Science.gov

Sample records for water resources engineering

  1. Water Resources & Environmental Engineering

    E-print Network

    Frey, H. Christopher

    Water Resources & Environmental Engineering Graduate Research Symposium NORTH CAROLINA STATE Management Air Pollution & Risk Analysis Water & Wastewater Engineering Groundwater Remediation Water were outraged to learn that hazardous levels of lead had been present in their drinking water supply

  2. Water Resources and Environmental Engineering

    E-print Network

    Frey, H. Christopher

    Water Resources and Environmental Engineering August 19, 2013 Department of Civil, Construction dimensions · Sustainable ­ Appropriate use of natural resources (air, water, land, coast, energy, materials ­ Water quality management ­ Emergency response (e.g., floods) · Resource use and allocation ­ Fuel

  3. Water Resources Engineering First Edition

    E-print Network

    Mays, Larry W.

    Water Resources Engineering First Edition Larry W. Mays, Ph.D., P.E., P.H. Professor of Civil Cataloging in Publication Data: Mays, Larry W. Water Resources Engineering/Larry W. Mays. -- 1st ed. ISBN 0;Acknowledgments Water Resources Engineering is the result of teaching classes over the past 24 years

  4. Integrated water resources management using engineering measures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Y.

    2015-04-01

    The management process of Integrated Water Resources Management (IWRM) consists of aspects of policies/strategies, measures (engineering measures and non-engineering measures) and organizational management structures, etc., among which engineering measures such as reservoirs, dikes, canals, etc., play the backbone that enables IWRM through redistribution and reallocation of water in time and space. Engineering measures are usually adopted for different objectives of water utilization and water disaster prevention, such as flood control and drought relief. The paper discusses the planning and implementation of engineering measures in IWRM of the Changjiang River, China. Planning and implementation practices of engineering measures for flood control and water utilization, etc., are presented. Operation practices of the Three Gorges Reservoir, particularly the development and application of regulation rules for flood management, power generation, water supply, ecosystem needs and sediment issues (e.g. erosion and siltation), are also presented. The experience obtained in the implementation of engineering measures in Changjiang River show that engineering measures are vital for IWRM. However, efforts should be made to deal with changes of the river system affected by the operation of engineering measures, in addition to escalatory development of new demands associated with socio-economic development.

  5. Hydrosystems engineering includes the technical areas of hydrology, hydraulics and water resources engineering which are interdisciplinary

    E-print Network

    Hydrosystems engineering includes the technical areas of hydrology, hydraulics and water resources, hydraulics and water resources engineering principles, but remains flexible enough to meet changing needs information systems, remote sensing, water policy and management, and water resources sustainability. Students

  6. Master of Science in Civil Engineering Environmental Engineering/Water Resources Engineering

    E-print Network

    Chen, Xinzhong

    Master of Science in Civil Engineering Environmental Engineering/Water Resources Engineering of Physics I COMPUTER SCIENCE CE 1305 - Engineering Analysis Ic CIVIL ENGINEERING CE 2301 - Statics CE 3303 3342 - Mathematical Statistics for Engineers and Scientists a MATH 3350 ­ Differential Equationsb

  7. Environmental and Water Resources Engineering Seminar Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering

    E-print Network

    Kamat, Vineet R.

    Environmental and Water Resources Engineering Seminar Department of Civil and Environmental a predictive framework for microbial community dynamics in drinking water systems Abstract. The abundant and diverse drinking water microbiome migrates daily from the drinking water treatment plant through

  8. Water Resources & Environmental Engineering Graduate Research Symposium

    E-print Network

    Frey, H. Christopher

    of the controversies surrounding the potential environmental impacts and benefits of shale gas development, focusing Carolina State University Department of Civil, Construction, & Environmental Engineering The shale gas revolution: green energy or a bridge to nowhere? #12;The shale gas revolution: green energy or a bridge

  9. Faculty of Engineering, LTH General syllabus for third-cycle studies in Water Resources Engineering

    E-print Network

    Faculty of Engineering, LTH General syllabus for third-cycle studies in Water Resources Engineering and most recently amended 3 February 2015 (reg. no U 2015/37). 1. Subject description Water Resources; geohydrology specialising in solute transport in soils, i. e. transport of water and matter between surface

  10. Environmental and Water Resources Engineering Seminar Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering

    E-print Network

    Kamat, Vineet R.

    Environmental and Water Resources Engineering Seminar Department of Civil and Environmental in Haitian water resources, and investigating Naegleria fowleri in Louisiana drinking water systems. Hollow. Microbial methods for water sampling are often designed to recover specific types of microbes from specific

  11. Environmental and Water Resources Engineering Seminar Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering

    E-print Network

    Kamat, Vineet R.

    Environmental and Water Resources Engineering Seminar Department of Civil and Environmental Nitrogen Removal in Water Resource Recovery Facilities: Past, Present, and Future Partial Nitritation of Michigan Glen Daigger, Ph.D., P.E., BCEE, NAE President, One Water Solutions LLC, Parker, CO Biological

  12. Environmental and Water Resources Engineering Seminar Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering

    E-print Network

    Kamat, Vineet R.

    Environmental and Water Resources Engineering Seminar Department of Civil and Environmental of water resources, they often merely serve as a convenience to limit field visits and simplify data of Michigan Real-time Water Systems Abstract: Recent advances in sensing, computation and communications have

  13. Environmental and Water Resources Engineering Seminar Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering

    E-print Network

    Kamat, Vineet R.

    to the interior is important for estimating basin-wide transport of heat and pollutants. A field experiment in oneEnvironmental and Water Resources Engineering Seminar Department of Civil and Environmental

  14. Environmental and Water Resources Engineering Seminar Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering

    E-print Network

    Kamat, Vineet R.

    Environmental and Water Resources Engineering Seminar Department of Civil and Environmental of Michigan Jonathan L. Goodall, Ph.D. Associate Professor, Civil and Environmental Engineering University of Virginia Integrated modeling of hydro-environmental and infrastructure systems Abstract: A trend in civil

  15. Environmental and Water Resources Engineering Seminar Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering

    E-print Network

    Kamat, Vineet R.

    Environmental and Water Resources Engineering Seminar Department of Civil and Environmental and Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering University of Michigan Future Scenario Modeling to Evaluate the Environmental Impacts of a New Technology Abstract: Estimating environmental impacts of a system at an early

  16. Remote sensing programs and courses in engineering and water resources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiefer, R. W.

    1981-01-01

    The content of typical basic and advanced remote sensing and image interpretation courses are described and typical remote sensing graduate programs of study in civil engineering and in interdisciplinary environmental remote sensing and water resources management programs are outlined. Ideally, graduate programs with an emphasis on remote sensing and image interpretation should be built around a core of five courses: (1) a basic course in fundamentals of remote sensing upon which the more specialized advanced remote sensing courses can build; (2) a course dealing with visual image interpretation; (3) a course dealing with quantitative (computer-based) image interpretation; (4) a basic photogrammetry course; and (5) a basic surveying course. These five courses comprise up to one-half of the course work required for the M.S. degree. The nature of other course work and thesis requirements vary greatly, depending on the department in which the degree is being awarded.

  17. JOINT SEMINAR ANNOUNCEMENT CEE 880 Environmental and Water Resources Engineering Seminar

    E-print Network

    Kamat, Vineet R.

    JOINT SEMINAR ANNOUNCEMENT CEE 880 ­ Environmental and Water Resources Engineering Seminar CEE 840 the Internet of Water: The Role of Real-Time Data in Water Resource Operations Abstract. Traditional water with the flow of information we will soon enable a suite of never before conceived solutions to water resource

  18. Environmental and Water Resources Engineering Seminar Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering

    E-print Network

    Kamat, Vineet R.

    environmental microbiology and chemistry to improve our understanding of trade-offs between energy efficiencyEnvironmental and Water Resources Engineering Seminar Department of Civil and Environmental of Michigan Lauren B. Stadler Ph.D. Candidate, Dept. of Civil and Environmental Eng., University of Michigan

  19. Environmental and Water Resources Engineering Seminar Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering

    E-print Network

    Kamat, Vineet R.

    Environmental and Water Resources Engineering Seminar Department of Civil and Environmental Scientist, Center for Sustainable Systems, SNRE University of Michigan Environmental Impacts of Coal Power this flexibility and operating them in such a manner may increase emissions and reduce the environmental benefits

  20. Sr. Engineer, Water Resources Univ of FL-SW FL Research & Education Center Immokalee, FL

    E-print Network

    Hill, Jeffrey E.

    Sr. Engineer, Water Resources Univ of FL-SW FL Research & Education Center ­ Immokalee, FL Technical position for research, extension, and teaching of water resources (quantity and quality and implementing construction plans for water resources projects, carrying out field and laboratory experiments

  1. Bridging Water Resources Policy and Environmental Engineering in the Classroom at Cornell University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walter, M. T.; Shaw, S. B.; Seifert, S.; Schwarz, T.

    2006-12-01

    Current university undergraduate students in environmental sciences and engineering are the next generation of environmental protection practitioners. Recognizing this, Cornell's Biological and Environmental Engineering department has developed a popular class, Watershed Engineering (BEE 473), specifically designed to bridge the too-common gap between water resources policy and state-of-art science and technology. Weekly homework assignments are to design real-life solutions to actual water resources problems, often with the objective of applying storm water policies to local situations. Where appropriate, usually in conjunction with recent amendments to the Federal Clean Water Act, this course introduces water resource protection tools and concepts developed in the Cornell Soil and Water Lab. Here we present several examples of how we build bridges between university classrooms and the complex world of water resources policy.

  2. Proceedings ASCE International Water Resources Engineering Conference August 8-12, 1999, Seattle, WA

    E-print Network

    Wells, Scott A.

    Proceedings ASCE International Water Resources Engineering Conference August 8-12, 1999, Seattle and Columbia Rivers. It is a eutrophic water body susceptible to algae blooms and crashes and periods of high pH which violate water quality standards. High nutrient loads from groundwater principally controls algae

  3. Proceedings ASCE International Water Resources Engineering Conference August 8-12, 1999, Seattle, WA

    E-print Network

    Wells, Scott A.

    1 Proceedings ASCE International Water Resources Engineering Conference August 8-12, 1999, Seattle is a two-dimensional water quality and hydrodynamic code supported by the USACE Waterways Experiments Station (Cole and Buchak, 1995). This model has been widely applied to stratified surface water systems

  4. JOINT SEMINAR ANNOUNCEMENT CEE 880 Environmental and Water Resources Engineering Seminar

    E-print Network

    Kamat, Vineet R.

    and Environmental Engineering University of Michigan Evaluating the Impacts of Hydraulic Fracturing: Michigan fluids at the surface. In addition to these environmental concerns, hydraulic fracturing of shaleJOINT SEMINAR ANNOUNCEMENT CEE 880 ­ Environmental and Water Resources Engineering Seminar CEE 840

  5. Teaching internationally: Texas A&M professor travels the world teaching water resources engineering 

    E-print Network

    Wythe, Kathy

    2008-01-01

    H2O | pg. 18 Story by Kathy Wythe Texas A&M professor travels the world teaching water resources engineering Dr. Francisco Olivera says he was born to teach. ?That?s what I have done all my life,? said Olivera, an associate professor... in Texas A&M University?s Zachry Department of Civil Engi- neering. Teaching internationally A native of Peru, Olivera graduated as a civil engineer from the Catholic University in Lima, Peru, and received a master?s degree in hydraulic engineering...

  6. Water resources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salomonson, V. V.; Rango, A.

    1973-01-01

    The application of ERTS-1 imagery to the conservation and control of water resources is discussed. The effects of exisiting geology and land use in the water shed area on the hydrologic cycle and the general characteristics of runoff are described. The effects of floods, snowcover, and glaciers are analyzed. The use of ERTS-1 imagery to map surface water and wetland areas to provide rapid inventorying over large regions of water bodies is reported.

  7. Water Resources Research Center

    E-print Network

    District of Columbia, University of the

    Water Resources Research Center WASHINGTON, DISTRICT Of COLUMBIA #12;ASSESSMENT OF THE STATE OF THE ART AND DEVELOPMENT OF PROPOSED IMPROVEMENTS IN RECREATION BENEFIT, VALUATION FOR WATER RESOURCES PLANNING conducted by Robert C. Waters Vassilios Moustakis Department of Engineering Administration School

  8. A social-economic-engineering combined framework for decision making in water resources planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, E. S.; Lee, K. S.

    2009-05-01

    This study develops a social-economic-engineering combined framework for decision making in water resources planning. This framework consists of four parts which are to spatially identify the grades on hydrological vulnerability (potential streamflow depletion and potential water quality deterioration), to evaluate the monetary values of improvements on hydrological vulnerability grades using the choice experiment method, to derive an alternative evaluation index (AEI) to quantify the effectiveness of all alternatives, and to combine the derived willingness-to-pays (WTPs) with the AEI and do the cost-benefit analysis of feasible alternatives. This framework includes the stakeholder participation in order to quantify the preferences with regard to management objectives (water quantity and quality) and WTPs of alternatives. Finally, the economic values of each alternative can be estimated by this study which combines the WTPs for improvements on hydrologic vulnerability grades with the AEI. The proposed procedure is applied in the Anyangcheon watershed which has been highly urbanized for past thirty years. As a result, WTPs are 0.24~10.08/month-household for water quantity and 0.80~8.60/month-household for water quality and residents of the five regions among six have higher WTPs for water quality improvement. Finally, since three of ten alternatives have BC>0, they can be proposed to the decision makers. This systematic screening procedure will provide decision makers with the flexibility to obtain stakeholders' consensus for water resources planning.

  9. Water Resources Forests & Water

    E-print Network

    Water Resources Forests & Water More than half of the nation's freshwater supply originates on forestland. Healthy and sustainable forests can help ensure a continuous supply of clean and abundant water. Not only does forestland provide the cleanest water of any land use, it also helps absorb rainfall

  10. Water Resources People cand Issues

    E-print Network

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Water Resources People cand Issues Interview With Professor Arthur Maass US Army Corps of Engineers Maass. (Water resources people and issues) 1. Water resources development--United States-- Planning--History. 2. Water resources development-- United States--Planning--History--Sources. I. Maass, Arthur. II

  11. Environmental, Water Resources, and Geotechnical Engineering Seminar Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering

    E-print Network

    Kamat, Vineet R.

    osmosis (PRO) can produce renewable energy from natural salinity gradients by harvesting the free energy Osmosis Mr. Yip is a Water-Geo-Energy Systems Faculty Candidate Abstract. The development of alternative power sources is necessary to enable a global shift to a sustainable energy future. Pressure retarded

  12. Reformulation of Engineering Education at Undergraduate Level in the Faculdad de Ingenieria y Ciencias Hidricas Universidad Nacional del Litoral--Water Resources and Engineering Degrees.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Theiler, Julio; Isla, Miguel; Arrillaga, Hugo; Ceirano, Eduardo; Lozeco, Cristobal

    This paper explains the educational changes in the Water Resources Engineering program offered by the Universidad Nacional del Litoral in Santa Fe, Argentina, for the last 20 years at the undergraduate level. The need for modernizing the engineering teaching program occurred due to changes in the social system in which the concepts of development…

  13. Postgraduate Programmes on Environmental Water Resources Engineering and Management in Greek Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Latinopoulos, Pericles; Angelidis, Panagiotis

    2014-01-01

    The management of complex water problems is nowadays being practised through new ways and approaches. Therefore, water engineers, planners and managers should be appropriately educated through modern undergraduate curricula and by well-designed postgraduate specialisation programmes. Within this framework, a study of the specific characteristics…

  14. Water Resources: Hydraulics and Hydrology

    E-print Network

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Water Resources: Hydraulics and Hydrology Interview with Margaret S. Petersen #12;This manuscript of History, Headquarters, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Alexandria, Virginia. MARGARET So PETERSEN WATER civilian and military engineers studied the behavior of rivers and the motion of water. They investigated

  15. Simplifying and upscaling water resources systems models that combine natural and engineered components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIntyre, N.; Keir, G.

    2014-12-01

    Water supply systems typically encompass components of both natural systems (e.g. catchment runoff, aquifer interception) and engineered systems (e.g. process equipment, water storages and transfers). Many physical processes of varying spatial and temporal scales are contained within these hybrid systems models. The need to aggregate and simplify system components has been recognised for reasons of parsimony and comprehensibility; and the use of probabilistic methods for modelling water-related risks also prompts the need to seek computationally efficient up-scaled conceptualisations. How to manage the up-scaling errors in such hybrid systems models has not been well-explored, compared to research in the hydrological process domain. Particular challenges include the non-linearity introduced by decision thresholds and non-linear relations between water use, water quality, and discharge strategies. Using a case study of a mining region, we explore the nature of up-scaling errors in water use, water quality and discharge, and we illustrate an approach to identification of a scale-adjusted model including an error model. Ways forward for efficient modelling of such complex, hybrid systems are discussed, including interactions with human, energy and carbon systems models.

  16. I. Education PhD in Water Resources Engineering, 2001, Tufts University, Medford, MA.

    E-print Network

    Arumugam, Sankar

    , Boston, MA, Jan 2001- May 2001. Consultant, South Asia Social and Environmental Section, World Bank: An Inter-basin Transfer Model with a Risk Management Framework, Water Resources Research, DOI: 10 &Earth System Sciences, 18, 2885-2898, 2014. 4. Singh, H., § and A. Sankarasubramanian1, Systematic

  17. Sr. Engineer, Water Resources Univ of FL-SW FL Research & Education Center Immokalee, FL

    E-print Network

    Ma, Lena

    sciences preferred. Proficiency in at least one programming language (e.g. Visual Basic, C) and have Technical position for research, extension, and teaching of water resources (quantity and quality-doctoral associates. The responsibilities will include co-development of grant funding proposals with the program

  18. System International d'Unites: Metric Measurement in Water Resources Engineering.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klingeman, Peter C.

    This pamphlet gives definitions and symbols for the basic and derived metric units, prefixes, and conversion factors for units frequently used in water resources. Included are conversion factors for units of area, work, heat, power, pressure, viscosity, flow rate, and others. (BB)

  19. Save Our Water Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bromley, Albert W.

    The purpose of this booklet, developed as part of Project SOAR (Save Our American Resources), is to give Scout leaders some facts about the world's resources, the sources of water pollution, and how people can help in obtaining solutions. Among the topics discussed are the world's water resources, the water cycle, water quality, sources of water

  20. Water Resources Water Quality and Water Treatment

    E-print Network

    Sohoni, Milind

    Water Resources TD 603 Lecture 1: Water Quality and Water Treatment CTARA Indian Institute of Technology, Bombay 2nd November, 2011 #12;OVERVIEW Water Quality WATER TREATMENT PLANTS WATER TREATMENT PLANTS WATER TREATMENT PLANTS WATER TRE OVERVIEW OF THE LECTURE 1. Water Distribution Schemes Hand Pump

  1. Water resource systems group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stedinger, Jery R.; Lettenmaier, Dennis P.

    The 11th meeting of the Water Resource Systems Group was held at the University of Washington (Seattle), August 7-8, 1987. These systems group meetings, which are informal gatherings of professionals who have an interest in the educational and research aspects of water resources systems analysis, have usually been held on university campuses. The 30 attendees of the 1987 meeting represented a cross section of university faculty and graduate students, government managers and researchers, and engineering consultants.The meeting opened with short discussions by Steve Burges (University of Washington), Chuck Howard (CDD Howard and Associates, Victoria, Canada), David Dawdy (consultant, San Francisco, Calif.), and Jon Liebman (University of Illinois, Urbana) outlining their views of current issues in the water resources area. Burges emphasized the limitations and inadequacies of many of the models currently used in hydrology: rainfall runoff models may not adequately capture the physical characteristics of the movement of water into channels, vadose and saturated zone pollutant transport models are incapable of reproducing many of the features observed in the field, and many streamflow forecasting models used for reservoir operations have been constructed to reproduce average conditions but break down under the extreme conditions (floods and droughts) where they are most needed.

  2. Water Basins Civil Engineering

    E-print Network

    Provancher, William

    Water Basins Civil Engineering Objective · Connect the study of water, water cycle, and ecosystems with engineering · Discuss how human impacts can effect our water basins, and how engineers lessen these impacts: · The basic concepts of water basins are why they are important · To use a topographic map · To delineate

  3. Fourth Tennessee water resources symposium

    SciTech Connect

    Sale, M.J.; Presley, P.M.

    1991-01-01

    The annual Tennessee Water Resources Symposium was initiated in 1988 as a means to bring together people with common interests in the state's important water-related resources at a technical, professional level. Initially the symposium was sponsored by the American Institute of Hydrology and called the Hydrology Symposium, but the Tennessee Section of the American Water Resources Association (AWRA) has taken on the primary coordination role for the symposium over the last two years and the symposium name was changed in 1990 to water resources to emphasize a more inter-disciplinary theme. This year's symposium carries on the successful tradition of the last three years. Our goal is to promote communication and cooperation among Tennessee's water resources professionals: scientists, engineers, and researchers from federal, state, academic, and private institutions and organizations who have interests and responsibilities for the state's water resources. For these conference proceedings, individual papers are processed separately for the Energy Data Base.

  4. Water, Ohio's Remarkable Resource.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Groves, Carrie J.

    Information on water and water resources in Ohio is presented in seven sections. Water from Ohio streams, water storage, lakes in Ohio, and ground water are discussed in the first section ("Water, A Part of the Earth"). A brief discussion on the ecosystem is provided in the second section ("Water and Life"). Topics discussed in the third section…

  5. "Modeling for effective and sustainable water resources management."

    E-print Network

    Zhigilei, Leonid V.

    "Modeling for effective and sustainable water resources management." Teresa Culver Associate Engineering University of Virginia Charlottesville, VA 434.982.6375 Environmental & Water Resources Group We prepare engineers for careers in the interdisciplinary field of environmental and water resources

  6. A social-economic-engineering combined framework for decision making in water resources planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, E. S.; Lee, K. S.

    2008-10-01

    This study presents a new methodology not only to evaluate willingness to pays (WTPs) for the improvement of hydrological vulnerability using a choice experiment (CE) method but also to do a cost-benefit analysis (CBA) of some feasible alternatives combing the derived WTPs with an alternative evaluation index (AEI). The hydrological vulnerability consists of potential streamflow depletion (PSD), and potential water quality deterioration (PWQD) and can be quantified using a multi-criteria decision making technique and pressure-state-response (PSR) framework. PSD and PWQD not only provide survey respondents with sufficient site-specific information to avoid scope sensitivity in a choice experiment but also support the standard of dividing the study watershed into six sub-regions for site-fitted management. Therefore CE was applied to six regions one after the other, in order to determine WTPs for improvements on hydrological vulnerability considering the characteristics which are vulnerability, location, and preferences with regard to management objectives. The AEI was developed to prioritize the feasible alternatives using a continuous water quantity/quality simulation model as well as multi-criteria decision making techniques. All criteria for alternative performance were selected based on a driver-pressures-state-impact-response (DPSIR) framework, and their weights were estimated using an Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP). In addition, the AEI that reflects on residents' preference with regard to management objectives was proposed in order to incite the stakeholder to participate in the decision making process. Finally, the economic values of each alternative are estimated by a newly developed method which combines the WTPs for improvements on hydrologic vulnerability with the AEI. This social-economic-engineering combined framework can provide the decision makers with more specific information as well as decrease the uncertainty of the CBA.

  7. Water Resource Adaptation Program

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Water Resource Adaptation Program (WRAP) contributes to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (U.S. EPA) efforts to provide water resource managers and decision makers with the tools needed to adapt water resources to demographic and economic development, and future clim...

  8. Process oriented thinking as a key for integration of ecohydrology, biotechnology and engineering for sustainable water resources management and ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zalewski, M.

    2015-04-01

    The recent high rate of environmental degradation due to unsustainable use of water and other natural resources and mismanagement, is, in many cases, the result of a dominant sectoral approach, limited communication between different users and agencies, and lack of knowledge transfer between different disciplines, and especially lack of dialogue between environmental scientists and engineers. There is no doubt that the genuine improvement of human well-being has to be based on understanding the complexity of interactions between abiotic, biotic and socio-economic systems. The major drivers of biogeosphere evolution and function have been the cycles of water and nutrients in a complex array of differing climates and catchment geomorphologies. In the face of global climate change and unequally distributed human populations, the recent sectoral mechanistic approach in natural resources management has to be replaced by an evolutionary systems approach based on well-integrated problem-solving and policy-oriented environmental science. Thus the principles of ecohydrology should be the basis for further integration of ecology, hydrology, engineering, biotechnology and other environmental sciences. Examples from UNESCO IHP VII show how the integration of these will not only increase the efficiency of measures to harmonize ecosystem potentials with societal needs, but also significantly reduce the costs of sustainable environmental management.

  9. Water Resources Milind Sohoni

    E-print Network

    Sohoni, Milind

    TD 603 Water Resources Milind Sohoni www.cse.iitb.ac.in/sohoni/ Lecture 9: Water in Agriculture () January 13, 2010 1 / 14 #12;Water in Agriculture Historically: Biggest consumer of water, in developed kilos of sugar. Though the source of water in all the three cases is usually different. Agriculture

  10. Nebraska Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    event was a one-day water law conference, designed for practicing attorneys, but attended by many waterNebraska Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report FY 2012 Nebraska Water Resources Center Engineering Department at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, took over as the interim director of the Water

  11. WATER SUPPLY AND WATER RESOURCES DIVISION - HOME PAGE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Water Supply and Water Resources Division (WSWRD) conducts research to help prepare the primary and secondary regulations for drinking water and to develop technologies and strategies for controlling waterborne contaminants. The program integrates chemistry, engineering, micr...

  12. Developing Our Water Resources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Volker, Adriaan

    1977-01-01

    Only very recently developed as a refined scientific discipline, hydrology has to cope with a complexity of problems concerning the present and future management of a vital natural resource, water. This article examines available water supplies and the problems and prospects of water resource development. (Author/MA)

  13. Class Schedule for Water Resources Engineering II (CGN 4933) Topic Reading

    E-print Network

    Nachabe, Mahmood H.

    The Vadose zone in the Hydrological cycle 3, 4 and 5 Soil Physical Properties, Capillary Pressure, Water Retention in Soils Instructor will distribute reading material 6 Static Water Content Distribution above Water Table 1 7, 8 and 9 Introduction to Hydrological Processes in Vadose Zone: Infiltration, Drainage

  14. Water Resources Milind Sohoni

    E-print Network

    Sohoni, Milind

    TD 603 Water Resources Milind Sohoni www.cse.iitb.ac.in/sohoni/ Building Numerical Models () August of surface flow of water and infiltration which may include time to flow, movement of solids etc. () August

  15. Analyzing water resources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Report on water resources discusses problems in water measurement demand, use, and availability. Also discussed are sensing accuracies, parameter monitoring, and status of forecasting, modeling, and future measurement techniques.

  16. Water Resources Milind Sohoni

    E-print Network

    Sohoni, Milind

    TD 603 Water Resources Milind Sohoni www.cse.iitb.ac.in/sohoni/ Lecture 2: Water cycle, stocks and flows () July 28, 2013 1 / 30 #12;The basic movement of water source: USGS. () July 28, 2013 2 / 30 #12, humidity and air flow. Formation of liquid-water in the Atmosphere-Cloud-Formation Coming Down Rain

  17. Water Resources Milind Sohoni

    E-print Network

    Sohoni, Milind

    TD 603 Water Resources Milind Sohoni www.cse.iitb.ac.in/sohoni/ Lecture 7: Regional Groundwater than the unit situations that we saw. Surface water/Groundwater interactions. lakes and streams springs (seepage) Ambient water-table movements Seasonal changes Inteference with other water end-users. Inherent

  18. Water Resources Milind Sohoni

    E-print Network

    Sohoni, Milind

    TD 603 Water Resources Milind Sohoni www.cse.iitb.ac.in/sohoni/ Lecture 8: Wells () August 28, 2012 project, utilizing enhanced ground-water. Water lifted from storage, to accumulate overnight from aquifer. Water from shallow aquifer, of about 7-8m thickness. accounts for about 30% of irrigation Unique

  19. NASA Water Resources Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toll, David L.

    2011-01-01

    With increasing population pressure and water usage coupled with climate variability and change, water issues are being reported by numerous groups as the most critical environmental problems facing us in the 21st century. Competitive uses and the prevalence of river basins and aquifers that extend across boundaries engender political tensions between communities, stakeholders and countries. In addition to the numerous water availability issues, water quality related problems are seriously affecting human health and our environment. The potential crises and conflicts especially arise when water is competed among multiple uses. For example, urban areas, environmental and recreational uses, agriculture, and energy production compete for scarce resources, not only in the Western U.S. but throughout much of the U.S. and also in numerous parts of the world. Mitigating these conflicts and meeting water demands and needs requires using existing water resources more efficiently. The NASA Water Resources Program Element works to use NASA products and technology to address these critical water issues. The primary goal of the Water Resources is to facilitate application of NASA Earth science products as a routine use in integrated water resources management for the sustainable use of water. This also includes the extreme events of drought and floods and the adaptation to the impacts from climate change. NASA satellite and Earth system observations of water and related data provide a huge volume of valuable data in both near-real-time and extended back nearly 50 years about the Earth's land surface conditions such as precipitation, snow, soil moisture, water levels, land cover type, vegetation type, and health. NASA Water Resources Program works closely to use NASA and Earth science data with other U.S. government agencies, universities, and non-profit and private sector organizations both domestically and internationally. The NASA Water Resources Program organizes its projects under five functional themes. I) Streamflow and Flood Forecasting 2) Water Supply and Irrigation (includes evapotranspiration) 3) Drought 4) Water Quality 5) Climate and Water Resources. To maximize this activity NASA Water Resources Program works closely with other government agencies (e.g., the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA); the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA); the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS); the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), USAID, the Air Force Weather Agency (AFWA)), universities, non-profit national and international organizations, and the private sector. The NASA Water Resources program currently is funding 21 active projects under the functional themes (http://wmp.gsfc.nasa.gov & http://science.nasa.gov/earth-science/applied-sciences/).

