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1

Water and Environmental Resources Engineering  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Learn about careers, education, and research in water and environmental engineering from diverse undergraduate and graduate engineering students. See what excites them about their future careers. Learn what engineers do, observe first hand student research projects on cleaning up wastewater and oil spills. Gives advice to students from students about engineering careers and training. Answers the questions "Is engineering too hard?" and "Are engineers geeks?"

Lilly Boruszkowski

2

Economic Representation of Agricultural Activities in Water Resources Systems Engineering  

E-print Network

i Economic Representation of Agricultural Activities in Water Resources Systems Engineering Representation of Agricultural Activities in Water Resources Systems Engineering Abstract Water demands reflect

Lund, Jay R.

3

TEKNISK VATTENRESURSLRA VVR 015 Water Resources Engineering  

E-print Network

. and Hammer, J R.: "Water and Wastewater Technology", (Third Edition) Prentice Hall, International EditionsTEKNISK VATTENRESURSL�RA VVR 015 Water Resources Engineering Antal poäng: 10.0. Kursansvarig: Rolf) Shaw, E.: "Hydrology in Practice", Chapman & Hall, 1994 (eller motsvrande). 3) Hammer Mark J

4

NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE 212 AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING BUILDING  

E-print Network

is Deputy Director for Water Resources Research. WASTE GUIDE ON THERMAL POLLUTION Copies of an "Industrial, Pacific Northwest Water Laboratory, Corvallis, Oregon, 97330, or Federal Water Pollution ControlNEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE 212 AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING BUILDING THE UNIVERSITY

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

5

NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE 212 AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING BUILDING  

E-print Network

NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE 212 AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING BUILDING THE UNIVERSITY; Legal Aspects of Drainage in New En~land; Detergent in Water; PCB in Water; Mercury in Water) water quality and non-point source control, and (4) water supply. The Water Programs Operations Office

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

6

NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE 212 AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING BUILDING  

E-print Network

NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE 212 AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING BUILDING THE UNIVERSITY of Land Treatment Related to Increasing Water Use Efficiency and Storage Efficiency of Rainfall Dr. Howard, rainfall machinery time requirements, soil temperature and crop yield data were collected on a sustained

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

7

Environmental and Water Resources Engineering Seminar Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering  

E-print Network

Environmental and Water Resources Engineering Seminar Department of Civil and Environmental of Michigan Jonathan L. Goodall, Ph.D. Associate Professor, Civil and Environmental Engineering University of Virginia Integrated modeling of hydro-environmental and infrastructure systems Abstract: A trend in civil

Kamat, Vineet R.

8

Environmental and Water Resources Engineering Seminar Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering  

E-print Network

Environmental and Water Resources Engineering Seminar Department of Civil and Environmental and Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering University of Michigan Future Scenario Modeling to Evaluate the Environmental Impacts of a New Technology Abstract: Estimating environmental impacts of a system at an early

Kamat, Vineet R.

9

WATER RESOURCES NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE  

E-print Network

WATER RESOURCES NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE 212 AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING BUILDING Committee on Natioha1 Water Resources report in 1961 and the formation of the Committee on Water Resources in emphasis"and values regarding water resources' research. Interest has shifted from}J4ter supply

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

10

WATER RESOURCES NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE  

E-print Network

WATER RESOURCES NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE 212 AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING BUILDING.ROGRAM FOR THE 1972, I~TERDISCIPL1NARY SEMINAR ON WATER RESOURCES1 The Interdisciplinary Water Resources Seminar upper classmen,graduate stUdents, ~rofessiona1 persons, faculty, nd others interested 1n water topics

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

11

JOINT SEMINAR ANNOUNCEMENT CEE 880 Environmental and Water Resources Engineering Seminar  

E-print Network

scales. My talk will focus intelligent water grids, which have the potential to revolutionizeJOINT SEMINAR ANNOUNCEMENT CEE 880 ­ Environmental and Water Resources Engineering Seminar CEE 840 the Internet of Water: The Role of Real-Time Data in Water Resource Operations Abstract. Traditional water

Kamat, Vineet R.

12

U.S. Army Engineer Institute for Water Resources  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The U.S. Army Engineer Institute for Water Resources (IWR) was created "to provide forward-looking analysis and research in developing methodologies to aid the Civil Works program." Their website is well-organized, and the homepage features a "How Do I"" set of links that will swiftly direct visitors to areas about IWR history, contact information, projects, and publications. The "Latest News and Project Highlights" is a good place to start, as it contains information about recent workshop projects, new fact sheets on IWR projects, and recent policy statements. Policy types will want to click on the "Publications" area straight away to read reports on environmental investments, alternative dispute resolution, and dam safety. Other visitors may wish to look at the "Featured Projects" area, which includes dredging data materials, details on harbor maintenance, and their hydrologic modeling system.

13

Environmental and Water Resources Engineering Seminar Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering  

E-print Network

Environmental and Water Resources Engineering Seminar Department of Civil and Environmental Scientist, Center for Sustainable Systems, SNRE University of Michigan Environmental Impacts of Coal Power this flexibility and operating them in such a manner may increase emissions and reduce the environmental benefits

Kamat, Vineet R.

14

WATER RESOURCES NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE  

E-print Network

WATER RESOURCES NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE 212 AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING BUILDING OF THE DIRECTOR . . · Once again during the spring 1973 semester the Nebraska Water Resources Research Institute will sponsor an Interdisciplinary Water Resources Seminar. These seminars have been held for the past five

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

15

WATER RESOURCES NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE  

E-print Network

WATER RESOURCES NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE 212 AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING BUILDING Research application is an educational activity. Its aim is to pro- duce a change in the water resource environment by producing a change in people who manage water resources. #12;-2- 6. Provide Readable Reports

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

16

WATER RESOURCES NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE  

E-print Network

WATER RESOURCES NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE 212 AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING BUILDING LABLE FRm1 ~.~, VI I RI RI I · The Nebraska Water Resources Research Institute has recently issued a new. This publi- cation may be obtained by writing: Dr. Warren Viessman, Jr., Director, Nebraska Water Resources

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

17

WATER RESOURCES NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE  

E-print Network

WATER RESOURCES NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE 212 AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING BUILDING,000,000 for the Sec. 101 matching grant program, and $2,000,000 for the Title II program. INTERDISCIPLINARY WATER RESOURCE SEMINAR An Interdisciplinary Water Resource Seminar will be offered during the 1970 Semeste

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

18

WATER RESOURCES NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE  

E-print Network

WATER RESOURCES NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE 212 AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING BUILDING ALLOTMENT PROJECT DEADLINE The Nebraska Water Resources Research Institute is now prepared to receive basicIe. LB-334, enacted by the 1969 Legislature, authorized the Nebraska Soil a~d Water Conservation

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

19

WATER RESOURCES ,'JEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE  

E-print Network

WATER RESOURCES ,'JEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE 212 AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING BUILDING, 1973 Research in support of the state water resources planni n q proces s c a n 01" a highly productive actually be understood. It must also be understood that planning for the use and development of water

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

20

Environmental and Water Resources Engineering Seminar Wednesday, January 15, 2012  

E-print Network

treatment evaluating disposal options in the U. S. and Bangladesh" Arsenic contamination of drinking water.D. Student Civil and Environmental Engineering University of Michigan "Arsenic wastes from drinking water found to contain high levels of naturally present arsenic. Here we focus on three different arsenic

Kamat, Vineet R.

21

Water Use in Agricultural Watersheds Derrel Martin, Professor, Irrigation and Water Resources Engineer, Dept. of Biological Systems  

E-print Network

Water Use in Agricultural Watersheds Derrel Martin, Professor, Irrigation and Water Resources Engineer, Dept. of Biological Systems Engineering, UNL Background Concerns about water use have intensified and Republican River Basins, and the implementation of LB 962. To understand water use it is helpful to consider

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

22

WATER RESOURCES NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE  

E-print Network

WATER RESOURCES NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE 212 AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING BUILDING in water pollution except that land runoff is a more meaningful problem than originally thought. BUREAU STUDIES SALINE WATER A study to generate a dependable \\'tay of evaluating the economic effects of salinity

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

23

WATER RESOURCES NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE  

E-print Network

WATER RESOURCES NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE 212 AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING BUILDING during precipitation-free periods and constitutes the principal source of fresh water for many arid local- ities. About 70-80 percent of the water used in Nebraska is from groundwater sources, while the national

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

24

WATER RESOURCES NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE  

E-print Network

WATER RESOURCES NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE 212 AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING BUILDING~ November 1973 Opportunities for cost effective research related to energy-water issues are abundant. Many. It would be impossible to list all fruitful avenues for energy-water research, but some important issues

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

25

Engineering Resources  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The American Society for Mechanical Engineers (ASME) was founded in 1880 by a small group of leading industrialists, and has grown since that time to include over 120,000 members in over 150 countries. This section of their website brings together a clutch of resources for those seeking to learn about career paths in the field. This page is a great way to get young people thinking about joining this noble profession.

26

WATER RESOURCES NEWS t'~EBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE  

E-print Network

WATER RESOURCES NEWS t'~EBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE 212 AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING.J~!GHIEEP. HlG STlJDF,~'T SELECTED FOR INSTITUTE DE WATER RESOURCES PLNm ING /\\HALYS ISAND REVIEl"1STIJDY Gary A studentjwho will work in 2-men teams with exneri- enced Corps of Engineers water resources planners

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

27

WATER RESOURCES NEWS NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE  

E-print Network

WATER RESOURCES NEWS NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE 212 AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING and the Soil and Water Division of the American Society of Agricultural Engineers will sponsor a three- tenance of these irnportQnt water resources sy~tcms. For further information and registration forms

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

28

Water Resources  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Uses of ERTS-1 imagery and data for water resources surveys and management are summarized. Areas discussed are: (1) land use and geology; (2) flood plain and flood inundation mapping; (3) snow cover mapping; (4) glacier observations; (5) data collection systems; (6) surface waters; (7) wetlands mapping; (8) water quality; (9) soil mapping; (10) phreatophyte and riparian vegetation mapping; and (11) evapotranspiration.

Salomonson, V. V.

1973-01-01

29

Master of Science in Civil Engineering Environmental Engineering/Water Resources Engineering  

E-print Network

Leveling Requirements MATH MATH 1351 - Calculus I MATH 1352 - Calculus II MATH 2350 - Calculus III MATH 3342 - Mathematical Statistics for Engineers and Scientists a MATH 3350 ­ Differential Equationsb May be waived if student can demonstrate proficiency in computer based problem solving capacity #12;

Gelfond, Michael

30

Environmental and Water Resources Engineering Seminar Wednesday, March 28, 2012  

E-print Network

as Incubators of Halogenated-Phenol Mediated Antibiotic Resistant Bacteria" Recent studies show that chlorinated phenolic compounds such as some disinfection by-products and commercial sanitizers can activate antibiotic resistant phenotypes in bacteria. It is a potential concern that conditions in point-of-use (PoU) water

Kamat, Vineet R.

31

Water resources  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The application of ERTS-1 imagery to the conservation and control of water resources is discussed. The effects of exisiting geology and land use in the water shed area on the hydrologic cycle and the general characteristics of runoff are described. The effects of floods, snowcover, and glaciers are analyzed. The use of ERTS-1 imagery to map surface water and wetland areas to provide rapid inventorying over large regions of water bodies is reported.

Salomonson, V. V.; Rango, A.

1973-01-01

32

WATER RESOURCES NEWS NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE  

E-print Network

WATER RESOURCES NEWS m NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE 212 AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING'f,R PLAmlEll The Nebraska Water Resources Research Institute (NWRRI) is planning a t wo-cday Seminar, entitled "Water Resources PlanninfT and Public Opinion", to be he Ld March 8,9, 1971 at the Nebraska Center

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

33

WATER RESOURCES NEWS NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE  

E-print Network

WATER RESOURCES NEWS NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE 212 AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING\\R PLN'~lFn The Nebraska Water Resources Research Instituie (NWRRI) is planning a two-day Seminar, enti of this conference is to acquaint water resources planners, managers, developers, researchers, and educators

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

34

WATER RESOURCES NEWS NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE  

E-print Network

WATER RESOURCES NEWS NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE 212 AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING INSTITUTES A SUCCESS The Water Resources Research Ins ti tute re cently sponsored two very successful one-week Summer Institutes. The titles of the Institutes were "Optimal Analysis of Water Resources Systems

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

35

WATER RESOURCES NEWS NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE  

E-print Network

WATER RESOURCES NEWS NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE 212 AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING in competition for Title II funds provided by the Water Resources Research Act of 1964. The grant totaling $51 pUblic participation in water resources planning activities. Project director is Dr. Edward J. Mc

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

36

WATER RESOURCES NEWS NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE  

E-print Network

WATER RESOURCES NEWS NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE 212 AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING Water Resources Research Institute will once agai n sponsor a one-week Summer Insti tute.jlu ly 21-26, 1974. Thi s year's theme is "Quantitative Planning Techniques in Water Resources. II The objective

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

37

Water Resources People cand Issues  

E-print Network

Water Resources People cand Issues Interview With Professor Arthur Maass US Army Corps of Engineers Maass. (Water resources people and issues) 1. Water resources development--United States-- Planning--History. 2. Water resources development-- United States--Planning--History--Sources. I. Maass, Arthur. II

US Army Corps of Engineers

38

Water Resources  

E-print Network

Groundwater Group, and Ebasco Services, Inc. In addition, the following plans, studies and reports related to water resources are also available to be read at the Planning Department or at the Permit Center: Water Assessment For San Juan County, prepared by the Citizens Water Advisory Committee with assistance from the County Planning and Health & Community Services departments and the state Departments of Ecology and Health, was adopted by Board of County Commissioners

unknown authors

39

WATER RESOURCES NEWS NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE  

E-print Network

WATER RESOURCES NEWS NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE 212 AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING OF THE DIRECTOR . . . April 1973 NEBRASKA AND THE NATIONAL WATER COMMISSION REPORT The National Water Commission grew out of con t r-ovc rey over water resource deve lopment in the Colorado River Basin. Rp

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

40

A computer-aided visualization tool for stochastic theory education in water resources engineering  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper, we propose and demonstrate the proof-of-concept for a computer-aided visualization tool for stochastic theory education in water resources engineering. Using Java Native Interfacing, the tool can wrap a space-time stochastic model written in any computer language and also not require any specific language compiler during tool usage. This feature also allows the tool to be implemented very

Jonathan Schwenk; Faisal Hossain; David Huddleston

2009-01-01

41

Water World and Environmental Resources Conference 2004, Environmental and Water Resources Institute of the American Society of Civil Engineers, Salt Lake City, Utah. May 27 June 1, 2004.  

E-print Network

1 Water World and Environmental Resources Conference 2004, Environmental and Water Resources of Natural Resources, Madison, WI 3 Pacific Water Resources, Lake Oswego, OR Abstract The authors have been

Pitt, Robert E.

42

WATER RESOURCES NEWS NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE  

E-print Network

WATER RESOURCES NEWS NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE 212 AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING that the traditional acceptance of and fundin0 approach to extensive water resources development projects would change. The era of large public works projects for water development is over insofar as national parti- cipation

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

43

WATER RESOURCES NEWS NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE  

E-print Network

WATER RESOURCES NEWS NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE 212 AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING-Oriented Water Research Plan for Nebraska, II is by Dr. Harren ViessL~n, Jr. This publication rnay be obta ined by vrr i ting : Dr · Warren Viessrnan, Jr., Director, Nebraska water Resources Research Institute, 212

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

44

WATER RESOURCES NEWS NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE  

E-print Network

WATER RESOURCES NEWS NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE 212 AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING OF INTEREST 1. -:1-!at er Leve1 s in Ob servat ion l·reJ 1 s in lITebra s ka 196 8 ~l > Nebraska Water Survey of soil and water resources. When #12;-2- completely operational, the data bank should be a great asset

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

45

WATER RESOURCES NEWS NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE  

E-print Network

WATER RESOURCES NEWS NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE 212 AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING . . . July 1973 The final report of the National Water Commission entitled Water Policies for the Future has been issued. Because its con- cluslons -a-rid -re-commend-atlOnsmay have far-reaching effects on water

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

46

Environmental and Water Resources Engineering Seminar Wednesday, January 16, 2013, 4:00 5:00 PM  

E-print Network

CEE 880 Environmental and Water Resources Engineering Seminar Wednesday, January 16, 2013, 4:00 ­ 5 Engineering University of Michigan Biomolecule pollutants and the challenges they pose to environmental in the environment. Certain biomolecules, however, can act as pollutants, causing human disease (e.g. prion proteins

Kamat, Vineet R.

47

WATER RESOURCES NEWS NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE  

E-print Network

WATER RESOURCES NEWS NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE 212 AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING BUilDING THE UNIVERSITY OF NEBRASKA LINCOLN, NEBRASKA 68503 Volume 2 Number 4 April 1970 INCREASED FUNDS FOR STATE WATER thus far include such educational and scientific organizations as the Universities Council on Water

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

48

WATER RESOURCES .NEWS NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE  

E-print Network

WATER RESOURCES .NEWS NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE 212 AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING" DIRECTOR ... c---~ / --'-----::L.\\ ".~-' ~1arch 1973 Incrc~sinq demands on our water supolies dictate~at~ent processes are improved and the procurement and development of naturJl water sources becomes increasingly

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

49

WATER RESOURCES NE:BRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE  

E-print Network

but often misunderstood. There are two sides to the energy-water coin. The most well-known is the energyWATER RESOURCES NE:BRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE 212 AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING BUILDING OF THE DIRECTOR · · · The energy crisis facing the nation is multi-faceted. Water's role is an important one

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

50

Reformulation of Engineering Education at Undergraduate Level in the Faculdad de Ingenieria y Ciencias Hidricas Universidad Nacional del Litoral--Water Resources and Engineering Degrees.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper explains the educational changes in the Water Resources Engineering program offered by the Universidad Nacional del Litoral in Santa Fe, Argentina, for the last 20 years at the undergraduate level. The need for modernizing the engineering teaching program occurred due to changes in the social system in which the concepts of development…

Theiler, Julio; Isla, Miguel; Arrillaga, Hugo; Ceirano, Eduardo; Lozeco, Cristobal

51

Engineering and Mineral Resources  

E-print Network

News ????????????????? ® College of Engineering and Mineral Resources Winter 2008 table of contents. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 wvCROSSROADS DepartmentofCivilandEnvironmentalEngineering Civil engineering exchange program and environmental engineering with a focus in transportation will have the opportunity to study abroad as part

Mohaghegh, Shahab

52

Water Resources: Hydraulics and Hydrology  

E-print Network

Water Resources: Hydraulics and Hydrology Interview with Margaret S. Petersen #12;This manuscript RESOURCES: HYDRAULICS AND HYDROLOGY #12;Approved for public release distribution IS unlimited. #12;Preface The United States Army Corps of Engineers significantly contributed to hydraulic and hydrologic engineering

US Army Corps of Engineers

53

1999 WATER RESOURCES SEMINARS "Spotlighting Water Research"  

E-print Network

Institute, Fountain Valley, CA March 31: "Unsaturated Hydraulic Properties for Movement of Water1999 WATER RESOURCES SEMINARS "Spotlighting Water Research" Wednesdays/3:00 to 3:50 p.m./116 L. W a Boost"--J. Michael Jess, Civil Engineer January 20: "Hydrologic Impact of Water Conservation Practices

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

54

Water Resources Georgia  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Water Resources Georgia: From the USGS web site comes the Georgia Water Information Network (GWIN)which offers water information for thousands of surface-water, ground-water, and water-quality measurement sites in Georgia.

55

Save Our Water Resources.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this booklet, developed as part of Project SOAR (Save Our American Resources), is to give Scout leaders some facts about the world's resources, the sources of water pollution, and how people can help in obtaining solutions. Among the topics discussed are the world's water resources, the water cycle, water quality, sources of water

Bromley, Albert W.

56

System International d'Unites: Metric Measurement in Water Resources Engineering.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This pamphlet gives definitions and symbols for the basic and derived metric units, prefixes, and conversion factors for units frequently used in water resources. Included are conversion factors for units of area, work, heat, power, pressure, viscosity, flow rate, and others. (BB)

Klingeman, Peter C.

57

Arkansas Water Resources Center  

E-print Network

to the Arkansas Soil and Water Conservation Commission By Marc A. Nelson Arkansas Water Resources Center Ron Redman Arkansas Soil and Water Conservation Commission L. Wade Cash Arkansas Water Resources Center G ROAD 76 BRIDGE ON BALLARD CREEK Submitted to: Arkansas Soil and Water Conservation Commission By: Marc

Soerens, Thomas

58

Water Resource Adaptation Program  

EPA Science Inventory

The Water Resource Adaptation Program (WRAP) contributes to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency?s (U.S. EPA) efforts to provide water resource managers and decision makers with the tools needed to adapt water resources to demographic and economic development, and future clim...

59

Water, Ohio's Remarkable Resource.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Information on water and water resources in Ohio is presented in seven sections. Water from Ohio streams, water storage, lakes in Ohio, and ground water are discussed in the first section ("Water, A Part of the Earth"). A brief discussion on the ecosystem is provided in the second section ("Water and Life"). Topics discussed in the third section…

Groves, Carrie J.

60

WATER SUPPLY AND WATER RESOURCES DIVISION - HOME PAGE  

EPA Science Inventory

The Water Supply and Water Resources Division (WSWRD) conducts research to help prepare the primary and secondary regulations for drinking water and to develop technologies and strategies for controlling waterborne contaminants. The program integrates chemistry, engineering, micr...

61

Water Resources Policy & Economics  

E-print Network

Water Resources Policy & Economics FOR 4984 Selected Course Topics · Appropriative and riparian water institutions · Incentives for conservation · Water rights for in-stream environmental use · Surface water-groundwater management · Water quality regulations · Water markets · Economic and policy

Buehrer, R. Michael

62

Developing Our Water Resources  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Only very recently developed as a refined scientific discipline, hydrology has to cope with a complexity of problems concerning the present and future management of a vital natural resource, water. This article examines available water supplies and the problems and prospects of water resource development. (Author/MA)

Volker, Adriaan

1977-01-01

63

Water Resources of Idaho  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This United States Geological Survey (USGS) website highlights water resources in the state of Idaho. Details about hydrology programs in the state include ground water data, water quality information, water use in the state of Idaho, surface water, Idaho programs, reports, flood and drought information, and state projects on ice core research and various rivers. There are links to more sites for additional information.

64

Arkansas Water Resources Center  

E-print Network

Arkansas Water Resources Center LASER-PHOTOACOUSTIC DETECTION OF WATER POLLUTANTS PHASE I Principal. '. 18 #12;cor~PLETIONREPORT LASER-PHOTOACOUSTICDETECTIONOF WATER POLLUTANTS: PHASEI October ls 1977 their waters. Recognizing that water pollution can pose serious health hazards and unknown long term effects

Soerens, Thomas

65

Resources on Engineering Education  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

On this website, Dr. Richard M. Felder, the Hoechst Celanese Professor Emeritus of Chemical Engineering at North Carolina State University, offers guidance, tips and resources for using techniques that he has found effective in teaching college level engineering courses. Numerous articles on learning styles, assessment, and instructional techniques are available here to download free of charge. Topics include active learning, cooperative learning and an Index of Learning Styles, which is "an on-line instrument used to assess preferences on four dimensions (active/reflective, sensing/intuitive, visual/verbal, and sequential/global) of a learning style model formulated by Richard M. Felder and Linda K. Silverman." Also posted here are some handouts for students with titles such as "How to Survive Engineering School" and "Tips on Test-Taking."

66

Water Resources Water Quality and Water Treatment  

E-print Network

PLANTS WATER TRE WATER QUALITY MONITORING NETWORK I Central Pollution Control Board (CPCB) hasEF) promotes basin-wide pollution control strategies. It liaises with State Water Pollution Control BoardsWater Resources TD 603 Lecture 1: Water Quality and Water Treatment CTARA Indian Institute

Sohoni, Milind

67

Water Resources Milind Sohoni  

E-print Network

TD 603 Water Resources Milind Sohoni www.cse.iitb.ac.in/sohoni/ Building Numerical Models () August of surface flow of water and infiltration which may include time to flow, movement of solids etc. () August

Sohoni, Milind

68

Water Resources of Utah  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This U.S. Geological Survey website provides real-time streamflow, surface-water, ground-water, and water-quality data; information on water resource programs of Utah such as the National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) study; maps and graphs of current U.S. water resource conditions; and USGS - Utah reports. The site also features a drought watch section for Utah containing drought definitions and more streamflow conditions; a section on the Upper Arkansas River Basin Toxic-Substances Hydrology Project; and information on contamination in ground water at Fry Canyon, Utah.

69

Water Resources Milind Sohoni  

E-print Network

TD 603 Water Resources Milind Sohoni www.cse.iitb.ac.in/sohoni/ Lecture 2: Water cycle, stocks and flows () July 28, 2013 1 / 30 #12;The basic movement of water source: USGS. () July 28, 2013 2 / 30 #12, humidity and air flow. Formation of liquid-water in the Atmosphere-Cloud-Formation Coming Down Rain

Sohoni, Milind

70

Water Resources Milind Sohoni  

E-print Network

TD 603 Water Resources Milind Sohoni www.cse.iitb.ac.in/sohoni/ Lecture 8: Wells () August 28, 2012 project, utilizing enhanced ground-water. Water lifted from storage, to accumulate overnight from aquifer. Water from shallow aquifer, of about 7-8m thickness. accounts for about 30% of irrigation Unique

Sohoni, Milind

71

Water Resources Milind Sohoni  

E-print Network

TD 603 Water Resources Milind Sohoni www.cse.iitb.ac.in/sohoni/ Lecture 7: Regional Groundwater than the unit situations that we saw. Surface water/Groundwater interactions. lakes and streams springs (seepage) Ambient water-table movements Seasonal changes Inteference with other water end-users. Inherent

Sohoni, Milind

72

Water Resources of Tennessee  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This site, from the U.S. Geological Survey, provides real-time, surface-water, ground-water and water-quality data; maps and graphs of current water resource conditions in the U.S. such as a daily streamflow conditions map; publications and product information; information on National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) programs of the Tennessee River Basin and Mobile River Basin; and information on water use in Tennessee.

73

Water Resources Research Center  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Visitors can access information on a variety of water issues in Arizona, including the Colorado River, riparian areas, water conservation, water rights, and recreation. The Arizona Water Resources Research Center (WRRC) provides FAQâs, a stream gauge map and a directory of water-related agencies and organizations. Real-time temperature, precipitation, wind speed and direction, and humidity readouts are available via the new WRRC weather station. Other materials include news articles, research reports, presentations, and links to other water-related sites.

74

Water Resources Center Archives  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Founded in 1957, the Water Resources Center Archives (WRCA) of the University of California at Berkeley (UCB) maintains a collection of current and historic water-related materials. The searchable WRCA site provides information on the Center's collections, including Print, Archival, Photograph (sample photos are online -- and are spectacular!), Map, CD-ROM and Video collections. In addition, the site offers information about the WRCA's publications and services, links to relevant Internet resources, and other information. While access to Water Resources Abstracts is restricted to UCB faculty/staff/students, the site's broad coverage of historical and current water information has plenty to offer to other viewers.

