milind

90

Urban Water Resources Management  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Urban Water Resources Management Web site is maintained by the Global Development Research Center. The center "carries out initiatives in education, research and practice, in the spheres of environment, urban, community, economy and information, and at scales that are effective." The site contains information and links to topics such as understanding the importance of water; organizations and institutions; documents and information repositories; initiatives, programs, and projects; and more.

91

Arkansas Water Resources Center  

E-print Network

to the Arkansas Natural Resources Commission Prepared by: Marc Nelson Wade Cash Keith Trost and Jennifer Purtle Keith Trost And Jennifer Purtle University of Arkansas AWRC- Water Quality Lab And J. V. Brahana every two weeks. Concentrations and loads were calculated by applying the measured sample concentration

Soerens, Thomas

92

Managing our water resources  

SciTech Connect

Water is a plentiful, renewable resource if it is properly managed. The US allocates 82% of its water to agriculture, 10% to industries and utilities. American farmers are beginning to adopt water-conserving techniques long used in the world's arid regions because past profligate use and recent droughts lowered both water tables and farm productivity. Runoff and pollution are responsible for much of the waste of usable water. Because of local water shortages, there is interest in drip irrigation, setting aside more land for reservoirs, and other conservation techniques to ensure adequate supplies for industrial development and economic growth. American faith in technology has led to schemes for desalination, cloud seeding, iceberg towing, and aquifer recharging, as well as the existing system of dams. Proper management of river basins is an important step in the process. 1 figure. (DCK)

Not Available

1982-05-01

93

What can I do with a degree in Natural Resources Engineering?  

E-print Network

resources. These resources include land, soils, water, the atmosphere, renewable energy and biologicalWhat can I do with a degree in Natural Resources Engineering? ENGINEERING Planning your career to www.canterbury.ac.nz/liaison/best_prep.shtml What is Natural Resources Engineering? Natural resources

Hickman, Mark

94

Water Resources People cand Issues  

E-print Network

Maass. (Water resources people and issues) 1. Water resources development--United States-- Planning--History. 2. Water resources development-- United States--Planning--History--Sources. I. Maass, Arthur. II with his Harvard colleagues, he has substantially influenced the development of water policy in the post

US Army Corps of Engineers

95

The role of the United States Water Resources Engineering Community in responding to the water related needs of the developing world  

E-print Network

of the water resources situation and examines how the provision of water supply and sanitadon has changed historically. The perspective from the United States higldights tbe activities of the USWREC and demonsn ates how the U. S. can have a vital role... listings of U. S. organizations and firms involved in the water supply and sanitation sector in developing countries arc provided for further contacts. Mutual cooperation between developing countries and tbe USWREC will ulthnately benefit the U. S...

Ormond, Timothy Paul

2012-06-07

96

Color photographs for water resources studies  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Air-photo interpretation is very well suited to water resources studies where limited observations of hydrologic data must be extended to regional characteristics for large areas. It is also useful in monitoring the hydrologic regimen of an area to detect possible changes. Color aerial photography is generally superior to black-and-white photography for these water resources investigations. Depth penetration through water, and excellent discrimination of water indicators, such as vegetation, are its -main assets. Meaningful interpretation of the photography depends on adequate ground control data. Experiences of the Water Resources Division, U. S. Geological Survey, indicate that the best interpretation is done by professional personnel-engineers, geologists, and water chemists intimately associated with a particular water resources project for which the photography has been obtained.

Schneider, William J.

1968-01-01

97

USGS Water Resources of Oregon  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Water Resources of Oregon contains water data and maps of hydrologic conditions and current streamflow conditions; publications about water resources of Oregon; historical water data about surface-water, ground-water and water quality; geographic data; and forecasts and flood potential outlooks. There is information on a surface-water data collection program, hydrologic studies, and USGS programs and activities in Oregon.

98

Water Resources Working Group Report  

E-print Network

Water Resources Working Group Report This report provided content for the Wisconsin Initiative in February 2011. #12;Water Resources Working Group Wisconsin Initiative on Climate Change Impacts October 2010 #12;Water Resources Working Group Members ­ WICCI Tim Asplund (Co-Chair) - Wisconsin Department

Sheridan, Jennifer

99

Water Resources Competitive Grants Program  

E-print Network

Water Resources Competitive Grants Program Fiscal Year 2012 Request for Proposals Pursuant to Section 104 of the Water Resources Research Act of 1984, as Amended Closing Date 4:00 PM, Eastern Time, August 15, 2012 (Institutes) Institute for Water Resources National Institutes for U.S. Army Corps

Virginia Tech

100

Mathematical simulation of temperatures in deep impoundments: verification tests of the Water Resources Engineers, Inc. model - Horsetooth and Flaming Gorge Reservoirs  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Successful use of predictive mathematical models requires verification of the accuracy of the models by applying them to existing situations where the prediction can be compared with reality. A Corps of Engineers' modification of a deep reservoir thermal stratification model developed by Water Resources Engineers, Inc., was applied to two existing Bureau of Reclamation reservoirs for verification. Diffusion coefficients used for the Corps' Detroit Reservoir were found to apply to Horsetooth Reservoir in Colorado, for which very food computer input data were available. The Detroit diffusion coefficients gave a reasonable simulation of Flaming Gorge Reservoir in Wyoming and Utah, which has very complex and variable physical characteristics and for which only average-quality computer input data were available.

King, D. L.; Sartoris, Jim J.

1973-01-01

101

WATER RESOURCES NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE  

E-print Network

from precipitation and surface sources, but artificial recharge can also supplement underground is "Regional Planning for Natural Resources with Special Emphasis on the Missouri River Basin." The seminar in Planning Special Problems of Nebraska - An Overview REGIONAL NEl'JS Speaker Jo~n E. Lagerstrom, Chairman

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

102

OFFICE OF WATER RESOURCE CENTER  

EPA Science Inventory

Resource Purpose: The Resource Center provides support to the management of the Immediate Office, Office of Groundwater and Drinking Water, Office of Science and Technology, Office of Wastewater Management, and Office of Wetlands, Oceans, and Watersheds. Support includes: ...

103

Unique Approaches to Water Resources  

E-print Network

with a fresh perspective on our next generation of leaders and renewed hope for the future of Florida's water of and access to global environmental resources are reaching a crisis point. Historical threats such as waterUnique Approaches to Water Resources Education in Florida Watershed Journal Executive Committee

Central Florida, University of

104

WATER RESOURCES NEWS NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE  

E-print Network

on the basis of their own funding. In Nebraska th2re is intensive interest in the extension of the agricultural designs. Opportunities for intensive water resources rlevelopment will be few unless the states accept to properly develop the water and related land resources of the state and that it is in the public interest

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

105

Computing Resources at Chemical and Biochemical Engineering  

E-print Network

Computing Resources at Chemical and Biochemical Engineering Note that use of all Rutgers University at Chemical and Biochemical Engineering. DSV Lab. The DSV lab consists of 60 Sun UltraSparc 10 computers. Each at the School of Engineering. The cluster consists of dual Pentium II/III Xeon computers with the Linux

106

Human Resources Engineering: A New Challenge1  

Microsoft Academic Search

The concept of human resources engineering is introduced, which is the process of using human skill resources as factors in design trade-off studies. The development of the military's response to human resources needs in systems is traced from the reacting phase, through the current predicting phase, to a possible future phase involving some degree of control. The implementation of the

Gordon A. Eckstrand; William B. Askren; Melvin T. Snyder

1967-01-01

107

MEMORANDUM OF UNDERSTANDING THE INSTITUTE FOR WATER RESOURCES (IWR)  

E-print Network

quality 6. Consensus building and conflict resolution 7. Water policy, governance and institutionalMEMORANDUM OF UNDERSTANDING BETWEEN THE INSTITUTE FOR WATER RESOURCES (IWR) AND SANDIA NATIONAL LABORATORIES (SANDIA) The Institute for Water Resources (IWR), United States Army Corps ofEngineers (USACE

US Army Corps of Engineers

108

WATER FROM (WASTE)WATER -- THE DEPENDABLE WATER RESOURCE  

Microsoft Academic Search

Water reclamation and reuse provides a unique and viable opportunity to augment traditional water supplies. As a multi-disciplined and important element of water resources development and management, water reuse can help to close the loop between water supply and wastewater disposal. Effective water reuse requires integration of water and reclaimed water supply functions. The successful development of this dependable water

Takashi Asano

109

Water Resources of Washington State  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This site contains information and water resource data on rivers and streams, ground water, and water quality. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) operates a satellite network of stream-gaging stations in the state, many of which form the backbone of flood-warning systems, and conducts studies of water resources, such as watersheds and aquifers. These studies help define the quantity and quality of the water, conditions of ecological habitat, and relations to land use and natural features. The site features publications and reports about the data and information from these studies. There is information on USGS projects related to regional water issues such as salmon recovery and the Endangered Species Act; floods, droughts and other natural hazards; and water availability. The site also provides water resource news such as a drought watch section and earthquake news for Washington State.

110

Arkansas Water Resources Center  

E-print Network

Submitted to the Arkansas Soil and Water Conservation Commission By M.A. Nelson L.W. Cash G.K. Trost to the Arkansas Soil and Water Conservation Commission M. A. Nelson, L. W. Cash, and G. K. Trost Arkansas Water Soil and Water Conservation Commission (ASWCC) and the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA

Soerens, Thomas

111

Water resources of Manatee County, Florida. Water-resources investigations  

SciTech Connect

Rapid development of Manatee County in southwest Florida is creating water-resource problems. The report presents an evaluation of the water resources and potential effects of water-resource developments. Most streams in the county have small drainage basins and low yields. The principal aquifers are the surficial, minor artesian, and the Floridan. The Floridan aquifer is the major source of irrigation water in the county. The minor artesian aquifer is a highly developed source of water for small rural supplies. Withdrawals of 20 to 50 million gallons per day from the Floridan aquifer since the 1950's have caused declines in the potentiometric surface of about 20 to 50 feet. The quality of ground water is good except in the coastal and southern parts of the county.

Brown, D.P.

1983-03-01

112

Water resources data, Louisiana, water year 2003  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Water resources data for the 2003 water year for Louisiana consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage, contents, and water quality of lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality of ground water. This report contains records for water discharge at 76 gaging stations; stage only for 86 gaging stations and 7 lakes; water quality for 56 surface-water stations (including 44 gaging stations) and 142 wells; and water levels for 313 observation wells. Also included are data for 158 crest-stage and flood-profile partial-record stations. Additional water data were collected at various sites not included in the systematic data-collection program, and are published as miscellaneous measurements. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating Federal and State agencies in Louisiana.

Baumann, Todd; Goree, B. B.; Lovelace, W. M.; Montgomery, P. A.; Resweber, J. C.; Ross, Garron B.; Sasser, D. C., Jr.; Walters, D. J.

2004-01-01

113

Water resources data, Louisiana, water year 2004  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Water resources data for the 2004 water year for Louisiana consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage, contents, and water quality of lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality of ground water. This report contains records for water discharge at 77 gaging stations; stage only for 86 gaging stations and 7 lakes; water quality for 60 surface-water stations (including 42 gaging stations) and 112 wells; and water levels for 304 observation wells. Also included are data for 158 crest-stage and flood-profile partial-record stations. Additional water data were collected at various sites not included in the systematic data-collection program, and are published as miscellaneous measurements. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating State and Federal agencies in Louisiana.

Baumann, Todd; Goree, B. B.; Lovelace, W. M.; Montogmery, P. A.; Resweber, J. C.; Ross, Garron B.; Ward, Aub N.; Walters, David J.

2005-01-01

114

Water Resources Data, Louisiana, Water Year 2001  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Water resources data for the 2001 water year for Louisiana consists of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage, contents, and water quality of lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality of ground water. This report contains records for water discharge at 71 gaging stations; stage only for 73 gaging stations and 7 lakes; water quality for 66 surface-water stations (including 39 gaging stations) and 92 wells; and water levels for 205 observation wells. Also included are data for 166 crest-stage and flood-profile partial-record stations. Additional water data were collected at various sites not included in the systematic data-collection program, and are published as miscellaneous measurements. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating State and Federal agencies in Louisiana.

Goree, B. B.; Lovelace, W. M.; Montgomery, P. A.; Resweber, J. C.; Sasser, D. C., Jr.; Walters, David J.

2002-01-01

115

Water Resources Data, Louisiana, Water Year 2002  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Water resources data for the 2002 water year for Louisiana consists of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage, contents, and water quality of lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality of ground water. This report contains records for water discharge at 85 gaging stations; stage only for 79 gaging stations and 7 lakes; water quality for 52 surface-water stations (including 40 gaging stations) and 104 wells; and water levels for 300 observation wells. Also included are data for 143 crest-stage and flood-profile partial-record stations. Additional water data were collected at various sites not included in the systematic data-collection program, and are published as miscellaneous measurements. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating State and Federal agencies in Louisiana.

Goree, B. B.; Lovelace, W. M.; Montgomery, P. A.; Resweber, J. C.; Labbe, Charles K.; Walters, David J.

2003-01-01

116

Water Resources Data, Louisiana, Water Year 2000  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Water resources data for the 2000 water year for Louisiana consists of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage, contents, and water quality of lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality of ground water. This report contains records for water discharge at 66 gaging stations; stage only for 70 gaging stations and 7 lakes; water quality for 45 surface-water stations (including 25 gaging stations) and 108 wells; and water levels for 221 observation wells. Also included are data for 204 crest-stage and flood-profile partial-record stations. Additional water data were collected at various sites not included in the systematic data-collection program, and are published as miscellaneous measurements. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating State and Federal agencies in Louisiana.

Goree, B. B.; Lovelace, W. M.; Montgomery, P. A.; Resweber, J. C.; Sasser, D. C., Jr.; Walters, David J.

2001-01-01

117

Water Resources of West Virginia  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) website provides water data, reports on water use, and information on water resource programs and activities in West Virginia. The water data consists of real-time, old and historical data; National Weather Service stage data; and river basin real-time streamflow data. National Water Information System Website (NWISWeb) data includes surface-water, ground-water, water-quality and real-time data. There is also a drought watch section with more streamflow conditions and a link to acid rain information for West Virginia.

118

Water Resources Management Legal Perspectives  

E-print Network

Water Resources Management Legal Perspectives Eyal Benvenisti Kaplan Workshop, Ma'agan 13 April of transboundary freshwater 1997 UN Convention, Article 2: (a) "Watercourse:" a system of surface waters which is required by international law." Invokes "the concept of common utilization of shared water

Einat, Aharonov

119

Water resources data, Tennessee, water year 2004  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Water resources data for the 2004 water year for Tennessee consists of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage, contents, and water quality of lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality of ground water. This report contains records for water discharge at 107 gaging stations; stage only for 1 gaging station, elevation and contents for 32 lakes reservoirs; water quality at 18 gaging stations and 17 wells; and water levels for 8 observation wells; and 1 precipitation station. Also included are data for 84 crest stage partial-record stations. Additional water data were collected at various stream sites not involved in the systematic data-collection program, and are published as miscellaneous measurements and analyses. These data represent the part of the National Water Data System operated by the US Geological Survey and cooperating State and Federal agencies in Tennessee.

Flohr, D. F.; Garrett, J. W.; Hamilton, J. T.; Phillips, T. D.

2005-01-01

120

Arkansas Water Resources Center  

E-print Network

, knowledge, attitudes, and opinions about water quality. A water quality survey was developed and conducted treatment management staff as well as a State Representative and the County Judge, and interested local

Soerens, Thomas

121

Center for Academic Resource in Engineering  

E-print Network

the learning experience for all undergraduate engineering students through academic support, enhancing students who have the same drive and motivation to achieve the impossible. Jenn Lee Junior, BioengineeringCARE Center for Academic Resource in Engineering Program Coordinator Dana Tempel #12;CARE enhances

Ha, Taekjip

122

EAWAG: An Environmental Science and Engineering Resource.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Interviewed is the director of a Swiss research and teaching institute in the field of water resources, water pollution control, and waste management. Topics include lake studies, research programs and priorities, advisory services, and the organizational structure of EAWAG. (BT)

Miller, Stanton

1980-01-01

123

Water resources data, Nebraska, water year 2004  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Nebraska water resources data report for water year 2004 includes records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; water elevation and/or contents of lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and quality of ground water in wells. This report contains records of stream stage for 3 stations; stream discharge for 101 continuous and 5 crest-stage gaging stations, and 6 miscellaneous sites; stream water quality for 7 gaging stations and 40 miscellaneous sites; water elevation and/or contents for 2 lakes and 1 reservoir; ground-water levels for 74 observation wells; and ground-water quality for 200 wells. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System collected in and near Nebraska by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating Federal, State, and local agencies.

compiled by Hitch, D. E.; Soensken, P. J.; Sebree, S. K.; Wilson, K. E.; Walczyk, V. C.; Drudik, R. A.; Miller, J. D.; Hull, S. H.

2005-01-01

124

Water Resources Data  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This portal provides access to a large selection of real-time and archived data on stream flow and water quality for surface and groundwater. Links are provided to the National Water Information System Web Interface (NWISWeb), which accesses data collected at approximately 1.5 million sites in all 50 states, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico. Data categories include current conditions information transmitted from selected surface and groundwater sites; descriptive site information; water flow and levels in streams, lakes, and springs; groundwater levels in wells; and chemical and physical data for all water sources. There is also a link to the 'Waterwatch' site, an interactive map that displays real-time stream-flow compared to historical conditions for the day of the year, as well as a link to the National Water Quality Assessment (NAWQA) data warehouse. Other links access materials on water use, acid rain, suspended sediment, and the Hydro-Climatic Data Network (HCDN).

125

WATER RESOURCES NEWS NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE  

E-print Network

of the' program is to provide training in the application of simulation and optimization techniques. The companion tools for this are simulation and mathematical programming. Used together they can be powerful: Introduction to Water Resources Systems Simulation Model Structuring - Surface Water Components Simulation

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

126

Water Resources Milind Sohoni  

E-print Network

of the colume of water that drains from a rock owing to gravity, to the total rock volumne. 00000000 T and at height h(T). Let cross-section of both tubes be A. Let Q be the total water discharged. We have Q = KA

Sohoni, Milind

127

Water Resources Milind Sohoni  

E-print Network

of Reference, brief history and brief outline. 2 Chap. 1 and 2: Introduction and Sector outline for Maharashtra. Agricultural, Industrial and Domestic 4 Annexure III: Water recycling technologies Wastewater and Industrial water re-treatment Tariff mechanism. 5 Annexure IV and V: Non-agricultural and agricultural tariffs. 6

Sohoni, Milind

128

Arkansas Water Resources Center  

E-print Network

Submitted to the Washington County Conservation District and Arkansas Soil and Water Conservation Commission storage structures. In 1991, the Arkansas Soil and Water Conservation Commission (ASWCC) and the U. S University of Arkansas Fayetteville, Arkansas 72701 #12;WASHINGTON COUNTY CONSERVATION DISTRICT ARKANSAS SOIL

Soerens, Thomas

129

Water Resources Milind Sohoni  

E-print Network

% Industrial 8 % 60 % Domestic 7 % 15 % Indian Hall-marks: Very low charges for agricultural water (Rs. 0 of sea-level rise due to thermal expansion alone. Can we explain this? () July 20, 2012 4 / 17 #12;Life-photosynthesis, energy transfer in animals, and so on. Life as we know it is water-centric (and organic carbon

Sohoni, Milind

130

502013-14 Suggested Course Plan CIVILTRACK: WATER RESOURCES  

E-print Network

408: Risk Analysis in Civil Engr. CE 451: Water Resources Engineering CE 453: Water Quality Control CE. and Engr. PhysICs (8 unIts) PHYS 151L: Mechanics and Thermodynamics PHYS 152L: Electricity and Magnetism other sCIenCe (8 unIts) CHEM 105AL: General Chemistry GEOL 305L: Intro. to Engineering Geology or BISC

Zhou, Chongwu

131

GIS IN WATER RESOURCES CE 413/513, 3 credits  

E-print Network

GIS IN WATER RESOURCES CE 413/513, 3 credits Prerequisites: Senior or graduate in Engineering or one previous GIS course CE 413 Instructor: Tracy Arras CE 513 Instructor: Wayne Huber Office: Owen 238 Learning Objectives · Demonstrate the basic concepts and operation of GIS for water resources Data models

Wright, Dawn Jeannine

132

Glaciers: A water resource  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Most Americans have never seen a glacier, and most would say that glaciers are rare features found only in inaccessible, isolated wilderness mountains. Are they really so rare? Or are they really potentially important sources of water supply?

Meier, Mark; Post, Austin

1995-01-01

133

Resource Development for Engineering Education.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presented is an outline of how to write a proposal for funding for engineering education research. Describes the five basic components of the prospective problem statement, objectives, procedures, evaluation, and budget. Information on public and private funding agencies and the three types of grants available, and projects, research, and…

Stefurak, A. L.; Brillhart, Lia V.

1980-01-01

134

Virtual water trade and world water resources.  

PubMed

Global virtual water trade was quantitatively estimated and evaluated. The basic idea of how to estimate unit requirement of water resources to produce each commodity is introduced and values for major agricultural and stock products are presented. The concept of virtual water and the quantitative estimates can help in assessing a more realistic water scarcity index in each country, projecting future water demand for food supply, increasing public awareness on water, and identifying the processes wasting water in the production. Really required water in exporting countries is generally smaller than virtually required water in importing countries, reflecting the comparative advantage of water use efficiency, and it is estimated to be 680 km3/y for 2000. On the contrary the virtually required water for the same year is estimated to be 1,130 km3/y, and the difference of 450 km3/y is virtually saved by global trade. However, solely virtual water should not be used for any decision making since the idea of virtual water implies only the usage and influence of water and no concerns on social, cultural, and environmental implications. Virtual water trade also does not consider other limiting factors than water. PMID:15195440

Oki, T; Kanae, S

2004-01-01

135

Arkansas Water Resources Center  

E-print Network

affecting water quality in Northwest Arkansas. Poultry litter containsapproximately 20 g P kg-I, of which sulfate, and incubated in the dark at 25°C for one week. Three soils which had been excessively fertilized sulfate under favorable pH conditions. SRP levels in the soils were reduced from approximately 5 mg P Kg

Soerens, Thomas

136

Arkansas Water Resources Center  

E-print Network

included several pesticide contamination studies on ground water, impact of silviculture practices riparian zone projects inventoried and characterized riparian zone vegetation along streams and springs in the Ozark region, surveyed birds in this habitant, and surveyed threatened species. A project on climate

Soerens, Thomas

137

1 UCOWRWATER RESOURCES UPDATE UNIVERSITIES COUNCIL ON WATER RESOURCES  

E-print Network

126, PAGES 1-10, NOVEMBER 2003 Non-Point Source Pollution and the Clean Water Act: Policy Problem policy. This dual requirement calls for interactions between water scientists, managers, and policy1 UCOWRWATER RESOURCES UPDATE UNIVERSITIES COUNCIL ON WATER RESOURCES WATER RESOURCES UPDATE, ISSUE

James, L. Allan

138

Sustainable water services and interaction with water resources in Europe and in Brazil  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The increasing interaction between large cities and nature makes "urban water" an issue: water resources and water services - including public water supply, sewage collection and treatment, and in large cities, storm water control -, which had become separate issues thanks to the process of water transport and treatment technologies, are now increasingly interfering with each other. We cannot take nature for granted anymore, and we need to protect water resources, if only to reduce the long term cost of transporting and treating water. In this paper, we compare the historical development of water industry technologies in European and Brazilian metropolitan areas, in their socio-economic and political context, tracing it through three "ages" of water technology and services which developed under civil engineering, sanitary engineering, and environmental engineering perspectives: the "quantity of water" and civil engineering paradigm was developed on the assumption that water should be drawn from natural environments far from the cities; in the "water quality" and chemical/sanitation engineering paradigm, water treatment was invented and allowed cities to take water from rivers closer to them and treat it, but also to reduce sewer discharge impacts; finally, the environmental engineering paradigm proposes to overcome the supply side perspective, by introducing demand side management, water conservation, water allocation flexibilisation, and an integrated approach to water services, water resources management, and land use policies.

Barraqué, B.; Formiga Johnsson, R. M.; Britto, A. L.

2007-09-01

139

Water Resources Data, Alabama, Water Year 2005  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Water resources data for the 2005 water year for Alabama consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stages and contents of lakes and reservoirs; and water levels in wells. This report includes records on both surface and ground water in the State. Specifically, it contains: (1) discharge records for 131 streamflow-gaging stations and 23 partial-record or miscellaneous streamflow stations; (2) stage and content records for 14 lakes and reservoirs and stage at 44 stations; (3) water-quality records for 125 streamflow-gaging stations and 67 ungaged streamsites; (4) water temperature at 179 surface-water stations; (5) specific conductance at 180 stations; (6) dissolved oxygen at 17 stations; (7) turbidity at 52 stations; (8) sediment data at 2 stations; (9) water-level records for 2 recording observation wells; and (10) water-quality records for 6 ground-water stations. Also included are lists of active and discontinued continuous-record surface-water-quality stations, and partial-record and miscellaneous surface- water-quality stations. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating Federal, State, and local agencies in Alabama.

Psinakis, W. L.; Lambeth, D. S.; Stricklin, V. E.; Treece, M. W.

2006-01-01

140

Water Resources Data, Alabama, Water Year 2004  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Water resources data for the 2004 water year for Alabama consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stages and contents of lakes and reservoirs; and water levels in wells. This report includes records on both surface and ground water in the State. Specifically, it contains: (1) discharge records for 131 streamflow-gaging stations, for 19 partial-record or miscellaneous streamflow stations; (2) stage and content records for 16 lakes and reservoirs and stage at 44 stations; (3) water-quality records for 21 streamflow-gaging stations, for 11 ungaged streamsites, and for 1 precipitation stations; (4) water temperature at 20 surface-water stations; (5) specific conductance and dissolved oxygen at 20 stations; (6) turbidity at 5 stations; (7) sediment data at 6 stations; (8) water-level records for 2 recording observa-tion wells; and (9) water-quality records for 6 ground-water stations. Also included are lists of active and discontinued continuous-record surface-water-quality stations, and partial-record and miscellaneous sur-face-water-quality stations. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating Federal, State, and local agencies in Alabama.

Psinakis, W. L.; Lambeth, D. S.; Stricklin, V. E.; Treece, M. W.

2005-01-01

141

Water Resources Data, Alabama, Water Year 2002  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Water resources data for the 2002 water year for Alabama consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stages and contents of lakes and reservoirs; and water levels in wells. This report includes records on both surface and ground water in the State. Specifically, it contains: (1) discharge records for 131 streamflow-gaging stations, for 41 partial-record or miscellaneous streamflow stations; (2) stage and content records for 14 lakes and reservoirs and stage at 47 stations; (3) water-quality records for 12 streamflow-gaging stations, for 17 ungaged streamsites, and for 2 precipitation stations; (4) water temperature at 14 surfacewater stations; (5) specific conductance and dissolved oxygen at 12 stations; (6) turbidity at 3 stations; (7) sediment data at 6 stations; (8) water-level records for 2 recording observation wells; and (9) water-quality records for 21 ground-water stations. Also included are lists of active and discontinued continuous-record surface-water-quality stations, and partial-record and miscellaneous surface-water-quality stations. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating Federal, State, and local agencies in Alabama.

Pearman, J. L.; Stricklin, V. E.; Psinakis, W. L.

2003-01-01

142

Water Resources Data, Alabama, Water Year 2003  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Water resources data for the 2003 water year for Alabama consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stages and contents of lakes and reservoirs; and water levels in wells. This report includes records on both surface and ground water in the State. Specifically, it contains: (1) discharge records for 130 streamflow-gaging stations, for 29 partial-record or miscellaneous streamflow stations; (2) stage and content records for 14 lakes and reservoirs and stage at 46 stations; (3) water-quality records for 12 streamflow-gaging stations, for 29 ungaged streamsites, and for 1 precipitation stations; (4) water temperature at 12 surfacewater stations; (5) specific conductance and dissolved oxygen at 12 stations; (6) turbidity at 3 stations; (7) sediment data at 6 stations; (8) water-level records for 2 recording observation wells; and (9) water-quality records for 9 ground-water stations. Also included are lists of active and discontinued continuous-record surface-water-quality stations, and partial-record and miscellaneous surface-water-quality stations. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating Federal, State, and local agencies in Alabama.

Psinakis, W. L.; Lambeth, D. S.; Stricklin, V. E.; Treece, M. W.

2004-01-01

143

The development of water services and their interaction with water resources in European and Brazilian cities  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The extension and complexity of large cities creates "urban water" and a related issue: public water services, including public water supply, sewage collection and treatment, and storm water control, had previously become a policy sector separate from water resource allocation issues thanks to water transport and treatment technologies. Large metropolitan areas today cannot take nature for granted anymore, and they need to protect water resources, if only to reduce the long term cost of transporting and treating water. In this paper, we compare the historical development of water services in European and Brazilian metropolitan areas, placing the technological developments in their geographic, socio-economic and political contexts. Our frame is to follow the successive contributions of civil engineering, sanitary engineering, and environmental engineering: the "quantity of water" and civil engineering paradigm allowed to mobilise water in and out of the city, and up the hills or the floors; in the "water quality" and chemical/sanitary engineering paradigm, water treatment gave more freedom to cities to take water from rivers closer to them, but also to reduce sewer discharge impacts; lastly, the environmental engineering paradigm proposes to overcome the supply side perspective, by introducing demand side management, water conservation, water allocation flexibilisation, and an integrated approach to water services, water resources management, and land use policies.

Barraqué, B.; Formiga Johnsson, R. M.; Nogueira de Paiva Britto, A. L.