  20. Splash! Water Resource Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southwest Florida Water Management District, Brooksville.

    This set of activities is designed to bring water resource education into the middle school classroom using an interdisciplinary approach. The packet contains timely, localized information about the water resources of west central Florida. Each activity is aligned to middle-school Sunshine State Standards. These hands-on, minds-on activities can…

  1. Water Resources Milind Sohoni

    E-print Network

    Sohoni, Milind

    TD 603 Water Resources Milind Sohoni www.cse.iitb.ac.in/sohoni/ Lecture 10: Minor Structures for Ground and Surface Water () March 23, 2010 1 / 31 #12;Classification by Purpose We may classify the velocity of water-flow (ii) increasing the infiltration coefficient (iii) explicit groundwater recharge

  2. Water Resources Milind Sohoni

    E-print Network

    Sohoni, Milind

    TD 603 Water Resources Milind Sohoni www.cse.iitb.ac.in/sohoni/ Lecture 4: Groundwater () December in dried sample. Saturation: When these voids are fully filled with water. Specific Yield Sy : the ration of the colume of water that drains from a rock owing to gravity, to the total rock volumne. 00000000

  3. Water Resources Milind Sohoni

    E-print Network

    Sohoni, Milind

    TD 603 Water Resources Milind Sohoni www.cse.iitb.ac.in/sohoni/ Analysis Framework for the 2009 / 16 #12;Vol II and Vol III Vol. II 1 Annexure I, Chap. 1: Bulk-water and tariffs-Principles. 2 Annexure I, Chap. 2: International Case Studies. 3 Annexure II: Report on water conservation technologies

  4. Water Resources Milind Sohoni

    E-print Network

    Sohoni, Milind

    TD 603 Water Resources Milind Sohoni www.cse.iitb.ac.in/sohoni/ Lecture 6: Mathematics, z). velocity vx (x, y, z, t) : in the x-direction. vx = Kx h/x saturated/water- table. Continuity Equation What is vx x + vy y + vz z ? It is the rate of accumulation of water at the point (x, y

  5. Water Resources Milind Sohoni

    E-print Network

    Sohoni, Milind

    TD 603 Water Resources Milind Sohoni www.cse.iitb.ac.in/sohoni/ Lecture 1: A Perspective () July 20, 2012 1 / 17 #12;Outline Two parts: The technical side to water. -M. Sohoni The basic hydrological cycle. The societal side to water. -N. C. Narayanan () July 20, 2012 2 / 17 #12;Texts Applied Hydrogeology, by C. W

  6. Water - an inexhaustible resource?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Divenah, C.; Esperou, E.

    2012-04-01

    We have chosen to present the topic "Water", by illustrating problems that will give better opportunities for interdisciplinary work between Natural Science (Physics, Chemistry, Biology and Geology) teachers at first, but also English teachers and maybe others. Water is considered in general, in all its shapes and states. The question is not only about drinking water, but we would like to demonstrate that water can both be a fragile and short-lived resource in some ways, and an unlimited energy resource in others. Water exists on Earth in three states. It participates in a large number of chemical and physical processes (dissolution, dilution, biogeochemical cycles, repartition of heat in the oceans and the atmosphere, etc.), helping to maintain the homeostasis of the entire planet. It is linked to living beings, for which water is the major compound. The living beings essentially organized themselves into or around water, and this fact is also valid for human kind (energy, drinking, trade…). Water can also be a destroying agent for living beings (tsunamis, mud flows, collapse of electrical dams, pollution...) and for the solid earth (erosion, dissolution, fusion). I) Water, an essential resource for the human kind After having highlighted the disparities and geopolitical problems, the pupils will study the chemistry of water with its components and their origins (isotopes, water trip). Then the ways to make it drinkable will be presented (filtration, decantation, iceberg carrying…) II) From the origin of water... We could manage an activity where different groups put several hypotheses to the test, with the goal to understand the origin(s?) of water on Earth. Example: Isotopic signature of water showing its extraterrestrial origin.. Once done, we'll try to determine the origin of drinking water, as a fossil resource. Another use of isotopes will allow them to evaluate the drinking water age, to realize how precious it can be. III) Water as a sustainable energy resource Water is used to produce energy under different processes like ancient tamed energy such as water mills, locks or more recently tidal energy, marine current power, generators based on swell or osmotic gradients. The pupils will work in groups to present different techniques to the class. We could try to determine if all these energy resources could replace the actual major energy source in France: nuclear. Conclusion: Liquid water is probably the cradle of life. Since the birth of human kind, its history is closely linked to the presence of water: drinking, fishing, hygiene, and also transport or business is strictly depending on this resource. Described as a fragile and limited resource when it is used for human consumption, we realize that water is also an uneven resource of energy for the next generations. The challenge will then be to reconcile these different aspects: respecting this nourishing resource and preserving it from pollution, overexploitation or wasting, and at the same time, using water as energy for a world that has a growing population.

  7. Protecting Our Water Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jewett, Jon

    1996-01-01

    Describes the watershed management approach for preserving water resources. Considers pollution sources ranging from industrial discharge to agricultural leachate and runoff and evaluates its impact on the total watershed environment. (JRH)

  8. Lunar Water Resource Demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muscatello, Anthony C.

    2008-01-01

    In cooperation with the Canadian Space Agency, the Northern Centre for Advanced Technology, Inc., the Carnegie-Mellon University, JPL, and NEPTEC, NASA has undertaken the In-Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU) project called RESOLVE. This project is a ground demonstration of a system that would be sent to explore permanently shadowed polar lunar craters, drill into the regolith, determine what volatiles are present, and quantify them in addition to recovering oxygen by hydrogen reduction. The Lunar Prospector has determined these craters contain enhanced hydrogen concentrations averaging about 0.1%. If the hydrogen is in the form of water, the water concentration would be around 1%, which would translate into billions of tons of water on the Moon, a tremendous resource. The Lunar Water Resource Demonstration (LWRD) is a part of RESOLVE designed to capture lunar water and hydrogen and quantify them as a backup to gas chromatography analysis. This presentation will briefly review the design of LWRD and some of the results of testing the subsystem. RESOLVE is to be integrated with the Scarab rover from CMIJ and the whole system demonstrated on Mauna Kea on Hawaii in November 2008. The implications of lunar water for Mars exploration are two-fold: 1) RESOLVE and LWRD could be used in a similar fashion on Mars to locate and quantify water resources, and 2) electrolysis of lunar water could provide large amounts of liquid oxygen in LEO, leading to lower costs for travel to Mars, in addition to being very useful at lunar outposts.

  9. Water resources, summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simons, D. B.

    1975-01-01

    The application of remote sensing products to the development and understanding of water resources problems is considered. Geology and hydrogeology, analysis of watersheds, snow and ice, prediction of runoff from snowmelt, hydrologic land use classifications, soil moisture, evapotranspiration, flood hazards, and water quality surveys are among the topics discussed. Suggestions for further use of remotely sensed data are given along with increased user requirements.

  10. Water Resources Milind Sohoni

    E-print Network

    Sohoni, Milind

    TD 603 Water Resources Milind Sohoni www.cse.iitb.ac.in/sohoni/ Lecture 3: Watershed and Maps () July 23, 2013 1 / 18 #12;Domain Decomposition p1 p2 p3 p5 p4 surface water A1 A2 A3 A4 A5 salinity ingress water table q W(q) W(p2) The watershed W (x) of a point x is W (x) = {all points y from where

  11. Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    investigation describing the characteristics of fresh water - salt water relationships in a small rock island in a salt water environment. This investigation will greatly aid applied scientists and water resource engineers in the more appropriate application of groundwater flow theory and models for other rock islands

  12. Arkansas Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    research scientists into water resources fields; 3)help to train future water scientists and engineers, innovative domestic wastewater disposal systems, ground water modeling and landuse mapping, erosion and pollution, water quality, and ecosystems. AWRC acts as a liaison between funding groups and the scientists

  13. Reformulated Neural Network (ReNN): a New Alternative for Data-driven Modelling in Hydrology and Water Resources Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razavi, S.; Tolson, B.; Burn, D.; Seglenieks, F.

    2012-04-01

    Reformulated Neural Network (ReNN) has been recently developed as an efficient and more effective alternative to feedforward multi-layer perceptron (MLP) neural networks [Razavi, S., and Tolson, B. A. (2011). "A new formulation for feedforward neural networks." IEEE Transactions on Neural Networks, 22(10), 1588-1598, DOI: 1510.1109/TNN.2011.2163169]. This presentation initially aims to introduce the ReNN to the water resources community and then demonstrates ReNN applications to water resources related problems. ReNN is essentially equivalent to a single-hidden-layer MLP neural network but defined on a new set of network variables which is more effective than the traditional set of network weights and biases. The main features of the new network variables are that they are geometrically interpretable and each variable has a distinct role in forming the network response. ReNN is more efficiently trained as it has a less complex error response surface. In addition to the ReNN training efficiency, the interpretability of the ReNN variables enables the users to monitor and understand the internal behaviour of the network while training. Regularization in the ReNN response can be also directly measured and controlled. This feature improves the generalization ability of the network. The appeal of the ReNN is demonstrated with two ReNN applications to water resources engineering problems. In the first application, the ReNN is used to model the rainfall-runoff relationships in multiple watersheds in the Great Lakes basin located in northeastern North America. Modelling inflows to the Great Lakes are of great importance to the management of the Great Lakes system. Due to the lack of some detailed physical data about existing control structures in many subwatersheds of this huge basin, the data-driven approach to modelling such as the ReNN are required to replace predictions from a physically-based rainfall runoff model. Unlike traditional MLPs, the ReNN does not necessarily require an independent set of data for validation as the ReNN has the capability to control and verify the network degree of regularization. As such, the ReNN can be very beneficial in this case study as the data available in this case study is limited. In the second application, ReNN is fitted on the response function of the SWAT hydrologic model to act as a fast-to-run response surface surrogate (i.e., metamodel) of the original computationally intensive SWAT model. Besides the training efficiency gains, the ReNN applications demonstrate how the ReNN interpretability could help users develop more reliable networks which perform predictably better in terms of generalization.

  14. Inland water resources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The work is reported of the panel concerning the application of space technology to the improved management of the nation's inland resources. The progress since the 1967-68 study is briefly reviewed. The data needed for the management of inlet water ways, and the potential benefits of better management are discussed along with 16 proposed demonstration projects.

  15. Resource Engineering MSc Programme

    E-print Network

    Langendoen, Koen

    to recover minerals and mineral ores from the earth, how these materials can be processed and how useable: In this specialisation, you will learn about the processing of mineral resources and secondary materials. Material life a programme that covers every aspect of the life cycle of mineral resources. In this track, you will learn how

  16. Water Resources Engineering MSCE Option For thesis, report, or courses-only options, the core courses and four engineering or other appropriate electives must

    E-print Network

    Chen, Xinzhong

    Advanced Water Treatment (s, [ENVE 5307]) ENVE 5307 Physical and Chemical Wastewater Treatment (f) ENVE in Natural Science and Engineering (f) Other graduate courses as approved by graduate advisor Research submit a degree program to the Graduate School. .Scholarships run from the beginning of the fall

  17. INSTITUTE FOR WATER RESOURCES FY 2011 ANNUAL REPORT

    E-print Network

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    INSTITUTE FOR WATER RESOURCES FY 2011 ANNUAL REPORT CHAPTER 43, REPORT OFTHE SECRETARY OFTHE ARMY ON CIVILWORKS ACTIVITIES FOR FY 2011 #12;43-1 INSTITUTE FOR WATER RESOURCES BACKGROUND The U.S. Army Engineer Institute for Water Resources (hereafter referred to as the Institute or "IWR") is a Corps of Engineers

  18. Water Resource Summary December 2013

    E-print Network

    Walter, M.Todd

    and through the landscape into intermittent streams, kills, creeks, rivers, aquifers, wetlands and floodplains about land use that minimize impacts to water resources, including drinking water supplies, floodplains

  19. Selected Blog Sites Related to Water Resources and Environmental Resources

    E-print Network

    James, L. Allan

    Selected Blog Sites Related to Water Resources and Environmental Resources Water News: Circle Water Resources Association (JAWRA) - http://awramedia.org/mainblog/ WaterWired ­ personal blog (IWRM) ­ personal blog site of a water resources professional - http

  20. Water Resources Competitive Grants Program

    E-print Network

    Anderson, Charles W.

    Water Resources Competitive Grants Program Fiscal Year 2015 Request for Proposals Pursuant to Section 104 of the Water Resources Research Act of 1984, as Amended Closing Date 4:00 PM, Eastern Time, July 17, 2015 (Institutes) Institute for Water Resources National Institutes for U.S. Army Corps

  1. Water Resources Data, Missouri, Water Year 2002

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hauck, H.S.; Nagel, C.D.

    2003-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, Water Resources Division, in cooperation with local, State, and Federal agencies and organizations, obtains a large quantity of data pertaining to the water resources of Missouri each water year (October 1 to September 30). These data, accumulated during the water years, constitute a valuable data base for developing an improved understanding of the water resources of Missouri. Water-resources data for the 2002 water year for Missouri consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; elevation, contents, and water quality of lakes and reservoirs. This volume contains discharge records for 172 gaging stations; elevation at 12 lakes and reservoirs; water quality at 113 sampling stations (including 2 lakes); and data for 39 crest-stage stations.

  2. 33 CFR 209.345 - Water resource policies and authorities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Water resource policies and authorities. 209.345 Section 209.345 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE...

  3. 33 CFR 209.345 - Water resource policies and authorities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Water resource policies and authorities. 209.345 Section 209.345 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE...

  4. 33 CFR 209.345 - Water resource policies and authorities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Water resource policies and authorities. 209.345 Section 209.345 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE...

  5. 33 CFR 209.345 - Water resource policies and authorities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Water resource policies and authorities. 209.345 Section 209.345 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE...

  6. 33 CFR 209.345 - Water resource policies and authorities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Water resource policies and authorities. 209.345 Section 209.345 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE...

  7. Redressing China's strategy of water resource exploitation.

    PubMed

    Ran, Lishan; Lu, Xi Xi

    2013-03-01

    China, with the confrontation of water-related problems as an element of its long history, has been investing heavily in water engineering projects over the past few decades based on the assumption that these projects can solve its water problems. However, the anticipated benefits did not really occur, or at least not as large as expected. Instead, the results involved additional frustrations, such as biodiversity losses and human-induced disasters (i.e., landslides and earthquakes). Given its inherent shortcomings, the present engineering-dominated strategy for the management of water resources cannot help solve China's water problems and achieve its goal of low-carbon transformation. Therefore, the present strategy for water resources exploitation needs to be reevaluated and redressed. A policy change to achieve better management of Chinese rivers is urgently needed. PMID:23314565

  8. Mathematical simulation of temperatures in deep impoundments: verification tests of the Water Resources Engineers, Inc. model - Horsetooth and Flaming Gorge Reservoirs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    King, D.L.; Sartoris, Jim J.

    1973-01-01

    Successful use of predictive mathematical models requires verification of the accuracy of the models by applying them to existing situations where the prediction can be compared with reality. A Corps of Engineers' modification of a deep reservoir thermal stratification model developed by Water Resources Engineers, Inc., was applied to two existing Bureau of Reclamation reservoirs for verification. Diffusion coefficients used for the Corps' Detroit Reservoir were found to apply to Horsetooth Reservoir in Colorado, for which very food computer input data were available. The Detroit diffusion coefficients gave a reasonable simulation of Flaming Gorge Reservoir in Wyoming and Utah, which has very complex and variable physical characteristics and for which only average-quality computer input data were available.

  9. Water Resource Economics An Introduction

    E-print Network

    Shaw, W. Douglass

    Water Resource Economics and Policy An Introduction W. Douglass Shaw, Professor, Department-9933 Email: elgarinfo@e-elgar.com `A state-of-the-art and comprehensive review of water resource economics in water economics as well as a source for researchers who need a state-of-the-art review of the literature

  10. Water Resources Data, Louisiana, Water Year 2000

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goree, B.B.; Lovelace, W.M.; Montgomery, P.A.; Resweber, J.C.; Sasser, D.C., Jr.; Walters, David J.

    2001-01-01

    Water resources data for the 2000 water year for Louisiana consists of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage, contents, and water quality of lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality of ground water. This report contains records for water discharge at 66 gaging stations; stage only for 70 gaging stations and 7 lakes; water quality for 45 surface-water stations (including 25 gaging stations) and 108 wells; and water levels for 221 observation wells. Also included are data for 204 crest-stage and flood-profile partial-record stations. Additional water data were collected at various sites not included in the systematic data-collection program, and are published as miscellaneous measurements. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating State and Federal agencies in Louisiana.

  11. Water Resources Data, Louisiana, Water Year 2002

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goree, B.B.; Lovelace, W.M.; Montgomery, P.A.; Resweber, J.C.; Labbe, Charles K.; Walters, David J.

    2003-01-01

    Water resources data for the 2002 water year for Louisiana consists of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage, contents, and water quality of lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality of ground water. This report contains records for water discharge at 85 gaging stations; stage only for 79 gaging stations and 7 lakes; water quality for 52 surface-water stations (including 40 gaging stations) and 104 wells; and water levels for 300 observation wells. Also included are data for 143 crest-stage and flood-profile partial-record stations. Additional water data were collected at various sites not included in the systematic data-collection program, and are published as miscellaneous measurements. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating State and Federal agencies in Louisiana.

  12. Water resources data, Louisiana, water year 2004

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Baumann, Todd; Goree, B.B.; Lovelace, W.M.; Montogmery, P.A.; Resweber, J.C.; Ross, Garron B.; Ward, Aub N.; Walters, David J.

    2005-01-01

    Water resources data for the 2004 water year for Louisiana consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage, contents, and water quality of lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality of ground water. This report contains records for water discharge at 77 gaging stations; stage only for 86 gaging stations and 7 lakes; water quality for 60 surface-water stations (including 42 gaging stations) and 112 wells; and water levels for 304 observation wells. Also included are data for 158 crest-stage and flood-profile partial-record stations. Additional water data were collected at various sites not included in the systematic data-collection program, and are published as miscellaneous measurements. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating State and Federal agencies in Louisiana.

  13. Water resources data, Louisiana, water year 2003

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Baumann, Todd; Goree, B.B.; Lovelace, W.M.; Montgomery, P.A.; Resweber, J.C.; Ross, Garron B.; Sasser, D.C., Jr.; Walters, D.J.

    2004-01-01

    Water resources data for the 2003 water year for Louisiana consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage, contents, and water quality of lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality of ground water. This report contains records for water discharge at 76 gaging stations; stage only for 86 gaging stations and 7 lakes; water quality for 56 surface-water stations (including 44 gaging stations) and 142 wells; and water levels for 313 observation wells. Also included are data for 158 crest-stage and flood-profile partial-record stations. Additional water data were collected at various sites not included in the systematic data-collection program, and are published as miscellaneous measurements. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating Federal and State agencies in Louisiana.

  14. Water Resources Data, Louisiana, Water Year 2001

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goree, B.B.; Lovelace, W.M.; Montgomery, P.A.; Resweber, J.C.; Sasser, D.C., Jr.; Walters, David J.

    2002-01-01

    Water resources data for the 2001 water year for Louisiana consists of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage, contents, and water quality of lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality of ground water. This report contains records for water discharge at 71 gaging stations; stage only for 73 gaging stations and 7 lakes; water quality for 66 surface-water stations (including 39 gaging stations) and 92 wells; and water levels for 205 observation wells. Also included are data for 166 crest-stage and flood-profile partial-record stations. Additional water data were collected at various sites not included in the systematic data-collection program, and are published as miscellaneous measurements. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating State and Federal agencies in Louisiana.

  15. Water Conservation Resource List.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    NJEA Review, 1981

    1981-01-01

    Alarmed by the growing water shortage, the New Jersey State Office of Dissemination has prepared this annotated list of free or inexpensive instructional materials for teaching about water conservation, K-l2. A tipsheet for home water conservation is appended. (Editor/SJL)

  16. Water Resources Data, Alaska, Water Year 2001

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meyer, D.F.; Solin, G.L.; Apgar, M.L.; Hess, D.L.; Swenson, W.A.

    2002-01-01

    Water-resources data for the 2001 water year for Alaska consists of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stages of lakes; and water levels and water quality of ground-water wells. This volume contains records for water discharge at 112 gaging stations; stage or contents only at 4 gaging stations; water quality at 37 gaging stations; and water levels for 30 observation wells. Also included are data for 51 crest-stage partial-record stations. Additional water data were collected at various sites not involved in the systematic data-collection program and are published as miscellaneous measurements and analyses. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating State and Federal agencies in Alaska.

  17. MEMORANDUM OF UNDERSTANDING THE INSTITUTE FOR WATER RESOURCES (IWR)

    E-print Network

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    MEMORANDUM OF UNDERSTANDING BETWEEN THE INSTITUTE FOR WATER RESOURCES (IWR) AND SANDIA NATIONAL LABORATORIES (SANDIA) The Institute for Water Resources (IWR), United States Army Corps ofEngineers (USACE": Having a common interest in integrated water resources management (IWRM) and computer aided dispute

  18. 33 CFR 209.345 - Water resource policies and authorities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Water resource policies and authorities. 209.345 Section 209.345 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURE § 209.345 Water resource policies and authorities. Reimbursement for Advance...

  19. Policy Sciences in Water Resources Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cummings, Ronald G.

    1984-07-01

    As the newly appointed Policy Sciences Editor for this journal, I would like to take this opportunity to introduce myself to WRR's readership as well as to offer a few comments concerning my views of policy sciences in water resources research. I am an economist working in the area of natural resources and environmental management. As such, I've spent a good part of my research career working with noneconomists. During 1969-1972, I worked in Mexico with hydrologists and engineers from Mexico's Water Resources Ministry in efforts to assess management/investment programs for reservoir systems and systems for interbasin water transfers. Between 1972 and 1975, while serving as Chairman of the Department of Resource Economics at the University of Rhode Island, my research involved collaborative efforts with biologists and soil scientists in studies concerning the conjunctive management of reservoirs for agricultural and lagoon systems and the control of salinity levels in soils and aquifers. Since 1975, at which time I joined the faculty at the University of New Mexico, I have worked with engineers at the Los Alamos National Laboratory in developing operation/management models for hot, dry rock geothermal systems and, more recently, with legal scholars and hydrologists in analyses of water rights issues. Thus I am comfortable with and appreciative of research conducted by my colleagues in systems engineering, operations research, and hydrology, as well as those in economics, law, and other social sciences.

  20. Water, Society and the future of water resources research (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, C. M.

    2013-12-01

    The subject of water and society is broad, but at heart is the study of water as a resource, essential to human activities, a vital input to food and energy production, the sustaining medium for ecosystems and yet also a destructive hazard. Society demands, withdraws, competes, uses and wastes the resource in dynamic counterpart. The science of water management emerges from this interface, a field at the nexus of engineering and geoscience, with substantial influence from economics and other social sciences. Within this purview are some of the most pressing environmental questions of our time, such as adaptation to climate change, direct and indirect connections between water and energy policy, the continuing dependence of agriculture on depletion of the world's aquifers, the conservation or preservation of ecosystems within increasingly human-influenced river systems, and food security and poverty reduction for the earth's poorest inhabitants. This presentation will present and support the hypothesis that water resources research is a scientific enterprise separate from, yet closely interrelated to, hydrologic science. We will explore the scientific basis of water resources research, review pressing research questions and opportunities, and propose an action plan for the advancement of the science of water management. Finally, the presentation will propose a Chapman Conference on Water and Society: The Future of Water Resources Research in the spring of 2015.

  1. Water Resources Research and Interdisciplinary Hydrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freeze, R. Allan

    1990-09-01

    Water Resource Research was born under the watchful eye of Walter Langbein, a modern-day Renaissance man whose interests spanned not only hydrology but all of the earth sciences, and not only the earth sciences but all of science. From its founding in1965 to the present day, the editors of WRR have always seen the journal as a medium of interdisciplinary interaction. On this 25th anniversary of WRR, I thought it might be worthwhile to look back on the interdisciplinary successes and failures of the past quarter decade, in our journal and in our science. There is no question that research in water resources is an interdisciplinary endeavor. At my university we have a graduate program in interdisciplinary hydrology on the books, and on those occasions when we gather together, there are students and faculty there from as many as seven different departments: geography, geology, soil science, forestry, civil engineering, mining engineering, and bioresource engineering. In addition, our campus hosts the Westwater Research Institute where physical scientists can get involved in interdisciplinary research with social scientists from regional and community planning, resource management, resource economics, commerce, and law. I suspect that many campuses have a similar breadth of water resources interests. It is this breadth that WRR is designed to serve.

  2. Water Resources of Rapides Parish

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Griffith, J.M.

    2009-01-01

    Rapides Parish, located in central Louisiana, contains fresh groundwater and surface-water resources. In 2005, about 443 million gallons per day (Mgal/d) were withdrawn from water sources in Rapides Parish. About 92 percent (409 Mgal/d) was withdrawn from surface water, and 8 percent (34 Mgal/d) was withdrawn from groundwater. Withdrawals for power generation accounted for 91 percent (403 Mgal/d) of the total water withdrawn. Withdrawals for other uses included public supply (27 Mgal/d), irrigation (9 Mgal/d), and aquaculture (3 Mgal/d). Water withdrawals in the parish generally increased from 1960 to 1995 and decreased from 1995 to 2005. This fact sheet summarizes basic information on the water resources of Rapides Parish, La. Information on groundwater and surface-water availability, quality, development, use, and trends is based on previously published reports listed in the references section.

  3. Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    in water resources, including the management of water resources among competing uses; controlling pollution Quality Focus Category: Water Quality, Sediments, Non Point Pollution Descriptors: AgricultureWater Resources Center Annual Technical Report FY 2001 Introduction Research Program Research

  4. Utah Center for Water Resources Research Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    Department of Natural Resources (UDNR), the State Engineers Office, all 12 local health departments, and several large water management agencies and purveyors in the state with specific water resources problems. These funds were used for research addressing water and wastewater management problems, outreach, information

  5. Center for Water Resources Research Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    Department of Natural Resources (UDNR), the State Engineers Office, all 12 local health departments, and several large water management agencies and purveyors in the state with specific water resources problems. These funds were used for research addressing water and wastewater management problems, outreach, information

  6. Water Resources of Ouachita Parish

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tomaszewski, Dan J.; Lovelace, John K.; Griffith, Jason M.

    2009-01-01

    Ouachita Parish, located in north-central Louisiana, contains fresh groundwater and surface-water resources. In 2005, about 152 million gallons per day (Mgal/d) were withdrawn from water sources in Ouachita Parish. About 84 percent (128 Mgal/d) was withdrawn from surface water, and 16 percent (24 Mgal/d) was withdrawn from groundwater. Power generation (87 Mgal/d) accounted for 58 percent of the total water withdrawn. Withdrawals for other uses included public supply (22 Mgal/d), industrial (24 Mgal/d), and irrigation (18 Mgal/d). This fact sheet summarizes basic information on the water resources of Ouachita Parish, La. Information on groundwater and surface-water availability, quality, development, use, and trends is based on previously published reports.

  7. GLOBAL CHANGE AND WATER RESOURCES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The influence of global change on future water resources is difficult to predict because various components are likely to be affected in opposing ways. Global warming would tend to increase evapotranspiration (ET) rates and irrigation water requirements, while increasing precipitation would both dec...

  8. Water Resources Data, Mississippi, Water Year 2002

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morris, F., III; Turnipseed, D.P.; Storm, J.B.

    2003-01-01

    Water resources data for the 2002 water year for Mississippi consist of records of surface water and ground water in the State. Specifically, it contains: (1) Discharge records for 91 streamflow-gaging stations, stage records for 22 of these gaging stations, discharge records for 91 partial-record stations or miscellaneous streamflow sites, including 13 flood hydrograph partial-record stations, 78 crest-stage partial-record stations, and 0 special study and miscellaneous sites; (2) stage only at 9 gaging stations; (3) water-quality records for 13 streamflow-gaging stations, 7 stage-only stations, and 3 water-quality monitor stations, 0 partial-record stations or miscellaneous sites, 97 short-term study sites, and 39 wells; and (4) water-level records for 18 observation wells. Records obtained from water-resources investigations are also included in special sections of the report. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey, and cooperating local, State, and Federal agencies in Mississippi.

  9. OFFICE OF WATER RESOURCE CENTER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Resource Purpose:The Resource Center provides support to the management of the Immediate Office, Office of Groundwater and Drinking Water, Office of Science and Technology, Office of Wastewater Management, and Office of Wetlands, Oceans, and Watersheds. Support includes: ...

  10. Sanitary engineering and water economy in Europe

    PubMed Central

    Krul, W. F. J. M.

    1957-01-01

    The author deals with a wide variety of aspects of water economy and the development of water resources, relating them to the sanitary engineering problems they give rise to. Among those aspects are the balance between available resources and water needs for various purposes; accumulation and storage of surface and ground water, and methods of replenishing ground water supplies; pollution and purification; and organizational measures to deal with the urgent problems raised by the heavy demands on the world's water supply as a result of both increased population and the increased need for agricultural and industrial development. The author considers that at the national level over-all plans for developing the water economy of countries might well be drawn up by national water boards and that the economy of inter-State river basins should receive international study. In such work the United Nations and its specialized agencies might be of assistance. PMID:13472427

  11. Water resources of Bossier Parish

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Prakken, Lawrence B.; Griffith, Jason M.

