Sample records for water resources engineering

  1. Water and Environmental Resources Engineering

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Lilly Boruszkowski

    Learn about careers, education, and research in water and environmental engineering from diverse undergraduate and graduate engineering students. See what excites them about their future careers. Learn what engineers do, observe first hand student research projects on cleaning up wastewater and oil spills. Gives advice to students from students about engineering careers and training. Answers the questions "Is engineering too hard?" and "Are engineers geeks?"

  2. Water Works! Water Resources Engineering and Turbine Energy

    E-print Network

    Barrash, Warren

    Water Works! Water Resources Engineering and Turbine Energy Facilitators: Dr. Jairo Hernandez for society. Water can be a tremendous resource when it comes to generating energy and work. The reason for this, is because when water is moving it is a force. This force carries momentum. Momentum

  3. FACULTY POSITION IN WATER RESOURCES AND ECOHYDROLOGIC ENGINEERING

    E-print Network

    Bohnhoff, David

    FACULTY POSITION IN WATER RESOURCES AND ECOHYDROLOGIC ENGINEERING POSITION: Assistant Professor of Agricultural and Biological Engineering. RESPONSIBILITIES: This is an academic year, tenure track, teaching focused on environment and natural resources engineering, modeling of hydrologic and ecological processes

  4. Master of Science in Civil Engineering Environmental Engineering/Water Resources Engineering

    E-print Network

    Gelfond, Michael

    Master of Science in Civil Engineering Environmental Engineering/Water Resources Engineering of Physics I COMPUTER SCIENCE CE 1305 - Engineering Analysis Ic CIVIL ENGINEERING CE 2301 - Statics CE 3303 - Mechanics of Solids CE 3305 - Mechanics of Fluids CE 3354 - Engineering Hydrology CE 3372 - Water Systems

  5. NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE 212 AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING BUILDING

    E-print Network

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    . University of North Carolina. Report No. 23 2)Water Resources Institute, 1969 Annual Report. Texas A improved soil and water conservation systems which are compatible with modern farming practices. A parallelNEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE 212 AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING BUILDING THE UNIVERSITY

  6. NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE 212 AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING BUILDING

    E-print Network

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE 212 AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING BUILDING THE UNIVERSITY involved. WATER PROBLEMS EMPHASIZED BY EPA The Environmental Protection Agency's Office of Air and Water. #12;-3- Assistant Administrator for Air and Water Programs, Robert L. Sansom, said Deputy Assistant

  7. CEE 692 ENVIRONMENTAL AND WATER RESOURCES ENGINEERING SEMINAR SPRING 2011

    E-print Network

    Mountziaris, T. J.

    CEE 692 ENVIRONMENTAL AND WATER RESOURCES ENGINEERING SEMINAR SPRING 2011 Friday 12:20 pm (in Introduction Water, Sanitation & Cholera in Milot, Haiti Dr. John Tobiason, UMass EWRE Friday Jan 28 Application of an Electrochemically-Active Carbon Nanotube Filter for Water Purification Dr. Chad Vecitis Asst

  8. Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Michigan Environmental and Water Resources Engineering Special Seminar

    E-print Network

    Kamat, Vineet R.

    Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Michigan Environmental and Water Resources Engineering ­ Special Seminar Friday, May 18, 2012, 11:00 a.m. Environmental and Water Resources, JORDAN Co-sponsored by Network for Women in Civil and Environmental Engineering Enhancing the Metal

  9. Environmental and Water Resources Engineering Seminar Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering

    E-print Network

    Kamat, Vineet R.

    Environmental and Water Resources Engineering Seminar Department of Civil and Environmental of Michigan Alexandria Boehm, Ph.D. Associate Professor, Civil and Environmental Engineering Stanford be found in E. casseliflavus, for example) affects its sensitivity to sunlight and photoinactivation rate

  10. ClimateVariations,ClimateChange,andWaterResourcesEngineering Complex water resource systems have been developed to

    E-print Network

    Piechota, Thomas C.

    predictability, and provides examples of its use in water resources management, planning, and design, flood and drought pre- paredness agencies, irrigation district managers, and any oth- ers that rely on water resources budgeting, planning, and sys- tems operations. Civil Engineering Water Resources

  11. Environmental and Water Resources Engineering Seminar Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering

    E-print Network

    Kamat, Vineet R.