75

Water Resources of Wyoming  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This U.S Geological Survey (USGS) website contains water data including water quality samples and water use data, information on USGS projects, links to USGS educational sites, and a bibliography of USGS water resource publications. Projects and studies covered include: the Wyoming Drought Watch, which contains maps of daily streamflow conditions and historical streamflow data; algal-nutrient relations in the Yellowstone River; county water resource studies; estimating peak-streamflow characteristics at ungaged sites; the Integrating Aquatic Ecosystem Data project of the Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Program (EMAP); an aquifer; water-quality issues associated with irrigation drainage; watershed delineation; urban hydrology; and a pathogen indicator synoptic study.

76

Water Resources Penn.  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Water Resources Penn.: The Office of Water Management plans, directs and coordinates departmental programs associated with the management and protection of the CommonwealthÂ?s water resources; administers and oversees departmental programs involving surface and groundwater quantity and quality planning, and soil and water conservation; coordinates policies, procedures and regulations which influence public water supply withdrawals and quality, sewage facilities planning, point source municipal and industrial discharges, encroachments upon waterways and wetlands, dam safety, earth disturbance activities and control of storm water and nonpoint source pollution; and coordinates the planning, design and construction of flood protection and stream improvement projects.

77

Water Resources of Indiana  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This United States Geological Survey (USGS) page contains information about the water resources in the state of Indiana. The district staff measure streamflow and ground-water levels as well as collect water-quality data (pH and mercury levels) throughout the state. Information on this site includes daily streamflow conditions, Biological Resources Division research in the state, drought information, and studies of the Upper Illinois River basin and White River basin. There are links to other sites for additional information.

78

Water Resources in Jordan  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Water resources in Jordan are very limited, among the lowest in the world on a per capita basis. The annual per capita share\\u000a of water is currently estimated at 135 m3 and this Figure is expected to drop to 90 m3 in the year 2020 as a result of the\\u000a disproportional increase in population relative to water resources development. Moreover,

Anwar Jiries

79

A social-economic-engineering combined framework for decision making in water resources planning  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This study presents a new methodology not only to evaluate willingness to pays (WTPs) for the improvement of hydrological vulnerability using a choice experiment (CE) method but also to do a cost-benefit analysis (CBA) of some feasible alternatives combing the derived WTPs with an alternative evaluation index (AEI). The hydrological vulnerability consists of potential streamflow depletion (PSD), and potential water quality deterioration (PWQD) and can be quantified using a multi-criteria decision making technique and pressure-state-response (PSR) framework. PSD and PWQD not only provide survey respondents with sufficient site-specific information to avoid scope sensitivity in a choice experiment but also support the standard of dividing the study watershed into six sub-regions for site-fitted management. Therefore CE was applied to six regions one after the other, in order to determine WTPs for improvements on hydrological vulnerability considering the characteristics which are vulnerability, location, and preferences with regard to management objectives. The AEI was developed to prioritize the feasible alternatives using a continuous water quantity/quality simulation model as well as multi-criteria decision making techniques. All criteria for alternative performance were selected based on a driver-pressures-state-impact-response (DPSIR) framework, and their weights were estimated using an Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP). In addition, the AEI that reflects on residents' preference with regard to management objectives was proposed in order to incite the stakeholder to participate in the decision making process. Finally, the economic values of each alternative are estimated by a newly developed method which combines the WTPs for improvements on hydrologic vulnerability with the AEI. This social-economic-engineering combined framework can provide the decision makers with more specific information as well as decrease the uncertainty of the CBA.

Chung, E. S.; Lee, K. S.

2008-10-01

80

Teaching internationally: Texas A&M professor travels the world teaching water resources engineering  

E-print Network

in Texas A&M University?s Zachry Department of Civil Engi- neering. Teaching internationally A native of Peru, Olivera graduated as a civil engineer from the Catholic University in Lima, Peru, and received a master?s degree in hydraulic engineering... from the International Institute for Hydraulic and Environmental Engineering in Delft, The Netherlands. In Peru he was a professor of engineering at the Catholic University for 12 years before coming to the United States in 1992 to obtain his doc...

Wythe, Kathy

2008-01-01

81

Water Resource Management  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This portal, published by the University of Florida/Institute of Food and Agricultural Science (IFAS) Extension, offers a selection of links to information about water management issues. There is a 'Beginner's Guide to Water Management', which provides a basic introduction to the terminology and concepts used in water management. Other links access information on management in coastal waters, the impact of climate change on water resources, the use of stormwater as an alternative supply, wastewater management, and many others.

82

Water resources of Massachusetts  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report describes the water resources of Massachusetts. It contains sections describing the location, use, quality, and management of water resources in Massachusetts, followed by a summary of the surface water and ground-water resources of all 27 river basins designated by the State for planning purposes. The data for each basin include information about selected continuous record streamflow-gaging stations, the distribution and size of major lakes and streams, and the character of the principal aquifers. Each basin summary is accompanied by a map that shows basin and political boundaries, hydrography, locations of continuous-record streamflow-gaging stations, and aquifer areas. The aquifer areas were derived from the Hydrologic Investigations Atlases and generally show areas that are likely to yield 100 gallons per minute or more to individual wells. The report was compiled from many reports, including 30 U.S. Geological Survey Hydrologic Investigations Atlases that inventory water resources of the State.

Simcox, Alison C.

1992-01-01

83

Water Resources Milind Sohoni  

E-print Network

. Melting point 0 C, boiling point 100 C. Specific heat (water): 1 calorie/gm/degree C. Second highest! veryTD 603 Water Resources Milind Sohoni www.cse.iitb.ac.in/sohoni/ Lecture 1: A Perspective () July 20, 2012 1 / 17 #12;Outline Two parts: The technical side to water. -M. Sohoni The basic hydrological cycle

Sohoni, Milind

84

Water Resources Milind Sohoni  

E-print Network

TD 603 Water Resources Milind Sohoni www.cse.iitb.ac.in/sohoni/ Lecture 10: Minor Structures for Ground and Surface Water () March 23, 2010 1 / 31 #12;Classification by Purpose We may classify the velocity of water-flow (ii) increasing the infiltration coefficient (iii) explicit groundwater recharge

Sohoni, Milind

85

Water Resources Milind Sohoni  

E-print Network

TD 603 Water Resources Milind Sohoni www.cse.iitb.ac.in/sohoni/ Lecture 4: Groundwater () December in dried sample. Saturation: When these voids are fully filled with water. Specific Yield Sy : the ration of the colume of water that drains from a rock owing to gravity, to the total rock volumne. 00000000

Sohoni, Milind

86

Water Resources Milind Sohoni  

E-print Network

TD 603 Water Resources Milind Sohoni www.cse.iitb.ac.in/sohoni/ Analysis Framework for the 2009 / 16 #12;Vol II and Vol III Vol. II 1 Annexure I, Chap. 1: Bulk-water and tariffs-Principles. 2 Annexure I, Chap. 2: International Case Studies. 3 Annexure II: Report on water conservation technologies

Sohoni, Milind

87

Water Resources Milind Sohoni  

E-print Network

TD 603 Water Resources Milind Sohoni www.cse.iitb.ac.in/sohoni/ Lecture 6: Mathematics, z). velocity vx (x, y, z, t) : in the x-direction. vx = Kx h/x saturated/water- table. Continuity Equation What is vx x + vy y + vz z ? It is the rate of accumulation of water at the point (x, y

Sohoni, Milind

88

Water Basins Civil Engineering  

E-print Network

Water Basins Civil Engineering Objective · Connect the study of water, water cycle, and ecosystems with engineering · Discuss how human impacts can effect our water basins, and how engineers lessen these impacts: · The basic concepts of water basins are why they are important · To use a topographic map · To delineate

Provancher, William

89

Water - an inexhaustible resource?  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We have chosen to present the topic "Water", by illustrating problems that will give better opportunities for interdisciplinary work between Natural Science (Physics, Chemistry, Biology and Geology) teachers at first, but also English teachers and maybe others. Water is considered in general, in all its shapes and states. The question is not only about drinking water, but we would like to demonstrate that water can both be a fragile and short-lived resource in some ways, and an unlimited energy resource in others. Water exists on Earth in three states. It participates in a large number of chemical and physical processes (dissolution, dilution, biogeochemical cycles, repartition of heat in the oceans and the atmosphere, etc.), helping to maintain the homeostasis of the entire planet. It is linked to living beings, for which water is the major compound. The living beings essentially organized themselves into or around water, and this fact is also valid for human kind (energy, drinking, trade…). Water can also be a destroying agent for living beings (tsunamis, mud flows, collapse of electrical dams, pollution...) and for the solid earth (erosion, dissolution, fusion). I) Water, an essential resource for the human kind After having highlighted the disparities and geopolitical problems, the pupils will study the chemistry of water with its components and their origins (isotopes, water trip). Then the ways to make it drinkable will be presented (filtration, decantation, iceberg carrying…) II) From the origin of water... We could manage an activity where different groups put several hypotheses to the test, with the goal to understand the origin(s?) of water on Earth. Example: Isotopic signature of water showing its extraterrestrial origin.. Once done, we'll try to determine the origin of drinking water, as a fossil resource. Another use of isotopes will allow them to evaluate the drinking water age, to realize how precious it can be. III) Water as a sustainable energy resource Water is used to produce energy under different processes like ancient tamed energy such as water mills, locks or more recently tidal energy, marine current power, generators based on swell or osmotic gradients. The pupils will work in groups to present different techniques to the class. We could try to determine if all these energy resources could replace the actual major energy source in France: nuclear. Conclusion: Liquid water is probably the cradle of life. Since the birth of human kind, its history is closely linked to the presence of water: drinking, fishing, hygiene, and also transport or business is strictly depending on this resource. Described as a fragile and limited resource when it is used for human consumption, we realize that water is also an uneven resource of energy for the next generations. The challenge will then be to reconcile these different aspects: respecting this nourishing resource and preserving it from pollution, overexploitation or wasting, and at the same time, using water as energy for a world that has a growing population.

Le Divenah, C.; Esperou, E.

2012-04-01

90

Water Resources of Illinois  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This United States Geological Survey (USGS) website is dedicated to water resources and studies in the state of Illinois. It contains real-time and daily streamflow data for the state, historical data, precipitation data, flooding information, groundwater quality, radium and arsenic water pollution, and studies on the Illinois River basin and Illinois lakes. Links are provided for additional information.

91

Water Resources Milind Sohoni  

E-print Network

An aquifer is an underground soil-strata which allows the storage and movement of water. K > 0.1cm/s and Sy in conductivity or storage are called aquitards. Example: Base Rock, Clays. Unconfined aquifer: accessible fromTD 603 Water Resources Milind Sohoni www.cse.iitb.ac.in/sohoni/ Lecture 5: Aquifer () August 16

Sohoni, Milind

92

Arkansas Water Resources Center  

E-print Network

Arkansas Water Resources Center ATRAZINE DEGRADATION, SORPTION AND BIOCONCENTRATION IN WATER UNIVERSITY OF ARKANSAS 112 OZARK HALL FAYETTEVILLE, ARKANSAS 72701 #12;B-2 #12;ATRAZINE DEGRADATION-34-0001-0206 STARTINGDATE: October 1,1979 ENDINGDATE: March 31, 1981 Atrazine Degradation, Sorption, and Bioconcentration

Soerens, Thomas

93

Arkansas Water Resources Center  

E-print Network

Steele, Arkansas Water Resources Center, Dr. Joel Cahoon, Dr. Dwayne Edwards, Biological and Agricultural of Beave],: Lake. Identified problems include low dissolved oxygen" and high concentrations of fecal coliform, iron, manganese, turbidity, and algae. The:se water quality problems are associated

Soerens, Thomas

94

Institute of Water Resources Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

: surface water flow in the Fenton and its tributaries, ground water levels in the alluvial aquifer adjacent Managment and Engineering & CT DEP). The surface-ground water interactions will be measuredInstitute of Water Resources Annual Technical Report FY 2003 Introduction The Connecticut Institute

95

Water Resources Milind Sohoni  

E-print Network

TD 603 Water Resources Milind Sohoni www.cse.iitb.ac.in/sohoni/ Lecture 3: Watershed and Maps () July 23, 2013 1 / 18 #12;Domain Decomposition p1 p2 p3 p5 p4 surface water A1 A2 A3 A4 A5 salinity ingress water table q W(q) W(p2) The watershed W (x) of a point x is W (x) = {all points y from where

Sohoni, Milind

96

Engineering assessment and feasibility study of Chattanooga Shale as a future source of uranium. [Preliminary mining; data on soils, meteorology, water resources, and biological resources  

SciTech Connect

This volume contains five appendixes: Chattanooga Shale preliminary mining study, soils data, meteorologic data, water resources data, and biological resource data. The area around DeKalb County in Tennessee is the most likely site for commercial development for recovery of uranium. (DLC)

Not Available

1978-06-01

97

Inland water resources  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The work is reported of the panel concerning the application of space technology to the improved management of the nation's inland resources. The progress since the 1967-68 study is briefly reviewed. The data needed for the management of inlet water ways, and the potential benefits of better management are discussed along with 16 proposed demonstration projects.

1975-01-01

98

Arkansas Water Resources Center  

E-print Network

, Colorado on the eastern face of the Rocky Mountains. The river flows southeasterly through Colorado, Kansas and below Great Bend, Kansas the river becomes crooked and subject to shifting channels. The upper sectionArkansas Water Resources Center AN EVALUATION OF THE EFFECTS OF DREDGING WITHIN THE ARKANSAS RIVER

Soerens, Thomas

99

Managing our water resources  

SciTech Connect

Water is a plentiful, renewable resource if it is properly managed. The US allocates 82% of its water to agriculture, 10% to industries and utilities. American farmers are beginning to adopt water-conserving techniques long used in the world's arid regions because past profligate use and recent droughts lowered both water tables and farm productivity. Runoff and pollution are responsible for much of the waste of usable water. Because of local water shortages, there is interest in drip irrigation, setting aside more land for reservoirs, and other conservation techniques to ensure adequate supplies for industrial development and economic growth. American faith in technology has led to schemes for desalination, cloud seeding, iceberg towing, and aquifer recharging, as well as the existing system of dams. Proper management of river basins is an important step in the process. 1 figure. (DCK)

Not Available

1982-05-01

100

Georgia Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

, sponsored by the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO/UN); 3. Hydrologic Engineering resources challenges in the state of Georgia, the U.S., and the world. Specific GWRI goals include: a and management; b) Educate scientists, engineers, and water professionals in state-of-the-science methods

101

USGS Water Resources of Oklahoma  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

U.S. Geological Survey (USGS): Water Resources of Oklahoma contains hydrologic data; information on current state water-resource projects; USGS maps and aerial photo images; USGS publications and presentations; technical resources; and information on the general climate and water quality monitoring programs. There is also a form for making water data requests; a drought watch for Oklahoma; analysis of daily and monthly water conditions for Oklahoma; and a Water Science for Schools site.

102

Color photographs for water resources studies  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Air-photo interpretation is very well suited to water resources studies where limited observations of hydrologic data must be extended to regional characteristics for large areas. It is also useful in monitoring the hydrologic regimen of an area to detect possible changes. Color aerial photography is generally superior to black-and-white photography for these water resources investigations. Depth penetration through water, and excellent discrimination of water indicators, such as vegetation, are its -main assets. Meaningful interpretation of the photography depends on adequate ground control data. Experiences of the Water Resources Division, U. S. Geological Survey, indicate that the best interpretation is done by professional personnel-engineers, geologists, and water chemists intimately associated with a particular water resources project for which the photography has been obtained.

Schneider, William J.

1968-01-01

103

Water Resources Working Group Report  

E-print Network

Water Resources Working Group Report This report provided content for the Wisconsin Initiative in February 2011. #12;Water Resources Working Group Wisconsin Initiative on Climate Change Impacts October 2010 #12;Water Resources Working Group Members ­ WICCI Tim Asplund (Co-Chair) - Wisconsin Department

Sheridan, Jennifer

104

Water Resources Competitive Grants Program  

E-print Network

Water Resources Competitive Grants Program Fiscal Year 2012 Request for Proposals Pursuant to Section 104 of the Water Resources Research Act of 1984, as Amended Closing Date 4:00 PM, Eastern Time, August 15, 2012 (Institutes) Institute for Water Resources National Institutes for U.S. Army Corps

Virginia Tech

105

Water Resource Economics An Introduction  

E-print Network

Water Resource Economics and Policy An Introduction W. Douglass Shaw, Professor, Department-9933 Email: elgarinfo@e-elgar.com `A state-of-the-art and comprehensive review of water resource economics, Colorado State University, US `W. Douglass Shaw's Water Resource Economics and Policy is a valuable

Shaw, W. Douglass

106

WATER RESOURCES NEWS NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE  

E-print Network

WATER RESOURCES NEWS NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE 212 AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERINGATER RE~nllRCES RJ::sr ARCIi ISSUES SIXTY A~l~J"AL REPQRI The 1970 annual report of the Office of Water provided practical methods for solving problems of salt water encroaching into a municipal well field. *A

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

107

Water Resources Outreach Program - Water Education Posters  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This site contains a series of six posters all relating to water education: wetlands, water use, waste water, navigation, ground water, and water quality. Each poster includes information about the topic as well as related classroom activities. The objective of the water-resources education program is to stimulate interest in and provide a basic knowledge of water resources for students in grades K-12. This United States Geological Survey (USGS) website is part of the Water Resources Education Initiative (WREI), a program developed by the USGS in 1991.

108

Resource Engineering MSc Programme  

E-print Network

with RWTH Aachen (in Aachen, Germany), Aalto University (in Helsinki, Finland), the University of Technology. The programme offers the following three specialisations: Mining Engineering: Within this specialisation, you as the newest mining methods for underground, surface and deep-sea mining. Special attention is paid

Langendoen, Koen

109

USGS Water Resources of Pennsylvania  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Water Resources of Pennsylvania provides information on current hydrologic conditions in Pennsylvania, including streamflow, ground-water, lake and reservoir, and drought conditions. There is also project information on water resources investigations and a watershed assistance program; USGS publications such as hydrologic data reports; maps and GIS data; and educational water science links.

110

Redressing China's strategy of water resource exploitation.  

PubMed

China, with the confrontation of water-related problems as an element of its long history, has been investing heavily in water engineering projects over the past few decades based on the assumption that these projects can solve its water problems. However, the anticipated benefits did not really occur, or at least not as large as expected. Instead, the results involved additional frustrations, such as biodiversity losses and human-induced disasters (i.e., landslides and earthquakes). Given its inherent shortcomings, the present engineering-dominated strategy for the management of water resources cannot help solve China's water problems and achieve its goal of low-carbon transformation. Therefore, the present strategy for water resources exploitation needs to be reevaluated and redressed. A policy change to achieve better management of Chinese rivers is urgently needed. PMID:23314565

Ran, Lishan; Lu, Xi Xi

2013-03-01

111

Water Resources of the Caribbean  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This branch of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) collects, compiles, analyzes, and distributes hydrologic information to promote best use and management of water resources for the benefit of the people and the natural environment. The water resources data includes real-time data of rainfall and streamflow, water level and discharge data, suspended sediment-discharge records, water-quality records, and ground-water-level records. The site also provides maps, water resources news, reports on USGS activities and projects in the Caribbean, a bibliographic reference search for the Caribbean region, and related USGS publications.

112

California Institute for Water Resources Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

California Institute for Water Resources Annual Technical Report FY 2011 California Institute for Water Resources Annual Technical Report FY 2011 1 #12;Introduction Across California, the University of California s Division of Agriculture and Natural Resources (UCANR) is an engine for problem solving. Serving

113

Mathematical simulation of temperatures in deep impoundments: verification tests of the Water Resources Engineers, Inc. model - Horsetooth and Flaming Gorge Reservoirs  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Successful use of predictive mathematical models requires verification of the accuracy of the models by applying them to existing situations where the prediction can be compared with reality. A Corps of Engineers' modification of a deep reservoir thermal stratification model developed by Water Resources Engineers, Inc., was applied to two existing Bureau of Reclamation reservoirs for verification. Diffusion coefficients used for the Corps' Detroit Reservoir were found to apply to Horsetooth Reservoir in Colorado, for which very food computer input data were available. The Detroit diffusion coefficients gave a reasonable simulation of Flaming Gorge Reservoir in Wyoming and Utah, which has very complex and variable physical characteristics and for which only average-quality computer input data were available.

King, D.L.; Sartoris, Jim J.

1973-01-01

114

Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

in water resources, including the management of water resources among competing uses; controlling pollution Quality Focus Category: Water Quality, Sediments, Non Point Pollution Descriptors: AgricultureWater Resources Center Annual Technical Report FY 2001 Introduction Research Program Research

115

Tennessee Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

Tennessee Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2007 Tennessee Water Resources of Tennessee Tennessee is fortunate to have what many consider to be an abundant and good quality water supply. Historically, federal government agencies, such as the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA), Corps of Engineers

116

Tennessee Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

Tennessee Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2008 Tennessee Water Resources of Tennessee Tennessee is fortunate to have what many consider to be an abundant and good quality water supply. Historically, federal government agencies, such as the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA), Corps of Engineers

117

Tennessee Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

Tennessee Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2009 Tennessee Water Resources of Tennessee Tennessee is fortunate to have what many consider to be an abundant and good quality water supply. Historically, federal government agencies, such as the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA), Corps of Engineers

118

Water Resources of Washington State  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This site contains information and water resource data on rivers and streams, ground water, and water quality. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) operates a satellite network of stream-gaging stations in the state, many of which form the backbone of flood-warning systems, and conducts studies of water resources, such as watersheds and aquifers. These studies help define the quantity and quality of the water, conditions of ecological habitat, and relations to land use and natural features. The site features publications and reports about the data and information from these studies. There is information on USGS projects related to regional water issues such as salmon recovery and the Endangered Species Act; floods, droughts and other natural hazards; and water availability. The site also provides water resource news such as a drought watch section and earthquake news for Washington State.

119

Water Resources Research and Interdisciplinary Hydrology  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Water Resource Research was born under the watchful eye of Walter Langbein, a modern-day Renaissance man whose interests spanned not only hydrology but all of the earth sciences, and not only the earth sciences but all of science. From its founding in1965 to the present day, the editors of WRR have always seen the journal as a medium of interdisciplinary interaction. On this 25th anniversary of WRR, I thought it might be worthwhile to look back on the interdisciplinary successes and failures of the past quarter decade, in our journal and in our science. There is no question that research in water resources is an interdisciplinary endeavor. At my university we have a graduate program in interdisciplinary hydrology on the books, and on those occasions when we gather together, there are students and faculty there from as many as seven different departments: geography, geology, soil science, forestry, civil engineering, mining engineering, and bioresource engineering. In addition, our campus hosts the Westwater Research Institute where physical scientists can get involved in interdisciplinary research with social scientists from regional and community planning, resource management, resource economics, commerce, and law. I suspect that many campuses have a similar breadth of water resources interests. It is this breadth that WRR is designed to serve.

Freeze, R. Allan

1990-09-01

120

Policy Sciences in Water Resources Research  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

As the newly appointed Policy Sciences Editor for this journal, I would like to take this opportunity to introduce myself to WRR's readership as well as to offer a few comments concerning my views of policy sciences in water resources research. I am an economist working in the area of natural resources and environmental management. As such, I've spent a good part of my research career working with noneconomists. During 1969-1972, I worked in Mexico with hydrologists and engineers from Mexico's Water Resources Ministry in efforts to assess management/investment programs for reservoir systems and systems for interbasin water transfers. Between 1972 and 1975, while serving as Chairman of the Department of Resource Economics at the University of Rhode Island, my research involved collaborative efforts with biologists and soil scientists in studies concerning the conjunctive management of reservoirs for agricultural and lagoon systems and the control of salinity levels in soils and aquifers. Since 1975, at which time I joined the faculty at the University of New Mexico, I have worked with engineers at the Los Alamos National Laboratory in developing operation/management models for hot, dry rock geothermal systems and, more recently, with legal scholars and hydrologists in analyses of water rights issues. Thus I am comfortable with and appreciative of research conducted by my colleagues in systems engineering, operations research, and hydrology, as well as those in economics, law, and other social sciences.

Cummings, Ronald G.

1984-07-01

121

Water resources data, Louisiana, water year 2004  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Water resources data for the 2004 water year for Louisiana consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage, contents, and water quality of lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality of ground water. This report contains records for water discharge at 77 gaging stations; stage only for 86 gaging stations and 7 lakes; water quality for 60 surface-water stations (including 42 gaging stations) and 112 wells; and water levels for 304 observation wells. Also included are data for 158 crest-stage and flood-profile partial-record stations. Additional water data were collected at various sites not included in the systematic data-collection program, and are published as miscellaneous measurements. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating State and Federal agencies in Louisiana.

Baumann, Todd; Goree, B.B.; Lovelace, W.M.; Montogmery, P.A.; Resweber, J.C.; Ross, Garron B.; Ward, Aub N.; Walters, David J.

2005-01-01

122

Water Resources Data, Louisiana, Water Year 2000  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Water resources data for the 2000 water year for Louisiana consists of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage, contents, and water quality of lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality of ground water. This report contains records for water discharge at 66 gaging stations; stage only for 70 gaging stations and 7 lakes; water quality for 45 surface-water stations (including 25 gaging stations) and 108 wells; and water levels for 221 observation wells. Also included are data for 204 crest-stage and flood-profile partial-record stations. Additional water data were collected at various sites not included in the systematic data-collection program, and are published as miscellaneous measurements. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating State and Federal agencies in Louisiana.

Goree, B.B.; Lovelace, W.M.; Montgomery, P.A.; Resweber, J.C.; Sasser, D.C., Jr.; Walters, David J.

2001-01-01

123

Water Resources Data, Louisiana, Water Year 2001  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Water resources data for the 2001 water year for Louisiana consists of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage, contents, and water quality of lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality of ground water. This report contains records for water discharge at 71 gaging stations; stage only for 73 gaging stations and 7 lakes; water quality for 66 surface-water stations (including 39 gaging stations) and 92 wells; and water levels for 205 observation wells. Also included are data for 166 crest-stage and flood-profile partial-record stations. Additional water data were collected at various sites not included in the systematic data-collection program, and are published as miscellaneous measurements. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating State and Federal agencies in Louisiana.

Goree, B.B.; Lovelace, W.M.; Montgomery, P.A.; Resweber, J.C.; Sasser, D.C., Jr.; Walters, David J.

2002-01-01

124

Water resources data, Louisiana, water year 2003  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Water resources data for the 2003 water year for Louisiana consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage, contents, and water quality of lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality of ground water. This report contains records for water discharge at 76 gaging stations; stage only for 86 gaging stations and 7 lakes; water quality for 56 surface-water stations (including 44 gaging stations) and 142 wells; and water levels for 313 observation wells. Also included are data for 158 crest-stage and flood-profile partial-record stations. Additional water data were collected at various sites not included in the systematic data-collection program, and are published as miscellaneous measurements. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating Federal and State agencies in Louisiana.

Baumann, Todd; Goree, B.B.; Lovelace, W.M.; Montgomery, P.A.; Resweber, J.C.; Ross, Garron B.; Sasser, D.C., Jr.; Walters, D.J.