    2011-01-01

    In 2005, about 15.8 million gallons per day (Mgal/d) of water were withdrawn in Bossier Parish, Louisiana, including 4.12 Mgal/d from groundwater sources and about 11.7 Mgal/d from surface-water sources. Public-supply use accounted for about 78 percent (12.4 Mgal/d) of the total water withdrawn. Other categories of use included industry, rural domestic, livestock, rice irrigation, general irrigation, and aquaculture. Based on water-use data collected at 5-year intervals from 1960 to 2005, water withdrawals in the parish increased from 4.96 to 15.8 Mgal/d. This fact sheet summarizes basic information on the water resources of Bossier Parish, La. Information on groundwater and surface-water availability, quality, development, use, and trends is based on previously published reports listed in the Selected References section.

  12. Water resources of Vernon Parish

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Prakken, Lawrence B.; Griffith, Jason M.; Fendick, Robert B., Jr.

    2012-01-01

    In 2005, about 6.67 million gallons per day (Mgal/d) of water were withdrawn in Vernon Parish, Louisiana, including about 6.46 Mgal/d from groundwater sources and 0.21 Mgal/d from surface-water sources. Public-supply use accounted for about 76 percent (5.06 Mgal/d) of the total water withdrawn. Other categories of use included rural domestic, livestock, general irrigation, and aquaculture. Based on water-use data collected at 5-year intervals from 1960 to 2005, water withdrawals in the parish peaked in 1990 at about 10.4 Mgal/d. This fact sheet summarizes basic information on the water resources of Vernon Parish, La. Information on groundwater and surface-water availability, quality, development, use, and trends is based on previously published reports listed in the Selected References section.

  13. Ohio Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    Ohio Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report FY 2014 Ohio Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report FY 2014 1 #12;Introduction Pursuant to the Water Resources Research Act of 1964, the Ohio Water Resources Center (WRC) is the federally-authorized and state-designated Water Resources Research

  14. Water Resources of Ascension Parish

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Griffith, J.M.; Fendick, R.B.

    2009-01-01

    Ascension Parish, located along the banks of the Mississippi River in south-central Louisiana, contains fresh groundwater and surface-water resources. In 2005, about 202 million gallons per day (Mgal/d) were withdrawn from water sources in Ascension Parish. About 94 percent (190 Mgal/d) was withdrawn from surface water, and 6 percent (12 Mgal/d) was withdrawn from groundwater. Additional water is supplied to Ascension Parish for public-supply use from East Baton Rouge Parish. Withdrawals for industrial use accounted for 95 percent (192 Mgal/d) of the total water withdrawn. Withdrawals for other uses included public-supply (4 Mgal/d), rural-domestic (3 Mgal/d), and aquaculture (3 Mgal/d). Water withdrawals in the parish generally increased from 1960 to 1995 and decreased from 1995 to 2005. This fact sheet summarizes basic information on the water resources of Ascension Parish, La. Information on groundwater and surface-water availability, quality, development, use, and trends is based on previously published reports listed in the references section.

  15. Water resources data, Kentucky. Water year 1991

    SciTech Connect

    McClain, D.L.; Byrd, F.D.; Brown, A.C.

    1991-12-31

    Water resources data for the 1991 water year for Kentucky consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams and lakes; and water-levels of wells. This report includes daily discharge records for 115 stream-gaging stations. It also includes water-quality data for 38 stations sampled at regular intervals. Also published are 13 daily temperature and 8 specific conductance records, and 85 miscellaneous temperature and specific conductance determinations for the gaging stations. Suspended-sediment data for 12 stations (of which 5 are daily) are also published. Ground-water levels are published for 23 recording and 117 partial sites. Precipitation data at a regular interval is published for 1 site. Additional water data were collected at various sites not involved in the systematic data-collection program and are published as miscellaneous measurement and analyses. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the US Geological Survey and cooperation State and Federal agencies in Kentucky.

  16. Puerto Rico Water Resources & Environmetal Research Institute

    E-print Network

    Puerto Rico Water Resources & Environmetal Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2013 Puerto Rico Water Resources & Environmetal Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 20131 #12;Introduction The Puerto Rico Water Resources and Environmental Research Institute (PRWRERI) is located

  17. Puerto Rico Water Resources & Environmetal Research Institute

    E-print Network

    Puerto Rico Water Resources & Environmetal Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2014 Puerto Rico Water Resources & Environmetal Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 20141 #12;Introduction The Puerto Rico Water Resources and Environmental Research Institute (PRWRERI) is located

  18. Puerto Rico Water Resources & Environmetal Research Institute

    E-print Network

    Puerto Rico Water Resources & Environmetal Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2012 Puerto Rico Water Resources & Environmetal Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 20121 #12;Introduction The Puerto Rico Water Resources and Environmental Research Institute (PRWRERI) is located

  19. Lunar Water Resource Demonstration (LWRD)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muscatello, Anthony C.

    2009-01-01

    Lunar Water Resource Demonstration (LWRD) is part of RESOLVE (Regolith and Environment Science & Oxygen and Lunar Volatile Extraction). RESOLVE is an ISRU ground demonstration: (1) A rover to explore a permanently shadowed crater at the south or north pole of the Moon (2) Drill core samples down to 1 meter (3) Heat the core samples to 150C (4) Analyze gases and capture water and/or hydrogen evolved (5) Use hydrogen reduction to extract oxygen from regolith

  20. Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2004 Introduction The Maryland Water Resources Research Center (MWRRC) supports Maryland's water research and educational needs by funding high priority research projects and sponsoring educational programs and conferences on current water issues

  1. Computing Resources at Chemical and Biochemical Engineering

    E-print Network

    Muzzio, Fernando J.

    Computing Resources at Chemical and Biochemical Engineering Note that use of all Rutgers University) consists of 18 Windows NT Workstations and is primarily reserved for classroom use for Chemical Engineering at Chemical and Biochemical Engineering. DSV Lab. The DSV lab consists of 60 Sun UltraSparc 10 computers. Each

  2. WATER RESOURCES PLANNING ACT Q:\\COMP\\WATER1\\WRPA

    E-print Network

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    103 WATER RESOURCES PLANNING ACT Q:\\COMP\\WATER1\\WRPA December 29, 2000 #12;Q:\\COMP\\WATER1\\WRPA December 29, 2000 #12;105 WATER RESOURCES PLANNING ACT [As Amended Through P.L. 106­580, Dec. 29, 2000 planning of water and related land resources, through the establishment of a water resources council

  3. Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    and agency coordination related to natural resources and environmental sustainability. During FY 2002Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2002 Introduction In 2002, Oregons Resources Program administrates interdisciplinary and multi-agency watershed education and water resources

  4. Water Resources of Caddo Parish

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Prakken, Lawrence B.; Griffith, Jason M.

    2011-01-01

    In 2005, about 72.9 million gallons per day (Mgal/d) of water were withdrawn in Caddo Parish, Louisiana, including about 7.70 Mgal/d from groundwater sources and 65.2 Mgal/d from surface-water sources. Public-supply use accounted for about 71 percent, and power generation accounted for about 19 percent of the total water withdrawn. Other categories of use included general irrigation, rural domestic, aquaculture, livestock, and industrial. Water-use data collected at 5-year intervals from 1960 to 2005 indicate water withdrawals in the parish peaked in 1965 and generally decreased afterwards, primarily because of reduced surface-water withdrawals for power generation. From 1965 to 2005, surface-water withdrawals for power generation declined from 419 to 14.2 Mgal/d. This fact sheet summarizes basic information on the water resources of Caddo Parish, La. Information on groundwater and surface-water availability, quality, development, use, and trends is based on previously published reports listed in the references section.

  5. Water resources of Webster Parish

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Prakken, Lawrence B.; Griffith, Jason M.

    2011-01-01

    In 2005, about 9.52 million gallons per day (Mgal/d) of water were withdrawn in Webster Parish, Louisiana (fig. 1), including about 9.33 Mgal/d from groundwater sources and 0.19 Mgal/d from surface-water sources1 (table 1). Publicsupply use accounted for about 70 percent of the total water withdrawn. Other categories of use included industrial, rural domestic, livestock, general irrigation, and aquaculture (table 2). Water-use data collected at 5-year intervals from 1960 to 2005 indicate water withdrawals in Webster Parish decreased substantially from 1970 to 1980; surface-water withdrawals for industrial use decreased from about 37 to 0 Mgal/d because of a paper mill closure in 1979. From 1980 to 2000, total water withdrawals in the parish ranged from 7 to 8 Mgal/d (fig. 2). This fact sheet summarizes basic information on the water resources of Webster Parish, La. Information on groundwater and surface-water availability, quality, development, use, and trends is based on previously published reports listed in the Selected References section.

  6. Ohio Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    Category: Water Quality, Surface Water, Non Point Pollution Descriptors: Principal Investigators: Dominic LOhio Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report FY 2010 Ohio Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report FY 2010 1 #12;Introduction Pursuant to the Water Resources Research Act of 1964, the Water

  7. Water Resources of Lafayette Parish

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fendick, Robert B., Jr.; Griffith, Jason M.; Prakken, Lawrence B.

    2011-01-01

    Fresh groundwater and surface water resources are available in Lafayette Parish, which is located in south-central Louisiana. In 2005, more than 47 million gallons per day (Mgal/d) were withdrawn from water sources in Lafayette Parish. About 92 percent (43.7 Mgal/d) of withdrawals was groundwater, and 8 percent (3.6 Mgal/d) was surface water. Public-supply withdrawals accounted for nearly 49 percent (23 Mgal/d) of the total groundwater use, with the cities of Lafayette and Carencro using about 21 Mgal/d. Withdrawals for other uses included about 10.4 Mgal/d for rice irrigation and about 8.4 Mgal/d for aquaculture. Water withdrawals in Lafayette Parish increased from 33 Mgal/d in 1995 to about 47 Mgal/d in 2005. This fact sheet summarizes information on the water resources of Lafayette Parish, La. Information on groundwater and surface-water availability, quality, development, use, and trends is based on previously published reports listed in the references section.

  8. Water resources of Allen Parish

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Prakken, Lawrence B.; Griffith, Jason M.; Fendick, Robert B., Jr.

    2012-01-01

    In 2005, approximately 29.2 million gallons per day (Mgal/d) of water were withdrawn in Allen Parish, Louisiana, including about 26.8 Mgal/d from groundwater sources and 2.45 Mgal/d from surface-water sources. Rice irrigation accounted for 74 percent (21.7 Mgal/d) of the total water withdrawn. Other categories of use included public supply, industrial, rural domestic, livestock, general irrigation, and aquaculture. Water-use data collected at 5-year intervals from 1960 to 2005 indicate water withdrawals in the parish were greatest in 1960 (119 Mgal/d) and 1980 (98.7 Mgal/d). The substantial decrease in surface-water use between 1960 and 1965 is primarily attributable to rice-irrigation withdrawals declining from 61.2 to 6.74 Mgal/d. This fact sheet summarizes information on the water resources of Allen Parish, La. Information on groundwater and surface-water availability, quality, development, use, and trends is based on previously published reports listed in the Selected References section.

  9. Annual water-resources review, White Sands Missile Range: 1971

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cruz, R.R.

    1972-01-01

    This report presents water-resource information that was collected at White Sands Missile Range during 1971 and early 1972 by personnel of the U.S. Geological Survey, Water Resources Division. Data on ground-water pumpage and resulting water-level fluctuation, chemical quality, percipitation, and surface-water runoff are summarized in the report. The data were obtained as a result of the continuing water-resources basic-data collection program sponsored by the Facilities Engineering Directorate, White Sands Missile Range.

  10. Arkansas Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    with water quality of surface water and ground water, especially non-point source pollution and sensitive, ground water modeling and landuse mapping, erosion and pollution, water quality and ecosystem functionsArkansas Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report FY 2009 Arkansas Water Resources Center

  11. Institute of Water Resources Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    Pollution, Surface Water, Water Quality Descriptors: Bacteria, Suspended Sediments, Water Quality Monitoring Pollution, Surface Water, WInstitute of Water Resources Annual Technical Report FY 2002 Introduction In fiscal year 2002

  12. Increasing life expectancy of water resources literature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heistermann, M.; Francke, T.; Georgi, C.; Bronstert, A.

    2014-06-01

    In a study from 2008, Larivière and colleagues showed, for the field of natural sciences and engineering, that the median age of cited references is increasing over time. This result was considered counterintuitive: with the advent of electronic search engines, online journal issues and open access publications, one could have expected that cited literature is becoming younger. That study has motivated us to take a closer look at the changes in the age distribution of references that have been cited in water resources journals since 1965. Not only could we confirm the findings of Larivière and colleagues. We were also able to show that the aging is mainly happening in the oldest 10-25% of an average reference list. This is consistent with our analysis of top-cited papers in the field of water resources. Rankings based on total citations since 1965 consistently show the dominance of old literature, including text books and research papers in equal shares. For most top-cited old-timers, citations are still growing exponentially. There is strong evidence that most citations are attracted by publications that introduced methods which meanwhile belong to the standard toolset of researchers and practitioners in the field of water resources. Although we think that this trend should not be overinterpreted as a sign of stagnancy, there might be cause for concern regarding how authors select their references. We question the increasing citation of textbook knowledge as it holds the risk that reference lists become overcrowded, and that the readability of papers deteriorates.

  13. Water Resources of Beauregard Parish

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Prakken, Lawrence B.; Griffith, Jason M.; Fendick, Robert B., Jr.

    2012-01-01

    In 2005, about 30.6 million gallons per day (Mgal/d) of water was withdrawn in Beauregard Parish, Louisiana, including about 30.4 Mgal/d from groundwater sources and 0.1 Mgal/d from surface water sources. Industrial use, primarily for wood products, accounted for about 72 percent (22.0 Mgal/d) of the total water withdrawn. Other categories of use included public supply, rural domestic, livestock, rice irrigation, general irrigation, and aquaculture. Water-use data collected at 5-year intervals from 1960 to 2005 indicate water withdrawals in the parish peaked at about 43.5 Mgal/d in 1985. The large increase in groundwater usage from 1970 to 1975 was primarily due to industrial withdrawals, which increased from 3.64 Mgl/d in 1970 to 29.0 Mgal/d in 1975. This fact sheet summarizes information on the water resources of Beauregard Parish, La. Information on groundwater and surface-water availability, quality, development, use, and trends is based on previously published reports listed in the Selected References section.

  14. PUERTO RICO WATER RESOURCES AND ENVIRONMENTAL

    E-print Network

    Gilbes, Fernando

    PUERTO RICO WATER RESOURCES AND ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH INSTITUTE REQUEST FOR PROPOSAL FY 2011 WATER. #12;RFP Water Resources Research Grant State Program FY2009 1 PUERTO RICO WATER RESOURCES resources problems of state and regional significance. The research priority areas for Puerto Rico

  15. New York State Water Resources Institute

    E-print Network

    Walter, M.Todd

    New York State Water Resources Institute Prioritizing Culverts and Dams in the Hudson River Estuary Program New York State Department of Environmental Conservation in cooperation with Cornell University NYS Water Resources Institute New York State Water Resources Institute New York State Water Resources

  16. Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    as authorized by section 104 of the Water Resources Research Act of 1984 (Public Law 98-242) as amendedWater Resources Center Annual Technical Report FY 2005 Introduction Delaware Water Resources Center June 30, 2006 The Delaware Water Resources Center receives an annual Federal matching grant

  17. Texas Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    Texas Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2007 Texas Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2007 1 #12;Introduction The Texas Water Resources Institute (TWRI), a unit of Texas AMAgriLife, and member of the National Institutes for Water Resources, provides leadership

  18. Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report FY 2009 Water Resources Center Annual Technical of Minnesota's Water Resources Center (WRC). The WRC is a collaborative enterprise involving several colleges programs, the WRC is also home to the Water Resources Sciences graduate major which offers both MS and Ph

  19. Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report FY 2006 #12;Introduction Delaware Water Resources Center June 30, 2007 The Delaware Water Resources Center receives an annual Federal matching grant as authorized by section 104 of the Water Resources Research Act of 1984 (Public Law 98-242) as amended

  20. Program Guidelines Master of Water Resources Degree

    E-print Network

    New Mexico, University of

    Program Guidelines Master of Water Resources Degree Water Resources Program University of New Mexico August 2015 Robert P. Berrens, Ph.D. Professor & Director Water Resources Program Social Sciences Guidelines August 2015 The Master of Water Resources Degree Table of Contents MISSION STATEMENT

  1. THE NAVAJO NATION DEPARTMENT OF WATER RESOURCES

    E-print Network

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    THE NAVAJO NATION DEPARTMENT OF WATER RESOURCES P.O. BOX 678 *FORT DEFIANCE, ARIZONA 86504 *(928 to the Water Resources Reform and Development Act of2014. The Navajo Nation Department of Water Resources of Water Resources, the Navajo Tribal Utility Authority, the Indian Health Service, the U.S. Department

  2. Nebraska Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    Risk Management Strategies in Water Resources. The second event was a one-day water law conference-sponsored by the University of Nebraska College of Law. The Nebraska Water Center also assisted the UNL Office of ResearchNebraska Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report FY 2013 Nebraska Water Resources Center

  3. Wyoming Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    Wyoming Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report FY 1999 Introduction Research Program In the west, water is critical to survival. Data and information concerning this resource are very valuable by the Water Research Program. Basic Project Information Category Data Title Water Resources Data System Water

  4. Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report FY 2007 Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report FY 2007 1 #12;Introduction The Rhode Island Water Resources Center has supported one information transfer project, "Clean Drinking Water in Rhode Island" and one research project "Enhancing Drinking Water

  5. Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2003 Introduction The Florida Water for Wetlands and Water Resources Research in 1995. Historically, since 1964, the WRRC as a separate or combined center has been a university-wide focus for water-resources research and has served as the Water

  6. Natural Resources in China ! Water resources

    E-print Network

    Pan, Feifei

    (evaporation + transpiration) for all the processes by which water in the liquid or solid phase at or near the land surface becomes water vapor. Water Bare soil Vegetated evaporation evaporation transpiration uptake evaporation evaporation #12;Transpiration Capillary rise is the rise in a liquid above the level

  7. Connecticut Institute of Water Resources Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    to the head of the Department of Natural Resources Management and Engineering, in the College of Agriculture and Natural Resources. The current Director is Dr. Glenn Warner, and the Associate Director is Dr. PatriciaConnecticut Institute of Water Resources Annual Technical Report FY 2006 #12;Introduction

  8. Water Resources Division training catalog

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hotchkiss, W.R.; Foxhoven, L.A.

    1984-01-01

    The National Training Center provides technical and management sessions nesessary for the conductance of the U.S. Geological Survey 's training programs. This catalog describes the facilities and staff at the Lakewood Training Center and describes Water Resources Division training courses available through the center. In addition, the catalog describes the procedures for gaining admission, formulas for calculating fees, and discussion of course evaluations. (USGS)

  9. Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 1999 Introduction ABSTRACT The FY 1999 Oregon Water Resources Research Institute (OWRRI) program included four research projects funded Coastal Lakes: Water Quality Status and Management Implications Based on Nutrient Loading OWRRI sponsored

  10. Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report FY 2003 Introduction Research Program Research priorities for the Illinois Water Resources Center (IWRC) include: Watershed and stream protection; integrated water management for multiple users; wetland processes; and emerging issues, including other

  11. EAWAG: An Environmental Science and Engineering Resource.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Stanton

    1980-01-01

    Interviewed is the director of a Swiss research and teaching institute in the field of water resources, water pollution control, and waste management. Topics include lake studies, research programs and priorities, advisory services, and the organizational structure of EAWAG. (BT)

  12. Arkansas Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    quality of surface water and ground water, especially non-point source pollution and sensitive ecosystems, ground water modeling and landuse mapping, erosion and pollution, water quality and ecosystem functionsArkansas Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report FY 2010 Arkansas Water Resources Center

  13. Nebraska Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    been hired in a variety of water-related fields including, water law, water chemistry, surface and hydrologic systems information are now being searched. The third annual Water Law, Policy and ScienceNebraska Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report FY 2007 Nebraska Water Resources Center

  14. Georgia Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    the Georgia Environmental Protection Division, water and power utilities, environmental organizations, lakeGeorgia Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2007 Georgia Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2007 1 #12;Introduction The Georgia Water Resources Institute (GWRI) strives

  15. Arkansas Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    Arkansas Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report FY 2000 Introduction Statewide Mission. The Arkansas Water Resources Center (AWRC) has a statewide mission to plan and conduct water resource research in Eastern Arkansas: Geochemical Tools to Characterize Sources of Saline Water Project Number: B-02 Start

  16. Arkansas Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    quality of surface water and groundwater, especially non-point source pollution and sensitive ecosystemsArkansas Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report FY 2013 Arkansas Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report FY 2013 1 #12;Introduction The Arkansas Water Resources Center is part

  17. Arkansas Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    Pollution Descriptors: animal waste, feed additive, water quality, land application, non-point sourceArkansas Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report FY 2001 Introduction Statewide Mission: The Arkansas Water Resources Center (AWRC) has a statewide mission to plan and conduct water resource research

  18. Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    point for water resources research. The WRRC is funded in part by Section 104 of Public Law 98Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2002 Introduction The Florida Water for Wetlands and Water Resources Research in 1995. Historically, since 1964, the WRRC as a separate or combined

  19. Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    management, water law, economics and public health, from the three Arizona universities are invited to applyWater Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2008 Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2008 1 #12;Introduction The University of Arizona's Water Resources Research

  20. Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    point for water resources research. The WRRC is funded in part by Section 104 of Public Law 98Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2001 Introduction The Florida Water for Wetlands and Water Resources Research in 1995. Historically, since 1964, the WRRC as a separate or combined

  1. Illinois Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    of the mosquito life cycle to see if vegetation management and composition in urban water bodies impact survivalIllinois Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report FY 2014 Illinois Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report FY 2014 1 #12;Introduction In 2014, the Illinois Water Resources Center secured

  2. THE NAVAJO NATION DEPARTMENT OF WATER RESOURCES

    E-print Network

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    THE NAVAJO NATION DEPARTMENT OF WATER RESOURCES P.O. BOX 678 *FORT DEFIANCE, ARIZONA 86504 *(928 to the Water Resources Reform and Development Act of2014. The Navajo Nation Department of Water Resources (NNDWR) is submitting proposals for four critically needed water projects: 1. The Southwest Navajo Rural

  3. THE NAVAJO NATION DEPARTMENT OF WATER RESOURCES

    E-print Network

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    THE NAVAJO NATION DEPARTMENT OF WATER RESOURCES P.O. BOX 678 *FORT DEFIANCE, ARIZONA 86504 *(928 to the Water Resources Reform and Development Act of2014. The Navajo Nation Depattment of Water Resources (NNDWR) is submitting proposals for four critically needed water projects: I. The Southwest Navajo Rural

  4. Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2013 Water Resources Research Center of Agriculture and Life Sciences, the University of Arizona Water Resources Research Center (WRRC) has a mission to promote understanding of critical state and regional water management and policy issues through research

  5. Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2014 Water Resources Research Center of Agriculture and Life Sciences, the University of Arizona Water Resources Research Center (WRRC) has a mission to promote understanding of critical state and regional water management and policy issues through research

  6. Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    , chromatographic separation, oil production, extractive metallurgy, lubrication, coating and cleaning (Osipow 1962Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report FY 2009 Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report FY 2009 1 #12;Introduction Pursuant to the Water Resources Research Act of 1964, the Water

  7. Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    a safe method for disinfection of drinking water. Their hypothesis was that having antibacterial agentsWater Resources Center Annual Technical Report FY 2012 Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report FY 2012 1 #12;Introduction During FY2012 the Rhode Island Water Resources Center has supported two

  8. Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2007 Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2007 1 #12;Introduction The University of Wisconsin Water Resources Institute (WRI activities. The WRI also supports a library containing more than 26,000 volumes covering all major water

  9. Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2008 Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2008 1 #12;Introduction The University of Wisconsin Water Resources Institute (WRI activities. The WRI also supports a library containing more than 26,000 volumes covering all major water

  10. Georgia Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    of Natural Resources, water and power utilities, environmental organizations and citizen groups, and lake Department of Natural Resources/ Environmental Protection Division under grant #2006R69. (8) TechnicalGeorgia Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2010 Georgia Water Resources Institute

  11. Center for Water Resources Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    Center for Water Resources Annual Technical Report FY 2010 Center for Water Resources Annual the adoption of management practices that prevent degradation of watersheds and water resources caused Technical Report FY 2010 1 #12;Introduction The people and resources of the University of California

  12. Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2000 Introduction This program report-June fiscal year rather than the March-February USGS Grant Award period. The New Mexico Water Resources Resources Research Act. It is considered to be the statewide nucleus for coordinating water resources

  13. College of Earth Resource Sciences and Engineering (CERSE) Department of Petroleum Engineering

    E-print Network

    College of Earth Resource Sciences and Engineering (CERSE) Department of Petroleum Engineering the satisfactory completion of a background investigation. #12;College of Earth Resource Sciences and Engineering

  14. Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    temperature, alkalinity and pH, nutrients, and bacteria. This data was analyzed to determine if any temporal and the level of chloride in the water. KEYWORDS: water quality, environmental monitoring, water pollutionWater Resources Center Annual Technical Report FY 2008 Water Resources Center Annual Technical

  15. Arkansas Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    quality of surface water and groundwater, especially non-point source pollution and sensitive ecosystems wastewater disposal systems, ground water modeling and land use mapping, erosion and pollution, water qualityArkansas Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report FY 2012 Arkansas Water Resources Center

  16. Nebraska Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    director. The second event was a one-day water law conference, designed for practicing attorneys College of Law. The Water Center also assisted the UNL Office of Research with the third annual WaterNebraska Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report FY 2011 Nebraska Water Resources Center

  17. Nebraska Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    Water Law, Policy, and Science conference, "Blue Gold: When Water Meets Money" was held on April 29Nebraska Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report FY 2009 Nebraska Water Resources Center of the University of Nebraska Water Center through August of 2009. Dr. Bruce I. Dvorak took over as Interim Director

  18. Center for Water Resources Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    , heights of inland water bodies (e.g. rivers, lakes, reservoirs) and changes in total water storageCenter for Water Resources Annual Technical Report FY 2006 #12;Introduction The UC Center for Water that will contribute to the efficient management of water resources within the state. Meeting the needs of the urban

  19. West Virginia Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    of Energy - National Energy Technology Laboratory $ U.S. Army Corps of Engineers - Huntington, WV District Committee for Water Research. Energy production impacts on water resources (oil and gas drilling; hydroelectric; biofuels; etc.); Nutrient reduction/nutrient control/sources of air deposition Mercury

  20. A DEMONSTRATION OF AREAWIDE WATER RESOURCES PLANNING

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Metropolitan Washington Council of Governments Framework Water Resources Planning Model developed and tested under this study is a comprehensive analytical tool for use in areawide water resources management planning. The physical simulation portion was formed by linking comp...

  1. Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2010 Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2010 1 #12;Introduction This program report provides required.nmsu.edu) provides online information about the institute, newsletters, technical report series, requests

  2. Environmental Evaluation of Water Resources Development 

    E-print Network

    James, W. P.; Woods, C. E.; Blanz, R. E.

    1976-01-01

    Methodology for the utilization of LANDSAT-1 imagery and aerial photography on the environmental evaluation of water resources development is presented. Environmental impact statements for water resource projects were collected and reviewed...

  3. Slowflow Signatures of Sustainable Water Resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartz, S. S.; Smith, B.

    2012-12-01

    Land transformation changes the sustainability of water resources by (a) altering the vegetation, impervious landcover, and drainage of the land surface hydrology system; (b) increasing withdrawals from surface and groundwater systems to support human water use; and (c) re-engineering the water budget through water and wastewater infrastructure that conveys interbasin water transfers and modifies both recharge and subsurface drainage. Slowflow derived from observed streamflow integrates watershed-scale hydrologic forcings and cumulative landscape changes. Multiple slowflow indices derived from USGS streamflow records are used to frame an endpoint mixing model of dominant hydrologic processes and human hydrologic alteration. Multimetric slowflow fingerprints can support more refined process-based inferences, distinguishing, e.g., changes in hydrologic response - (runoff and recharge) from changes in hydraulic response (effective aquifer drainage) in regional streamflow analysis. Examples drawn from USGS streamflow records along the urban-rural landuse gradient in the watersheds of the Baltimore Ecosystem Study (an NSF Urban Long Term Ecological Research site in the Baltimore Metropolitan area) and piedmont Hydroclimatic Data Network (HCDN) basins in the Chesapeake Bay watershed, are used to illustrate multimetric fingerprinting of slowflow response. Within the inherent limits of equifinality in observed streamflow response, multimetric slowflow analysis can refine the signature and attribution of hydroclimatic variability and human hydrologic alteration inferred from regional streamflow information.

  4. Scouting It Out: Interpreting Water Resources at the National Jamboree.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hays, Dave

    1998-01-01

    Federal natural-resource-management agencies combined efforts with volunteer scouting staff to develop a conservation area at the 1997 National Boy Scout Jamboree. Profiles the program, which adopted the theme of environmental stewardship, and focuses on how the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers interpreted water resources. The exhibit highlighted the…

  5. Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 1999 Introduction WATER PROBLEMS AND ISSUES OF MISSOURI The water problems and issues in the State of Missouri can be separated into three general areas: 1) water quality, 2) water quantity, and 3) water policy. Each of Missouri's specific

  6. Summary Analysis [United States Water Resources Council].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roose, John B.; Cobb, Gary D.