2008-08-01

144

Nebraska Water Conference Council's Annual Water and Natural Resources Tour  

E-print Network

Districts Nebraska Water Conference Council Nebraska Public Power District School of Natural Resources Buettner Central Nebraska Public Power & Irrigation District Michael Jess Water Center, UniversityNebraska Water Conference Council's Annual Water and Natural Resources Tour of The Middle Missouri

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

145

Evaluation of a predictive ground-water solute-transport model at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho. US Geological Survey water-resources investigation 82-25  

Microsoft Academic Search

In 1973, a digital chemical solute-transport modeling study at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) had been used to project chloride and tritium waste plumes for 1980. The model indicated that for the conditions assumed, the wastes would be at or near the INEL southern boundary by 1980. Eight wells were drilled during the summer of 1980 near the southern

B. D. Lewis; F. J. Goldstein

1982-01-01

146

Water resource and power generation  

Microsoft Academic Search

We propose a simple model of competition between a thermal station and a hydrostation for the production of energy. We show that, despite the static characteristics of the thermal cost function, the thermal output is determined by intertemporal considerations. This results from the scarcity of the water resource which is storable at zero operating cost. We analyze the combination of

Claude Crampes; Michel Moreaux

2001-01-01

147

Water Resource Uses and Issues in Texas.  

E-print Network

- source issues facing the State. Water resources to meet agricultural, municipal, industrial, and residen- tial demands are taken from ground-water and surface-water sources. Ground Water Ground-water supplies are obtained from both reserves...- source issues facing the State. Water resources to meet agricultural, municipal, industrial, and residen- tial demands are taken from ground-water and surface-water sources. Ground Water Ground-water supplies are obtained from both reserves...

McNeely, John G.; Lacewell, Ronald D.

1978-01-01

148

Water resources data, Kentucky. Water year 1991  

SciTech Connect

Water resources data for the 1991 water year for Kentucky consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams and lakes; and water-levels of wells. This report includes daily discharge records for 115 stream-gaging stations. It also includes water-quality data for 38 stations sampled at regular intervals. Also published are 13 daily temperature and 8 specific conductance records, and 85 miscellaneous temperature and specific conductance determinations for the gaging stations. Suspended-sediment data for 12 stations (of which 5 are daily) are also published. Ground-water levels are published for 23 recording and 117 partial sites. Precipitation data at a regular interval is published for 1 site. Additional water data were collected at various sites not involved in the systematic data-collection program and are published as miscellaneous measurement and analyses. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the US Geological Survey and cooperation State and Federal agencies in Kentucky.

McClain, D.L.; Byrd, F.D.; Brown, A.C.

1991-12-31

149

Nebraska Water Conference Council's Annual Water & Natural Resources Tour  

E-print Network

Association of Resources Districts Nebraska Water Conference Council Nebraska Public Power District SchoolNebraska Water Conference Council's Annual Water & Natural Resources Tour Focusing upon Wildlife Nebraska Public Power & Irrigation District Gateway Farm Expo Kearney Area Chamber of Commerce Nebraska

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

150

Water Resources Division training catalog  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The National Training Center provides technical and management sessions nesessary for the conductance of the U.S. Geological Survey 's training programs. This catalog describes the facilities and staff at the Lakewood Training Center and describes Water Resources Division training courses available through the center. In addition, the catalog describes the procedures for gaining admission, formulas for calculating fees, and discussion of course evaluations. (USGS)

Hotchkiss, W. R.; Foxhoven, L. A.

1984-01-01

151

Uncertainty Management in Urban Water Engineering Adaptation to Climate Change  

EPA Science Inventory

Current water resource planning and engineering assume a stationary climate, in which the observed historical water flow rate and water quality variations are often used to define the technical basis. When the non-stationarity is considered, however, climate change projection co...

152

Environmental Evaluation of Water Resources Development  

E-print Network

Methodology for the utilization of LANDSAT-1 imagery and aerial photography on the environmental evaluation of water resources development is presented. Environmental impact statements for water resource projects were collected and reviewed...

James, W. P.; Woods, C. E.; Blanz, R. E.

153

Water Resource System Optimization by Geometric Programming  

E-print Network

Water resources planners and systems analysts are continually confronted with many complex optimization problems. Two major factors contribute to this problem. Firstly, mathematical modeling and system description capabilities in water resources...

Meier, W. L.; Shih, C. S.; Wray, D. J.

154

A DEMONSTRATION OF AREAWIDE WATER RESOURCES PLANNING  

EPA Science Inventory

The Metropolitan Washington Council of Governments Framework Water Resources Planning Model developed and tested under this study is a comprehensive analytical tool for use in areawide water resources management planning. The physical simulation portion was formed by linking comp...

155

"Modeling for effective and sustainable water resources management."  

E-print Network

engineering. Our research focuses on the development and use of computational modeling for effective water these simplifications affect the efficacy of model-derived nutrient management schemes meant to protect coastal systems"Modeling for effective and sustainable water resources management." Teresa Culver Associate

Acton, Scott

156

Graduate School of Creative Science and Engineering Department of Earth Sciences, Resources and Environmental Engineering  

E-print Network

Graduate School of Creative Science and Engineering Department of Earth Sciences, Resources and Engineering Department of Earth Sciences, Resources and Environmental Engineering Research Area Research/092015/04 1 #12; Graduate School of Creative Science and Engineering Department of Earth Sciences, Resources

Kaji, Hajime

157

Water Resources Research National Competitive Grants Program  

E-print Network

Water Resources Research National Competitive Grants Program Fiscal Year 2012 Announcement Announcement No. G12AS20005 under Section 104(g) of the Water Resources Research Act of 1984, as Amended. Geological Survey Water Resources OMB Number:1028-0095 Expiration Date 01/31/2013 PAPERWORK REDUCTION ACT

Hanson, Stephen José

158

Research on Texas Water and Recreation Resources.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The need for research pertaining to the best use of water and recreation resources in Texas is emphasized in these four papers presented at the 1968 Experiment Station Conference, College Station, Texas. "Parameters of Water Resources in Texas" identifies and elaborates upon the important elements presently constituting the water resources

Texas A and M Univ., College Station. Texas Agricultural Experiment Station.

159

Summary Analysis [United States Water Resources Council].  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report contains a summary and analysis of public response to the Water Resources Council proposed principles and standards and its accompanying draft environmental impact statement for planning the use of water and related land resources as well as planning and evaluating water and related land resources programs and projects. Both written…

Roose, John B.; Cobb, Gary D.

160

Water resources. [mapping and management  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Substantial progress has been made in applying ERTS-1 data to water resources problems, nevertheless, more time and effort still appear necessary for further quantification of results, including the specification of thematic measurement accuracies. More modeling can be done very profitably. In particular, more strategy models describing the processes wherein ERTS-1 data would be acquired, analyzed, processed, and utilized in operational situations could be profitably accomplished. It is generally observed that the ERTS-1 data applicability is evident in several areas and that the next most general and substantive steps in the implementation of the data in operational situations would be greatly encouraged by the establishment of an operational earth resources satellite organization and capability. Further encouragement of this operational capability would be facilitated by all investigators striving to document their procedures as fully as possible and by providing time and cost comparisons between ERTS-1 and conventional acquisition approaches.

Salomonson, V. V.

1974-01-01

161

WATER RESOURCES PLANNING ACT Q:\\COMP\\WATER1\\WRPA  

E-print Network

expanding demands for water throughout the Nation, it is hereby declared to be the policy of the Congress103 WATER RESOURCES PLANNING ACT Q:\\COMP\\WATER1\\WRPA December 29, 2000 #12;Q:\\COMP\\WATER1\\WRPA December 29, 2000 #12;105 WATER RESOURCES PLANNING ACT [As Amended Through P.L. 106�580, Dec. 29, 2000

US Army Corps of Engineers

162

Contamination of water resources by pathogenic bacteria  

PubMed Central

Water-borne pathogen contamination in water resources and related diseases are a major water quality concern throughout the world. Increasing interest in controlling water-borne pathogens in water resources evidenced by a large number of recent publications clearly attests to the need for studies that synthesize knowledge from multiple fields covering comparative aspects of pathogen contamination, and unify them in a single place in order to present and address the problem as a whole. Providing a broader perceptive of pathogen contamination in freshwater (rivers, lakes, reservoirs, groundwater) and saline water (estuaries and coastal waters) resources, this review paper attempts to develop the first comprehensive single source of existing information on pathogen contamination in multiple types of water resources. In addition, a comprehensive discussion describes the challenges associated with using indicator organisms. Potential impacts of water resources development on pathogen contamination as well as challenges that lie ahead for addressing pathogen contamination are also discussed. PMID:25006540

2014-01-01

163

PUERTO RICO WATER RESOURCES AND ENVIRONMENTAL  

E-print Network

of water and water-related phenomena in Puerto Rico, and (D) the dissemination of research results to water, and riverine zones among others. 2. Drinking Water Quality Research: Fluoride as a health agent, controlPUERTO RICO WATER RESOURCES AND ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH INSTITUTE REQUEST FOR PROPOSAL FY 2011 WATER

Gilbes, Fernando

164

PUERTO RICO WATER RESOURCES AND ENVIRONMENTAL  

E-print Network

of water and water-related phenomena in Puerto Rico, and (D) the dissemination of research results to water, and riverine zones among others. 2. Drinking Water Quality Research: Fluoride as a health agent, controlPUERTO RICO WATER RESOURCES AND ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH INSTITUTE REQUEST FOR PROPOSAL FY 2012 WATER

Gilbes, Fernando

165

Ocean and Resources Engineering is the application of ocean science and engineering to the challenging conditions  

E-print Network

Ocean and Resources Engineering is the application of ocean science and engineering to the challenging conditions found in the ocean environment. Motions of and forces on floating structures due resources are among some of the consid- erations that set ocean and resources engineering apart from

Frandsen, Jannette B.

166

18 CFR 701.76 - The Water Resources Council Staff.  

18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false The Water Resources Council Staff. 701.76 Section 701.76 Conservation of Power and Water Resources WATER RESOURCES COUNCIL...

2014-04-01

167

WATER RESOURCES NEWS NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE  

E-print Network

of Water Use; (2) Nonpoint Source Pollution; (3) Meeting Water Requirements; (4) Energy-Water Relationships development. (2) Water Pollution and Water Quality Control - Nonpoint Source Pollution Definition: Degradation of water quality from nonpoint source pollution. (3) Water Use Efficiency Definition: Minimize water use

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

168

Multi-National Collaborative Modeling of Water Dependent Resources in the Tigris-Euphrates River Basin  

Microsoft Academic Search

A team of scientists and engineers from the Iraq Ministry of Water Resources, the Iraq Transition Assistance Office of the U.S. Department of State, UNESCO, and Sandia National Laboratories collaborated to build a systems model of Iraqi water resources and related systems, including transboundary water systems, surface water and reservoirs, agriculture, salinity, municipal and industrial uses, and issues related to

H. Passell; J. D. Roach; M. D. Reno; G. T. Klise; V. C. Tidwell

2010-01-01

169

Electric power engineering education resources 1993-94: IEEE Power Engineering Society Committee report  

Microsoft Academic Search

This subcommittee report is based on the thirteenth biennial survey of power engineering education resources in the US and Canada, eleven of which have bees previously published. This survey is conducted to determine the electric power engineering education resources available in ABET (Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology) accredited engineering programs in the US and Canada for the 1993-94 academic

R. L. King; M. E. El-Hawary; M. T. Glinkowski; C. Grigg; C. A. Gross; V. Rajagopalan; T. G. Schmehl; T. S. Sidhu; R. J. Thomas; D. O. Wiitanen; S. M. Yousif

1996-01-01

170

World water dynamics: global modeling of water resources.  

PubMed

The growing scarcity of fresh and clean water is among the most important issues facing civilization in the 21st century. Despite the growing attention to a chronic, pernicious crisis in world's water resources our ability to correctly assess and predict global water availability, use and balance is still quite limited. An attempt is documented here in modeling global world water resources using system dynamics approach. Water resources sector (quantity and quality) is integrated with five sectors that drive industrial growth: population; agriculture; economy; nonrenewable resources; and persistent pollution. WorldWater model is developed on the basis of the last version of World3 model. Simulations of world water dynamics with WorldWater indicate that there is a strong relationship between the world water resources and future industrial growth of the world. It is also shown that the water pollution is the most important future water issue on the global level. PMID:12448404

Simonovic, Slobodan P

2002-11-01

171

Water resources and freshwater ecosystems in Sudan  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sudan is a large country with varying standards of living, culture and climate. When this is superimposed on the multi-sectoral nature of water, coordination of activities in water resources planning, management and development becomes essential. The spirit of cooperation and close cooperation with countries sharing the same water resources should continue, preferably through an institutional cooperative framework for each shared

Abdeen Mustafa Omer

2008-01-01

172

Integrated Water Resources Management in Peru  

Microsoft Academic Search

Peru is a country with a strategic location for water resources, however, like many other countries, it is facing water supply and demand problems due to demographic densification growth, and pollution problems due to agricultural and industrial usage. In order to address these problems, integrated water resource management approach has been introduced. It includes the coordinated development, management and policies

Laura E. Higa Eda; Weiqi Chen

2010-01-01

173

USGS Water Resources of South Dakota  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Water Resources of South Dakota site contains hydrologic data, including realtime streamflow, precipitation, and water use data. There are USGS water resources publications and information on projects such as the Black Hills Hydrology Study; the National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Volatile Organic Chemicals National Synthesis; the Belle Fourche Watershed Assessment Study; and the Sensitivity of Ground Water to Contamination project in Lawrence County, South Dakota.

174

Water Budgets: Foundations for Effective Water-Resources and  

E-print Network

Water Budgets: Foundations for Effective Water-Resources and Environmental Management U Survey3. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service4. U.S. Geological Survey5. #12;Water Budgets: Foundations for Effective Water-Resources and Environmental Management By Richard W. Healy, Thomas C. Winter, James W. La

175

Protecting Water Resources and Managing Stormwater  

E-print Network

Protecting Water Resources and Managing Stormwater A BiRd'S EyE ViEW foR NEW HAMPSHiRE Co, endorsement or recommendation. Protecting Water Resources and Managing Stormwater: A Birds Eye View For New Cover Photos: Photos.com #12;PRotECtiNG WAtER RESouRCES ANd MANAGiNG StoRMWAtER iN NEW HAMPSHiRE 1 TABl

New Hampshire, University of

176

Ch.9 Water Resources ! Hydrologic cycle  

E-print Network

(PET) ! Potential evapotranspiration (PET) is the amount of water that would evaporate and transpire #12;Potential Evapotranspiration (PET) ! Potential evapotranspiration (PET) is the amount of waterCh.9 Water Resources #12;! Hydrologic cycle ! Water-budget concept and water balance equation

Pan, Feifei

177

Water-Resources Manpower: Supply and Demand Patterns to 1980.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Relating the supply of scientific manpower to the educational potential of the general population and the productive capacity of the educational system, this study disaggregates independent projections of scientific manpower supply and demand to yield projections for water resources manpower. This supply of engineers, natural scientists, and…

Lewis, James E.

178

78 FR 10615 - Westfield Water Resources Department; Notice of Application Accepted for Filing and Soliciting...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...by the applicant. g. Filed Pursuant to: Federal Power Act 16 U.S.C. 791a-825r h. Applicant Contact: Mr. Charles Darling, Water Systems Engineer, Westfield Water Resources Department, 28 Sackett Street, Westfield, MA 01085; phone...

2013-02-14

179

Water resource management: an Indian perspective.  

PubMed

Water is precious natural resource for sustaining life and environment. Effective and sustainable management of water resources is vital for ensuring sustainable development. In view of the vital importance of water for human and animal life, for maintaining ecological balance and for economic and developmental activities of all kinds, and considering its increasing scarcity, the planning and management of water resource and its optimal, economical and equitable use has become a matter of the utmost urgency. Management of water resources in India is of paramount importance to sustain one billion plus population. Water management is a composite area with linkage to various sectors of Indian economy including the agricultural, industrial, domestic and household, power, environment, fisheries and transportation sector. The water resources management practices should be based on increasing the water supply and managing the water demand under the stressed water availability conditions. For maintaining the quality of freshwater, water quality management strategies are required to be evolved and implemented. Decision support systems are required to be developed for planning and management of the water resources project. There is interplay of various factors that govern access and utilization of water resources and in light of the increasing demand for water it becomes important to look for holistic and people-centered approaches for water management. Clearly, drinking water is too fundamental and serious an issue to be left to one institution alone. It needs the combined initiative and action of all, if at all we are serious in socioeconomic development. Safe drinking water can be assured, provided we set our mind to address it. The present article deals with the review of various options for sustainable water resource management in India. PMID:25151722

Khadse, G K; Labhasetwar, P K; Wate, S R

2012-10-01

180

Climate Change and Water Resources Management: A Federal Perspective  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Many challenges, including climate change, face the Nation's water managers. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) has provided estimates of how climate may change, but more understanding of the processes driving the changes, the sequences of the changes, and the manifestation of these global changes at different scales could be beneficial. Since the changes will likely affect fundamental drivers of the hydrological cycle, climate change may have a large impact on water resources and water resources managers. The purpose of this interagency report prepared by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation), and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) is to explore strategies to improve water management by tracking, anticipating, and responding to climate change. This report describes the existing and still needed underpinning science crucial to addressing the many impacts of climate change on water resources management.

Brekke, Levi D.; Kiang, Julie E.; Olsen, J. Rolf; Pulwarty, Roger S.; Raff, David A.; Turnipseed, D. Phil; Webb, Robert S.; White, Kathleen D.

2009-01-01

181

Climate Change and Water Resources Management: Adaptations for Flood Control and Water Supply  

E-print Network

the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Sacramento District, for providing the lower American River channel and urbanization can have major combined effects on flood damage and optimal long-term flood management. The caseClimate Change and Water Resources Management: Adaptations for Flood Control and Water Supply

Lund, Jay R.

182

Citizen's guide to coastal water resource management  

SciTech Connect

Contents include: taking the initiative; water-quality standards; Coastal Area Management Act; dredge-and-fill permits under Section 404; sediment and erosion control; other environmental laws; nonregulatory ways to help protect water resources.

Kennedy, J.; Miller, T.

1988-01-01

183

California State Water Resources Control Board  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

From this website one can link to laws and regulations related to water and water issues in California, as well as to the state's nine regional control boards. Topics covered include water education, water quality and water rights, as well as various programs such as blue-green algae, environmental justice, irrigated agriculture, septic, and storm water, among others. This website is a good source of California-based policy on water resource issues.

Board, State W.; California, State O.

184

Integrated water resources management: Concepts and issues  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

After the describing the historical developments that led the development of Integrated Water Resources Management (IWRM), the paper defines this important concept. It subsequently deals with the thorny issue of water security as well as water conflict, after which the major issues over which thus far no consensus has been achieved are briefly reviewed. The paper concludes with an analysis of the role of the IAHS International Commission on Water Resources Systems (ICWRS) in promoting IWRM.

Savenije, H. H. G.; Van der Zaag, P.

185

Water Resources, Development and Management Service  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The world's food production depends on the availability of water, a precious but finite resource. Users can learn about the need for more efficient usage of water for irrigation, and about the activities of the Water Resources Development and Management Service, which is concerned with sustainable use and conservation of water in agriculture. Links to other sites related to irrigation practices and food production are also provided.

2004-05-10

186

Water Resources, Development and Management Service  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The world\\'s food production depends on the availability of water, a precious but finite resource. Users can learn about the need for more efficient usage of water for irrigation, and about the activities of the Water Resources Development and Management Service, which is concerned with sustainable use and conservation of water in agriculture. Links to other sites related to irrigation practices and food production are also provided.

2007-02-10

187

WATER RESOURCES NEWS NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE  

E-print Network

. . . July 1973 The final report of the National Water Commission entitled Water Policies for the Future has will depend on the policies that are adopted." Most estimates of future water demands and water-related ac specific alternative be adopted as a goal for national policy, but to determine the availability of water

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

188

How predictable are water resources?  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Peter Mason, technical director of international dams and hydropower at MWH, explains how some water resources might be more predictable than generally supposed. Some years ago the writer examined the levels of Lake Victoria in east Africa as part of a major refurbishment project. This revealed a clear cyclic behavior in lake level and hence in discharges from the lake down the Nile system and up into Egypt. A recent study by the writer demonstrated that 20-year mean flows in the Kafue River in Zambia corresponded well to reconstructed rainfall records based on regional tree ring records. The Rio Parana has a catchment area of 3,100,000km 2 and a mean stream flow of 21,300m 3/sec. In the wider context an improved understanding of apparent periodicities in the natural record would seem to offer at least one planning scenario to be considered in terms of investment and even for the long term planning of aid and famine relief.

Mason, P.

2010-10-01

189

Climate Change and Water Resources in the  

E-print Network

Climate Change and Water Resources in the Tropical Andes Mathias Vuille Inter-American Development Bank Environmental Safeguards Unit TECHNICAL NOTE No. IDB-TN-515 March 2013 #12;Climate Change-American Development Bank Felipe Herrera Library Vuille, Mathias. Climate change and water resources in the tropical

Vuille, Mathias

190

REMOTE SENSING APPLICATIONS IN WATER RESOURCE PROTECTION  

Microsoft Academic Search

Remote sensing applications in water resource protection at Taipei Water Resource Management Commission (TWMC) has been pursued for more than 12 years. Remote sensing applications were not easy as it should be in the first several years because of satellite image resolution and limitations of computer software and hardware. Above all, remote sensing has to depend on its basic maps

Mu-Lin WU; Chiou-Hsiung CHEN; Specialist Hsiu-Lan HUANG

191

Overview of the Environmental and Water Resources Institute's "Guidelines For Integrated Water Resources Management" Project  

SciTech Connect

Integrated Water Resources Management is a systematic approach to optimizing our understanding, control and management of water resources within a basin to meet multiple objectives. Recognition of the need for integrating water resources within basins is not unique to the Environmental and Water Resources Institute’s Integrated Water Resources Management Task Committee. Many individuals, governments and other organizations have attempted to develop holistic water resources management programs. In some cases, the results have been very effective and in other cases, valiant attempts have fallen far short of their initial goals. The intent of this Task Committee is to provide a set of guidelines that discusses the concepts, methods and tools necessary for integrating and optimizing the management of the physical resources and to optimize and integrate programs, organizations, infrastructure, and socioeconomic institutions into comprehensive water resources management programs.

Gerald Sehlke

2005-03-01

192

542012-13SuggestedCoursePlan CIVIL TRACK: WATER RESOURCES  

E-print Network

408: Risk Analysis in Civil Engr. CE 451: Water Resources Engineering CE 453: Water Quality Control CE542012-13SuggestedCoursePlan CIVIL TRACK: WATER RESOURCES FIRST YEAR FALL: 16-17 units SPRING: 17. and Engr. PHYSICS (8 UNITS) PHYS 151L: Mechanics and Thermodynamics PHYS 152L: Electricity and Magnetism

Zhou, Chongwu

193

WATER RESOURCES NEWS t'~EBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE  

E-print Network

Representatives of the Courcil on Environmental Quality (CEQ) and of the Chief of Army Engineers were in PJorida. The President asked CEQ and the Corps to ,develop "recommendatjons for the future of this area." The l07-mile

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

194

KE Basin water dispositioning engineering study  

SciTech Connect

This engineering study is a feasibility study of KE Basin water treatment to an acceptable level and dispositioning the treated water to Columbia River, ground through ETF or to air through evaporation.

Hunacek, G.S.; Gahir, S.S.

1994-09-23

195

USGS Water Resources of South Carolina  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This site contains drought watch information, publications, and water data. There is information on programs such as bioremediation, the May River Project, and the National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Santee River Basin and Coastal Drainages Study Unit. An education section contains earth science, mapping, and water resources.

196

Water Matters: Water Resources Teacher's Guide, Vol. 2.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This guide is one of three teacher's guides developed for the U.S. Geological Survey's Water Resources Education Initiative. Each guide supplements a set in the accompanying poster series which forms the core of this project. This guide covers navigating the water highways, groundwater, and water quality and helps teachers use the included Water

Crowder, Jane Nelson; Cain, Joe

197

World water dynamics: global modeling of water resources  

Microsoft Academic Search

The growing scarcity of fresh and clean water is among the most important issues facing civilization in the 21st century. Despite the growing attention to a chronic, pernicious crisis in world's water resources our ability to correctly assess and predict global water availability, use and balance is still quite limited. An attempt is documented here in modeling global world water

Slobodan P. Simonovic

2002-01-01

198

WATER RESOURCES NEWS NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE  

E-print Network

plant. The Wall Street Journal reports this: "T'her-rnaI pollution may be bad, but the fish in nearby which would consolidate the Federal government's major air and water pollution control programs. So far, water and air:', the comm.i.ttee said. Changes in the environment can be helpful as well as harm- ful

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

199

Managing water resources for crop production  

PubMed Central

Increasing crop production to meet the food requirements of the world's growing population will put great pressure on global water resources. Given that the vast freshwater resources that are available in the world are far from fully exploited, globally there should be sufficient water for future agricultural requirements. However, there are large areas where low water supply and high human demand may lead to regional shortages of water for future food production. In these arid and semi-arid areas, where water is a major constraint on production, improving water resource management is crucial if Malthusian disasters are to be avoided. There is considerable scope for improvement, since in both dryland and irrigated agriculture only about one-third of the available water (as rainfall, surface, or groundwater) is used to grow useful plants. This paper illustrates a range of techniques that could lead to increased crop production by improving agricultural water use efficiency. This may be achieved by increasing the total amount of water available to plants or by increasing the efficiency with which that water is used to produce biomass. Although the crash from the Malthusian precipice may ultimately be inevitable if population growth is not addressed, the time taken to reach the edge of the precipice could be lengthened by more efficient use of existing water resources.

Wallace, J. S.; Batchelor, C. H.

1997-01-01

200

Water resources data-Maine water year 2004  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Water Resources Dicipline of the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with State, Federal,and other local governmental agencies, obtains a large amount of data pertaining to the water resources of Maine each year. These data, accumulated during the many water years, constitute a valuable data base for developing an improved understanding of the water resources of the State. Water-resources data for the 2004 water year for Maine consists of records of stage, discharge, ground water levels, water quality of streams and ground-water wells, precipitation quantity, and snow quantity. This report contains discharge records for: 6 gage-height stations, 62 discharge gaging stations, stream water-quality data for 6 stations, water level for 23 ground-water wells, water-quality data for 24 ground-water wells, precipitation quantity data for 15 stations, and snow quantity data for 80 stations, Additional water data were collected at other sites, not part of the systematic data-collection program, and are published as special study and miscellaneous record sections.

Stewart, G.J.; Caldwell, J.M.; Cloutier, A.R.; Flight, L.E.

2005-01-01

201

USGS Water Resources of New York  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Water Resources of New York provides drought information for New York State, water reports and past news items, water data including streamflow and ground-water conditions, maps and publications, and an education section with water science links. There is also information on current water studies and research, including the National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) programs for the Hudson River Basin, Delaware River Basin, Lake Erie/Lake St. Clair Basin, and the Long Island-New Jersey coast.

202

The National Park Service: Water Resources Division  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This portal provides access to a variety of materials on water resource programs in the National Park System (NPS). The homepage features links to news releases, announcements, and topics of current interest. Other links access information on various water resource issues, arranged by topic: fisheries, hydrology, laws and regulations, watersheds, wetlands, and many others. The documents pertaining to these topics include technical reports, fact sheets, planning documents, program information, and other webpages. Some of these items are available in downloadable, printable format (PDFs). The Water Quality page features the Environmental Contaminants Encyclopedia, a searchable reference on waterborne contaminants and their impacts on fish, wildlife, invertebrates, and other non-human living resources. There is also a page for students and teachers that provides access to information on volunteer projects and information about interpretative and educational activities involving water resources in the National Park system.

203

Social learning and water resources management  

Microsoft Academic Search

Natural resources management in general, and water resources management in particular, are currently undergoing a major paradigm shift. Management practices have largely been developed and implemented by experts using technical means based on designing systems that can be predicted and controlled. In recent years, stakeholder involvement has gained increasing importance. Collaborative governance is considered to be more appropriate for integrated

C. Pahl-Wostl; M. Craps; A. R. P. J. Dewulf; E. Mostert; D. Tabara; T. Taillieu

2007-01-01

204

Social Learning and Water Resources Management  

Microsoft Academic Search

Natural resources management in general, and water resources management in particular, are currently undergoing a major paradigm shift. Management practices have largely been developed and implemented by experts using technical means based on designing systems that can be predicted and controlled. In recent years, stakeholder involvement has gained increasing importance. Collaborative governance is considered to be more appropriate for integrated

C. Pahl-Wostl; M. Craps; A. Dewulf; E. Mostert; D. Tabara; T. Taillieu

2007-01-01

205

Water Resource System modeling for the US  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We develop a water resource system model of the US (WRS-US) that identifies 99 river basins. The model is built on river basin-specific estimates of water requirements for thermoelectric cooling, irrigation, public supply, self-supply and mining. WRS-US allocates water resources across uses in order to minimize water stress over the year in each river basin. We use the model to predict water stress through to 2050 under two climate policies and two climate models. The largest water stresses are predicted to occur in the South West of the US. Average water stress is not expected to be alleviated by a constrained GHG emission policy by 2050. However, the mitigation policy will reduce inter-annual variability of water stress.

Blanc, E.; Strzepek, K. S.; Schlosser, C. A.; Jacoby, H.; Gueneau, A.; Fant, C.; Rausch, S.; Awadalla, S.

2012-12-01

206

30 CFR 402.6 - Water-Resources Research Program.  

...2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Water-Resources Research Program. 402.6 Section...GEOLOGICAL SURVEY, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR WATER-RESOURCES RESEARCH PROGRAM AND THE WATER-RESOURCES TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM...

2014-07-01

207

A DEMONSTRATION OF AREAWIDE WATER RESOURCES PLANNING. USERS MANUAL  

EPA Science Inventory

This report documents a demonstration of areawide water resources planning by the Metropolitan Washington, DC. Council of Governments (MWCOG). The MWCOG Framework Water Resources Planning Model is a comprehensive analytical tool for use in areawide water resources management plan...

208

33 CFR 209.345 - Water resource policies and authorities.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-07-01 false Water resource policies and authorities...PROCEDURE § 209.345 Water resource policies and authorities...Federal Reimbursement Policy for Work by States...Entities on Authorized Water Resources...

2011-07-01

209

33 CFR 209.345 - Water resource policies and authorities.  

...2014-07-01 false Water resource policies and authorities...PROCEDURE § 209.345 Water resource policies and authorities...Federal Reimbursement Policy for Work by States...Entities on Authorized Water Resources...