2004-01-01

125

Water Resources Data, Louisiana, Water Year 2002  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Water resources data for the 2002 water year for Louisiana consists of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage, contents, and water quality of lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality of ground water. This report contains records for water discharge at 85 gaging stations; stage only for 79 gaging stations and 7 lakes; water quality for 52 surface-water stations (including 40 gaging stations) and 104 wells; and water levels for 300 observation wells. Also included are data for 143 crest-stage and flood-profile partial-record stations. Additional water data were collected at various sites not included in the systematic data-collection program, and are published as miscellaneous measurements. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating State and Federal agencies in Louisiana.

Goree, B.B.; Lovelace, W.M.; Montgomery, P.A.; Resweber, J.C.; Labbe, Charles K.; Walters, David J.

2003-01-01

126

Water, Society and the future of water resources research (Invited)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The subject of water and society is broad, but at heart is the study of water as a resource, essential to human activities, a vital input to food and energy production, the sustaining medium for ecosystems and yet also a destructive hazard. Society demands, withdraws, competes, uses and wastes the resource in dynamic counterpart. The science of water management emerges from this interface, a field at the nexus of engineering and geoscience, with substantial influence from economics and other social sciences. Within this purview are some of the most pressing environmental questions of our time, such as adaptation to climate change, direct and indirect connections between water and energy policy, the continuing dependence of agriculture on depletion of the world's aquifers, the conservation or preservation of ecosystems within increasingly human-influenced river systems, and food security and poverty reduction for the earth's poorest inhabitants. This presentation will present and support the hypothesis that water resources research is a scientific enterprise separate from, yet closely interrelated to, hydrologic science. We will explore the scientific basis of water resources research, review pressing research questions and opportunities, and propose an action plan for the advancement of the science of water management. Finally, the presentation will propose a Chapman Conference on Water and Society: The Future of Water Resources Research in the spring of 2015.

Brown, C. M.

2013-12-01

127

Water Resources of New Jersey  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This website offers timely access to data and information provided by the New Jersey District of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), which collects basic hydrologic data and makes interpretive investigations of the water resources of New Jersey. There is information and data on ground water, surface water, water quality, and daily streamflow conditions. Links to online publications on water in New Jersey are also provided.

128

Water resources data, Arkansas, 2004  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey Arkansas Water Science Center, in cooperation with State, Federal, and other local governmental agencies, obtains a large amount of data pertaining to the water resources of Arkansas each year. These data, accumulated during many water years, constitute a valuable database for developing an improved understanding of the water resources of the State. Water resources data reported for the 2004 water year for Arkansas consist of records of discharge and water quality (physical measurements and chemical concentrations) of streams, water quality of lakes, and ground-water levels and ground-water quality. Data from selected sites in Louisiana, Missouri, and Oklahoma also are included. This report contains daily discharge records for 104 surface-water gaging stations, 82 peak-discharge partial-record stations, 8 stage-only stations, water-quality data for 79 surface-water stations and 16 wells, and water levels for 47 observation wells. Additional water data were collected at various sites, not part of the systematic data-collection program, and are published as miscellaneous measurements.

Brossett, T.H.; Schrader, T.P.; Evans, D.A.

2005-01-01

129

Arkansas Water Resources Center  

E-print Network

Submitted to the Arkansas Soil and Water Conservation Commission By M.A. Nelson L.W. Cash G.K. Trost to the Arkansas Soil and Water Conservation Commission M. A. Nelson, L. W. Cash, and G. K. Trost Arkansas Water Soil and Water Conservation Commission (ASWCC) and the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA

Soerens, Thomas

130

Arkansas Water Resources Center  

E-print Network

Submitted to the Washington County Conservation District and Arkansas Soil and Water Conservation Commission & WATER CONSERVATION COMMISSION INTRODUCTION In Northwest Arkansas, nutrients transported by surface water storage structures. In 1991, the Arkansas Soil and Water Conservation Commission (ASWCC) and the U. S

Soerens, Thomas

131

Unique Approaches to Water Resources  

E-print Network

as a result of free trade, atmospheric transport of trace pollutants, and urbanization. Available waterUnique Approaches to Water Resources Education in Florida Watershed Journal Executive Committee Photos courtesy of Dr. Frederick Bloetscher, PE W e are a diverse community of water profes- sionals. We

Central Florida, University of

132

Water resources data, Alaska, water year 2005  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Water resources data for the 2005 water year for Alaska consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stages of lakes; and water levels and water quality of ground water. This volume contains records for water discharge at 114 gaging stations; stage or contents only at 3 gaging stations; water quality at 37 gaging stations; and water levels for 41 observation wells. Also included are data for 55 crest-stage partial-record stations. Additional water data were collected at various sites not involved in the systematic data-collection program and are published as miscellaneous measurements and analyses. Some data collected during 2005 will be published in subsequent reports. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating State and Federal agencies in Alaska.

Jackson, M.L.; Castor, M.E.; Goetz, J.M.; Solin, G.L.; Wiles, J.M.

2006-01-01

133

Water resources data, Kansas, water year 2004  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Water-resources data for the 2004 water year for Kansas consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; elevation and contents of lakes and reservoirs; and water levels of ground-water wells. This report contains records for water discharge at 155 complete-record gaging stations; elevation and contents at 17 lakes and reservoirs; water-quality records at 2 precipitation stations, water-level data at 14 observation wells; and records of specific conductance, pH, water temperature, dissolved oxygen, and turbidity at 16 gaging stations and 2 lakes with water-quality monitors. Also included are discharge data for 29 high-flow partial-record stations. These data represent that part of the National Water Information System collected by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with local, State, and Federal agencies in Kansas.

Putnam, J.E.; Schneider, D.R.

2005-01-01

134

Arkansas Water Resources Center  

E-print Network

CONJUNCTIVE WATER MANAGEMENT BY TARGET APPROACHES PREPARED FOR: WINTHROP ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION CONJUNCTIVE WATER MANAGEMENT BY TARGET APPROACHES PREPARED FOR:, WINTHROP ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION AND;" c by the Winthrop Rockefeller Foundation. Little Rock. and the International Agricultural Programs Office (through

Soerens, Thomas

135

Arkansas Water Resources Center  

E-print Network

Submitted to the Arkansas Soil and Water Conservation Commission By Marc A. Nelson, Ph.D., P.E. L. Wade Cash of Moores Creek above Lincoln Lake 2003 Submitted to the Arkansas Soil and Water Conservation Commission M composting, and waste storage structures. In 1991, the Arkansas Soil and Water Conservation Commission (ASWCC

Soerens, Thomas

136

Water Conservation Resource List.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Alarmed by the growing water shortage, the New Jersey State Office of Dissemination has prepared this annotated list of free or inexpensive instructional materials for teaching about water conservation, K-l2. A tipsheet for home water conservation is appended. (Editor/SJL)

NJEA Review, 1981

1981-01-01

137

USGS Water Resources of Montana  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

U.S. Geological Survey (USGS): Water Resources of Montana contains information on current activities such as data collection, investigations, and the National Water-Quality Assessment Program of the Northern Rockies and Yellowstone River. The hydrologic data includes realtime streamflow tables, Montana Flood-Frequency and Basin-Characteristic Data, and monthly water summaries. There is also a list of USGS water-related publications from the Montana district that can be ordered.

138

Water Resources Research National Competitive Grants Program  

E-print Network

Announcement No. G13AS00009 under Section 104(g) of the Water Resources Research Act of 1984, as Amended or call 970-226-9445. #12;i NATIONAL INSTITUTES FOR WATER RESOURCES U.S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY WATER RESOURCES of the Water Resources Research Act of 1984, as amended (http://water.usgs.gov/wrri/institutes.html). Proposals

139

Water Resources Data  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This portal provides access to a large selection of real-time and archived data on stream flow and water quality for surface and groundwater. Links are provided to the National Water Information System Web Interface (NWISWeb), which accesses data collected at approximately 1.5 million sites in all 50 states, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico. Data categories include current conditions information transmitted from selected surface and groundwater sites; descriptive site information; water flow and levels in streams, lakes, and springs; groundwater levels in wells; and chemical and physical data for all water sources. There is also a link to the 'Waterwatch' site, an interactive map that displays real-time stream-flow compared to historical conditions for the day of the year, as well as a link to the National Water Quality Assessment (NAWQA) data warehouse. Other links access materials on water use, acid rain, suspended sediment, and the Hydro-Climatic Data Network (HCDN).

2011-11-15

140

WATER RESOURCES PLANNING ACT Q:\\COMP\\WATER1\\WRPA  

E-print Network

103 WATER RESOURCES PLANNING ACT Q:\\COMP\\WATER1\\WRPA December 29, 2000 #12;Q:\\COMP\\WATER1\\WRPA December 29, 2000 #12;105 WATER RESOURCES PLANNING ACT [As Amended Through P.L. 106­580, Dec. 29, 2000 planning of water and related land resources, through the establishment of a water resources council

US Army Corps of Engineers

141

Virtual water trade and world water resources.  

PubMed

Global virtual water trade was quantitatively estimated and evaluated. The basic idea of how to estimate unit requirement of water resources to produce each commodity is introduced and values for major agricultural and stock products are presented. The concept of virtual water and the quantitative estimates can help in assessing a more realistic water scarcity index in each country, projecting future water demand for food supply, increasing public awareness on water, and identifying the processes wasting water in the production. Really required water in exporting countries is generally smaller than virtually required water in importing countries, reflecting the comparative advantage of water use efficiency, and it is estimated to be 680 km3/y for 2000. On the contrary the virtually required water for the same year is estimated to be 1,130 km3/y, and the difference of 450 km3/y is virtually saved by global trade. However, solely virtual water should not be used for any decision making since the idea of virtual water implies only the usage and influence of water and no concerns on social, cultural, and environmental implications. Virtual water trade also does not consider other limiting factors than water. PMID:15195440

Oki, T; Kanae, S

2004-01-01

142

Water Resources of Ouachita Parish  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Ouachita Parish, located in north-central Louisiana, contains fresh groundwater and surface-water resources. In 2005, about 152 million gallons per day (Mgal/d) were withdrawn from water sources in Ouachita Parish. About 84 percent (128 Mgal/d) was withdrawn from surface water, and 16 percent (24 Mgal/d) was withdrawn from groundwater. Power generation (87 Mgal/d) accounted for 58 percent of the total water withdrawn. Withdrawals for other uses included public supply (22 Mgal/d), industrial (24 Mgal/d), and irrigation (18 Mgal/d). This fact sheet summarizes basic information on the water resources of Ouachita Parish, La. Information on groundwater and surface-water availability, quality, development, use, and trends is based on previously published reports.

Tomaszewski, Dan J.; Lovelace, John K.; Griffith, Jason M.

2009-01-01

143

Water resources data, Nevada, water year 2003  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Water-resources data for the 2003 water year for Nevada consists of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage, contents, and water quality of lakes and reservoirs; precipitation; and water levels in wells. This report contains discharge records for 182 streamflow-gaging stations on streams, canals and drains; Discharge data for 52 partial record stations and miscellaneous sites, and 23 springs; stage and contents records for 21 ponds, lakes and reservoirs; Water levels for 178 primary observation wells, and 715 secondary observation wells; Water-quality data for 70 streams, canal, spring and drain sites and 276 wells; precipitation totals for 40 stations; and water withdrawals for 11 wells.

Stockton, Emil L.; Jones, Clifford Z.; Rowland, Ryan C.; Medina, Rose L.

2003-01-01

144

1Prepared by BG Rahm & SJ Riha (NYS Water Resources Institute), D Yoxtheimer (Penn State Marcellus Center for Outreach and Research), E Boyer (PA Water Resources Research Center), D Carder (WVU Center for Alternative Fuels, Engines, and Emissions), K Davi  

E-print Network

shale for natural gas resources involves a variety of activities that can potentially impact and air quality issues associated with shale gas development in the Northeast1 Development of Marcellus environmental water and air quality. Some of these impacts are well-documented, while others involve more

145

Ohio Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

Category: Water Quality, Surface Water, Non Point Pollution Descriptors: Principal Investigators: Dominic LOhio Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report FY 2010 Ohio Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report FY 2010 1 #12;Introduction Pursuant to the Water Resources Research Act of 1964, the Water

146

Water Resources Research National Competitive Grants Program  

E-print Network

Announcement No. 11HQPA0008 under Section 104(g) of the Water Resources Research Act of 1984, as Amended or call 970-226-9445. #12;i NATIONAL INSTITUTES FOR WATER RESOURCES U.S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY WATER RESOURCES Resources Research Act of 1984, as amended (http://water.usgs.gov/wrri/institutes.html). Proposals involving

Goodman, Robert M.

147

Water Resources Research National Competitive Grants Program  

E-print Network

Announcement No. G12AS20005 under Section 104(g) of the Water Resources Research Act of 1984, as Amended or call 970-226-9445. #12;i NATIONAL INSTITUTES FOR WATER RESOURCES U.S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY WATER RESOURCES established under the provisions of the Water Resources Research Act of 1984, as amended (http

Hanson, Stephen José

148

Texas Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

Texas Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2007 Texas Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2007 1 #12;Introduction The Texas Water Resources Institute (TWRI), a unit of Texas AMAgriLife, and member of the National Institutes for Water Resources, provides leadership

149

Texas Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

Texas Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2004 Introduction The Mission of the Texas Water Resources Institute is to: (1) Serve as the designated Water Resources Research Institute for the State of Texas, as part of the National Institutes for Water Resources Research Program and established

150

Engineering & Technical Resources on the Internet.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Offers pointers on finding resources on the Internet that may be useful to engineers and scientists. Suggests steps that beginners can take to become acquainted with the Internet and defines common Internet terms. Presents a list of engineering Internet resources that include listservs, USENET groups, gophers, and World Wide Web sites. (Author/JMV)

Schwarzwalder, Robert

1996-01-01

151

Sustainable water services and interaction with water resources in Europe and in Brazil  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The increasing interaction between large cities and nature makes "urban water" an issue: water resources and water services - including public water supply, sewage collection and treatment, and in large cities, storm water control -, which had become separate issues thanks to the process of water transport and treatment technologies, are now increasingly interfering with each other. We cannot take nature for granted anymore, and we need to protect water resources, if only to reduce the long term cost of transporting and treating water. In this paper, we compare the historical development of water industry technologies in European and Brazilian metropolitan areas, in their socio-economic and political context, tracing it through three "ages" of water technology and services which developed under civil engineering, sanitary engineering, and environmental engineering perspectives: the "quantity of water" and civil engineering paradigm was developed on the assumption that water should be drawn from natural environments far from the cities; in the "water quality" and chemical/sanitation engineering paradigm, water treatment was invented and allowed cities to take water from rivers closer to them and treat it, but also to reduce sewer discharge impacts; finally, the environmental engineering paradigm proposes to overcome the supply side perspective, by introducing demand side management, water conservation, water allocation flexibilisation, and an integrated approach to water services, water resources management, and land use policies.

Barraqué, B.; Formiga Johnsson, R. M.; Britto, A. L.

2007-09-01

152

Water Resources Data, Mississippi, Water Year 2002  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Water resources data for the 2002 water year for Mississippi consist of records of surface water and ground water in the State. Specifically, it contains: (1) Discharge records for 91 streamflow-gaging stations, stage records for 22 of these gaging stations, discharge records for 91 partial-record stations or miscellaneous streamflow sites, including 13 flood hydrograph partial-record stations, 78 crest-stage partial-record stations, and 0 special study and miscellaneous sites; (2) stage only at 9 gaging stations; (3) water-quality records for 13 streamflow-gaging stations, 7 stage-only stations, and 3 water-quality monitor stations, 0 partial-record stations or miscellaneous sites, 97 short-term study sites, and 39 wells; and (4) water-level records for 18 observation wells. Records obtained from water-resources investigations are also included in special sections of the report. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey, and cooperating local, State, and Federal agencies in Mississippi.

Morris, F., III; Turnipseed, D.P.; Storm, J.B.

2003-01-01

153

Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2003 Introduction The Florida Water for Wetlands and Water Resources Research in 1995. Historically, since 1964, the WRRC as a separate or combined center has been a university-wide focus for water-resources research and has served as the Water

154

Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report FY 2007 Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report FY 2007 1 #12;Introduction The Rhode Island Water Resources Center has supported one information transfer project, "Clean Drinking Water in Rhode Island" and one research project "Enhancing Drinking Water

155

Wyoming Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

Wyoming Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report FY 1999 Introduction Research Program In the west, water is critical to survival. Data and information concerning this resource are very valuable by the Water Research Program. Basic Project Information Category Data Title Water Resources Data System Water

156

Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

' Water Resources Research Center (WRRC) mainly address research related to water quantity and qualityWater Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2012 Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2012 1 #12;Introduction The Hawaiian Islands share the same water

157

The development of water services and their interaction with water resources in European and Brazilian cities  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The extension and complexity of large cities creates "urban water" and a related issue: public water services, including public water supply, sewage collection and treatment, and storm water control, had previously become a policy sector separate from water resource allocation issues thanks to water transport and treatment technologies. Large metropolitan areas today cannot take nature for granted anymore, and they need to protect water resources, if only to reduce the long term cost of transporting and treating water. In this paper, we compare the historical development of water services in European and Brazilian metropolitan areas, placing the technological developments in their geographic, socio-economic and political contexts. Our frame is to follow the successive contributions of civil engineering, sanitary engineering, and environmental engineering: the "quantity of water" and civil engineering paradigm allowed to mobilise water in and out of the city, and up the hills or the floors; in the "water quality" and chemical/sanitary engineering paradigm, water treatment gave more freedom to cities to take water from rivers closer to them, but also to reduce sewer discharge impacts; lastly, the environmental engineering paradigm proposes to overcome the supply side perspective, by introducing demand side management, water conservation, water allocation flexibilisation, and an integrated approach to water services, water resources management, and land use policies.

Barraqué, B.; Formiga Johnsson, R. M.; Nogueira de Paiva Britto, A. L.

2008-08-01

158

Water resources of Bossier Parish  

USGS Publications Warehouse

In 2005, about 15.8 million gallons per day (Mgal/d) of water were withdrawn in Bossier Parish, Louisiana, including 4.12 Mgal/d from groundwater sources and about 11.7 Mgal/d from surface-water sources. Public-supply use accounted for about 78 percent (12.4 Mgal/d) of the total water withdrawn. Other categories of use included industry, rural domestic, livestock, rice irrigation, general irrigation, and aquaculture. Based on water-use data collected at 5-year intervals from 1960 to 2005, water withdrawals in the parish increased from 4.96 to 15.8 Mgal/d. This fact sheet summarizes basic information on the water resources of Bossier Parish, La. Information on groundwater and surface-water availability, quality, development, use, and trends is based on previously published reports listed in the Selected References section.

Prakken, Lawrence B.; Griffith, Jason M.

2011-01-01

159

Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 1999 Introduction ABSTRACT The FY 1999 Oregon Water Resources Research Institute (OWRRI) program included four research projects funded Coastal Lakes: Water Quality Status and Management Implications Based on Nutrient Loading OWRRI sponsored

160

Illinois Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

include: evaluation of water treatment technology, source water protection planning, mitigation of nitrateIllinois Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report FY 2004 Introduction The Illinois Water of Illinois water resources. In 2004, IWRC hosted Illinois Water, a biennial conference on water issues

161

Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

to shallow ground waters is the main water quality problem in the Coastal Plain. Average annual rainfall/year, providing 10 to 12 inches/year of ground water infiltration. Surface water is the main water supply sourceWater Resources Center Annual Technical Report FY 2009 Water Resources Center Annual Technical

162

Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

to shallow ground waters is the main water quality problem in the Coastal Plain. Average annual rainfall/year, providing 10 to 12 inches/year of ground water infiltration. Surface water is the main water supply sourceWater Resources Center Annual Technical Report FY 2012 Water Resources Center Annual Technical

163

Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

to shallow ground waters is the main water quality problem in the Coastal Plain. Average annual rainfall/year, providing 10 to 12 inches/year of ground water infiltration. Surface water is the main water supply sourceWater Resources Center Annual Technical Report FY 2011 Water Resources Center Annual Technical

164

Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

to shallow ground waters is the main water quality problem in the Coastal Plain. Average annual rainfall/year, providing 10 to 12 inches/year of ground water infiltration. Surface water is the main water supply sourceWater Resources Center Annual Technical Report FY 2008 Water Resources Center Annual Technical

165

Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

to shallow ground waters is the main water quality problem in the Coastal Plain. Average annual rainfall/year, providing 10 to 12 inches/year of ground water infiltration. Surface water is the main water supply sourceWater Resources Center Annual Technical Report FY 2007 Water Resources Center Annual Technical

166

Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

to shallow ground waters is the main water quality problem in the Coastal Plain. Average annual rainfall/year, providing 10 to 12 inches/year of ground water infiltration. Surface water is the main water supply sourceWater Resources Center Annual Technical Report FY 2010 Water Resources Center Annual Technical

167

Arkansas Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

with water quality of surface water and ground water, especially non-point source pollution and sensitive, ground water modeling and landuse mapping, erosion and pollution, water quality and ecosystem functionsArkansas Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report FY 2009 Arkansas Water Resources Center

168

Environmental and Water Resources Engineering Seminar Wednesday, March 20, 2013, 4:00 5:00 PM  

E-print Network

scenarios, and two wastewater strengths. At 15°C and for medium strength wastewater treatment, An Engineering, University of Michigan Navigating Wastewater Energy Recovery Strategies: A Life Cycle Comparison processes that strive to recover energy in the form of biogas either directly from domestic wastewater (An

Kamat, Vineet R.

169

College of Earth Resource Sciences and Engineering (CERSE) Department of Petroleum Engineering  

E-print Network

College of Earth Resource Sciences and Engineering (CERSE) Department of Petroleum Engineering the satisfactory completion of a background investigation. #12;College of Earth Resource Sciences and Engineering

170

D.C. Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

technologies and equipment that develop their expertise in water resource management. Results of each project Laboratory has the capacity to perform qualitative and quantitative analysis on most water, air, soil quality and quantity. The Storm Water Management Modeling (SWMM) Software System and Worldwide Engine

171

D.C. Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

technologies and equipment that develop their expertise in water resource management. Results of each project Laboratory will have the capacity to perform qualitative and quantitative analysis on most water, air, soil quality and quantity. The Storm Water Management Modeling (SWMM) Software System and Worldwide Engine

172

Institute of Water Resources Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

Pollution, Surface Water, Water Quality Descriptors: Bacteria, Suspended Sediments, Water Quality Monitoring Pollution, Surface Water, WInstitute of Water Resources Annual Technical Report FY 2002 Introduction In fiscal year 2002

173

Engineering Resources: The Engineers Forum on Sustainability  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Cosponsored by three prominent engineering societies, the Engineers Forum on Sustainability was founded to "help promote the principles and practice of sustainability." The forum's newsletter can be viewed at this site. It contains information on worldwide activities and developments in the field of sustainability, including educational initiatives, environmental protection programs, international conferences, and more. The July 2003 issue features a special guest article written by the President of the World Federation of Engineering Societies, who touches on issues of sustainable development, technology transfer, and the role of engineers in developing countries. The newsletter is released roughly three times a year.

174

New England's Ground Water Resources  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This resource provides a detailed description of the ground water system in New England. Although it was written specifically for New England, most or all of it applies to other parts of the country also. The liberal use of diagrams helps to explain terms such as saturated and unsaturated zones, bedrock, water table, and zones of aeration and contribution. Types of aquifers are discussed as to their porosity, permeability and hydraulic conductivity. They include bedrock, soil, stratified drift, superficial deposits, unconsolidated materials, and confined aquifers along with discharge and recharge areas. There is also an explanation of a water budget including precipitation, evapotranspiration, infiltration and runoff.

175

Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

, none is more important for long-term sustainability than the potential impacts on water resourcesWater Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2010 Water Resources Research Center. Water is essential for sustaining life and economies. Closely following and deeply intertwined

176

Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2013 Water Resources Research Center of Agriculture and Life Sciences, the University of Arizona Water Resources Research Center (WRRC) has a mission to promote understanding of critical state and regional water management and policy issues through research

177

Water Resources Research National Competitive Grants Program  

E-print Network

Announcement No. G12AS20005 under Section 104(g) of the Water Resources Research Act of 1984, as Amended Collins, CO 80525 or call 970-226-9445. #12;i NATIONAL INSTITUTES FOR WATER RESOURCES U.S. GEOLOGICAL of the Water Resources Research Act of 1984, as amended (http://water.usgs.gov/wrri/institutes.html). Proposals

Gilbes, Fernando

178

Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

, the research focus mainly addresses the following general categories. · Groundwater Characterization Assessment. Subjects cover, in general, water resources sustainability, climate and climate change influence on waterWater Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2013 Water Resources Research Center

179

Arkansas Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

quality of surface water and groundwater, especially non-point source pollution and sensitive ecosystemsArkansas Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report FY 2013 Arkansas Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report FY 2013 1 #12;Introduction The Arkansas Water Resources Center is part

180

Arkansas Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

Pollution Descriptors: animal waste, feed additive, water quality, land application, non-point sourceArkansas Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report FY 2001 Introduction Statewide Mission: The Arkansas Water Resources Center (AWRC) has a statewide mission to plan and conduct water resource research

181

Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

to shallow ground waters is the main water quality problem in the Coastal Plain. Rainfall as of 2000 River which, in turn, flows into the Delaware River. Ground water is the major water supply sourceWater Resources Center Annual Technical Report FY 2004 Introduction The Delaware Water Resources

182

Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

of contaminants to shallow ground waters is the main water quality problem in the Coastal Plain. Average annual/yr, providing 10 to 12 in/yr of groundwater infiltration. Surface water is the main water supply sourceWater Resources Center Annual Technical Report FY 2005 Introduction Delaware Water Resources Center

183

Arkansas Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

quality of surface water and ground water, especially non-point source pollution and sensitive ecosystems, ground water modeling and landuse mapping, erosion and pollution, water quality and ecosystem functionsArkansas Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report FY 2010 Arkansas Water Resources Center

184

EAWAG: An Environmental Science and Engineering Resource.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Interviewed is the director of a Swiss research and teaching institute in the field of water resources, water pollution control, and waste management. Topics include lake studies, research programs and priorities, advisory services, and the organizational structure of EAWAG. (BT)

Miller, Stanton

1980-01-01

185

Water resources of Webster Parish  

USGS Publications Warehouse

In 2005, about 9.52 million gallons per day (Mgal/d) of water were withdrawn in Webster Parish, Louisiana (fig. 1), including about 9.33 Mgal/d from groundwater sources and 0.19 Mgal/d from surface-water sources1 (table 1). Publicsupply use accounted for about 70 percent of the total water withdrawn. Other categories of use included industrial, rural domestic, livestock, general irrigation, and aquaculture (table 2). Water-use data collected at 5-year intervals from 1960 to 2005 indicate water withdrawals in Webster Parish decreased substantially from 1970 to 1980; surface-water withdrawals for industrial use decreased from about 37 to 0 Mgal/d because of a paper mill closure in 1979. From 1980 to 2000, total water withdrawals in the parish ranged from 7 to 8 Mgal/d (fig. 2). This fact sheet summarizes basic information on the water resources of Webster Parish, La. Information on groundwater and surface-water availability, quality, development, use, and trends is based on previously published reports listed in the Selected References section.

Prakken, Lawrence B.; Griffith, Jason M.