    This report contains a summary and analysis of public response to the Water Resources Council proposed principles and standards and its accompanying draft environmental impact statement for planning the use of water and related land resources as well as planning and evaluating water and related land resources programs and projects. Both written…

  7. WRRC Report No. 153 Water Resources Publications

    E-print Network

    District of Columbia, University of the

    ) Social Sciences incl. economics, law, political science, sociology, water resources policy or planningWRRC Report No. 153 Water Resources Publications Pertaining to the District of Columbia - Second Edition - DC WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH CENTER University of the District of Columbia Washington, DC March

  8. Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    point for water resources research. The WRRC is funded in part by Section 104 of Public Law 98Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 1999 Introduction PROGRAM REPORT FLORIDA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH CENTER FEDERAL GRANT NO. 1434-HQ-96-GRO2663 PERIOD: March 1, 1999 - February 29

  9. Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report FY 2004 Introduction The Delaware Water Resources Center receives an annual Federal matching grant as authorized by section 104 of the Water Resources Research Act of 1984 (Public Law 98-242) as amended by Public Law 101-397, Public Law 104-147, and Public

  10. Texas Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    Texas Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2012 Texas Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2012 1 #12;Introduction The Texas Water Resources Institute (TWRI), a unit of Texas A&M AgriLife Research, Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service and the College of Agriculture

  11. Texas Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    Texas Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2011 Texas Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2011 1 #12;Introduction The Texas Water Resources Institute (TWRI), a unit of Texas AgriLife Research, Texas AgriLife Extension Service and the College of Agriculture and Life

  12. Texas Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    Texas Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2010 Texas Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2010 1 #12;Introduction The Texas Water Resources Institute (TWRI), a unit of Texas AgriLife Research, Texas AgriLife Extension Service and the College of Agriculture and Life

  13. Texas Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    Texas Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2008 Texas Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2008 1 #12;Introduction The Texas Water Resources Institute (TWRI), a unit of Texas AgriLife Research, Texas AgriLife Extension Service and the College of Agriculture and Life

  14. Texas Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    Texas Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2009 Texas Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2009 1 #12;Introduction The Texas Water Resources Institute (TWRI), a unit of Texas AgriLife Research, Texas AgriLife Extension Service and the College of Agriculture and Life

  15. Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 1999 Introduction 1999 New Mexico Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report Grant Award 1434-HQ-96- GR02687 Base Grant Mexico Water Resources Research Institute (NMWRRI) was established in 1963 by the New Mexico State

  16. Journal of the Nevada Water Resources Association

    E-print Network

    Piechota, Thomas C.

    Journal of the Nevada Water Resources Association Fall 2004 A publication of the Nevada Water Resources Association, providing hydrologic information to the people of Nevada Volume 1, Number 1 #12;Nevada Water Resources Association Executive Director Donna Bloom President Mark Forest Editor

  17. Arkansas Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    Arkansas Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report FY 2002 Introduction Statewide Mission: The Arkansas Water Resources Center (AWRC) has a statewide mission to plan and conduct water resource research. AWRC cooperates closely with colleges, universities, and other organizations in Arkansas to address

  18. Research on Texas Water and Recreation Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas A and M Univ., College Station. Texas Agricultural Experiment Station.

    The need for research pertaining to the best use of water and recreation resources in Texas is emphasized in these four papers presented at the 1968 Experiment Station Conference, College Station, Texas. "Parameters of Water Resources in Texas" identifies and elaborates upon the important elements presently constituting the water resources

  19. Texas Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    (1); water treatment (1); non-point pollution (1); and water quality (5). Note that several projectsTexas Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2003 Introduction The Mission of the Texas Water Resources Institute is to: (1) Provide leadership for Experiment Station and Extension

  20. Arkansas Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    quality of surface water and groundwater, especially non-point source pollution and sensitive ecosystems modeling and landuse mapping, erosion and pollution, water quality and ecosystem functions. The CenterArkansas Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report FY 2011 Arkansas Water Resources Center

  1. Arkansas Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    quality and quantity of surface water and groundwater, especially non-point source pollution and sensitive and pollution, innovation in domestic wastewater disposal systems, ground water modeling and land use mappingArkansas Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report FY 2014 Arkansas Water Resources Center

  2. Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    /Non-Point/Runoff · Ocean Outfall Biomonitoring · General Marine Water Quality · Economics/Policy/Law · ClimateWater Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2013 Water Resources Research Center areas, water shortages and quality problems are more critical in Hawaii and the Pacific because

  3. Nebraska Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    Research Initiative (WRRI) completed into its fifth and final year. The annual Water Law, PolicyNebraska Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report FY 2008 Nebraska Water Resources Center of the University of Nebraska Water Center since 2000, with Michael Jess as associate director, and Lorrie Benson, J

  4. Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    /Non-Point/Runoff· Ocean Outfall Biomonitoring· General Marine Water Quality· Economics/Policy/Law· ClimateWater Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2014 Water Resources Research Center areas, water shortages and quality problems are more critical in Hawaii and the Pacific because

  5. Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    which are designed to protect the designated uses of each classified water body in the State. While-enrichment of Delaware's water bodies is due to soil erosion, failing septic systems, and nutrient losses from landWater Resources Center Annual Technical Report FY 1999 Introduction The Water Resource Problems

  6. Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    contributes as much to a water allocation problem as water scarcity itself. To compound the situation, NewWater Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2006 #12;Introduction This program. The New Mexico Water Resources Research Institute (NMWRRI) was established in 1963 by the New Mexico State

  7. Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    contributes as much to a water allocation problem as water scarcity itself. To compound the situation, NewWater Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2005 Introduction This program report. The New Mexico Water Resources Research Institute (NMWRRI) was established in 1963 by the New Mexico State

  8. Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    . Such widely varied precipitation is as much a water allocation problem as water scarcity itself. Like otherWater Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2001 Introduction This program report. The New Mexico Water Resources Research Institute (NMWRRI) was established in 1963 by the New Mexico State

  9. Illinois Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    /31/2008 Funding Source: 104G Congressional District: 15th Illinois Research Category: Water Quality Focus Category: Non Point Pollution, Sediments, Water Quality Descriptors: Principal Investigators: Charles J. WerthIllinois Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report FY 2008 Illinois Water Resources Center

  10. Elementary soil and water engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Schwab, G.O.; Frevert, R.K.

    1985-01-01

    Between 1967-1975 the Northwest lost 325 acres per day of prime farmland, the Midwest (our nation's bread basket) 493 acres, and the Southwest 548 acres per day. We lost one million acres like this each year, three million for all rural land. Six problems affect our diminishing soil and water resources: erosion, drainage, irrigation, conservation of soil moisture, efficiency of water storage, floods. The first five problems are discussed in this book.

  11. 78 FR 10615 - Westfield Water Resources Department; Notice of Application Accepted for Filing and Soliciting...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-14

    ...Project would be located on a water supply pipeline entering the...Contact: Mr. Charles Darling, Water Systems Engineer, Westfield Water Resources Department, 28 Sackett...p. All filings must (1) Bear in all capital letters the...

  12. Front Range Infrastructure Resources Project: water-resources activities

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robson, Stanley G.; Heiny, Janet S.

    1998-01-01

    Infrastructure, such as roads, buildings, airports, and dams, is built and maintained by use of large quantities of natural resources such as aggregate (sand and gravel), energy, and water. As urban area expand, local sources of these resource are becoming inaccessible (gravel cannot be mined from under a subdivision, for example), or the cost of recovery of the resource becomes prohibitive (oil and gas drilling in urban areas is costly), or the resources may become unfit for some use (pollution of ground water may preclude its use as a water supply). Governmental land-use decision and environmental mandates can further preclude development of natural resources. If infrastructure resources are to remain economically available. current resource information must be available for use in well-reasoned decisions bout future land use. Ground water is an infrastructure resource that is present in shallow aquifers and deeper bedrock aquifers that underlie much of the 2,450-square-mile demonstration area of the Colorado Front Range Infrastructure Resources Project. In 1996, mapping of the area's ground-water resources was undertaken as a U.S. Geological Survey project in cooperation with the Colorado Department of Natural Resources, Division of Water Resources, and the Colorado Water Conservation Board.

  13. Uncertainty Management in Urban Water Engineering Adaptation to Climate Change

    EPA Science Inventory

    Current water resource planning and engineering assume a stationary climate, in which the observed historical water flow rate and water quality variations are often used to define the technical basis. When the non-stationarity is considered, however, climate change projection co...

  14. NASA Earth Resources Survey Symposium. Volume 1-D: Water resources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Conference papers on water resources and management are summarized. Summaries cover land use, flood control and prediction, watersheds and the effects of snow melt, soil moisture content, and the usefulness of satellite remote sensors in detecting ground and surface water.

  15. Classification of geothermal resources - an engineering approach

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, K.C.

    1996-12-31

    Geothermal resources have been classified into low, intermediate and high enthalpy resources by their reservoir temperatures. The temperature ranges used are arbitrary and there is not a general agreement. Geothermal resources should be classified by two independent thermodynamic properties of their fluids at the wellhead. They should reflect the fluids availability to do work. By setting the triple point of water as the sink condition, and normalizing the fluids specific energies by the maximum specific energy of dry saturated steam, geothermal resources can be classified into high, medium, and low category resources by their specific energy indices (SEI) of greater than 0.5, between 0.05 and 0.5, and less than 0.05. These correspond to geothermal fluids having energies greater than that of dry saturated steam at 1 bar absolute, between saturated water and dry saturated steam at 1 bar absolute, and less than saturated water at 1 bar absolute respectively.

  16. Classification of Geothermal Resources - An engineering approach

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, K.C.

    1996-01-24

    Geothermal resources have been classified into low, intermediate and high enthalpy resources by their reservoir temperatures. The temperature ranges used are arbitrary and there is not a general agreement. Geothermal resources should be classified by two independent thermodynamic properties of their fluids at the wellhead. They should reflect the fluids availability to do work. By setting the triple point of water as the sink condition, and normalising the fluids specific exergies by the maximum specific exergy of dry saturated steam, geothermal resources can be classified into high, medium, and low category resources by their specific exergy indices (SEI) of greater than 0.5, between 0.05 and 0.5, and less than 0.05. These correspond to geothermal fluids having exergies greater than that of dry saturated steam at 1 bar absolute, between saturated water and dry saturated steam at 1 bar absolute, and less than saturated water at 1 bar absolute respectively.

  17. DC WRRC Report No. 127 GROUND WATER RESOURCE ASSESSMENT STUDY FOR

    E-print Network

    District of Columbia, University of the

    DC WRRC Report No. 127 GROUND WATER RESOURCE ASSESSMENT STUDY FOR THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA WELL pollution on the District of Columbia's ground water. 'PROJECT STAFF *GOURND WATER RESOURCE ASSESSMENT STUDY Dept of Engineering Kobina Atobrah ­ Geomatrix, Inc. #12;DC WRRC Report No. 127 GROUND WATER RESOURCE

  18. Contamination of water resources by pathogenic bacteria

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Water-borne pathogen contamination in water resources and related diseases are a major water quality concern throughout the world. Increasing interest in controlling water-borne pathogens in water resources evidenced by a large number of recent publications clearly attests to the need for studies that synthesize knowledge from multiple fields covering comparative aspects of pathogen contamination, and unify them in a single place in order to present and address the problem as a whole. Providing a broader perceptive of pathogen contamination in freshwater (rivers, lakes, reservoirs, groundwater) and saline water (estuaries and coastal waters) resources, this review paper attempts to develop the first comprehensive single source of existing information on pathogen contamination in multiple types of water resources. In addition, a comprehensive discussion describes the challenges associated with using indicator organisms. Potential impacts of water resources development on pathogen contamination as well as challenges that lie ahead for addressing pathogen contamination are also discussed. PMID:25006540

  19. Nebraska Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    -related fields including, water law, water chemistry, surface hydrology, climate modeling, water economics searched. The third annual Water Law, Policy and Science Conference was hosted by the UniversityNebraska Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report FY 2005 Introduction Dr. Kyle D. Hoagland

  20. Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    nitrate levels in underground sources of drinking water are a potential health concern, as well iron concentrations in well water and salt water intrusion are also ground water concerns for the StateWater Resources Center Annual Technical Report FY 2000 Introduction Delaware has more than 2

  1. Georgia Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    's Future , co-sponsored by GWRI, Ga EPD, ASCE, USGS. (3) Mega City Water Forum: Innovative Water Supply-basins as well as basinwide; (ii) assess the water amounts available in each sub-basin to meet current and future the Georgia Water Resources Conference, the Mega-City Water Forum, and the Kindsvater Symposium. CALIFORNIA

  2. Arkansas Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    irrigation, ground water modeling, non-point source pollution, quality of ground water and surface water Utilities, 6) Upper White River Basin Foundation, 7) Walton Family Foundation, Inc. 8) Beaver Water DistrictArkansas Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report FY 2005 Introduction Statewide Mission

  3. Arkansas Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    irrigation, ground water modeling, non-point source pollution, quality of ground water and surface water of Environmental Quality, 9)Rogers Water Utilities, 10)Upper White River Basin Foundation, 11)Walton FamilyArkansas Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report FY 2006 #12;Introduction State Wide Mission

  4. International cooperation in water resources

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jones, J.R.; Beall, R.M.; Giusti, E.V.

    1979-01-01

    Advancements in hydrology proceeded slowly until the late 1800's when new ventures created a surge of interest and accomplishment. Progress waned again until the middle 20th century when an International Hydrological Decade was conceived, eventually receiving wide multinational support from governmental agencies and nongovernmental institutions. Organized by UNESCO, the Decade program was launched January 1, 1965. Participation included 107 nations, six United Nations agencies, and more than a dozen international scientific organizations. The initial program emphasized scientific research, and international cooperation; the second half of the Decade, emphasized technical assistance and technology transfer, largerly through education, training and demonstration. The success of the Decade led to the establishment of the International Hydrological Program, again under the aegis of UNESCO, to continue the work of the Decade indefinitely. The five major program activities, now involving about 90 countries and several international organizations, include: the scientific program, the promotion of education and training, the enhancement of information exchange, support of technical assistance, and the enlargement of regional cooperation. A significant amount of activity related to hydrological data networks and forecasting is carried on in an Operational Hydrology Programme by the WMO, chiefly through its Commission for Hydrology. Other international governmental organizations with a strong interest in water include the UN, the UN Development Programme, the FAO, the WHO, the International Atomic Energy Agency, the UN Environment Programme, the International Standardization Organization, and developmental institutions such as the World Bank. The specialized interests of researchers outside of the governmental structure, are met through association in various scientific and technical organizations which are world wide in scope and membership. Notwithstanding a sometimes bewildering variety of organizations, there certainly exists, for any nation, group, or individual, a demonstrated mechanism for almost any conceivable form of international cooperation in hydrology and water resources. ?? 1979 Akademische Verlagsgesellschaft.

  5. Water Resources Data-Missouri, Water Year 2003

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hauck, H.S.; Nagel, C.D.

    2004-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, Water Resources Division, in cooperation with local, State, and Federal agencies and organizations, obtains a large quantity of data pertaining to the water resources of Missouri each water year (October 1 to September 30). These data, accumulated during the water years, constitute a valuable data base for developing an improved understanding of the water resources of Missouri. Water-resources data for the 2003 water year for Missouri consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; elevation, contents, and water quality of lakes and reservoirs. This volume contains discharge records for 171 gaging stations; elevation at 12 lakes and reservoirs; water quality at 106 sampling stations (including 2 lakes); and data for 39 crest-stage stations; and water-level records for 8 ground-water monitoring wells.

  6. Water resources thesaurus: A vocabulary for indexing and retrieving the literature of water resources research and development

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    U.S. Geological Survey

    1980-01-01

    This Water Resources Thesaurus encompasses such broad research areas as the hydrologic cycle, supply of and demand for water, conservation and best use of available supplies of water, methods of increasing supplies, and the economic, legal, social, engineering, recreational, biological, geographical, ecological, and qualitative aspects of water resources. This volume represents a major revision of the previous edition of the Thesaurus, published in 1971. The principal source of terms for this edition has been the indexing used in Selected Water Resources Abstracts (SWRA). Since its inception in 1968, SWRA has indexed tens of thousands of publications. Its indexing terminology has been developed by expert abstracters and researchers, and represents the range of disciplines related to research, development, and management of water resources.

  7. Ground water: the hidden resource

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vandas, Stephen; Farrar, Frank, (artist)

    1996-01-01

    Ground water is water underground in saturated zones beneath the land surface. Contrary to popular belief, ground water does not form underground "rivers." It fills the pores and fractures in underground materials such as sand, gravel, and other rock. If ground water flows from rock materials or can be removed by pumping from the saturated rock materials In useful amounts, the rock materials are called aquifers. Ground water moves slowly, typically at rates of 7 to 60 centimeters per day in an aquifer. As a result, water could remain in an aquifer for hundreds or thousands of years. Ground water is the source of about 40 percent of water used for public supplies and about 38 percent of water used for agriculture in the United States.

  8. Nebraska Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    Nebraska Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report FY 1998 Introduction Research Program Basic Parameters Project Number C-44 Start Date 08/01/1996 End Date 08/01/1999 Research Category Ground-water Flow Institution Nebraska Water Resources Center Principal Investigators Name Title During Project Period

  9. Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    ways to better use, manage and preserve water resources in Alabama, the Southeast and nationwide Institute is positioned to bring about change for the future by discovering ways we can preserve and protectWater Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2002 Introduction The Alabama Water

  10. Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    these activities facilitate the translation of the research sponsored by the Institute into practical applicationsWater Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2003 Introduction The Puerto Rico Water Resources and Environmental Research Institute (PRWRERI) is one of 54 water research centers

  11. Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    : the Acid Rain Monitoring project and the Springfield Surface Water Monitoring Project. Two new projectsWater Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2002 Introduction The Massachusetts Water Resources Research Center had a busy year of transitions. Long-time Director Paul Godfrey retired

  12. Water Resource Uses and Issues in Texas. 

    E-print Network

    McNeely, John G.; Lacewell, Ronald D.

    1978-01-01

    : Wafer Resource Uses and Issues in Texas. The present publication considers the implications of ground-water over- drafts and impending full utilization of surface-water resources in Texas. Princi- gal source of information was the Texas Department... ..................................................... 10 ........................................ Environmental Constraints 11 .......................................... Ground-Water Management .- 12 The Ogallala Aquifer .............................................. 14...

  13. forreading. Sustainability Index for Water Resources

    E-print Network

    Pasternack, Gregory B.

    of environ- mental considerations, water scarcity, and climate change. Recently, strong emphasis has beenO nly forreading. D o notD ow nload. Sustainability Index for Water Resources Planning presents a water resources sustainability index that makes it possible to evaluate and compare different

  14. Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2005 Introduction The University of Wisconsin Water Resources Institute (WRI) is based at UW-Madison as an academic unit of the universitys Graduate,000 volumes covering all major water topics. With nearly 75% of its current base budget targeted for research

  15. Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2006 #12;Introduction The University of Wisconsin Water Resources Institute (WRI) is based at UW-Madison as an academic unit of the university,000 volumes covering all major water topics. With nearly 75% of its current base budget targeted for research

  16. Water resource management: an Indian perspective.

    PubMed

    Khadse, G K; Labhasetwar, P K; Wate, S R

    2012-10-01

    Water is precious natural resource for sustaining life and environment. Effective and sustainable management of water resources is vital for ensuring sustainable development. In view of the vital importance of water for human and animal life, for maintaining ecological balance and for economic and developmental activities of all kinds, and considering its increasing scarcity, the planning and management of water resource and its optimal, economical and equitable use has become a matter of the utmost urgency. Management of water resources in India is of paramount importance to sustain one billion plus population. Water management is a composite area with linkage to various sectors of Indian economy including the agricultural, industrial, domestic and household, power, environment, fisheries and transportation sector. The water resources management practices should be based on increasing the water supply and managing the water demand under the stressed water availability conditions. For maintaining the quality of freshwater, water quality management strategies are required to be evolved and implemented. Decision support systems are required to be developed for planning and management of the water resources project. There is interplay of various factors that govern access and utilization of water resources and in light of the increasing demand for water it becomes important to look for holistic and people-centered approaches for water management. Clearly, drinking water is too fundamental and serious an issue to be left to one institution alone. It needs the combined initiative and action of all, if at all we are serious in socioeconomic development. Safe drinking water can be assured, provided we set our mind to address it. The present article deals with the review of various options for sustainable water resource management in India. PMID:25151722

  17. 1. Introduction Chilled water, a unique resource comprising water and

    E-print Network

    Ahrendt, Wolfgang

    1. Introduction Chilled water, a unique resource comprising water and energy elements, is commonly the targeted buildings. In typical chilled water systems, chilled water is distributed throughout the building to provide air conditioning and equipment cooling. The chilled water system has been one of the most

  18. Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    -related programs in the Midwest. Research topics include: water quality tracking, aquatic nuisance species mitigation, oyster disease, and aquaculture. Outreach topics include: aquatic nuisance species educationWater Resources Center Annual Technical Report FY 2002 Introduction Research Program Research

  19. Water resources of St. Tammany Parish, Louisiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Griffith, Jason M.

    2009-01-01

    This fact sheet summarizes basic information on the water resources of St. Tammany Parish, La. Information on groundwater and surface-water availability, quality, development, use, and trends is based on previously published reports listed in the references section.

  20. Texas Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    as the duties and purview of existing water management institutions. It summarizes of water laws on both sides of the border and applicable international water law. Chapter three reports on the views of experts as they seekTexas Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2001 Introduction Research Program #12

  1. Nebraska Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    law, water chemistry, surface hydrology, climate modeling, water economics, and stream ecology annual Water Law, Policy and Science Conference was hosted by the University of Nebraska-Lincoln on May 4Nebraska Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report FY 2006 #12;Introduction Dr. Kyle D

  2. Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report FY 2006 #12;Introduction The Rhode Island Water was designed to enhance the supply of water. One research project developed a method for evaluating the safety supported two outreach programs, one for high school students and the other for water professionals

  3. Texas Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    Texas Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report FY 1999 Introduction The FY 99 research Basic Project Information Category Data Title Value Assessment in Surface Water Transfers: Deterministic program was focused on statewide efforts in water supply and water quality (TMDL) planning. The project

  4. Texas Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    Texas Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2000 Introduction The 2000 research address Texas water concerns and challenges that have been identified as critically important by water Project Information Category Data Title Quality and Membrane Treatability of the Lake Houston Water Supply

  5. Deleware Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    % of estuarine waters (excluding the Delaware River and Bay). Safe shellfish harvesting and consumption is alsoDeleware Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report FY 2002 Introduction Delaware Water,954 acres of lakes and ponds that have been classified using the federal Clean Water Act's rating system

  6. Water Availability and Management of Water Resources

    EPA Science Inventory

    One of the most pressing national and global issues is the availability of freshwater due to global climate change, energy scarcity issues and the increase in world population and accompanying economic growth. Estimates of water supplies and flows through the world's hydrologic c...

  7. Proposal for Modifications to an Authorized Water Resources Development Project

    E-print Network

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    to the Water Resources Reform and Development Act of 2014 Submitted to: U.S. Army Corps of Engineers 441 G Street NW. Washington, DC 20314­1000 Submitted By: City of South El Monte 1415 Santa Anita Ave. So El Monte 1415 Santa Anita Ave. So El Monte, CA 91733 Attention: Anthony R. Ybarra, City Manager TYbarra

  8. Water-Resources Manpower: Supply and Demand Patterns to 1980.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, James E.

    Relating the supply of scientific manpower to the educational potential of the general population and the productive capacity of the educational system, this study disaggregates independent projections of scientific manpower supply and demand to yield projections for water resources manpower. This supply of engineers, natural scientists, and…

  9. ANNUAL REPORT TO CONGRESS ON FUTURE WATER RESOURCES DEVELOPMENT --TALKING POINTS

    E-print Network

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    ANNUAL REPORT TO CONGRESS ON FUTURE WATER RESOURCES DEVELOPMENT -- TALKING POINTS US ARMY CORPS OF ENGINEERS BUILDING STRONG® Annual Report to Congress on Future Water Resources Development Section 7001 of Water Resources Reform and Development Act (WRRDA) 2014 requires that the Secretary of the Army annually

  10. An evolutionary annealing-simplex algorithm for global optimisation of water resource systems

    E-print Network

    Neumaier, Arnold

    An evolutionary annealing-simplex algorithm for global optimisation of water resource systems Andreas Efstratiadis and Demetris Koutsoyiannis Department of Water Resources, Faculty of Civil and then it was applied in two global optimisation problems taken from water resources engineering, the calibration

  11. Climate Change and Water Resources Management: A Federal Perspective

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brekke, Levi D.; Kiang, Julie E.; Olsen, J. Rolf; Pulwarty, Roger S.; Raff, David A.; Turnipseed, D. Phil; Webb, Robert S.; White, Kathleen D.

    2009-01-01

    Many challenges, including climate change, face the Nation's water managers. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) has provided estimates of how climate may change, but more understanding of the processes driving the changes, the sequences of the changes, and the manifestation of these global changes at different scales could be beneficial. Since the changes will likely affect fundamental drivers of the hydrological cycle, climate change may have a large impact on water resources and water resources managers. The purpose of this interagency report prepared by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation), and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) is to explore strategies to improve water management by tracking, anticipating, and responding to climate change. This report describes the existing and still needed underpinning science crucial to addressing the many impacts of climate change on water resources management.

  12. Assessing Water and Carbon Footprints for Sustainable Water Resource Management

    EPA Science Inventory

    The key points of this presentation are: (1) Water footprint and carbon footprint as two sustainability attributes in adaptations to climate and socioeconomic changes, (2) Necessary to evaluate carbon and water footprints relative to constraints in resource capacity, (3) Critical...

  13. Puerto Rico Water Resources & Environmetal Research Institute

    E-print Network

    Puerto Rico Water Resources & Environmetal Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2011 Puerto Rico Water Resources & Environmetal Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 20111 #12;Introduction The PRWRERI is an integral part of the University of Puerto Rico at Mayaguez. As such, it acts

  14. Texas Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    Texas Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2006 #12;Introduction The Texas Water Resources Institute (TWRI), a unit of the Texas Agricultural Experiment Station and Texas Cooperative. The institute maintains joint or collaborative projects with 15 Texas universities and 3 in other states; 11

  15. Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2009 Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2009 1 #12;Introduction This program report provides the required.nmsu.edu) provides online information about the institute, newsletters, technical report series, requests

  16. Institute of Water Resources Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    Institute of Water Resources Annual Technical Report FY 2003 Introduction The Connecticut Institute of Water Resources is located at the University of Connecticut (UCONN) and reports to the head projects. Submitted proposals are reviewed for technical merit by outside reviewers as well as by an ad

  17. Georgia Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    Georgia Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2000 Introduction In Fiscal Year 2000 through various research projects. In the reporting period, GWRI research resulted in numerous refereed journal publications, conference papers, and water resources research reports. The institute produced two

  18. Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2007 Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2007 1 #12;Introduction This program report provides the required.nmsu.edu) provides on-line information about the institute, newsletters, technical report series, requests

  19. Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2008 Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2008 1 #12;Introduction This program report provides the required.nmsu.edu) provides on-line information about the institute, newsletters, technical report series, requests

  20. Georgia Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    Georgia Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2013 Georgia Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2013 1 #12;Introduction Mission Statement: GWRI strives to improve the science Director, Advisory Board, and technical support staff. The technical support taff comprises several Ph

  1. Water Resources and Supply Adaptation: A paradigm Shifting for Future Climate?

    EPA Science Inventory

    Climate change adds another layer of complexity in planning, engineering and management of water resources and urban water infrastructures. Yet our current practice is confined to the traditional approach that evaluates developmental scenarios and their sustainability mostly by a...

  2. Academic Resources for Success in the Civil & Environmental Engineering Department

    E-print Network

    Connors, Daniel A.

    Academic Resources for Success in the Civil & Environmental Engineering Department TUTORING & STUDY Monday: Civil and Environmental Engineering Tuesday: Chemical and Biological Engineering Wednesday and referrals for problem solving, coaching skills and mentoring to help people solve conflicts on their own

  3. Water resources data-Maine water year 2004

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stewart, G.J.; Caldwell, J.M.; Cloutier, A.R.; Flight, L.E.

    2005-01-01

    The Water Resources Dicipline of the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with State, Federal,and other local governmental agencies, obtains a large amount of data pertaining to the water resources of Maine each year. These data, accumulated during the many water years, constitute a valuable data base for developing an improved understanding of the water resources of the State. Water-resources data for the 2004 water year for Maine consists of records of stage, discharge, ground water levels, water quality of streams and ground-water wells, precipitation quantity, and snow quantity. This report contains discharge records for: 6 gage-height stations, 62 discharge gaging stations, stream water-quality data for 6 stations, water level for 23 ground-water wells, water-quality data for 24 ground-water wells, precipitation quantity data for 15 stations, and snow quantity data for 80 stations, Additional water data were collected at other sites, not part of the systematic data-collection program, and are published as special study and miscellaneous record sections.