    Environmental and Water Resources Engineering Seminar Department of Civil and Environmental of Michigan Jonathan L. Goodall, Ph.D. Associate Professor, Civil and Environmental Engineering University Engineering Wednesday, March 19, 2014, 4:30 ­ 5:30 PM 1670 Beyster Building (North Campus), University

  12. Environmental and Water Resources Engineering Seminar Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering

    E-print Network

    Kamat, Vineet R.

    Environmental and Water Resources Engineering Seminar Department of Civil and Environmental and Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering University of Michigan Future Scenario Modeling to Evaluate Engineering Wednesday, April 16, 2014, 4:30 ­ 5:30 PM 1670 Beyster Building (North Campus), University

  13. Environmental and Water Resources Engineering Seminar Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering

    E-print Network

    Kamat, Vineet R.

    Environmental and Water Resources Engineering Seminar Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering Wednesday, January 22, 2014, 4:30 ­ 5:30 PM 1670 Beyster Building (North Campus), University Scientist, Center for Sustainable Systems, SNRE University of Michigan Environmental Impacts of Coal Power

  14. NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE 212 AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING BUILDING

    E-print Network

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    water resources research program. The approach is to view urban water sources, use, and management, urban water use and needs, water system construction, and flood plain management. The focal point is Deputy Director for Water Resources Research. WASTE GUIDE ON THERMAL POLLUTION Copies of an "Industrial

  15. Environmental, Water Resources, and Geotechnical Engineering Seminar Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering

    E-print Network

    Kamat, Vineet R.

    , and displacements in energy foundations will be discussed, including thermo-hydro-mechanical finite element analysis geotechnics. Dr. McCartney is a Water-Geo-Energy Systems Faculty Candidate #12;Environmental, Water Resources, and Geotechnical Engineering Seminar Department of Civil

  16. WATER RESOURCES NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE

    E-print Network

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    WATER RESOURCES NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE 212 AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING BUILDING Committee on Natioha1 Water Resources report in 1961 and the formation of the Committee on Water Resources in emphasis"and values regarding water resources' research. Interest has shifted from}J4ter supply

  17. WATER RESOURCES NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE

    E-print Network

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    WATER RESOURCES NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE 212 AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING BUILDING,000,000 for the Sec. 101 matching grant program, and $2,000,000 for the Title II program. INTERDISCIPLINARY WATER RESOURCE SEMINAR An Interdisciplinary Water Resource Seminar will be offered during the 1970 Semeste

  18. WATER RESOURCES NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE

    E-print Network

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    WATER RESOURCES NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE 212 AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING BUILDING Research application is an educational activity. Its aim is to pro- duce a change in the water resource environment by producing a change in people who manage water resources. #12;-2- 6. Provide Readable Reports

  19. WATER RESOURCES NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE

    E-print Network

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    WATER RESOURCES NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE 212 AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING BUILDING OF THE DIRECTOR . . · Once again during the spring 1973 semester the Nebraska Water Resources Research Institute will sponsor an Interdisciplinary Water Resources Seminar. These seminars have been held for the past five

  20. WATER RESOURCES NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE

    E-print Network

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    WATER RESOURCES NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE 212 AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING BUILDING LABLE FRm1 ~.~, VI I RI RI I · The Nebraska Water Resources Research Institute has recently issued a new. This publi- cation may be obtained by writing: Dr. Warren Viessman, Jr., Director, Nebraska Water Resources

  1. WATER RESOURCES NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE

    E-print Network

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    WATER RESOURCES NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE 212 AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING BUILDING ALLOTMENT PROJECT DEADLINE The Nebraska Water Resources Research Institute is now prepared to receive basicIe. LB-334, enacted by the 1969 Legislature, authorized the Nebraska Soil a~d Water Conservation

  2. Land and water resources model integration: software engineering and beyond

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. M. Argent; B. Houghton

    2001-01-01

    Integrated modelling has arisen as a valuable tool for assisting environmental management. Many existing land and water resources models are, however, not amenable to integration. To transform and develop models that serve integrated environmental management we need to address technical and social issues that include model reformulation and design, adoption of standard specification, notation and documentation on models and the

  3. WATER RESOURCES NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE

    E-print Network

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    WATER RESOURCES NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE 212 AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING BUILDING in water pollution except that land runoff is a more meaningful problem than originally thought. BUREAU STUDIES SALINE WATER A study to generate a dependable \\'tay of evaluating the economic effects of salinity

  4. WATER RESOURCES NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE

    E-print Network

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    WATER RESOURCES NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE 212 AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING BUILDING during precipitation-free periods and constitutes the principal source of fresh water for many arid local- ities. About 70-80 percent of the water used in Nebraska is from groundwater sources, while the national

  5. Proceedings ASCE International Water Resources Engineering Conference August 8-12, 1999, Seattle, WA

    E-print Network

    Wells, Scott A.