2011-01-01

186

OVERVIEW OF USEPA'S WATER SUPPLY & WATER RESOURCES DIVISION PROGRAM  

EPA Science Inventory

The United States Environmental Protection Agency's (USEPA) Water Supply and Water Resources Division (WSWRD) conducts a wide range of research on regulated and unregulated contaminants in drinking water, water distribution systems, homeland security, source water protection, and...

187

A DEMONSTRATION OF AREAWIDE WATER RESOURCES PLANNING  

EPA Science Inventory

The Metropolitan Washington Council of Governments Framework Water Resources Planning Model developed and tested under this study is a comprehensive analytical tool for use in areawide water resources management planning. The physical simulation portion was formed by linking comp...

188

Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

contaminated by heavy metals, salts, polyhalogenated aromatics (including PCB's), nitroaromatics resources, including the management of water resources among competing uses; controlling pollution from and Research Objectives A major post-technological/environmental issue is remediation of water sources

189

Environmental Evaluation of Water Resources Development  

E-print Network

Methodology for the utilization of LANDSAT-1 imagery and aerial photography on the environmental evaluation of water resources development is presented. Environmental impact statements for water resource projects were collected and reviewed...

James, W. P.; Woods, C. E.; Blanz, R. E.

190

USGS Water Resources of Georgia  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Water Resources of Georgia contains a map of current streamflow conditions; Georgia HydroWatch, a portal to hydrologic data and related information for Georgia; a listing of projects being conducted by the USGS in Georgia; and publications such as abstracts and full reports for USGS projects in Georgia. The water data includes flood-frequency information, low-flow frequency statistics, a drought watch, information on the Chattahoochee BacteriALERT program, and a Flint River Flood tracking chart.

191

Water Resources Division training catalog  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The National Training Center provides technical and management sessions nesessary for the conductance of the U.S. Geological Survey 's training programs. This catalog describes the facilities and staff at the Lakewood Training Center and describes Water Resources Division training courses available through the center. In addition, the catalog describes the procedures for gaining admission, formulas for calculating fees, and discussion of course evaluations. (USGS)

Hotchkiss, W.R.; Foxhoven, L.A.

1984-01-01

192

Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

-Methylisoborneol: Potential Drinking Water Applications. 5th Annual Environmental Research Poster Symposium, and A. Lindner. 2002. Microbial Transformation Potential of 2-Methylisoborneol: Potential Drinking WaterWater Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2002 Introduction The Florida Water

193

Arkansas Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

facilitated by the Arkansas Water Resources Center have included irrigation, ground water modeling, non-point source pollution, quality of ground water and surface water, efficient septic tank design, and ecosystemArkansas Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report FY 2002 Introduction Statewide Mission

194

Arkansas Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

quality of surface water and groundwater, especially non-point source pollution and sensitive ecosystems wastewater disposal systems, ground water modeling and land use mapping, erosion and pollution, water qualityArkansas Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report FY 2012 Arkansas Water Resources Center

195

Water Resources Research National Competitive Grants Program  

E-print Network

F Water Resources Research National Competitive Grants Program Fiscal Year 2014 Announcement Announcement No. G14AS00014 under Section 104(g) of the Water Resources Research Act of 1984, as Amended. Geological Survey Water Resources OMB Number 1028-0097 Expiration Date 10/31/2016 PAPERWORK REDUCTION ACT

Mukhtar, Saqib

196

Texas Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

Texas Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2013 Texas Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2013 1 #12;Introduction The Texas Water Resources Institute (TWRI), a unit of Texas A&M AgriLife Research, Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service and the College of Agriculture

197

Texas Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

Texas Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2009 Texas Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2009 1 #12;Introduction The Texas Water Resources Institute (TWRI), a unit of Texas AgriLife Research, Texas AgriLife Extension Service and the College of Agriculture and Life

198

Texas Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

Texas Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2012 Texas Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2012 1 #12;Introduction The Texas Water Resources Institute (TWRI), a unit of Texas A&M AgriLife Research, Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service and the College of Agriculture

199

Texas Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

Texas Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2011 Texas Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2011 1 #12;Introduction The Texas Water Resources Institute (TWRI), a unit of Texas AgriLife Research, Texas AgriLife Extension Service and the College of Agriculture and Life

200

Texas Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

Texas Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2010 Texas Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2010 1 #12;Introduction The Texas Water Resources Institute (TWRI), a unit of Texas AgriLife Research, Texas AgriLife Extension Service and the College of Agriculture and Life

201

American Society of Civil Engineers: Teaching Resources  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Do you want to help train the next generation of civil engineers? This website provides a plethora of high-quality, hands-on activities for just that purpose. The site has resources for educators, parents, and engineers. The Educators section contains classroom resources that include ZOOM into Engineering and West Point Bridge Contest. The real interactive gems are in the Digital Media area. Visitors can take advantage of playful experiences like It's Cool to Be A Civil Engineer and Designing a Roller Coaster. The Parents area includes some very fun activities parents can do with their children. All told, there are seven such low-cost activities with instructions, including Paper Bridge and Newspaper Tower All in all, it's a lovely site and one that will inspire future engineers and create new connections between educators and their students.

202

Water resources investigations in New York, 1980  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report describes the water-resources investigations conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey in New York in 1980; many of these studies will continue into 1981 or longer. The Geological Survey began its water-resources studies in New York State in 1895 with a stream-gaging program in the Catskill Mountain region and entered its first cooperative program, with the Office of the State Engineer, in 1900. Since 1910, the Survey has maintained a District office in Albany to direct its water investigations within the State. A Long Island subdistrict office was established in 1932 to monitor and study the ground-water situation in this area of increasing urbanization. Subdistrict offices are also maintained in Ithaca and Albany to collect and interpret data from western and eastern New York, respectively. A field station is maintained in Potsdam to collect records in the northernmost part of the State. A bibliography of reports published or released in 1980 by the New York District is included. (USGS)

Finch, Anne J., (compiler)

1980-01-01

203

Water resources in unified accounting for natural resources  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The aim of this paper is to incorporate the water resources into the unified resources accounting based on scientific objectivity so as to present a brief portrait of the significance of water for the resource conversion and management of the national-scale society in a systems ecological perspective. The water resources in sustaining the human society are incorporated into the total exergy budget and national-scale social exergy accounting framework, not only by accounting the conventionally usable water flowing through society regarding seawater as reference environment, but also by introducing the evaporation exergy of freshwater as essential investment from the hydrological cycle. A case study of the Chinese society 2001-2005 is conducted, with the societal system broken down into seven sectors, i.e., extraction, conversion, agriculture, industry, transportation, tertiary and households sectors, to explore the resource utilization structure based on the proposed accounting method. Typical results for China 2005 showed that the total net input of the societal conventional resource exergy was 87.9 EJ, of which 75.4 EJ was from mineral resources and 22.6 EJ from other resources, while the water resource exergy input amounted to 105.1 EJ, which contributed 54.5% of the total resources exergy investment to the total society. Finally, the exergetic resource use intensities (RUIs) for six sectors were calculated, with the results that RUIs of agriculture and conversion sectors are much higher than those derived from conventional resource accounting.

Cai, Z. F.; Yang, Q.; Zhang, B.; Chen, H.; Chen, B.; Chen, G. Q.

2009-09-01

204

Nebraska Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

Nebraska Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report FY 2013 Nebraska Water Resources Center Department at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, took over as the interim director of the Nebraska Water and program specialist, respectively. The Nebraska Water Center staff also includes Rachael Herpel

205

Arkansas Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

quality of surface water and groundwater, especially non-point source pollution and sensitive ecosystems modeling and landuse mapping, erosion and pollution, water quality and ecosystem functions. The CenterArkansas Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report FY 2011 Arkansas Water Resources Center

206

Texas Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

(1); water treatment (1); non-point pollution (1); and water quality (5). Note that several projectsTexas Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2003 Introduction The Mission of the Texas Water Resources Institute is to: (1) Provide leadership for Experiment Station and Extension

207

Puerto Rico Water Resources & Environmetal Research Institute  

E-print Network

Innovation Grant from the Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS). Establish surface water collector, in the meantime trained personnel from the Department of Natural Resources who will be assuming a leading rolePuerto Rico Water Resources & Environmetal Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2011

208

Contamination of water resources by pathogenic bacteria  

PubMed Central

Water-borne pathogen contamination in water resources and related diseases are a major water quality concern throughout the world. Increasing interest in controlling water-borne pathogens in water resources evidenced by a large number of recent publications clearly attests to the need for studies that synthesize knowledge from multiple fields covering comparative aspects of pathogen contamination, and unify them in a single place in order to present and address the problem as a whole. Providing a broader perceptive of pathogen contamination in freshwater (rivers, lakes, reservoirs, groundwater) and saline water (estuaries and coastal waters) resources, this review paper attempts to develop the first comprehensive single source of existing information on pathogen contamination in multiple types of water resources. In addition, a comprehensive discussion describes the challenges associated with using indicator organisms. Potential impacts of water resources development on pathogen contamination as well as challenges that lie ahead for addressing pathogen contamination are also discussed. PMID:25006540

2014-01-01

209

Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 1999 Introduction WATER PROBLEMS AND ISSUES OF MISSOURI The water problems and issues in the State of Missouri can be separated into three general areas: 1) water quality, 2) water quantity, and 3) water policy. Each of Missouri's specific

210

Adapting water accounting for integrated water resource management. The Júcar Water Resource System (Spain)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

An increase in water demands, exacerbated by climate change and the tightening of environmental requirements, leads to a reduction in available water resources for economic uses. This situation poses challenges for water resource planning and management. Water accounting has emerged as an appropriate tool to improve transparency and control in water management. There are multiple water accounting approaches, but they generally involve a very exhaustive list of accounted concepts. According to our findings in this research, one of the best water accounting methodologies is the Australian Water Accounting Standard. However, its implementation for integrated water resource planning and management purposes calls into questioning the amount of information and level of detail necessary for the users of water accounts. In this paper, we present a different method of applying the Australian Water Accounting Standard in relation to water resource management, which improves its utility. In order to compare the original approach and that proposed here, we present and discuss an application to the Júcar Water Resource System, in eastern Spain.

Momblanch, Andrea; Andreu, Joaquín; Paredes-Arquiola, Javier; Solera, Abel; Pedro-Monzonís, María

2014-11-01

211

Water Budgets: Foundations for Effective Water-Resources and  

E-print Network

Water Budgets: Foundations for Effective Water-Resources and Environmental Management U Survey3. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service4. U.S. Geological Survey5. #12;Water Budgets: Foundations for Effective Water-Resources and Environmental Management By Richard W. Healy, Thomas C. Winter, James W. La

212

USGS Water Resources of South Dakota  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Water Resources of South Dakota site contains hydrologic data, including realtime streamflow, precipitation, and water use data. There are USGS water resources publications and information on projects such as the Black Hills Hydrology Study; the National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Volatile Organic Chemicals National Synthesis; the Belle Fourche Watershed Assessment Study; and the Sensitivity of Ground Water to Contamination project in Lawrence County, South Dakota.

213

WATER RESOURCES NEWS NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE  

E-print Network

of Water Use; (2) Nonpoint Source Pollution; (3) Meeting Water Requirements; (4) Energy-Water Relationships development. (2) Water Pollution and Water Quality Control - Nonpoint Source Pollution Definition: Degradation of water quality from nonpoint source pollution. (3) Water Use Efficiency Definition: Minimize water use

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

214

Assessment of Water Quality in Corps of Engineers Reservoirs  

Microsoft Academic Search

Concern over freshwater quality and emphasis on developing improved methods for managing existing water resource projects led the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to initiate several water research programs. Compiling and analyzing a Corps-wide water quality database for reservoirs and tailwaters was one such effort: These data are being supplemented with subjective information about enhancement needs solicited from field offices.

Robert H. Kennedy; Robert F. Gaugush

1988-01-01

215

Uncertainty Management in Urban Water Engineering Adaptation to Climate Change  

EPA Science Inventory

Current water resource planning and engineering assume a stationary climate, in which the observed historical water flow rate and water quality variations are often used to define the technical basis. When the non-stationarity is considered, however, climate change projection co...

216

Corpus Resources and Minority Language Engineering  

Microsoft Academic Search

Abstract: Low density languages are typically viewed as those forwhich few language resources are available. Work relating tolow density languages is becoming a focus of increasingattention within language engineering (e.g. Charoenporn, 1997,Hall and Hudson, 1997, Somers, 1997, Nirenberg and Raskin,1998, Somers, 1998). However, much work related to lowdensity languages is still in its infancy, or worse, work isblocked because the

Tony Mcenery; Paul Baker; Lou Burnard

2000-01-01

217

STIMULATION AND RESERVOIR ENGINEERING OF GEOTHERMAL RESOURCES  

E-print Network

STIMULATION AND RESERVOIR ENGINEERING OF GEOTHERMAL RESOURCES Paul Kruger and Henry J . Ramey, Jr . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 THE GEOTHERMAL CHIMNEY MODEL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Current Design of t h e . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67 Geothermal Reservoir Phy.Sica1 PIodels . . . . . . . . . . . . 73 RAD3N I N GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIRS

Stanford University

218

Nebraska Water Conference Council 2008 Water & Natural Resources Tour  

E-print Network

Nebraska Water Conference Council 2008 Water & Natural Resources Tour Republican River Basin of Kansas & Nebraska Sponsoring Organizations Central Nebraska Public Power & Irrigation District Farm Chamber of Commerce Steve Ress, UNL Water Center Assistance provided by Rex Buchanan, Kansas Geological

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

219

Sustainable Water Resources in Semiarid Agroecosystems  

Microsoft Academic Search

Developing sustainable water resources management in agroecosystems is difficult in semiarid regions with limited or sporadic water inputs and heavy reliance on irrigation. Sustainable water management needs to consider both water quantity and water quality. Conversion of natural ecosystems to rain-fed agroecosystems has increased groundwater recharge in many semiarid regions in Australia, SW US, and W. Africa; however, such changes

R. C. Reedy; G. Favreau; J. B. Gates; A. Mukherjee; B. R. Scanlon; C. Zheng

2009-01-01

220

Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

of contaminants to shallow ground waters is the main water quality problem in the Coastal Plain. Average annual. Ground water is the major water supply source for the Atlantic Coastal Plain, a province. Ground water protection is particularly important given the increasing reliance on this resource

221

Water resource management: an Indian perspective.  

PubMed

Water is precious natural resource for sustaining life and environment. Effective and sustainable management of water resources is vital for ensuring sustainable development. In view of the vital importance of water for human and animal life, for maintaining ecological balance and for economic and developmental activities of all kinds, and considering its increasing scarcity, the planning and management of water resource and its optimal, economical and equitable use has become a matter of the utmost urgency. Management of water resources in India is of paramount importance to sustain one billion plus population. Water management is a composite area with linkage to various sectors of Indian economy including the agricultural, industrial, domestic and household, power, environment, fisheries and transportation sector. The water resources management practices should be based on increasing the water supply and managing the water demand under the stressed water availability conditions. For maintaining the quality of freshwater, water quality management strategies are required to be evolved and implemented. Decision support systems are required to be developed for planning and management of the water resources project. There is interplay of various factors that govern access and utilization of water resources and in light of the increasing demand for water it becomes important to look for holistic and people-centered approaches for water management. Clearly, drinking water is too fundamental and serious an issue to be left to one institution alone. It needs the combined initiative and action of all, if at all we are serious in socioeconomic development. Safe drinking water can be assured, provided we set our mind to address it. The present article deals with the review of various options for sustainable water resource management in India. PMID:25151722

Khadse, G K; Labhasetwar, P K; Wate, S R

2012-10-01

222

Georgia Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

#35334). (5) Tidal Streams: A Renewable Energy Source for Georgia , Kevin Haas, Georgia Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2008 1 #12;Introduction INTRODUCTION The Georgia Water Resources Institute, environmental organizations, lake associations, California Energy Commission, California Department of Water

223

Citizen's guide to coastal water resource management  

SciTech Connect

Contents include: taking the initiative; water-quality standards; Coastal Area Management Act; dredge-and-fill permits under Section 404; sediment and erosion control; other environmental laws; nonregulatory ways to help protect water resources.

Kennedy, J.; Miller, T.

1988-01-01

224

Water Resources and Supply Adaptation: A paradigm Shifting for Future Climate?  

EPA Science Inventory

Climate change adds another layer of complexity in planning, engineering and management of water resources and urban water infrastructures. Yet our current practice is confined to the traditional approach that evaluates developmental scenarios and their sustainability mostly by a...

225

Climate Change and Water Resources Management: A Federal Perspective  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Many challenges, including climate change, face the Nation's water managers. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) has provided estimates of how climate may change, but more understanding of the processes driving the changes, the sequences of the changes, and the manifestation of these global changes at different scales could be beneficial. Since the changes will likely affect fundamental drivers of the hydrological cycle, climate change may have a large impact on water resources and water resources managers. The purpose of this interagency report prepared by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation), and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) is to explore strategies to improve water management by tracking, anticipating, and responding to climate change. This report describes the existing and still needed underpinning science crucial to addressing the many impacts of climate change on water resources management.

Brekke, Levi D.; Kiang, Julie E.; Olsen, J. Rolf; Pulwarty, Roger S.; Raff, David A.; Turnipseed, D. Phil; Webb, Robert S.; White, Kathleen D.

2009-01-01

226

Water-Resources Manpower: Supply and Demand Patterns to 1980.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Relating the supply of scientific manpower to the educational potential of the general population and the productive capacity of the educational system, this study disaggregates independent projections of scientific manpower supply and demand to yield projections for water resources manpower. This supply of engineers, natural scientists, and…

Lewis, James E.

227

Water Resources, Development and Management Service  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The world\\'s food production depends on the availability of water, a precious but finite resource. Users can learn about the need for more efficient usage of water for irrigation, and about the activities of the Water Resources Development and Management Service, which is concerned with sustainable use and conservation of water in agriculture. Links to other sites related to irrigation practices and food production are also provided.

228

Water Resources, Development and Management Service  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The world's food production depends on the availability of water, a precious but finite resource. Users can learn about the need for more efficient usage of water for irrigation, and about the activities of the Water Resources Development and Management Service, which is concerned with sustainable use and conservation of water in agriculture. Links to other sites related to irrigation practices and food production are also provided.

2004-05-10

229

Water Resources Management and Integrated Water Resources Management (IWRM) in Cameroon  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cameroon is blessed with abundant water resources. Rapid population increase, unplanned urbanisation, intensive industrial\\u000a and socio-economic development have led to poor and unsustainable management of these resources. Integrated Water Resources\\u000a Management (IWRM) is a promising approach in ensuring sustainable management of Cameroon’s water resources. It entails management\\u000a of water for various purposes and not for a single purpose which therefore

Andrew Ako Ako; Gloria Eneke Takem Eyong; George Elambo Nkeng

2010-01-01

230

Texas Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

Texas Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2006 #12;Introduction The Texas Water Resources Institute (TWRI), a unit of the Texas Agricultural Experiment Station and Texas Cooperative. The institute maintains joint or collaborative projects with 15 Texas universities and 3 in other states; 11

231

Texas Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

Texas Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2005 Introduction The Texas Water Resources Institute (TWRI), a unit of the Texas Agricultural Experiment Station and Texas Cooperative Texas universities and four in other states; nine federal agencies; five state agencies; seven

232

UF in Florence Global Water Resource Management  

E-print Network

buildings, city squares, gardens, monasteries, museums, and art galleries. Excursions Coursework human pressures on water resources create the need for sustainable water resource management worldwide the city and in walking distance or a short commute to where classes are held. #12;University of Florida

Jawitz, James W.

233

Climate Change and Water Resources in the  

E-print Network

Climate Change and Water Resources in the Tropical Andes Mathias Vuille Inter-American Development Bank Environmental Safeguards Unit TECHNICAL NOTE No. IDB-TN-515 March 2013 #12;Climate Change-American Development Bank Felipe Herrera Library Vuille, Mathias. Climate change and water resources in the tropical

Vuille, Mathias

234

Mississippi Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

Mississippi Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2009 Mississippi Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2009 1 #12;Introduction The Mississippi Water Program Introduction The Mississippi Water Resources Research Institute (MWRRI) conducts an annual

235

Mississippi Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

Mississippi Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2008 Mississippi Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2008 1 #12;Introduction The Mississippi Water Program Introduction The Mississippi Water Resources Research Institute (MWRRI) conducts an annual

236

GIS APPLICATION FOR INTERGRATED WATER RESOURCES MANAGEMENT  

Microsoft Academic Search

Water is constantly flowing through the landscape in response to weather events and most often, in the form of streams and rivers. This water flow carries micro-organisms, dissolved chemicals and sediment, which define water quality. We need to understand these flow- and quality-patterns and how they change in order to properly manage water resources of river basins. Hydrological analysis and

E. Theron; O. J. Gericke; S. W. Slabbert; M Dent

237

Chapter 13 Water Resources Hoover Dam  

E-print Network

management Water shortage linked to food supply Learning Objectives #12; The global water cycle due to surface runoff #12; A drainage basin or watershed is an area of land that contributes waterChapter 13 Water Resources #12;Hoover Dam #12;The Colorado River Basin Population growth

Pan, Feifei

238

International cooperation in water resources  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Advancements in hydrology proceeded slowly until the late 1800's when new ventures created a surge of interest and accomplishment. Progress waned again until the middle 20th century when an International Hydrological Decade was conceived, eventually receiving wide multinational support from governmental agencies and nongovernmental institutions. Organized by UNESCO, the Decade program was launched January 1, 1965. Participation included 107 nations, six United Nations agencies, and more than a dozen international scientific organizations. The initial program emphasized scientific research, and international cooperation; the second half of the Decade, emphasized technical assistance and technology transfer, largerly through education, training and demonstration. The success of the Decade led to the establishment of the International Hydrological Program, again under the aegis of UNESCO, to continue the work of the Decade indefinitely. The five major program activities, now involving about 90 countries and several international organizations, include: the scientific program, the promotion of education and training, the enhancement of information exchange, support of technical assistance, and the enlargement of regional cooperation. A significant amount of activity related to hydrological data networks and forecasting is carried on in an Operational Hydrology Programme by the WMO, chiefly through its Commission for Hydrology. Other international governmental organizations with a strong interest in water include the UN, the UN Development Programme, the FAO, the WHO, the International Atomic Energy Agency, the UN Environment Programme, the International Standardization Organization, and developmental institutions such as the World Bank. The specialized interests of researchers outside of the governmental structure, are met through association in various scientific and technical organizations which are world wide in scope and membership. Notwithstanding a sometimes bewildering variety of organizations, there certainly exists, for any nation, group, or individual, a demonstrated mechanism for almost any conceivable form of international cooperation in hydrology and water resources. ?? 1979 Akademische Verlagsgesellschaft.

Jones, J.R.; Beall, R.M.; Giusti, E.V.

1979-01-01

239

How predictable are water resources?  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Peter Mason, technical director of international dams and hydropower at MWH, explains how some water resources might be more predictable than generally supposed. Some years ago the writer examined the levels of Lake Victoria in east Africa as part of a major refurbishment project. This revealed a clear cyclic behavior in lake level and hence in discharges from the lake down the Nile system and up into Egypt. A recent study by the writer demonstrated that 20-year mean flows in the Kafue River in Zambia corresponded well to reconstructed rainfall records based on regional tree ring records. The Rio Parana has a catchment area of 3,100,000km 2 and a mean stream flow of 21,300m 3/sec. In the wider context an improved understanding of apparent periodicities in the natural record would seem to offer at least one planning scenario to be considered in terms of investment and even for the long term planning of aid and famine relief.

Mason, P.

2010-10-01

240

Assessing Water and Carbon Footprints for Sustainable Water Resource Management  

EPA Science Inventory

The key points of this presentation are: (1) Water footprint and carbon footprint as two sustainability attributes in adaptations to climate and socioeconomic changes, (2) Necessary to evaluate carbon and water footprints relative to constraints in resource capacity, (3) Critical...

241

Advancing Science for Water Resources Management  

Microsoft Academic Search

Despite the major advances in science to underpin water resources and river management that have taken place over the past\\u000a two decades, a need remains to establish a unifying framework that will lead to new, appropriate tools for water resources\\u000a management. In Europe, this need has been highlighted by the promotion of the Water Framework Directive. From a scientific\\u000a perspective,

G. E. Petts; J. Nestler; R. Kennedy

2006-01-01

242

Advancing science for water resources management  

Microsoft Academic Search

Despite the major advances in science to underpin water resources and river management that have taken place over the past\\u000a two decades, a need remains to establish a unifying framework that will lead to new, appropriate tools for water resources\\u000a management. In Europe, this need has been highlighted by the promotion of the Water Framework Directive. From a scientific\\u000a perspective,

G. E. Petts; J. Nestler; R. Kennedy

243

Graduate School of Creative Science and Engineering Department of Earth Sciences, Resources and Environmental Engineering  

E-print Network

Graduate School of Creative Science and Engineering Department of Earth Sciences, Resources and Engineering Department of Earth Sciences, Resources and Environmental Engineering Research Area Research/092015/04 1 #12; Graduate School of Creative Science and Engineering Department of Earth Sciences, Resources

Kaji, Hajime

244

Techniques for integrated water resources management  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The course, Decision Support Techniques for Integrated Water Resources Management, is designed mainly for technical managers and staff of water resources management agencies at the international, national, regional, and local water board level, as well as consultants in other professions working in or interested in the field of water resources development, planning, and operation. It will be held in Wageningen, The Netherlands, June 10-15, 1991.The course objective is to promote better understanding and dissemination of techniques to be applied in “real-world” integrated water resources management. The course offers an introduction to the concepts of decision modeling, plus ample case studies to demonstrate their applicability. It covers decision theory, operations research and simulation methods, as well as certain aspects of law and psychology. Selected multiple objective techniques will be presented, followed by an overview of recent trends in the field. Computer-based techniques will be demonstrated.

245

Environmental geophysics mapping salinity and water resources  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Salinity and fresh water are two sides of the same coin, most conveniently measured by electrical conductivity; they can now be mapped rapidly in three dimensions using airborne electromagnetics (AEM). Recent developments in the calibration of airborne data against in-field measurements and additional information from radiometrics, magnetics and digital elevation models lend new insights into salinity, groundwater flow systems and water resources. Freshwater resources can be mapped, and salinity risk and the outcome of management interventions may be forecast, on the basis of the specific architecture of complete groundwater flow systems-enabling practical, cost-effective protection and development of water resources.

Dent, David

2007-05-01

246

Water Resources of New Hampshire and Vermont  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Water Resources of New Hampshire and Vermont provides the latest information on drought conditions and rainfall data for the area; water data including streamflow and ground-water levels; and streamflow maps showing watersheds. There are also U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) publications, including reports on USGS projects; USGS news and events; and educational links.

247

Water Matters: Water Resources Teacher's Guide, Vol. 2.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This guide is one of three teacher's guides developed for the U.S. Geological Survey's Water Resources Education Initiative. Each guide supplements a set in the accompanying poster series which forms the core of this project. This guide covers navigating the water highways, groundwater, and water quality and helps teachers use the included Water

Crowder, Jane Nelson; Cain, Joe

248

Water Resources Management Practicum 2006 Nelson Institute for Environmental Studies  

E-print Network

2007 Water Resources Management Practicum 2006 Nelson Institute for Environmental Studies for Monona Bay, Madison, Wisconsin #12;Water Resources Management Practicum Nelson Institute for Environmental Studies, 608/262-7996. The Water Resources Management Practicum is a regular part

Sheridan, Jennifer

249

30 CFR 402.6 - Water-Resources Research Program.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Water-Resources Research Program. 402.6 Section...GEOLOGICAL SURVEY, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR WATER-RESOURCES RESEARCH PROGRAM AND THE WATER-RESOURCES TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM...