  4. Arkansas Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    Pollution Loads Project Number C-02 Start Date 09/01/1998 End Date 08/31/1999 Research Category Water the optimum number and timing of storm and baseflow water quality sampling to determine pollutant loadsArkansas Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report FY 1999 Introduction Research Program Basic

  5. Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report FY 1998 Introduction Research Program Research priorities that address six areas of water research were established in 1989 to guide the IWRC research program through 1998. These priorities are: groundwater quality; potential insufficiencies in water

  6. Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report FY 2002 Introduction Research Program INTRODUCTION The Water and Environmental Research Center (WERC) at the University of Alaska Fairbanks (UAF) continues Water Quality Issue? Joan Braddock, PI. Recently we have had numerous studies examining arctic hydrology

  7. Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report FY 1998 Introduction Research Program Basic Project to environmental protection. A new framework is used in this study which acknowledges water quality benefits framework for determining the feasibility of cooperative (e.g., cost sharing) water quality protection

  8. Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    concentrations, pH, and at selected sites manganese, organic matter, and ferric and ferrous iron; (2) to mapWater Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2003 Introduction In 2003, Oregons Center for Water and Environmental Sustainability (CWESt) focused efforts on three programs: 1) The Water

  9. Criticality of Water: Aligning Water and Mineral Resources Assessment.

    PubMed

    Sonderegger, Thomas; Pfister, Stephan; Hellweg, Stefanie

    2015-10-20

    The concept of criticality has been used to assess whether a resource may become a limiting factor to economic activities. It has been primarily applied to nonrenewable resources, in particular to metals. However, renewable resources such as water may also be overused and become a limiting factor. In this paper, we therefore developed a water criticality method that allows for a new, user-oriented assessment of water availability and accessibility. Comparability of criticality across resources is desirable, which is why the presented adaptation of the criticality approach to water is based on a metal criticality method, whose basic structure is maintained. With respect to the necessary adaptations to the water context, a transparent water criticality framework is proposed that may pave the way for future integrated criticality assessment of metals, water, and other resources. Water criticality scores were calculated for 159 countries subdivided into 512 geographic units for the year 2000. Results allow for a detailed analysis of criticality profiles, revealing locally specific characteristics of water criticality. This is useful for the screening of sites and their related water criticality, for indication of water related problems and possible mitigation options and water policies, and for future water scenario analysis. PMID:26392153

  10. Water Formatics Engineered formation of nanobubbles networks

    E-print Network

    Jacob, Eshel Ben

    Water Formatics Engineered formation of nanobubbles networks in water and aqueous solutions We present the idea that the anomalous effects of rf-treatments of water and aqueous solution resulted from-bubble exchange interactions. These exchange interactions are mediated by the ordering of the water molecules

  11. Managing water resources for crop production

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, J. S.; Batchelor, C. H.

    1997-01-01

    Increasing crop production to meet the food requirements of the world's growing population will put great pressure on global water resources. Given that the vast freshwater resources that are available in the world are far from fully exploited, globally there should be sufficient water for future agricultural requirements. However, there are large areas where low water supply and high human demand may lead to regional shortages of water for future food production. In these arid and semi-arid areas, where water is a major constraint on production, improving water resource management is crucial if Malthusian disasters are to be avoided. There is considerable scope for improvement, since in both dryland and irrigated agriculture only about one-third of the available water (as rainfall, surface, or groundwater) is used to grow useful plants. This paper illustrates a range of techniques that could lead to increased crop production by improving agricultural water use efficiency. This may be achieved by increasing the total amount of water available to plants or by increasing the efficiency with which that water is used to produce biomass. Although the crash from the Malthusian precipice may ultimately be inevitable if population growth is not addressed, the time taken to reach the edge of the precipice could be lengthened by more efficient use of existing water resources.

  12. Overview of the Environmental and Water Resources Institute's "Guidelines For Integrated Water Resources Management" Project

    SciTech Connect

    Gerald Sehlke

    2005-03-01

    Integrated Water Resources Management is a systematic approach to optimizing our understanding, control and management of water resources within a basin to meet multiple objectives. Recognition of the need for integrating water resources within basins is not unique to the Environmental and Water Resources Institute’s Integrated Water Resources Management Task Committee. Many individuals, governments and other organizations have attempted to develop holistic water resources management programs. In some cases, the results have been very effective and in other cases, valiant attempts have fallen far short of their initial goals. The intent of this Task Committee is to provide a set of guidelines that discusses the concepts, methods and tools necessary for integrating and optimizing the management of the physical resources and to optimize and integrate programs, organizations, infrastructure, and socioeconomic institutions into comprehensive water resources management programs.

  13. Water resources of Cameron Parish, Louisiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Prakken, Lawrence B.

    2014-01-01

    This fact sheet presents a brief overview of groundwater and surface-water resources in Cameron Parish, Louisiana. Information on the availability, use, and quality of water from groundwater and surface-water sources in the parish is discussed. Previously published reports and data stored in the U.S. Geological Survey’s National Water Information System (http://waterdata.usgs.gov/nwis) are the primary sources of this information.

  14. Water resources of Lafourche Parish, Louisiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Prakken, Lawrence B.; Lovelace, John K.

    2013-01-01

    This fact sheet presents a brief overview of groundwater and surface-water resources in Lafourche Parish, Louisiana. Information on the availability, past and current use trends, and water quality from groundwater and surface-water sources in the parish is discussed. Previously published reports and data stored in the U.S. Geological Survey’s National Water Information System (http://waterdata.usgs.gov/nwis) are the primary sources of the information presented here.

  15. Water resources of Jefferson Parish, Louisiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Prakken, Lawrence B.; Lovelace, John K.

    2014-01-01

    This fact sheet presents a brief overview of groundwater and surface-water resources in Jefferson Parish, Louisiana. Information on the availability, use, and quality of water from groundwater and surface-water sources in the parish is discussed. Previously published reports and data stored in the U.S. Geological Survey’s National Water Information System (http://waterdata.usgs.gov/nwis) are the primary sources of this information.

  16. The National Institutes for Water Resources is a 501(c)4 organization dedicated to providing representation for the State Water Research Institutes in collective activities to implement the provisions of the Water Resources Research Act of 1984.

    E-print Network

    Firestone, Jeremy

    The National Institutes for Water Resources is a 501(c)4 organization dedicated to providing of the Water Resources Research Act of 1984. Brian Haggard NIWR President, October 2013 to September 2014 Arkansas Water Resources Center · 203 Engineering Hall, Fayetteville, Arkansas 72701 · haggard

  17. Water resources of La Salle Parish, Louisiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    White, Vincent E.; Prakken, Lawrence B.

    2015-01-01

    Information concerning the availability, use, and quality of water in La Salle Parish, Louisiana, is critical for proper water-supply management. The purpose of this fact sheet is to present information that can be used by water managers, parish residents, and others for stewardship of this vital resource. Information on the availability, past and current use, use trends, and water quality from groundwater and surface-water sources in the parish is presented. Previously published reports and data stored in the U.S. Geological Survey’s National Water Information System (http://waterdata.usgs.gov/nwis) are the primary sources of the information presented here.

  18. Water resources of St. James Parish, Louisiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    White, Vincent E.; Prakken, Lawrence B.

    2015-01-01

    Information concerning the availability, use, and quality of water in St. James Parish, Louisiana, is critical for proper water-supply management. The purpose of this fact sheet is to present information that can be used by water managers, parish residents, and others for stewardship of this vital resource. Information on the availability, past and current use, use trends, and water quality from groundwater and surface-water sources in the parish is presented. Previously published reports and data stored in the U.S. Geological Survey’s National Water Information System (http://waterdata.usgs.gov/nwis) are the primary sources of the information presented here.

  19. Water resources of Vermilion Parish, Louisiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Prakken, Lawrence B.; White, Vincent E.

    2014-01-01

    Information concerning the availability, use, and quality of water in Vermilion Parish, Louisiana, is critical for proper water-supply management. The purpose of this fact sheet is to present information that can be used by water managers, parish residents, and others for stewardship of this vital resource. Information on the availability, past and current use, use trends, and water quality from groundwater and surface-water sources in the parish is presented. Previously published reports and data stored in the U.S. Geological Survey’s National Water Information System (http://waterdata.usgs.gov/nwis) are the primary sources of the information presented here.

  20. Water resources of Terrebonne Parish, Louisiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Prakken, Lawrence B.; Lovelace, John K.; White, Vincent E.

    2014-01-01

    Information concerning the availability, use, and quality of water in Terrebonne Parish, Louisiana, is critical for proper water-supply management. The purpose of this fact sheet is to present information that can be used by water managers, parish residents, and others for stewardship of this vital resource. Information on the availability, past and current use, use trends,and water quality from groundwater and surface-water sources in the parish is presented. Previously published reports and data stored in the U.S. Geological Survey’s National Water Information System http://waterdata.usgs.gov/nwis are the primary sources of the information presented here.

  1. Water resources of De Soto Parish, Louisiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Prakken, Lawrence B.; White, Vincent E.

    2014-01-01

    Information concerning the availability, use, and quality of water in De Soto Parish, Louisiana, is critical for proper water-supply management. The purpose of this fact sheet is to present information that can be used by water managers, parish residents, and others for stewardship of this vital resource. Information on the availability, past and current use, use trends, and water quality from groundwater and surface-water sources in the parish is presented. Previously published reports and data stored in the U.S. Geological Survey’s National Water Information System (http://waterdata. usgs.gov/nwis) are the primary sources of the information presented here.

  2. Water resources of Jefferson Davis Parish, Louisiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    White, Vincent E.; Prakken, Lawrence B.

    2014-01-01

    Information concerning the availability, use, and quality of water in Jefferson Davis Parish, Louisiana, is critical for proper water-supply management. The purpose of this fact sheet is to present information that can be used by water managers, parish residents, and others for stewardship of this vital resource. Information on the availability, past and current use, use trends, and water quality from groundwater and surface-water sources in the parish is presented. Previously published reports and data stored in the U.S. Geological Survey’s National Water Information System (http://waterdata.usgs.gov/nwis) are the primary sources of the information presented here.

  3. Water resources of Acadia Parish, Louisiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Prakken, Larry B.; White, Vincent E.

    2014-01-01

    Information concerning the availability, use, and quality of water in Acadia Parish, Louisiana, is critical for proper water-supply management. The purpose of this fact sheet is to present information that can be used by water managers, parish residents, and others for stewardship of this vital resource. Information on the availability, past and current use, use trends, and water quality from groundwater and surface-water sources in the parish is presented. Previously published reports and data stored in the U.S. Geological Survey’s National Water Information System (http://waterdata.usgs.gov/nwis) are the primary sources of the information presented here.

  4. Water resources of West Feliciana Parish, Louisiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Prakken, Lawrence B.; Lovelace, John K.; Tomaszewski, Dan J.; Griffith, Jason M.

    2014-01-01

    Information concerning the availability, use, and quality of water in West Feliciana Parish, Louisiana, is critical for proper water-supply management. The purpose of this fact sheet is to present information that can be used by water managers, parish residents, and others for stewardship of this vital resource. Information on the availability, past and current use, use trends, and water quality from groundwater and surface-water sources in the parish is discussed. Previously published reports and data stored in the U.S. Geological Survey’s National Water Information System (http://waterdata.usgs.gov/nwis) are the primary sources of the information presented here.

  5. Water resources of Orleans Parish, Louisiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Prakken, Lawrence B.; White, Vincent E.; Lovelace, John K.

    2014-01-01

    Information concerning the availability, use, and quality of water in Orleans Parish, Louisiana, is critical for proper water-supply management. The purpose of this fact sheet is to present information that can be used by water managers, parish residents, and others for stewardship of this vital resource. Information on the availability, past and current use, use trends, and water quality from groundwater and surface-water sources in the parish is presented. Previously published reports and data stored in the U.S. Geological Survey’s National Water Information System (http://waterdata.usgs.gov/nwis) are the primary sources of the information presented here.

  6. Water resources of St. Mary Parish, Louisiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Prakken, Lawrence B.; White, Vincent E.; Lovelace, John K.

    2014-01-01

    Information concerning the availability, use, and quality of water in St. Mary Parish, Louisiana, is critical for proper water-supply management. The purpose of this fact sheet is to present information that can be used by water managers, parish residents, and others for management of this vital resource. Information on the availability, past and current use, use trends, and water quality from groundwater and surface-water sources in the parish is presented. Previously published reports and data stored in the U.S. Geological Survey’s National Water Information System (http://waterdata.usgs.gov/nwis) are the primary sources of the information presented here.

  7. Water resources of Caldwell Parish, Louisiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Prakken, Lawrence B.; White, Vincent E.

    2014-01-01

    Information concerning the availability, use, and quality of water in Caldwell Parish, Louisiana, is critical for proper water-supply management. The purpose of this fact sheet is to present information that can be used by water managers, parish residents, and others for stewardship of this vital resource. Information on the availability, past and current use, use trends, and water quality from groundwater and surface-water sources in the parish is presented. Previously published reports and data stored in the U.S. Geological Survey’s National Water Information System (http://waterdata.usgs.gov/nwis) are the primary sources of the information presented here.

  8. Water resources of St. Charles Parish, Louisiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    White, Vincent E.; Prakken, Lawrence B.

    2015-01-01

    Information concerning the availability, use, and quality of water in St. Charles Parish, Louisiana, is critical for proper water-supply management. The purpose of this fact sheet is to present information that can be used by water managers, parish residents, and others for stewardship of this vital resource. Information on the availability, past and current use, use trends, and water quality from groundwater and surface-water sources in the parish is presented. Previously published reports and data stored in the U.S. Geological Survey’s National Water Information System (http://waterdata.usgs.gov/nwis) are the primary sources of the information presented here.

  9. Water resources of Sabine Parish, Louisiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Prakken, Lawrence B.; White, Vincent E.; Lovelace, John K.

    2014-01-01

    Information concerning the availability, use, and quality of water in Sabine Parish, Louisiana, is critical for proper water-supply management. The purpose of this fact sheet is to present information that can be used by water managers, parish residents, and others for stewardship of this vital resource. Information on the availability, past and current use, use trends, and water quality from groundwater and surface-water sources in the parish is presented. Previously published reports and data stored in the U.S. Geological Survey’s (USGS) National Water Information System (http://waterdata.usgs.gov/nwis) are the primary sources of the information presented here.

  10. Water Resources Availability in Kabul, Afghanistan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akbari, A. M.; Chornack, M. P.; Coplen, T. B.; Emerson, D. G.; Litke, D. W.; Mack, T. J.; Plummer, N.; Verdin, J. P.; Verstraeten, I. M.

    2008-12-01

    The availability of water resources is vital to the rebuilding of Kabul, Afghanistan. In recent years, droughts and increased water use for drinking water and agriculture have resulted in widespread drying of wells. Increasing numbers of returning refugees, rapid population growth, and potential climate change have led to heightened concerns for future water availability. The U.S. Geological Survey, with support from the U.S. Agency for International Development, began collaboration with the Afghanistan Geological Survey and Ministry of Energy and Water on water-resource investigations in the Kabul Basin in 2004. This has led to the compilation of historic and recent water- resources data, creation of monitoring networks, analyses of geologic, geophysical, and remotely sensed data. The study presented herein provides an assessment of ground-water availability through the use of multidisciplinary hydrogeologic data analysis. Data elements include population density, climate, snowpack, geology, mineralogy, surface water, ground water, water quality, isotopic information, and water use. Data were integrated through the use of conceptual ground-water-flow model analysis and provide information necessary to make improved water-resource planning and management decisions in the Kabul Basin. Ground water is currently obtained from a shallow, less than 100-m thick, highly productive aquifer. CFC, tritium, and stable hydrogen and oxygen isotopic analyses indicate that most water in the shallow aquifer appears to be recharged post 1970 by snowmelt-supplied river leakage and secondarily by late winter precipitation. Analyses indicate that increasing withdrawals are likely to result in declining water levels and may cause more than 50 percent of shallow supply wells to become dry or inoperative particularly in urbanized areas. The water quality in the shallow aquifer is deteriorated in urban areas by poor sanitation and water availability concerns may be compounded by poor well construction practices and little planning. By 2050, the available water resources in the Kabul Basin may be reduced as a result of Central Asian climate changes. Increasing air temperatures associated with climate change are likely to lead to a decreasing snowpack and an earlier growing season, resulting in less recharge from river leakage. As a result, more than 60 percent of existing supply wells may become dry or inoperative. The impacts of climate change would likely be greatest in the agricultural regions in the western areas of the basin. Water resources in the in northern areas of the basin may meet future water needs. However, in other areas of the basin, particularly the more urbanized southern areas adjacent to and including the city of Kabul, water resources may be stressed. Ground water in deep aquifers, more than 100 m below land surface, is presently unused. Conceptual ground-water-flow simulations indicate that ground water in deep aquifers may be thousands of years old. The deep aquifer may sustain limited increases in municipal water use, but may not support increased agricultural use which is much greater than municipal use. However, the hydraulic feasibility and quality of deep ground-water extractions are not well known and are being investigated.

  11. Water Resource System Optimization by Geometric Programming 

    E-print Network

    Meier, W. L.; Shih, C. S.; Wray, D. J.

    1971-01-01

    water resources optimization problems. This new and potentially powerful technique is called geometric programming. It is one of a class of mathematical programming techniques. Mathematical programming discussed extensively elsewhere [56,23] refers to a...

  12. Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    , these water sources do require treatment to preserve/restore the resource quality (and keep the company of organic contaminants onto crushed kenaf fibers. Although it produces no fruit, kenaf is a plant

  13. Resources for Small Water Systems in Texas 

    E-print Network

    Dozier, Monty; Theodori, Gene L.; Jensen, Ricard

    2007-03-28

    This publication is a guide to finding the many resources available to help managers of small water systems in Texas. Details are provided about sources of financial assistance, tools for capacity building, training programs and educational...

  14. Strategy of Water Resources Planning Under Risk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Z.; Ye, M.

    2007-12-01

    In water resources systems analysis, risk, caused by uncertainty, is an important issue to consider, whereas definition of risk and its measure is controversial (many definitions are available in different research fields). The problem of computing the degree of risk in water resources planning is very difficult, and has received more and more attentions from more hydrologists. This study discussed the necessity of risk analysis on decision-making associated with problems of managing regional water quantity. A new concept of risk function for regional water resource planning was introduced, and a theory of risk analysis of water resource systems was developed and implemented numerically. The developed methodology is general and can be used to tackle many kinds of decision-making problems. When loss (or benefit) volumes of an action set and probabilities of nature state of decision environments are given, non-inferior planning strategy or strategies can be derived by ordering the size of risk degrees calculated by the proposed risk function. This method was illustrated in a case study at the Huanghuaihai basin, China, one of the major food-producing areas in north China. In the last several decades, problems of water shortage and pollution are severe, and extreme weather conditions frequently occur. How to reasonably allocate the limited fresh water in the future under uncertainty is an urgent task. In this research, alternative strategies of water resource planning were investigated and risk of the strategies was assessed to facilitate the decision-making of Chinese government. The developed methodology selected the optimum choice of water resources planning strategies to avoid the risk of water shortage. This research has practicably provided support of decision-making of the Chinese central and local governments and organizations in their regional and national planning.

  15. Sustainability of ground-water resources

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Alley, William M.; Reilly, Thomas E.; Franke, O. Lehn

    1999-01-01

    The pumpage of fresh ground water in the United States in 1995 was estimated to be approximately 77 billion gallons per day (Solley and others, 1998), which is about 8 percent of the estimated 1 trillion gallons per day of natural recharge to the Nation's ground-water systems (Nace, 1960). From an overall national perspective, the ground-water resource appears ample. Locally, however, the availability of ground water varies widely. Moreover, only a part of the ground water stored in the subsurface can be recovered by wells in an economic manner and without adverse consequences.

  16. Elsevier's dictionary of water and hydraulic engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Van der Tuin, J.D.

    1987-01-01

    This dictionary deals with water: water in relation to engineering projects designed to utilize it, to control it, or to defend us against it; water as a basic element of our environment, and water as the subject of a variety of physical phenomena. The dictionary comprises a basic table with 5,117 terms in English. Equivalents are given in French, Spanish, Dutch and German, keyed to the basic table by number. The aim of the dictionary is to promote better understanding and communication between people of different nationalities working in the field of hydraulics, water management and hydraulic engineering.

  17. Ozone in water treatment: Application and engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Langlais, B.; Reckhow, D.A.; Brink, D.R.

    1991-01-01

    This book is a cumulative effort between the American Water Works Association Research Foundation and Champagnie General des Eaux. It is designed to provide guidance in two areas: application of ozone to drinking water and appropriate system design and operation. It is geared for use by environmentalists, engineers, and water treatment plant personnel.

  18. Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    critical water resource questions in agriculture, mining, forestry, recreation, and hydropower of environmental quality and social well-being of people. 2. To stimulate, coordinate and provide leadership entities, state and federal government agencies to carry out their responsibilities concerned with water

  19. World Water Resources Assessment for 2050

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oki, T.; Agata, Y.; Kanae, S.; Musiake, K.; Saruhashi, T.

    2003-04-01

    nticipated water scarcity in the first half of this century is one of the most concerned international issues to be assessed adequately. However, even though the issue has an international impact and world wide monitoring is critical, there are limited number of global estimates at present. In this study, annual water availability was derived from annual runoff estimated by land surface models using Total Runoff Integrating Pathways (TRIP) with 0.5 degree by 0.5 degree longitude/latitude resolution globally. Global distribution of water withdrawal for each sector in the same horizontal spatial resolution was estimated based on country-base statistics of municipal water use, industrial water use, and agricultural intake, using global geographical information system with global distributions of population and irrigated crop land area. The total population under water stress estimated for 1995 corresponded very well with former estimates, however, the number is highly depend on how to assume the ratio how much water from upstream of the region can be considered as ``available'' water resources within the region. It suggests the importance of regional studies evaluating the the water quality deterioration in the upper stream, the real consumption of water resources in the upper stream, and the accessibility to water. The last factor should be closely related to how many large scale water withdrawal schemes are implemented in the region. Further studies by an integrated approach to improve the accuracy of future projections on both the natural and social sides of the water resources should be promoted. About the future projection of the global water resources assessment, population growth, climatic change, and the increase of water consumption per capita are considered. Population growth scenario follows the UN projection in each country. Change in annual runoff was estimated based on the climatic simulation by a general circulation model by the Center of Climate System Study, U of Tokyo, and the National Institute for Environmental Studies, coupled with TRIP. The increase in unit consumption of water was related to the predicted growth of GDP. With the increase of population only, future population under strong water scarcity, with water scarcity index is larger than 0.4, will increase by 90% in 2050 compared to the current situation in 1995. Consideration of the climatic change due to the global warming will relax this situation, and only 74% will be under the strong water scarcity according to the future projection used in this study.

  20. National water summary on wetland resources

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fretwell, J. D., (compiler); Williams, John S.; Redman, Phillip J.

    1996-01-01

    This National Water Summary on Wetland Resources documents wetland resources in the United States. It presents an overview of the status of knowledge of wetlands at the present time-what they are, where they are found, why they are important, and the controversies surrounding them, with an emphasis on their hydrology. Wetland resources in each State, the District of Columbia (combined with Maryland), Puerto Rico, the U.S. Virgin Islands, and the western Pacific Islands are described.

  1. Ground water and surface water; a single resource

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Winter, Thomas C.; Harvey, Judson W.; Franke, O. Lehn; Alley, William M.

    1998-01-01

    The importance of considering ground water and surface water as a single resource has become increasingly evident. Issues related to water supply, water quality, and degradation of aquatic environments are reported on frequently. The interaction of ground water and surface water has been shown to be a significant concern in many of these issues. Contaminated aquifers that discharge to streams can result in long-term contamination of surface water; conversely, streams can be a major source of contamination to aquifers. Surface water commonly is hydraulically connected to ground water, but the interactions are difficult to observe and measure. The purpose of this report is to present our current understanding of these processes and activities as well as limitations in our knowledge and ability to characterize them.

  2. Water resources of Claiborne Parish, Louisiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fendick, Robert B., Jr.; Prakken, Lawrence B.; Griffith, Jason M.

    2013-01-01

    This fact sheet summarizes basic information on the water resources of Claiborne Parish. Information on groundwater and surface-water availability, quality, development, use, and trends is based on previously published reports listed in the Cited References section. In 2010, about 2.60 million gallons per day (Mgal/d) of water were withdrawn in Claiborne Parish, Louisiana, including about 2.42 Mgal/d from groundwater sources and 0.18 Mgal/d from surface-water sources. Public-supply use accounted for about 84 percent of the total water withdrawn. Other categories of use included industrial, rural domestic, livestock, and general irrigation. Water-use data collected at 5-year intervals from 1960 to 2010 indicated that total water withdrawals in the parish have ranged from about 2.6 to 3.9 Mgal/d.

  3. Water Intensity of Electricity from Geothermal Resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, G. S.; Glassley, W. E.

    2010-12-01

    BACKGROUND Electricity from geothermal resources could play a significant role in the United States over the next few decades; a 2006 study by MIT expects a capacity of 100GWe by 2050 as feasible; approximately 10% of total electricity generating capacity up from less than 1% today. However, there is limited research on the water requirements and impacts of generating electricity from geothermal resources - conventional as well as enhanced. To the best of our knowledge, there is no baseline exists for water requirements of geothermal electricity. Water is primarily required for cooling and dissipation of waste heat in the power plants, and to account for fluid losses during heat mining of enhanced geothermal resources. MODEL DESCRIPTION We have developed a model to assess and characterize water requirements of electricity from hydrothermal resources and enhanced geothermal resources (EGS). Our model also considers a host of factors that influence cooling water requirements ; these include the temperature and chemical composition of geothermal resource; installed power generation technology - flash, organic rankine cycle and the various configurations of these technologies; cooling technologies including air cooled condensers, wet recirculating cooling, and hybrid cooling; and finally water treatment and recycling installations. We expect to identify critical factors and technologies. Requirements for freshwater, degraded water and geothermal fluid are separately estimated. METHODOLOGY We have adopted a lifecycle analysis perspective that estimates water consumption at the goethermal field and power plant, and accounts for transmission and distribution losses before reaching the end user. Our model depends upon an extensive literature review to determine various relationships necessary to determine water usage - for example relationship between thermal efficiency and temperature of a binary power plant, or differences in efficiency between various ORC configurations, or differences in efficiency of a plant with a wet cooled system and one with dry cooled system. There are a number of factors that we do not consider; most of these factors are location specific. These include ambient temperature and humidity, specific design parameters of the power plant, and dissolved solids and chemical composition of freshwater withdrawn from ground or surface sources. Even for a specific plant, water intensity will vary over time due to fluctuations in ambient temperature and humidity, and in temperature of the geothermal fluid. Thus the model’s water usage estimates should be treated as “first order” or “preliminary” estimates. This paper is part of a series exploring the water footprint of future transportation fuels including biofuels and electricity. The paper's broader objective is to highlight limitations imposed by water shortages to achieve higher penetration of various alternative fuels.

  4. 18 CFR 701.76 - The Water Resources Council Staff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false The Water Resources Council Staff. 701.76 Section 701.76 Conservation of Power and Water Resources WATER RESOURCES COUNCIL COUNCIL ORGANIZATION Headquarters Organization § 701.76 The Water Resources Council Staff. The...

  5. 18 CFR 701.76 - The Water Resources Council Staff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false The Water Resources Council Staff. 701.76 Section 701.76 Conservation of Power and Water Resources WATER RESOURCES COUNCIL COUNCIL ORGANIZATION Headquarters Organization § 701.76 The Water Resources Council Staff. The...

  6. 18 CFR 701.76 - The Water Resources Council Staff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false The Water Resources Council Staff. 701.76 Section 701.76 Conservation of Power and Water Resources WATER RESOURCES COUNCIL COUNCIL ORGANIZATION Headquarters Organization § 701.76 The Water Resources Council Staff. The...

  7. 18 CFR 701.76 - The Water Resources Council Staff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false The Water Resources Council Staff. 701.76 Section 701.76 Conservation of Power and Water Resources WATER RESOURCES COUNCIL COUNCIL ORGANIZATION Headquarters Organization § 701.76 The Water Resources Council Staff. The...

  8. 18 CFR 701.76 - The Water Resources Council Staff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2013-04-01 2012-04-01 true The Water Resources Council Staff. 701.76 Section 701.76 Conservation of Power and Water Resources WATER RESOURCES COUNCIL COUNCIL ORGANIZATION Headquarters Organization § 701.76 The Water Resources Council Staff. The...

  9. New York State Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    New York State Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2013 New York State Water Water Resources Institute (WRI) is to improve the management of water resources in New York State awareness of emerging water resources issues and to develop and assess new water management technologies

  10. New York State Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    New York State Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2012 New York State Water Water Resources Institute (WRI) is to improve the management of water resources in New York State awareness of emerging water resources issues and to develop and assess new water management technologies

  11. Linking water resources to food security through virtual water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamea, Stefania

    2014-05-01

    The largest use of global freshwater resources is related to food production. While each day we drink about 2 liters of water, we consume (eating) about 4000 liters of ''virtual water'', which represents the freshwater used to produce crop-based and livestock-based food. Considering human water consumption as a whole, most part originates from agriculture (85.8%), and only minor parts come from industry (9.6%) or households (4.6%). These numbers shed light on the great pressure of humanity on global freshwater resources and justify the increasing interest towards this form of environmental impact, usually known as ''water footprint''. Virtual water is a key variable in establishing the nexus between water and food. In fact, water resources used for agricultural production determine local food availability, and impact the international trade of agricultural goods. Trade, in turn, makes food commodities available to nations which are not otherwise self-sufficient, in terms of water resources or food, and it establishes an equilibrium between food demand and production at the global scale. Therefore, food security strongly relies on international food trade, but also on the use of distant and foreign water resources, which need to be acknowledged and investigated. Virtual water embedded in production and international trade follows the fate of food on the trade network, generating virtual flows of great magnitude (e.g., 2800 km3 in 2010) and defining local and global virtual water balances worldwide. The resulting water-food nexus is critical for the societal and economic development, and it has several implications ranging from population dynamics to the competing use of freshwater resources, from dietary guidelines to globalization of trade, from externalization of pollution to policy making and to socio-economic wealth. All these implications represent a great challenge for future research, not only in hydrology but in the many fields related to this interdisciplinary topic. Virtual water and water footprint accounting provide the tools for understanding such implications and to describe, quantify, and investigate the inextricable link existing between water resources and food security.

  12. 30 CFR 402.6 - Water-Resources Research Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Water-Resources Research Program. 402.6 Section 402.6 Mineral Resources GEOLOGICAL SURVEY, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR WATER-RESOURCES RESEARCH PROGRAM AND THE WATER-RESOURCES TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM Description of Water-Resources Programs §...

  13. 30 CFR 402.6 - Water-Resources Research Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Water-Resources Research Program. 402.6 Section 402.6 Mineral Resources GEOLOGICAL SURVEY, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR WATER-RESOURCES RESEARCH PROGRAM AND THE WATER-RESOURCES TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM Description of Water-Resources Programs §...