    1 Proceedings ASCE International Water Resources Engineering Conference August 8-12, 1999, Seattle is a two-dimensional water quality and hydrodynamic code supported by the USACE Waterways Experiments Station (Cole and Buchak, 1995). This model has been widely applied to stratified surface water systems

  6. Proceedings ASCE International Water Resources Engineering Conference August 8-12, 1999, Seattle, WA

    E-print Network

    Wells, Scott A.

    Proceedings ASCE International Water Resources Engineering Conference August 8-12, 1999, Seattle and Columbia Rivers. It is a eutrophic water body susceptible to algae blooms and crashes and periods of high pH which violate water quality standards. High nutrient loads from groundwater principally controls algae

  7. Water World and Environmental Resources Conference 2004, Environmental and Water Resources Institute of the American Society of Civil Engineers, Salt Lake City, Utah. July 27 June 1, 2004.

    E-print Network

    Pitt, Robert E.

    1 Water World and Environmental Resources Conference 2004, Environmental and Water Resources Institute of the American Society of Civil Engineers, Salt Lake City, Utah. July 27 ­ June 1, 2004. High material and those in ionic forms for filtered stormwater collected at Tuscaloosa, AL, outfalls. Table 1

  8. NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE 212 AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING BUILDING

    E-print Network

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    and Hater Programs is placing more emphasis on water pollution control. EPA Administrator William D and water pollution control specialists. #12;have three divisions: data support, and (3) to give greater planning. ''If.Te are making these changes in order to water pollution control strategy and in wide cleanup

  9. NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE 212 AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING BUILDING

    E-print Network

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    , and Federal Government agencies to undertake research into any aspects of water problems related of the Interior to make grants, contracts, and matching or other arrangements with educational institutions to encourage and support research investigations dealing with major water problem areas and which hold promise

  10. WATER RESOURCES NEWS t'~EBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE

    E-print Network

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    WATER RESOURCES NEWS t'~EBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE 212 AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING.J~!GHIEEP. HlG STlJDF,~'T SELECTED FOR INSTITUTE DE WATER RESOURCES PLNm ING /\\HALYS ISAND REVIEl"1STIJDY Gary A studentjwho will work in 2-men teams with exneri- enced Corps of Engineers water resources planners

  11. WATER RESOURCES NEWS NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE

    E-print Network

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    WATER RESOURCES NEWS NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE 212 AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING and the Soil and Water Division of the American Society of Agricultural Engineers will sponsor a three- tenance of these irnportQnt water resources sy~tcms. For further information and registration forms

  12. Water resources

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1995-10-01

    This section of the Energy Vision 2020 draft report discusses the environmental effects on the water resources of the region. Water quality concerns in the region include: (1) point and non-point sources of pollution, (2) toxic substances found in both sediments and wildlife of some reservoirs, and (3) occurrences of low dissolved oxygen levels downstream of certain dams. Each of these concerns are discussed with respect to the aquatic environments of the region.

  13. WATER RESOURCES NEWS NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE

    E-print Network

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    WATER RESOURCES NEWS NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE 212 AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING\\R PLN'~lFn The Nebraska Water Resources Research Instituie (NWRRI) is planning a two-day Seminar, enti of this conference is to acquaint water resources planners, managers, developers, researchers, and educators

  14. WATER RESOURCES NEWS NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE

    E-print Network

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    WATER RESOURCES NEWS m NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE 212 AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING'f,R PLAmlEll The Nebraska Water Resources Research Institute (NWRRI) is planning a t wo-cday Seminar, entitled "Water Resources PlanninfT and Public Opinion", to be he Ld March 8,9, 1971 at the Nebraska Center

  15. WATER RESOURCES NEWS NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE

    E-print Network

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    WATER RESOURCES NEWS NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE 212 AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING INSTITUTES A SUCCESS The Water Resources Research Ins ti tute re cently sponsored two very successful one-week Summer Institutes. The titles of the Institutes were "Optimal Analysis of Water Resources Systems