2013-07-01

250

30 CFR 402.6 - Water-Resources Research Program.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Water-Resources Research Program. 402.6 Section...GEOLOGICAL SURVEY, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR WATER-RESOURCES RESEARCH PROGRAM AND THE WATER-RESOURCES TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM...

2012-07-01

251

30 CFR 402.6 - Water-Resources Research Program.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Water-Resources Research Program. 402.6 Section...GEOLOGICAL SURVEY, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR WATER-RESOURCES RESEARCH PROGRAM AND THE WATER-RESOURCES TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM...

2014-07-01

252

30 CFR 402.6 - Water-Resources Research Program.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Water-Resources Research Program. 402.6 Section...GEOLOGICAL SURVEY, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR WATER-RESOURCES RESEARCH PROGRAM AND THE WATER-RESOURCES TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM...

2011-07-01

253

New Jersey Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

New Jersey Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2000 Introduction Introduction The New Jersey Water Resources Research Institute underwent a significant reorganization: New Jersey Water Resources Research Institute Principal Investigators: Tamar Barkay Publication 1

254

Mississippi Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

Mississippi Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2013 Mississippi Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2013 1 #12;Introduction The Mississippi Water Resources Research Institute (MWRRI), established by the Mississippi legislature in1984, is a quasi

255

30 CFR 402.6 - Water-Resources Research Program.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Water-Resources Research Program. 402.6 Section...GEOLOGICAL SURVEY, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR WATER-RESOURCES RESEARCH PROGRAM AND THE WATER-RESOURCES TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM...

2010-07-01

256

National water summary on wetland resources  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This National Water Summary on Wetland Resources documents wetland resources in the United States. It presents an overview of the status of knowledge of wetlands at the present time-what they are, where they are found, why they are important, and the controversies surrounding them, with an emphasis on their hydrology. Wetland resources in each State, the District of Columbia (combined with Maryland), Puerto Rico, the U.S. Virgin Islands, and the western Pacific Islands are described.

Fretwell, J. D., (compiler); Williams, John S.; Redman, Phillip J.

1996-01-01

257

The National Park Service: Water Resources Division  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This portal provides access to a variety of materials on water resource programs in the National Park System (NPS). The homepage features links to news releases, announcements, and topics of current interest. Other links access information on various water resource issues, arranged by topic: fisheries, hydrology, laws and regulations, watersheds, wetlands, and many others. The documents pertaining to these topics include technical reports, fact sheets, planning documents, program information, and other webpages. Some of these items are available in downloadable, printable format (PDFs). The Water Quality page features the Environmental Contaminants Encyclopedia, a searchable reference on waterborne contaminants and their impacts on fish, wildlife, invertebrates, and other non-human living resources. There is also a page for students and teachers that provides access to information on volunteer projects and information about interpretative and educational activities involving water resources in the National Park system.

258

Digital Resource Package for Teaching Water Quality  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This digital resource package is a collection of online sources to help K-12 teachers create lessons on the Geology subject of water quality. Topics include Field Trips and Labs, Simulations and Media, Case Studies, Lesson Plans, and Reference Material.

Moin, Laura

259

Texas Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

Texas Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2001 Introduction Research Program #12;Texas Groundwater Management and Global Applications Basic Information Title: Texas Groundwater Principal Investigators: Daniel Stein Publication 1. Stein, Daniel R., 2002, Texas-Mexico Groundwater

260

USGS Water Resources Maps and GIS Information  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This portal, sponsored by the United States Geological Survey (USGS), provides access to maps and Geographic Information Systems (GIS) datasets for water resources in the United States. There is an extensive selection of datasets on irrigation, groundwater resources and issues, surficial and subsurface geology, hydrology, water contaminants, stream flow, and many other topics. There are also links to the Geospatial Data Clearinghouse, the EarthExplorer Landsat imagery site, the National Map Seamless Server, and other mapping and data download sites.

261

Graduate Study and Research in Ocean and Resources Engineering  

E-print Network

1 Guide to Graduate Study and Research in Ocean and Resources Engineering University the University of Hawaii at Manoa (UH) an ideal place for education and research in ocean and resources, the department changed its name to Ocean and Resources Engineering (ORE) to better reflect the research thrust

Frandsen, Jannette B.

262

Water resources of Lafourche Parish, Louisiana  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This fact sheet presents a brief overview of groundwater and surface-water resources in Lafourche Parish, Louisiana. Information on the availability, past and current use trends, and water quality from groundwater and surface-water sources in the parish is discussed. Previously published reports and data stored in the U.S. Geological Survey’s National Water Information System (http://waterdata.usgs.gov/nwis) are the primary sources of the information presented here.

Prakken, Lawrence B.; Lovelace, John K.

2013-01-01

263

Water resources of Jefferson Parish, Louisiana  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This fact sheet presents a brief overview of groundwater and surface-water resources in Jefferson Parish, Louisiana. Information on the availability, use, and quality of water from groundwater and surface-water sources in the parish is discussed. Previously published reports and data stored in the U.S. Geological Survey’s National Water Information System (http://waterdata.usgs.gov/nwis) are the primary sources of this information.

Prakken, Lawrence B.; Lovelace, John K.

2014-01-01

264

Resources for Small Water Systems in Texas  

E-print Network

Texas (Alice) and the High Plains (Levelland) provide on- site training and technical assistance. ORCA staff at these fi eld offi ces can help communi- ties develop loan and grant applications for water and wastewater systems. The Texas Engineering...

Dozier, Monty; Theodori, Gene L.; Jensen, Ricard

2007-03-28

265

Water resources of Sabine Parish, Louisiana  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Information concerning the availability, use, and quality of water in Sabine Parish, Louisiana, is critical for proper water-supply management. The purpose of this fact sheet is to present information that can be used by water managers, parish residents, and others for stewardship of this vital resource. Information on the availability, past and current use, use trends, and water quality from groundwater and surface-water sources in the parish is presented. Previously published reports and data stored in the U.S. Geological Survey’s (USGS) National Water Information System (http://waterdata.usgs.gov/nwis) are the primary sources of the information presented here.

Prakken, Lawrence B.; White, Vincent E.; Lovelace, John K.

2014-01-01

266

Water resources of West Feliciana Parish, Louisiana  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Information concerning the availability, use, and quality of water in West Feliciana Parish, Louisiana, is critical for proper water-supply management. The purpose of this fact sheet is to present information that can be used by water managers, parish residents, and others for stewardship of this vital resource. Information on the availability, past and current use, use trends, and water quality from groundwater and surface-water sources in the parish is discussed. Previously published reports and data stored in the U.S. Geological Survey’s National Water Information System (http://waterdata.usgs.gov/nwis) are the primary sources of the information presented here.

Prakken, Lawrence B.; Lovelace, John K.; Tomaszewski, Dan J.; Griffith, Jason M.

2014-01-01

267

Water resources of Terrebonne Parish, Louisiana  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Information concerning the availability, use, and quality of water in Terrebonne Parish, Louisiana, is critical for proper water-supply management. The purpose of this fact sheet is to present information that can be used by water managers, parish residents, and others for stewardship of this vital resource. Information on the availability, past and current use, use trends,and water quality from groundwater and surface-water sources in the parish is presented. Previously published reports and data stored in the U.S. Geological Survey’s National Water Information System http://waterdata.usgs.gov/nwis are the primary sources of the information presented here.

Prakken, Lawrence B.; Lovelace, John K.; White, Vincent E.

2014-01-01

268

Water resources of Orleans Parish, Louisiana  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Information concerning the availability, use, and quality of water in Orleans Parish, Louisiana, is critical for proper water-supply management. The purpose of this fact sheet is to present information that can be used by water managers, parish residents, and others for stewardship of this vital resource. Information on the availability, past and current use, use trends, and water quality from groundwater and surface-water sources in the parish is presented. Previously published reports and data stored in the U.S. Geological Survey’s National Water Information System (http://waterdata.usgs.gov/nwis) are the primary sources of the information presented here.

Prakken, Lawrence B.; White, Vincent E.; Lovelace, John K.

2014-01-01

269

Water resources of St. Mary Parish, Louisiana  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Information concerning the availability, use, and quality of water in St. Mary Parish, Louisiana, is critical for proper water-supply management. The purpose of this fact sheet is to present information that can be used by water managers, parish residents, and others for management of this vital resource. Information on the availability, past and current use, use trends, and water quality from groundwater and surface-water sources in the parish is presented. Previously published reports and data stored in the U.S. Geological Survey’s National Water Information System (http://waterdata.usgs.gov/nwis) are the primary sources of the information presented here.

Prakken, Lawrence B.; White, Vincent E.; Lovelace, John K.

2014-01-01

270

SMALL SYSTEM STUDIES (WATER SUPPLY AND WATER RESOURCES DIVISION)  

EPA Science Inventory

To support and help in the struggle to improve the quality of drinking water in the U.S. and abroad (China and South America), the National Risk Management Research Laboratory's Water Supply and Water Resources Division (WSWRD) uses the USEPA Test and Evaluation (T&E) Facility lo...

271

Ocean and Resources Engineering is the application of ocean science and engineering to the challenging conditions  

E-print Network

Ocean and Resources Engineering is the application of ocean science and engineering to the challenging conditions found in the ocean environment. Motions of and forces on floating structures due resources are among some of the consid- erations that set ocean and resources engineering apart from

Frandsen, Jannette B.

272

HISTORICAL ASPECTS OF WATER RESOURCES  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the history of water, the realization that microorganisms were a benefit rather than a bane stands out as an important milestone. William Dibdin, a nineteenth century, British, self-taught environ- mental microbiologist, developed fundamental knowledge of biological wastewater treatment. The knowledge enabled the River Thames to be cleaned up and provided a basis for worldwide water quality improvement.

N. EARL SPANGENBERG; FAYE ANDERSON; ERICH P. D ITSCHMAN; JEFFERSON G. EDGENS; JOHN H. HERRING; RICHARD H. MCCUEN; LAUREL E. PHOENIX; CHARLES W. S LAUGHTER

273

Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

of Minnesota's Water Resources Center (WRC). The WRC is a collaborative enterprise involving several colleges environments Basic Information Title: Tracing nutrient sources at the land-water interface in urban Investigator Jacques Finlay, Professor, Department of Ecology Evolution and Behavior Sarah Hobbie, Professor

274

Ohio Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

emission and Ethan's Kubatko research on using Lake Erie waves as a source of renewable energy. In addition Technical Report FY 2011 1 #12;Introduction Pursuant to the Water Resources Research Act of 1964, the Water. Introduction 1 #12;Research Program Introduction In this reporting period we sponsored five new research

275

Graduate Study and Research in Ocean and Resources Engineering  

E-print Network

1 Guide to Graduate Study and Research in Ocean and Resources Engineering University the University of Hawaii at Manoa (UH) an ideal place for education and research in ocean and resources ..................................................................................................................... 5 Responsible Conduct of Research Training

Frandsen, Jannette B.

276

WATER RESOURCES NEWS NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE  

E-print Network

on the movement and quality of water in the aquifer. The system will be used to asseSs any impact of nuclear as the scientist adds or sUbstracts events such as pollution, or a particular ..type'.ofvvas.te management plan. nl will be devoted to scientific and technical discussions of nearly every facet of oil spill prevention and control

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

277

Water resources management. World Bank policy paper  

SciTech Connect

Water resources have been one of the most important areas of World Bank lending during the past three decades. Through its support for sector work and investments in irrigation, water supply, sanitation, flood control, and hydropower, the Bank has contributed to the development of many countries and helped provide essential services to many communities. Moreover, the Bank and governments have not taken sufficient account of environmental concerns in the management of water resources. (Copyright (c) 1993 International Bank for Reconstruction and Development/The World Bank.)

Easter, K.W.; Feder, G.; Le Moigne, G.; Duda, A.M.; Forsyth, E.

1993-01-01

278

Water Resources of New Mexico  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) site provides water data for New Mexico, a map of New Mexico basins, and publications. Descriptions of the following USGS investigations are provided: the Rio Grande National Water-Quality Assessment, the Middle Rio Grande Basin Study, USGS measurements of a century of floods, Rio Puerco Basin Studies, Monitoring of Piezometers in the Middle Rio Grande Basin, and Ground Water Monitoring and Pumpage in the Albuquerque Area. An education section includes general information on hydrology and a New Mexico fact sheet. There is a section monitoring drought conditions and a collection of photographs of drought.

279

Electric power engineering education resources 1993-94: IEEE Power Engineering Society Committee report  

Microsoft Academic Search

This subcommittee report is based on the thirteenth biennial survey of power engineering education resources in the US and Canada, eleven of which have bees previously published. This survey is conducted to determine the electric power engineering education resources available in ABET (Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology) accredited engineering programs in the US and Canada for the 1993-94 academic

R. L. King; M. E. El-Hawary; M. T. Glinkowski; C. Grigg; C. A. Gross; V. Rajagopalan; T. G. Schmehl; T. S. Sidhu; R. J. Thomas; D. O. Wiitanen; S. M. Yousif

1996-01-01

280

Glossary of Water Resource Terms.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Twelve reference sources were used in the compilation of this glossary of water pollution control terminology. Definitions for 364 words, acronyms, and phrases are included with cross references. (KP)

Titelbaum, Olga Adler

281

Observing Changes in Water Resources  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this video segment adapted from the College of Menominee Nation, tribal members observe lower water levels in lakes and streams and call for global, collaborative solutions to address climate change.

2012-03-23

282

Water Availability and Management of Water Resources  

EPA Science Inventory

One of the most pressing national and global issues is the availability of freshwater due to global climate change, energy scarcity issues and the increase in world population and accompanying economic growth. Estimates of water supplies and flows through the world's hydrologic c...

283

Conference Topic: Integrated Water Resources and Coastal Areas Management National Water Information Systems: A Tool to Support Integrated Water Resources  

E-print Network

of natural disasters; and reduced water quality due to pollution from industrial, agricultural and municipalConference Topic: Integrated Water Resources and Coastal Areas Management National Water Information Systems: A Tool to Support Integrated Water Resources Management in the Caribbean Marie-Claire St

Barthelat, Francois

284

Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

and wastewater treatment processes. The Center continues to be administered through the College of Engineering in the area of physical, chemical, and biological treatment processes for water and wastewater. The mission and Elimelech 1996). Colloidal interactions are also important in water and wastewater treatment

285

Native Waters: An American Indian Water Resource Education Project  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This community education initiative supports the efforts of Native American tribal leaders, educators, and students to develop contemporary, scientifically accurate, and culturally sensitive water education resources, programs, and networking opportunities. A traveling exhibit provides a Native American point of view on protection and conservation of water resources. A teachers' guide is provided to accompany the exhibit. Other materials include learning opportunities for students and educators, news articles, publications, scholarship information, and links to related information.

2004-01-01

286

University of Wisconsin Extension: Water Resources Programs  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The University of Wisconsin Extension provides "information about water quality and natural resources education programs in Wisconsin." Users can find out about monitoring the water quality of streams, river cleanups, and other volunteer projects. Teachers can learn how to educate their students about runoff pollution through the construction of a watershed model. The website presents numerous water related initiatives including the Multi-Agency Land and Water Education Grant Program, Give Water a Hand for young people taking action in their community, and the Landowner Assessment and Project Evaluation (LOAPE) Program.

287

Water Resources of Hawaii and the Pacific  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The mission of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) District Office in Honolulu, Hawaii is to assess water resources for the Hawaiian islands and the Western Pacific - the quality and quantity of surface-water and ground-water in this region. Information is provided about water use, streamflow, ground-water levels, well drilling, flood frequency, isotope hydrology, benthic invertebrates, contamination, the Iao aquifer on Maui island, rainfall amounts and storm monitoring. There is real-time data available as well as on-line reports and abstracts relating to hydrologic conditions in these areas.

288

Sustainability of ground-water resources  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The pumpage of fresh ground water in the United States in 1995 was estimated to be approximately 77 billion gallons per day (Solley and others, 1998), which is about 8 percent of the estimated 1 trillion gallons per day of natural recharge to the Nation's ground-water systems (Nace, 1960). From an overall national perspective, the ground-water resource appears ample. Locally, however, the availability of ground water varies widely. Moreover, only a part of the ground water stored in the subsurface can be recovered by wells in an economic manner and without adverse consequences.

Alley, William M.; Reilly, Thomas E.; Franke, O. Lehn

1999-01-01

289

North Dakota Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

North Dakota Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2003 Introduction This report describes the activities of the North Dakota Water Resources Research Institute (ND WRRI) during Geological Survey. Section 104 of the Water Resources Research Act requires the North Dakota Water Resources

290

North Dakota Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

North Dakota Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2002 Introduction This report describes the activities of the North Dakota Water Resources Research Institute (ND WRRI) during Geological Survey. Section 104 of the Water Resources Research Act requires the North Dakota Water Resources

291

18 CFR 701.76 - The Water Resources Council Staff.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

18 ? Conservation of Power and Water Resources ? 2 ? 2012-04-01 ? 2012-04-01 ? false ? The Water Resources Council Staff. ? 701.76 ? Section 701.76 ? Conservation of Power and Water Resources ? WATER RESOURCES COUNCIL ? COUNCIL ORGANIZATION ? Headquarters Organization ? § 701.76 ? The...

2012-04-01

292

Virginia Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

Virginia Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2012 Virginia Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2012 1 #12;Introduction The Virginia Water Resources Research-135.7:8). Mission The VWRRC promotes research on practical solutions to water resources problems; provides research

293

Alabama Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

Alabama Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2011 Alabama Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2011 1 #12;Introduction The Alabama Water Resources Research with the newly created Auburn University Water Resources Center (AU-WRC), and in 2008 it was designated as part

294

Oklahoma Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

Oklahoma Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2013 Oklahoma Water the Oklahoma Water Resources Research Institute (OWRRI, part of the Oklahoma Water Resources Center) continued its integration in to the Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources at Oklahoma State

295

CALIFORNIA DROUGHT State of California The Resources Agency California Department of Water Resources  

E-print Network

CALIFORNIA DROUGHT AN UPDATE 2008 State of California · The Resources Agency · California Department of Water Resources #12;CALIFORNIA DROUGHT, AN UPDATE April 2008 DEPARTME NT OF WATER R ESOURCES ST for Resources The Resources Agency Lester A. Snow Director Department of Water Resources #12;CALIFORNIA DROUGHT

296

Water Intensity of Electricity from Geothermal Resources  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

BACKGROUND Electricity from geothermal resources could play a significant role in the United States over the next few decades; a 2006 study by MIT expects a capacity of 100GWe by 2050 as feasible; approximately 10% of total electricity generating capacity up from less than 1% today. However, there is limited research on the water requirements and impacts of generating electricity from geothermal resources - conventional as well as enhanced. To the best of our knowledge, there is no baseline exists for water requirements of geothermal electricity. Water is primarily required for cooling and dissipation of waste heat in the power plants, and to account for fluid losses during heat mining of enhanced geothermal resources. MODEL DESCRIPTION We have developed a model to assess and characterize water requirements of electricity from hydrothermal resources and enhanced geothermal resources (EGS). Our model also considers a host of factors that influence cooling water requirements ; these include the temperature and chemical composition of geothermal resource; installed power generation technology - flash, organic rankine cycle and the various configurations of these technologies; cooling technologies including air cooled condensers, wet recirculating cooling, and hybrid cooling; and finally water treatment and recycling installations. We expect to identify critical factors and technologies. Requirements for freshwater, degraded water and geothermal fluid are separately estimated. METHODOLOGY We have adopted a lifecycle analysis perspective that estimates water consumption at the goethermal field and power plant, and accounts for transmission and distribution losses before reaching the end user. Our model depends upon an extensive literature review to determine various relationships necessary to determine water usage - for example relationship between thermal efficiency and temperature of a binary power plant, or differences in efficiency between various ORC configurations, or differences in efficiency of a plant with a wet cooled system and one with dry cooled system. There are a number of factors that we do not consider; most of these factors are location specific. These include ambient temperature and humidity, specific design parameters of the power plant, and dissolved solids and chemical composition of freshwater withdrawn from ground or surface sources. Even for a specific plant, water intensity will vary over time due to fluctuations in ambient temperature and humidity, and in temperature of the geothermal fluid. Thus the model’s water usage estimates should be treated as “first order” or “preliminary” estimates. This paper is part of a series exploring the water footprint of future transportation fuels including biofuels and electricity. The paper's broader objective is to highlight limitations imposed by water shortages to achieve higher penetration of various alternative fuels.

Mishra, G. S.; Glassley, W. E.

2010-12-01

297

DEVELOPING STATEWIDE WATER RESOURCE PLANS  

E-print Network

population and economic growth · Competition/conflict for water for different uses · Lack of sufficient/Methodology Development Data Collection Analysis #12;Common Characteristics of State Planning · Each state's approach comprehensive planning ­ To quantify/identify current and future needs ­ To quantify supply ­ To evaluate

Soerens, Thomas

298

NASA's Applied Sciences for Water Resources  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Earth Systems Division within NASA has the primary responsibility for the Earth Science Applied Science Program and the objective to accelerate the use of NASA science results in applications to help solve problems important to society and the economy. The primary goal of the Earth Science Applied Science Program is to improve future and current operational systems by infusing them with scientific knowledge of the Earth system gained through space-based observation, assimilation of new observations, and development and deployment of enabling technologies, systems, and capabilities. This paper discusses one of the major problems facing water resources managers, that of having timely and accurate data to drive their decision support tools. It then describes how NASA?s science and space based satellites may be used to overcome this problem. Opportunities for the water resources community to participate in NASA?s Water Resources Applications Program are described.

Doorn, Bradley; Toll, David; Engman, Ted

2011-01-01

299

WATER: Water Activities Teaching Environmental Responsibility: Teacher Resource, Environmental Science.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This activity book was developed as part of an effort to protect water quality of the Stillwater River, Ohio, through a Watershed Protection Project. It is designed to raise teachers' and students' awareness and trigger a sense of stewardship towards the preservation of water resources. The activities are generally appropriate for elementary age…

Kramer, Ed, Ed.; And Others

300

The National Park Service Water Resources Division  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This newly updated website details the National Park Service's (NPS) programs in water resources. Categorized into six sections, the site covers such topics as Water Quality and Groundwater Analysis, Wetlands, Water Rights, Fishery Programs, the National Water-Quality Assessment Program (NAWQA), and the National Wild and Scenic Rivers System. Within each category users will find research tools and fact sheets, including the newly released, searchable Environmental Contaminants Encyclopedia (discussed in the April 17, 1998 Scout Report). Although targeted at the general public, much of this information will be of use to educators and students.

Division., United S.

2005-11-01

301

The National Park Service Water Resources Division  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This newly updated website details the National Park Service's (NPS) programs in water resources. Categorized into six sections, the site covers such topics as Water Quality and Groundwater Analysis, Wetlands, Water Rights, Fishery Programs, the National Water-Quality Assessment Program (NAWQA), and the National Wild and Scenic Rivers System. Within each category users will find research tools and fact sheets, including the newly released, searchable Environmental Contaminants Encyclopedia (discussed in the April 17, 1998 Scout Report). Although targeted at the general public, much of this information will be of use to educators and students.

Division., United S.

1998-01-01

302

Water resources planning for rivers draining into Mobile Bay  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The application of remote sensing, automatic data processing, modeling and other aerospace related technologies to hydrological engineering and water resource management are discussed for the entire river drainage system which feeds the Mobile Bay estuary. The adaptation and implementation of existing mathematical modeling methods are investigated for the purpose of describing the behavior of Mobile Bay. Of particular importance are the interactions that system variables such as river flow rate, wind direction and speed, and tidal state have on the water movement and quality within the bay system.

April, G. C.

1976-01-01

303

Higher Resolution for Water Resources Studies  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Earth system science community is providing an increasing range of science results for the benefit of achieving the Millennium Development Goals. In addressing questions such as reducing poverty and hunger, achieving sustainable global development, or by defining adaptation strategies for climate change, one of the key issues will be the quantitative description and understanding of the global water cycle, which will allow useful projections of available future water resources for several decades ahead. The quantities of global water cycle elements that we observe today - and deal with in hydrologic and atmospheric modeling - are already very different from the natural flows as human influence on the water cycle by storage, consumption and edifice has been going on for millennia, and climate change is expected to add more uncertainty. In this case Tony Blair’s comment that perhaps the most worrying problem is climate change does not cover the full story. We shall also have to quantify how the human demand for water resources and alterations of the various elements of the water cycle may proceed in the future: will there be enough of the precious water resource to sustain current and future demands by the various sectors involved? The topics that stakeholders and decision makers concerned with managing water resources are interested in cover a variety of human uses such as agriculture, energy production, ecological flow requirements to sustain biodiversity and ecosystem services, or human cultural aspects, recreation and human well-being - all typically most relevant at the regional or local scales, this being quite different from the relatively large-scale that the IPCC assessment addresses. Halfway through the Millennium process, the knowledge base of the global water cycle is still limited. The sustainability of regional water resources is best assessed through a research program that combines high-resolution climate and hydrologic models for expected future scenarios (as in the IPCC ensembles) with appropriate observational data under current conditions in order to benchmark the models’ accuracy. Expected future changes in water availability could then be characterized and appropriate adaptation action designed in co-operation with the water use community. In situ observations of water cycle variables can also be used and developed together with remote sensing data from space to provide initial data for global seasonal or decadal forecasting and monitoring of global change in less well observed regions of the world.

Dumenil-Gates, L.

2009-12-01

304

Missouri Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

Missouri Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2012 Missouri Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2012 1 #12;Introduction Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2012-2013 WATER PROBLEMS AND ISSUES OF MISSOURI The water problems and issues

305

Missouri Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

Missouri Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2011 Missouri Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2011 1 #12;Introduction Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2011-2012 WATER PROBLEMS AND ISSUES OF MISSOURI The water problems and issues

306

Geothermal Water Use: Life Cycle Water Consumption, Water Resource Assessment, and Water Policy Framework  

DOE Data Explorer

This report examines life cycle water consumption for various geothermal technologies to better understand factors that affect water consumption across the life cycle (e.g., power plant cooling, belowground fluid losses) and to assess the potential water challenges that future geothermal power generation projects may face. Previous reports in this series quantified the life cycle freshwater requirements of geothermal power-generating systems, explored operational and environmental concerns related to the geochemical composition of geothermal fluids, and assessed future water demand by geothermal power plants according to growth projections for the industry. This report seeks to extend those analyses by including EGS flash, both as part of the life cycle analysis and water resource assessment. A regional water resource assessment based upon the life cycle results is also presented. Finally, the legal framework of water with respect to geothermal resources in the states with active geothermal development is also analyzed.

Schroeder, Jenna N.

307

Geothermal Water Use: Life Cycle Water Consumption, Water Resource Assessment, and Water Policy Framework  

SciTech Connect

This report examines life cycle water consumption for various geothermal technologies to better understand factors that affect water consumption across the life cycle (e.g., power plant cooling, belowground fluid losses) and to assess the potential water challenges that future geothermal power generation projects may face. Previous reports in this series quantified the life cycle freshwater requirements of geothermal power-generating systems, explored operational and environmental concerns related to the geochemical composition of geothermal fluids, and assessed future water demand by geothermal power plants according to growth projections for the industry. This report seeks to extend those analyses by including EGS flash, both as part of the life cycle analysis and water resource assessment. A regional water resource assessment based upon the life cycle results is also presented. Finally, the legal framework of water with respect to geothermal resources in the states with active geothermal development is also analyzed.