  14. 30 CFR 402.6 - Water-Resources Research Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Water-Resources Research Program. 402.6 Section 402.6 Mineral Resources GEOLOGICAL SURVEY, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR WATER-RESOURCES RESEARCH PROGRAM AND THE WATER-RESOURCES TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM Description of Water-Resources Programs §...

  15. 30 CFR 402.6 - Water-Resources Research Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Water-Resources Research Program. 402.6 Section 402.6 Mineral Resources GEOLOGICAL SURVEY, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR WATER-RESOURCES RESEARCH PROGRAM AND THE WATER-RESOURCES TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM Description of Water-Resources Programs §...

  16. 30 CFR 402.6 - Water-Resources Research Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Water-Resources Research Program. 402.6 Section 402.6 Mineral Resources GEOLOGICAL SURVEY, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR WATER-RESOURCES RESEARCH PROGRAM AND THE WATER-RESOURCES TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM Description of Water-Resources Programs §...

  17. Water resources data West Virginia water wear 2001

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ward, S.M.; Taylor, B.C.; Crosby, G.R.

    2002-01-01

    Water-resources data for the 2001 water year for West Virginia consist of records of discharge and water quality of streams and water levels of observation wells. This report contains discharge records for 65 streamflow-gaging stations; discharge records provided by adjacent states for 7 streamflow-gaging stations; annual maximum discharge at 18 crest-stage partial-record stations; water-quality records for 4 stations; and water-level records for 10 observation wells. Locations of these sites are shown on figures 4 and 5. Additional water data were collected at various sites, not involved in the systematic data collection program, and are published as miscellaneous sites. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System collected by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating State and Federal agencies in West Virginia.

  18. The Bio-Resources Option in a Civil Engineering program2 applies mathematics, physics, chemistry and biology to

    E-print Network

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    The Bio-Resources Option in a Civil Engineering program2 applies mathematics, physics, chemistry Engineering curriculum. The third and fourth years allow students to build upon the basic Civil Engineering curriculum with courses that focus on soil, water, and environmental concerns. Civil Engineering majors

  19. WATER: Water Activities Teaching Environmental Responsibility: Teacher Resource, Environmental Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kramer, Ed, Ed.; And Others

    This activity book was developed as part of an effort to protect water quality of the Stillwater River, Ohio, through a Watershed Protection Project. It is designed to raise teachers' and students' awareness and trigger a sense of stewardship towards the preservation of water resources. The activities are generally appropriate for elementary age…

  20. URBAN WATERSHED MANAGEMENT BRANCH (WATER SUPPLY AND WATER RESOURCES DIVISION)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Controlling Wet Weather Flow (WWF)pollution is one of the top cleanup priority areas for the USEPA. The Urban Watershed Management Branch (UWMB)of the National Risk Management Research Laboratory's Water Supply and Water Resources Division is responsible for EPA's WWF research. U...

  1. Higher Resolution for Water Resources Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumenil-Gates, L.

    2009-12-01

    The Earth system science community is providing an increasing range of science results for the benefit of achieving the Millennium Development Goals. In addressing questions such as reducing poverty and hunger, achieving sustainable global development, or by defining adaptation strategies for climate change, one of the key issues will be the quantitative description and understanding of the global water cycle, which will allow useful projections of available future water resources for several decades ahead. The quantities of global water cycle elements that we observe today - and deal with in hydrologic and atmospheric modeling - are already very different from the natural flows as human influence on the water cycle by storage, consumption and edifice has been going on for millennia, and climate change is expected to add more uncertainty. In this case Tony Blair’s comment that perhaps the most worrying problem is climate change does not cover the full story. We shall also have to quantify how the human demand for water resources and alterations of the various elements of the water cycle may proceed in the future: will there be enough of the precious water resource to sustain current and future demands by the various sectors involved? The topics that stakeholders and decision makers concerned with managing water resources are interested in cover a variety of human uses such as agriculture, energy production, ecological flow requirements to sustain biodiversity and ecosystem services, or human cultural aspects, recreation and human well-being - all typically most relevant at the regional or local scales, this being quite different from the relatively large-scale that the IPCC assessment addresses. Halfway through the Millennium process, the knowledge base of the global water cycle is still limited. The sustainability of regional water resources is best assessed through a research program that combines high-resolution climate and hydrologic models for expected future scenarios (as in the IPCC ensembles) with appropriate observational data under current conditions in order to benchmark the models’ accuracy. Expected future changes in water availability could then be characterized and appropriate adaptation action designed in co-operation with the water use community. In situ observations of water cycle variables can also be used and developed together with remote sensing data from space to provide initial data for global seasonal or decadal forecasting and monitoring of global change in less well observed regions of the world.

  2. Geothermal Water Use: Life Cycle Water Consumption, Water Resource Assessment, and Water Policy Framework

    DOE Data Explorer

    Schroeder, Jenna N.

    2014-06-10

    This report examines life cycle water consumption for various geothermal technologies to better understand factors that affect water consumption across the life cycle (e.g., power plant cooling, belowground fluid losses) and to assess the potential water challenges that future geothermal power generation projects may face. Previous reports in this series quantified the life cycle freshwater requirements of geothermal power-generating systems, explored operational and environmental concerns related to the geochemical composition of geothermal fluids, and assessed future water demand by geothermal power plants according to growth projections for the industry. This report seeks to extend those analyses by including EGS flash, both as part of the life cycle analysis and water resource assessment. A regional water resource assessment based upon the life cycle results is also presented. Finally, the legal framework of water with respect to geothermal resources in the states with active geothermal development is also analyzed.

  3. Water resources of Assumption Parish, Louisiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Prakken, Lawrence B.; Lovelace, John K.

    2013-01-01

    Information concerning the availability, use, and quality of water in Assumption Parish, Louisiana, is critical for proper water-supply management. The purpose of this fact sheet is to present information that can be used by water managers, parish residents, and others for management of this vital resource. Information on the availability, past and current use, use trends, and water quality from groundwater and surface-water sources in the parish is presented. Previously published reports and data stored in the U.S. Geological Survey’s National Water Information System (http://waterdata.usgs.gov/nwis) are the primary sources of the information presented here. In 2010, about 21.4 million gallons per day (Mgal/d) of water were withdrawn in Assumption Parish, including about 12.4 Mgal/d from surface-water sources and 9.03 Mgal/d from groundwater sources. Withdrawals for industrial use accounted for about 16.4 Mgal/d or 76 percent of the total water withdrawn. Other categories of use included public supply, rural domestic, livestock, general irrigation, and aquaculture.Water-use data collected at 5-year intervals from 1960 to 2010 indicated that water withdrawals peaked in 2000 at about 29.7 Mgal/d.

  4. Why a water degree? Water: Resources, Policy, and Management is an

    E-print Network

    Hopkins, William A.

    Why a water degree? Water: Resources, Policy, and Management is an interdisciplinary, holistically, and management to ensure that water is a sustainable resource. What could be more important? Water connects quality analyst · Water resource planner Contact: Professor Stephen Schoenholtz stephen

  5. NASA's Applied Sciences for Water Resources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doorn, Bradley; Toll, David; Engman, Ted

    2011-01-01

    The Earth Systems Division within NASA has the primary responsibility for the Earth Science Applied Science Program and the objective to accelerate the use of NASA science results in applications to help solve problems important to society and the economy. The primary goal of the Earth Science Applied Science Program is to improve future and current operational systems by infusing them with scientific knowledge of the Earth system gained through space-based observation, assimilation of new observations, and development and deployment of enabling technologies, systems, and capabilities. This paper discusses one of the major problems facing water resources managers, that of having timely and accurate data to drive their decision support tools. It then describes how NASA?s science and space based satellites may be used to overcome this problem. Opportunities for the water resources community to participate in NASA?s Water Resources Applications Program are described.

  6. Cooperative water resource technology transfer program

    SciTech Connect

    D'itri, F.M.

    1982-06-01

    This cooperative water resource technology transfer program sought to develop/present educational programs (conferences/seminars/workshops) and technology transfer brochures to enhance public awareness/appreciation of state water quality problems and to stress economic tradeoffs needed to resolve given problems. Accomplishments of this program for the different conferences held 1979-1981 are described (inland lake eutrophication: causes, effects, and remedies; contamination of groundwater supplies by toxic chemicals: causes, effects, and prevention; supplemental irrigation; stormwater management; cooperative research needs for renovation and reuse of municipal water in agriculture; selection and management of vegetation for slow rate and overland flow land application systems to treat municipal wastewater; effects of acid precipitation on ecological systems: Great Lakes region; water competition in Michigan; Michigan natural resources outlook.

  7. A DEMONSTRATION OF AREAWIDE WATER RESOURCES PLANNING. USERS MANUAL

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report documents a demonstration of areawide water resources planning by the Metropolitan Washington, DC. Council of Governments (MWCOG). The MWCOG Framework Water Resources Planning Model is a comprehensive analytical tool for use in areawide water resources management plan...

  8. Louisiana Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    Louisiana Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2005 Introduction This report presents a description of the activities of the Louisiana Water Resources Research Institute resources. The federal mandate recognizes the ubiquitous involvement of water in environmental and societal

  9. Louisiana Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    Louisiana Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2003 Introduction This report presents a description of the activities of the Louisiana Water Resources Research Institute resources. The federal mandate recognizes the ubiquitous involvement of water in environmental and societal

  10. Louisiana Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    Louisiana Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2001 Introduction This report presents a description of the activities of the Louisiana Water Resources Research Institute Water Resources Research Institute (LWRRI) is unique among academic research institutions in the state

  11. 18 CFR 701.76 - The Water Resources Council Staff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...Organization § 701.76 The Water Resources Council Staff. The Water Resources Council Staff...decisions of the Council, and all other laws, rules, regulations, and orders applicable to the Water Resources Council, and will...

  12. 18 CFR 701.76 - The Water Resources Council Staff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...Organization § 701.76 The Water Resources Council Staff. The Water Resources Council Staff...decisions of the Council, and all other laws, rules, regulations, and orders applicable to the Water Resources Council, and will...

  13. 18 CFR 701.76 - The Water Resources Council Staff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...Organization § 701.76 The Water Resources Council Staff. The Water Resources Council Staff...decisions of the Council, and all other laws, rules, regulations, and orders applicable to the Water Resources Council, and will...

  14. 30 CFR 402.6 - Water-Resources Research Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Water-Resources Research Program. 402.6 Section...GEOLOGICAL SURVEY, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR WATER-RESOURCES RESEARCH PROGRAM AND THE WATER-RESOURCES TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM...

  15. 30 CFR 402.6 - Water-Resources Research Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Water-Resources Research Program. 402.6 Section...GEOLOGICAL SURVEY, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR WATER-RESOURCES RESEARCH PROGRAM AND THE WATER-RESOURCES TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM...

  16. 30 CFR 402.6 - Water-Resources Research Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Water-Resources Research Program. 402.6 Section...GEOLOGICAL SURVEY, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR WATER-RESOURCES RESEARCH PROGRAM AND THE WATER-RESOURCES TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM...

  17. 30 CFR 402.6 - Water-Resources Research Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Water-Resources Research Program. 402.6 Section...GEOLOGICAL SURVEY, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR WATER-RESOURCES RESEARCH PROGRAM AND THE WATER-RESOURCES TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM...

  18. 30 CFR 402.6 - Water-Resources Research Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Water-Resources Research Program. 402.6 Section...GEOLOGICAL SURVEY, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR WATER-RESOURCES RESEARCH PROGRAM AND THE WATER-RESOURCES TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM...

  19. Louisiana Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    Louisiana Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2002 Introduction This report presents a description of the activities of the Louisiana Water Resources Research Institute Pardue. The Louisiana Water Resources Research Institute (LWRRI) is unique among academic research

  20. Modeling Renewable Water Resources under Climate Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, X.; Tang, Q.

    2014-12-01

    The impacts of climate change on renewable water resources are usually assessed using hydrological models driven by downscaled climate outputs from global climate models. Most hydrological models do not have explicit parameterization of vegetation and thus are unable to assess the effects of elevated atmospheric CO2 on stomatal conductance and water loss of leaf. The response of vegetation to elevated atmospheric CO2 would reduce evaporation and affect runoff and renewable water resources. To date, the impacts of elevated CO2 on vegetation transpiration were not well addressed in assessment of water resources under climate change. In this study, the distributed biosphere-hydrological (DBH) model, which incorporates a simple biosphere model into a distributed hydrological scheme, was used to assess the impacts of elevated CO2 on vegetation transpiration and consequent runoff. The DBH model was driven by five General Circulation Models (GCMs) under four Representative Concentration Pathways (RCPs). For each climate scenario, two model experiments were conducted. The atmospheric CO2 concentration in one experiment was assumed to remain at the level of 2000 and increased as described by the RCPs in the other experiment. The results showed that the elevated CO2 would result in decrease in evapotranspiration, increase in runoff, and have considerable impacts on water resources. However, CO2 induced runoff change is generally small in dry areas likely because vegetation is usually sparse in the arid area.

  1. Legal Aspects of Kansas Water Resources Planning

    E-print Network

    Peck, John C.

    1989-01-01

    stream_size 5640 stream_content_type text/plain stream_name John C. Peck & Doris K. Nagel, Legal Aspects of Kansas Water Resources Planning, 37 U. Kan. L. Rev. 199 (1988-1989).pdf.txt stream_source_info John C. Peck & Doris K. Nagel..., Legal Aspects of Kansas Water Resources Planning, 37 U. Kan. L. Rev. 199 (1988-1989).pdf.txt Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 HeinOnline -- 37 U. Kan. L. Rev. 199 1988-1989 HeinOnline -- 37 U. Kan. L...

  2. Water resources of St. Bernard Parish, Louisiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Prakken, Larry B.

    2013-01-01

    In 2010, about 261 million gallons per day (Mgal/d) of water were withdrawn in St. Bernard Parish, Louisiana, almost entirely from surface-water sources. Industrial use accounted for about 97 percent (253 Mgal/d) of the total water withdrawn. Other categories of use included public supply, rural domestic, and livestock. Water-use data collected at 5-year intervals from 1960 to 2010 indicated that total water withdrawals in the parish ranged from about 138 to 720 Mgal/d, with industrial use of surface water making up the bulk of water withdrawals. The large decline in surface-water withdrawals from 1980 to 1985 was largely attributable to a decrease in industrial use from 654 Mgal/d in 1980 to 127 Mgal/d in 1985. This fact sheet summarizes basic information on the water resources of St. Bernard Parish. Information on groundwater and surface-water availability, quality, development, use, and trends is based on previously published reports listed in the Selected References section.

  3. Water resources of Plaquemines Parish, Louisiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Prakken, Larry B.

    2013-01-01

    In 2010, about 85.1 million gallons per day (Mgal/d) of water were withdrawn in Plaquemines Parish, Louisiana. Surface-water sources accounted for almost all withdrawals; groundwater sources accounted for only 0.04 Mgal/d. Industrial use accounted for about 92 percent of the total water withdrawn. Other categories of use included public supply, rural domestic, and livestock. Water-use data collected at 5-year intervals from 1960 to 2010 indicated that water withdrawals in Plaquemines Parish peaked at about 177 Mgal/d in 1975. The peak resulted primarily from an increase in industrial surface-water withdrawals from about 23.8 Mgal/d in 1970 to 171 Mgal/d in 1975. Since 1975, water withdrawals have ranged from about 157 to 85.1 Mgal/d, with industrial surface-water withdrawals accounting for most of the variation. This fact sheet summarizes basic information on the water resources of Plaquemines Parish. Information on groundwater and surface-water availability, quality, development, use, and trends is based on previously published reports listed in the Selected References section.

  4. Water resources planning for rivers draining into Mobile Bay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    April, G. C.

    1976-01-01

    The application of remote sensing, automatic data processing, modeling and other aerospace related technologies to hydrological engineering and water resource management are discussed for the entire river drainage system which feeds the Mobile Bay estuary. The adaptation and implementation of existing mathematical modeling methods are investigated for the purpose of describing the behavior of Mobile Bay. Of particular importance are the interactions that system variables such as river flow rate, wind direction and speed, and tidal state have on the water movement and quality within the bay system.

  5. Game Theory in water resources management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsanevaki, Styliani Maria; Varouchakis, Emmanouil; Karatzas, George

    2015-04-01

    Rural water management is a basic requirement for the development of the primary sector and involves the exploitation of surface/ground-water resources. Rational management requires the study of parameters that determine their exploitation mainly environmental, economic and social. These parameters reflect the influence of irrigation on the aquifer behaviour and on the level-streamflow of nearby rivers as well as on the profit from the farming activity for the farmers' welfare. The question of rural water management belongs to the socio-political problems, since the factors involved are closely related to user behaviour and state position. By applying Game Theory one seeks to simulate the behaviour of the system 'surface/ground-water resources to water-users' with a model based on a well-known game, "The Prisoner's Dilemma" for economic development of the farmers without overexploitation of the water resources. This is a game of two players that have been extensively studied in Game Theory, economy and politics because it can describe real-world cases. The present proposal aims to investigate the rural water management issue that is referred to two competitive small partnerships organised to manage their agricultural production and to achieve a better profit. For the farmers' activities water is required and ground-water is generally preferable because consists a more stable recourse than river-water which in most of the cases in Greece are of intermittent flow. If the two farmer groups cooperate and exploit the agreed water quantities they will gain equal profits and benefit from the sustainable availability of the water recourses (p). If both groups overexploitate the resource to maximize profit, then in the medium-term they will incur a loss (g), due to the water resources reduction and the increase of the pumping costs. If one overexploit the resource while the other use the necessary required, then the first will gain great benefit (P), and the second will suffer a significant loss (G). According to Game Theory both parties, due to lack of confidence, will not cooperate and will eventually overexploit the resource, although their long-term interests would be the rational management. The lack of cooperation between the two players leads in the 3rd preference of each player, while cooperation secures their 2nd preference. In addition, the administrative authorities may intervene in the game by setting penalties (fines, irrigation block) on players who have "unorthodox" behaviour to ensure collaborative strategy. Game Theory techniques obtain the equilibrium point of the system as the outcome of interaction among stakeholders through a process of supply-demand under cooperation and conflict. For every strategy, functions will be formed such that to be used for any agricultural product and in different regions based on rural water costs. Thus, the game applies under variable annual strategies and time intervals providing the accumulated profit of the stakeholders with respect to the environmental cost. The outcome will provide a useful decision-making tool for both stakeholders and administrative authorities for optimal water resources management in relation to the agricultural development.

  6. Entropy, recycling and macroeconomics of water resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karakatsanis, Georgios; Mamassis, Nikos; Koutsoyiannis, Demetris

    2014-05-01

    We propose a macroeconomic model for water quantity and quality supply multipliers derived by water recycling (Karakatsanis et al. 2013). Macroeconomic models that incorporate natural resource conservation have become increasingly important (European Commission et al. 2012). In addition, as an estimated 80% of globally used freshwater is not reused (United Nations 2012), under increasing population trends, water recycling becomes a solution of high priority. Recycling of water resources creates two major conservation effects: (1) conservation of water in reservoirs and aquifers and (2) conservation of ecosystem carrying capacity due to wastewater flux reduction. Statistical distribution properties of the recycling efficiencies -on both water quantity and quality- for each sector are of vital economic importance. Uncertainty and complexity of water reuse in sectors are statistically quantified by entropy. High entropy of recycling efficiency values signifies greater efficiency dispersion; which -in turn- may indicate the need for additional infrastructure for the statistical distribution's both shifting and concentration towards higher efficiencies that lead to higher supply multipliers. Keywords: Entropy, water recycling, water supply multipliers, conservation, recycling efficiencies, macroeconomics References 1. European Commission (EC), Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), International Monetary Fund (IMF), Organization of Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), United Nations (UN) and World Bank (2012), System of Environmental and Economic Accounting (SEEA) Central Framework (White cover publication), United Nations Statistics Division 2. Karakatsanis, G., N. Mamassis, D. Koutsoyiannis and A. Efstratiades (2013), Entropy and reliability of water use via a statistical approach of scarcity, 5th EGU Leonardo Conference - Hydrofractals 2013 - STAHY '13, Kos Island, Greece, European Geosciences Union, International Association of Hydrological Sciences, International Union of Geodesy and Geophysics 3. United Nations (UN) (2012), World Water Development Report 4, UNESCO Publishing

  7. Integrated water resources modelling for assessing sustainable water governance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skoulikaris, Charalampos; Ganoulis, Jacques; Tsoukalas, Ioannis; Makropoulos, Christos; Gkatzogianni, Eleni; Michas, Spyros

    2015-04-01

    Climatic variations and resulting future uncertainties, increasing anthropogenic pressures, changes in political boundaries, ineffective or dysfunctional governance of natural resources and environmental degradation are some of the most fundamental challenges with which worldwide initiatives fostering the "think globally, act locally" concept are concerned. Different initiatives target the protection of the environment through sustainable development; Integrated Water Resources Management (IWRM) and Transboundary Water Resources Management (TWRM) in the case of internationally shared waters are frameworks that have gained wide political acceptance at international level and form part of water resources management planning and implementation on a global scale. Both concepts contribute in promoting economic efficiency, social equity and environmental sustainability. Inspired by these holistic management approaches, the present work describes an effort that uses integrated water resources modelling for the development of an integrated, coherent and flexible water governance tool. This work in which a sequence of computer based models and tools are linked together, aims at the evaluation of the sustainable operation of projects generating renewable energy from water as well as the sustainability of agricultural demands and environmental security in terms of environmental flow under various climatic and operational conditions. More specifically, catchment hydrological modelling is coupled with dams' simulation models and thereafter with models dedicated to water resources management and planning,while the bridging of models is conducted through geographic information systems and custom programming tools. For the case of Mesta/Nestos river basin different priority rules in the dams' operational schedule (e.g. priority given to power production as opposed to irrigation needs and vice versa), as well as different irrigation demands, e.g. current water demands as opposed to those defined in the River Basin Management Plan (RBMP), are thoroughly examined in order to ascertain the river's capability to cover multi water demands and the potential of further infrastructure development. Due to the transboundary nature of the river basin in question, different scenarios quantify the maximum water volumes that could be further exploited in the upper part of the basin in order to avoid adverse consequences to the downstream regional economy, power productivity and environmental flow, and in terms of water governance to satisfy the need to balance water use between socio-economic activities and ecosystems.

  8. Remote water cooled heat engine

    SciTech Connect

    Webby, C.W.

    1982-03-02

    A method of operating a heat engine is described where heated gas is introduced into a venturi or a convergent/divergent nozzle. The heated gas is cooled in a low pressure region by fluid injection, the resultant mixture then being passed through the divergent or diffuser part of the venturi or nozzle to a working apparatus. A heat engine is also disclosed which operates according to this method which includes a heat source coupled to a venturi or convergent/divergent nozzle. The nozzle can be substituted by a loop or cyclone. Means are provided to inject fluid into the gas stream in the nozzle loop or cyclone.

  9. North Dakota Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    North Dakota Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2012 North Dakota Water the activities of the North Dakota Water Resources Research Institute (NDWRRI) during the period of March 1, 2012 for Water Resources(NIWR). The NDWRRI was founded in 1965, by authority of Congress (Water Resources

  10. Water: a strategic resource. Student essay

    SciTech Connect

    Thornton, R.E.

    1986-04-15

    Availability of fresh water has been taken for granted throughout our history. In fact, the United States has been blessed with what was once thought to be a limitless natural resource, fresh water. The sources for this fresh water are precipitation, surface water, and ground water. Today, these sources are under relentless pressure from chronic pollution and over-usage. The federal government has begun the process of studying and doumenting the problems associated with our water supply but, to date, its efforts are far to little, too late. Budget constraints and funding projections only add to the already bleak picture. We are learning that water problems can't be contained and that they cross state, local, and private boundaries. This problem of area pollution has drawn considerable concern within the Department of Defense (DOD) as more and more of our installations are finding their water environment jeopardized. Solutions for the preservation cleansing and protection of our fresh-water systems are going to be expensive and technically complicated to accomplish and administer. Action is needed now.

  11. Water resources of Natchitoches Parish, Louisiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fendick, Robert B., Jr.; Prakken, Larry B.; Griffith, Jason M.

    2013-01-01

    In 2005, about 33.8 million gallons per day (Mgal/d) was withdrawn from water sources in Natchitoches Parish, Louisiana. Surface water sources accounted for about 86 percent (29.2 Mgal/d) of all withdrawals whereas groundwater sources accounted for about 14 percent (4.62 Mgal/d). Withdrawals for industrial use accounted for about 42 percent (14.1 Mgal/d) of the total water withdrawn (table 2). Other categories of use included public supply, rural domestic, livestock, rice irrigation, general irrigation, and aquaculture. The city of Natchitoches used almost 5.6 Mgal/d (about 5.2 Mgal/d of surface water and 0.4 Mgal/d of ground water) for public supply. Water-use data collected at 5-year intervals from 1960 to 2005 indicated that total water withdrawals increased from about 3.5 Mgal/d in 1960 to a peak of almost 35 Mgal/d in 2000. This fact sheet summarizes basic information on the water resources of Natchitoches Parish. Information on groundwater and surface-water availability, quality, development, use, and trends is based on previously published reports listed in the Selected References section.

  12. Engineering Water Analysis Laboratory Activity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlenker, Richard M.

    The purposes of water treatment in a marine steam power plant are to prevent damage to boilers, steam-operated equipment, and steam and condensate lives, and to keep all equipment operating at the highest level of efficiency. This laboratory exercise is designed to provide students with experiences in making accurate boiler water tests and to…

  13. Virginia Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    Water Central, a newsletter featuring articles on water-related policy and law, summaries of waterVirginia Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2013 Virginia Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2013 1 #12;Introduction The Virginia Water Resources Research

  14. Virginia Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    Water Central, a newsletter featuring articles on water-related policy and law, summaries of waterVirginia Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2012 Virginia Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2012 1 #12;Introduction The Virginia Water Resources Research

  15. Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    , Soil Biochemistry, Runoff, Riparian Forests, Acid Phosphatase Lead Institute: University of Rhode for the Rhode Island Water Resources Institute. Research Program Basic Information Title: Acid Phosphates. Gorres, and J. A. Amador. 2000. Seasonal variation in acid phosphatase activity as a function

  16. Georgia Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    , and satellites) and the development of models for climate and weather forecasting, hydrologic watershed had significant impact in Georgia as well as other US and world regions. Two examples of GWRI research of comprehensive water resources management strategies The Nile is the worlds longest river, and its watershed

  17. Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    of Minnesota's Water Resources Center (WRC). The WRC is a collaborative enterprise involving several colleges approximately three research projects each year. However, the effect of sequestration on our FY13 budget allowed, Management and Planning Descriptors: Principal Investigators: Jacques C. Finlay, Sarah Hobbie Publications

  18. Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2002 Introduction This program report-line information about the institute, newsletters, technical report series, requests for proposals, upcoming-federal matching funds. Please note that there may be some overlap in information with our 2001 report because data

  19. Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2004 Introduction This program report.nmsu.edu) provides on-line information about the institute, newsletters, technical report series, requests-federal matching funds. Please note that there may be some overlap in information with our 2003 report because data

  20. Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    to the National Aquatic Nuisance Species Task Force. This information can be used to further the understanding of aquatic invasions and make informed management decisions regarding possible control of introduced speciesWater Resources Center Annual Technical Report FY 1998 Introduction Research Program Information

  1. Water Resources Data, West Virginia, Water Year 2003

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ward, S.M.; Rosier, M.T.; Crosby, G.R.

    2004-01-01

    Water-resources data for the 2003 water year for West Virginia consists of records of stream discharge, reservoir and ground-water levels, and water quality of streams and ground-water wells. This report contains discharge records for 70 streamflow-gaging stations; discharge records provided by adjacent states for 8 streamflow-gaging stations; annual maximum discharge at 16 crest-stage partial-record stations; stage records for 6 detention reservoirs; water-quality records for 2 stations; and water-level records for 8 observation wells. Locations of streamflow, detention reservoir, and water-quality stations are shown on figure 4. Locations of ground-water observation wells are shown on figure 5. Additional water data were collected at various sites, not involved in the systematic data-collection program, and are published as miscellaneous sites. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System collected by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating State and Federal agencies in West Virginia.

  2. Water resources data-West Virginia, water year 2004

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ward, S.M.; Rosier, M.T.; Crosby, G.R.

    2005-01-01

    Water-resources data for the 2004 water year for West Virginia consist of records of stream discharge, reservoir and ground-water levels, and water quality of streams and ground-water wells. This report contains discharge records for 65 streamflow-gaging stations; discharge records provided by adjacent states for 8 streamflow-gaging stations; annual maximum discharge at 17 crest-stage partial-record stations; stage records for 14 detention reservoirs; water-quality records for 2 stations; and water-level records for 10 observation wells. Locations of streamflow, detention reservoir, and water-quality stations are shown on figure 4. Locations of ground-water observation wells are shown on figure 5. Additional water-quality data were collected at various sites, not involved in the systematic data collection program, and are published as miscellaneous sites. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System collected by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating State and Federal agencies in West Virginia.

  3. Lunar Water Resource Demonstration (LWRD) Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muscatello, Anthony C.; Captain, Janine E.; Quinn, Jacqueline W.; Gibson, Tracy L.; Perusich, Stephen A.; Weis, Kyle H.