  16. WATER RESOURCES NEWS NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE

    E-print Network

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    WATER RESOURCES NEWS NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE 212 AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING Water Resources Research Institute will once agai n sponsor a one-week Summer Insti tute.jlu ly 21-26, 1974. Thi s year's theme is "Quantitative Planning Techniques in Water Resources. II The objective

  17. Water Resources People cand Issues

    E-print Network

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Water Resources People cand Issues Interview With Professor Arthur Maass US Army Corps of Engineers Maass. (Water resources people and issues) 1. Water resources development--United States-- Planning--History. 2. Water resources development-- United States--Planning--History--Sources. I. Maass, Arthur. II

  18. WATER RESOURCES NEWS NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE

    E-print Network

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    WATER RESOURCES NEWS NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE 212 AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING-Oriented Water Research Plan for Nebraska, II is by Dr. Harren ViessL~n, Jr. This publication rnay be obta ined by vrr i ting : Dr · Warren Viessrnan, Jr., Director, Nebraska water Resources Research Institute, 212

  19. WATER RESOURCES NEWS NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE

    E-print Network

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    WATER RESOURCES NEWS NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE 212 AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING that the traditional acceptance of and fundin0 approach to extensive water resources development projects would change. The era of large public works projects for water development is over insofar as national parti- cipation

  20. WATER RESOURCES .NEWS NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE

    E-print Network

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    WATER RESOURCES .NEWS NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE 212 AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING" DIRECTOR ... c---~ / --'-----::L.\\ ".~-' ~1arch 1973 Incrc~sinq demands on our water supolies dictate~at~ent processes are improved and the procurement and development of naturJl water sources becomes increasingly

  1. WATER RESOURCES NEWS NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE

    E-print Network

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    WATER RESOURCES NEWS NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE 212 AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING BUilDING THE UNIVERSITY OF NEBRASKA LINCOLN, NEBRASKA 68503 Volume 2 Number 4 April 1970 INCREASED FUNDS FOR STATE WATER thus far include such educational and scientific organizations as the Universities Council on Water

  2. Reformulation of Engineering Education at Undergraduate Level in the Faculdad de Ingenieria y Ciencias Hidricas Universidad Nacional del Litoral--Water Resources and Engineering Degrees.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Theiler, Julio; Isla, Miguel; Arrillaga, Hugo; Ceirano, Eduardo; Lozeco, Cristobal

    This paper explains the educational changes in the Water Resources Engineering program offered by the Universidad Nacional del Litoral in Santa Fe, Argentina, for the last 20 years at the undergraduate level. The need for modernizing the engineering teaching program occurred due to changes in the social system in which the concepts of development…

  3. Water Use in Agricultural Watersheds Derrel Martin, Professor, Irrigation and Water Resources Engineer, Dept. of Biological Systems

    E-print Network

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    the fate of water as depicted in the hydrologic cycle (Figure 1). There is a constant amount of water can affect the hydrologic cycle and the water balance of a watershed by diverting surface waterWater Use in Agricultural Watersheds Derrel Martin, Professor, Irrigation and Water Resources

  4. Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Univ. of Michigan Environmental and Water Resources Engineering Special Seminar

    E-print Network

    Kamat, Vineet R.

    and neighboring areas face health threats from drinking arsenic- contaminated groundwater. The challenge and ordinary steel electrodes to produce iron rust in the arsenic-contaminated groundwater that binds arsenic for arsenic remediation in rural South Asian drinking water Abstract: Over 60 million people in Bangladesh

  5. Environmental, Water Resources, and Geotechnical Engineering Seminar Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering

    E-print Network

    Kamat, Vineet R.

    Osmosis Mr. Yip is a Water-Geo-Energy Systems Faculty Candidate Abstract. The development of alternative power sources is necessary to enable a global shift to a sustainable energy future. Pressure retarded University Harnessing Natural Salinity Gradients for Sustainable Power Generation with Pressure Retarded

  6. Postgraduate Programmes on Environmental Water Resources Engineering and Management in Greek Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Latinopoulos, Pericles; Angelidis, Panagiotis

    2014-01-01

    The management of complex water problems is nowadays being practised through new ways and approaches. Therefore, water engineers, planners and managers should be appropriately educated through modern undergraduate curricula and by well-designed postgraduate specialisation programmes. Within this framework, a study of the specific characteristics…