2014-07-01

210

33 CFR 209.345 - Water resource policies and authorities.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-07-01 false Water resource policies and authorities...PROCEDURE § 209.345 Water resource policies and authorities...Federal Reimbursement Policy for Work by States...Entities on Authorized Water Resources...

2012-07-01

211

33 CFR 209.345 - Water resource policies and authorities.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-07-01 false Water resource policies and authorities...PROCEDURE § 209.345 Water resource policies and authorities...Federal Reimbursement Policy for Work by States...Entities on Authorized Water Resources...

2010-07-01

212

33 CFR 209.345 - Water resource policies and authorities.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-07-01 false Water resource policies and authorities...PROCEDURE § 209.345 Water resource policies and authorities...Federal Reimbursement Policy for Work by States...Entities on Authorized Water Resources...

2013-07-01

213

Towards transition management of European water resources  

Microsoft Academic Search

Global change fundamentally changes the nature of water-related problems. We will illustrate this by showing how perceptions\\u000a of the water-problems in the Netherlands have shifted in the past four decades. The nature of water-related problems changed\\u000a from a technical problem to a so-called ‘persistent’ problem, characterized by plurality, uncertainty and complexity. Although\\u000a integrated water resource management (IWRM) has been advocated

Rutger van der Brugge; Jan Rotmans

2007-01-01

214

3. Water Resources and Water Supply  

Microsoft Academic Search

Of all of the elements of the Texas economy, society, and environment considered in this book, water is most closely coupled with climate. It is also the quintessential limiting factor for human development of the state. Simply put, \\

George H. Ward

215

Avoiding conflicts over Africa's water resources.  

PubMed

Some 85% of Africa's water resources are comprised of large river basins that are shared between several countries. High rates of population growth accompanied by continued increases in the demand for water have resulted in several countries passing the point where the scarcity of water supplies effectively limits further development. Present population trends and patterns of water use suggest that more African countries will exceed the limits of their economically usable, land-based water resources before 2025. Normally, water allocation and distribution priorities within a country are aligned with national development objectives. While this may achieve national "water security" objectives, greater emphasis needs to be placed on regional efforts to ensure that the available water resources are used to derive sustainable long-term benefits for the peoples of Africa as a whole. Ideally, each country's water-resource management strategy needs to be aligned with that of its neighbors if peace and prosperity are to be maintained and conflict is to be avoided in the region. PMID:12164134

Ashton, Peter J

2002-05-01

216

Strategy of Water Resources Planning Under Risk  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In water resources systems analysis, risk, caused by uncertainty, is an important issue to consider, whereas definition of risk and its measure is controversial (many definitions are available in different research fields). The problem of computing the degree of risk in water resources planning is very difficult, and has received more and more attentions from more hydrologists. This study discussed the necessity of risk analysis on decision-making associated with problems of managing regional water quantity. A new concept of risk function for regional water resource planning was introduced, and a theory of risk analysis of water resource systems was developed and implemented numerically. The developed methodology is general and can be used to tackle many kinds of decision-making problems. When loss (or benefit) volumes of an action set and probabilities of nature state of decision environments are given, non-inferior planning strategy or strategies can be derived by ordering the size of risk degrees calculated by the proposed risk function. This method was illustrated in a case study at the Huanghuaihai basin, China, one of the major food-producing areas in north China. In the last several decades, problems of water shortage and pollution are severe, and extreme weather conditions frequently occur. How to reasonably allocate the limited fresh water in the future under uncertainty is an urgent task. In this research, alternative strategies of water resource planning were investigated and risk of the strategies was assessed to facilitate the decision-making of Chinese government. The developed methodology selected the optimum choice of water resources planning strategies to avoid the risk of water shortage. This research has practicably provided support of decision-making of the Chinese central and local governments and organizations in their regional and national planning.

Wang, Z.; Ye, M.

2007-12-01

217

Coop: 02-2011 COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING AND MINERAL RESOURCES  

E-print Network

Coop: 02-2011 COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING AND MINERAL RESOURCES COOPERATIVE EDUCATION PROGRAM STUDENT Self-Motivation Enthusiasm Attitude Verbal Skills Listening Skills Human Relations Persuasiveness Team Player Technical Skills Conceptual Skills Organizational Skills Comprehension Perception Attendance

Mohaghegh, Shahab

218

Coop: 02-2011 COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING AND MINERAL RESOURCES  

E-print Network

Coop: 02-2011 COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING AND MINERAL RESOURCES COOPERATIVE EDUCATION PROGRAM STUDENT interested in you as an individual? 4. Did your immediate supervisor attempt to motivate you relative to your

Mohaghegh, Shahab

219

Water Resources of New Mexico  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) site provides water data for New Mexico, a map of New Mexico basins, and publications. Descriptions of the following USGS investigations are provided: the Rio Grande National Water-Quality Assessment, the Middle Rio Grande Basin Study, USGS measurements of a century of floods, Rio Puerco Basin Studies, Monitoring of Piezometers in the Middle Rio Grande Basin, and Ground Water Monitoring and Pumpage in the Albuquerque Area. An education section includes general information on hydrology and a New Mexico fact sheet. There is a section monitoring drought conditions and a collection of photographs of drought.

220

Glossary of Water Resource Terms.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The rapidly developing field of water pollution control already has stimulated its own special language through origination of new terminology and popularization of other vocabulary formerly reserved for highly technical study. Understanding of this langu...

O. A. Titelbaum

1970-01-01

221

SMALL SYSTEM STUDIES (WATER SUPPLY AND WATER RESOURCES DIVISION)  

EPA Science Inventory

To support and help in the struggle to improve the quality of drinking water in the U.S. and abroad (China and South America), the National Risk Management Research Laboratory's Water Supply and Water Resources Division (WSWRD) uses the USEPA Test and Evaluation (T&E) Facility lo...

222

Water and conflict: Fresh water resources and international security  

Microsoft Academic Search

Fresh water is a fundamental resource, integral to all ecological and societal activities, including food and energy production, transportation, waste disposal, industrial development and human health. This article outlines the links between water and conflict, and presents some of the issues and information that make it possible to assess when and where water-related conflicts are most likely to occur. Tools

Gleick

2009-01-01

223

Based on the Water Cycle of Water Resource Assessment  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper takes annual water cycle in 1980~2004 of Tianjin city in China as an example to describe a method of integrated assessment on water resource, which is divided into four categories: genera,special, national economy available and quality qualified in functional zone. Distributed hydrology model is used to couple artificial water balance, and precipitation is taken as full aperture flux

Huaibin Wei; Zuhao Zhou

2011-01-01

224

An imminent human resource crisis in ground water hydrology?  

PubMed

Anecdotal evidence, mostly from the United States, suggests that it has become increasingly difficult to find well-trained, entry-level ground water hydrologists to fill open positions in consulting firms and regulatory agencies. The future prospects for filling positions that require training in ground water hydrology are assessed by considering three factors: the market, the numbers of qualified students entering colleges and universities, and the aging of the existing workforce. The environmental and water resources consulting industry has seen continuous albeit variable growth, and demand for environmental scientists and hydrologists is expected to increase significantly. Conversely, students' interest and their enrollment in hydrology and water resources programs have waned in recent years, and the interests of students within these departments have shifted away from ground water hydrology in some schools. This decrease in the numbers of U.S. students graduating in hydrology or emphasizing ground water hydrology is coinciding with the aging of and pending retirement of ground water scientists and engineers in the baby boomer generation. We need to both trigger the imagination of students at the elementary school level so that they later want to apply science and math and communicate the career opportunities in ground water hydrology to those high school and college graduates who have acquired the appropriate technical background. Because the success of a consulting firm, research organization, or regulatory agency is derived from the skills and judgment of the employees, human resources will be an increasingly more critical strategic issue for many years. PMID:19260994

Stephens, Daniel B

2009-01-01

225

Climate change, water resources and child health  

Microsoft Academic Search

Climate change is occurring and has tremendous consequences for children's health worldwide. This article describes how the rise in temperature, precipitation, droughts, floods, glacier melt and sea levels resulting from human-induced climate change is affecting the quantity, quality and flow of water resources worldwide and impacting child health through dangerous effects on water supply and sanitation, food production and human

Elizabeth J Kistin; John Fogarty; Ryan Shaening Pokrasso; Michael McCally; Peter G McCornick

2010-01-01

226

Water Availability and Management of Water Resources  

EPA Science Inventory

One of the most pressing national and global issues is the availability of freshwater due to global climate change, energy scarcity issues and the increase in world population and accompanying economic growth. Estimates of water supplies and flows through the world's hydrologic c...

227

Teach Engineering: Resources for K-12  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This library features teacher-tested, standards-based engineering content for K-12 teachers to use in science and math classrooms. Engineering lessons connect real-world experiences with curricular content already taught in K-12 classrooms. The collection is searchable by keyword, grade level, or educational standard, and can be browsed by subject area, curricular unit, lessons or activities.

228

University of Idaho Water of the West Initiative: Development of a sustainable, interdisciplinary water resources program  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Recently, an interdisciplinary group of faculty from the University of Idaho was awarded a major internal grant for their project "Water of the West (WoW)" to launch an interdisciplinary Water Resources Graduate Education Program. This Water Resources program will facilitate research and education to influence both the scientific understanding of the resource and how it is managed, and advance the decision-making processes that are the means to address competing societal values. By educating students to integrate environmental sciences, socio-economic, and political issues, the WoW project advances the University's land grant mission to promote economic and social development in the state of Idaho. This will be accomplished through novel experiential interdisciplinary education activities; creation of interdisciplinary research efforts among water resources faculty; and focusing on urgent regional problems with an approach that will involve and provide information to local communities. The Water Resources Program will integrate physical and biological sciences, social science, law, policy and engineering to address problems associated with stewardship of our scarce water resources. As part of the WoW project, faculty will: (1) develop an integrative problem-solving framework; (2) develop activities to broaden WR education; (3) collaborate with the College of Law to offer a concurrent J.D. degree, (4) develop a virtual system of watersheds for teaching and research, and (5) attract graduate students for team-based education. The new program involves 50 faculty from six colleges and thirteen departments across the university. This university-wide initiative is strengthened by collaboration with the Idaho Water Resources Research Institute, and participation from off-campus Centers in Idaho Falls, Boise, Twin Falls, and Coeur d'Alene. We hope this presentation will attract university faculty, water resources professionals, and others for stimulating discussions on interdisciplinary approaches in water resources education.

Boll, J.; Cosens, B.; Fiedler, F.; Link, T.; Wilson, P.; Harris, C.; Tuller, M.; Johnson, G.; Kennedy, B.

2006-12-01

229

Water Resources Availability in Kabul, Afghanistan  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The availability of water resources is vital to the rebuilding of Kabul, Afghanistan. In recent years, droughts and increased water use for drinking water and agriculture have resulted in widespread drying of wells. Increasing numbers of returning refugees, rapid population growth, and potential climate change have led to heightened concerns for future water availability. The U.S. Geological Survey, with support from the U.S. Agency for International Development, began collaboration with the Afghanistan Geological Survey and Ministry of Energy and Water on water-resource investigations in the Kabul Basin in 2004. This has led to the compilation of historic and recent water- resources data, creation of monitoring networks, analyses of geologic, geophysical, and remotely sensed data. The study presented herein provides an assessment of ground-water availability through the use of multidisciplinary hydrogeologic data analysis. Data elements include population density, climate, snowpack, geology, mineralogy, surface water, ground water, water quality, isotopic information, and water use. Data were integrated through the use of conceptual ground-water-flow model analysis and provide information necessary to make improved water-resource planning and management decisions in the Kabul Basin. Ground water is currently obtained from a shallow, less than 100-m thick, highly productive aquifer. CFC, tritium, and stable hydrogen and oxygen isotopic analyses indicate that most water in the shallow aquifer appears to be recharged post 1970 by snowmelt-supplied river leakage and secondarily by late winter precipitation. Analyses indicate that increasing withdrawals are likely to result in declining water levels and may cause more than 50 percent of shallow supply wells to become dry or inoperative particularly in urbanized areas. The water quality in the shallow aquifer is deteriorated in urban areas by poor sanitation and water availability concerns may be compounded by poor well construction practices and little planning. By 2050, the available water resources in the Kabul Basin may be reduced as a result of Central Asian climate changes. Increasing air temperatures associated with climate change are likely to lead to a decreasing snowpack and an earlier growing season, resulting in less recharge from river leakage. As a result, more than 60 percent of existing supply wells may become dry or inoperative. The impacts of climate change would likely be greatest in the agricultural regions in the western areas of the basin. Water resources in the in northern areas of the basin may meet future water needs. However, in other areas of the basin, particularly the more urbanized southern areas adjacent to and including the city of Kabul, water resources may be stressed. Ground water in deep aquifers, more than 100 m below land surface, is presently unused. Conceptual ground-water-flow simulations indicate that ground water in deep aquifers may be thousands of years old. The deep aquifer may sustain limited increases in municipal water use, but may not support increased agricultural use which is much greater than municipal use. However, the hydraulic feasibility and quality of deep ground-water extractions are not well known and are being investigated.

Akbari, A. M.; Chornack, M. P.; Coplen, T. B.; Emerson, D. G.; Litke, D. W.; Mack, T. J.; Plummer, N.; Verdin, J. P.; Verstraeten, I. M.

2008-12-01

230

The water resources of lakes in China  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper deals mainly with the water resources of China’s lakes scattered over five drainage basins with a total area of 71,787 km2 and a total storage capacity of 7,088 million m3, the fresh water capacity of which amounts to about 2,261 million m3, varying from year to year or even within a year. Attention should be paid to the reasonable utilization of water resources and the problems that have already emerged should be carefully and skillfully handled.

Wang, Hongdao

1987-09-01

231

Water resources management. World Bank policy paper  

SciTech Connect

Water resources have been one of the most important areas of World Bank lending during the past three decades. Through its support for sector work and investments in irrigation, water supply, sanitation, flood control, and hydropower, the Bank has contributed to the development of many countries and helped provide essential services to many communities. Moreover, the Bank and governments have not taken sufficient account of environmental concerns in the management of water resources. (Copyright (c) 1993 International Bank for Reconstruction and Development/The World Bank.)

Easter, K.W.; Feder, G.; Le Moigne, G.; Duda, A.M.; Forsyth, E.

1993-01-01

232

Engineering Education: Web-Based Interactive Learning Resources  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article presents a study that aimed to determine engineering students' preferred way of learning and to provide additional learning resources to support their methods of learning. The population for this study was drawn from electrical, civil, and mechanical engineering programs at an urban university. Overall, the results of the study…

Ndahi, Hassan B.; Charturvedi, Sushil; Akan, A. Osman; Pickering, J. Worth

2007-01-01

233

Electric Power Engineering Educational Resources 1969-1970  

Microsoft Academic Search

This committee report covers results of a survey of electric power engineering educational resources at eighty-two ECPD (Engineers Council for Professional Development) accredited schools in the USA for the acedemic year 1969-1970. It includes a listing of faculty active during the subject year and their professional experience together with information on student enrollment and its composition. Also included is information

F. C. Fisher; L. S. Vanslyck; E. T. B. Gross; C. C. Mosher; H. B. Hamilton; J. R. Tudor

1972-01-01

234

Civil & Environmental Engineering Graduate Resource Guide  

E-print Network

Getting Help Dealing with stress, grievance procedures and legal resources Graduate Study at the College that are available to you as a U-M graduate student. We hope the information in this guide will help you make Student employment resources, information for current employees and campus Career Services information

Kamat, Vineet R.

235

Metabolic engineering applications to renewable resource utilization  

Microsoft Academic Search

Lignocellulosic materials containing cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin are the most abundant renewable organic resource on earth. The utilization of renewable resources for energy and chemicals is expected to increase in the near future. The conversion of both cellulose (glucose) and hemicellulose (hexose and pentose) for the production of fuel ethanol is being studied intensively, with a view to developing a

Aristos Aristidou; Merja Penttilä

2000-01-01

236

Water Resource Planning and Management using Motivated Machine JANUSZ STARZYK  

E-print Network

1 Water Resource Planning and Management using Motivated Machine Learning JANUSZ STARZYK School uses of water resources. Motivated machine learning, presented in this paper, supports intelligent learning water management decisions is presented. Keywords: multi-objective analysis; water management

Starzyk, Janusz A.

237

University of Wisconsin Extension: Water Resources Programs  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The University of Wisconsin Extension provides "information about water quality and natural resources education programs in Wisconsin." Users can find out about monitoring the water quality of streams, river cleanups, and other volunteer projects. Teachers can learn how to educate their students about runoff pollution through the construction of a watershed model. The website presents numerous water related initiatives including the Multi-Agency Land and Water Education Grant Program, Give Water a Hand for young people taking action in their community, and the Landowner Assessment and Project Evaluation (LOAPE) Program.

238

Water Resources of Hawaii and the Pacific  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The mission of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) District Office in Honolulu, Hawaii is to assess water resources for the Hawaiian islands and the Western Pacific - the quality and quantity of surface-water and ground-water in this region. Information is provided about water use, streamflow, ground-water levels, well drilling, flood frequency, isotope hydrology, benthic invertebrates, contamination, the Iao aquifer on Maui island, rainfall amounts and storm monitoring. There is real-time data available as well as on-line reports and abstracts relating to hydrologic conditions in these areas.

239

Water Matters. Water Resources Teacher's Guide, Vol. 1.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This teachers guide is designed to accompany a series of posters developed through the U.S. Geological Survey's Water Resources Education Initiative, a cooperative effort between public and private education interests. It provides teacher guidance, background information, suggestions for a variety of classroom activities, and supplemental resource

Kauffman, Sue Cox

240

Native Waters: An American Indian Water Resource Education Project  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This community education initiative supports the efforts of Native American tribal leaders, educators, and students to develop contemporary, scientifically accurate, and culturally sensitive water education resources, programs, and networking opportunities. A traveling exhibit provides a Native American point of view on protection and conservation of water resources. A teachers' guide is provided to accompany the exhibit. Other materials include learning opportunities for students and educators, news articles, publications, scholarship information, and links to related information.

2004-01-01

241

Conference Topic: Integrated Water Resources and Coastal Areas Management National Water Information Systems: A Tool to Support Integrated Water Resources  

E-print Network

of natural disasters; and reduced water quality due to pollution from industrial, agricultural and municipalConference Topic: Integrated Water Resources and Coastal Areas Management National Water Information Systems: A Tool to Support Integrated Water Resources Management in the Caribbean Marie-Claire St

Barthelat, Francois

242

Water Intensity of Electricity from Geothermal Resources  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

BACKGROUND Electricity from geothermal resources could play a significant role in the United States over the next few decades; a 2006 study by MIT expects a capacity of 100GWe by 2050 as feasible; approximately 10% of total electricity generating capacity up from less than 1% today. However, there is limited research on the water requirements and impacts of generating electricity from geothermal resources - conventional as well as enhanced. To the best of our knowledge, there is no baseline exists for water requirements of geothermal electricity. Water is primarily required for cooling and dissipation of waste heat in the power plants, and to account for fluid losses during heat mining of enhanced geothermal resources. MODEL DESCRIPTION We have developed a model to assess and characterize water requirements of electricity from hydrothermal resources and enhanced geothermal resources (EGS). Our model also considers a host of factors that influence cooling water requirements ; these include the temperature and chemical composition of geothermal resource; installed power generation technology - flash, organic rankine cycle and the various configurations of these technologies; cooling technologies including air cooled condensers, wet recirculating cooling, and hybrid cooling; and finally water treatment and recycling installations. We expect to identify critical factors and technologies. Requirements for freshwater, degraded water and geothermal fluid are separately estimated. METHODOLOGY We have adopted a lifecycle analysis perspective that estimates water consumption at the goethermal field and power plant, and accounts for transmission and distribution losses before reaching the end user. Our model depends upon an extensive literature review to determine various relationships necessary to determine water usage - for example relationship between thermal efficiency and temperature of a binary power plant, or differences in efficiency between various ORC configurations, or differences in efficiency of a plant with a wet cooled system and one with dry cooled system. There are a number of factors that we do not consider; most of these factors are location specific. These include ambient temperature and humidity, specific design parameters of the power plant, and dissolved solids and chemical composition of freshwater withdrawn from ground or surface sources. Even for a specific plant, water intensity will vary over time due to fluctuations in ambient temperature and humidity, and in temperature of the geothermal fluid. Thus the model’s water usage estimates should be treated as “first order” or “preliminary” estimates. This paper is part of a series exploring the water footprint of future transportation fuels including biofuels and electricity. The paper's broader objective is to highlight limitations imposed by water shortages to achieve higher penetration of various alternative fuels.

Mishra, G. S.; Glassley, W. E.

2010-12-01

243

Water resource sharing from a microeconomic perspective  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article introduces Capacity Sharing (CS) as an innovative property?rights structure that encourages efficient use of resources by providing a transparent, probability?based water sharing system on which sustainable management of international freshwater resources can be based. Derived from micro?economic theory, CS is the allocation of percentages of the total reservoir space along with inflows and outflows among individual users in

Norman J. Dudley

1999-01-01

244

NASA's Applied Sciences for Water Resources  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Earth Systems Division within NASA has the primary responsibility for the Earth Science Applied Science Program and the objective to accelerate the use of NASA science results in applications to help solve problems important to society and the economy. The primary goal of the Earth Science Applied Science Program is to improve future and current operational systems by infusing them with scientific knowledge of the Earth system gained through space-based observation, assimilation of new observations, and development and deployment of enabling technologies, systems, and capabilities. This paper discusses one of the major problems facing water resources managers, that of having timely and accurate data to drive their decision support tools. It then describes how NASA?s science and space based satellites may be used to overcome this problem. Opportunities for the water resources community to participate in NASA?s Water Resources Applications Program are described.

Doorn, Bradley; Toll, David; Engman, Ted

2011-01-01

245

Environmental resource document for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Volume 2  

SciTech Connect

This document contains information related to the environmental characterization of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The INEL is a major US Department of Energy facility in southeastern Idaho dedicated to nuclear research, waste management, environmental restoration, and other activities related to the development of technology. Environmental information covered in this document includes land, air, water, and ecological resources; socioeconomic characteristics and land use; and cultural, aesthetic, and scenic resources.

Irving, J.S.

1993-07-01

246

Environmental resource document for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Volume 1  

SciTech Connect

This document contains information related to the environmental characterization of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The INEL is a major US Department of Energy facility in southeastern Idaho dedicated to nuclear research, waste management, environmental restoration, and other activities related to the development of technology. Environmental information covered in this document includes land, air, water, and ecological resources; socioeconomic characteristics and land use; and cultural, aesthetic, and scenic resources.

Irving, J.S.

1993-07-01

247

18 CFR 701.76 - The Water Resources Council Staff.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

18 ? Conservation of Power and Water Resources ? 2 ? 2012-04-01 ? 2012-04-01 ? false ? The Water Resources Council Staff. ? 701.76 ? Section 701.76 ? Conservation of Power and Water Resources ? WATER RESOURCES COUNCIL ? COUNCIL ORGANIZATION ? Headquarters Organization ? § 701.76 ? The...

2012-04-01

248

CALIFORNIA DROUGHT State of California The Resources Agency California Department of Water Resources  

E-print Network

CALIFORNIA DROUGHT AN UPDATE 2008 State of California · The Resources Agency · California Department of Water Resources #12;CALIFORNIA DROUGHT, AN UPDATE April 2008 DEPARTME NT OF WATER R ESOURCES ST for Resources The Resources Agency Lester A. Snow Director Department of Water Resources #12;CALIFORNIA DROUGHT

249

WATER: Water Activities Teaching Environmental Responsibility: Teacher Resource, Environmental Science.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This activity book was developed as part of an effort to protect water quality of the Stillwater River, Ohio, through a Watershed Protection Project. It is designed to raise teachers' and students' awareness and trigger a sense of stewardship towards the preservation of water resources. The activities are generally appropriate for elementary age…

Kramer, Ed, Ed.; And Others

250

Cooperative water resource technology transfer program  

SciTech Connect

This cooperative water resource technology transfer program sought to develop/present educational programs (conferences/seminars/workshops) and technology transfer brochures to enhance public awareness/appreciation of state water quality problems and to stress economic tradeoffs needed to resolve given problems. Accomplishments of this program for the different conferences held 1979-1981 are described (inland lake eutrophication: causes, effects, and remedies; contamination of groundwater supplies by toxic chemicals: causes, effects, and prevention; supplemental irrigation; stormwater management; cooperative research needs for renovation and reuse of municipal water in agriculture; selection and management of vegetation for slow rate and overland flow land application systems to treat municipal wastewater; effects of acid precipitation on ecological systems: Great Lakes region; water competition in Michigan; Michigan natural resources outlook.

D'itri, F.M.

1982-06-01

251

Water Resource Economics and Policy `A state-of-the-art and comprehensive review of water resource economics policy issues  

E-print Network

Water Resource Economics and Policy `A state-of-the-art and comprehensive review of water resource!' ­ Eric Schuck, Colorado State University, USA `W. Douglass Shaw's Water Resource Economics and Policy Colby, University of Arizona, USA `Douglass Shaw's Water Resource Economics and Policy is a timely

Shaw, W. Douglass

252

Geothermal Water Use: Life Cycle Water Consumption, Water Resource Assessment, and Water Policy Framework  

DOE Data Explorer

This report examines life cycle water consumption for various geothermal technologies to better understand factors that affect water consumption across the life cycle (e.g., power plant cooling, belowground fluid losses) and to assess the potential water challenges that future geothermal power generation projects may face. Previous reports in this series quantified the life cycle freshwater requirements of geothermal power-generating systems, explored operational and environmental concerns related to the geochemical composition of geothermal fluids, and assessed future water demand by geothermal power plants according to growth projections for the industry. This report seeks to extend those analyses by including EGS flash, both as part of the life cycle analysis and water resource assessment. A regional water resource assessment based upon the life cycle results is also presented. Finally, the legal framework of water with respect to geothermal resources in the states with active geothermal development is also analyzed.

Jenna N. Schroeder

253

Farm Assessment for Water Resource Protection Field Assessment  

E-print Network

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Soil conservation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 #12;2 On-Farm Soil Monitoring for Water Resource Protection Purdue University Cooperative and water quality. Use the Extension publication On-Farm Soil Monitoring for Water Resource Protection WQ-43

Holland, Jeffrey

254

Fiscal Year 1984 Program Report: Oregon Water Resources Research Institute.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The FY 1984 Oregon Water Resources Research Institute program included 10 projects concerned with water management of forest, range, agricultural and estuarine zones, including the associated biological resources, problem areas of Oregon water law, and te...

1985-01-01

255

Engineering Water Analysis Laboratory Activity.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purposes of water treatment in a marine steam power plant are to prevent damage to boilers, steam-operated equipment, and steam and condensate lives, and to keep all equipment operating at the highest level of efficiency. This laboratory exercise is designed to provide students with experiences in making accurate boiler water tests and to…

Schlenker, Richard M.

256

Water Resources Research and interdisciplinary hydrology  

Microsoft Academic Search

Water Resource Research was born under the watchful eye of Walter Langbein, a modern-day Renaissance man whose interests spanned not only hydrology but all of the earth sciences, and not only the earth sciences but all of science. From its founding in1965 to the present day, the editors of WRR have always seen the journal as a medium of interdisciplinary

R. Allan Freeze

1990-01-01

257

Resource reliability, accessibility and governance: pillars for managing water resources to achieve water security in Nepal  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

As one of the world's most water-abundant countries, Nepal has plenty of water yet resources are both spatially and temporally unevenly distributed. With a population heavily engaged in subsistence farming, whereby livelihoods are entirely dependent on rain-fed agriculture, changes in freshwater resources can substantially impact upon survival. The two main sources of water in Nepal come from monsoon precipitation and glacial runoff. The former is essential for sustaining livelihoods where communities have little or no access to perennial water resources. Much of Nepal's population live in the southern Mid-Hills and Terai regions where dependency on the monsoon system is high and climate-environment interactions are intricate. Any fluctuations in precipitation can severely affect essential potable resources and food security. As the population continues to expand in Nepal, and pressures build on access to adequate and clean water resources, there is a need for institutions to cooperate and increase the effectiveness of water management policies. This research presents a framework detailing three fundamental pillars for managing water resources to achieve sustainable water security in Nepal. These are (i) resource reliability; (ii) adequate accessibility; and (iii) effective governance. Evidence is presented which indicates that water resources are adequate in Nepal to sustain the population. In addition, aspects of climate change are having less impact than previously perceived e.g. results from trend analysis of precipitation time-series indicate a decrease in monsoon extremes and interannual variation over the last half-century. However, accessibility to clean water resources and the potential for water storage is limiting the use of these resources. This issue is particularly prevalent given the heterogeneity in spatial and temporal distributions of water. Water governance is also ineffective due to government instability and a lack of continuity in policy. Subsequently, with poor accessibility and poor governance, the threat to human water security remains high in Nepal. Nonetheless, the nation has great potential to better manage natural capital and harness reserves for improving livelihoods, such as river flows for generating hydropower. Suggested solutions for transboundary water cooperation are explored within a water-energy-food nexus framework.

Biggs, E. M.; Duncan, J.; Atkinson, P.; Dash, J.

2013-12-01

258

A novel systemic approach to water resources optimisation in areas with limited water resources  

Microsoft Academic Search

Water is a constrained natural resource and in many areas of the planet water shortage is considered to be one of the most important issues to be resolved. This is certainly true for many Greek islands, where there is serious water shortage especially during the summer, thus hindering the development of the islands. The aim of the present work is

E. Kondili; J. K. Kaldellis; C. Papapostolou

2010-01-01

259

Vermont Water Resources Research Center five-year plan for water resources research and development  

Microsoft Academic Search

Vermont has identified eight priority research areas: acid precipitation, allocation of water resources, data base lakes and wetlands management, land runoff, management of toxic and hazardous materials, and waste water management and drinking water supply. Vermont has an average annual precipitation of 42 inches and is generally decentralized both culturally and hydrologically. This decentralization presents special management problems due to

M. Long; E. A. Cassell

1980-01-01

260

Architecture of a Federated Query Engine for Heterogeneous Resources  

PubMed Central

The Federated Utah Research and Translational Health e-Repository (FURTHeR) is a Utah statewide informatics platform for the new Center for Clinical and Translational Science at the University of Utah. We have been working on one of FURTHeR’s key components, a federated query engine for heterogeneous resources, that we believe has the potential to meet some of the fundamental needs of translational science to access and integrate diverse biomedical data and promote discovery of new knowledge. The architecture of the federated query engine for heterogeneous resources is described and demonstrated. PMID:20351825

Bradshaw, Richard L.; Matney, Susan; Livne, Oren E.; Bray, Bruce E.; Mitchell, Joyce A.; Narus, Scott P.