Schroeder, Jenna N.

2014-06-10

308

Oklahoma Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

Oklahoma Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2009 Oklahoma Water for Sustainable Environments (ISE) at Oklahoma State University promotes interdisciplinary environmental research development of the natural environment. The Oklahoma Water Resources Research Institute (OWRRI) is located

309

Oklahoma Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

Oklahoma Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2008 Oklahoma Water for Sustainable Environments (ISE) at Oklahoma State University continues to promote interdisciplinary, and sustainably developing the natural environment. The Oklahoma Water Resources Research Institute (OWRRI

310

Oklahoma Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

Oklahoma Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2010 Oklahoma Water for Sustainable Environments (ISE) at Oklahoma State University promotes interdisciplinary environmental research development of the natural environment. The Oklahoma Water Resources Research Institute (OWRRI) is located

311

Water Resource Uses and Issues in Texas.  

E-print Network

helpful in providing data revisions for river and coastal basins. Mr. Micky Walker made available to us the graphic data and picture file of the Department. Dr. Jack R. Runkles, Director of the Texas Water Resources Institute, s:; provided guidance... called for, and the Water Development Board contracted with the Remote Sensing Center of Texas A&M University for a 1976 season-long remote sensing study of certain critical river deltas along the Central Texas Coast. The studies are continuing...

McNeely, John G.; Lacewell, Ronald D.

1978-01-01

312

Ground Water and Surface Water: A Single Resource  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This report discusses how natural processes and human activities affect the interactions of ground water and surface water, and the importance of considering ground water and surface water as a single resource. Topics include natural processes of ground- and surface-water interaction; chemical interactions; and the effect of landscapes on these interactions. There is also discussion of the effects of human activities such as agriculture, urban and industrial development, modifications to drainages, and changes to the atmosphere. A downloadable, printable version is provided.

313

Impact of climate change on water resources  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Climate change will affect hydrological regimes of rivers, and have a direct impact on availability, renewability, and quality of water resources. To better understand current and future water resources in the Pearl River basin, here we assess the impact of climate change on river discharge, and identify whether climate change will lead to increasing water availability or scarcity at the catchment scale. The Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) model is used for hydrological simulation driven by WATCH (the Integrated Project Water and Global Change) forcing data (1958-2001), WATCH forcing data ERA interim (1979-2001) and ten bias-corrected projected climate scenarios from MPI-ESM-LR, HadGEM2-ES, CNRM-CM5, IPSL-CM5A-LR and EC-EARTH forced by RCP4.5 and RCP8.5 (1961-2099). All subbasins except Yujiang basin show a decrease in streamflow from 1961 to 2099. The results also indicate that the wet season will become more wet, and the dry season will become drier over the whole Pearl River basin after 2030. Highly uneven spatial and temporal distribution of water resources may result in water shortages and severe hazards in this region.

Yan, Dan; Werners, Saskia; Ludwig, Fulco

2014-05-01

314

Resource reliability, accessibility and governance: pillars for managing water resources to achieve water security in Nepal  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

As one of the world's most water-abundant countries, Nepal has plenty of water yet resources are both spatially and temporally unevenly distributed. With a population heavily engaged in subsistence farming, whereby livelihoods are entirely dependent on rain-fed agriculture, changes in freshwater resources can substantially impact upon survival. The two main sources of water in Nepal come from monsoon precipitation and glacial runoff. The former is essential for sustaining livelihoods where communities have little or no access to perennial water resources. Much of Nepal's population live in the southern Mid-Hills and Terai regions where dependency on the monsoon system is high and climate-environment interactions are intricate. Any fluctuations in precipitation can severely affect essential potable resources and food security. As the population continues to expand in Nepal, and pressures build on access to adequate and clean water resources, there is a need for institutions to cooperate and increase the effectiveness of water management policies. This research presents a framework detailing three fundamental pillars for managing water resources to achieve sustainable water security in Nepal. These are (i) resource reliability; (ii) adequate accessibility; and (iii) effective governance. Evidence is presented which indicates that water resources are adequate in Nepal to sustain the population. In addition, aspects of climate change are having less impact than previously perceived e.g. results from trend analysis of precipitation time-series indicate a decrease in monsoon extremes and interannual variation over the last half-century. However, accessibility to clean water resources and the potential for water storage is limiting the use of these resources. This issue is particularly prevalent given the heterogeneity in spatial and temporal distributions of water. Water governance is also ineffective due to government instability and a lack of continuity in policy. Subsequently, with poor accessibility and poor governance, the threat to human water security remains high in Nepal. Nonetheless, the nation has great potential to better manage natural capital and harness reserves for improving livelihoods, such as river flows for generating hydropower. Suggested solutions for transboundary water cooperation are explored within a water-energy-food nexus framework.

Biggs, E. M.; Duncan, J.; Atkinson, P.; Dash, J.

2013-12-01

315

Emerging climate services for water resources planning  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

The author’s perspective on new or experimental forecasts and data products that may be important for water resource planning were shared. Everyone who lives and works with the consequences of weather and climate have known or suspected for years that climate is shifting, have been adapting, and wa...

316

Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

/cosponsor seminars and conferences on campus. The 2004 Water Resources conference addressed "Wastewater Treatment. Information Transfer Program On October 22, 2004 a conference was held on Wastewater Treatment Plants and the Maryland Sea Grant College Background Municipal wastewater treatment plants have been traditionally

317

Environmental Education Compendium for Water Resources.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Interdisciplinary by nature, environmental education is appropriate in any subject area and many educators often integrate environmental concepts into their lesson plans. This compendium of 109 collections of curriculum materials has been developed to assist educators in their selection of materials focusing on water resources. Curricula cover…

California State Dept. of Education, Sacramento.

318

USGS Water Resources of North Dakota  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Water Resources of North Dakota contains current streamflow conditions and other hydrologic data, a drought watch section, publications, and an education section. There is information on: the connection between Lewis and Clark and the USGS; canoeing the rivers of North Dakota; and the Missouri River streamflow-gaging station and how the USGS collects streamflow data.

319

Texas Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

Texas Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2002 Introduction Research Program During 2002-03, TWRI supported 10 research projects to graduate students at 6 universities in Texas, including Texas A&M University, Baylor University, Rice University, West Texas A&M University

320

Center for Water Resources Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

, Academic Programs and Strategic Initiatives for the University of California, Division of Agriculture, state and local government agencies; agricultural, natural resource, and nongovernmental organizations to the latter two groups. Short-and long-term climate trends will exacerbate the problems associated with water

321

Climate change and global water resources  

Microsoft Academic Search

By 2025, it is estimated that around 5 billion people, out of a total population of around 8 billion, will be living in countries experiencing water stress (using more than 20% of their available resources). Climate change has the potential to impose additional pressures in some regions. This paper describes an assessment of the implications of climate change for global

Nigel W. Arnell

1999-01-01

322

Texas Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

of Texas AgriLife Research, Texas AgriLife Extension Service and the College of Agriculture and Life. Texas AgriLife Research and the Texas AgriLife Extension Service provide administrative support for TWRI leadership in working to stimulate priority research and Extension educational programs in water resources

323

Center for Water Resources Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

that will contribute to the efficient management of water resources within the state. Meeting the needs of the urban in cases where the bulk of the contamination is from non-point sources such as urban or agricultural runoff of Point and Non-Point Source Fecal Pollution from an Urban Watershed in Southern California Basic

324

Water Intensity of Electricity from Geothermal Resources  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND Electricity from geothermal resources could play a significant role in the United States over the next few decades; a 2006 study by MIT expects a capacity of 100GWe by 2050 as feasible; approximately 10% of total electricity generating capacity up from less than 1% today. However, there is limited research on the water requirements and impacts of generating electricity

G. S. Mishra; W. E. Glassley

2010-01-01

325

GIS and Water Resources Modeling Workshop  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This site from Venkatesh Merwade of Purdue university offers tutorials relating to GIS and water resources modeling. Topic areas covered are hydraulic and hydrologic modeling, GIS and hydrologic modeling and downloading geospatial and temporal data for hydroloic/hydraulic modeling. All tutorials have links for necessary datasets.

Merwade, Venkatesh

326

North Dakota Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

North Dakota Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 1998 Introduction Research Program INTRODUCTION The North Dakota Water Resources Research Institute is one of 54 entities, information transfer, and education on water resources. The bulk of the North Dakota Institute's resources

327

Kansas Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

Kansas Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2009 Kansas Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2009 1 #12;Introduction The Kansas Water Resources Institute-federal funds from state and other sources. KWRI is administered by the Kansas Center for Agricultural Resources

328

Kansas Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

Kansas Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2008 Kansas Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2008 1 #12;Introduction The Kansas Water Resources Institute from state and other sources. KWRI is administered by the Kansas Center for Agricultural Resources

329

Kansas Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

Kansas Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2012 Kansas Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2012 1 #12;Introduction The Kansas Water Resources Institute-federal funds from state and other sources. KWRI is administered by the Kansas Center for Agricultural Resources

330

Kansas Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

Kansas Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2011 Kansas Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2011 1 #12;Introduction The Kansas Water Resources Institute-federal funds from state and other sources. KWRI is administered by the Kansas Center for Agricultural Resources

331

Kansas Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

Kansas Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2013 Kansas Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2013 1 #12;Introduction The Kansas Water Resources Institute-federal funds from state and other sources. KWRI is administered by the Kansas Center for Agricultural Resources

332

Kansas Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

Kansas Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2010 Kansas Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2010 1 #12;Introduction The Kansas Water Resources Institute-federal funds from state and other sources. KWRI is administered by the Kansas Center for Agricultural Resources

333

Kansas Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

Kansas Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2007 Kansas Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2007 1 #12;Introduction The Kansas Water Resources Institute from state and other sources. KWRI is administered by the Kansas Center for Agricultural Resources

334

Mississippi Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

Mississippi Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2004 Introduction The FY 2004 Annual Technical Report of the Mississippi Water Resources Research - GeoResources Institute. Mississippi Water Resources Conference proceedings. 2. Ampim, P.A., J.H. Massey, B.A. Stewart, M.C. Smith, A

335

COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING & MINERAL RESOURCES TRANSFER REQUEST FORM  

E-print Network

COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING & MINERAL RESOURCES TRANSFER REQUEST FORM Name. ___Engineering majors offered do not match my interests. ___I have other obligations and the curriculum is too intensive. ___Courses I want to take are not offered enough. ___Engineering is not challenging enough for me

Mohaghegh, Shahab

336

J. David Lowell Master of Engineering in Mineral Resources  

E-print Network

. Prerequisites in calculus, physics, chemistry, engineering science, and geology must be satisfied prior another university (courses from Arizona State University and Northern Arizona University can be included engineering from the University of Arizona will transfer into the Master of Engineering in Mineral Resources

Ziurys, Lucy M.

337

Water Resources Data System State Climate Office  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Water Resources Data System is a "clearinghouse of hydrological and climatological data for the State of Wyoming" provided by the University of Wyoming. Online data include a water quality database, climatological data (such as snow depth and precipitation), and earthquake and landslide data. A water library link contains research briefs, publications, a reference shelf, newsletters, and other related documents. Additional links on the main page include US Geological Survey stream flow conditions, the state climatologist office, data clearinghouses, and other Wyoming-specific informational sites.

338

Water resources of Assumption Parish, Louisiana  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Information concerning the availability, use, and quality of water in Assumption Parish, Louisiana, is critical for proper water-supply management. The purpose of this fact sheet is to present information that can be used by water managers, parish residents, and others for management of this vital resource. Information on the availability, past and current use, use trends, and water quality from groundwater and surface-water sources in the parish is presented. Previously published reports and data stored in the U.S. Geological Survey’s National Water Information System (http://waterdata.usgs.gov/nwis) are the primary sources of the information presented here. In 2010, about 21.4 million gallons per day (Mgal/d) of water were withdrawn in Assumption Parish, including about 12.4 Mgal/d from surface-water sources and 9.03 Mgal/d from groundwater sources. Withdrawals for industrial use accounted for about 16.4 Mgal/d or 76 percent of the total water withdrawn. Other categories of use included public supply, rural domestic, livestock, general irrigation, and aquaculture.Water-use data collected at 5-year intervals from 1960 to 2010 indicated that water withdrawals peaked in 2000 at about 29.7 Mgal/d.

Prakken, Lawrence B.; Lovelace, John K.

2013-01-01

339

KE Basin water dispositioning engineering study  

SciTech Connect

This engineering study is a feasibility study of KE Basin water treatment to an acceptable level and dispositioning the treated water to Columbia River, ground through ETF or to air through evaporation.

Hunacek, G.S.; Gahir, S.S.

1994-09-23

340

Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

of a 2000 liter pilot-scale system were presented at the 9th International Conference on Cold Regions Engineering and were published in the conference proceedings (Pilon and White, 1998). Presentations were made Association on December 9, 1998 and to the Water and Environmental Research Center on October 16, 1998

341

Entropy, recycling and macroeconomics of water resources  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We propose a macroeconomic model for water quantity and quality supply multipliers derived by water recycling (Karakatsanis et al. 2013). Macroeconomic models that incorporate natural resource conservation have become increasingly important (European Commission et al. 2012). In addition, as an estimated 80% of globally used freshwater is not reused (United Nations 2012), under increasing population trends, water recycling becomes a solution of high priority. Recycling of water resources creates two major conservation effects: (1) conservation of water in reservoirs and aquifers and (2) conservation of ecosystem carrying capacity due to wastewater flux reduction. Statistical distribution properties of the recycling efficiencies -on both water quantity and quality- for each sector are of vital economic importance. Uncertainty and complexity of water reuse in sectors are statistically quantified by entropy. High entropy of recycling efficiency values signifies greater efficiency dispersion; which -in turn- may indicate the need for additional infrastructure for the statistical distribution's both shifting and concentration towards higher efficiencies that lead to higher supply multipliers. Keywords: Entropy, water recycling, water supply multipliers, conservation, recycling efficiencies, macroeconomics References 1. European Commission (EC), Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), International Monetary Fund (IMF), Organization of Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), United Nations (UN) and World Bank (2012), System of Environmental and Economic Accounting (SEEA) Central Framework (White cover publication), United Nations Statistics Division 2. Karakatsanis, G., N. Mamassis, D. Koutsoyiannis and A. Efstratiades (2013), Entropy and reliability of water use via a statistical approach of scarcity, 5th EGU Leonardo Conference - Hydrofractals 2013 - STAHY '13, Kos Island, Greece, European Geosciences Union, International Association of Hydrological Sciences, International Union of Geodesy and Geophysics 3. United Nations (UN) (2012), World Water Development Report 4, UNESCO Publishing

Karakatsanis, Georgios; Mamassis, Nikos; Koutsoyiannis, Demetris

2014-05-01

342

Virginia Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

Virginia Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2013 Virginia Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2013 1 #12;Introduction The Virginia Water Resources Research-135.7:8). Mission The VWRRC provides research and educational opportunities to future water scientists; promotes

343

Louisiana Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

Louisiana Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2013 Louisiana Water a description of the activities of the Louisiana Water Resources Research Institute for the period of March 1, 2013 to February 28, 2014 under the direction of Dr. John Pardue. The Louisiana Water Resources

344

Louisiana Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

Louisiana Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2011 Louisiana Water a description of the activities of the Louisiana Water Resources Research Institute for the period of March 1, 2011 to February 28, 2012 under the direction of Dr. John Pardue. The Louisiana Water Resources

345

Idaho Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

Idaho Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2010 Idaho Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2010 1 #12;Introduction The Idaho Water Resources Research Institute (IWRRI) is housed at the University of Idaho. IWRRI is dedicated to supporting and promoting water

346

Idaho Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

Idaho Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2012 Idaho Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2012 1 #12;Introduction The Idaho Water Resources Research Institute (IWRRI) is housed at the University of Idaho. IWRRI is dedicated to supporting and promoting water

347

Idaho Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

Idaho Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2011 Idaho Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2011 1 #12;Introduction The Idaho Water Resources Research Institute (IWRRI) is housed at the University of Idaho. IWRRI is dedicated to supporting and promoting water

348

Idaho Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

Idaho Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2009 Idaho Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2009 1 #12;Introduction The Idaho Water Resources Research Institute (IWRRI) is housed at the University of Idaho. IWRRI is dedicated to supporting and promoting water

349

Idaho Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

Idaho Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2013 Idaho Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2013 1 #12;Introduction The Idaho Water Resources Research Institute (IWRRI) is housed at the University of Idaho. IWRRI is dedicated to supporting and promoting water

350

New Jersey Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

New Jersey Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2013 New Jersey Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2013 1 #12;Introduction The New Jersey Water 1 #12;Research Program Introduction The New Jersey Water Resources Research Institute has a policy

351

Center for Water Resources Research Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

the CUAHSI HydroServer software stack on virtual servers hosted at the Utah Water Research Laboratory (UWRLCenter for Water Resources Research Annual Technical Report FY 2010 Center for Water Resources Research Annual Technical Report FY 2010 1 #12;Introduction The Utah Center for Water Resources Research

352

Vermont Water Resources and Lake Studies Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

Vermont Water Resources and Lake Studies Center Annual Technical Report FY 2009 Vermont Water for the Vermont Water Resources and Lake Studies Center for FY2009 is attached. The grant awarded under the State Introduction In the 2009-2010 project year the Vermont Water Resources and Lake Studies Center continued its

353

Vermont Water Resources and Lake Studies Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

Vermont Water Resources and Lake Studies Center Annual Technical Report FY 2012 Vermont Water describe the activities of the Vermont Water Resources and Lake Studies Center in the project year just the Vermont Water Resources and Lake Studies Center continued its collaboration with the Vermont Agency

354

Benjamin M. Statler College of Engineering and Mineral Resources Freshman Engineering Study Lab Weeks  

E-print Network

Benjamin M. Statler College of Engineering and Mineral Resources ­ Freshman Engineering Study Lab there is a problem with your grade, email Statler-StudyLabs@mail.wvu.edu as soon as possible. First Week of Classes

Mohaghegh, Shahab

355

Water: a strategic resource. Student essay  

SciTech Connect

Availability of fresh water has been taken for granted throughout our history. In fact, the United States has been blessed with what was once thought to be a limitless natural resource, fresh water. The sources for this fresh water are precipitation, surface water, and ground water. Today, these sources are under relentless pressure from chronic pollution and over-usage. The federal government has begun the process of studying and doumenting the problems associated with our water supply but, to date, its efforts are far to little, too late. Budget constraints and funding projections only add to the already bleak picture. We are learning that water problems can't be contained and that they cross state, local, and private boundaries. This problem of area pollution has drawn considerable concern within the Department of Defense (DOD) as more and more of our installations are finding their water environment jeopardized. Solutions for the preservation cleansing and protection of our fresh-water systems are going to be expensive and technically complicated to accomplish and administer. Action is needed now.

Thornton, R.E.

1986-04-15

356

College of Earth Resource Sciences and Engineering (CERSE) Department of Petroleum Engineering  

E-print Network

College of Earth Resource Sciences and Engineering (CERSE) Department of Petroleum Engineering School of Mines Petroleum Engineering Department invites applications for a full-time faculty position. The Petroleum Engineering Department has a world-class program in education and research and offers

357

College of Earth Resource Sciences and Engineering (CERSE) Department of Petroleum Engineering  

E-print Network

College of Earth Resource Sciences and Engineering (CERSE) Department of Petroleum Engineering of Mines Petroleum Engineering Department invites applications for a full-time faculty position. The Petroleum Engineering Department has a world-class program in education and research and offers

358

College of Earth Resource Sciences and Engineering (CERSE) Department of Petroleum Engineering  

E-print Network

College of Earth Resource Sciences and Engineering (CERSE) Department of Petroleum Engineering of a background investigation. Colorado School of Mines Petroleum Engineering Department invites applications. The Petroleum Engineering Department has a world-class program in education and research and offers

359

EngineeringJobs.com: A National Index of Engineering Jobs and Resources  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

EngineeringJobs.com is a wonderful resource for engineers seeking employment and employers looking for engineers. Job seekers can explore over 100 career databases and companies; post resumes; send a resume to special recruiters; research companies; or explore the engineering tools, references, societies, and organizations. Company pages are listed alphabetically. Employers can review posted resumes or list job openings.

1998-01-01

360

Water Resources Center, Desert Research Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

Water Resources Center, Desert Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2000 Introduction None. Unusual growth patterns based on year round food availability and spatially unpredictable food quality modeling, irrigation, algae Lead Institute: Water Resources Center, Desert Research Institute

361

A Report on the Effectiveness of Texas Water Resources  

E-print Network

A readership survey conducted in May 1977 found that readers of Texas Water Resources find it useful, attractive and informative. The bulletin is published by the Texas Water Resources Institute to generate public awareness and understanding...

Ruesink, L. E.

362

Oklahoma Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

Oklahoma Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2005 Introduction The Environmental Institute (EI) at Oklahoma State University promotes interdisciplinary environmental research developing the natural environment. The Oklahoma Water Resources Research Institute, located within the EI

363

Oklahoma Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

Oklahoma Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2006 #12;Introduction The Environmental Institute (EI) at Oklahoma State University promotes interdisciplinary environmental research developing the natural environment. The Oklahoma Water Resources Research Institute (OWRRI), located within

364

Colorado Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

Colorado Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 1999 Introduction WATER Water Institute Program for FY1999, the Advisory Council on Water Research Policy (ACWRP) for the Colorado Water Resources Research Institute (CWRRI) was activated. The Council held its initial meeting

365

Missouri Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

Missouri Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2013 Missouri Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2013 1 #12;Introduction WATER PROBLEMS AND ISSUES OF MISSOURI The water problems and issues in the State of Missouri can be separated into three general areas: 1) water

366

Center for Water Resources Research Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

is providing input to the Committee on issues addressing water quality, wastewater treatment, and NPS pollution water resources, NPS pollution, and projected water needs. Future water-related issues assist the StateCenter for Water Resources Research Annual Technical Report FY 1999 Introduction Abstract In FY 99

367

Coop: 02-2011 COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING AND MINERAL RESOURCES  

E-print Network

Coop: 02-2011 COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING AND MINERAL RESOURCES COOPERATIVE EDUCATION PROGRAM STUDENT: _____________________________ Major: ______ Student ID: ______________ Address: _____________________________ Work Term's subsequent work period: Fall 2011 1 May 2011 #12;Coop: 02-2011 GENERAL PERFORMANCE APPRAISAL INSTRUCTION

Mohaghegh, Shahab

368

Graduate Study and Research in Ocean and Resources Engineering  

E-print Network

Guide to Graduate Study and Research in Ocean and Resources Engineering University of Hawaii-oriented activities make the University of Hawaii at Manoa an ideal place for education and research in ocean Research Facilities

Frandsen, Jannette B.

369

INTERGRATING SOURCE WATER PROTECTION AND DRINKING WATER TREATMENT: U.S. ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY'S WATER SUPPLY AND WATER RESOURCES DIVISION  

EPA Science Inventory

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Water Supply and Water Resources Division (WSWRD) is an internationally recognized water research organization established to assist in responding to public health concerns related to drinking water supplies. WSWRD has evolved from...

370

INTEGRATING SOURCE WATER PROTECTION AND DRINKING WATER TREATMENT: U.S. ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY'S WATER SUPPLY AND WATER RESOURCES DIVISION  

EPA Science Inventory

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Water Supply and Water Resources Division (WSWRD) is an internationally recognized water research organization established to assist in responding to public health concerns related to drinking water supplies. WSWRD has evolved from...

371

Water Resources Data for California, Water Year 1988. Volume 5. Ground-Water Data for California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Water resources data for the 1988 water year for California consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage and contents in lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water-quality in wells. Volume 5 contains water levels for 980 observation wells and water-quality data for 239 observation monitoring wells. These data represent that part of the National water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating State and Federal agencies in California.

Lamb, C.E.; Fogelman, R.P.; Grillo, D.A.

1989-01-01

372

Water Resources Data, California, Water Year 1989. Volume 5. Ground-Water Data  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Water resources data for the 1989 water year for California consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage and contents in lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality in weils. Volume 5 contains water levels for 1,037 observation wells and water-quality data for 254 monitoring wells. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperatine State and Federal agencies in California.

Lamb, C.E.; Johnson, J.A.; Fogelman, R.P.; Grillo, D.A.

1990-01-01

373

Water Resources Data for California, Water Year 1987. Volume 5. Ground-water Data for California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Water resources data for the 1987 water year for California consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage and contents in lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality in wells. Volume 5 contains water levels for 786 observation wells and water-quality data for 168 observation wells. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating State and Federal agencies in California.

Lamb, C.E.; Fogelman, R.P.; Grillo, D.A.