    2009-01-01

    NASA has undertaken the In-Situ Resource Utilization (lSRU) project called RESOLVE (Regolith and Environment Science & Oxygen and Lunar Volatile Extraction). This project is an Earth-based lunar precursor demonstration of a system that could be sent to explore permanently shadowed polar lunar craters, where it would drill into regolith, quantify the volatiles that are present, and extract oxygen by hydrogen reduction of iron oxides. The RESOLVE chemical processing system was mounted within the CMU rover "Scarab" and successfully demonstrated on Hawaii's Mauna Kea volcano in November 2008. This technology could be used on Mars as well. As described at the 2008 Mars Society Convention, the Lunar Water Resource Demonstration (LWRD) supports the objectives of the RESOLVE project by capturing and quantifying water and hydrogen released by regolith upon heating. Field test results for the quantification of water using LWRD showed that the volcanic ash (tephra) samples contained 0.15-0.41% water, in agreement with GC water measurements. Reduction of the RH in the surge tank to near zero during recirculation show that the water is captured by the water beds as desired. The water can be recovered by heating the Water Beds to 230 C or higher. Test results for the capture and quantification of pure hydrogen have shown that over 90% of the hydrogen can be captured and 98% of the absorbed hydrogen can be recovered upon heating the hydride to 400 C and desorbing the hydrogen several times into the evacuated surge tank. Thus, the essential requirement of capturing hydrogen and recovering it has been demonstrated. ,

  4. Water resources review: Wheeler Reservoir, 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Wallus, R.; Cox, J.P.

    1990-09-01

    Protection and enhancement of water quality is essential for attaining the full complement of beneficial uses of TVA reservoirs. The responsibility for improving and protecting TVA reservoir water quality is shared by various federal, state, and local agencies, as well as the thousands of corporations and property owners whose individual decisions affect water quality. TVA's role in this shared responsibility includes collecting and evaluating water resources data, disseminating water resources information, and acting as a catalyst to bring together agencies and individuals that have a responsibility or vested interest in correcting problems that have been identified. This report is one in a series of status reports that will be prepared for each of TVA's reservoirs. The purpose of this status report is to provide an up-to-date overview of the characteristics and conditions of Wheeler Reservoir, including: reservoir purposes and operation; physical characteristics of the reservoir and the watershed; water quality conditions: aquatic biological conditions: designated, actual, and potential uses of the reservoir and impairments of those uses; ongoing or planned reservoir management activities. Information and data presented here are form the most recent reports, publications, and original data available. 21 refs., 8 figs., 29 tabs.

  5. Troubled waters: managing our vital resources.

    PubMed

    1999-03-01

    Presented are articles from Global Issues, an electronic journal of the US Information Agency that focuses on managing the water resources of the world. The three main articles are as follows: 1) ¿The Quiet Revolution to Restore Our Aquatic Ecosystems¿, 2) ¿Charting a New Course to Save America's Waters¿, and 3) ¿Freshwater: Will the World's Future Needs be Met?¿ The journal also presents commentaries on the age-old water shortage in the Middle East; solutions to water waste on the farm and in cities; managing water scarcity in the driest region of the US; and a new approach to environmental management in the Bermejo River in Argentina and Bolivia. Furthermore, this issue contains statistics on water usage and supplies and a report that examines proposals for policies that could set the world on a better course for water management. Lastly, this issue provides a bibliography of books, documents, and articles on freshwater issues as well as a list of Internet sites offering further information on water quality, supplies, and conservation. PMID:12290381

  6. Resource reliability, accessibility and governance: pillars for managing water resources to achieve water security in Nepal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biggs, E. M.; Duncan, J.; Atkinson, P.; Dash, J.

    2013-12-01

    As one of the world's most water-abundant countries, Nepal has plenty of water yet resources are both spatially and temporally unevenly distributed. With a population heavily engaged in subsistence farming, whereby livelihoods are entirely dependent on rain-fed agriculture, changes in freshwater resources can substantially impact upon survival. The two main sources of water in Nepal come from monsoon precipitation and glacial runoff. The former is essential for sustaining livelihoods where communities have little or no access to perennial water resources. Much of Nepal's population live in the southern Mid-Hills and Terai regions where dependency on the monsoon system is high and climate-environment interactions are intricate. Any fluctuations in precipitation can severely affect essential potable resources and food security. As the population continues to expand in Nepal, and pressures build on access to adequate and clean water resources, there is a need for institutions to cooperate and increase the effectiveness of water management policies. This research presents a framework detailing three fundamental pillars for managing water resources to achieve sustainable water security in Nepal. These are (i) resource reliability; (ii) adequate accessibility; and (iii) effective governance. Evidence is presented which indicates that water resources are adequate in Nepal to sustain the population. In addition, aspects of climate change are having less impact than previously perceived e.g. results from trend analysis of precipitation time-series indicate a decrease in monsoon extremes and interannual variation over the last half-century. However, accessibility to clean water resources and the potential for water storage is limiting the use of these resources. This issue is particularly prevalent given the heterogeneity in spatial and temporal distributions of water. Water governance is also ineffective due to government instability and a lack of continuity in policy. Subsequently, with poor accessibility and poor governance, the threat to human water security remains high in Nepal. Nonetheless, the nation has great potential to better manage natural capital and harness reserves for improving livelihoods, such as river flows for generating hydropower. Suggested solutions for transboundary water cooperation are explored within a water-energy-food nexus framework.

  7. Quantitative water quality with ERTS-1. [Kansas water resources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yarger, H. L.; Mccauley, J. R.; James, G. W.; Magnuson, L. M.; Marzolf, G. R.

    1974-01-01

    Analyses of ERTS-1 MSS computer compatible tapes of reservoir scenes in Kansas along with ground truth show that MSS bands and band ratios can be used for reliable prediction of suspended loads up to at least 900 ppm. The major reservoirs in Kansas, as well as in other Great Plains states, are playing increasingly important roles in flood control, recreation, agriculture, and urban water supply. Satellite imagery is proving useful for acquiring timely low cost water quality data required for optimum management of these fresh water resources.

  8. Pennsylvania Water Resources Research Center, Penn State Institutes of Energy and the

    E-print Network

    of Forest Resources at Penn State, provides baseline data on the accumulation of mercury in forested streams and Environmental Engineering, completed a study entitled "Impact of Infiltrating Runoff on Ground-Water Recharge Quality" which determined the amount and water quality of ground-water recharge from constructed detention

  9. Water resources data for Oregon, water year 2004

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Herrett, Thomas A.; Hess, Glenn W.; House, Jon G.; Ruppert, Gregory P.; Courts, Mary-Lorraine

    2005-01-01

    The annual Oregon water data report is one of a series of annual reports that document hydrologic data gathered from the U.S. Geological Survey's surface- and ground-water data-collection networks in each State, Puerto Rico, and the Trust Territories. These records of streamflow, ground-water levels, and quality of water provide the hydrologic information needed by State, local, Tribal, and Federal agencies and the private sector for developing and managing our Nation's land and water resources. This report contains water year 2004 data for both surface and ground water, including discharge records for 209 streamflow-gaging stations, 42 partial-record or miscellaneous streamflow stations, and 9 crest-stage partial-record streamflow stations; stage-only records for 6 gaging stations; stage and content records for 15 lakes and reservoirs; water-level records from 12 long-term observation wells; and water-quality records collected at 133 streamflow-gaging stations and 1 atmospheric deposition station.

  10. Water Resources Data for California, Water Year 1988. Volume 5. Ground-Water Data for California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lamb, C.E.; Fogelman, R.P.; Grillo, D.A.

    1989-01-01

    Water resources data for the 1988 water year for California consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage and contents in lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water-quality in wells. Volume 5 contains water levels for 980 observation wells and water-quality data for 239 observation monitoring wells. These data represent that part of the National water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating State and Federal agencies in California.

  11. Water Resources Data, California, Water Year 1989. Volume 5. Ground-Water Data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lamb, C.E.; Johnson, J.A.; Fogelman, R.P.; Grillo, D.A.

    1990-01-01

    Water resources data for the 1989 water year for California consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage and contents in lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality in weils. Volume 5 contains water levels for 1,037 observation wells and water-quality data for 254 monitoring wells. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperatine State and Federal agencies in California.

  12. Water Resources Data for California, Water Year 1987. Volume 5. Ground-water Data for California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lamb, C.E.; Fogelman, R.P.; Grillo, D.A.

    1989-01-01

    Water resources data for the 1987 water year for California consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage and contents in lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality in wells. Volume 5 contains water levels for 786 observation wells and water-quality data for 168 observation wells. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating State and Federal agencies in California.

  13. New York State Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    New York State Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2014 New York State Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2014 1 #12;Introduction The Mission of the New York State Water Resources Institute (WRI) is to improve the management of water resources in New York State

  14. Kansas Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    of the U.S. established by law in the Water Resources Research Act of 1964. The network is fundedKansas Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2013 Kansas Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2013 1 #12;Introduction The Kansas Water Resources Institute

  15. INSTITUTE FOR WATER RESOURCES FY 2012 ANNUAL REPORT

    E-print Network

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    INSTITUTE FOR WATER RESOURCES FY 2012 ANNUAL REPORT CHAPTER 43, REPORT OFTHE SECRETARY OFTHE ARMY ON CIVILWORKS ACTIVITIES FOR FY 2012 #12;INSTITUTE FOR WATER RESOURCES 43-1 INSTITUTE FOR WATER RESOURCES FY.............................................. 6 International Center for Integrated Water Resources Management

  16. California Institute for Water Resources Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    California Institute for Water Resources Annual Technical Report FY 2012 California Institute for Water Resources Annual Technical Report FY 2012 1 #12;Introduction The California Institute for Water and Natural Resources (UCANR), enabled by the federal Water Resources Research Act (WRRA), with the mission

  17. South Carolina Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    South Carolina Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report FY 2014 South Carolina Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report FY 2014 1 #12;Introduction The South Carolina Water Resources, the university community and the water resources constituencies of those institutions. This is accomplished

  18. Alabama Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    Alabama Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2011 Alabama Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2011 1 #12;Introduction The Alabama Water Resources Research with the newly created Auburn University Water Resources Center (AU-WRC), and in 2008 it was designated as part

  19. Alabama Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    Alabama Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2014 Alabama Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2014 1 #12;Introduction The Alabama Water Resources Research with the newly created Auburn University Water Resources Center (AU-WRC), and in 2008 it was designated as part

  20. Alabama Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    Alabama Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2010 Alabama Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2010 1 #12;Introduction The Alabama Water Resources Research on pressing problems in Alabama's water resources. The AWRRI - in partnership with state and federal agencies

  1. Florida Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    Florida Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2011 Florida Water Resources opportunities in critical areas of water resources that are targeted to meet Florida's short- and long-term needs. The Florida Water Resources Research Center coordinates graduate student funding

  2. Alabama Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    Alabama Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2013 Alabama Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2013 1 #12;Introduction The Alabama Water Resources Research with the newly created Auburn University Water Resources Center (AU-WRC), and in 2008 it was designated as part

  3. Florida Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    Florida Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2009 Florida Water Resources opportunities in critical areas of water resources that are targeted to meet Florida's short- and long-term needs. The Florida Water Resources Research Center coordinates graduate student funding

  4. Alabama Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    Alabama Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2012 Alabama Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2012 1 #12;Introduction The Alabama Water Resources Research with the newly created Auburn University Water Resources Center (AU-WRC), and in 2008 it was designated as part

  5. Missouri Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    Missouri Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2011 Missouri Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2011 1 #12;Introduction Water Resources Research Center Annual The Missouri Water Resources Research Center s objectives are: 1) to establish active research programs to aid

  6. Florida Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    Florida Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2008 Florida Water Resources opportunities in critical areas of water resources that are targeted to meet Florida's short- and long-term needs. The Florida Water Resources Research Center coordinates graduate student funding

  7. Florida Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    Florida Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2012 Florida Water Resources opportunities in critical areas of water resources that are targeted to meet Florida's short- and long-term needs. The Florida Water Resources Research Center coordinates graduate student funding

  8. Virginia Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    Virginia Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2009 Virginia Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2009 1 #12;Introduction The Virginia Water Resources Research via the VWRRC website a publication series that synthesizes and reports on water resources science

  9. Virginia Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    Virginia Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2010 Virginia Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2010 1 #12;Introduction The Virginia Water Resources Research via the VWRRC website a publication series that synthesizes and reports on water resources science

  10. 18 CFR 701.76 - The Water Resources Council Staff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    18 ? Conservation of Power and Water Resources ? 2 ? 2010-04-01 ? 2010-04-01 ? false ? The Water Resources Council Staff. ? 701.76 ? Section 701.76 ? Conservation of Power and Water Resources ? WATER RESOURCES COUNCIL ? COUNCIL ORGANIZATION ? Headquarters Organization ? § 701.76 ? The...

  11. 18 CFR 701.76 - The Water Resources Council Staff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    18 ? Conservation of Power and Water Resources ? 2 ? 2012-04-01 ? 2012-04-01 ? false ? The Water Resources Council Staff. ? 701.76 ? Section 701.76 ? Conservation of Power and Water Resources ? WATER RESOURCES COUNCIL ? COUNCIL ORGANIZATION ? Headquarters Organization ? § 701.76 ? The...

  12. D.C. Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    come from parts of the country with very different climate, hydrology, water law, and water useD.C. Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2009 D.C. Water Resources Research of the District of Columbia (DC) Water Resources Research Institute (the Institute) for the period March 1, 2009

  13. Virginia Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    and law, summaries of water conditions in Virginia, and news briefs about water issues. Producing VirginiaVirginia Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2011 Virginia Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2011 1 #12;Introduction The Virginia Water Resources Research

  14. Missouri Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    Missouri Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2012 Missouri Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2012 1 #12;Introduction Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2012-2013 WATER PROBLEMS AND ISSUES OF MISSOURI The water problems and issues

  15. Missouri Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    , hazardous waste disposal acid precipitation, anthropogenic effects on aquatic ecosystems and wetlands. WaterMissouri Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2008 Missouri Water Resources Introduction Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2008-2009 WATER PROBLEMS AND ISSUES

  16. Meet the Editors: Water Resources Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Mohi

    2006-02-01

    On 1 January 2005, a five-member team assumed editorial responsibility for Water Resources Research (WRR). A year later the team of Brian Berkowitz, Amilcare Porporato, Thomas Torgersen, Scott Tyler, and Editor-in-Chief Marc Parlange are pleased with the successes of several changes to the journal. ``WRR is the international stage where new and emerging ideas are discussed and where the directions for scientific research in all aspects of hydrology are charted,'' explained Porporato. ``This is the reason why we have worked hard with our associate editors to attract `opinion papers,' `inspired reviews,' and, more recently, `rapid communications.''' The aim of these new paper types is to encourage discussion of water resource issues relevant to society and to quickly present new results that advance theoretical, mathematical, technological, and experimental observations, Porporato said.

  17. Ethos, equity, and the water resource

    SciTech Connect

    Leopold, L.B. )

    1990-03-01

    The author uses two concepts, well known to ancient civilizations but latterly forgotten, in an analysis of some aspects of water resource use. First, democratic governance at the will of the people is effective and responsive as long as the exists an ethos in administration - a set of beliefs that guide decision making even though unwritten into law. Second, democrat guidance is effective when equity - fairness to all - is not submerged to private or narrow interests.

  18. Missouri Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    COMMITTEE MEMBERS 1. Dr. John Madras, Department of Natural Resources, Water and Pollution Control, PO Box. Steve McIntosh, Water Resources Program, Department of natural Resources, PO Box 176, Jefferson City, MO. 5. Dr. Hamed Mubarak, State Water Resources Economist, Department of Natural Resources, 205

  19. Virginia Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    Virginia Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 1998 Introduction Research Focus Category #3 None Lead Institution Virginia Water Resources Research Center Principal Investigators Name Title During Project Period Affiliated Organization Order Leonard Shabman Professor Virginia Water

  20. Conservation of Water and Related Land Resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caldwell, Lynton K.

    1984-04-01

    The author was quite clear about the purpose of this book and clearly achieved his intent. In his preface, the author states, “The purpose of this book is to acquaint the reader with a broad understanding of the topics relevant to the management of the nation's water and related land resources.” The book is a product of the author's 20 years of work as a teacher, consultant, researcher, and student of watershed management and hydrology and has served as a text for a course entitled Soil and Water Conservation, which the author has taught at the State University of New York, College of Environmental Science and Forestry at Syracuse, New York. But it was also written with the intent to be of use “to informal students of water and land related resources on the national level as well.” The objectives of Black's course at Syracuse and its larger purpose define the scope of the book which, again in the author's words, have been “(1) to acquaint students with principles of soil and water conservation; (2) to stimulate an appreciation for an integrated, comprehensive approach to land management; (3) to illustrate the influence of institutional, economic, and cultural forces on the practice of soil and water conservation; and (4) to provide information, methods, and techniques by which soil and water conservation measures are applied to land, as well as the basis for predicting and evaluating results.” The book is written in straightforward nontechnical language and provides the reader with a set of references, a table of cases, a list of abbreviations, and an adequate index. It impresses this reviewer as a very well edited piece of work.

  1. Virginia Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    Water Central, a newsletter featuring articles on water-related policy and law, summaries of waterVirginia Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2014 Virginia Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2014 1 #12;Introduction Introduction The Virginia Water

  2. INTEGRATING SOURCE WATER PROTECTION AND DRINKING WATER TREATMENT: U.S. ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY'S WATER SUPPLY AND WATER RESOURCES DIVISION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Water Supply and Water Resources Division (WSWRD) is an internationally recognized water research organization established to assist in responding to public health concerns related to drinking water supplies. WSWRD has evolved from...

  3. INTERGRATING SOURCE WATER PROTECTION AND DRINKING WATER TREATMENT: U.S. ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY'S WATER SUPPLY AND WATER RESOURCES DIVISION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Water Supply and Water Resources Division (WSWRD) is an internationally recognized water research organization established to assist in responding to public health concerns related to drinking water supplies. WSWRD has evolved from...

  4. Water Exploration: An Online High School Water Resource Education Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellins, K. K.; McCall, L. R.; Amos, S.; McGowan, R. F.; Mote, A.; Negrito, K.; Paloski, B.; Ryan, C.; Cameron, B.

    2010-12-01

    The Institute for Geophysics at The University of Texas at Austin and 4empowerment.com, a Texas-based for-profit educational enterprise, teamed up with the Texas Water Development Board to develop and implement a Web-based water resources education program for Texas high school students. The program, Water Exploration uses a project-based learning approach called the Legacy Cycle model to permit students to conduct research and build an understanding about water science and critical water-related issues, using the Internet and computer technology. The three Legacy Cycle modules in the Water Exploration curriculum are: Water Basics, Water-Earth Dynamics and People Need Water. Within each Legacy Cycle there are three different challenges, or instructional modules, laid out as projects with clearly stated goals for students to carry out. Each challenge address themes that map to the water-related “Big Ideas” and supporting concepts found in the new Earth Science Literacy Principles: The Big Ideas and Supporting Concepts of Earth Science. As students work through a challenge they follow a series of steps, each of which is associated (i.e., linked online) with a manageable number of corresponding, high quality, research-based learning activities and Internet resources, including scholarly articles, cyber tools, and visualizations intended to enhance understanding of the concepts presented. The culmination of each challenge is a set of “Go Public” products that are the students’ answers to the challenge and which serve as the final assessment for the challenge. The “Go Public” products are posted to a collaborative workspace on the Internet as the “legacy” of the students’ work, thereby allowing subsequent groups of students who take the challenge to add new products. Twenty-two science educators have been trained on the implementation of the Water Exploration curriculum. A graduate student pursuing a master’s degree in science education through The University of Texas’ UTEACH program is conducting research to track the teachers’ implementation of Water Exploration and assess their comfort with cyber-education through classroom observations, students and teacher surveys, and evaluation of students’ “Go Public” products.

  5. Water Resources Center, Desert Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    Category: Ground-water Flow and Transport Focus Category: Waste Water, Nitrate Contamination, Non PointWater Resources Center, Desert Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2002 Introduction Pollution Descriptors: surface water quality, turbidity, chlorophyll, nutrient info Principal Investigators

  6. Niche engineering reveals complementary resource use

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Greater resource use by diverse communities might result from species occupying different, complementary niches. Niche partitioning is difficult to directly demonstrate, however, because differences among species in the resources they use are often difficult to separate from other species-specific t...

  7. Using Case Studies to Teach Interdisciplinary Water Resource Sustainability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orr, C. H.; Tillotson, K.

    2012-12-01

    Teaching about water resources and often emphasizes the biophysical sciences to understand highly complex hydrologic, ecologic and engineering systems, yet most impediments to improving management emerge from social processes. Challenges to more sustainable management often result from trade-offs among stakeholders (e.g., ecosystem services, energy, municipal use, and agriculture) and occur while allocating resources to competing goals of economic development, social equity, and efficient governance. Competing interests operating across multiple scales can increase tensions and prevent collaborative resolution of resource management problems. Here we discuss using specific, place-based cases to teach the interdisciplinary context of water management. Using a case approach allows instructors to first explore the geologic and hydrologic setting of a specific problem to let students understand where water comes from, then how it is used by people and ecosystems, and finally what conflicts arise from mismatches between water quality, quantity, timing, human demand, and ecosystem needs. The case approach helps students focus on specific problem to understand how the landscape influences water availability, without needing to first learn everything about the relevant fields. We look at geology, hydrology and climate in specific watersheds before addressing the human and ecosystem aspects of the broader, integrated system. This gives students the context to understand what limits water availability and how a water budget constrains possible solutions to sustainability problems. It also mimics the approach we have taken in research addressing these problems. In an example case the Spokane Coeur D'Alene basin, spanning the border between SE Washington and NW Idaho, includes a sole source aquifer system with high exchange between surface water and a highly conductive aquifer. The Spokane River does not meet water quality standards and is likely to face climate driven shifts in precipitation which will alter both water availability and dilution capacity. Possible stakeholders include not only municipal, agricultural and industrial water users but also several levels of regulatory governance as the watershed crosses state lines and includes tribal lands. While the water system is bound by the limits of stratigraphy and hydrology, there are feedbacks to the physical system revealed feedbacks to the physical system resulting from decisions, preferences, and beliefs of the stakeholders. The complexity of these feedbacks are most easily explored through discussion of the specific case, which can then be generalized. The course design encourages participation and let students discuss, argue, and think critically about real problems they can identify with and that interest them. Walking through the cases shows students how complicated environmental problem-solving can be in a way that they internalize and how these ideas are then transferable to other situations.

  8. Accelerated Capacity Development in Water Resources Education: the experiences of the Ethiopian Institute of Water Resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alamirew, T.; Mekonnen, G.; Viglione, A.

    2012-04-01

    Ethiopia recently recognises that the water resources development is the major entry point in poverty alleviation and sustainable development. Water in Ethiopia plays a key role in the Water-Energy-Food-nexus. Over 98% of the electricity in the country is generated using hydropower and yet about 2000 MW has been developed. Out of the 3.5 Mha potentially irrigable land, only 0.25 Mha has been developed to date. Access to drinking water supply coverage is among the lowest in the world. One of the limiting factors in harnessing the resource base is the absence of water professionals to face the fast growing demand in education, research, development in the water sector. Recognising this, in collaboration with University of Connecticut of the United States, Addis Ababa University launched the Ethiopian Institute of Water Resources (EIWR) by enrolling 18 PhD and 24 MSc students. The program is unique in that much of the course instructors are coming from US and European Universities, but deliver courses together with Ethiopian collaborators. This is supposed to facilitate knowledge and experience transfer from the US/EU scientist to Ethiopian counterparts. The theses/dissertations are designed to focus on Ethiopia's immediate hydrological problems on selected basins, and will be coordinated by three advisors for each PhD - one from US/EU, one from Ethiopian Universities, and one water professional from the sector. We report here the lessons learned in setting up the EIWR institute and the education program.

  9. 33 CFR 209.345 - Water resource policies and authorities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Water resource policies and... ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURE § 209.345 Water resource policies and authorities... other Non-Federal Entities on Authorized Water Resources Projects.” (3) Section 221, FCA of 1970 (Pub....

  10. North Dakota Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    North Dakota Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2003 Introduction This report describes the activities of the North Dakota Water Resources Research Institute (ND WRRI) during as the National Institutes for Water Resources. The Institute was founded in 1965,by authority of Congress (Water

  11. Louisiana Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    Louisiana Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2010 Louisiana Water a description of the activities of the Louisiana Water Resources Research Institute for the period of March 1, 2010 to February 28, 2011 under the direction of Dr. John Pardue. The Louisiana Water Resources

  12. Louisiana Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    Louisiana Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2012 Louisiana Water a description of the activities of the Louisiana Water Resources Research Institute for the period of March 1, 2012 to February 28, 2013 under the direction of Dr. John Pardue. The Louisiana Water Resources

  13. Louisiana Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    Louisiana Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2011 Louisiana Water a description of the activities of the Louisiana Water Resources Research Institute for the period of March 1, 2011 to February 28, 2012 under the direction of Dr. John Pardue. The Louisiana Water Resources

  14. Louisiana Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    Louisiana Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2014 Louisiana Water a description of the activities of the Louisiana Water Resources Research Institute for the period of March 1, 2014 to February 28, 2015 under the direction of Dr. John Pardue. The Louisiana Water Resources

  15. Louisiana Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    Louisiana Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2008 Louisiana Water a description of the activities of the Louisiana Water Resources Research Institute for the period of March 1, 2008 to February 28, 2009 under the direction of Dr. John Pardue. The Louisiana Water Resources

  16. North Dakota Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    North Dakota Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2002 Introduction This report describes the activities of the North Dakota Water Resources Research Institute (ND WRRI) during as the National Institutes for Water Resources. The Institute was founded in 1965,by authority of Congress (Water

  17. North Dakota Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    North Dakota Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2011 North Dakota Water describes the activities of the North Dakota Water Resources Research Institute (NDWRRI) during the period as the National Institutes for Water Resources (NIWR). The NDWRRI was founded in 1965, by authority of Congress

  18. Louisiana Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    Louisiana Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2007 Louisiana Water a description of the activities of the Louisiana Water Resources Research Institute for the period of March 1, 2007 to February 29, 2008 under the direction of Dr. John Pardue. The Louisiana Water Resources

  19. Louisiana Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    Louisiana Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2013 Louisiana Water a description of the activities of the Louisiana Water Resources Research Institute for the period of March 1, 2013 to February 28, 2014 under the direction of Dr. John Pardue. The Louisiana Water Resources

  20. Indiana Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    Indiana Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2014 Indiana Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2014 1 #12;Introduction Indiana Water Resources Research Center 2014 Program and Management Report Overview: This report covers the activities of the Indiana Water

  1. Idaho Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    water education within the state at the K-12, undergraduate and graduate levels; and (7) To developIdaho Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2011 Idaho Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2011 1 #12;Introduction The Idaho Water Resources Research

  2. Idaho Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    of contamination from past mining activities in Idaho's water bodies; a novel approach to reducing phosphorousIdaho Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2009 Idaho Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2009 1 #12;Introduction The Idaho Water Resources Research

  3. Water Resource Planning and Management using Motivated Machine JANUSZ STARZYK

    E-print Network

    Starzyk, Janusz A.

    1 Water Resource Planning and Management using Motivated Machine Learning JANUSZ STARZYK School@ohio.edu Abstract Water resources planning and management require problem resolution and optimized use of resources uses of water resources. Motivated machine learning, presented in this paper, supports intelligent

  4. AOIPS water resources data management system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanwie, P.

    1977-01-01

    The text and computer-generated displays used to demonstrate the AOIPS (Atmospheric and Oceanographic Information Processing System) water resources data management system are investigated. The system was developed to assist hydrologists in analyzing the physical processes occurring in watersheds. It was designed to alleviate some of the problems encountered while investigating the complex interrelationships of variables such as land-cover type, topography, precipitation, snow melt, surface runoff, evapotranspiration, and streamflow rates. The system has an interactive image processing capability and a color video display to display results as they are obtained.

  5. AOIPS water resources data management system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merritt, E. S.; Shotwell, R. L.; Place, M. C.; Belknap, N. J.

    1976-01-01

    A geocoded data management system applicable for hydrological applications was designed to demonstrate the utility of the Atmospheric and Oceanographic Information Processing System (AOIPS) for hydrological applications. Within that context, the geocoded hydrology data management system was designed to take advantage of the interactive capability of the AOIPS hardware. Portions of the Water Resource Data Management System which best demonstrate the interactive nature of the hydrology data management system were implemented on the AOIPS. A hydrological case study was prepared using all data supplied for the Bear River watershed located in northwest Utah, southeast Idaho, and western Wyoming.

  6. Colorado Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    demand a better understanding of basic water science, technology and policy. Whether water managers work been named an Extension water resources specialist. Reagan received a B.S. in Agronomy from Texas AColorado Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2000 Introduction As water

  7. Center for Water Resources Research Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    is providing input to the Committee on issues addressing water quality, wastewater treatment, and NPS pollution water resources, NPS pollution, and projected water needs. Future water-related issues assist the StateCenter for Water Resources Research Annual Technical Report FY 1999 Introduction Abstract In FY 99

  8. GEOGRAPHY 347 -WATER AS A RESOURCE Course Description -Fall, 2012

    E-print Network

    James, L. Allan

    , including the economics of water, water rights law, and legislative controls such as the Clean Water ActGEOGRAPHY 347 - WATER AS A RESOURCE Course Description - Fall, 2012 Instructor: Dr. Allan James website: http://people.cas.sc.edu/ajames/347/index.html Textbook: Watersheds and Water Resources; 2010

  9. Missouri Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    Missouri Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2014 Missouri Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2014 1 #12;Introduction WATER PROBLEMS AND ISSUES OF MISSOURI The water problems and issues in the State of Missouri can be separated into three general areas: 1) water

  10. Missouri Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    Missouri Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2013 Missouri Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2013 1 #12;Introduction WATER PROBLEMS AND ISSUES OF MISSOURI The water problems and issues in the State of Missouri can be separated into three general areas: 1) water

  11. ANALYTICAL CAPABILITY - ISOTOPE HYDROLOGY LABORATORY (WATER QUALITY MANAGEMENT BRANCH, WATER SUPPLY AND WATER RESOURCES DIVISION, NRMRL)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The mission of NRMRL's Water Supply and Water Resources Division's Isotope Hydrology Laboratory is to resolve environmental hydrology problems through research and application of naturally occurring isotopes.Analytical capabilities at IHL include light stable isotope radio mass...