  7. Engineering and Mineral Resources

    E-print Network

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    News ????????????????? ® College of Engineering and Mineral Resources Winter 2008 table of contents. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 wvCROSSROADS DepartmentofCivilandEnvironmentalEngineering Civil engineering exchange program and environmental engineering with a focus in transportation will have the opportunity to study abroad as part

  8. Arkansas Water Resources Center

    E-print Network

    Soerens, Thomas

    -800 Cooperating Agencies Arkansas Water Resources Center ARKANSAS SOIL & WATER CONSERVATION COMMISSION WASHINGTON COUNTY SOIL AND WATER CONSERVATION DISTRICT UNIVERSITY OF ARKANSAS Federal Assistance Project No. C Cooperating Agencies ARKANSAS WATER RESOURCES CENTER ARKANSAS SOIL & WATER CONSERVATION COMMISSION WASHINGTON

  9. Water Resources Policy & Economics

    E-print Network

    Buehrer, R. Michael

    Water Resources Policy & Economics FOR 4984 Selected Course Topics · Appropriative and riparian water institutions · Incentives for conservation · Water rights for in-stream environmental use · Surface water-groundwater management · Water quality regulations · Water markets · Economic and policy

  10. WATER RESOURCES NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE

    E-print Network

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    of water to all major social issues is finally driven home. The energy crisis is a case in point. Water and energy are inextricably bound. Energy is consumed and sometimes produced by every form of water resources for reductions in energy consumption through prudent water development and management. Technological, political

  11. Save Our Water Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bromley, Albert W.

    The purpose of this booklet, developed as part of Project SOAR (Save Our American Resources), is to give Scout leaders some facts about the world's resources, the sources of water pollution, and how people can help in obtaining solutions. Among the topics discussed are the world's water resources, the water cycle, water quality, sources of water

  12. System International d'Unites: Metric Measurement in Water Resources Engineering.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klingeman, Peter C.

    This pamphlet gives definitions and symbols for the basic and derived metric units, prefixes, and conversion factors for units frequently used in water resources. Included are conversion factors for units of area, work, heat, power, pressure, viscosity, flow rate, and others. (BB)

  13. Water Resources Water Quality and Water Treatment

    E-print Network

    Sohoni, Milind

    Water Resources TD 603 Lecture 1: Water Quality and Water Treatment CTARA Indian Institute of Technology, Bombay 2nd November, 2011 #12;OVERVIEW Water Quality WATER TREATMENT PLANTS WATER TREATMENT PLANTS WATER TREATMENT PLANTS WATER TRE OVERVIEW OF THE LECTURE 1. Water Distribution Schemes Hand Pump

  14. Sustainable Natural Resource Engineering

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Lynch, Daniel

    Natural Resources figure centrally in the understanding of Sustainability and the Professional responsibility of engineers. A teaching approach is outlined that a) utilizes standard Engineering preparation in applied mathematics; b) applies it as a unifying theme across the natural resource field; c) embeds basic undergraduate exposure to ecological and economic concepts; and d) operates via desktop simulation tools accessible to all university students. The approach suggested is related to the new American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) Body of Knowledge (BOK2) requirement of Sustainability.

  15. Arkansas Water Resources Center

    E-print Network

    Soerens, Thomas

    to the Arkansas Soil and Water Conservation Commission By Marc A. Nelson Arkansas Water Resources Center Ron Redman Arkansas Soil and Water Conservation Commission L. Wade Cash Arkansas Water Resources Center G ROAD 76 BRIDGE ON BALLARD CREEK Submitted to: Arkansas Soil and Water Conservation Commission By: Marc

  16. Water Resource Adaptation Program

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Water Resource Adaptation Program (WRAP) contributes to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency?s (U.S. EPA) efforts to provide water resource managers and decision makers with the tools needed to adapt water resources to demographic and economic development, and future clim...

  17. Water Resources of Wisconsin

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This U.S. Geological Survey (USGS)website provides water data, online publications, a list of USGS - Wisconsin publications, and links to water resource projects and studies in Wisconsin. The water data consists of real-time streamflow, quarterly streamflow reports, water levels measured by a ground-water observation network of 140 wells throughout Wisconsin, and NWISWeb (National Water Information System on the Web) data (consisting of real-time streamflow, ground level water, surface water and water quality data).