2009-01-01

261

Recommended Academic Plan for Biological Engineering Natural Resource Engineering Option (BE/N R E)  

E-print Network

(GN), General Physics: Mechanics 4 CHEM 110 (GN) Chemical Principles I 3 CHEM 111 (GN), Experimental), Contextual Integration of Communication Skills for the Technical Workplace 2 C E 360, Fluid Mechanics 3 I ERecommended Academic Plan for Biological Engineering ­ Natural Resource Engineering Option (BE/N R

Omiecinski, Curtis

262

STATE WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE PROGRAM: GROUND WATER RESEARCH.  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This paper updates a review of the accomplishments of the State Water Resources Research Program in ground water contamination research. The aim is to assess the progress made towards understanding the mechanisms of ground water contamination and based on this understanding, to suggest procedures for the prevention and control of ground water contamination. The following research areas are covered: (1) mechanisms of organic contaminant transport in the subsurface environment; (2) bacterial and viral contamination of ground water from landfills and septic tank systems; (3) fate and persistence of pesticides in the subsurface; (4) leachability and transport of ground water pollutants from coal production and utilization; and (5) pollution of ground water from mineral mining activities.

Burton, James, S.

1985-01-01

263

Water resources review: Wheeler Reservoir, 1990  

SciTech Connect

Protection and enhancement of water quality is essential for attaining the full complement of beneficial uses of TVA reservoirs. The responsibility for improving and protecting TVA reservoir water quality is shared by various federal, state, and local agencies, as well as the thousands of corporations and property owners whose individual decisions affect water quality. TVA's role in this shared responsibility includes collecting and evaluating water resources data, disseminating water resources information, and acting as a catalyst to bring together agencies and individuals that have a responsibility or vested interest in correcting problems that have been identified. This report is one in a series of status reports that will be prepared for each of TVA's reservoirs. The purpose of this status report is to provide an up-to-date overview of the characteristics and conditions of Wheeler Reservoir, including: reservoir purposes and operation; physical characteristics of the reservoir and the watershed; water quality conditions: aquatic biological conditions: designated, actual, and potential uses of the reservoir and impairments of those uses; ongoing or planned reservoir management activities. Information and data presented here are form the most recent reports, publications, and original data available. 21 refs., 8 figs., 29 tabs.

Wallus, R.; Cox, J.P.

1990-09-01

264

Water Resources In Nepal: Institutional Analysis Based On Legal Provisions  

E-print Network

WATER RESOURCES IN NEPAL: INSTITUTIONAL ANALYSIS BASED ON LEGAL PROVISIONS Shyamu Thapa Magar Introduction Natural resources are fundamental to life and are the basis of livelihood for human beings as well as animals. Water resources also play... important role for survival and prospects for biotic environment. For the livelihood activities, all kinds of sources of water are important to the viability of ecosystem. Water resources come in different forms and have mUltiple uses. Water is present...

Magar, Shyamu Thapa

2005-01-01

265

Water: a strategic resource. Student essay  

SciTech Connect

Availability of fresh water has been taken for granted throughout our history. In fact, the United States has been blessed with what was once thought to be a limitless natural resource, fresh water. The sources for this fresh water are precipitation, surface water, and ground water. Today, these sources are under relentless pressure from chronic pollution and over-usage. The federal government has begun the process of studying and doumenting the problems associated with our water supply but, to date, its efforts are far to little, too late. Budget constraints and funding projections only add to the already bleak picture. We are learning that water problems can't be contained and that they cross state, local, and private boundaries. This problem of area pollution has drawn considerable concern within the Department of Defense (DOD) as more and more of our installations are finding their water environment jeopardized. Solutions for the preservation cleansing and protection of our fresh-water systems are going to be expensive and technically complicated to accomplish and administer. Action is needed now.

Thornton, R.E.

1986-04-15

266

Uncertainty Management in Urban Water Engineering Adaptation to Climate Change - abstract  

EPA Science Inventory

Current water resource planning and engineering assume a stationary climate, in which the observed historical water flow rate and water quality variations are often used to define the technical basis. When the non-stationarity is considered, however, climate change projection co...

267

Management Strategy to Reduce Tastes and Odors In Phoenix's Water Supply Lawrence A. Baker (Water Resources Center, U. of Minnesota), Paul Westerhoff (Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering, ASU),  

E-print Network

, in the canals, and even in the water treatment plants. MIB concentrations vary in time and space. 0 10 20 30 40Management Strategy to Reduce Tastes and Odors In Phoenix's Water Supply Lawrence A. Baker (Water and odors" (T&O) in drinking water. Removing T&Os within a water treatment plant is very expensive. In 1999

Hall, Sharon J.

268

Ethos, equity, and the water resource  

SciTech Connect

The author uses two concepts, well known to ancient civilizations but latterly forgotten, in an analysis of some aspects of water resource use. First, democratic governance at the will of the people is effective and responsive as long as the exists an ethos in administration - a set of beliefs that guide decision making even though unwritten into law. Second, democrat guidance is effective when equity - fairness to all - is not submerged to private or narrow interests.

Leopold, L.B. (Univ. of California, Berkeley (USA))

1990-03-01

269

Troubled waters: managing our vital resources.  

PubMed

Presented are articles from Global Issues, an electronic journal of the US Information Agency that focuses on managing the water resources of the world. The three main articles are as follows: 1) ¿The Quiet Revolution to Restore Our Aquatic Ecosystems¿, 2) ¿Charting a New Course to Save America's Waters¿, and 3) ¿Freshwater: Will the World's Future Needs be Met?¿ The journal also presents commentaries on the age-old water shortage in the Middle East; solutions to water waste on the farm and in cities; managing water scarcity in the driest region of the US; and a new approach to environmental management in the Bermejo River in Argentina and Bolivia. Furthermore, this issue contains statistics on water usage and supplies and a report that examines proposals for policies that could set the world on a better course for water management. Lastly, this issue provides a bibliography of books, documents, and articles on freshwater issues as well as a list of Internet sites offering further information on water quality, supplies, and conservation. PMID:12290381

1999-03-01

270

Increasing Awareness of Sustainable Water Management for Future Civil Engineers  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

There are more than 1.2 billion people around the world that do not have access to drinking water. While there are plans under the United Nations Millennium Development Goals to halve this number by 2015, there are a number of regions that will be exposed to water scarcity in the coming future. Providing sufficient water for future development is a great challenge for planners and designers of water supply systems. In order to design sustainable water supplies for the future, it is important to learn how people consume water and how water consumption can be reduced. The education of future civil engineers should take into account not only technical aspects of the water supply but also the accompanying social and economical issues, and appreciated the strengths and weaknesses of traditional solutions. The Faculty of Civil Engineering, at the University of Rijeka, has begun incorporating a series of activities that engage undergraduate students and the local community to develop a mutual understanding of the future needs for sustainable management. We present one of the activities, collaboration with the Lancaster Environment Centre at Lancaster University in the UK through the field course Water and environmental management in Mediterranean context. The course, which is designed for the Lancaster University geography students, features a combination of field trips and visits to provide an understanding of the socio-economic and environmental context of water management in two counties (Istra and Primorsko-Goranska). Students from Lancaster visit the Croatian water authority and a regional water company, where they learn about current management practices and problems in managing water supplies and demand through the year. They make their own observations of current management practices in the field and learn about water consumption from the end users. One day field visit to a village in the area that is still not connected to the main water supply system is organised together with civil engineering students from the University of Rijeka. The aims of this field visit are: to learn about traditional water supply from an underground storage of rain water called cisterna; and to find out from inhabitants about their current water usage habits and expectations, and how these might change when they get water from the main water supply system. This joint activity has been beneficial for both groups of students. The engineering students become aware of the importance of the social aspects in designing the water supply system, while the geography students learn about the engineering challenges entailed. Both groups learn that water consumption increases with the provision of water through pipeline systems and that this needs to be taken into account in the design of water supply and management of water resources. Importantly, they learn the benefits of traditional sustainable water supply methods, which could be implemented as primary or additional sources of water supply in other areas.In summary, both groups of students develop their professional knowledge and skills as well as generic and transferable skills, which are very important for those who will continue to a career in the design and management of water systems.

Ilic, Suzana; Karleusa, Barbara; Deluka-Tibljas, Aleksandra

2010-05-01

271

Quantitative water quality with ERTS-1. [Kansas water resources  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Analyses of ERTS-1 MSS computer compatible tapes of reservoir scenes in Kansas along with ground truth show that MSS bands and band ratios can be used for reliable prediction of suspended loads up to at least 900 ppm. The major reservoirs in Kansas, as well as in other Great Plains states, are playing increasingly important roles in flood control, recreation, agriculture, and urban water supply. Satellite imagery is proving useful for acquiring timely low cost water quality data required for optimum management of these fresh water resources.

Yarger, H. L.; Mccauley, J. R.; James, G. W.; Magnuson, L. M.; Marzolf, G. R.

1974-01-01

272

Modeling Water Resource Systems under Climate Change: IGSM-WRS  

E-print Network

Through the integration of a Water Resource System (WRS) component, the MIT Integrated Global System Model (IGSM) framework has been enhanced to study the effects of climate change on managed water-resource systems. ...

Strzepek, K.

273

A Report on the Effectiveness of Texas Water Resources  

E-print Network

A readership survey conducted in May 1977 found that readers of Texas Water Resources find it useful, attractive and informative. The bulletin is published by the Texas Water Resources Institute to generate public awareness and understanding...

Ruesink, L. E.

274

502014-15 Suggested Course Plan CIvIltrack: Water reSOUrceS  

E-print Network

408: Risk Analysis in Civil Engr. CE 451: Water Resources Engineering CE 453: Water Quality Control CE unITs) phYS 151l: Mechanics and Thermodynamics phYS 152l: Electricity and Magnetism oTheR sCIenCe (8 unITs) ChEm 105Al: General Chemistry GEOl 305l: Intro. to Engineering Geology or BISC 220l: Cell

Zhou, Chongwu

275

2007 Water Resources Advisory Panel By Jessica Harder  

E-print Network

priorities. In April, WRAP identified potential funding sources for four water research projects UNL water2007 Water Resources Advisory Panel Update By Jessica Harder The Water Resources Advisory Panel (WRAP) and University of Nebraska-Lincoln are making progress on the panel's top water research

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

276

New Jersey Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

on cutting-edge research topics in water sciences. Research projects span a wide range of topics in waterNew Jersey Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2011 New Jersey Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2011 1 #12;Introduction The New Jersey Water

Hanson, Stephen José

277

A new modeling approach for water resources policy analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Water resources policy analysis deals with the protection of people from the harmful effects of water and assurance of a consistent, adequate supply of usable water. Population and regulatory pressures, political and economic instabilities, and climatic variations can all be expected to further stress water supply resources. Developing policy for managing water systems for human needs in such an environment

Slobodan P. Simonovic; Hussam Fahmy

1999-01-01

278

GEOGRAPHY 347 -WATER AS A RESOURCE Course Description -Fall, 2012  

E-print Network

GEOGRAPHY 347 - WATER AS A RESOURCE Course Description - Fall, 2012 Instructor: Dr. Allan James website: http://people.cas.sc.edu/ajames/347/index.html Textbook: Watersheds and Water Resources; 2010 Description: This is a survey course on concepts and tools of water resources management. It begins

James, L. Allan

279

Changes in surface water regime and resources in  

E-print Network

.6 êì3 -��� Water resources and hydrological monitoring Lake water resources: 500 cub. km Glaciers: 62.9 cub. km Rivers: 34.6 cub. km River water resources and its dynamics, cub. km/year Mongolian glaciers

280

Power and Water Resources Pooling Authority NOTICE OF SPECIAL MEETING  

E-print Network

Power and Water Resources Pooling Authority NOTICE OF SPECIAL MEETING Notice is hereby given that a special meeting of the Board of Directors of the Power and Water Resources Pooling Authority (PWRPA or service at least 3 days before the meeting. Requests should be sent to: Power and Water Resources Pooling

281

Water Resources Data for California, Water Year 1986. Volume 5. Ground-Water Data for California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Water resources data for the 1986 water year for California consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage and contents in lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality in wells. Volume 5 contains water levels for 765 observation wells and water-quality data for 174 observation wells. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating State and Federal agencies in California.

Lamb, C. E.; Keeter, G. L.; Grillo, D. A.

1988-01-01

282

Water Resources Data, Texas Water Year 1998, Volume 4. Ground Water  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Water-resources data for the 1998 water year for Texas consists of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage and contents in lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality in wells. Volume 4 contains water levels for 759 observation wells and 146 water-quality data for monitoring wells. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating Federal, State, and local agencies in Texas.

Gandara, S.C.; Barbie, D.L.

1999-01-01

283

Water Resources Data - Texas Water Year 2000, Volume 6. Ground Water  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Water-resources data for the 2000 water year for Texas consists of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage and contents in lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality in wells. Volume 6 contains water levels for 898 observation wells and 145 water-quality data for monitoring wells. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating Federal, State, and local agencies in Texas.

Barbie, D.L.

2001-01-01

284

Water Resources Data - Texas, Water Year 2002, Volume 6. Ground Water  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Water-resources data for the 2002 water year for Texas consists of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage and contents in lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality in wells. Volume 6 contains water levels for 960 observation wells and water-quality data for 173 monitoring wells. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating Federal, State, and local agencies in Texas.

Barbie, D.L.

2003-01-01

285

Water resources data - Texas water year 2001 : Volume 6. Ground water  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Water-resources data for the 2001 water year for Texas consists of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage and contents in lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality in wells. Volume 6 contains water levels for 908 observation wells and water-quality data for 155 monitoring wells. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating Federal, State, and local agencies in Texas.

Barbie, D.L.

2002-01-01

286

Water Resources Data - Texas Water Year 1999, Volume 6. Ground Water  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Water-resources data for the 1999 water year for Texas consists of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage and contents in lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality in wells. Volume 6 contains water levels for 759 observation wells and 146 water-quality data for monitoring wells. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating Federal, State, and local agencies in Texas.

Gandara, S.C.; Barbie, D.L.

2000-01-01

287

Water Resources Data for California, Water Year 1987. Volume 5. Ground-water Data for California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Water resources data for the 1987 water year for California consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage and contents in lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality in wells. Volume 5 contains water levels for 786 observation wells and water-quality data for 168 observation wells. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating State and Federal agencies in California.

Lamb, C. E.; Fogelman, R. P.; Grillo, D. A.

1989-01-01

288

Water Resources Data, California, Water Year 1989. Volume 5. Ground-Water Data  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Water resources data for the 1989 water year for California consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage and contents in lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality in weils. Volume 5 contains water levels for 1,037 observation wells and water-quality data for 254 monitoring wells. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperatine State and Federal agencies in California.

Lamb, C. E.; Johnson, J. A.; Fogelman, R. P.; Grillo, D. A.

1990-01-01

289

Water Resources Data for California, Water Year 1988. Volume 5. Ground-Water Data for California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Water resources data for the 1988 water year for California consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage and contents in lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water-quality in wells. Volume 5 contains water levels for 980 observation wells and water-quality data for 239 observation monitoring wells. These data represent that part of the National water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating State and Federal agencies in California.

Lamb, C. E.; Fogelman, R. P.; Grillo, D. A.

1989-01-01

290

Conservation of Water and Related Land Resources  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The author was quite clear about the purpose of this book and clearly achieved his intent. In his preface, the author states, “The purpose of this book is to acquaint the reader with a broad understanding of the topics relevant to the management of the nation's water and related land resources.” The book is a product of the author's 20 years of work as a teacher, consultant, researcher, and student of watershed management and hydrology and has served as a text for a course entitled Soil and Water Conservation, which the author has taught at the State University of New York, College of Environmental Science and Forestry at Syracuse, New York. But it was also written with the intent to be of use “to informal students of water and land related resources on the national level as well.” The objectives of Black's course at Syracuse and its larger purpose define the scope of the book which, again in the author's words, have been “(1) to acquaint students with principles of soil and water conservation; (2) to stimulate an appreciation for an integrated, comprehensive approach to land management; (3) to illustrate the influence of institutional, economic, and cultural forces on the practice of soil and water conservation; and (4) to provide information, methods, and techniques by which soil and water conservation measures are applied to land, as well as the basis for predicting and evaluating results.” The book is written in straightforward nontechnical language and provides the reader with a set of references, a table of cases, a list of abbreviations, and an adequate index. It impresses this reviewer as a very well edited piece of work.

Caldwell, Lynton K.

1984-04-01

291

INTERGRATING SOURCE WATER PROTECTION AND DRINKING WATER TREATMENT: U.S. ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY'S WATER SUPPLY AND WATER RESOURCES DIVISION  

EPA Science Inventory

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Water Supply and Water Resources Division (WSWRD) is an internationally recognized water research organization established to assist in responding to public health concerns related to drinking water supplies. WSWRD has evolved from...

292

INTEGRATING SOURCE WATER PROTECTION AND DRINKING WATER TREATMENT: U.S. ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY'S WATER SUPPLY AND WATER RESOURCES DIVISION  

EPA Science Inventory

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Water Supply and Water Resources Division (WSWRD) is an internationally recognized water research organization established to assist in responding to public health concerns related to drinking water supplies. WSWRD has evolved from...

293

Water resources inventory of northwest Florida  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Water resources of the 16 counties of the northwest Florida appear adequate unitl at least 2020. In the 4 westernmost counties, the sand-and-gravel aquifer and streams combined could provide 2,200 to 3,600 million gallons per day of water. Streams outside these counties could provide 5,600 million gallons per day. The Floridan aquifer could provide 220 million gallons per day. Generally, water of quality suitable for most purposes is available throughout the area, although water in smaller streams and in the sand-and-gravel aquifer is acidic and locally contains excessive iron. Water in the upper part of the Floridan aquifer is generally fresh, but saline at depth and in some coastal areas. The quantity of water available in the study area is about 8,020 to 9,420 million gallons per day and projected needs for the year 2020 range from 2,520 to 4,130 million gallons per day. ' Approximate method ' flood-prone area maps cover most of the area. (Woodard-USGS)

Dysart, J. E.; Pascale, C. A.; Trapp, Henry

1977-01-01

294

Cooling arrangement for water-cooled internal combustion engine  

Microsoft Academic Search

A cooling arrangement is described for a water-cooled internal combustion engine. The cooling arrangement comprises a radiator, a water jacket of the internal combustion engine, a cooling water passage for circulating the cooling between the radiator and the water jacket, and a cooling water temperature detecting means for outputting signal related to the cooling water temperature detecting means for outputting

T. Taguchi; M. Nakano; N. Hiramoto; H. Tominaga

1986-01-01

295

Accelerated Capacity Development in Water Resources Education: the experiences of the Ethiopian Institute of Water Resources  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Ethiopia recently recognises that the water resources development is the major entry point in poverty alleviation and sustainable development. Water in Ethiopia plays a key role in the Water-Energy-Food-nexus. Over 98% of the electricity in the country is generated using hydropower and yet about 2000 MW has been developed. Out of the 3.5 Mha potentially irrigable land, only 0.25 Mha has been developed to date. Access to drinking water supply coverage is among the lowest in the world. One of the limiting factors in harnessing the resource base is the absence of water professionals to face the fast growing demand in education, research, development in the water sector. Recognising this, in collaboration with University of Connecticut of the United States, Addis Ababa University launched the Ethiopian Institute of Water Resources (EIWR) by enrolling 18 PhD and 24 MSc students. The program is unique in that much of the course instructors are coming from US and European Universities, but deliver courses together with Ethiopian collaborators. This is supposed to facilitate knowledge and experience transfer from the US/EU scientist to Ethiopian counterparts. The theses/dissertations are designed to focus on Ethiopia's immediate hydrological problems on selected basins, and will be coordinated by three advisors for each PhD - one from US/EU, one from Ethiopian Universities, and one water professional from the sector. We report here the lessons learned in setting up the EIWR institute and the education program.

Alamirew, T.; Mekonnen, G.; Viglione, A.

2012-04-01

296

BENJAMIN M. STATLER COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING AND MINERAL RESOURCES 4 Engineers Energize the World  

E-print Network

air, water, and soil; improving upon current recycling methods; and devising new ways to manage solid this energy to consumers. In addition, engineers work to improve these processes and to increase energy waste and wastewater. By assessing the environmental impact of everything we do, engineers

Mohaghegh, Shahab

297

AOIPS water resources data management system  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The text and computer-generated displays used to demonstrate the AOIPS (Atmospheric and Oceanographic Information Processing System) water resources data management system are investigated. The system was developed to assist hydrologists in analyzing the physical processes occurring in watersheds. It was designed to alleviate some of the problems encountered while investigating the complex interrelationships of variables such as land-cover type, topography, precipitation, snow melt, surface runoff, evapotranspiration, and streamflow rates. The system has an interactive image processing capability and a color video display to display results as they are obtained.

Vanwie, P.

1977-01-01

298

Public Participation in Integrated Water Resource Management: Villages in Lao PDR and the Mekong River Basin.  

E-print Network

??Several authors have challenged Integrated Water Resource Management (IWRM) as inoperable and technocratic for the issues surrounding water resources known as contemporary water resource politics.… (more)

Ko, Julia

2009-01-01

299

ANALYTICAL CAPABILITY - ISOTOPE HYDROLOGY LABORATORY (WATER QUALITY MANAGEMENT BRANCH, WATER SUPPLY AND WATER RESOURCES DIVISION, NRMRL)  

EPA Science Inventory

The mission of NRMRL's Water Supply and Water Resources Division's Isotope Hydrology Laboratory is to resolve environmental hydrology problems through research and application of naturally occurring isotopes. Analytical capabilities at IHL include light stable isotope radio mass...

300

Water You Engineering? An Activity to Develop Water-Quality Awareness  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Water is one of our most precious resources. However, for many in the United States, having fresh, safe drinking water is taken for granted, and due to this perceived lack of relevance, students may not fully appreciate the luxury of having safe running water--in the home. One approach to resolving water-quality issues in the United States may reside in providing education that presents accurate information in a meaningful way. Accordingly, this article describes a unit designed to emphasize the importance of water-quality testing and purification and to introduce students to local water-quality issues. The engineering-based module of this eighth-grade science activity is particularly important due to the design-build-test component.

Todd, Carrie D.; Riskowski, Jody

2009-04-01

301

Hawaii Bioenergy Master Plan Land and Water Resources  

E-print Network

, that will utilize the fuel once it is produced. To evaluate Hawaii's water resources and their potential to support water, desalinated water, and other; · Document the potential for biomass production in conjunction irrigation techniques; and · Estimate and document biofuel production potential based on water resources

302

Funded by Arkansas Natural Resources Commission through Beaver Water District  

E-print Network

including pH, conductivity, water temperature, and dissolved oxygen concentration. The selected sites wereFunded by Arkansas Natural Resources Commission through Beaver Water District MSC Publication 362 | Arkansas Water Resources Center WATER QUALITY MONITORING AND CONSTITUENT LOAD ESTIMATION IN THE UPPER WHITE

Soerens, Thomas

303

Assessment tools for dryland water resources  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Since water resources are scarce across dryland areas, including Mediterranean Europe and much of Africa, the sparseness of meteo and hydrometric networks require the application of indirect methods to make best use of existing resources, and to plan for future needs in a world of changing climates. Although remote sensing methods may be among the most effective for present conditions, they have limited forecasting potential. Here we apply coarse scale modelling approaches, based on partitioning precipitation between evapotranspiration, runoff and recharge , and making use of CRU interpolated gridded climate data for the present and recent past, with offsets for future conditions based on GCM scenarios. These methods can be applied at a range of scales: first to provide broad regionalisation patterns for hydrological response and second to provide default background data that can be supplemented by local data to provide site-specific advice to land managers. These methods have been applied in the EU MIRAGE project to regionalise the frequency of the dry phase in temporary streams during the Mediterranean summer, to help define reference ecological conditions across the humid to arid spectrum. They are also being applied in the EU WAHARA project to support the sharing of appropriate good practice for water harvesting in semi-arid Africa, in partnership with researchers in Ethiopia, Tunisia, Zambia and Burkina-Faso. Initial results show where it appropriate to consider transferring techniques between climatically comparable areas.

Kirkby, Mike; Gallart, Francesc; Irvine, Brian; Fleskens, Luuk; Froebrich, Jochen

2013-04-01

304

Engineering measures for reservoirs and irrigation to reduce water-borne diseases  

Microsoft Academic Search

Water resources engineers from countries with a temperate climate are often little aware of the health hazards which reservoir and irrigation development may impose on the population in the neighbourhood of such projects. The World Health Organization (WHO) has identified more than three dozen diseases which are related to water. These will be described. While directly infectious diseases are mostly

JOSEF F. MOCK

305

July 1, 2006 College of Engineering and Mineral Resources  

E-print Network

in Biometric Systems Bachelor of Science in Industrial Engineering Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering Bachelor of Science in Mining Engineering Bachelor of Science in Petroleum and Natural Gas Engineering Computer Engineering and Electrical Engineering Computer Engineering and Biometrics Systems

Mohaghegh, Shahab

306

January 1, 2007 College of Engineering and Mineral Resources  

E-print Network

in Biometric Systems Bachelor of Science in Industrial Engineering Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering Bachelor of Science in Mining Engineering Bachelor of Science in Petroleum and Natural Gas Engineering Computer Engineering and Electrical Engineering Computer Engineering and Biometrics Systems

Mohaghegh, Shahab

307

July 1, 2009 College of Engineering and Mineral Resources  

E-print Network

in Biometric Systems Bachelor of Science in Industrial Engineering Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering Bachelor of Science in Mining Engineering Bachelor of Science in Petroleum and Natural Gas Engineering Computer Engineering and Electrical Engineering Computer Engineering and Biometrics Systems

Mohaghegh, Shahab

308

July 1, 2007 College of Engineering and Mineral Resources  

E-print Network

in Biometric Systems Bachelor of Science in Industrial Engineering Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering Bachelor of Science in Mining Engineering Bachelor of Science in Petroleum and Natural Gas Engineering Computer Engineering and Electrical Engineering Computer Engineering and Biometrics Systems

Mohaghegh, Shahab

309

July 1, 2008 College of Engineering and Mineral Resources  

E-print Network

in Biometric Systems Bachelor of Science in Industrial Engineering Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering Bachelor of Science in Mining Engineering Bachelor of Science in Petroleum and Natural Gas Engineering Computer Engineering and Electrical Engineering Computer Engineering and Biometrics Systems

Mohaghegh, Shahab

310

Training Resources Page 1 of 6 USGS Training Resources for Ground-Water Hydrology  

E-print Network

Training Resources Page 1 of 6 USGS Training Resources for Ground-Water Hydrology Resources listed;Training Resources Page 2 of 6 Copies are available for purchase from the National Ground Water Association://ma.water.usgs.gov/publications/WRIR_99-4225/index.htm) 3. Bennett, G.D., Reilly, T.E., and Hill, M.C., 1990, Technical training note

Torgersen, Christian

311

Understanding Water Conservation in Williamstown: Protecting a "Plentiful" Resource  

E-print Network

Understanding Water Conservation in Williamstown: Protecting a "Plentiful" Resource, an international organization committed to water conservation practice and advocacy, the global population tripled's quote embodies one of the greatest difficulties facing the contemporary movement for water conservation

Aalberts, Daniel P.

312

JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN WATER RESOURCES ASSOCIATION VOL. 37, NO. 5 AMERICAN WATER RESOURCES ASSOCIATION OCTOBER 2001  

E-print Network

water column P. The physical process of flow and sediment sorption apparently regulated P reten- tionJOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN WATER RESOURCES ASSOCIATION VOL. 37, NO. 5 AMERICAN WATER RESOURCES on water chemistry and nutrient retention in Spavinaw Creek, Arkansas, during summer baseflows in 1998

Stanley, Emily

313

VIRTUAL WATER: A FRAMEWORK FOR COMPARATIVE REGIONAL RESOURCE ASSESSMENT  

Microsoft Academic Search

New developments in water resource allocation techniques range from local management of green water to international trade in water. A further extension of this is through the virtual water concept, which is the water required to produce a crop or product. The virtual water content of many products is now available at a national and global scale. While these calculations

EMILY KATE SCHENDEL; JENNIFER R. MACDONALD; HANS SCHREIER; LES M. LAVKULICH

2007-01-01

314

Water Resources Data - Texas, Water Year 2003, Volume 6. Ground Water  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Water-resources data for the 2003 water year for Texas consists of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage and contents in lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality in wells. Volume 6 contains water levels for 880 ground-water observation wells and water-quality data for 158 monitoring wells. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating Federal, State, and local agencies in Texas.

Barbie, D.L.

2003-01-01

315

natural resources training program The goal of training programs coordinated by the Texas Water Resources  

E-print Network

Resources Institute (TWRI) and the Texas A&M Institute of Renewable Natural Resources (IRNR) is helping land Institute ·Texas A&M Institute of Renewable Natural Resources ·Texas AgriLife Extension Service ·Texas Agrinatural resources training program The goal of training programs coordinated by the Texas Water

316

Total Water Management: The New Paradigm for Urban Water Resources Planning  

EPA Science Inventory

There is a growing need for urban water managers to take a more holistic view of their water resource systems as population growth, urbanization, and current resource management practices put different stresses on local water resources and urban infrastructure. Total Water Manag...