  12. ISOTOPE HYDROLOGY LABORATORY (WATER QUALITY MANAGEMENT BRANCH, WATER SUPPLY AND WATER RESOURCES DIVISION, NRMRL)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The mission of NRMRL's Water Supply and Water Resources Division's Isotope Hydrology Laboratory (IHL) is to resolve environmental hydrology problems through research and application of naturally occurring isotopes.The emergent field of isotope hydrology follows advances in anal...

  13. Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    Focus Category: Treatment, Waste Water, Water Quality Descriptors: Treatment, toxic substances, water Category: Water quality Focus Category: Treatment, toxic substances, water quality, wastewater. Principal health risks to animals and humans. Among the five pollutants of primary concern to MWRA's Toxic

  14. Assessment tools for dryland water resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirkby, Mike; Gallart, Francesc; Irvine, Brian; Fleskens, Luuk; Froebrich, Jochen

    2013-04-01

    Since water resources are scarce across dryland areas, including Mediterranean Europe and much of Africa, the sparseness of meteo and hydrometric networks require the application of indirect methods to make best use of existing resources, and to plan for future needs in a world of changing climates. Although remote sensing methods may be among the most effective for present conditions, they have limited forecasting potential. Here we apply coarse scale modelling approaches, based on partitioning precipitation between evapotranspiration, runoff and recharge , and making use of CRU interpolated gridded climate data for the present and recent past, with offsets for future conditions based on GCM scenarios. These methods can be applied at a range of scales: first to provide broad regionalisation patterns for hydrological response and second to provide default background data that can be supplemented by local data to provide site-specific advice to land managers. These methods have been applied in the EU MIRAGE project to regionalise the frequency of the dry phase in temporary streams during the Mediterranean summer, to help define reference ecological conditions across the humid to arid spectrum. They are also being applied in the EU WAHARA project to support the sharing of appropriate good practice for water harvesting in semi-arid Africa, in partnership with researchers in Ethiopia, Tunisia, Zambia and Burkina-Faso. Initial results show where it appropriate to consider transferring techniques between climatically comparable areas.

  15. 1 UCOWRWATER RESOURCES UPDATE UNIVERSITIES COUNCIL ON WATER RESOURCES

    E-print Network

    James, L. Allan

    126, PAGES 1-10, NOVEMBER 2003 Non-Point Source Pollution and the Clean Water Act: Policy Problem protection of water quality from point-source (PS), NPS, and ground-water pollution. However By the late 1980s, early efforts to reduce water pollution from PSs (e.g. industries and sewage treatment

  16. XVIII International Conference on Water Resources J. Carrera (Ed)

    E-print Network

    Torres-Verdín, Carlos

    XVIII International Conference on Water Resources CMWR 2010 J. Carrera (Ed) CIMNE, Barcelona 2010,16], however they require intensive parallel computational resources. Understanding the relative permeability

  17. Training days: TWRI coordinates water resources training programs 

    E-print Network

    Jensen, Ric

    2008-01-01

    Training days TWRI coordinates water resources training programs | pg. 2 Story by Ric Jensen tx H2O | pg. 3 H elping water professionals learn how to manage water resources is the goal of new training programs coordinated by the Texas Water... courses on water-related geographic information systems, remote sensing technology, and computer simulation models. Planned or anticipated topics include the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT), Agricultural Policy Economic Extender (APEX), Water...

  18. Modeling Water Resource Systems under Climate Change: IGSM-WRS

    E-print Network

    Strzepek, K.

    Through the integration of a Water Resource System (WRS) component, the MIT Integrated Global System Model (IGSM) framework has been enhanced to study the effects of climate change on managed water-resource systems. ...

  19. A Report on the Effectiveness of Texas Water Resources 

    E-print Network

    Ruesink, L. E.

    1977-01-01

    A readership survey conducted in May 1977 found that readers of Texas Water Resources find it useful, attractive and informative. The bulletin is published by the Texas Water Resources Institute to generate public awareness and understanding...

  20. Indiana Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    Indiana Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2010 Indiana Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2010 1 #12;Introduction Overview: This report covers them available via the Purdue University Library at "IWRRC Technical Reports

  1. Uncertainty Management in Urban Water Engineering Adaptation to Climate Change - abstract

    EPA Science Inventory

    Current water resource planning and engineering assume a stationary climate, in which the observed historical water flow rate and water quality variations are often used to define the technical basis. When the non-stationarity is considered, however, climate change projection co...

  2. [Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Part B permit application: Volume 6, Revision 3: Engineering Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-03-01

    This report is part of revision 3 to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act part B permit application for the WIPP facility. Engineering drawings and details are included on the following: fire protection sprinkler system and fire water collection system; fault analysis and protective device coordination; primary power distribution, area electrical diagrams; paving details; fencing plan; railroad access plan; and access road plans.

  3. [Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Part B permit application: Volume 6, Revision 3: Engineering Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-01-01

    This report is part of revision 3 to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act part B permit application for the WIPP facility. Engineering drawings and details are included on the following: fire protection sprinkler system and fire water collection system; fault analysis and protective device coordination; primary power distribution, area electrical diagrams; paving details; fencing plan; railroad access plan; and access road plans.

  4. Puerto Rico Water Resources and Environmental Research Institute

    E-print Network

    Gilbes, Fernando

    Puerto Rico Water Resources and Environmental Research Institute http://prwreri.uprm.edu Puerto Rico Water Resources and Environmental Research Institute, PO Box 9040, Mayaguez, PR 00681Puerto Rico://prwreri.uprm.edu Email: prwreri@uprm.eduURL: http://prwreri.uprm.edu Email: prwreri@uprm.edu Puerto Rico Water Resources

  5. Florida Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    point for water resources research. The WRRC is funded in party by Section 104 of Public Law 98Florida Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2004 Introduction The Florida Water Resources Research Center (WRRC) was re-established as a separate entity from the combined Center

  6. Virgin Islands Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    of 1984 as amended by Public law 101-397. Like other water resources research institutes, it receivesVirgin Islands Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2001 Introduction The Water Resources Research Institute (WRRI) at the University of the Virgin Islands (UVI) is one of the 54

  7. California Institute for Water Resources Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    California Institute for Water Resources Annual Technical Report FY 2014 California Institute for Water Resources Annual Technical Report FY 2014 1 #12;Introduction The California Institute for Water Resources (CIWR) is a special program within the University of California's (UC) Division of Agriculture

  8. California Institute for Water Resources Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    California Institute for Water Resources Annual Technical Report FY 2013 California Institute for Water Resources Annual Technical Report FY 2013 1 #12;Introduction The California Institute for Water Resources (CIWR) is a special program within the University of California's (UC) Division of Agriculture

  9. Utah Center for Water Resources Research Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    Utah Center for Water Resources Research Annual Technical Report FY 2014 Utah Center for Water Resources Research Annual Technical Report FY 2014 1 #12;Introduction The Utah Center for Water Resources Research (UCWRR) is located at Utah State University (USU), the Land Grant University in Utah

  10. Utah Center for Water Resources Research Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    Utah Center for Water Resources Research Annual Technical Report FY 2012 Utah Center for Water Resources Research Annual Technical Report FY 2012 1 #12;Introduction The Utah Center for Water Resources Research (UCWRR) is located at Utah State University (USU), the Land Grant University in Utah, as part

  11. Water Resources People and Issues GILBERT F. WHITE

    E-print Network

    Ponce, V. Miguel

    Water Resources People and Issues GILBERT F. WHITE by Martin Reuss #12;Interview with Gilbert F ever think about going anywhere else? 3 #12;Water Resources People and Issues A: No. We were all natural resources and water and land. When I encountered a group in the geography department

  12. Cannon River Watershed: Landowner Survey on Water Resources

    E-print Network

    Cannon River Watershed: Landowner Survey on Water Resources and Conservation Action by Mae A: Landowner Survey on Water Resources and Conservation Action A Project Report by Mae A. Davenport, Amit K 2014 #12;i CANNON RIVER WATERSHED: LANDOWNER SURVEY ON WATER RESOURCES AND CONSERVATION ACTION

  13. Pricing Water As If All Resources Matter Ronald C. Griffin

    E-print Network

    Griffin, Ronald

    Pricing Water As If All Resources Matter by Ronald C. Griffin Department of Agricultural Economics Association International, June 29 - July 3, 2000, Vancouver, B.C. #12;Pricing Water As If All Resources using better water prices. The resources which are potentially better allocated as a consequence

  14. Water Resource Infrastructure in New York: Assessment, Management, & Planning

    E-print Network

    Walter, M.Todd

    Water Resource Infrastructure in New York: Assessment, Management, & Planning Prepared September 4th , 2013 NEW YORK STATE WATER RESOURCES INSTITUTE Department of Earth: (607) 255-2016 http://wri.eas.cornell.edu Email: nyswri@cornell.edu #12;Water Resource

  15. California Institute for Water Resources Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    California Institute for Water Resources Annual Technical Report FY 2011 California Institute for Water Resources Annual Technical Report FY 2011 1 #12;Introduction Across California, the University. The California Institute for Water Resources (CIWR) is a special program within UCANR, enabled by the federal

  16. Louisiana Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    Louisiana Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2006 #12;Introduction This report presents a description of the activities of the Louisiana Water Resources Research Institute resources. The federal mandate recognizes the ubiquitous involvement of water in environmental and societal

  17. 987 REGULAR SESSION NEW YORK STATE WATER RESOURCES INSTITUTE

    E-print Network

    Walter, M.Todd

    987 REGULAR SESSION Ch. 605 NEW YORK STATE WATER RESOURCES INSTITUTE CHAPTER 605 Approved and effective Aug. 3, 1987 AN ACT to establish the New York state water resources institute at Cornell. Legislative findings. Water resource quality and management, particularly groundwater, is a high priority

  18. South Carolina Water Resources Research Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    South Carolina Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2010 South Carolina Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2010 1 #12;Introduction The South Carolina Water Resources Center uses its operating funds to carry out its mission as a liaison between the US

  19. South Carolina Water Resources Research Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    South Carolina Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2011 South Carolina Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2011 1 #12;Introduction The South Carolina Water Resources Center uses its operating funds to carry out its mission as a liaison between the US

  20. South Carolina Water Resources Research Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    South Carolina Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2013 South Carolina Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2013 1 #12;Introduction The South Carolina Water Resources Center uses its operating funds to carry out its mission as a liaison between the US

  1. Citizen Involvement in Water Resources Issues in New England

    E-print Network

    Gold, Art

    Citizen Involvement in Water Resources Issues in New England Abstract A survey determined citizen involvement and actions taken about water resource issues in New England. The major findings were: (1) 50. To obtain additional water resources information 55% of respondents indicated they would read printed fact

  2. Hawaii Bioenergy Master Plan Land and Water Resources

    E-print Network

    Hawaii Bioenergy Master Plan Land and Water Resources Submitted to Hawaii Natural Energy Institute factors, soils, geology and geography, land use patterns, surface and groundwater water resources, that will utilize the fuel once it is produced. To evaluate Hawaii's water resources and their potential to support

  3. Puerto Rico Water Resources and Environmental Research Institute

    E-print Network

    Gilbes, Fernando

    under the provisions of section 104 of the Water Resources Research Act of 1984 (Public Law 98-242), as amended by Public Laws 101-397, 104-147, 106- 374, and 109-471. Section 104 of the Water ResourcesPuerto Rico Water Resources and Environmental Research Institute U.S. Geological Survey Department

  4. Puerto Rico Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    Puerto Rico Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2008 Puerto Rico Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2008 1 #12;Introduction This report covers, technical reports, quarterly newsletter and a web site are used by the Institute to keep the water resources

  5. New Jersey Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    New Jersey Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2004 Introduction The New Jersey Water Resources Research Institute supports a diverse program of research projects and information-term investment in New Jersey water resource problems. With the latter (graduate students), the priority

  6. Louisiana Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    Louisiana Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2000 Introduction This report presents a description of the activities of the Louisiana Water Resources Research Institute for the period of March 1, 2000 to February 28, 2001. The Louisiana Water Resources Research Institute (LWRRI

  7. Puerto Rico Water Resources and Environmental Research Institute

    E-print Network

    Gilbes, Fernando

    under the provisions of section 104 of the Water Resources Research Act of 1984 (Public Law 98-242), as amended by Public Laws 101-397, 104-147, 106-374, and 109-471. Section 104 of the Water Resources ResearchPuerto Rico Water Resources and Environmental Research Institute U.S. Geological Survey Department

  8. Assistant Professor, Water Quantity/Irrigation Engineering Department of Biological Systems Engineering

    E-print Network

    Mazzotti, Frank

    engineering to assist in developing improved/innovative irrigation systems and in communicating effective degree in engineering. Candidates should demonstrate excellent oral and #12;written communication skillsAssistant Professor, Water Quantity/Irrigation Engineering Department of Biological Systems

  9. Puerto Rico Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    Puerto Rico Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2010 Puerto Rico Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2010 1 #12;Introduction The Puerto Rico Water of Puerto Rico. The Institute is one of 54 water research centers established throughout the United States

  10. Puerto Rico Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    Puerto Rico Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2009 Puerto Rico Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2009 1 #12;Introduction The Puerto Rico Water of Puerto Rico. The Institute is one of 54 water research centers established throughout the United States

  11. Oklahoma Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    Half Empty? and facilitated discussions afterward. Films included Blue Gold: World Water Wars, LiquidOklahoma Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2009 Oklahoma Water development of the natural environment. The Oklahoma Water Resources Research Institute (OWRRI) is located

  12. Missouri Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    waste disposal acid precipitation, anthropogenic effects on aquatic ecosystems and wetlands. WaterMissouri Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2006 #12;Introduction WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH CENTER ANNUAL TECHNICAL REPORT FY 2006-2007 WATER PROBLEMS AND ISSUES OF MISSOURI

  13. Nevada Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    on evapotranspiration from Tamarix in the Lower Virgin River: Are Beetles Saving Water? 2013 Universities CouncilNevada Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2013 Nevada Water Resources research has established the Division of Hydrologic Sciences as the recognized "Institute" under the Water

  14. Nevada Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    on evapotranspiration from Tamarix in the Lower Virgin River: Are Beetles Saving Water? 2013 Universities Council the beetle's defoliation of tamarisk as a water savings measure. These savings can be accessed by measuring the Nevada Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2012 Nevada Water Resources

  15. South Carolina Water Resources Research Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    necessary in the resource management decision-making arena as well as the water policy arena of the state issues as well as water quality and water quantity issues in the Saluda/Reedy watershed. The SCWRCSouth Carolina Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2008 South Carolina

  16. D.C. Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    for environmental and water quality testing, as well as modeling and simulation. In 2014, the Institute funded than 100 students were trained in the water quality testing technologies through lab course, as wellD.C. Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2014 D.C. Water Resources

  17. Florida Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    to narrative criteria that categorized water bodies as impaired using observed biological responses.epa.gov/lawsregs/rulesregs/upload/floridaprepub.pdf). Under this plan, concentration thresholds will be established for each water body type (i.e., lakesFlorida Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2013 Florida Water Resources

  18. Florida Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    . Previously, nutrients were managed according to narrative criteria that categorized water bodies as impaired, concentration thresholds will be established for each water body type (i.e., lakes, wetlands, riversFlorida Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2014 Florida Water Resources

  19. Virgin Islands Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    principal islands, Water Island, St. Croix, St. John and St. Thomas. Safe and sufficient water supplies haveVirgin Islands Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2007 Virgin Islands Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2007 1 #12;Introduction The United States

  20. Nevada Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    Objectives In the face of climate change, pollution, and population growth, water scarcity has becomeNevada Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2014 Nevada Water Resources research has established the Division of Hydrologic Sciences as the recognized "Institute" under the Water

  1. Multi-agent Water Resources Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castelletti, A.; Giuliani, M.

    2011-12-01

    Increasing environmental awareness and emerging trends such as water trading, energy market, deregulation and democratization of water-related services are challenging integrated water resources planning and management worldwide. The traditional approach to water management design based on sector-by-sector optimization has to be reshaped to account for multiple interrelated decision-makers and many stakeholders with increasing decision power. Centralized management, though interesting from a conceptual point of view, is unfeasible in most of the modern social and institutional contexts, and often economically inefficient. Coordinated management, where different actors interact within a full open trust exchange paradigm under some institutional supervision is a promising alternative to the ideal centralized solution and the actual uncoordinated practices. This is a significant issue in most of the Southern Alps regulated lakes, where upstream hydropower reservoirs maximize their benefit independently form downstream users; it becomes even more relevant in the case of transboundary systems, where water management upstream affects water availability downstream (e.g. the River Zambesi flowing through Zambia, Zimbabwe and Mozambique or the Red River flowing from South-Western China through Northern Vietnam. In this study we apply Multi-Agent Systems (MAS) theory to design an optimal management in a decentralized way, considering a set of multiple autonomous agents acting in the same environment and taking into account the pay-off of individual water users, which are inherently distributed along the river and need to coordinate to jointly reach their objectives. In this way each real-world actor, representing the decision-making entity (e.g. the operator of a reservoir or a diversion dam) can be represented one-to-one by a computer agent, defined as a computer system that is situated in some environment and that is capable of autonomous action in this environment in order to meet its design objectives. The proposed approach is numerically tested on a synthetic case study, characterized by two multi-purpose reservoirs in cascade, two diversion dams and four different conflicting water uses: hydropower energy production, drinking supply, flooding prevention along the reservoir shores and irrigation supply. The system is therefore composed by four agents: the two operators of the diversion dams, which are purely reactive agents since they simply respond directly to the environment, and the operators of the two reservoirs, which are more complex agents because they have an internal state and their decisions are taken according to a closed-loop control scheme. In particular, the set of agents can act considering only their own objectives or they can coordinate to jointly reach better compromise solutions. Different interaction scenarios between the two extreme behaviours of centralized management and completely non-cooperation are simulated and analysed.

  2. Water resources data, Maryland and Delaware, water year 1997, volume 2. ground-water data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smigaj, Michael J.; Saffer, Richard W.; Starsoneck, Roger J.; Tegeler, Judith L.

    1998-01-01

    The Water Resources Division of the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with State agencies, obtains a large amount of data pertaining to the water resources of Maryland and Delaware each water year. These data, accumulated during many water years, constitute a valuable data base for developing an improved understanding of the water resources of the State. To make these data readily available to interested parties outside the U.S. Geological Survey, the data are published annually in this report series entitled 'Water Resources Data - Maryland and Delaware.' This series of annual reports for Maryland and Delaware began with the 1961 water year with a report that contained only data relating to the quantities of surface water. For the 1964 water year, a similar report was introduced that contained only data relating to water quality. Beginning with the l975 water year, the report format was changed to present, in one volume, data on quantities of surface water, quality of surface and ground water, and ground-water levels. In the 1989 water year, the report format was changed to two volumes. Both volumes contained data on quantities of surface water, quality of surface and ground water, and ground-water levels. Volume 1 contained data on the Atlantic Slope Basins (Delaware River thru Patuxent River) and Volume 2 contained data on the Monongahela and Potomac River basins. Beginning with the 1991 water year, Volume 1 contains all information on quantities of surface water and surface- water-quality data and Volume 2 contains ground-water levels and ground-water-quality data. This report is Volume 2 in our 1998 series and includes records of water levels and water quality of ground-water wells and springs. It contains records for water levels at 397 observation wells, discharge data for 6 springs, and water quality at 107 wells. Location of ground-water level wells are shown on figures 3 and 4. The location for the ground-water-quality sites are shown on figures 5. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System collected by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating State and Federal agencies in Maryland and Delaware. Prior to introduction of this series and for several water years concurrent with it, water resources data for Maryland and Delaware were published in U.S. Geological Survey Water-Supply Papers. Data on water levels for the 1935 through 1974 water years were published under the title 'Ground-Water Levels in the United States.' The above mentioned Water-Supply Papers may be consulted in the libraries of the principal cities of the United States and may be purchased from the Branch of Information Services, Federal Center, Bldg. 41, Box 25286, Denver, CO 80225-0286. Publications similar to this report are published annually by the Geological Survey for all States. These official Survey reports have an identification number consisting of the two-letter State abbreviation, the last two digits of the water year, and the volume number. For example, this volume is identified as 'U.S. Geological Survey Water-Data Report MD-DE-98-2.' For archiving and general distribution, the reports for l971- 74 water years also are identified as water data reports. These water-data reports are for sale in paper copy or in microfiche by the National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, Springfield, VA 22161. Additional information, including current prices, for ordering specific reports may be obtained from the District Chief at the address given on the back of the title page or by telephone (410)238-4200.

  3. Environmental Tracers for Determining Water Resource Vulnerability to Climate Change

    SciTech Connect

    Singleton, M

    2009-07-08

    Predicted changes in the climate will have profound impacts on water availability in the Western US, but large uncertainties exist in our ability to predict how natural and engineered hydrological systems will respond. Most predictions suggest that the impacts of climate change on California water resources are likely to include a decrease in the percentage of precipitation that falls as snow, earlier onset of snow-pack melting, and an increase in the number of rain on snow events. These processes will require changes in infrastructure for water storage and flood control, since much of our current water supply system is built around the storage of winter precipitation as mountain snow pack. Alpine aquifers play a critical role by storing and releasing snowmelt as baseflow to streams long after seasonal precipitation and the disappearance of the snow pack, and in this manner significantly impact the stream flow that drives our water distribution systems. Mountain groundwater recharge and, in particular, the contribution of snowmelt to recharge and baseflow, has been identified as a potentially significant effect missing from current climate change impact studies. The goal of this work is to understand the behavior of critical hydrologic systems, with an emphasis on providing ground truth for next generation models of climate-water system interactions by implementing LLNL capabilities in environmental tracer and isotopic science. We are using noble gas concentrations and multiple isotopic tracers ({sup 3}H/{sup 3}He, {sup 35}S, {sup 222}Rn, {sup 2}H/{sup 1}H, {sup 18}O/{sup 16}O, and {sup 13}C/{sup 12}C) in groundwater and stream water in a small alpine catchment to (1) provide a snapshot of temperature, altitude, and physical processes at the time of recharge, (2) determine subsurface residence times (over time scales ranging from months to decades) of different groundwater age components, and (3) deconvolve the contribution of these different groundwater components to alpine stream baseflow. This research is showing that groundwater in alpine areas spends between a few years to several decades in the saturated zone below the surface, before feeding into streams or being pumped for use. This lag time may act to reduce the impact on water resources from extreme wet or dry years. Furthermore, our measurements show that the temperature of water when it reaches the water table during recharge is 4 to 9 degrees higher than would be expected for direct influx of snowmelt, and that recharge likely occurs over diffuse vegetated areas, rather than along exposed rock faces and fractures. These discoveries have implications for how alpine basins will respond to climate effects that lead to more rain than snow and earlier snow pack melting.

  4. Environmental resource document for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Irving, J.S.

    1993-07-01

    This document contains information related to the environmental characterization of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The INEL is a major US Department of Energy facility in southeastern Idaho dedicated to nuclear research, waste management, environmental restoration, and other activities related to the development of technology. Environmental information covered in this document includes land, air, water, and ecological resources; socioeconomic characteristics and land use; and cultural, aesthetic, and scenic resources.

  5. Environmental resource document for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    Irving, J.S.

    1993-07-01

    This document contains information related to the environmental characterization of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The INEL is a major US Department of Energy facility in southeastern Idaho dedicated to nuclear research, waste management, environmental restoration, and other activities related to the development of technology. Environmental information covered in this document includes land, air, water, and ecological resources; socioeconomic characteristics and land use; and cultural, aesthetic, and scenic resources.

  6. Water resources data, Maryland and Delaware, water year 1999, volume 2. ground-water data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Saffer, Richard W.; Starsoneck, Roger J.; Marchand, Elizabeth H.; Smigaj, Michael J.

    2000-01-01

    Water resources data for the 1999 water year for Maryland and Delaware consist of records of water levels and water quality of ground-water wells. This report (Volume 2. Ground-Water Data) contains water levels at 395 observation wells, discharge records for 6 springs and water quality at 1 spring, 186 wells, and 27 streambed piezometers. Locations of ground-water level wells are shown on figures 5 and 6. Locations of ground-water-quality sites are shown on figure 7. The data in this report represent that part of the National Water Data System collected by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating State, local, and Federal agencies in Maryland and Delaware.

  7. Illinois Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    Date: 12/31/2007 Funding Source: 104G Congressional District: 15 Research Category: Ground-water Flow and General Model Conceptualization, National Ground Water Association - 2008 Ground Water Summit, Memphis, TN/2/2008), PRO-GRADE: A GIS plug-in package for ground water recharge and discharge estimation, Ground Water. 1

  8. Water Resource Economics and Policy `A state-of-the-art and comprehensive review of water resource economics policy issues

    E-print Network

    Shaw, W. Douglass

    Water Resource Economics and Policy `A state-of-the-art and comprehensive review of water resource for classes in water economics as well as a source for researchers who need a state-of-the-art review of the literature.' ­ Frank A. Ward, New Mexico State University, USA `For years, I've taught water economics

  9. Training Resources Page 1 of 6 USGS Training Resources for Ground-Water Hydrology

    E-print Network

    Training Resources Page 1 of 6 USGS Training Resources for Ground-Water Hydrology Resources listed include reports, videotapes, and self-study manuals. I. General 1. Heath, R.C., 1983, Basic ground-water for a beginning course in ground-water hydrology: part 1-- course participants: U.S. Geological Survey Open

  10. Institute of Water Resources Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    : water quality, water chemistry, wastewater treatment, toxic substances wastewater, organic compounds, nutrients, nitrogen,denitrification eutrophication, biological treatment, bacteria,activated sludge

  11. International Water Resources Association Water International, Volume 28, Number 2, Pages 209216, June 2003

    E-print Network

    Scott, Christopher

    ­216, June 2003 209 Facing Water Scarcity in Jordan Reuse, Demand Reduction, Energy, and Transboundary future water supplies. Keywords: Integrated water resources management, water scarcity, water reuse": The Depths of Jordan's Water Scarcity The total renewable freshwater resources in Jordan are estimated

  12. Puerto Rico Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    of pollution that make waters fail to meet state water quality standards, and to develop Water Cleanup Plans to address those pollutants. The Water Cleanup Plan (TMDL) establishes limits on pollutants that canPuerto Rico Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2005 Introduction

  13. Puerto Rico Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    of pollution that make waters fail to meet state water quality standards, and to develop Water Cleanup Plans to address those pollutants. The Water Cleanup Plan (TMDL) establishes limits on pollutants that canPuerto Rico Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2004 Introduction

  14. Colorado Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    established CWRRI water research priorities as follows: Understanding the life cycle of plains minnows ImpactColorado Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 1999 Introduction WATER Water Institute Program for FY1999, the Advisory Council on Water Research Policy (ACWRP

  15. sustainability Responsibly steward water resources by focusing on efficiency,

    E-print Network

    sustainability Responsibly steward water resources by focusing on efficiency, cul va ng climate adapted landscape, minimizing potable water use, and maximizing use of reclaimed water. 8% The Ins tute experienced an eight percent increase in campus water use in FY2014. The increase is due to changes in water

  16. Architecture of a Federated Query Engine for Heterogeneous Resources

    PubMed Central

    Bradshaw, Richard L.; Matney, Susan; Livne, Oren E.; Bray, Bruce E.; Mitchell, Joyce A.; Narus, Scott P.

    2009-01-01

    The Federated Utah Research and Translational Health e-Repository (FURTHeR) is a Utah statewide informatics platform for the new Center for Clinical and Translational Science at the University of Utah. We have been working on one of FURTHeR’s key components, a federated query engine for heterogeneous resources, that we believe has the potential to meet some of the fundamental needs of translational science to access and integrate diverse biomedical data and promote discovery of new knowledge. The architecture of the federated query engine for heterogeneous resources is described and demonstrated. PMID:20351825

  17. Architecture of a federated query engine for heterogeneous resources.

    PubMed

    Bradshaw, Richard L; Matney, Susan; Livne, Oren E; Bray, Bruce E; Mitchell, Joyce A; Narus, Scott P

    2009-01-01

    The Federated Utah Research and Translational Health e-Repository (FURTHeR) is a Utah statewide informatics platform for the new Center for Clinical and Translational Science at the University of Utah. We have been working on one of FURTHeR's key components, a federated query engine for heterogeneous resources, that we believe has the potential to meet some of the fundamental needs of translational science to access and integrate diverse biomedical data and promote discovery of new knowledge. The architecture of the federated query engine for heterogeneous resources is described and demonstrated. PMID:20351825

  18. A systems engineering management approach to resource management applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hornstein, Rhoda Shaller

    1989-01-01

    The author presents a program management response to the following question: How can the traditional practice of systems engineering management, including requirements specification, be adapted, enhanced, or modified to build future planning and scheduling systems for effective operations? The systems engineering management process, as traditionally practiced, is examined. Extensible resource management systems are discussed. It is concluded that extensible systems are a partial solution to problems presented by requirements that are incomplete, partially immeasurable, and often dynamic. There are positive indications that resource management systems have been characterized and modeled sufficiently to allow their implementation as extensible systems.

  19. Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    of the Clean Water Act. Approximately 1000 water bodies are currently classified as impaired or use-limited in Idaho. Many water bodies are classified as P-limited due to their high nitrogen:phosphorus ratios (N quality management plans for all use-limited water bodies. A management plan for Cascade Reservoir

  20. Water resources by orbital remote sensing: Examples of applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martini, P. R. (principal investigator)

    1984-01-01

    Selected applications of orbital remote sensing to water resources undertaken by INPE are described. General specifications of Earth application satellites and technical characteristics of LANDSAT 1, 2, 3, and 4 subsystems are described. Spatial, temporal and spectral image attributes of water as well as methods of image analysis for applications to water resources are discussed. Selected examples are referred to flood monitoring, analysis of water suspended sediments, spatial distribution of pollutants, inventory of surface water bodies and mapping of alluvial aquifers.