1989-01-01

374

North Dakota Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

North Dakota Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2008 North Dakota Water the activities of the North Dakota Water Resources Research Institute (NDWRRI) during the period of March 1, 2008 and Conservation Sciences program of North Dakota State University (NDSU), Natural Resources Management program

375

North Dakota Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

North Dakota Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2009 North Dakota Water the activities of the North Dakota Water Resources Research Institute (NDWRRI) during the period of March 1, 2009 and Conservation Sciences program of North Dakota State University (NDSU), Natural Resources Management program

376

North Dakota Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

North Dakota Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2010 North Dakota Water the activities of the North Dakota Water Resources Research Institute (NDWRRI) during the period of March 1, 2010 and Conservation Sciences program of North Dakota State University (NDSU), Natural Resources Management program

377

North Dakota Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

North Dakota Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2013 North Dakota Water the activities of the North Dakota Water Resources Research Institute (NDWRRI) during the period of March 1, 2013 and Conservation Sciences program of North Dakota State University (NDSU), Natural Resources Management program

378

North Dakota Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

North Dakota Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2011 North Dakota Water describes the activities of the North Dakota Water Resources Research Institute (NDWRRI) during the period with the Environmental and Conservation Sciences program of North Dakota State University (NDSU), Natural Resources

379

California Institute for Water Resources Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

California Institute for Water Resources Annual Technical Report FY 2013 California Institute for Water Resources Annual Technical Report FY 2013 1 #12;Introduction The California Institute for Water Resources (CIWR) is a special program within the University of California's (UC) Division of Agriculture

380

California Institute for Water Resources Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

California Institute for Water Resources Annual Technical Report FY 2012 California Institute for Water Resources Annual Technical Report FY 2012 1 #12;Introduction The California Institute for Water Resources (CIWR) is a special program within the University of California's Division of Agriculture

381

Maryland Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

Maryland Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2013 Maryland Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2013 1 #12;Introduction During Funding Year 2013, the Maryland With 104B funding, the Maryland Water Resources Research Center supported three new research projects

382

Water Resources Management Practicum 2005 Nelson Institute for Environmental Studies  

E-print Network

Water Resources Management Practicum 2005 Nelson Institute for Environmental Studies University Context 2006 #12;#12;Water Resources Management Practicum 2005 Nelson Institute for Environmental Studies/263-2741 (voice/TDD), for information and referral. The Water Resources Management Practicum is a regular part

Sheridan, Jennifer

383

Puerto Rico Water Resources and Environmental Research Institute  

E-print Network

Section 104 of the Water Resources Research Act of 1984, as Amended ANNOUNCEMENT 11HQPA0002 Revised Centre Avenue Fort Collins, CO 80525 or call 970-226-9445. #12;PUERTO RICO WATER RESOURCES under the provisions of section 104 of the Water Resources Research Act of 1984 (Public Law 98

Gilbes, Fernando

384

Idaho Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

Idaho Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2008 Idaho Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2008 1 #12;Introduction The Idaho Water Resources Research Institute (IWRRI) was created by the Idaho Legislature in 1963 and is administered by the University

385

New Jersey Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

New Jersey Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2006 #12;Introduction The New Jersey Water Resources Research Institute supports a diverse program of research projects-term investment in New Jersey water resource problems. With the latter (graduate students), the priority

386

Power and Water Resources Pooling Authority NOTICE OF SPECIAL MEETING  

E-print Network

Power and Water Resources Pooling Authority NOTICE OF SPECIAL MEETING Notice is hereby given that a special meeting of the Board of Directors of the Power and Water Resources Pooling Authority (PWRPA or service at least 3 days before the meeting. Requests should be sent to: Power and Water Resources Pooling

387

Vermont Water Resources and Lake Studies Center Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

Vermont Water Resources and Lake Studies Center Annual Technical Report FY 2006 #12;Introduction The Annual Report for the Vermont Water Resources and Lake Studies Center for FY2006 is attached. The grant In the 2006-2007 project year the Vermont Water Resources and Lake Studies Center entered into an exciting new

388

New Jersey Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

resources * train students at the undergraduate, graduate and postgraduate levels to become the next generation of water resource professional for NJ * facilitate the transfer of information from researchers and change on water resources VI. Socioeconomic and information transfer problems in water management

389

Kansas Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

Kansas Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2006 #12;Introduction The Kansas Water Resources Institute is part of a national network of water resource institutes in every/Geological Survey (USGS) and non-federal funds from state and other sources. KWRI is administered by the Kansas

390

Utah Center for Water Resources Research Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

Utah Center for Water Resources Research Annual Technical Report FY 2012 Utah Center for Water Resources Research Annual Technical Report FY 2012 1 #12;Introduction The Utah Center for Water Resources Research (UCWRR) is located at Utah State University (USU), the Land Grant University in Utah, as part

391

Utah Center for Water Resources Research Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

Utah Center for Water Resources Research Annual Technical Report FY 2013 Utah Center for Water Resources Research Annual Technical Report FY 2013 1 #12;Introduction The Utah Center for Water Resources Research (UCWRR) is located at Utah State University (USU), the Land Grant University in Utah, as part

392

Utah Center for Water Resources Research Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

Utah Center for Water Resources Research Annual Technical Report FY 2011 Utah Center for Water Resources Research Annual Technical Report FY 2011 1 #12;Introduction The Utah Center for Water Resources Research (UCWRR) is located at Utah State University (USU), the Land Grant University in Utah, as part

393

Mississippi Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

Mississippi Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2005 Introduction The FY 2005 Annual Technical Report for the Mississippi Water Resources Research Institute summarizes USGS in the South Atlantic-Gulf Region, Mississippi Water Resources Research Institute, Mississippi State University

394

Oklahoma Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

Oklahoma Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2012 Oklahoma Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2012 1 #12;Introduction During 2012 the Oklahoma Sciences and Natural Resources at Oklahoma State University (OSU). Together with the Water Research

395

Sustainable Water Resources in Semiarid Agroecosystems  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Developing sustainable water resources management in agroecosystems is difficult in semiarid regions with limited or sporadic water inputs and heavy reliance on irrigation. Sustainable water management needs to consider both water quantity and water quality. Conversion of natural ecosystems to rain-fed agroecosystems has increased groundwater recharge in many semiarid regions in Australia, SW US, and W. Africa; however, such changes are not sustainable because rising water tables may ultimately reach the land surface and direct evaporation would cause salinization, as found in dryland salinity in Australia. In addition, increased recharge mobilizes pre-existing salt reservoirs that accumulated in soil profiles over millennia since the previous glaciation in Australia and the SW US. Increased recharge can also mobilize pre-existing nutrient reservoirs to underlying aquifers or create new reservoirs from soil organic nitrogen as in SW US and W. Africa. It is much more difficult to develop sustainable water management in irrigated agroecosystems as shown by water table declines of up to 1 m/yr in the north China Plain and up to 1.4 m/yr in the US High Plains. In addition to mobilizing pre-existing salts, irrigation also adds salts and nutrients to the system through irrigation water and fertilizers as seen in the US High Plains and Rajasthan, India. Various approaches are being considered to make agricultural water management more sustainable. Approaches include switching from rain-fed to groundwater fed irrigated agriculture in the US High Plains to prevent water tables from reaching the land surface, proposed expansion of irrigation with fresh groundwater in west Africa to reduce water tables, deficit irrigation and rotation of irrigation with rain-fed agriculture to reduce overexploitation of aquifers in irrigated areas in the US High Plains and parts of India, improved timing of fertilizer applications to reduce leaching, and consideration of nutrients in irrigation water and from soil organic nitrogen in recommended fertilizer application rates in the US High Plains and W. Africa. Quantification of increased recharge under agroecosystems relative to natural ecosystems can be used to estimate the level of irrigation that can be supported sustainably. Deficit irrigation in parts of the US High Plains has resulted in incipient soil salinization because of insufficient water to flush salts through the system. Proposed programs to achieve sustainability need to consider tradeoffs between water quantity and water quality.

Reedy, R. C.; Favreau, G.; Gates, J. B.; Mukherjee, A.; Scanlon, B. R.; Zheng, C.

2009-12-01

396

Environmental resource document for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Volume 1  

SciTech Connect

This document contains information related to the environmental characterization of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The INEL is a major US Department of Energy facility in southeastern Idaho dedicated to nuclear research, waste management, environmental restoration, and other activities related to the development of technology. Environmental information covered in this document includes land, air, water, and ecological resources; socioeconomic characteristics and land use; and cultural, aesthetic, and scenic resources.

Irving, J.S.

1993-07-01

397

Training Resources Page 1 of 6 USGS Training Resources for Ground-Water Hydrology  

E-print Network

Training Resources Page 1 of 6 USGS Training Resources for Ground-Water Hydrology Resources listed include reports, videotapes, and self-study manuals. I. General 1. Heath, R.C., 1983, Basic ground-water for a beginning course in ground-water hydrology: part 1-- course participants: U.S. Geological Survey Open

Torgersen, Christian

398

Electric Power Engineering Educational Resources 1969-1970  

Microsoft Academic Search

This committee report covers results of a survey of electric power engineering educational resources at eighty-two ECPD (Engineers Council for Professional Development) accredited schools in the USA for the acedemic year 1969-1970. It includes a listing of faculty active during the subject year and their professional experience together with information on student enrollment and its composition. Also included is information

F. C. Fisher; L. S. Vanslyck; E. T. B. Gross; C. C. Mosher; H. B. Hamilton; J. R. Tudor

1972-01-01

399

Water resources inventory of northwest Florida  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Water resources of the 16 counties of the northwest Florida appear adequate unitl at least 2020. In the 4 westernmost counties, the sand-and-gravel aquifer and streams combined could provide 2,200 to 3,600 million gallons per day of water. Streams outside these counties could provide 5,600 million gallons per day. The Floridan aquifer could provide 220 million gallons per day. Generally, water of quality suitable for most purposes is available throughout the area, although water in smaller streams and in the sand-and-gravel aquifer is acidic and locally contains excessive iron. Water in the upper part of the Floridan aquifer is generally fresh, but saline at depth and in some coastal areas. The quantity of water available in the study area is about 8,020 to 9,420 million gallons per day and projected needs for the year 2020 range from 2,520 to 4,130 million gallons per day. ' Approximate method ' flood-prone area maps cover most of the area. (Woodard-USGS)

Dysart, J.E.; Pascale, C.A.; Trapp, Henry

1977-01-01

400

Water resources activities in Louisiana district, fiscal year 1985  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Water resources activities of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in Louisiana consist of collecting water resources data and conducting interpretive hydrologic investigations and research. The water resources data and the results of the interpretive investigations are published or released by either the USGS or by cooperating agencies. The USGS water resources activities in Louisiana for the 1985 fiscal year (October 1, 1984 to September 30, 1985) are described, including data collection and dissemination, water resources appraisals (interpretive studies) and research. (Lantz-PTT)

Herbert, R.A.; Ellsworth, E.A.

1985-01-01

401

ANALYTICAL CAPABILITY - ISOTOPE HYDROLOGY LABORATORY (WATER QUALITY MANAGEMENT BRANCH, WATER SUPPLY AND WATER RESOURCES DIVISION, NRMRL)  

EPA Science Inventory

The mission of NRMRL's Water Supply and Water Resources Division's Isotope Hydrology Laboratory is to resolve environmental hydrology problems through research and application of naturally occurring isotopes. Analytical capabilities at IHL include light stable isotope radio mass...

402

Accelerated Capacity Development in Water Resources Education: the experiences of the Ethiopian Institute of Water Resources  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Ethiopia recently recognises that the water resources development is the major entry point in poverty alleviation and sustainable development. Water in Ethiopia plays a key role in the Water-Energy-Food-nexus. Over 98% of the electricity in the country is generated using hydropower and yet about 2000 MW has been developed. Out of the 3.5 Mha potentially irrigable land, only 0.25 Mha has been developed to date. Access to drinking water supply coverage is among the lowest in the world. One of the limiting factors in harnessing the resource base is the absence of water professionals to face the fast growing demand in education, research, development in the water sector. Recognising this, in collaboration with University of Connecticut of the United States, Addis Ababa University launched the Ethiopian Institute of Water Resources (EIWR) by enrolling 18 PhD and 24 MSc students. The program is unique in that much of the course instructors are coming from US and European Universities, but deliver courses together with Ethiopian collaborators. This is supposed to facilitate knowledge and experience transfer from the US/EU scientist to Ethiopian counterparts. The theses/dissertations are designed to focus on Ethiopia's immediate hydrological problems on selected basins, and will be coordinated by three advisors for each PhD - one from US/EU, one from Ethiopian Universities, and one water professional from the sector. We report here the lessons learned in setting up the EIWR institute and the education program.

Alamirew, T.; Mekonnen, G.; Viglione, A.

2012-04-01

403

The Electronic Clearinghouse for Exemplary Engineering Technology Resources  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Electronic Clearinghouse for Exemplary Engineering Technology Resources (or NETEC) is a site created with substantial funding from the National Science Foundation. Drawing on the teaching experiences and resources developed by many concerned persons in industry and academic settings, the Clearinghouse contains everything from course materials for material engineering to journal articles that deal with the science (and art) of teaching in the subfields of engineering. First-time visitors may wish to register on the homepage, and then proceed to browse through the âÂÂClearinghouse Resourcesâ area. Here they can click on an alphabetized list of terms, such as digital electronics and skill standards, and look through the available materials. Of course, there is a great deal more available here than the very fine educational resources, as visitors can also look over online job boards and mentorship opportunities.

404

Mississippi Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

); this could include the development of vegetation management plans for drainage canal systems; and 3) Human and groundwater management, water quality management and water resources development, contaminant transportMississippi Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2012 Mississippi Water

405

Mississippi Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

); this could include the development of vegetation management plans for drainage canal systems; and 3) Human and groundwater management, water quality management and water resources development, contaminant transportMississippi Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2011 Mississippi Water

406

North Dakota Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

North Dakota Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2005 Introduction This report describes the activities of the North Dakota Water Resources Research Institute (NDWRRI) during water agencies in North Dakota: State Water Commission, State Department of Health, and the USGS North

407

Maryland Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

Maryland Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2012 Maryland Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2012 1 #12;Introduction During Funding Year 2012, the Maryland annual Maryland Water Symposium featured "Clean Water Connections: Law, History, Science & Communities

408

Mississippi Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

Mississippi Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2006 #12;Introduction The Mississippi Water Resources Research Institute (MWRRI) provides a statewide center of expertise in water organizations with tools to increase efficiency and effectiveness #12;Research Program The Mississippi Water

409

Oklahoma Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

Oklahoma Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2011 Oklahoma Water changes to the Oklahoma Water Resources Research Institute (OWRRI). OWRRI moved from the Division of the Vice President for Research at Oklahoma State University (OSU) to join the Water Research and Extension

410

Optimality versus stability in water resource allocation.  

PubMed

Water allocation is a growing concern in a developing world where limited resources like fresh water are in greater demand by more parties. Negotiations over allocations often involve multiple groups with disparate social, economic, and political status and needs, who are seeking a management solution for a wide range of demands. Optimization techniques for identifying the Pareto-optimal (social planner solution) to multi-criteria multi-participant problems are commonly implemented, although often reaching agreement for this solution is difficult. In negotiations with multiple-decision makers, parties who base decisions on individual rationality may find the social planner solution to be unfair, thus creating a need to evaluate the willingness to cooperate and practicality of a cooperative allocation solution, i.e., the solution's stability. This paper suggests seeking solutions for multi-participant resource allocation problems through an economics-based power index allocation method. This method can inform on allocation schemes that quantify a party's willingness to participate in a negotiation rather than opt for no agreement. Through comparison of the suggested method with a range of distance-based multi-criteria decision making rules, namely, least squares, MAXIMIN, MINIMAX, and compromise programming, this paper shows that optimality and stability can produce different allocation solutions. The mismatch between the socially-optimal alternative and the most stable alternative can potentially result in parties leaving the negotiation as they may be too dissatisfied with their resource share. This finding has important policy implications as it justifies why stakeholders may not accept the socially optimal solution in practice, and underlies the necessity of considering stability where it may be more appropriate to give up an unstable Pareto-optimal solution for an inferior stable one. Authors suggest assessing the stability of an allocation solution as an additional component to an analysis that seeks to distribute water in a negotiated process. PMID:24412983

Read, Laura; Madani, Kaveh; Inanloo, Bahareh

2014-01-15

411

Engineering aspects of water pollution control systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

The importance of proper engineering when providing pollution control systems is emphasized. Organization of engineering projects is described in detail. Included are discussions of: (1) collection and evaluation of available data; (2) establishment of survey and test program; (3) integration and evaluation of findings; (4) establishment of pollution control and water utilization systems; and (5) specification and detailed design preparation.

R. G. Dalbke; A. J. Turk

1967-01-01

412

Water Exploration: An Online High School Water Resource Education Program  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Institute for Geophysics at The University of Texas at Austin and 4empowerment.com, a Texas-based for-profit educational enterprise, teamed up with the Texas Water Development Board to develop and implement a Web-based water resources education program for Texas high school students. The program, Water Exploration uses a project-based learning approach called the Legacy Cycle model to permit students to conduct research and build an understanding about water science and critical water-related issues, using the Internet and computer technology. The three Legacy Cycle modules in the Water Exploration curriculum are: Water Basics, Water-Earth Dynamics and People Need Water. Within each Legacy Cycle there are three different challenges, or instructional modules, laid out as projects with clearly stated goals for students to carry out. Each challenge address themes that map to the water-related “Big Ideas” and supporting concepts found in the new Earth Science Literacy Principles: The Big Ideas and Supporting Concepts of Earth Science. As students work through a challenge they follow a series of steps, each of which is associated (i.e., linked online) with a manageable number of corresponding, high quality, research-based learning activities and Internet resources, including scholarly articles, cyber tools, and visualizations intended to enhance understanding of the concepts presented. The culmination of each challenge is a set of “Go Public” products that are the students’ answers to the challenge and which serve as the final assessment for the challenge. The “Go Public” products are posted to a collaborative workspace on the Internet as the “legacy” of the students’ work, thereby allowing subsequent groups of students who take the challenge to add new products. Twenty-two science educators have been trained on the implementation of the Water Exploration curriculum. A graduate student pursuing a master’s degree in science education through The University of Texas’ UTEACH program is conducting research to track the teachers’ implementation of Water Exploration and assess their comfort with cyber-education through classroom observations, students and teacher surveys, and evaluation of students’ “Go Public” products.

Ellins, K. K.; McCall, L. R.; Amos, S.; McGowan, R. F.; Mote, A.; Negrito, K.; Paloski, B.; Ryan, C.; Cameron, B.

2010-12-01

413

Water resources data, Maryland and Delaware, water year 2001, volume 2. ground-water data  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Water resources data for the 2001 water year for Maryland and Delaware consist of records of water levels and water quality of ground-water wells. This report (Volume 2. Ground-Water Data) contains water levels at 379 observation wells, discharge records for 5 springs, and water quality at 238 wells and 10 springs. Locations of ground-water level wells are shown on figures 5 and 6. Locations of groundwater- quality sites are shown on figure 7. The data in this report represent that part of the National Water Data System collected by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating State, local, and Federal agencies in Maryland and Delaware.

Smigaj, Michael J.; Saffer, Richard W.; Pentz, Robert H.; Marchand, Elizabeth H.

2002-01-01

414

Indiana Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

at Purdue University­the Purdue Water Community (http://www.purdue.edu/dp/water/about.php); (3) foster. In terms of web resources we have maintained the digital library of most of our back issues of water center

415

Understanding Water Conservation in Williamstown: Protecting a "Plentiful" Resource  

E-print Network

Understanding Water Conservation in Williamstown: Protecting a "Plentiful" Resource, an international organization committed to water conservation practice and advocacy, the global population tripled's quote embodies one of the greatest difficulties facing the contemporary movement for water conservation

Aalberts, Daniel P.

416

Integrated Water Resources Simulation Model for Rural Community  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The purpose of this study is to develop several water resources simulation models for residence houses, constructed wetlands and farms and then integrate these models for a rural community. Domestic and irrigation water uses are the major water demand in rural community. To build up a model estimating domestic water demand for residence houses, the average water use per person per day should be accounted first, including water uses of kitchen, bathroom, toilet and laundry. On the other hand, rice is the major crop in the study region, and its productive efficiency sometimes depends on the quantity of irrigation water. The water demand can be estimated by crop water use, field leakage and water distribution loss. Irrigation water comes from rainfall, water supply system and reclaimed water which treated by constructed wetland. In recent years, constructed wetlands play an important role in water resources recycle. They can purify domestic wastewater for water recycling and reuse. After treating from constructed wetlands, the reclaimed water can be reused in washing toilets, watering gardens and irrigating farms. Constructed wetland is one of highly economic benefits for treating wastewater through imitating the processing mechanism of natural wetlands. In general, the treatment efficiency of constructed wetlands is determined by evapotranspiration, inflow, and water temperature. This study uses system dynamics modeling to develop models for different water resource components in a rural community. Furthermore, these models are integrated into a whole system. The model not only is utilized to simulate how water moves through different components, including residence houses, constructed wetlands and farms, but also evaluates the efficiency of water use. By analyzing the flow of water, the water resource simulation model can optimizes water resource distribution under different scenarios, and the result can provide suggestions for designing water resource system of a rural community. Keywords: Water Resources, Simulation Model, Domestic Water, Irrigation, Constructed Wetland, Rural Community

Li, Y.-H.; Liao, W.-T.; Tung, C.-P.

2012-04-01

417

18 CFR 701.3 - Purpose of the Water Resources Council.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Purpose of the Water Resources Council. 701.3 Section 701.3 Conservation of Power and Water Resources WATER RESOURCES COUNCIL COUNCIL...

2014-04-01

418

Pennsylvania Water Resources Research Center, Penn State Institutes of Energy and the  

E-print Network

Pennsylvania Water Resources Research Center, Penn State Institutes of Energy and the Environment Annual Technical Report FY 2009 Pennsylvania Water Resources Research Center, Penn State Institutes's 54 water resources research institutes, the Pennsylvania Water Resources Research Center (PA

419

Computing Resources at Chemical and Biochemical Engineering  

E-print Network

) consists of 18 Windows NT Workstations and is primarily reserved for classroom use for Chemical Engineering undergraduates. To obtain a departmental Windows NT user account, see Getting and using computer accounts

420

Indiana Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

, and wildlife ecology; Respond to public interest in the conservation, development, and use of water resources Department of Environmental Management, the Department of Natural Resources and other state groupsIndiana Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2004 Introduction Report

421

North Dakota Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

and Conservation Sciences program of North Dakota State University (NDSU), Natural Resources Management programNorth Dakota Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2012 North Dakota Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2012 1 #12;Introduction This report describes

422

Kansas Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

Kansas Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2000 Introduction The Kansas Water Resources Research Institute (KWRRI) is managed by Kansas State University. Within K-State, KWRRI is administratively under the Kansas Center for Agricultural Resources and the Environment (KCARE). Dr. Bill Hargrove

423

VIRTUAL WATER: A FRAMEWORK FOR COMPARATIVE REGIONAL RESOURCE ASSESSMENT  

Microsoft Academic Search

New developments in water resource allocation techniques range from local management of green water to international trade in water. A further extension of this is through the virtual water concept, which is the water required to produce a crop or product. The virtual water content of many products is now available at a national and global scale. While these calculations

EMILY KATE SCHENDEL; JENNIFER R. MACDONALD; HANS SCHREIER; LES M. LAVKULICH

2007-01-01

424

Water Woes - An Engineering Design Challenge  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This Engineering Design Challenge is intended to help students apply the concepts of evaporation and condensation from SC.3.P.9.1 as they build devices to evaporate salt water and collect the condensation for drinking water. It is not intended as an initial introduction to this benchmark."

Mentillo, Holly

2012-07-31

425

Integration of hydrogeology and soil science for sustainable water resources-focus on water quantity  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Increased biofuel production has heightened awareness of the strong linkages between crop water use and depletion of water resources. Irrigated agriculture consumed 90% of global fresh water resources during the past century. Addressing crop water use and depletion of groundwater resources requires ...

426

Total Water Management: The New Paradigm for Urban Water Resources Planning  

EPA Science Inventory

There is a growing need for urban water managers to take a more holistic view of their water resource systems as population growth, urbanization, and current resource management practices put different stresses on local water resources and urban infrastructure. Total Water Manag...

427

Engineering Water Analysis Laboratory Activity.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purposes of water treatment in a marine steam power plant are to prevent damage to boilers, steam-operated equipment, and steam and condensate lives, and to keep all equipment operating at the highest level of efficiency. This laboratory exercise is designed to provide students with experiences in making accurate boiler water tests and to…

Schlenker, Richard M.

428

Water resources management: case study of Sharkia governorate, Egypt  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Ministry of water resources and irrigation in Egypt is currently implementing projects that expand new cultivated area, and accordingly the supplies of Nile River to the Nile Delta will be negatively affected. So, Enormous interest toward water resources management has been taken in the Egyptian water sector. Conveyance infrastructure and irrigation technology has been gradually improved to ensure efficient distribution and utilization of scarce water resources. The present study is focused on the optimum utilization of water resources in Sharkia governorate, Egypt. Operational and planning distribution model is implemented on the selected case study (Sharkia governorate) to develop appropriate water plan. The gross revenue of all crops is correlated to surface water discharge, ground water discharge, surface water salinity, and ground water salinity. In addition, the effect of varying both surface and groundwater quantities and qualities on the gross revenue has been investigated. Moreover, the effect of limiting rice production on the gross revenue is allocated.

Mohamed, Y. A.; Rashad, M.

2012-06-01

429

North Dakota Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

North Dakota Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2007 North Dakota Water the activities of the North Dakota Water Resources Research Institute (NDWRRI) during the period of March 1, 2007 with the Environmental and Conservation Sciences program of North Dakota State University (NDSU), Energy

430

Forest Influences on Climate and Water Resources at the Landscape  

E-print Network

Chapter 15 Forest Influences on Climate and Water Resources at the Landscape to Regional Scale Ge regional climate and water resources is lacking. The studies on climate-forests feedbacks have received is to provide an in-depth examination of forest-climate-water interactions by synthe- sizing recent scientific

Phipps, Steven J.

431

Water Resources Research Institute of the University of North Carolina  

E-print Network

Water Resources Research Institute of the University of North Carolina Annual Technical Report FY 2000 Introduction SUMMARY The North Carolina Water Resources Research Institute program for 2000-2001 (Federal Fiscal Year 2000) continued to focus on three broad areas of concern: surface waters, groundwater

432

New Jersey Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

New Jersey Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2011 New Jersey Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2011 1 #12;Introduction The New Jersey Water (Lithobates clamitans) as a biological indicator of risk near Superfund sites in New Jersey. Her research

Hanson, Stephen José

433

New Jersey Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

New Jersey Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2007 New Jersey Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2007 1 #12;Introduction The New Jersey Water of northern New Jersey. The goal of our information transfer program is to bring timely information about

434

New Jersey Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

New Jersey Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2009 New Jersey Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2009 1 #12;Introduction The New Jersey Water decontamination. However, this project ended early when the PI moved to a university outside of New Jersey

435

New Jersey Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

New Jersey Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2010 New Jersey Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2010 1 #12;Introduction The New Jersey Water-penetrating radar, to evaluate near-surface geology influencing local hydrology within canopy gaps in the New Jersey

436

New Jersey Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

New Jersey Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2008 New Jersey Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2008 1 #12;Introduction The New Jersey Water analytical technique to determine the source of fine-grained sediments in New Jersey streams. Galster

437

New Jersey Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

New Jersey Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2012 New Jersey Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2012 1 #12;Introduction The New Jersey Water occurring in New Jersey. The program continues to develop the NJWRRI website (www

438

Pennsylvania Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

Pennsylvania Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2012 Pennsylvania Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2012 1 #12;Introduction The Pennsylvania Water at the Pennsylvania State University. There, PA-WRRC resides within the Penn State Institutes of Energy

439

Pennsylvania Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

Pennsylvania Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2013 Pennsylvania Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2013 1 #12;Introduction The Pennsylvania Water of the Pennsylvania State University, the primary land-grant University within Pennsylvania. The Center resides

440

Pennsylvania Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

Pennsylvania Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2011 Pennsylvania Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2011 1 #12;Introduction The Pennsylvania Water at the Pennsylvania State University. There, PAWRRC resides within the Penn State Institutes of Energy

441

Vermont Water Resources and Lake Studies Center Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

Vermont Water Resources and Lake Studies Center Annual Technical Report FY 2000 Introduction Attached is the Fiscal Year 2000 Annual Report for the Vermont Water Resources and Lake Studies Center Buffers: Reducing Fecal Contamination of Vermont Surface Waters Project Number: B-03 Start Date: 3

442

New Mexico Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

New Mexico Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2012 New Mexico Water is based on a July-June fiscal year rather than the March-February USGS Grant Award period. The New Mexico Water Resources Research Institute (NMWRRI) was established in 1963 by the New Mexico State University

443

New Mexico Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

New Mexico Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2013 New Mexico Water is based on a July-June fiscal year rather than the March-February USGS Grant Award period. The New Mexico Water Resources Research Institute (NM WRRI) was established in 1963 by the New Mexico State University

444

New Mexico Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

New Mexico Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2011 New Mexico Water is based on a July-June fiscal year rather than the March-February USGS Grant Award period. The New Mexico Water Resources Research Institute (NMWRRI) was established in 1963 by the New Mexico State University

445

Kansas Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

Kansas Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2001 Introduction Roles in Kansas as a major institution to go to for water resources research Competitive Grants Process August 1. The Administrative Council (see Governance below) meets to discuss the output from the Water and the Future of Kansas

446

Kansas Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

Kansas Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2002 Introduction Research, and other federal sources > Be recognized in Kansas as a major institution to go to for water resources to discuss the output from the Water and the Future of Kansas Conference and to develop the prioritized list

447

Tennessee Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

Tennessee Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2006 #12;Introduction Water Resources Issues and Problems of Tennessee Tennessee is fortunate to have what many consider to be an abundant and good quality water supply. Historically, federal government agencies, such as the Tennessee

448

Tennessee Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

Tennessee Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2004 Introduction Water Resources Issues and Problems of Tennessee Tennessee is fortunate to have what many consider to be an abundant and good quality water supply. Historically, federal government agencies, such as the Tennessee

449

Tennessee Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

Tennessee Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2013 Tennessee Water Resources and Problems of Tennessee Tennessee is fortunate to have what many consider to be an abundant and good quality water supply. Historically, federal government agencies, such as the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA

450

Tennessee Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

Tennessee Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2003 Introduction Water Resources Issues and Problems of Tennessee Tennessee is fortunate to have what many consider to be an abundant and good quality water supply. Historically, federal government agencies, such as the Tennessee

451

Tennessee Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

Tennessee Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2002 Introduction Water Resources Issues and Problems of Tennessee Tennessee is fortunate to have what many consider to be an abundant and good quality water supply. Historically, federal government agencies, such as the Tennessee

452

Tennessee Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

Tennessee Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2001 Introduction Water Resources Issues and Problems of Tennessee Tennessee is fortunate to have what many consider to be an abundant and good quality water supply. Historically, federal government agencies, such as the Tennessee

453

Tennessee Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

Tennessee Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2011 Tennessee Water Resources and Problems of Tennessee Tennessee is fortunate to have what many consider to be an abundant and good quality water supply. Historically, federal government agencies, such as the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA

454

Tennessee Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

Tennessee Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2010 Tennessee Water Resources and Problems of Tennessee Tennessee is fortunate to have what many consider to be an abundant and good quality water supply. Historically, federal government agencies, such as the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA

455

Tennessee Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

Tennessee Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2005 Introduction Water Resources Issues and Problems of Tennessee Tennessee is fortunate to have what many consider to be an abundant and good quality water supply. Historically, federal government agencies, such as the Tennessee

456

Tennessee Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

Tennessee Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 1999 Introduction Water Resources Issues and Problems of Tennessee Tennessee is fortunate to have what many consider to be an abundant and good quality water supply. Historically, federal government agencies, such as the Tennessee

457

Tennessee Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

Tennessee Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2012 Tennessee Water Resources and Problems of Tennessee Tennessee is fortunate to have what many consider to be an abundant and good quality water supply. Historically, federal government agencies, such as the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA

458

Louisiana Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

a comprehensive approach to water resource issues that are related to state and regional needs. Louisiana is the water state; no other state has so much of its cultural and economic life involved with water resource-point source pollution, and hydrologic modeling. The research program has two components. One component

459

Policy implications of climate change impacts on water resources management  

Microsoft Academic Search

Policy makers and water resources managers should be aware of the evolving information on climate change impacts as an activity that is preparatory, but not central, to sound decision making on current water resources management actions. Policies that ensure effective contemporary water management will form the core of a “no regrets” strategy that will contemporaneously serve adaptation to climate change

E. Z. Stakhiv

1998-01-01

460

Oklahoma Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

Oklahoma Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2007 Oklahoma Water Institute at Oklahoma State University was renamed the Institute for Sustainable Environments, or ISE. The Oklahoma Water Resources Research Institute (OWRRI) is located within the ISE and is responsible

461

Water resources by orbital remote sensing: Examples of applications  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Selected applications of orbital remote sensing to water resources undertaken by INPE are described. General specifications of Earth application satellites and technical characteristics of LANDSAT 1, 2, 3, and 4 subsystems are described. Spatial, temporal and spectral image attributes of water as well as methods of image analysis for applications to water resources are discussed. Selected examples are referred to flood monitoring, analysis of water suspended sediments, spatial distribution of pollutants, inventory of surface water bodies and mapping of alluvial aquifers.