317

July 1, 2008 College of Engineering and Mineral Resources  

E-print Network

of Philosophy Occupational Safety and Health: Doctor of Philosophy Petroleum and Natural Gas Engineering: Master Science and Electrical Engineering, Industrial and Management Systems Engineering, Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Mining Engineering, and Petroleum and Natural Gas Engineering. The facilities

Mohaghegh, Shahab

318

July 1, 2009 College of Engineering and Mineral Resources  

E-print Network

of Philosophy Occupational Safety and Health: Doctor of Philosophy Petroleum and Natural Gas Engineering: Master Science and Electrical Engineering, Industrial and Management Systems Engineering, Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Mining Engineering, and Petroleum and Natural Gas Engineering. The facilities

Mohaghegh, Shahab

319

Quantitative determination of engine water ingestion  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper describes a novel non-intrusive optical technique for determination of liquid mass flux in a droplet laden airstream. The technique was developed for quantitative determination of engine water ingestion resulting from heavy rain or wheel spray. Independent measurements of the liquid water content (LWC) of the droplet laden aircraft and of the droplet velocities were made at the simulated nacelle inlet plane for the liquid mass flux determination. The liquid water content was measured by illuminating and photographing the droplets contained within a thin slice of the flow field by means of a sheet of light from a pulsed YAG laser. A fluorescent dye introduced in the water greatly improved the droplet image definition. The droplet velocities were determined from double exposed photographs of the moving droplet field. The technique was initially applied to a steady spray generated in a wind tunnel. It was found that although the spray was initially steady, the aerodynamic breakup process was inherently unsteady. This resulted in a wide variation of the instantaneous liquid water content of the droplet laden airstream. The standard deviation of ten separate LWC measurements was 31 percent of the average. However, the liquid mass flux calculated from the average LWC and droplet velocities came within 10 percent of the known water ingestion rate.

Parikh, P.; Hernan, M.; Sarohia, V.

1986-01-01

320

Water resources carrying capacity analysis in Strategic Environmental Assessment  

Microsoft Academic Search

Water resources is the essential and basic natural resources for human living, it is one of the most important factors for restricting natural environment, human survival and development. China is facing serious water pollution and water shortages. In this paper, based on \\

Jie Ding; Jianfu Zhao; Zengsheng Zhang

2011-01-01

321

FOG COLLECTION AS A COMPLEMENTARY WATER RESOURCE IN EGYPT  

Microsoft Academic Search

Fog is an environmental water resource of great importance. It plays an integral role in many diverse ecosystems. A very special part of the fog activities in the world today is focused on fog collection to provide water for managed use. One of the most exciting aspects of this resource is that in many regions the supply of water will

Ayman F. Batisha

322

Working Paper 123 Water Resources and Irrigation Development in  

E-print Network

#12;#12;Working Paper 123 Water Resources and Irrigation Development in Ethiopia Seleshi Bekele., Ayana, M.; Alamirew, T. 2007. Water Resources and Irrigation Development in Ethiopia. Colombo, Sri Lanka: International Water Management Institute. 78p. (Working Paper 123) / irrigation programs / irrigation potential

Menke, William

323

Water Resources Brent Lofgren, NOAA, Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory  

E-print Network

Lakes, for example, hold nearly 20% of the earth's accessible surface fresh water supply and haveChapter 12 Water Resources AUTHORS Brent Lofgren, NOAA, Great Lakes Environmental Research, B., and A. Gronewold, 2014. Water resources. In: Climate Change in the Midwest: A Synthesis Report

324

Second Forum on Energy & Water Sustainability: Increasing Resource Productivity  

E-print Network

Second Forum on Energy & Water Sustainability: Increasing Resource Productivity April 10, 2009 2) Technological solutions to increase energy productivity 3) Energy-water co-benefits of increasing resource productivity 4) Case Studies of combined energy-water conservation projects 5) Private Sector

Keller, Arturo A.

325

Water resources data Texas, water year 2004, volume 6. ground water  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Water-resources data for the 2004 water year for Texas consists of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage and contents in lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality in wells. Volume 6 contains water levels for 913 groundwater observation wells and water-quality data for 150 monitoring wells. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating Federal, State, and local agencies in Texas.

Barbie, Dana L.; Reece, Brian D.; Eames, Deanna R.

2005-01-01

326

Geography 347: Water as a Resource Lecture Schedule -Fall, 2012  

E-print Network

Change; Evaporation and Global Fresh Water Ch.3&4 3 Sept.4 Tu Infiltration and Surface Runoff Ch.5 Th as a Resource Lecture Schedule - Fall, 2012 Week Day Topic Readings Section IV. Water Use; Supply & Demand 10 Tu -------- 11 Tu Water Economics: concepts, increasing supplies Ch.18 Nov.1,Th Water Economics (cont.): water

James, L. Allan

327

Technical Review of Water-Resources Investigations of the Tule Desert, Lincoln County, Southern Nevada  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Nevada State Engineer in Ruling No. 5181 required Lincoln County and Vidler Water Company, Inc., to provide results from additional water-resources studies of Tule Desert in southern Nevada to support water-rights application 64692. As outlined by the ruling, the additional studies were to include the determination of the amount of ground water available from the Tule Desert basin, ground-water recharge to the Tule Desert, and the direction of ground-water flow. Results of these additional studies were published in five reports prepared for Lincoln County and Vidler Water Company, Inc. The National Park Service formally requested that the U.S. Geological Survey provide technical reviews of these five reports. The Nevada State Engineer in Ruling No. 5181 required Lincoln County and Vidler Water Company, Inc., to provide results from additional water-resources studies of Tule Desert in southern Nevada to support water-rights application 64692. As outlined by the ruling, the additional studies were to include the determination of the amount of ground water available from the Tule Desert basin, ground-water recharge to the Tule Desert, and the direction of ground-water flow. Results of these additional studies were published in five reports prepared for Lincoln County and Vidler Water Company, Inc. The National Park Service formally requested that the U.S. Geological Survey provide technical reviews of these five reports.

Berger, David L.; Halford, Keith J.; Belcher, Wayne R.; Lico, Michael S.

2008-01-01

328

Acid mine water treatment using engineered wetlands  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

During the last two decades, the United States mining industry has greatly increased the amount it spends on pollution control. The application of biotechnology to mine water can reduce the industry's water treatment costs (estimated at over a million dollars a day) and improve water quality in streams and rivers adversely affected by acidic mine water draining from abandoned mines. Biological treatment of mine waste water is typically conducted in a series of small excavated ponds that resemble, in a superficial way, a small marsh area. The ponds are engineered to first facilitate bacterial oxidation of iron; ideally, the water then flows through a composted organic substrate that supports a population of sulfate-reducing bacteria. The latter process raises the pH. During the past four years, over 400 wetland water treatment systems have been built on mined lands as a result of research by the U.S. Bureau of Mines. In general, mine operators find that the wetlands reduce chemical treatment costs enough to repay the cost of wetland construction in less than a year. Actual rates of iron removal at field sites have been used to develop empirical sizing criteria based on iron loading and pH. If the pH is 6 or above, the wetland area (m2) required is equivalent to the iron load (grams/day) divided by 10. Theis requirement doubles at a pH of 4 to 5. At a pH below 4, the iron load (grams/day) should be divided by 2 to estimate the area required (m2).

Kleinmann, Robert L. P.

1990-03-01

329

Structure for Headquarters in the Water Resources Discipline Office of Water Quality  

E-print Network

Structure for Headquarters in the Water Resources Discipline Office of Water Quality Donna Myers Chief Branch of Quality Systems George Ritz National Water Quality Laboratory (Acting) Dave Reppert Quality Mark Niles National Streamflow Accounting Network Charlie Crawford National Water Quality

Fleskes, Joe

330

Analysis of U.S. Water Resources under Climate Change  

E-print Network

The MIT Integrated Global System Model (IGSM) framework, extended to include a Water Resource System (WRS) component, is applied to an integrated assessment of effects of alternative climate policy scenarios on U.S. water ...

Blanc, E.

331

Quantitative determination of engine water ingestion  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A nonintrusive optical technique is described for determination of liquid mass flux in a droplet laden airstream. The techniques were developed for quantitative determination of engine water ingestion resulting from heavy rain or wheel spray. Independent measurements of the liquid water content (LWC) of the droplet laden airstream and of the droplet velocities were made at the stimulated nacelle inlet plane for the liquid mass flux determination. The LWC was measured by illuminating and photographing the droplets contained within a thin slice of the flow field by means of a sheet of light from a pulsed laser. A fluorescent dye introduced in the water enchanced the droplet image definition. The droplet velocities were determined from double exposed photographs of the moving droplet field. The technique was initially applied to a steady spray generated in a wind tunnel. It was found that although the spray was initially steady, the aerodynamic breakup process was inherently unsteady. This resulted in a wide variation of the instantaneous LWC of the droplet laden airstream. The standard deviation of ten separate LWC measurements was 31% of the average. However, the liquid mass flux calculated from the average LWC and droplet velocities came within 10% of the known water ingestion rate.

Parikh, P.; Hernan, M.; Sarohia, V.

1986-01-01

332

Water resources data, Maryland and Delaware, water year 1997, volume 2. ground-water data  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Water Resources Division of the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with State agencies, obtains a large amount of data pertaining to the water resources of Maryland and Delaware each water year. These data, accumulated during many water years, constitute a valuable data base for developing an improved understanding of the water resources of the State. To make these data readily available to interested parties outside the U.S. Geological Survey, the data are published annually in this report series entitled 'Water Resources Data - Maryland and Delaware.' This series of annual reports for Maryland and Delaware began with the 1961 water year with a report that contained only data relating to the quantities of surface water. For the 1964 water year, a similar report was introduced that contained only data relating to water quality. Beginning with the l975 water year, the report format was changed to present, in one volume, data on quantities of surface water, quality of surface and ground water, and ground-water levels. In the 1989 water year, the report format was changed to two volumes. Both volumes contained data on quantities of surface water, quality of surface and ground water, and ground-water levels. Volume 1 contained data on the Atlantic Slope Basins (Delaware River thru Patuxent River) and Volume 2 contained data on the Monongahela and Potomac River basins. Beginning with the 1991 water year, Volume 1 contains all information on quantities of surface water and surface- water-quality data and Volume 2 contains ground-water levels and ground-water-quality data. This report is Volume 2 in our 1998 series and includes records of water levels and water quality of ground-water wells and springs. It contains records for water levels at 397 observation wells, discharge data for 6 springs, and water quality at 107 wells. Location of ground-water level wells are shown on figures 3 and 4. The location for the ground-water-quality sites are shown on figures 5. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System collected by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating State and Federal agencies in Maryland and Delaware. Prior to introduction of this series and for several water years concurrent with it, water resources data for Maryland and Delaware were published in U.S. Geological Survey Water-Supply Papers. Data on water levels for the 1935 through 1974 water years were published under the title 'Ground-Water Levels in the United States.' The above mentioned Water-Supply Papers may be consulted in the libraries of the principal cities of the United States and may be purchased from the Branch of Information Services, Federal Center, Bldg. 41, Box 25286, Denver, CO 80225-0286. Publications similar to this report are published annually by the Geological Survey for all States. These official Survey reports have an identification number consisting of the two-letter State abbreviation, the last two digits of the water year, and the volume number. For example, this volume is identified as 'U.S. Geological Survey Water-Data Report MD-DE-98-2.' For archiving and general distribution, the reports for l971- 74 water years also are identified as water data reports. These water-data reports are for sale in paper copy or in microfiche by the National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, Springfield, VA 22161. Additional information, including current prices, for ordering specific reports may be obtained from the District Chief at the address given on the back of the title page or by telephone (410)238-4200.

Smigaj, Michael J.; Saffer, Richard W.; Starsoneck, Roger J.; Tegeler, Judith L.

1998-01-01

333

USEPA?s Water Resource Adaptation Program (WRAP) ? Drinking Water Research and Global Climate Change  

EPA Science Inventory

The Water Resource Adaptation Program (WRAP) contributes to EPA?s efforts to provide water resource managers and decision makers with the tools they need to adapt water resources (e.g., watersheds and infrastructure) to future climate change and demographic and economic developme...

334

Training days: TWRI coordinates water resources training programs  

E-print Network

tx H2O | pg. 2 Training days TWRI coordinates water resources training programs | pg. 2 Story by Ric Jensen tx H2O | pg. 3 H elping water professionals learn how to manage water resources is the goal of new training programs coordinated... (APEX), Water Rights Analysis Package (WRAP), and EPANET. In other training programs, the institute is working with Texas AgriLife Research, Texas AgriLife Extension Service, state and federal agencies, and various universities to conduct training...

Jensen, Ric

2008-01-01

335

Water Resources Data, New Jersey, Water Year 2005Volume 3 - Water-Quality Data  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Water-resources data for the 2005 water year for New Jersey are presented in three volumes, and consists of records of stage, discharge, and water-quality of streams; stage and contents of lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water-quality of ground water. Volume 3 contains a summary of surface- and ground-water hydrologic conditions for the 2005 water year, a listing of current water-resources projects in New Jersey, a bibliography of water-related reports, articles, and fact sheets for New Jersey completed by the Geological Survey in recent years, water-quality records of chemical analyses from 118 continuing-record surface-water stations, 30 ground-water sites, records of daily statistics of temperature and other physical measurements from 9 continuous-recording stations, and 5 special studies that included 89 stream, 11 lake, and 29 ground-water sites. Locations of water-quality stations are shown in figures 23-25. Locations of special-study sites are shown in figures 41-46. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating federal, state, and local agencies in New Jersey.

DeLuca, Michael J.; Heckathorn, Heather A.; Lewis, Jason M.; Gray, Bonnie J.; Feinson, Lawrence S.

2006-01-01

336

Water Resources Data, New Jersey, Water Year 2003; Volume 3. Water-Quality Data  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Water-resources data for the 2003 water year for New Jersey are presented in three volumes, and consists of records of stage, discharge, and water-quality of streams; stage and contents of lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water-quality of ground water. Volume 3 contains a summary of surface- and ground-water hydrologic conditions for the 2003 water year, a listing of current water-resources projects in New Jersey, a bibliography of water-related reports, articles, and fact sheets for New Jersey completed by the Geological Survey in recent years, water-quality records of chemical analyses from 123 continuing-record surface-water stations, 35 ground-water sites, records of daily statistics of temperature and other physical measurements from 20 continuous-recording stations, and 5 special-study sites consisting of 2 surface-water sites, 1 spring site, and 240 groundwater sites. Locations of water-quality stations are shown in figures 21-25. Locations of special-study sites are shown in figures 49-53. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating federal, state, and local agencies in New Jersey.

DeLuca, Michael J.; Hoppe, Heidi L.; Heckathorn, Heather A.; Riskin, Melissa L.; Gray, Bonnie J.; Melvin, Emma-Lynn; Liu, Nicholas A.

2004-01-01

337

Human resources in science and engineering: Policy implications  

SciTech Connect

Recently, there has been much debate concerning the adequacy of the United States` (U.S.) human resources base to meet its future needs for science and engineering (S/E) talent. Science policy analysts - and scientists and engineers themselves - disagree about whether there will be any shortages of scientists and engineers, and if so, what they will mean for the U.S. Whether or not these shortages materialize, it is necessary for the U.S. to expand the pool from which it recruits its S/E talent. This paper addresses the question of how to increases the diversity of the S/E talent pool to include those who are projected by the year 2000 to be the majority of entry-level workers in the U.S. workforce: women and racial/ethnic minorities. Market forces alone cannot increase the size and diversity of the U.S. S/E workforce. Policy intervention will continue to be required to increase the diversity of the S/E workforce.

Leggon, C.B.

1995-12-31

338

Water resources data, Maryland and Delaware, water year 1999, volume 2. ground-water data  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Water resources data for the 1999 water year for Maryland and Delaware consist of records of water levels and water quality of ground-water wells. This report (Volume 2. Ground-Water Data) contains water levels at 395 observation wells, discharge records for 6 springs and water quality at 1 spring, 186 wells, and 27 streambed piezometers. Locations of ground-water level wells are shown on figures 5 and 6. Locations of ground-water-quality sites are shown on figure 7. The data in this report represent that part of the National Water Data System collected by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating State, local, and Federal agencies in Maryland and Delaware.

Saffer, Richard W.; Starsoneck, Roger J.; Marchand, Elizabeth H.; Smigaj, Michael J.

2000-01-01

339

Senate working on reauthorization of water resources development bill  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Although the details are not even written for forthcoming legislation to reauthorize the U.S. federal Water Resources Development Act (WRDA), three broad themes emerged during a 20 September hearing by the U.S. Senate Committee on Environment and Public Works (EPW). First, passage of the WRDA bill, which would authorize water projects around the country, already appears to have bipartisan support, as well as support from conservation, industry, and labor groups. WRDA was last reauthorized in 2007 when the Senate voted 79-14 in broad bipartisan support to override President George W. Bush's veto of the $23 billion bill. Second, although the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers—which manages, operates, and maintains a vast water resources infrastructure including more than 600 dams, 926 harbors, and 12,000 miles of commercial inland navigation channels—received some praise for its projects, it was also criticized as being a bureaucracy in need of repair. Third, WRDA legislation is operating under different ground rules than in the past. EPW committee chair Barbara Boxer (D-Calif.) said that she has been working with Republicans on WRDA legislation and that she hopes to move forward with a bill later this year—possibly bringing it up for a markup during Congress's lame duck session following the national election in November. She said that would be a way to set a marker for leadership on both sides of the congressional aisle to move forward with the bill. Boxer said she would “get my dream bill in place” and then provide it to committee ranking member James Inhofe (R-Okla.) and other Republicans for their comments.

Showstack, Randy

2012-10-01

340

On the matter of sustainable water resources management  

EPA Science Inventory

This chapter attempts to develop the concept of sustainability and make it operational in the realm of water resources management. Water is unique in its primacy among natural resources as an essential component of life itself. Due to its equally unique chemical and physical prop...

341

Forest Influences on Climate and Water Resources at the Landscape  

E-print Network

Chapter 15 Forest Influences on Climate and Water Resources at the Landscape to Regional Scale Ge of forests and climate and water resources at the landscape and regional scale. The paper presents two case studies that examine the influences of forests on microclimate, watershed hydrology, and regional climate

Phipps, Steven J.

342

Assessment of Resources and Needs for Water Development  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents a brief history of water resource utilization, the present availability and uses of water, and strategies for water management. Three characteristic features of water demand management are explained: (1) emphasis on non-structural measures; (2) multi-dimensional organization and policies; (3) emphasis on research. (MA)

United Nations and Water, 1977

1977-01-01

343

Monty C. Dozier, Assistant Professor and Extension Water Resources Specialist  

E-print Network

, coffee filter or paper towel into a container to remove any sediment or floating matter. Boil the waterER-002 6-06 Monty C. Dozier, Assistant Professor and Extension Water Resources Specialist Courtney such as a hurricane or flood, your water supplies may have become contaminated or been temporarily cut off. To make

344

Natural resources accounting: A tool for water resources management in Botswana  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Natural Resource Accounting (NRA) has become an important environmental/natural resources management tool in recent years. It provides information on stocks of a resource available at a particular point in time and what activities the resource is being used for. The conventional System of National Income Accounts (SNA) normally does not capture the cost of depletion, degradation or pollution of natural resources. This encourages unsustainable use of natural resources since the costs are not reflected when assessing the country’s economic performance or development progress. NRA is thus an attempt to integrate environmental issues into the conventional national accounts. The water sector is one sector that could greatly benefit from this natural resource management tool. Botswana has adopted NRA as a natural resource management tool and has so far developed accounts for minerals, livestock and water. The focus of this paper is on Water Accounting (WA) in relation to Integrated Water Resources Management (IWRM). IWRM is concerned with coordinated development and management of water in order to maximise economic and social welfare without compromising the sustainability of ecosystems. WA helps fill data gaps since it provides the required information for IWRM to be achieved. The aim of this paper therefore is to evaluate the Water Accounts of Botswana Report of 2006 to determine the extent to which it can contribute to integrated water resources management. The paper is based on literature review and the results show that: the available water stocks vary depending on rainfall patterns, well fields are over utilised, there has been growth in consumption, and more than 80% of the waste water produced is not being put to use. These results calls for changes in policies, role of institutions and practices pertaining to water resources management which is what IWRM is all about hence the paper concludes that indeed WA can contribute to the realisation of IWRM.

Hambira, Wame L.

345

USGS Water Resources: Water Use in the United States (title provided or enhanced by cataloger)  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This portal, published by the United States Geological Survey (USGS) Water Resources Program, provides access to information on national water use. There are links to a set of reports and data on U.S. water use from 1985 to 2000. Other links access a map comparison of consumptive use and renewable water supply by water-resources region, introductory material on the National Water-Use Information Program, a bibliography, and a handbook for collecting water use data.

346

Challenges for the management of water resource systems under the impact of global climate change \\/ The Yesa reservoir in the Spanish Pyrenees as an example  

Microsoft Academic Search

It is becoming obvious that climate change has profound impacts on water resource systems, composed of natural ecosystem, engineered facilities and management institutions. As a consequence a successful management strategy of water resource systems has to meet the challenge of more frequent extremes with respect to the criteria of sustainability. This might lead to reduced water availability facing an increased

A. Winterscheid

2003-01-01

347

Review of water resource potential for developing geothermal resource sites in the western United States  

SciTech Connect

Water resources at 28 known geothermal resource areas (KGRAs) in the western United States are reviewed. Primary emphasis is placed upon examination of the waer resources, both surface and ground, that exist in the vicinity of the KGRAs located in the southwestern states of California, Arizona, Utah, Nevada, and New Mexico. In most of these regions water has been in short supply for many years and consequently a discussion of competing demands is included to provide an appropriate perspective on overall usage. A discussion of the water resources in the vicinity of KGRAs in the States of Montana, Idaho, Oregon, and Washington are also included.

Sonnichsen, J.C. Jr.

1980-07-01

348

Manatee County government's commitment to Florida's water resources  

SciTech Connect

With ever increasing development demands in coastal areas and subsequent declines in natural resources, especially water, coastal communities must identify creative options for sustaining remaining water resources and an accepted standard of living. The Manatee County agricultural reuse project, using reclaimed wastewater is part of a water resource program, is designed to meet these challenges. The reuse system works in concert with consumer conservation practices and efficiency of use measures which are being implemented by all public and private sector water users in this southwest Florida community.

Hunsicker, C.

1998-07-01

349

A Bachelor of Engineering Technology Curriculum in Water Quality Management: Course Guides.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Contained are course guides for a Bachelor of Engineering Technology (BET) Curriculum in Water Quality Management. Detailed course content, as well as instructional resources, are included in this volume. Each guide is written in behavioral terms using the instructional objective format. A suggested curriculum is shown with methods of…

Cole, Charles A.; And Others

350

Water Resource Management in an Uncertain Climate: Science, Planning and Decisionmaking  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Water resource management relies on scietific information. However this information is used in the context of social and environmental factors that are not always well articulated or understood. Because of the central importance of water resources (economically, politically and culturally) many water management decisions may seem counter-intuitive to scientific researchers. This presentation explores the perspectives of scientists, engineers and managers in the context of water resources management in the Western United States. It is based on the research and the practical experience of the authors.Lessons are drawn for improved coordination, communication and joint learning between scientists and practitioners in situations where both technical uncertainty and the decision stakes are large.

Pulwarty, R.; Jacobs, K.

2003-04-01

351

Water Resources Data for Florida, Water Year 1999. Volume 1A. Northeast Florida Surface Water.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Water resources data for the 1999 water year in Florida consist of continuous or or daily discharge for 354 streams, periodic discharge for 17 streams, continuous or daily stage for 121 streams, periodic stage for 1 stream, peak stage and discharge for 38...

2000-01-01

352

Assessment of water resources and implementation of rural water supplies in western Kenya  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Kenya-Finland Water Supply Programme has been operating mainly in the Western Province of Kenya. Among other activities it has assessed the water resources and made water supply development plan for the area. It is also implementing the plan. Surface water resources are abundant, but the quality is poor. Reasons for the poor quality are effluent from some factories and

AIMO RUQTSALAINEN; PERTTI TURUNEN

353

July 1, 2005 College of Engineering and Mineral Resources  

E-print Network

and management systems engineering; mechanical and aerospace engineering; mining engineering; and petroleum in Biometric Systems Bachelor of Science in Industrial Engineering Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering Bachelor of Science in Mining Engineering Bachelor of Science in Petroleum and Natural Gas

Mohaghegh, Shahab

354

Experience in using the water resources of the Novosibirsk reservoir  

SciTech Connect

With the creation of the Novosibirsk hydrodevelopment a water-management complex was formed on its basis, which unites water users and water consumers such as hydropower, water transport, irrigation, municipal services, agriculture, forestry, and fishery. During the 30-year operation of the hydrodevelopment changes have occurred in the natural conditions on the stretch of the Ob river adjacent to the development which was the cause of the occurrence of a considerable shortage of water resources in years with a low runoff of the river. To increase the effectiveness of using water resources of the Novosibirsk reservoir, organizational and technical measures on providing the normal activities of the water-management complex under conditions of a water resource shortage have partially been and will be carried out in the near future.

Bityukov, V.P.

1988-07-01

355

State of ISRAEL Water Resources Management  

E-print Network

Supply System #12;State of ISRAEL Complexity of the water distribution system · Different Sources Actions for Closing the Gap ­Between Supply and Demand Long Term Water saving and efficient use of water 600 650 700 750 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 Fresh Water used for Agriculture

Einat, Aharonov

356

New Developments in GIS in Water Resources  

E-print Network

• Standardized formats Data: • Dynamic in time • Simple in space (points) • No standardized formats What is “Hydro”? • Hydrology • Hydrography Circulation of the waters of the earth through the hydrologic cycle The “blue lines” on maps Properties of Water... Standardized formats Data: Dynamic in time Simple in space (points) No standardized formats What is “Hydro”? Hydrology Hydrography Circulation of the waters of the earth through the hydrologic cycle The “blue lines” on maps Properties of WaterWater...

Maidment, David

2008-11-19

357

Engineering Considerations for Privatizing Water and Wastewater Utility Systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

Due to shrinking federal, state, and local utility budgets, city management structures requiring more cost effect utility operating models, and ever more stringent environmental regulations requiring technical expertise, engineers are now faced with adapting to, evaluating, and providing technical support for various forms of utilities privatization. Utilities privatization (UP) is a method to leverage engineering and monetary resources to operate

Dana Evans Voight

2009-01-01

358

Conjunctive use of water resources for sustainable irrigated agriculture  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The continuous increase in global population and simultaneous decrease in good quality water resources emphasizes the need of using surface water and groundwater resources conjunctively for irrigation. The conjunctive use allows the utilization of poor quality water, which cannot be used as such for the crop production due to its harmful effect on soil and crop health. This paper presents an overview on issues and methods of the conjunctive use of surface water and groundwater resources for sustainable irrigated agriculture. The background of the conjunctive water use and its applications for the management of poor quality water and management of rising watertable are presented. The management of conjunctive water use through the computer-based models is also covered in this review. The advantages and disadvantages of the approach have been described. Conclusions are provided based on this review which could be useful for all the stakeholders.

Singh, Ajay

2014-11-01

359

Current water resources activities in Arkansas, 1986-87  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report describes water resources activities conducted by the Arkansas District of the U.S. Geological Survey, Water Resources Division during fiscal years 1986 and 1987. Activities included surface water, groundwater, water quality, and water-use investigations. Eighteen projects were funded during 1986 and 1987. For each project, a description of the project objectives, approach, plans and reports is included. Lists are included of reports completed during the period and of reports previously published by, or in conjunction with, the Geological Survey. (USGS)

Louthian, B.L.; Gann, E.E.

1988-01-01

360

Current water resources activities in Arkansas, 1984-85  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report describes water resources activities conducted by the Arkansas District of the U.S. Geological Survey, Water Resources Division, during fiscal years 1984 and 1985. Activities included surface water, groundwater, water quality, and water-use investigations. Twenty-five projects were funded during 1984 and 1985. For each project, a description of the project objectives, approach, plans and reports is included. Lists are included of reports completed during the period and of reports previously published by, or in conjunction with the Geological Survey. (USGS)

Louthian, B.L.; Gann, E.E.

1985-01-01

361

Water resources management in the framework of sustainable development  

Microsoft Academic Search

Two of the greatest problems of the human society are those related to water shortage and the degradation of the environment. The main causes of water shortage problems are (i) the demographic explosion, (ii) the rising of living standards, (iii) the short-term climatic changes and (iv) the management of water resources. It has been made clear that the measures taken

Ilias Mariolakos

2007-01-01

362

Multi-Level Learning Processes in (Water) Resource Governance  

E-print Network

Multi-Level Learning Processes in (Water) Resource Governance Systems Claudia Pahl-Wostl Professor towards more Adaptive Governance in River Basins) GWSP (Global Water System Project) #12;Tradition ,,Messy" Problems ? Government & Technical Experts Governance by many actors #12;Paradigm Shift in Water

Slatton, Clint

363

Approaches to Planning Water Resources Jay R. Lund, Professor  

E-print Network

lead water planners and policy makers to seek fundamental principles and approaches for organizing 1966). Rational planning ideas also have been employed in some of history's most innovative waterApproaches to Planning Water Resources Jay R. Lund, Professor Department of Civil and Environmental

Pasternack, Gregory B.

364

Water resources. [monitoring and management from ERTS-1 data  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

ERTS-1 applications in snow and ice monitoring, surface water monitoring, including monitoring of wetland areas and flood inundated area mapping, and also watershed monitoring for runoff prediction are discussed. Results also indicate that geological features can be noted which relate to ground water. ERTS-1 data can be used successfully in operational situations by water resources management agencies.

Salomonson, V. V.

1974-01-01

365

Citizen Involvement in Water Resources Issues in New England  

E-print Network

monitoring c. Lake, river, or bay protection groups d. Town conservation commissions e. Other water to #12;conserve and preserve water quality (Campbell, Johnson, & Larson, 2004). Extension programs seek and conservation of water resources (Beierle, 1999). Experiential learning has been shown to be very effective

Gold, Art

366

WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH, VOL. , NO. , PAGES 110, The Impact of Wettability Alteration on Two-Phase Flow  

E-print Network

WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH, VOL. , NO. , PAGES 1­10, The Impact of Wettability Alteration on Two, Sultan Qaboos University, Al-Khoudh, Oman Tad W. Patzek Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering (NAPLs) and gases that co-exist with water in soils and rocks, is of fundamental interest to subsurface

Patzek, Tadeusz W.

367

Water resource management problems in Romania  

Microsoft Academic Search

Water supply is an important contextual theme in programme of planned economic development. Using the Romanian example it is shown how increasingly heavy demands for water call for a more sophisticated approach to planning in each drainage basin, with measures to increase water storages and reduce pollution. Such activity can also bring important benefits for navigation, flood control and hydroelectricity

D. Turnock

1979-01-01

368

RESOURCES FOR OUTDOOR WATER USE DETERMINATION  

E-print Network

also found home owner-installed smart timers outperformedSmart” Irrigation Controller Programs . 34 Evaluation of Sensor-Based Residential Irrigation Water Application on HomesHomes Rating System .. 17 Research Report on Turfgrass Allowance 18 Model Water Efficient Landscape Ordinance . 18 The California Water Smart

Melody, Moya

2014-01-01

369

The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory Source Water Assessment  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) covers approximately 890 square miles and includes 12 public water systems that must be evaluated for Source water protection purposes under the Safe Drinking Water Act. Because of its size and location, six watersheds and five aquifers could potentially affect the INEEL's drinking water sources. Based on a preliminary evaluation of the

Sehlke

2003-01-01

370

A new modeling approach for water resources policy analysis  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Water resources policy analysis deals with the protection of people from the harmful effects of water and assurance of a consistent, adequate supply of usable water. Population and regulatory pressures, political and economic instabilities, and climatic variations can all be expected to further stress water supply resources. Developing policy for managing water systems for human needs in such an environment is difficult, slow, and very costly. The approach to water resources policy analysis developed in this paper is that of the rational decision maker who lays out goals and uses logical processes to explore the best way to reach those goals. The decision maker may be an individual or a group. The emphasis in this paper is on how water resources decisions ought to be analyzed and made. In establishing this framework we are proposing integration of object-oriented modeling approach with systems analysis. Our concern here is with how the water policy analysis process should be structured to best address a policy choice, and with the object- oriented model that will aid understanding and prediction. The proposed approach is illustrated in the paper by the case study of water resources policy analysis for Egypt.

Simonovic, Slobodan P.; Fahmy, Hussam

1999-01-01

371

ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING  

E-print Network

ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING www.cee.pdx.edu What do environmental engineers do? Civil and Environmental Engineering (CEE) is an exciting, challenging, and dynamic field that is critical to our quality of life. Environmental engineers help manage and protect natural resources like water supplies as well

372

Water resources and the urban environment--98  

SciTech Connect

This report contains all the papers presented at the meeting. There are 25 sessions and one poster session in the document. The Sessions are: (1) Landfill gas/groundwater interactions; (2) Urban solids management; (3) Local issues; (4) Surface water quality studies 1; (5) Reductive treatment of hazardous wastes with zero-valent iron; (6) Water reuse 1; (7) Biosolids management; (8) GIS information systems 1; (9) Drinking water distribution; (10) Anaerobic treatment; (11) Water reuse 2; (12) Municipal wastewater treatment technology; (13) GIS information systems 2; (14) Drinking water treatment 1; (15) Risk-based site remediation; (16) Small urban watersheds; (17) Disinfection; (18) Air pollution control and risk assessment; (19) Drinking water treatment 2; (20) Biological wastewater treatment; (21) Wastewater treatment; (22) Decentralized small-scale alternative wastewater management systems; (23) General environmental issues; (24) Drinking water treatment 3; and (25) Groundwater remediation. Papers have been processed separately for inclusion on the database.

Wilson, T.E. [ed.

1998-07-01

373

Water resources regulation based on ET management - A case study on Huabei Plain in China  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Because of the unreasonable exploitation and use of water, the problems such as shortage of water amount and deterioration of water quality are prominent on Huabei Plain in China. In this region the conflicts arose among the domestic, industrial and agricultural water use, and the proportion of the agricultural water consumption is more than 70%. Therefore it is very important to well regulate the water resources in this region, especially the agricultural water use. Since the actual consumption of regional water resources over agricultural area is evaporation and transpiration (denoted as ET), regional net water consumption (i.e. ETtotal), which is estimated by ET of plowland, represents the actual water consumption of the region as well as the effects of water saving. In this paper the idea of the ET management is to combine the reduction of the exploitation of groundwater with the resource saving, and to integrate the engineering water-saving measures, agricultural water-saving measures with water-saving management. The aim of the ET management is to reduce the present ET to the objective ET, and it is represented by the objective indexes, e.g. the regional ETtotal is reduced to the multi-year-mean recharged water amount, the recharge of groundwater is dynamical balanced with the exploitation, and finally the zero-over-exploitation of groundwater is achieved. The objective ET is determined by the regional available water amount, which is calculated based on precipitation and available water amount recharged from outside the region, as well as other factors such as the allocation scheme of water resources. The key technical points of distribution method of water rights based on objective ET are: 1) the objective-ET distribution schemes of water rights in wet year and dry year are added to the water-right distribution based on multi-year-mean objective ET; 2) the distribution methods of surface-water rights and groundwater rights are explored to match the objective-ET distribution method, and the connections and interactions among ET water rights, surface-water rights and groundwater rights are studied. A case study is carried out to test the ET method over an agricultural area on Huabei Plain. SWAT model is employed to compare three water-saving scenarios. The results will lead to the practical water allocation scheme that is suitable in the study area.

Wang, S.

2012-04-01

374

Criteria for an effective water resource planning process  

E-print Network

In examining the present status of water resource planning in the Pacific Northwest, numerous critical inadequacies become readily apparent. One method of minimizing some of these inadequacies is through administrative ...

Bowers, James Myron

1961-01-01

375

Recent US Geological Survey Publications On Water Resources in Alaska  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The United States Geological Survey has made available publications on Water Resources in Alaska. Although the actual reports need to be ordered, abstracts of papers on Alaska hydrology and glaciology are available at the Website.

376

Alternate Solutions to Water Resource Development -- A Case Study  

E-print Network

This study was undertaken in an effort to develop procedural methodology for the consideration of alternative solutions for water resources development in a short period of time with a view toward reduction of total costs involved in prefeasibility...

Basco, D. R.; Rahman, K. M. A.

377

Nebraska Water Conference Council's Annual Water & Natural Resources Field Trip  

E-print Network

. A fully renovated home designed by famed architect Frank Lloyd Wright, the only example in Nebraska . . . Nebraska Association of Resources Districts Frank Kwapnioski . . . Nebraska Public Power District Roger

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

378

A Citizen's Guide to Coastal Water Resource Management.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

More people than ever are using coastal waters for recreation and business activities and living along the shores. This puts more pressure on natural resources and creates more conflicts between the people using the resources. This guidebook is designed to help citizens develop an understanding of how coastal management works. Four chapters in…

Kennedy, Jim; Miller, Todd

379

Comparison of variants of using local and pipelined water resources  

SciTech Connect

Water consumption of territorially separated objects can be assigned by some continual quantity, for example, the density of rural population. If the route of tansportation and distribution of water resources being withdrawn from without has a sufficiently dense network, then its length will be the sought parameter when selecting water-supply variants. The problem of selecting the water-supply variant involves taking into account cost, time factor, consumption of materials and energy, shortage of means being used, nature-conservation factors, possibility of expropriation of lands, and diversion of water. The technico-economic characteristics of individual pipeline systems are given. The results of investigations permit developing schemes of regionalization of water-shortage territories based on the indices of the potential cost of obtaining the necessary amount of water of the required quality due to the rational combination of measures on the development and use both of local water resources and those piped in from without.

Sanin, M.V.

1986-03-01

380

http://www.cemr.wvu.edu/freshman UPDATED 12/15/2010 COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING AND MINERAL RESOURCES FRESHMAN ENGINEERING  

E-print Network

at least 2 hours (in two 1-hour sessions or one 2-hour session) each week working on homework or studying ­ FRESHMAN ENGINEERING STUDY LAB POLICY SPRING 2011 The College of Engineering and Mineral Resources (CEMR) is committed to student success. Study labs are the result of student suggestions and are designed to help

Mohaghegh, Shahab

381

Economic Analysis of a Waste Water Resource Heat Pump Air-Conditioning System in North China  

E-print Network

This paper describes the situation of waste water resource in north China and the characteristics and styles of a waste water resource heat pump system, and analyzes the economic feasibility of a waste water resource heat pump air...

Chen, H.; Li, D.; Dai, X.

2006-01-01

382

30 CFR 402.7 - Water-Resources Technology Development Program.  

...2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Water-Resources Technology Development Program...GEOLOGICAL SURVEY, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR WATER-RESOURCES RESEARCH PROGRAM AND THE WATER-RESOURCES TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM...

2014-07-01

383

18 CFR 701.3 - Purpose of the Water Resources Council.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...ORGANIZATION Introduction § 701.3 Purpose of the Water Resources Council. It is the purpose of the Water Resources Council to effectuate the policy of the United States in the Water Resources Planning Act (hereinafter the Act) to...

2011-04-01

384

78 FR 18562 - Economic and Environmental Principles and Requirements for Water and Related Land Resources...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...SUMMARY: Section 2031 of the Water Resources Development Act of...Principles and Guidelines for Water and Related Land Resources Implementation...Standards), setting out broad policy and principles that guide investments...evaluating, and comparing water resources projects,...

2013-03-27

385

18 CFR 701.3 - Purpose of the Water Resources Council.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...ORGANIZATION Introduction § 701.3 Purpose of the Water Resources Council. It is the purpose of the Water Resources Council to effectuate the policy of the United States in the Water Resources Planning Act (hereinafter the Act) to...

2013-04-01

386

18 CFR 701.3 - Purpose of the Water Resources Council.  

...ORGANIZATION Introduction § 701.3 Purpose of the Water Resources Council. It is the purpose of the Water Resources Council to effectuate the policy of the United States in the Water Resources Planning Act (hereinafter the Act) to...

2014-04-01

387

18 CFR 701.3 - Purpose of the Water Resources Council.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...ORGANIZATION Introduction § 701.3 Purpose of the Water Resources Council. It is the purpose of the Water Resources Council to effectuate the policy of the United States in the Water Resources Planning Act (hereinafter the Act) to...

2012-04-01

388

18 CFR 701.3 - Purpose of the Water Resources Council.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...ORGANIZATION Introduction § 701.3 Purpose of the Water Resources Council. It is the purpose of the Water Resources Council to effectuate the policy of the United States in the Water Resources Planning Act (hereinafter the Act) to...

2010-04-01

389

Surface water resources issues analysis: Wheeler Reservoir watershed region  

SciTech Connect

This report is one in a continuing series of periodic water resources issues analyses (WRIAs) conducted within the various local drainage basins that comprise the larger Tennessee River drainage basin. These analyses, based primarily upon existing information gathered from a variety of sources, perform several functions: document known or probable water quality issues that should be addressed by TVA or others; identify specific needs for additional information; guide routine surface water monitoring programs; and provide focus for planning and setting priorities for subsequent water quality assessments, mitigative activities, and resource management projects. 4 refs., 1 fig., 16 tabs.

Cox, J.P.

1990-02-01

390

The role of hydrology in water resources management  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Modern water resources management developed as a branch of science based engineering since the landmark publication of Mass et al. (1962&1967) which emerged from the Harvard Water Program. Clearly, water was managed much earlier, in fact since the early days of civilization, as evidenced by the publication of Vitruvius on architecture in the 1st Century BC, but the 1950s marked the advent of modeling enabled by computers, which transformed the field we call Water Resources Management (WRM). Since then, thousands of papers have been published and thousands of decisions and projects have been aided by WRM methodologies and model results. This presentation is not an historical review of water resources management, although it appears in a session titled The Evolution of WRM Paradigms. Instead, it is an attempt to discuss the role of hydrology as a feeder of information for the management domain. The issues faced by hydrologists who work to serve and support WRM will be discussed and elucidated by case studies. For hydrologists, some of the important points in this regard are: - Planning, design and operation are three interconnected "layers" of WRM. Planning is where the sources and consumers are identified, the overall "architecture" of a proposed system is laid out, including its topology and connectivity. Design is where sizes of facilities are fixed. Operational policy determines the operation of the system under a selected forecasted set of typical and/or critical conditions, while real-time operation means setting the operational variables for a defined time period ahead (hour, day, week, month, year). The three "layers" are inter-connected and inter-dependent, but still can be addressed differently. - Hydrological data of different types are required, according to the management issue being addressed. They range from short term now-casting/forecasting for real-time operation and response, e.g., for flood protection, to long-term time probabilistic series and ensembles for planning, which consider changing natural and anthropogenic drivers (land use, climate change). Since hydrology is a continuous process that is not divided internally according to the needs of management, the hydrological analysis must be geared to produce the suitable information for the different management issues. - Aggregation and disaggregation in space and time: selection of the level of detail in time and space should begin from the needs of the management issue being addressed, and dictate the monitoring, collection and processing. - Water quality: should receive more attention, as it is playing an ever increasing role in management, including its importance in ecological services. - Optimization, simulation and combining the two: optimization for WRM is used extensively. Some optimization models are able to address uncertainty internally, and further development continues. Simulation is easier to employ, but it merely produces "if-then" analysis. Combination of optimization and simulation is a common way to combine the advantages of the two. - Uncertainty, forecasting, ensembles: the uncertainties inherent in hydrological analysis and forecasting lead to the requirement for generating forecasts with a probabilistic characterization. This can be in the form of PDFs, time series, ensembles.

Shamir, U.

2011-12-01

391

Talking sustainability: Federal intiatives target major water resources concerns  

E-print Network

by congressional funding. The following Texas Water Resources Institute (TWRI) projects have impacted major water resource problems in Texas and beyond. Ogallala Aquifer Project The Ogallala Aquifer, stretching from South Dakota to Texas, covers 174...,000 square miles, including 36,080 square miles in the Texas High Plains. In western Kansas and the Texas High Plains, the aquifer is declining at an unacceptable rate. Aquifer depletion rates of 1 to 3 feet per year are common in that region...

Lee, Leslie

2010-01-01

392

Talking sustainability:Federal initiatives target major water resources concerns  

E-print Network

by congressional funding. The following Texas Water Resources Institute (TWRI) projects have impacted major water resource problems in Texas and beyond. Ogallala Aquifer Project The Ogallala Aquifer, stretching from South Dakota to Texas, covers 174...,000 square miles, including 36,080 square miles in the Texas High Plains. In western Kansas and the Texas High Plains, the aquifer is declining at an unacceptable rate. Aquifer depletion rates of 1 to 3 feet per year are common in that region...

Lee, Leslie

2011-01-01

393

Resources for Small Water Systems in Texas  

E-print Network

supply and wastewater treatment projects through state bonds and federal grants. TWDB administers the Economically Distressed Areas Program (EDAP), which provides fi nancial assistance to eligible counties and communities. Some counties are eligible... for water-related projects. RWAF loans can be used to build infrastructure, purchase water well fi elds, and purchase or lease water rights. 2 Recently, TWDB developed the Small Community Hardship Program (SCHP), which offers limited fi nancial help...

Dozier, Monty; Theodori, Gene L.; Jensen, Ricard

2007-03-28

394

Water on Mars - Volatile history and resource availability  

SciTech Connect

An attempt is made to define the available deposits of water in the near-surface region of Mars which will be available to human exploration missions. The Martian seasonal water cycle is reviewed, and geochemical and geological constraints on the availability of water are examined. It is concluded that the only sure source of water in amounts significant as a resource are in the polar ice deposits. 43 refs.

Jakosky, B.M.

1990-01-01

395

TeachEngineering: Resources for K-12 Annotations  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The TeachEngineering digital library provides teacher-tested, standards-based engineering content for K-12 teachers to use in science and math classrooms. Engineering lessons connect real-world experiences with curricular content already taught in K-12 classrooms. Mapped to educational content standards, TeachEngineering's comprehensive curricula are hands-on, inexpensive, and relevant to children's daily lives.

2005-02-23

396

USGS Ground-Water Resources Program  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This USGS page holds a collection of reports on regional studies of groundwater systems, multidisciplinary studies of critical groundwater issues, access to groundwater data, and research and methods development. Topics addressed by reports on this page include groundwater issues in the Southwest, saltwater intrusion on the Atlantic coast, land subsidence, and the sustainability of groundwater resources.

Usgs

397

Water resources data, Ohio: Water year 1991. Volume 2, St. Lawrence River Basin: Statewide project data  

SciTech Connect

The Water Resources Division of the US Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with State agencies, obtains a large amount of data pertaining to the water resources of Ohio each water year. These data, accumulated during many years, constitute a valuable data base for developing an improved understanding of the water resources of the State. To make these data readily available to interested parties outside the USGS, the data are published annually in this report series entitled ``Water Resources Data--Ohio.`` This report (in two volumes) includes records on surface water and ground water in the State. Specifically, it contains: (1) Discharge records for 131 streamflow-gaging stations, 95 miscellaneous sites; (2) stage and content records for 5 streams, lakes, and reservoirs; (3) water-quality for 40 streamflow-gaging stations, 378 wells, and 74 partial-record sites; and (4) water levels for 431 observation wells.

Shindel, H.L.; Klingler, J.H.; Mangus, J.P.; Trimble, L.E.

1992-03-01

398

Integrating water data, models and forecasts - the Australian Water Resources Information System (Invited)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Under the Commonwealth Water Act 2007 the Bureau of Meteorology was given a new national role in water information, encompassing standards, water accounts and assessments, hydrological forecasting, and collecting, enhancing and making freely available Australia's water information. The Australian Water Resources Information System (AWRIS) is being developed to fulfil part of this role, by providing foundational data, information and model

R. Argent; P. Sheahan; N. Plummer

2010-01-01

399

Arizona has relatively limited water resources due to its arid climate and limited surface water.  

E-print Network

consumption. The life cycle water consumption was estimated for a range of potential low-carbon energy sources the general range of the potential impacts on water use. Life Cycle Water Use per Vehicle Mile 0.01 0.1 1 10Arizona has relatively limited water resources due to its arid climate and limited surface water

Fay, Noah

400

UNIVERSITIES COUNCIL ON WATER RESOURCES JOURNAL OF CONTEMPORARY WATER RESEARCH & EDUCATION  

E-print Network

] st century: a water crisis and an energy crisis (Brown 1998, 2003, Flavin 1999, Feffer 2008). Water that these integrated policies will have to address is to provide sufficient clean fresh water while maintainingUNIVERSITIES COUNCIL ON WATER RESOURCES JOURNAL OF CONTEMPORARY WATER RESEARCH & EDUCATION ISSUE

Delaware, University of

401

In press, Water Resources Research Optimization of Environmental Water Purchases with Uncertainty  

E-print Network

increasingly to market solutions to meet new environmental demands for water in fully allocated systems water supply systems and infrastructure to meet both human and environmental water demands. MarketsIn press, Water Resources Research Optimization of Environmental Water Purchases with Uncertainty

Pasternack, Gregory B.

402

Resource Management and Contingencies in Aerospace Concurrent Engineering  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

significant concern in designing complex systems implementing new technologies is that while knowledge about the system is acquired incrementally, substantial financial commitments, even make-or-break decisions, must be made upfront, essentially in the unknown. One practice that helps in dealing with this dichotomy is the smart embedding of contingencies and margins in the design to serve as buffers against surprises. This issue presents itself in full force in the aerospace industry, where unprecedented systems are formulated and committed to as a matter of routine. As more and more aerospace mission concepts are generated by concurrent design laboratories, it is imperative that such laboratories apply well thought-out contingency and margin structures to their designs. The first part of this publication provides an overview of resource management techniques and standards used in the aerospace industry. That is followed by a thought provoking treatise on margin policies. The expose presents the actual flight telemetry data recorded by the thermal discipline during several recent NASA Goddard Space Flight Center missions. The margins actually achieved in flight are compared against pre-flight predictions, and the appropriateness and the ramifications of having designed with rigid margins to bounding stacked worst case conditions are assessed. The second half of the paper examines the particular issues associated with the application of contingencies and margins in the concurrent engineering environment. In closure, a discipline-by-discipline disclosure of the contingency and margin policies in use at the Integrated Design Center at NASA s Goddard Space Flight Center is made.

Karpati, Gabe; Hyde, Tupper; Peabody, Hume; Garrison, Matthew

2012-01-01

403

NEW YORK STATE WATER RESOURCES INSTITUTE  

E-print Network

://wri.eas.cornell.edu Email: nyswri@cornell.edu Private Water Well Testing in Areas Impacted by Marcellus Shale Gas Drilling of Marcellus Shale gas development on drinking water supplies. It is intended for landowners and private http://www.dec.ny.gov/energy/58440.html The most comprehensive review of shale gas drilling in New

Wang, Z. Jane

404

“Virtual water”: An unfolding concept in integrated water resources management  

Microsoft Academic Search

In its broadest sense, virtual water refers to the water required for the production of food commodities. Issues relating to virtual water have drawn much attention in scientific communities and the political sphere since the mid 1990s. This paper provides a critical review of major research issues and results in the virtual water literature and pinpoints the remaining questions and

Hong Yang; Alexander Zehnder

2007-01-01

405

Bringing ecosystem services into integrated water resources management.  

PubMed

In this paper we propose an ecosystem service framework to support integrated water resource management and apply it to the Murray-Darling Basin in Australia. Water resources in the Murray-Darling Basin have been over-allocated for irrigation use with the consequent degradation of freshwater ecosystems. In line with integrated water resource management principles, Australian Government reforms are reducing the amount of water diverted for irrigation to improve ecosystem health. However, limited understanding of the broader benefits and trade-offs associated with reducing irrigation diversions has hampered the planning process supporting this reform. Ecosystem services offer an integrative framework to identify the broader benefits associated with integrated water resource management in the Murray-Darling Basin, thereby providing support for the Government to reform decision-making. We conducted a multi-criteria decision analysis for ranking regional potentials to provide ecosystem services at river basin scale. We surveyed the wider public about their understanding of, and priorities for, managing ecosystem services and then integrated the results with spatially explicit indicators of ecosystem service provision. The preliminary results of this work identified the sub-catchments with the greatest potential synergies and trade-offs of ecosystem service provision under the integrated water resources management reform process. With future development, our framework could be used as a decision support tool by those grappling with the challenge of the sustainable allocation of water between irrigation and the environment. PMID:23900082

Liu, Shuang; Crossman, Neville D; Nolan, Martin; Ghirmay, Hiyoba

2013-11-15

406

Towards Transition Management of European Water Resources Published in Journal Water Resource Management, Special issue: Advances in global Change Research  

Microsoft Academic Search

Global change fundamentally changes the nature of water-related problems. We will illustrate this by showing how perceptions of the water-problems in the Netherlands have shifted in the past four decades. The nature of water-related problems changed from a technical problem' to a so-called 'persistent' problem, characterized by plurality, uncertainty and complexity. Although integrated water resource management (IWRM) has been advocated

Rutger van der Brugge; Jan Rotmans

407

Water Resources Research National Competitive Grants Program  

E-print Network

for better estimation of the physical and economic supply of water; alternative approaches and governance be filed on the Internet at https://niwr.net/ by 4:00 PM, Eastern Time, Thursday, February 20, 2014

Mukhtar, Saqib

408

GLOSSARY OF WATER RESOURCES TERMS Compiled by  

E-print Network

acidic, which can pollute the receiving stream. Acid Rain - rain with a pH of less than 7.0. Acre resulting in land build-up. Acid Mine - Drainage - the water discharge from coal mines, usually highly

District of Columbia, University of the

409

Texas Water Resources: Vulnerability from Contaminants  

E-print Network

. This dissertation focuses on the most widespread contaminants of surface and ground water, which are E. coli and nitrate, respectively. Therefore, this research investigates the linkages between bio-chemical and hydrologic processes for E. coli transport, explores...

Dwivedi, Dipankar

2012-10-02

410

Water-resource facilities and management strategy for Oman  

Microsoft Academic Search

Catastrophic floods and prolonged periods of drought are the main ‘water’ challenges facing Oman. So the inhabitants have had to resort to ingenious ways of utilising the available-water resources, such as through building falaj systems and the optimal selection of suitable crops, but nevertheless when exposed to extremely-dry weather conditions, temporary and even permanent migration is still the only option

H. Al-Ismaily; D. Probert

1998-01-01

411

Paso del Norte Watershed Council Coordinated Water Resources Database Project  

E-print Network

cooperative database project that would provide streamlined access to a range of water resource data in the Paso del Norte region. In August of 2002, the El Paso Water Utilities provided initial funding to the Paso del Norte Watershed Council to develop a...

Brown, Christopher; Sheng, Zhuping; Rich, Matt

412

CHRISTOPHER A. SCOTT Professor Research Professor, Water Resources Policy  

E-print Network

� Southwest US; Latin America (Mexico, Chile, Argentina, Brazil, Peru); South Asia (India, Nepal) SUMMARY on water resources and policy, human-environment interactions, the water-energy nexus, and climate, Hindi, and Nepali. His sustained efforts to effect policy impact via dialogue between decision

413

A Public Education Program in Water Resources Management.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes a program designed to improve public awareness/understanding of major factors in managing water resources. Use is made of an interactive computer simulator to place lay people and teachers in decision-making situations involving real variables and alternatives and to project for them the probable consequences of their water management…

Amend, John R.; Armold, Anita A.

1983-01-01

414

An Assessment of Climate Change, Water Resources, and Policy Research  

Microsoft Academic Search

A significant climate change can affect water resources and result in social and\\/or environmental impacts that can become policy issues. Review of the research in this emerging field of climate, water and policy reveals certain key issues that affect the transfer of information to policymakers. It also reveals the necessity for interdisciplinary analyses, a lack of information about parts of

Stanley A. Changnon Jr

1987-01-01

415

Managing water resources infrastructure in the face of different values  

Microsoft Academic Search

Water resources infrastructure (WRI) plays a key role in water management. It can serve or negatively affect some seven to ten different and sometimes conflicting values. WRI management is therefore not a purely technical issue. Economic analyses can help to some extent, but only for values related to current human use. Multi-criteria analysis can cover all values, but in the

Erik Mostert

2008-01-01

416

Social learning: the key to integrated water resources management?  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article discusses social learning as a means to implement integrated water resources management (IWRM). Implementing IWRM requires cooperation between policy sectors, countries, government bodies, the civic sector and scientific disciplines. The social learning approach suggests several ingredients for such cooperation. First, water managers and the other stakeholders need to realize their dependence on each other. Second, they need to

E. Mostert; M. Craps; C. Pahl-Wostl

2008-01-01

417

REGIONAL EFFECTS OF CLIMATE CHANGE ON WATER RESOURCES SYSTEMS  

Microsoft Academic Search

Regional effects of greenhouse warming on water resources and water management systems are assessed for a moun­ tainous region of central Greece, by using plausible hypothetical scenarios of temperature and precipitation change. Basin response is examined by focusing on surface runoff series generated by a monthly conceptual model sensitive to temperature and precipitation changes. Results indicate that certain basin morphoclimatic

M. A. MBflKOU; P. S. HADJISAWA

418

Applications of space technology to water resources management  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Space technology transfer is discussed in terms of applying visible and infrared remote sensing measurement to water resources management. Mapping and monitoring of snowcovered areas, hydrologic land use, and surface water areas are discussed, using information acquired from LANDSAT and NOAA satellite systems.

Salomonson, V. V.

1977-01-01

419

Cultural Waters: Values of Water Resources in Hidalgo, Mexico  

E-print Network

managed system and a municipally managed system. My research resulted in three major findings. These were: 1) water scarcity is the main water concern in the two communities, which people attribute to deforestation; 2) despite considerable differences...

Hurst, Kristin

2013-04-08

420

Water resources in a changing climate: An Idaho research initiative  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A new initiative in Idaho funded by NSF EPSCoR will build state-wide research infrastructure to address how changes in future climatic conditions may impact water resources, as well as ecological and human systems. This project is supporting complementary field studies on a highly managed river system (Snake River Plain) and a relatively unmanaged system (Salmon River Basin). The project aims to fill a critical niche in hydrology by understanding the connection between surface flow and groundwater. Research capacity is being developed in three main areas: 1) hydroclimatology to improve modeling of water resources affected by climate change, 2) integration of hydrology and economic modeling in the Snake River basin, and 3) highly interdisciplinary research in the Salmon River basin involving climate, water, fire, insect infestations, geomorphology, and stream health. The project will also enhance outreach and educational experiences in climate change and water resources. A description of the new initiative and the activities associated with it will be given.

Walden, V. P.

2009-12-01

421

Graduate Study and Research in Ocean and Resources Engineering  

E-print Network

Timeline......................................................................................... 7 Faculty into the School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology (SOEST). The Department of Ocean Engineering

Frandsen, Jannette B.

422

Continuous real-time water information: an important Kansas resource  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Continuous real-time information on streams, lakes, and groundwater is an important Kansas resource that can safeguard lives and property, and ensure adequate water resources for a healthy State economy. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) operates approximately 230 water-monitoring stations at Kansas streams, lakes, and groundwater sites. Most of these stations are funded cooperatively in partnerships with local, tribal, State, or other Federal agencies. The USGS real-time water-monitoring network provides long-term, accurate, and objective information that meets the needs of many customers. Whether the customer is a water-management or water-quality agency, an emergency planner, a power or navigational official, a farmer, a canoeist, or a fisherman, all can benefit from the continuous real-time water information gathered by the USGS.

Loving, Brian L.; Putnam, James E.; Turk, Donita M.

2014-01-01

423

Activities affecting surface water resources: A general overview  

SciTech Connect

In November 1987, P.E.I. signed a federal/provincial work-sharing arrangement on water resource management focusing on groundwater pollution, surface water degradation and estuarine eutrophication. The surface water program was designed to identify current surface water uses and users within 12 major watersheds across the Island containing 26 individual rivers, as well as problems arising due to practices that degrade the quality of surface water and restricts its value to other user groups. This report presents a general overview of the program, covering the general characteristics of the Island; operations in agriculture, fish and wildlife, forestry, recreation, fisheries, and industry; alterations of natural features of waterways; wetlands; additional watershed activities such as hydrometric stations and subdivision development; and activities affecting surface water resources such as sedimentation sources, pollution point sources and instream obstructions.

Not Available

1990-01-01

424

Applications of remote sensing to water resources  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Analyses were made of selected long-term (1985 and beyond) objectives, with the intent of determining if significant data-related problems would be encountered and to develop alternative solutions to any potential problems. One long-term objective selected for analysis was Water Availability Forecasting. A brief overview was scheduled in FY-77 of the objective -- primarily a fact-finding study to allow Data Management personnel to gain adequate background information to perform subsequent data system analyses. This report, includes discussions on some of the larger problems currently encountered in water measurement, the potential users of water availability forecasts, projected demands of users, current sensing accuracies, required parameter monitoring, status of forecasting modeling, and some measurement accuracies likely to be achievable by 1980 and 1990.