Martini, P. R. (principal investigator)

1984-01-01

462

Bibliography of selected water-resources publications by the U.S. Geological Survey for North Carolina, 1886-1995  

USGS Publications Warehouse

More than 660 selected publications, written by scientists, engineers, and technicians of the U.S. Geological Survey during the period 1886-1995, compose the bulk of information about North Carolina?s water resources. The bibliography includes interpretive reports on water resources, ground water, surface water, water quality, and public-water supply and water use, as well as data reports on the same subjects. The interpretive reports are organized by geographic areas of the State. These areas include statewide, physiographic province, major river basin, and county. The data reports are listed by water-resource topic, and the introduction to each topic provides historical notes for data-collection and publication activities. Summary tables list Water-Supply Paper numbers for reports containing ground-water, surface-water, and water-quality data by calendar year or water year. A concluding section discusses the availability of U.S. Geological Survey publications.

Winner, M.D., Jr.

1996-01-01

463

Water resources data Texas, water year 2004, volume 6. ground water  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Water-resources data for the 2004 water year for Texas consists of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage and contents in lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality in wells. Volume 6 contains water levels for 913 groundwater observation wells and water-quality data for 150 monitoring wells. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating Federal, State, and local agencies in Texas.

Barbie, Dana L.; Reece, Brian D.; Eames, Deanna R.

2005-01-01

464

Current perspectives in contaminant hydrology and water resources sustainability  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Human society depends on liquid freshwater resources to meet drinking, sanitation and hygiene, agriculture, and industry needs. Improved resource monitoring and better understanding of the anthropogenic threats to freshwater environments are critical to efficient management of freshwater resources and ultimately to the survival and quality of life of the global human population. This book helps address the need for improved freshwater resource monitoring and threat assessment by presenting current reviews and case studies focused on the fate and transport of contaminants in the environment and on the sustainability of groundwater and surface-water resources around the world. It is intended for students and professionals working in hydrology and water resources management.

Bradley, Paul M.

2013-01-01

465

Multidimensional Simulation Applied to Water Resources Management  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A framework for an integrated decision aiding simulation (IDEAS) methodology using numerical, linguistic, and pictorial entities and operations is introduced. IDEAS relies upon traditional numerical formulations, logical rules to handle linguistic entities with linguistic values, and a set of pictorial operations. Pictorial entities are defined by their shape, size, color, and position. Pictorial operators include reproduction (copy of a pictorial entity), mutation (expansion, rotation, translation, change in color), fertile encounters (intersection, reunion), and sterile encounters (absorption). Interaction between numerical, linguistic, and pictorial entities is handled through logical rules or a simplified vector calculus operation. This approach is shown to be applicable to various environmental and water resources management analyses using a model to assess the impacts of an oil spill. Future developments, including IDEAS implementation on parallel processing machines, are also discussed.

Camara, A. S.; Ferreira, F. C.; Loucks, D. P.; Seixas, M. J.

1990-09-01

466

Fuzzy Comprehensive Evaluation for Carrying Capacity of Regional Water Resources  

Microsoft Academic Search

Evaluation of regional water resources capacity provides a scientific basis for further water resources utilization and social\\u000a economic sustainable development. This paper mainly studied on the case of Lanzhou City located in the western China. By using\\u000a the method of fuzzy comprehensive evaluation and basing on the historical datum of 40 years, this paper evaluated the current\\u000a situation of water resource

Li Gong; Chunling Jin

2009-01-01

467

Environmental Tracers for Determining Water Resource Vulnerability to Climate Change  

SciTech Connect

Predicted changes in the climate will have profound impacts on water availability in the Western US, but large uncertainties exist in our ability to predict how natural and engineered hydrological systems will respond. Most predictions suggest that the impacts of climate change on California water resources are likely to include a decrease in the percentage of precipitation that falls as snow, earlier onset of snow-pack melting, and an increase in the number of rain on snow events. These processes will require changes in infrastructure for water storage and flood control, since much of our current water supply system is built around the storage of winter precipitation as mountain snow pack. Alpine aquifers play a critical role by storing and releasing snowmelt as baseflow to streams long after seasonal precipitation and the disappearance of the snow pack, and in this manner significantly impact the stream flow that drives our water distribution systems. Mountain groundwater recharge and, in particular, the contribution of snowmelt to recharge and baseflow, has been identified as a potentially significant effect missing from current climate change impact studies. The goal of this work is to understand the behavior of critical hydrologic systems, with an emphasis on providing ground truth for next generation models of climate-water system interactions by implementing LLNL capabilities in environmental tracer and isotopic science. We are using noble gas concentrations and multiple isotopic tracers ({sup 3}H/{sup 3}He, {sup 35}S, {sup 222}Rn, {sup 2}H/{sup 1}H, {sup 18}O/{sup 16}O, and {sup 13}C/{sup 12}C) in groundwater and stream water in a small alpine catchment to (1) provide a snapshot of temperature, altitude, and physical processes at the time of recharge, (2) determine subsurface residence times (over time scales ranging from months to decades) of different groundwater age components, and (3) deconvolve the contribution of these different groundwater components to alpine stream baseflow. This research is showing that groundwater in alpine areas spends between a few years to several decades in the saturated zone below the surface, before feeding into streams or being pumped for use. This lag time may act to reduce the impact on water resources from extreme wet or dry years. Furthermore, our measurements show that the temperature of water when it reaches the water table during recharge is 4 to 9 degrees higher than would be expected for direct influx of snowmelt, and that recharge likely occurs over diffuse vegetated areas, rather than along exposed rock faces and fractures. These discoveries have implications for how alpine basins will respond to climate effects that lead to more rain than snow and earlier snow pack melting.

Singleton, M

2009-07-08

468

What can I do with a degree in Natural Resources Engineering?  

E-print Network

technology for the sustainable development, management and conservation of our natural resources .' WhereWhat can I do with a degree in Natural Resources Engineering? ENGINEERING Planning your career to www.canterbury.ac.nz/liaison/best_prep.shtml What is Natural Resources Engineering? Natural resources

Hickman, Mark

469

Internet resources for phenotyping engineered rodents.  

PubMed

Genetically engineered mice (GEM) and rats (GER) have emerged as the main mammalian models for investigating normal (physiological, or "health") and abnormal (patho-logical, or "disease") mechanisms. Regardless of the genetic manipulation, novel GEM and GER must undergo meticulous genotypic and phenotypic analyses before it is possible to predict the significance of the engineered gene with re-spect to health and disease, especially when the desire is to extrapolate the findings to humans. Numerous websites have been generated to give researchers additional tools to facilitate genotyping and phenotyping. This list of many extant sites with descriptions of their basic features provides a starting point for new and established scientists faced with the need to characterize a new GEM or GER model. PMID:16547373

Bolon, Brad

2006-01-01

470

Colorado Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

Colorado Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2000 Introduction As water managers work to solve the integrated water problems facing Colorado today, the dimensions of each issue demand a better understanding of basic water science, technology and policy. Whether water managers work

471

Puerto Rico Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

of pollution that make waters fail to meet state water quality standards, and to develop Water Cleanup Plans to address those pollutants. The Water Cleanup Plan (TMDL) establishes limits on pollutants that canPuerto Rico Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2005 Introduction

472

Puerto Rico Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

of pollution that make waters fail to meet state water quality standards, and to develop Water Cleanup Plans to address those pollutants. The Water Cleanup Plan (TMDL) establishes limits on pollutants that canPuerto Rico Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2004 Introduction

473

Increasing Awareness of Sustainable Water Management for Future Civil Engineers  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

There are more than 1.2 billion people around the world that do not have access to drinking water. While there are plans under the United Nations Millennium Development Goals to halve this number by 2015, there are a number of regions that will be exposed to water scarcity in the coming future. Providing sufficient water for future development is a great challenge for planners and designers of water supply systems. In order to design sustainable water supplies for the future, it is important to learn how people consume water and how water consumption can be reduced. The education of future civil engineers should take into account not only technical aspects of the water supply but also the accompanying social and economical issues, and appreciated the strengths and weaknesses of traditional solutions. The Faculty of Civil Engineering, at the University of Rijeka, has begun incorporating a series of activities that engage undergraduate students and the local community to develop a mutual understanding of the future needs for sustainable management. We present one of the activities, collaboration with the Lancaster Environment Centre at Lancaster University in the UK through the field course Water and environmental management in Mediterranean context. The course, which is designed for the Lancaster University geography students, features a combination of field trips and visits to provide an understanding of the socio-economic and environmental context of water management in two counties (Istra and Primorsko-Goranska). Students from Lancaster visit the Croatian water authority and a regional water company, where they learn about current management practices and problems in managing water supplies and demand through the year. They make their own observations of current management practices in the field and learn about water consumption from the end users. One day field visit to a village in the area that is still not connected to the main water supply system is organised together with civil engineering students from the University of Rijeka. The aims of this field visit are: to learn about traditional water supply from an underground storage of rain water called cisterna; and to find out from inhabitants about their current water usage habits and expectations, and how these might change when they get water from the main water supply system. This joint activity has been beneficial for both groups of students. The engineering students become aware of the importance of the social aspects in designing the water supply system, while the geography students learn about the engineering challenges entailed. Both groups learn that water consumption increases with the provision of water through pipeline systems and that this needs to be taken into account in the design of water supply and management of water resources. Importantly, they learn the benefits of traditional sustainable water supply methods, which could be implemented as primary or additional sources of water supply in other areas.In summary, both groups of students develop their professional knowledge and skills as well as generic and transferable skills, which are very important for those who will continue to a career in the design and management of water systems.

Ilic, Suzana; Karleusa, Barbara; Deluka-Tibljas, Aleksandra

2010-05-01

474

Water Center & School of Natural Resources Spring 2011 Water Seminar Series  

E-print Network

Water Center & School of Natural Resources Spring 2011 Water Seminar Series University University 27 Integrating Water and Vegetation to Transform Our Cities Water Supply and Higher Education in the Czech Republic: Lessons Learned

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

475

Water for the Nation: An overview of the USGS Water Resources Division  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Water Resources Division (WRD) of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) provides reliable, impartial, timely information needed to understand the Nation's water resources. WRD actively promotes the use of this information by decisionmakers to: * Minimize the loss of life and property as a result of water-related hazards such as floods, droughts, and land movement. * Effectively manage ground-water and surface-water resources for domestic, agricultural, commercial, industrial, recreational, and ecological uses. * Protect and enhance water resources for human health, aquatic health, and environmental quality. * Contribute to wise physical and economic development of the Nation's resources for the benefit of present and future generations.

U.S. Geological Survey

1998-01-01

476

Pennsylvania Water Resources Research Center, Penn State Institutes of Energy and the  

E-print Network

Pennsylvania Water Resources Research Center, Penn State Institutes of Energy and the Environment Annual Technical Report FY 2010 Pennsylvania Water Resources Research Center, Penn State Institutes resources research institutes, the Pennsylvania Water Resources Research Center (PA-WRRC) emphasizes

477

http://www.cemr.wvu.edu/freshman UPDATED 12/15/2010 COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING AND MINERAL RESOURCES FRESHMAN ENGINEERING  

E-print Network

http://www.cemr.wvu.edu/freshman UPDATED 12/15/2010 COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING AND MINERAL RESOURCES ­ FRESHMAN ENGINEERING STUDY LAB POLICY SPRING 2011 The College of Engineering and Mineral Resources (CEMR, and Engineering courses, students need more structure to develop good study skills, and students learn as much

Mohaghegh, Shahab

478

1 UCOWRWATER RESOURCES UPDATE UNIVERSITIES COUNCIL ON WATER RESOURCES  

E-print Network

126, PAGES 1-10, NOVEMBER 2003 Non-Point Source Pollution and the Clean Water Act: Policy Problem protection of water quality from point-source (PS), NPS, and ground-water pollution. However By the late 1980s, early efforts to reduce water pollution from PSs (e.g. industries and sewage treatment

James, L. Allan

479

USEPA?s Water Resource Adaptation Program (WRAP) ? Drinking Water Research and Global Climate Change  

EPA Science Inventory

The Water Resource Adaptation Program (WRAP) contributes to EPA?s efforts to provide water resource managers and decision makers with the tools they need to adapt water resources (e.g., watersheds and infrastructure) to future climate change and demographic and economic developme...

480

Water resources data, Maryland and Delaware, water year 1997, volume 2. ground-water data  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Water Resources Division of the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with State agencies, obtains a large amount of data pertaining to the water resources of Maryland and Delaware each water year. These data, accumulated during many water years, constitute a valuable data base for developing an improved understanding of the water resources of the State. To make these data readily available to interested parties outside the U.S. Geological Survey, the data are published annually in this report series entitled 'Water Resources Data - Maryland and Delaware.' This series of annual reports for Maryland and Delaware began with the 1961 water year with a report that contained only data relating to the quantities of surface water. For the 1964 water year, a similar report was introduced that contained only data relating to water quality. Beginning with the l975 water year, the report format was changed to present, in one volume, data on quantities of surface water, quality of surface and ground water, and ground-water levels. In the 1989 water year, the report format was changed to two volumes. Both volumes contained data on quantities of surface water, quality of surface and ground water, and ground-water levels. Volume 1 contained data on the Atlantic Slope Basins (Delaware River thru Patuxent River) and Volume 2 contained data on the Monongahela and Potomac River basins. Beginning with the 1991 water year, Volume 1 contains all information on quantities of surface water and surface- water-quality data and Volume 2 contains ground-water levels and ground-water-quality data. This report is Volume 2 in our 1998 series and includes records of water levels and water quality of ground-water wells and springs. It contains records for water levels at 397 observation wells, discharge data for 6 springs, and water quality at 107 wells. Location of ground-water level wells are shown on figures 3 and 4. The location for the ground-water-quality sites are shown on figures 5. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System collected by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating State and Federal agencies in Maryland and Delaware. Prior to introduction of this series and for several water years concurrent with it, water resources data for Maryland and Delaware were published in U.S. Geological Survey Water-Supply Papers. Data on water levels for the 1935 through 1974 water years were published under the title 'Ground-Water Levels in the United States.' The above mentioned Water-Supply Papers may be consulted in the libraries of the principal cities of the United States and may be purchased from the Branch of Information Services, Federal Center, Bldg. 41, Box 25286, Denver, CO 80225-0286. Publications similar to this report are published annually by the Geological Survey for all States. These official Survey reports have an identification number consisting of the two-letter State abbreviation, the last two digits of the water year, and the volume number. For example, this volume is identified as 'U.S. Geological Survey Water-Data Report MD-DE-98-2.' For archiving and general distribution, the reports for l971- 74 water years also are identified as water data reports. These water-data reports are for sale in paper copy or in microfiche by the National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, Springfield, VA 22161. Additional information, including current prices, for ordering specific reports may be obtained from the District Chief at the address given on the back of the title page or by telephone (410)238-4200.

Smigaj, Michael J.; Saffer, Richard W.; Starsoneck, Roger J.; Tegeler, Judith L.

1998-01-01

481

Indiana Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

University­the Purdue Water Community (http://www.purdue.edu/dp/water/about.php); (3) foster a research of number of grant proposals including a record number of 104g submissions. In terms of web resources we

482

Coupling Groundwater Modeling with Biology to Identify Strategic Water Resources  

E-print Network

Coupling Groundwater Modeling with Biology to Identify Strategic Water Resources Didier Graillot 1 ABSTRACT The identification of hydraulic interactions between rivers and groundwater is part and parcel hinders groundwater modeling everywhere and simulating water management scenarios in every place

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

483

Analysis of U.S. Water Resources under Climate Change  

E-print Network

The MIT Integrated Global System Model (IGSM) framework, extended to include a Water Resource System (WRS) component, is applied to an integrated assessment of effects of alternative climate policy scenarios on U.S. water ...

Blanc, E.

484

WATER RESOURCES DATA--STATE, 2005 1 DEFINITION OF TERMS  

E-print Network

such as algae, water level, and precipitation are used in their common everyday meanings, definitions of whichWATER RESOURCES DATA--STATE, 2005 1 DEFINITION OF TERMS Specialized technical terms related

Torgersen, Christian

485

Summary Statistics on Academic Science/Engineering Resources - Early Release.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The data presented in this summary (released in advance of their publication) are derived from four surveys of academic science and engineering (S/E) activities conducted anually by the National Science Foundation's Division of Science Resources Studies, Universities, and Nonprofit Institutions Studies Groups: (1) Survey of Scientific and…

1985

486

Wentworth Institute Resource Guide for Mechanical Engineering Laboratory Manual.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This publication is a resource guide designed primarly as an aid to the instructor. All of the experiments contained in the Mechanical Engineering Laboratory Manual have been successfully completed under laboratory conditions by both staff and students. The results of these experiments have been computed and are presented in this publication. The…

Avakian, Harry; And Others

487

Availability and historical development of ground-water resources on Long Island, New York: An introduction. Water Resources Investigation  

SciTech Connect

The report explains the scientific aspects of Long Island's ground-water resources, summarizes much of the information obtained during the more than 45 years of the U.S. Geological Survey's study of Long Island's ground-water system, and describes the causes of four selected ground-water-contamination problems and the management responses. The first two sections introduce the basic principles of ground-water occurrence and describe some techniques used to obtain information on this resource. The third section describes the physical characteristics of the Long Island ground-water system, and the fourth section describes the development of Long Island's ground-water resources since the time of the earliest European settlers. The fifth section presents four historic examples of problems that have developed to illustrate the variety of threats to the island's ground-water resources and how management, through a scientific understanding of the resource, has addressed such problems.

Nemickas, B.; Mallard, G.E.; Reilly, T.E.

1990-01-01

488

Water You Engineering? An Activity to Develop Water-Quality Awareness  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Water is one of our most precious resources. However, for many in the United States, having fresh, safe drinking water is taken for granted, and due to this perceived lack of relevance, students may not fully appreciate the luxury of having safe running water--in the home. One approach to resolving water-quality issues in the United States may reside in providing education that presents accurate information in a meaningful way. Accordingly, this article describes a unit designed to emphasize the importance of water-quality testing and purification and to introduce students to local water-quality issues. The engineering-based module of this eighth-grade science activity is particularly important due to the design-build-test component.

Todd, Carrie D.; Riskowski, Jody

2009-04-01

489

Talking sustainability: Federal intiatives target major water resources concerns  

E-print Network

Talking sustainability Federal initiatives target major water resources concerns Story by Leslie Lee txH2O | pg. 12 Federal initiatives are large-scale projects, often encompassing multiple counties, regions, or states, made possible... on ground- water resources; assessing the interrelationships with future climate forecasts, cropping patterns, and water-use policies and regulations; developing and evaluating water- saving technologies for agricul- tural industries; and estimating...

Lee, Leslie

2010-01-01

490

An ARS Retiree Looks at USDA Water Resource Programs  

Microsoft Academic Search

ARS scientists and engineers have been developing natural resource models to assist action agencies with programs to manage and rectify environmental concerns at various time and spatial scales. Past efforts are reviewed and comments offered on future needs.

Kenneth G. Renard

491

Community Education for Participation in Water Resource Planning  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The School of Natural Resources and the Institute for Social Research at the University of Michigan aided the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers in promoting public education about, and participation in, the Susquehanna River Basin Project. (SE)

Wenrich, J. William; and others

1969-01-01

492

U.S. Geological Survey - Water Resources of Virginia  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Users can access information on Virginia water resources, including real-time streamflow and ground water data, water quality data, and water use data. Interactive streamflow and groundwater level maps allow the user to locate recent data on stream discharge, gage height,and water level. Annual surface water and ground water reports are available from 1995. Other materials include information on the Chesapeake Bay river input monitoring program, links to U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) publications and information on USGS projects in Virginia; and links to USGS outreach and educational resources. Weather information is also available.

493

Multi-agent Water Resources Management  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Increasing environmental awareness and emerging trends such as water trading, energy market, deregulation and democratization of water-related services are challenging integrated water resources planning and management worldwide. The traditional approach to water management design based on sector-by-sector optimization has to be reshaped to account for multiple interrelated decision-makers and many stakeholders with increasing decision power. Centralized management, though interesting from a conceptual point of view, is unfeasible in most of the modern social and institutional contexts, and often economically inefficient. Coordinated management, where different actors interact within a full open trust exchange paradigm under some institutional supervision is a promising alternative to the ideal centralized solution and the actual uncoordinated practices. This is a significant issue in most of the Southern Alps regulated lakes, where upstream hydropower reservoirs maximize their benefit independently form downstream users; it becomes even more relevant in the case of transboundary systems, where water management upstream affects water availability downstream (e.g. the River Zambesi flowing through Zambia, Zimbabwe and Mozambique or the Red River flowing from South-Western China through Northern Vietnam. In this study we apply Multi-Agent Systems (MAS) theory to design an optimal management in a decentralized way, considering a set of multiple autonomous agents acting in the same environment and taking into account the pay-off of individual water users, which are inherently distributed along the river and need to coordinate to jointly reach their objectives. In this way each real-world actor, representing the decision-making entity (e.g. the operator of a reservoir or a diversion dam) can be represented one-to-one by a computer agent, defined as a computer system that is situated in some environment and that is capable of autonomous action in this environment in order to meet its design objectives. The proposed approach is numerically tested on a synthetic case study, characterized by two multi-purpose reservoirs in cascade, two diversion dams and four different conflicting water uses: hydropower energy production, drinking supply, flooding prevention along the reservoir shores and irrigation supply. The system is therefore composed by four agents: the two operators of the diversion dams, which are purely reactive agents since they simply respond directly to the environment, and the operators of the two reservoirs, which are more complex agents because they have an internal state and their decisions are taken according to a closed-loop control scheme. In particular, the set of agents can act considering only their own objectives or they can coordinate to jointly reach better compromise solutions. Different interaction scenarios between the two extreme behaviours of centralized management and completely non-cooperation are simulated and analysed.

Castelletti, A.; Giuliani, M.

2011-12-01

494

Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

diversity and violations of water quality standards for dissolved oxygen and temperature. Ground water iron concentrations in well water and salt water intrusion are also ground water concerns for the State that reliance on ground water for drinking water supplies has been increasing in Delaware. Priority areas

495

Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

and violations of water quality standards for dissolved oxygen and temperature. Ground water in Delaware iron concentrations in well water and salt water intrusion are also ground water concerns for the State that reliance on ground water for drinking water supplies has been increasing in Delaware. Priority areas

496

Water resources data, Maryland and Delaware, water year 1999, volume 2. ground-water data  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Water resources data for the 1999 water year for Maryland and Delaware consist of records of water levels and water quality of ground-water wells. This report (Volume 2. Ground-Water Data) contains water levels at 395 observation wells, discharge records for 6 springs and water quality at 1 spring, 186 wells, and 27 streambed piezometers. Locations of ground-water level wells are shown on figures 5 and 6. Locations of ground-water-quality sites are shown on figure 7. The data in this report represent that part of the National Water Data System collected by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating State, local, and Federal agencies in Maryland and Delaware.

Saffer, Richard W.; Starsoneck, Roger J.; Marchand, Elizabeth H.; Smigaj, Michael J.

2000-01-01

497

North Dakota Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

North Dakota Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 1999 Introduction This report deals with the activities of the North Dakota Water Resources Research Institute (ND WRRI) during and fellowship recipients. The ND WRRI has its offices at North Dakota's land grant institution, North Dakota

498

North Dakota Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

North Dakota Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2004 Introduction This report describes the activities of the North Dakota Water Resources Research Institute (NDWRRI) during by offering competitive fellowships at both research universities in North Dakota; and The NDWRRI cooperates

499

North Dakota Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

North Dakota Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2001 Introduction This report describes the activities of the North Dakota Water Resources Research Institute (ND WRRI) during and publications by grant and fellowship recipients.The ND WRRI has its offices at North Dakota's land grant

500

North Dakota Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

North Dakota Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2006 #12;Introduction This report describes the activities of the North Dakota Water Resources Research Institute (NDWRRI) during closely with the Environmental and Conservation Sciences program of North Dakota State University (NDSU