1977-01-01

425

texas water resources institute Water management is one of the most significant challenges facing Texas today. Major water quantity and water quality  

E-print Network

texas water resources institute Water management is one of the most significant challenges facing Texas today. Major water quantity and water quality problems exist, affecting the environment and economy. Texas needs solutions. At the Texas Water Resources Institute, we help solve these pressing water

426

Reclaimed municipal wastewater--a potential water resource in China.  

PubMed

Due to water resource shortage and socio-economic development within twenty years, China faces serious problems of water supply and water pollution. Several criteria and suitable reclamation processes related to water reuse have been created in China, which are helpful to improve the situation of water scarcity. In the future, reclaimed municipal wastewater reuse will mainly be developed for urban and industrial use. Potential supply quantity of reclaimed water, quality of reclaimed water, and reclamation cost are favorable to potential reuses. Based on further public environmental education, on a relevant development of national and local standards for reclaimed water quality, and on an increase of sanitary rate, more and more planned reclaimed water reuse projects would be expected in China. PMID:11436803

He, P; Phan, L; Gu, G; Hervouet, G

2001-01-01

427

The Changing Water Paradigm: A Look at Twenty-first Century Water Resources Development  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Pacific Institute for Studies in Development, Environment, and Security (the Pacific Institute) has recently posted several new publications on their Website. This resource, written by Peter Gleick and originally published in Water International [(25)1:127-138, 2000], examines the current shifts in water resource management (.pdf format).

428

CLIMATIC SENSITIVITY OF CALIFORNIA WATER RESOURCES  

EPA Science Inventory

The possible effects of climate change on the combined Central Valley Project-California State Water Project (CVP/SWP) were evaluated using a three-stage approach. n the first stage, runoff from four headwater "study catchments" was simulated using rainfall/snowmelt-runoff models...

429

Multiple Criteria Analysis and Water Resources Risk  

E-print Network

Decision Maps ­Russian method ·LP to generate alternatives ·Visualize more than three criteria ­Useful Scientists ­ publication Cost of chemicals Scientists ­ water quality Cost of operation Cost of maintenance Decisions Alexander V. Lotov Russian Academy of Sciences, Computing Center, and Lomonosov Moscow State

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

430

Techniques of Water-Resources Investigations Reports  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This USGS site describes field and analytical methods used in surface and groundwater hydrology. The site includes 9 books which cover the collection of water data, collection of environmental data, applications of hydraulics, hydrologic analysis and interpretation, laboratory analysis, modeling techniques and more. The text and figures are included as both html and pdf files.

Usgs

431

The Sparta Aquifer: A Sustainable Water Resource?  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Introduction The Sparta aquifer is an aquifer of regional importance within the Mississippi embayment aquifer system. It consists of varying amounts of unconsolidated sand, inter-stratified with silt and clay lenses within the Sparta Sand of the Claiborne Group. It extends from south Texas, north into Louisiana, Arkansas, and Tennessee, and eastward into Mississippi and Alabama (fig. 1). On both the west and east sides of the Mississippi embayment, the Sparta aquifer is exposed at the surface (outcrops) and is locally unconfined; it becomes confined as it dips toward the axis of the embayment, (generally corresponding with the Mississippi River) and southward toward the Gulf of Mexico where it is deeply buried in the subsurface (Hosman, 1968). Generalized ground-water flow in the Sparta aquifer is from the outcrop areas to the axis (center) of the embayment (fig. 2). In Arkansas, the Sparta aquifer outcrops parallel to the Fall Line at the western extreme of the Mississippi embayment (the Fall Line is a line dividing the mountainous highlands of Arkansas from the lowland area); and the formation dips from its outcrop area to the southeast. The Sparta aquifer supplies water for municipalities, industries such as paper production, and to a lesser degree, irrigation of agricultural crops (fig. 3). This report highlights hydrologic conditions of the aquifer in Arkansas County as an example of how water use is affecting water levels.

McKee, Paul W.; Hays, Phillip D.

2002-01-01

432

Review of Water Resources and Desalination Technologies  

SciTech Connect

Water shortages affect 88 developing countries that are home to half of the world's population. In these places, 80-90% of all diseases and 30% of all deaths result from poor water quality. Furthermore, over the next 25 years, the number of people affected by severe water shortages is expected to increase fourfold. Low cost methods to desalinate brackish water and sea water can help reverse this destabilizing trend. Desalination has now been practiced on a large scale for more than 50 years. During this time continual improvements have been made, and the major technologies are now remarkably efficient, reliable, and inexpensive. For many years, thermal technologies were the only viable option, and multi-stage flash (MSF) was established as the baseline technology. Multi-effect evaporation (MEE) is now the state-of-the-art thermal technology, but has not been widely implemented. With the growth of membrane science, reverse osmosis (RO) overtook MSF as the leading desalination technology, and should be considered the baseline technology. Presently, RO of seawater can be accomplished with an energy expenditure in the range of 11-60 kJ/kg at a cost of $2 to $4 per 1000 gallons. The theoretical minimum energy expenditure is 3-7 kJ/kg. Since RO is a fairly mature technology, further improvements are likely to be incremental in nature, unless design improvements allow major savings in capital costs. Therefore, the best hope to dramatically decrease desalination costs is to develop ''out of the box'' technologies. These ''out of the box'' approaches must offer a significant advantage over RO (or MEE, if waste heat is available) if they are to be viable. When making these comparisons, it is crucial that the specifics of the calculation are understood so that the comparison is made on a fair and equivalent basis.

MILLER, JAMES E.

2003-03-01

433

Watershed Based, Institutional Approaches to Developing Clean Water Resources  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Access to clean and sufficient amounts of water is a critical problem in many countries. A watershed approach is vital in understanding pollution pathways affecting water resources and in developing participatory solutions. Such integration of information with participatory approaches can lead to more sustainable solutions than traditional "crisis-to-crisis" management approaches. This study aims at applying a watershed based joint action approach to manage water resources. Since most watersheds have urban and rural sources of pollution and a wide disparity in access to and use of water, alternative solutions need to take an integrated approach through cooperative actions. An institutional model was applied to seven subwatersheds in Honduras to evaluate various sources and effects of water contamination and water shortages. Two specific pathways of water resources degradation were studied (contamination from coffee pulp manufacturing and urban nonpoint sources) to develop alternative solutions that mitigate downstream impacts of access to clean water. A locally driven joint mechanism to reuse coffee pulp in farming systems is proposed. Such an institutional solution can maximize benefits to both farms and the coffee pulp industry. A combination of education and investment in sanitary facilities in urbanizing areas is proposed to minimize urban sources of water contamination.

Randhir, Timothy; Genge, Cole

2005-04-01

434

Trend detection in seasonal data: from hydrology to water resources  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this paper we investigate the relationship between hydro-climatic trends and their impacts on water resources at the basin scale, focusing on a catchment on the Italian and Swiss Alps in the period 1974-2010. More generally, we address the topic of trend detection in environmental time series combining novel and traditional tools in order to simultaneously tackle the issue of seasonality and interannual variability, which usually characterize natural processes. The paper's contribution is twofold. First, we propose a novel tool to be applied in Exploratory Data Analysis, named MASH (Moving Average over Shifting Horizon). It allows to simultaneously investigate the seasonality in the data and filter out the effects of interannual variability, thus facilitating trend detection. We describe how to combine the MASH with statistical trend detection tests, like the Mann-Kendall test, the Seasonal Kendall test, and the Linear Regression test, and Sen's method, to quantify the trends occurring in different seasons. Second, we estimate the impacts of hydrological changes in terms of water resources and we discuss their relevance from the water resources management perspective. We define and simulate a set of indicators of performances, resilience, reliability, and vulnerability, so to assess the ability of the water resources systems to absorb changes in the hydrological patterns. The analysis reveals that, in the case study area, statistically significant trends in hydro-climatic records have been undergoing in the last decades, although they have had limited impacts on water resources.

Anghileri, Daniela; Pianosi, Francesca; Soncini-Sessa, Rodolfo

2014-04-01

435

NASA Space Engineering Research Center for utilization of local planetary resources  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The University of Arizona and NASA have joined to form the UA/NASA Space Engineering Research Center. The purpose of the Center is to discover, characterize, extract, process, and fabricate useful products from the extraterrestrial resources available in the inner solar system (the moon, Mars, and nearby asteroids). Individual progress reports covering the center's research projects are presented and emphasis is placed on the following topics: propellant production, oxygen production, ilmenite, lunar resources, asteroid resources, Mars resources, space-based materials processing, extraterrestrial construction materials processing, resource discovery and characterization, mission planning, and resource utilization.

Ramohalli, Kumar; Lewis, John S.

1990-01-01

436

Water Resources Management In The Eastern Himalayan Urban Ecosystem  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Himalayan ecosystem is one of the most important and threatened ecosystems on the earth. In this region, the scarcity of water in general, and drinking water in par- ticular is affecting common people and drawing the attention of researchers. Given the present situation and governance, in the near future it is most likely to deteriorate further. With expanding population and urbanization, accelerating human activities, and increasing per capita water consumption, problem of water supply in the moun- tain households will be certainly acute in the coming years. This crisis of decreasing availability of water is not only going to hamper the economic development of the region, but is also likely to threaten the very survival of the already marginalised and deprived people who are also on the brink of poverty and are incapable of coping with such crisis. Sustainable water harvesting and management of water resources offers the best hope for meeting the challenges of the growing water crisis. For this appropriate policy intervention, use of latest technology, application of tools like GIS and information from the satellite imageries, community participation and use of tra- ditional knowledge and traditional water management practices will be essential to overcome the challenge of looming water crisis. Darjiling Himalaya, located in the eastern Himalayas has a fragile environment and it is witnessing serious problems both in quality and quantity of water supply. Weak institutional arrangements, lack of awareness among citizens and a gap in the effective arrangements are huge stumbling blocks. This region is endowed with abundance of water resources and rich ecosystem. Therefore, this calls for an effective and participatory water management system with due attention given to the upgradation and expansion of the existing infrastructure. This paper takes a stock of the existing water resources in the Darjiling Himalaya, especially around the town of Darjiling, discusses the problem as perceived by the people and comes out with some viable suggestions.

Bomjan, S.

437

Water resources transfers through Chinese interprovincial and foreign food trade.  

PubMed

China's water resources are under increasing pressure from socioeconomic development, diet shifts, and climate change. Agriculture still concentrates most of the national water withdrawal. Moreover, a spatial mismatch in water and arable land availability--with abundant agricultural land and little water resources in the north--increases water scarcity and results in virtual water transfers from drier to wetter regions through agricultural trade. We use a general equilibrium welfare model and linear programming optimization to model interprovincial food trade in China. We combine these trade flows with province-level estimates of commodities' virtual water content to build China's domestic and foreign virtual water trade network. We observe large variations in agricultural water-use efficiency among provinces. In addition, some provinces particularly rely on irrigation vs. rainwater. We analyze the virtual water flow patterns and the corresponding water savings. We find that this interprovincial network is highly connected and the flow distribution is relatively homogeneous. A significant share of water flows is from international imports (20%), which are dominated by soy (93%). We find that China's domestic food trade is efficient in terms of rainwater but inefficient regarding irrigation, meaning that dry, irrigation-intensive provinces tend to export to wetter, less irrigation-intensive ones. Importantly, when incorporating foreign imports, China's soy trade switches from an inefficient system to a particularly efficient one for saving water resources (20 km(3)/y irrigation water savings, 41 km(3)/y total). Finally, we identify specific provinces (e.g., Inner Mongolia) and products (e.g., corn) that show high potential for irrigation productivity improvements. PMID:24958864

Dalin, Carole; Hanasaki, Naota; Qiu, Huanguang; Mauzerall, Denise L; Rodriguez-Iturbe, Ignacio

2014-07-01

438

Some aspects of integrated water resources management in central Asia  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Two main tasks are to be implemented for elaboration of the governmental water distribution criteria in Central Asia: 1 -development of the common methodological basis for the intergovernmental water distribution; and 2 - to reopen and continue both theoretical and experimental researches of various aspects of the wastewater reuse. The prospects of socio economic development of all Central Asian countries are substantially defined by the water resources availability. The water resources of Central Asia belong, mainly, watersheds of the Syr-Darya and Amu Darya rivers. The basic flow of Amu Darya is formed in territory of Tajikistan. Then the Amu Darya river proceeds along border of Afghanistan with Uzbekistan, crosses Turkmenistan and again comes back to Uzbekistan and then runs into the Aral Sea. The Syr-Darya is second river on the water discharge and is first river on length in Central Asia. The basic flow of Syr Darya is formed in territory of Kyrgyzstan. Then the Syr-Darya river crosses of Uzbekistan and Tajikistan and runs into the Aral Sea in territory of Kazakhstan. During the Soviet Union the water resources of two river watersheds were divided among the Central Asian republics on the basis of the general plans developed by the center in Moscow. In the beginning of 90s years, after taking of sovereignty by the former Soviet republics, the unified control system of water resources management was abolished and the various approaches to its transformation caused by features of the national economy developing, elected models of transition from command to market mechanisms of economic activity, and also specificity of political and social processes in each of the states of region were planned. The distinctions of modern priorities of economic development of the states of region have generated the contradiction of interests in the intergovernmental water distribution that can in the long term become complicated even more in connection with the increasing of water requirement in Afghanistan. (In particular, there is a conflict of interests concerning the functioning of the Toktogul reservoir: Kazakhstan and Uzbekistan are interested in the irrigation regime of operations of reservoir; Kyrgyzstan and Tajikistan are interested in the energy conditions of its functioning.) In the national diagnostic reports the numerical parameters of the water resources use dynamics for previous years, and also estimation of water resources do not coincide, that complicates development of principles and criteria of the intergovernmental water distribution. It also indirectly influences the solution of the water cost problem. Discrepancy of the specified settlement data is explained, basically, differences of techniques and algorithms of accounts. In the principal theses of national water strategy of all Central Asian states developed in the end of 90s years, it was marked the necessity of development of the uniform methodical approaches for the strong water consumption rates. The perspective water requirements should be estimated proceeding from the national economic programs of each state. In this connection the coordination by all interested states of region both the uniform approach for estimations of the future water consumption and the uniform settlement base for the improving of models and procedures of the intergovernmental water distribution is admitted as an urgent need. One of the corner-stone tasks in the framework of the common methodological basis for the intergovernmental water distribution is development of the unified method for estimation of irrigation water requirements, because one of the main consumers of water resources in the Central Asian states is irrigation. Last years authors were conducting investigations on development of new modification of the Heat and Water Balances Model (HWBM) and its adaptation to estimation of irrigation water requirements in arid an semi-arid regions in the framework of the INCO-COPERNICUS project "Adaptation of Efficient Water Use Criteria in Marginal Regions of Europe and Middle

Khaydarova, V.; Penkova, N.; Pak, E.; Poberejsky, L.; Beltrao, J.

2003-04-01

439

Are sustainable water resources possible in northwestern India?  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Sustainable water resources can have many definitions with the simplest as a supply-demand problem, with climate dictating the supply of water and human water use the demand. One sign of a system that is not sustainable would be falling groundwater tables, as is the case in northwest India. This region serves as the country's breadbasket, and irrigated agriculture is ubiquitous. The state of Punjab alone produces 22% of the country's wheat and 13% of all the country's grains while only accounting for 1.5% of the country's area. Although the region receives an average precipitation of 600mm per year, it is dominated by monsoonal rainfall with streamflow augmented by upstream snowmelt and glacial melt in spring and summer that is released from a large dam into canals. Large agricultural water demands occur both during the rainy season as well as during the drier winter season. Water and food security are inextricably linked here, and when considering how to manage water sustainably, the consequences on agriculture must also be considered. In this study, we evaluate what a sustainable water resources system would look like in this region, accounting for current climate, crop water demands, and available reservoir storage. The effects of multiple water-saving scenarios are considered, such as crop choice, cropped area, and the use of forecasts in irrigation scheduling. We find that the current system is untenable and hard decisions will have to be made by policymakers in order to halt the depletion of groundwater and manage the region's water resources in a sustainable, effective manner. This work serves as a prototype for evaluating water resources in other regions with high seasonal variability in rainfall and streamflow and large irrigation demands.

Troy, T. J.; Devineni, N.; Perveen, S.; Robertson, A. W.; Lall, U.

2012-12-01

440

Research on agrichemicals in water resources  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A plan to study the effects of agricultural systems on the occurrence of agricultural chemicals in ground and surface waters is being formulated by the U.S. Department of Agriculture and the U.S. Geological Survey. Initial research will focus on the herbicides atrazine and alachlor, the insecticide carbofuran, and plant nutrient, nitrate, in the midwest cornbelt. The cornbelt has uniquely similar agriculture over a large area. Many hydrologic and agronomic scientific disciplines from several federal and state agencies are being integrated to conduct research at several scales. The integration of information from this research is intended to lead to the identification of major processes affecting agrichemical fate and ultimately to development of farming systems that protect, improve, or remediate water quality.

Burkart, Michael R.; Onstad, Charles A.; Bubenzer, Gary D.

441

Noesis: Ontology based Scoped Search Engine and Resource Aggregator for Atmospheric Science  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The goal for search engines is to return results that are both accurate and complete. The search engines should find only what you really want and find everything you really want. Search engines (even meta search engines) lack semantics. The basis for search is simply based on string matching between the user's query term and the resource database and the semantics associated with the search string is not captured. For example, if an atmospheric scientist is searching for "pressure" related web resources, most search engines return inaccurate results such as web resources related to blood pressure. In this presentation Noesis, which is a meta-search engine and a resource aggregator that uses domain ontologies to provide scoped search capabilities will be described. Noesis uses domain ontologies to help the user scope the search query to ensure that the search results are both accurate and complete. The domain ontologies guide the user to refine their search query and thereby reduce the user's burden of experimenting with different search strings. Semantics are captured by refining the query terms to cover synonyms, specializations, generalizations and related concepts. Noesis also serves as a resource aggregator. It categorizes the search results from different online resources such as education materials, publications, datasets, web search engines that might be of interest to the user.

Ramachandran, R.; Movva, S.; Li, X.; Cherukuri, P.; Graves, S.

2006-12-01

442

VULNERABILITY ASSESSMENT OF WATER RESOURCES SYSTEMS IN THE EASTERN NILE BASIN  

E-print Network

in AFRICAN STUDIES (Natural Resources-Water Resources) INSTITUTE OF AFRICAN RESEARCH AND STUDIES CAIRO Studies-Natural Resources (2004) A Thesis Submitted to the Department of Natural Resources Institute (Natural Resources-Water Resources) Under the Supervision of Dr. Mohamed M. Nour El-Din Eweis Professor

Richner, Heinz

443

Water resources review: Chatuge Reservoir, 1991  

SciTech Connect

TVA is preparing a series of reports that provide technical information on the characteristics and uses of individual TVA reservoirs. These reports present a summary of (1) reservoir purpose and operation; (2) physical characteristics of the reservoir and the watershed; (3) water quality conditions; (4) aquatic biological conditions; and (5) designated, actual, and potential uses of the reservoir and impairments of those uses. This report is for Chatuge Reservoir.

Cox, J.; Wallus, R.

1992-06-01

444

Acid mine water treatment using engineered wetlands  

Microsoft Academic Search

During the last two decades, the United States mining industry has greatly increased the amount it spends on pollution control.\\u000a The application of biotechnology to mine water can reduce the industry's water treatment costs (estimated at over a million\\u000a dollars a day) and improve water quality in streams and rivers adversely affected by acidic mine water draining from abandoned\\u000a mines.

Robert L. P. Kleinmann

1990-01-01

445

UNL WATER CENTER --PART OF THE SCHOOL OF NATURAL RESOURCES VOL. 37, NO. 1 WINTER 2005  

E-print Network

-2003: The Biennial Report on Fresh- water Resources and Water in Crisis: A Guide to the World's FreshWaterUNL WATER CENTER -- PART OF THE SCHOOL OF NATURAL RESOURCES VOL. 37, NO. 1 WINTER 2005 INSIDE WATER CURRENT PROTECTING NEBRASKA'S WATER RESOURCES THROUGH RESEARCH AND EDUCATION 6 ..............Center Passes

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

446

Current and future water resources of the Congo River basin  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The water resources of the Congo Basin are under enormous pressure due to decreases in the Oubangui River discharge for the last three decades and the shrinking of Lake Chad. We report on a systematic analysis of the hydrology and water resources of the entire Congo Basin, and that part of the basin within the geographical boundaries of each of the countries across which it flows. We used hydrological models, data from global data bases, and future climate scenarios. We address both historical and future state of water resources management (availability, flood and drought occurrence, dams/reservoirs, and water infrastructure) using the on-going development of a basin scale climate change impact assessment within the Wageningen Universiy -Congo Basin project frame work. Detailed analysis of potential impacts of climate change on the basin's water availability are assessed using two hydrological and water resources models (VIC, Variable Infiltration Capacity and LPJ, Lund-Potsdam-Jena). We use EU-WATCH historical data, three global climate models with two emissions scenarios downscaled and bias corrected using the statistical bias correction procedure described in EU-WATCH project.

Sonessa, M.; Beyene, T.; Lettenmaier, D. P.; Kabat, P.; Fulco, L.; Franssen, W.

2011-12-01

447

Collection, storage, retrieval, and publication of water-resources data  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This publication represents a series of papers devoted to the subject of collection, storage, retrieval, and publication of hydrologic data. The papers were presented by members of the U.S. Geological Survey at the International Seminar on Organization and Operation of Hydrologic Services, Ottawa, Canada, July 15-16, 1976, sponsored by the World Meteorological Organization. The first paper, ' Standardization of Hydrologic Measurements, ' by George F. Smoot discusses the need for standardization of the methods and instruments used in measuring hydrologic data. The second paper, ' Use of Earth Satellites for Automation of Hydrologic Data Collection, ' by Richard W. Paulson discusses the use of inexpensive battery-operated radios to transmit realtime hydrologic data to earth satellites and back to ground receiving stations for computer processing. The third paper, ' Operation Hydrometeorological Data-Collection System for the Columbia River, ' by Nicholas A. Kallio discusses the operation of a complex water-management system for a large river basin utilizing the latest automatic telemetry and processing devices. The fourth paper, ' Storage and Retrieval of Water-Resources Data, ' by Charles R. Showen discusses the U.S. Geological Survey 's National Water Data Storage and Retrieval System (WATSTORE) and its use in processing water resources data. The final paper, ' Publication of Water Resources Data, ' by S. M. Lang and C. B. Ham discusses the requirement for publication of water-resources data to meet the needs of a widespread audience and for archival purposes. (See W78-09324 thru W78-09328) (Woodard-USGS)

Compiled by Showen, C. R.

1978-01-01

448

NASA'S Water Resources Element Within the Applied Sciences Program  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The NASA Earth Systems Division has the primary responsibility for the Applied Science Program and the objective to accelerate the use of NASA science results in applications to help solve problems important to society and the economy. The primary goal of the NASA Applied Science Program is to improve future and current operational systems by infusing them with scientific knowledge of the Earth system gained through space-based observation, assimilation of new observations, and development and deployment of enabling technologies, systems, and capabilities. This paper discusses major problems facing water resources managers, including having timely and accurate data to drive their decision support tools. It then describes how NASA's science and space based satellites may be used to overcome this problem. Opportunities for the water resources community to participate in NASA's Water Resources Applications Program are described.

Toll, David; Doorn, Bradley; Engman, Edwin

2011-01-01

449

The application of the aggregative approach in simulation modeling of water resources systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

This is a discussion about constructing simulation models for complex water resources systems (WRS). They are based on the piecewise linear aggregates theory developed in the U.S.S.R. The method allows us to lay down general principles for the construction of such simulation models and automate water resources calculations. Water resources systems simulation models incorporate balance equations, describe water resources inputs

Vladimir M. Shnaydman

1992-01-01

450

Water distillation using waste engine heat from an internal combustion engine  

E-print Network

To meet the needs of forward deployed soldiers and disaster relief personnel, a mobile water distillation system was designed and tested. This system uses waste engine heat from the exhaust flow of an internal combustion ...

Mears, Kevin S

2006-01-01

451

Water resources development in Santa Clara Valley, California: insights into the human-hydrologic relationship  

SciTech Connect

Groundwater irrigation is critical to food production and, in turn, to humankind's relationship with its environment. The development of groundwater in Santa Clara Valley, California during the early twentieth century is instructive because (1) responses to unsustainable resource use were largely successful; (2) the proposals for the physical management of the water, although not entirely novel, incorporated new approaches which reveal an evolving relationship between humans and the hydrologic cycle; and (3) the valley serves as a natural laboratory where natural (groundwater basin, surface watershed) and human (county, water district) boundaries generally coincide. Here, I investigate how water resources development and management in Santa Clara Valley was influenced by, and reflective of, a broad understanding of water as a natural resource, including scientific and technological innovations, new management approaches, and changing perceptions of the hydrologic cycle. Market demands and technological advances engendered reliance on groundwater. This, coupled with a series of dry years and laissez faire government policies, led to overdraft. Faith in centralized management and objective engineering offered a solution to concerns over resource depletion, and a group dominated by orchardists soon organized, fought for a water conservation district, and funded an investigation to halt the decline of well levels. Engineer Fred Tibbetts authored an elaborate water salvage and recharge plan that optimized the local water resources by integrating multiple components of the hydrologic cycle. Informed by government investigations, groundwater development in Southern California, and local water law cases, it recognized the limited surface storage possibilities, the spatial and temporal variability, the relatively closed local hydrology, the interconnection of surface and subsurface waters, and the value of the groundwater basin for its storage, transportation, and treatment abilities. The proposal was typically described as complementing an already generous nature, not simply subduing it. Its implementation was limited by political tensions, and fifteen years later, a scaled-down version was constructed. Well levels recovered, but within a decade were declining due to increasing withdrawals. I assert that the approach in Santa Clara Valley was a forerunner to more recent innovations in natural resource management in California and beyond.

Reynolds, Jesse L.; Narasimhan, T.N.

2000-06-01

452

Mapping Climate Change Vulnerability Distribution of Water Resources in a Regional Water Supply System  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In recent years, the threat of increasing frequency of extreme weather rise up human attention on climate change. It is important to know how climate change might effect regional water resources, however, there is not much information to help government understanding how climate change will effect the water resources locally. To a regional water supply system, there might be some hotspots more vulnerable to climate. For example, the water supply of some area is from the water of river. When the storm occurred, the water can't be treated due to high density of suspended sediment in the river. Then the water supply in this area is more vulnerable to climate. This study used an integrated tool - TaiWAP (Taiwan Water Resources Assessment Program) for climate change vulnerability assessment on water resources, which includes 10 GCMs output of SRES A2, A1B, B2 scenarios, weather generator, GWLF model, and Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP) tool. A water supply system is very complex which needs dynamic modeling to determine the vulnerability distribution. This study used a system dynamics model- VENSIM connected with TaiWAP to simulate a water supply system and evaluate vulnerability of each unit in a water supply system. The vulnerable hotspots will be indicated in the system and the adaptive strategies will be applied to strengthen the local vulnerable area. The adaptive capacity will be enhanced to mitigate climate change impacts on water supply system locally to achieve sustainable water uses.

Liu, T.; Tung, C.; Li, M.

2011-12-01

453

Roadmap for sustainable water resources in southwestern North America  

PubMed Central

The management of water resources in arid and semiarid areas has long been a challenge, from ancient Mesopotamia to the modern southwestern United States. As our understanding of the hydrological and climatological cycles has improved, and our ability to manipulate the hydrologic cycle has increased, so too have the challenges associated with managing a limited natural resource for a growing population. Modern civilization has made remarkable progress in water management in the past few centuries. Burgeoning cities now survive in desert regions, relying on a mix of simple and complex technologies and management systems to bring adequate water and remove wastewater. These systems have permitted agricultural production and urban concentrations to expand in regions previously thought to have inadequate moisture. However, evidence is also mounting that our current management and use of water is unsustainable. Physical, economic, and ecological limits constrain the development of new supplies and additional water withdrawals, even in regions not previously thought vulnerable to water constraints. New kinds of limits are forcing water managers and policy makers to rethink previous assumptions about population, technology, regional planning, and forms of development. In addition, new threats, especially the challenges posed by climatic changes, are now apparent. Sustainably managing and using water in arid and semiarid regions such as the southwestern United States will require new thinking about water in an interdisciplinary and integrated way. The good news is that a wide range of options suggest a roadmap for sustainable water management and use in the coming decades. PMID:21149725

Gleick, Peter H.

2010-01-01

454

Fiscal Year 1990 program report: California Water Resources Center  

SciTech Connect

The report contains a synopsis of the results of research projects sponsored under Grant No. 14-08-00001-G1550, the 1990 Water Research Institute Program (WRIP) for the University of California Water Resources Center. Five projects investigating the following topic areas are: Mixing in Bay/Delta Flows, Dynamics of Selenium and Arsenic Oxidation in Water-Sediment Systems, Adaptive Grid Refinement for Groundwater Contaminant Transport Simulation, Salinity and Fish Effects on the Plankton and Benthos of the Salton Sea: Microcosm Experiment, and Effects of Global Climate Change and Increased Atmospheric CO2 on Water Use.

Not Available

1991-07-01

455

Western Water Resources: Coming Problems and the Policy Alternatives  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This quote from the book leads one to speculate as to what will happen to water policy in these times of increased concern for reducing federal spending, for more reliance on state and local governments as opposed to the federal government, and for more reliance on the private sector as opposed to any level of governmental control. Remembering that a wrenching debate preceded deregulation of oil and other energy prices, what are the opportunities for deregulation in the water resources field?Western Water Resources consists of the proceedings of a symposium held in Denver in September 1979 and Hosted by the Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City. As in any conference, there is, in addition to the organized substantive content of the papers, a mixture of the clever and the banal, peppered with some humor and chit-chat. Among the contributors are economists, including Charles Howe, Allen Kneese, Emery Castle, and Kenneth Boulding; legal scholars, such as George Radosevich and Frank Trelease; and political figures, such as Scott Matheson, Governor of Utah, Guy Martin, former Assistant Secretary for Land and Water Resources of the Department of the Interior, and Leo Eisel, former Director of the Water Resources Council. Some papers are followed by a discussion from commentors.

Wahl, Richard

456

Integrating Green and Blue Water Management Tools for Land and Water Resources Planning  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The role of land use and land use change on the hydrological cycle is well known. However, the impacts of large scale land use change are poorly considered in water resources planning, unless they require direct abstraction of water resources and associated development of infrastructure e.g. Irrigation Schemes. However, large scale deforestation for the supply of raw materials, expansion of the areas of plantation forestry, increasing areas under food production and major plans for cultivation of biofuels in many developing countries are likely to result in extensive land use change. Given the spatial extent and temporal longevity of these proposed developments, major impacts on water resources are inevitable. It is imperative that managers and planners consider the consequences for downstream ecosystems and users in such developments. However, many popular tools, such as the vitual water approach, provide only coarse scale "order of magnitude" type estimates with poor consideration of, and limited usefulness, for land use planning. In this paper, a framework for the consideration of the impacts of large scale land use change on water resources at a range of temporal and spatial scales is presented. Drawing on experiences from South Africa, where the establishment of exotic commercial forest plantations is only permitted once a water use license has been granted, the framework adopts the "green water concept" for the identification of potential high impact areas of land use change and provides for integration with traditional "blue water" water resources planning tools for more detailed planning. Appropriate tools, ranging from simple spreadsheet solutions to more sophisticated remote sensing and hydrological models are described, and the application of the framework for consideration of water resources impacts associated with the establishment of large scale tectona grandis, sugar cane and jatropha curcas plantations is illustrated through examples in Mozambique and South Africa. Keywords: Land use change, water resources, green water, blue water, biofuels, developing countries

Jewitt, G. P. W.

2009-04-01

457

StreamStats: A Water Resources Web Application  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Streamflow statistics, such as the 1-percent flood, the mean flow, and the 7-day 10-year low flow, are used by engineers, land managers, biologists, and many others to help guide decisions in their everyday work. For example, estimates of the 1-percent flood (the flow that is exceeded, on average, once in 100 years and has a 1-percent chance of being exceeded in any year, sometimes referred to as the 100-year flood) are used to create flood-plain maps that form the basis for setting insurance rates and land-use zoning. This and other streamflow statistics also are used for dam, bridge, and culvert design; water-supply planning and management; water-use appropriations and permitting; wastewater and industrial discharge permitting; hydropower facility design and regulation; and the setting of minimum required streamflows to protect freshwater ecosystems. In addition, researchers, planners, regulators, and others often need to know the physical and climatic characteristics of the drainage basins (basin characteristics) and the influence of human activities, such as dams and water withdrawals, on streamflow upstream from locations of interest to understand the mechanisms that control water availability and quality at those locations. Knowledge of the streamflow network and downstream human activities also is necessary to adequately determine whether an upstream activity, such as a water withdrawal, can be allowed without adversely affecting downstream activities. Streamflow statistics could be needed at any location along a stream. Most often, streamflow statistics are needed at ungaged sites, where no streamflow data are available to compute the statistics. At U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) streamflow data-collection stations, which include streamgaging stations, partial-record stations, and miscellaneous-measurement stations, streamflow statistics can be computed from available data for the stations. Streamflow data are collected continuously at streamgaging stations. Streamflow measurements are collected systematically over a period of years at partial-record stations to estimate peak-flow or low-flow statistics. Streamflow measurements usually are collected at miscellaneous-measurement stations for specific hydrologic studies with various objectives. StreamStats is a Web-based Geographic Information System (GIS) application (fig. 1) that was created by the USGS, in cooperation with Environmental Systems Research Institute, Inc. (ESRI)1, to provide users with access to an assortment of analytical tools that are useful for water-resources planning and management. StreamStats functionality is based on ESRI's ArcHydro Data Model and Tools, described on the Web at http://support.esri.com/index.cfm?fa=downloads.dataModels.filteredGateway&dmid=15. StreamStats allows users to easily obtain streamflow statistics, basin characteristics, and descriptive information for USGS data-collection stations and user-selected ungaged sites. It also allows users to identify stream reaches that are upstream and downstream from user-selected sites, and to identify and obtain information for locations along the streams where activities that may affect streamflow conditions are occurring. This functionality can be accessed through a map-based user interface that appears in the user's Web browser (fig. 1), or individual functions can be requested remotely as Web services by other Web or desktop computer applications. StreamStats can perform these analyses much faster than historically used manual techniques. StreamStats was designed so that each state would be implemented as a separate application, with a reliance on local partnerships to fund the individual applications, and a goal of eventual full national implementation. Idaho became the first state to implement StreamStats in 2003. By mid-2008, 14 states had applications available to the public, and 18 other states were in various stages of implementation.

Ries, Kernell G., III; Guthrie, John G.; Rea, Alan H.; Steeves, Peter A.; Stewart, David W.

2008-01-01

458

Irrigania - a web-based game about sharing water resources  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

For teaching about collaboration and conflicts with regard to shared water resources, various types of games offer valuable opportunities. Single-player computer games often give much power to the player and ignore the fact that the best for some group might be difficult to achieve in reality if the individuals have their own interests. Here we present a new game called Irrigania, which aims at representing water conflicts among several actors in a simplified way. While simple in its rules, this game illustrates several game-theoretical situations typical for water-related conflicts. The game has been implemented as a web-based computer game, which allows easy application in classes. First classroom applications of the game indicated that, despite the simple rules, interesting patterns can evolve when playing the game in a class. These patterns can be used to discuss game theoretical considerations related to water resource sharing.

Seibert, J.; Vis, M. J. P.

2012-08-01

459

Water rights: scarce resource allocation, bureaucracy, and the environment  

SciTech Connect

This collection of 9 papers confronts the major issues of water allocation: (1) growing demand and scarce resources point to persistent scarcity; (2) market capabilities and limitations must be identified; and (3) ineffectiveness of state intervention should be understood. The analysis is divided into 3 parts (3 papers each). Part 1 provides a summary look at water policy. Part 2 focuses on reform - proposals for eradicating inefficient allocation resulting from present institutions. The 3 articles examine the economics of property rights based on prior appropriation; efficiency aspects of privatization of water rights based on consumptive use; and a comparison of public and private ownership. Part 3 goes further toward privatization, arguing that institutional externalities can be removed and the most valued use of resources attained through private management of ground water basins.

Anderson, T.L. (ed.)

1983-01-01

460

Conceptual Model of Water Resources in the Kabul Basin, Afghanistan  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The United States (U.S.) Geological Survey has been working with the Afghanistan Geological Survey and the Afghanistan Ministry of Energy and Water on water-resources investigations in the Kabul Basin under an agreement supported by the United States Agency for International Development. This collaborative investigation compiled, to the extent possible in a war-stricken country, a varied hydrogeologic data set and developed limited data-collection networks to assist with the management of water resources in the Kabul Basin. This report presents the results of a multidisciplinary water-resources assessment conducted between 2005 and 2007 to address questions of future water availability for a growing population and of the potential effects of climate change. Most hydrologic and climatic data-collection activities in Afghanistan were interrupted in the early 1980s as a consequence of war and civil strife and did not resume until 2003 or later. Because of the gap of more than 20 years in the record of hydrologic and climatic observations, this investigation has made considerable use of remotely sensed data and, where available, historical records to investigate the water resources of the Kabul Basin. Specifically, this investigation integrated recently acquired remotely sensed data and satellite imagery, including glacier and climatic data; recent climate-change analyses; recent geologic investigations; analysis of streamflow data; groundwater-level analysis; surface-water- and groundwater-quality data, including data on chemical and isotopic environmental tracers; and estimates of public-supply and agricultural water uses. The data and analyses were integrated by using a simplified groundwater-flow model to test the conceptual model of the hydrologic system and to assess current (2007) and future (2057) water availability. Recharge in the basin is spatially and temporally variable and generally occurs near streams and irrigated areas in the late winter and early spring. In irrigated areas near uplands or major rivers, the annual recharge rate may be about 1.2 ? 10-3 meters per year; however, in areas at lower altitude with little irrigation, the recharge rate may average about 0.7 ? 10-3 meters per year. With increasing population, the water needs of the Kabul Basin are estimated to increase from 112,000 cubic meters per day to about 725,000 cubic meters per day by the year 2057. In some areas of the basin, particularly in the north along the western mountain front and near major rivers, water resources are generally adequate for current needs. In other areas of the basin, such as in the east and away from major rivers, the available water resources may not meet future needs. On the basis of the model simulations, increasing withdrawals are likely to result in declining water levels that may cause more than 50 percent of shallow (typically less than 50 meters deep) supply wells to become dry or inoperative. The water quality in the shallow (less than 100 meters thick), unconsolidated primary aquifer has deteriorated in urban areas because of poor sanitation. Concerns about water availability may be compounded by poor well-construction practices and lack of planning. Future water resources of the Kabul Basin will likely be reduced as a result of increasing air temperatures associated with global climate change. It is estimated that at least 60 percent of shallow groundwater-supply wells would be affected and may become dry or inoperative as a result of climate change. These effects of climate change would likely be greatest in the agricultural areas adjacent to the Paghman Mountains where a majority of springs, karezes, and wells would be affected. The water available in the shallow primary aquifer of the basin may meet future water needs in the northern areas of the Kabul Basin near the Panjsher River. Conceptual groundwater-flow simulations indicate that the basin likely has groundwater reserves in unused unconsolidate

Mack, Thomas J.; Akbari, M. Amin; Ashoor, M. Hanif; Chornack, Michael P.; Coplen, Tyler B.; Emerson, Douglas G.; Hubbard, Bernard E.; Litke, David W.; Michel, Robert L.; Plummer, L. Niel; Rezai, M. Taher; Senay, Gabriel B.; Verdin, James P.; Verstraeten, Ingrid M.

2010-01-01

461

Water Resources Data Ohio: Water year 1994. Volume 1, Ohio River Basin excluding Project Data  

SciTech Connect

The Water Resources Division of the US Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with State agencies, obtains a large amount of data each water year (a water year is the 12-month period from October 1 through September 30 and is identified by the calendar year in which it ends) pertaining to the water resources of Ohio. These data, accumulated during many years, constitute a valuable data base for developing an improved understanding of the water resources of the State. To make these data readily available to interested parties outside the USGS, they are published annually in this report series entitled ``Water Resources Data--Ohio.`` This report (in two volumes) includes records on surface water and ground water in the State. Specifically, it contains: (1) Discharge records for streamflow-gaging stations, miscellaneous sites, and crest-stage stations; (2) stage and content records for streams, lakes, and reservoirs; (3) water-quality data for streamflow-gaging stations, wells, synoptic sites, and partial-record sit -aid (4) water-level data for observation wells. Locations of lake-and streamflow-gaging stations, water-quality stations, and observation wells for which data are presented in this volume are shown in figures 8a through 8b. The data in this report represent that part of the National Water Data System collected by the USGS and cooperating State and Federal agencies in Ohio. This series of annual reports for Ohio began with the 1961 water year with a report that contained only data relating to the quantities of surface water. For the 1964 water year, a similar report was introduced that contained only data relating to water quality. Beginning with the 1975 water year, the report was changed to present (in two or three volumes) data on quantities of surface water, quality of surface and ground water, and ground-water levels.

NONE

1994-12-31

462

Biotechnology for a renewable resources chemicals and fuels industry, biochemical engineering R and D  

SciTech Connect

To establish an effective biotechnology of biomass processing for the production of fuels and chemicals, an integration of research in biochemical engineering, microbial genetics, and biochemistry is required. Reduction of the costs of producing chemicals and fuels from renewable resources will hinge on extensive research in biochemical engineering.

Villet, R.H.

1980-04-01

463

Spans and suspensions: building bridges and water security through integrated water resource management.  

PubMed

There are three chasms that block the route to water security: the impact of population growth (and the associated urbanization); widespread malnutrition and poverty; conflict between agricultural demand and other human uses of water. To cross these chasms requires firstly education (primary education for girls is crucial) and the introduction of integrated water resource management. It requires the application of community energies and dedication, and the harnessing of private sector energies resources, but it will also need the development of innovative financial mechanisms. Above all it requires a major shift in the way we manage water, discarding prejudices and preconceptions, to address our water needs with imagination and commitment. PMID:12019835

Catley-Carlson, Margaret

2002-01-01

464

Domestic water supply, competition for water resources and IWRM in Tanzania: a review and discussion paper  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper reviews the historical development of domestic water supplies in Tanzania, the consequences of major policy shifts during the last seven decades, and some of the reasons for the failure of water supply systems. It considers the extent to which water resource issues are constraints in meeting the water supply needs of rural and urban populations, and the relevance of integrated water resources management to the WSS sector. Drawing upon case-study material from two major river basins, the Pangani and Rufiji, it reviews some of the practical steps being taken to implement IWRM principles in Tanzania.

Maganga, Faustin P.; Butterworth, John A.; Moriarty, Patrick

465

Human Resources Management An Engineering Perspective APS 1004H Course Outline  

E-print Network

Human Resources Management ­ An Engineering Perspective APS 1004H Course Outline Professor: Tom the relationship between management and workers. The course takes a holistic and strategic view of how human they relate to human resource management, the course topics include: organizational behavior including methods

466

Analysis of the Integrated Water Resources Management Approach: Turkey-EU Water Relations as A Casestudy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Integrated Water Resources Management (IWRM) approach which upholds the implementation of environmental and economic principles at the river basin level is imposed by the evolution of water problems in the industrialized world. The current consensus on IWRM is the result of a reorientation after a century of development in which the water sector was faced with a number of serious

Aysegül KIBAROGLU

467

Be a Water Watcher: A Resource Guide for Water Conservation, K-12.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This is a resource guide (in response to the New York City water emergency) for grades K-12 on the subject of water conservation. Activities are suggested for science, industrial arts, social studies, and communications arts classes. A bibliography on water is also provided. (APM)

New York City Board of Education, Brooklyn, NY. Div. of Curriculum and Instruction.

468

Mainstreaming the Participatory Approach in Water Resource Governance: The 2002 water law in Kenya  

Microsoft Academic Search

O.A. K'Akumu examines reforms that have been put in place by the Water Act of 2002 in Kenya. He shows that the government remains an active and powerful player in the management of water while local institutions need to be strengthened for effective water resource governance. Development (2008) 51, 56–62. doi:10.1057\\/palgrave.development.1100457

O A Kakumu

2008-01-01

469

A Dynamic Water Resources Management Approach in Beijing Using System Dynamics Model  

Microsoft Academic Search

Water resources constrain the scale and quality of social and economic development in many water shortage cities and regions. Thus, the management via dynamic water resources prediction is a key for the overall city strategic planning. In this study, an integrated dynamic model of water consumption was developed using system dynamics (SD) and based on water resources carrying capacity (WRCC)

Xin Zhang; Haiyan Feng; Xiaomin Mao; Mingke Zheng; Rui Wang

2009-01-01

470

Water resources data for Iowa, water year 1992. Water-data report (Annual), 1 October 1991-30 September 1992  

SciTech Connect

Water resources data for the 1992 water year for Iowa consist of records of stage discharge, and water quality of streams; stage, contents, and water quality of lakes and reservoirs; ground water levels and water quality of ground-water wells. The report contains records of water discharge for 114 stream-gaging stations; stage or contents for 8 lakes and reservoirs; water quality for 6 stream-gaging stations; sediment records for 13 stream-gaging stations; water levels for 204 observation wells; and chemical analyses for 88 municipal wells. Also included are 111 crest-stage partial-record stations.

Gorman, J.G.; Anderson, C.J.; Lambert, R.B.; Sneck-Fahrer, D.; Wang, W.

1993-03-31

471

Nebraska Water Conference Council's Annual Water & Natural Resources Tour  

E-print Network

- Water Center Coordinating Committee Tim Anderson . . . Central Nebraska Public Power & Irrigation:30 Depart Bayside Golf Course; travel US 26 & secondary roads to Crescent Lake National Wildlife Refuge. 2:00 Arrive at Crescent Lake National Wildlife Refuge; remarks from Neil Powers, Refuge Manager. 3:00 Depart

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

472

76 FR 27344 - Water Resources Management Plan/Environmental Impact Statement, Mojave National Preserve, San...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...of Intent to Prepare a Water Resources Management...National Environmental Policy Act of 1969, Mojave...inform preparation of a Water Resources Management...and NPS management policies. Surface water availability in the...

2011-05-11

473

Incorporation of Agricultural Risk into Water Resource Planning Models  

E-print Network

the demand for water at an alarming rate. With this in mind, the U. S. Congress has instructed our federal agencies to investigate "The needs and possibilities for all significant resource uses and purposes of development, including, but not limited to...

Conner, J. R.

474

RAINFALL AND WATER RESOURCES VARIABILITY IN SUB-SAHARAN AFRICA  

E-print Network

of Geography and Environmental Sciences, North West University, Republic of South Africa. *CorrespondingRAINFALL AND WATER RESOURCES VARIABILITY IN SUB-SAHARAN AFRICA DURING THE 20TH CENTURY Declan VARIABILITY IN SUB-SAHARAN AFRICA DURING THE 20TH CENTURY Declan Conway1, 2*, Aurelie Persechino1, Sandra

Watson, Andrew

475

Mediterranean water resources in a global change scenario  

Microsoft Academic Search

Mediterranean areas of both southern Europe and North Africa are subject to dramatic changes that will affect the sustainability, quantity, quality, and management of water resources. Most climate models forecast an increase in temperature and a decrease in precipitation at the end of the 21st century. This will enhance stress on natural forests and shrubs, and will result in more

José M. García-Ruiz; J. Ignacio López-Moreno; Sergio M. Vicente-Serrano; Santiago Beguería

2011-01-01

476

Environmental Research In Practice: Restoration And Protection Of Water Resources  

EPA Science Inventory

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is tasked to protect human health and the environment. To carry out this task, the EPA makes use of technical expertise within its Office of Research and Development. Restoration and protection of water resources is one area of tec...

477

Water Resources Management Practicum 2005 Nelson Institute for Environmental Studies  

E-print Network

educational programs or activities. Inquiries concerning this policy may be directed to appropriate campus of a contemporary water resources problem. The conclusions and recommendations are those of the graduate student Public Information Office 30A Science Hall 550 North Park Street Madison, Wisconsin 53706 608

Sheridan, Jennifer

478

A versatile and interoperable network sensors for water resources monitoring  

Microsoft Academic Search

Monitoring systems to assess water resources quantity and quality require extensive use of in-situ measurements, that have great limitations like difficulties to access and share data, and to customise and easy reconfigure sensors network to fulfil end-users needs during monitoring or crisis phases. In order to address such limitations Sensor Web Enablement technologies for sensors management have been developed and

Alberto Ortolani; Carlo Brandini; Roberto Costantini; Letizia Costanza; Lucia Innocenti; Francesco Sabatini; Bernardo Gozzini

2010-01-01

479

Water resources development of the Indo?Nepal region  

Microsoft Academic Search

There is no difference of opinion about the idea that development of water and hydroelectric power resources in the Indo?Nepal region would be of substantial mutual benefit to both countries. Any development in the region of Nepal and the Indian States of Uttar Pradesh and Bihar would be of considerable benefit to the people, as this region is one of

A. Ramachandra Rao; T. Prasad

1994-01-01

480

Assessment criteria for a sustainable management of the water resources  

Microsoft Academic Search

The present work describes the in-progress activities devoted to the definition of a model of sustainable management of the water resources at local scale, with special reference to an Optimal Territorial Ambit (ATO). These activities partly take as a starting point the EPSILON international research project \\

M. Maiolo; G. Martirano; P. Morrone; D. Pantusa

481

Water Resources Division Training Bulletin, July 1973 Through June 1974.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This bulletin provides information about available training as well as information to assist supervisors and training officers in developing a coordinated, efficient training program in hydrology and other subjects related to water-resources investigations. Most of the training is presented at the Center at Lakewood, Colorado. Information is given…

Abrams, R. O.; Brown, D. W.

482

Population momentum and the demand on land and water resources  

PubMed Central

Future world population growth is fuelled by two components: the demographic momentum, which is built into the age composition of current populations, and changes in reproductive behaviour and mortality of generations yet to come. This paper investigates, by major world regions and countries, what we know about population growth, what can be projected with reasonable certainty, and what is pure speculation. The exposition sets a frame for analysing demographic driving forces that are expected to increase human demand and pressures on land and water resources. These have been contrasted with current resource assessments of regional availability and use of land, in particular with estimates of remaining land with cultivation potential. In establishing a balance between availabilty of land resources and projected needs, the paper distinguishes regions with limited land and water resources and high population pressure from areas with abundant resources and low or moderate demographic demand. Overall, it is estimated that two-thirds of the remaining balance of land with rainfed cultivation potential is currently covered by various forest ecosystems and wetlands. The respective percentages by region vary between 23% in Southern Africa to 89% in South-Eastern Asia. For Latin America and Asia the estimated share of the balance of land with cultivation potential under forest and wetland ecosystems is about 70%, in Africa this is about 60%. If these were to be preserved, the remaining balance of land with some potential for rainfed crop cultivation would amount to some 550 million hectares. The regions which will experience the largest difficulties in meeting future demand for land resources and water, or alternatively have to cope with much increased dependency on external supplies, include foremost Western Asia, South-Central Asia, and Northern Africa. A large stress on resources is to be expected also in many countries of Eastern, Western and Southern Africa

Fischer, G.; Heilig, G. K.

1997-01-01

483

COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING & MINERAL RESOURCES TRANSFER REQUEST FORM  

E-print Network

. ___Chem (110/115) ___Too much effort required when I am not certain this is what I want to do. ___Engineering majors offered do not match my interests. ___I have other obligations and the curriculum is too

Mohaghegh, Shahab

484

Optimization approach for water resources long term planning and management  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Integration of short-term operation and long-term planning is one of the challenges of development and management of water resources systems. This research is interested in an optimization algorithm consisting of a short-term time step dynamic programming (DP) formulation, coupled with a long-term time step expectation of the future benefit function of flows scenarios. The method takes into account the short-term variability or seasonality of the flow regime as well as long-term uncertainty of flows, which is actuated by either climate change or global climate variability associated with phases of oceanic and atmospheric phenomena. The DP is used to determine an optimum operating policy of flows scenarios for the short-term time step. The use of flows scenarios in optimization problem represents the stochastic aspect of flows, and transition between scenarios is done at long-term time step. This method could be used for water resources planning in the context of future hydrologic regime uncertainties or to evaluate climate change impacts on existing water resources systems. The algorithm was tested for optimum hydropower production of Manicouagan water resources system, Québec, Canada, with two hydropower plants with reservoir and three run-of-river plants, for a period of 90 years, from 2010 to 2099. Future climate weekly time step operating policy was produced with two time steps: annual time step for management of water resources in non-stational climate and a weekly time step for flow seasonality. Annual flows have been used to compute transition probabilities between flow scenarios. Results show that there will be an increase of hydropower production in the future climate thanks to the increase of seasonal and annual flows. However, climate change will reduce the efficiency of the existing hydropower system, with more unproductive spills. The algorithm permitted to evaluate the impact of climate change on water resources without taking any assumptions other than the climate change scenarios and it was able to adapt the operating policy to the climate seasonality and climate change uncertainties in the optimization problem. Key words: water resources, optimization, non-stational climate, flow regime, dynamic programming

Haguma, D.; Leconte, R.; Krau, S.; Côté, P.

2012-04-01

485

A Complex Adaptive Systems Approach to Simulate Sociotechnical Dynamics in Urban Water Resources Management  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The quality and availability of water resources depends on the dynamic interactions among natural, infrastructure, and social systems. Decentralized decisions regarding land and water use shape the hydrologic characteristics of a watershed and drive the need for infrastructure to meet water demands. Simultaneously, policy-makers can update zoning regulations and drought management strategies based on the availability of natural resources. Engineering management has conventionally considered these social processes and policy adaptations as static inputs, ignoring feedbacks and interactions among decision-makers and the water system. A new modeling framework that explores the interactions among the components of an urban water system and allows the simulation of dynamic management strategies can provide new insight to the influence of feedbacks on water sustainability. This research develops and demonstrates a new Complex Adaptive Systems approach to model the interactions among population growth, land use change, the hydrologic cycle, residential water use, and inter-basin transfers. Agent-based and cellular automata models, representing consumers and policy-makers who make land and water use decisions, are coupled with hydrologic models (Figure 1). The framework is applied to simulate the complexities of urbanization and water supply for an illustrative case study over a long-term planning horizon. Results indicate that interactions among the decentralized decisions of individual residents can significantly influence system-wide sustainability. In addition, as water management decisions become more tightly constrained due to stresses of population growth, land use change, and drought, adaptive operation rules may be developed to restrict the water use and land use of consumers as the availability of water decreases. These strategies are simulated and assessed based on their abilities to increase the sustainability of the water supply system.

Zechman, E. M.; Giacomoni, M. H.

2011-12-01

486

Bilharziasis control in relation to water resources development in Africa and the Middle East  

PubMed Central

As part of its world-wide programme for the control of bilharziasis, the World Health Organization has set up a Bilharziasis Advisory Team, composed of an epidemiologist and an engineer, to investigate in different countries the prevalence of the disease and its relationship to irrigation, agriculture and a variety of factors associated with the development of water resources. This paper is an appraisal of the situation in 15 countries in Africa and the Middle East, based largely on surveys conducted by the Bilharziasis Advisory Team in the period 1958-60. Analyses of data from these 15 countries indicate that about 26 million people, out of a total population of 107 million, have bilharziasis. In spite of considerable expenditure on control measures, the prevalence of the disease is increasing. This trend is closely related to water resources development. On the basis of observations in the field, it is believed that improved water management and agricultural methods, stream and water impoundment control, the proper use of molluscicides and mechanical barriers, and certain aspects of environmental sanitation offer practical solutions to this problem. The complexity of these measures requires the closest co-operation between the various agencies, national and international, concerned with agriculture, water resources and public health. PMID:20604119

McMullen, Donald B.; Buzo, Z. J.; Rainey, Marshall B.; Francotte, Jean

1962-01-01

487

http://www.cemr.wvu.edu/freshman UPDATED 12/15/2010 COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING AND MINERAL RESOURCES FRESHMAN ENGINEERING  

E-print Network

7 x Week 8 x Week 9 Week 10 Week 11 Week 12 x Week 13 Week 14 Week 15 x Extra Credit Study Lab Gradehttp://www.cemr.wvu.edu/freshman UPDATED 12/15/2010 COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING AND MINERAL RESOURCES an opportunity to get an extra week of study labs. This shows when the webpage was last updated. Please, ignore

Mohaghegh, Shahab

488

Establishing Vulnerability Map of Water Resources in Regional Water Supply System  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In recent years, the threat of increasing frequency of extreme weather rise up human attention on climate change. To reduce the threat of water scarcity, it is important to know how climate change might affect regional water resources and where the hotspots, the vulnerability points, are. However, there is not much information to help government understanding how climate change will affect the water resources locally. To a regional water supply system, there might be some hotspots more vulnerable to climate due to the lack of water treatment plants or tape water pipe system. And also, there might be some hotspots more vulnerable due to high population and high industrial product value when they expose to the same threat of water scarcity. This study aims to evaluate the spatial vulnerability distribution of water resources and propose the adaptive plan for southern region of Taiwan. An integrated tool - TaiWAP (Taiwan Water Resources Assessment Program) for climate change vulnerability assessment on water resources, which includes 10 GCMs output of SRES A2, A1B, B2 scenarios, weather generator, GWLF model, and Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP) tool is used for climate impact assessment. For the simulation of the complex water supply system, the system dynamics model- VENSIM which is connected with TaiWAP is adopted to simulate a water supply system and evaluate vulnerability of each unit in a water supply system. The vulnerable hotspots will be indicated in the system and the adaptive strategies will be applied to strengthen the local vulnerable area. The adaptive capacity will be enhanced to mitigate climate change impacts on water supply system locally to achieve sustainable water uses.

Liu, T. M.; Tung, C. P.; Li, M. H.

2012-04-01

489

Attribution of water resources evolution in the highly water-stressed Hai River Basin of China  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Many observations and studies have shown that water resources amount in the Hai River Basin decreased significantly over the last half of the twentieth century. This study attempts to attribute the observed changes in the water resources amount in the basin over a 40 year period (1961-2000) to different factors, including natural climate variability, climate change induced by anthropogenic forcing of greenhouse gas emissions (referred to as anthropogenic forcing hereafter), and local human activity. First, the temporal variation of the annual water resources amount in the basin during the past 40 years is analyzed by employing the moving-average method, the linear regression method, and the Mann-Kendall method. Second, through setting different scenarios, the effects on the water resources amount due to different factors, including natural climate variability, anthropogenic forcing, and local human activity, are obtained using the parallel climate model, the distributed hydrological model water and energy transfer processes in large river basins, and the statistical downscaling model. Third, the fingerprint-based attribution method is used to obtain the signal strengths of observed changes in water resources amount during 1961-2000 and changes in the water resources amount under different scenarios. Finally, by comparing the signal strengths, the observed changes in water resources amount in the basin can be attributed to different factors. The results indicate that natural climate variability and local human activity may be two factors responsible for the observed changes in the water resources amount during the past 40 years in the basin, with local human activity being the main factor and accounting for about 60% of the changes.

Jia, Yangwen; Ding, Xiangyi; Wang, Hao; Zhou, Zuhao; Qiu, Yaqin; Niu, Cunwen

2012-02-01

490

2002 Water and Natural Resources Seminar: "Current Water and Natural Resources  

E-print Network

Jan. 23 "Endangered Tiger Beetles in the Salt Creek Watershed," Glenn D. Johnson, General Manager in Nebraska v. Wyoming," Roger Patterson, Director, Nebraska Department of Natural Resources, Lincoln. Feb. 27

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

491

Water Watch: Maps and Graphs of Current Water Resources Conditions  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This web site provides access to the river and stream water flow information that is collected in the United States. Current levels are compared with historical streamflow records for Real-Time (over several hours), Daily, 7-Day Average, and Below Normal streamflows. Colored maps and graphs show the data by different time periods such as day, week, or year. Relative wet and dry conditions are easily determined. Access to key related National Weather Service features is also provided.

492