  18. Water Resources News

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Water Resources division of the US Geological Service provides this water news resource, tracking current water-related events and recent publications from across the US. Recent news items include: flooding in Texas, the impacts of Hurricane Bonnie, the release of a USGS report on water use in the US, and stream-flow data from Puerto Rico, to name a few.

  19. Nebraska Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    graphene oxide filter for drinking water contaminants removal. The Water Sciences Laboratory (WSL) coreNebraska Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report FY 2012 Nebraska Water Resources Center Engineering Department at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, took over as the interim director of the Water

  20. WATER SUPPLY AND WATER RESOURCES DIVISION - HOME PAGE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Water Supply and Water Resources Division (WSWRD) conducts research to help prepare the primary and secondary regulations for drinking water and to develop technologies and strategies for controlling waterborne contaminants. The program integrates chemistry, engineering, micr...

  1. Water Resources Milind Sohoni

    E-print Network

    Sohoni, Milind

    TD 603 Water Resources Milind Sohoni www.cse.iitb.ac.in/sohoni/ Lecture 9: Water in Agriculture () January 13, 2010 1 / 14 #12;Water in Agriculture Historically: Biggest consumer of water, in developed kilos of sugar. Though the source of water in all the three cases is usually different. Agriculture

  2. Arkansas Water Resources Center

    E-print Network

    Soerens, Thomas

    water contaminants be- cause they can enter the ground water when the limestone is dissolved by carbonic at concentration levels which might lead to contamination of ground water to undesirably high levels. AnalysesArkansas Water Resources Center TRACE METAL AND MAJOR ELEMENTS IN WATER- SOLUBLE ROCKS OF NORTHWEST

  3. Arkansas Water Resources Center

    E-print Network

    Soerens, Thomas

    Arkansas Water Resources Center LASER-PHOTOACOUSTIC DETECTION OF WATER POLLUTANTS PHASE I Principal. '. 18 #12;cor~PLETIONREPORT LASER-PHOTOACOUSTICDETECTIONOF WATER POLLUTANTS: PHASEI October ls 1977 their waters. Recognizing that water pollution can pose serious health hazards and unknown long term effects

  4. Water Basins Civil Engineering

    E-print Network

    Provancher, William

    Water Basins Civil Engineering Objective · Connect the study of water, water cycle, and ecosystems with engineering · Discuss how human impacts can effect our water basins, and how engineers lessen these impacts: · The basic concepts of water basins are why they are important · To use a topographic map · To delineate

  5. Process oriented thinking as a key for integration of ecohydrology, biotechnology and engineering for sustainable water resources management and ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zalewski, M.

    2015-04-01

    The recent high rate of environmental degradation due to unsustainable use of water and other natural resources and mismanagement, is, in many cases, the result of a dominant sectoral approach, limited communication between different users and agencies, and lack of knowledge transfer between different disciplines, and especially lack of dialogue between environmental scientists and engineers. There is no doubt that the genuine improvement of human well-being has to be based on understanding the complexity of interactions between abiotic, biotic and socio-economic systems. The major drivers of biogeosphere evolution and function have been the cycles of water and nutrients in a complex array of differing climates and catchment geomorphologies. In the face of global climate change and unequally distributed human populations, the recent sectoral mechanistic approach in natural resources management has to be replaced by an evolutionary systems approach based on well-integrated problem-solving and policy-oriented environmental science. Thus the principles of ecohydrology should be the basis for further integration of ecology, hydrology, engineering, biotechnology and other environmental sciences. Examples from UNESCO IHP VII show how the integration of these will not only increase the efficiency of measures to harmonize ecosystem potentials with societal needs, but also significantly reduce the costs of sustainable environmental management.

  6. Arkansas Water Resources Center

    E-print Network

    Soerens, Thomas

    included several pesticide contamination studies on ground water, impact of silviculture practicesArkansas Water Resources Center 1995 Institute Program Report Prepared for: U.S. Geological Survey Reston, VA By: Kenneth F. Steele, Director June 1996 MSC-102.1995 Arkansas Water Resources Center 112

  7. Water Resources of Utah

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This U.S. Geological Survey website provides real-time streamflow, surface-water, ground-water, and water-quality data; information on water resource programs of Utah such as the National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) study; maps and graphs of current U.S. water resource conditions; and USGS - Utah reports. The site also features a drought watch section for Utah containing drought definitions and more streamflow conditions; a section on the Upper Arkansas River Basin Toxic-Substances Hydrology Project; and information on contamination in ground water at Fry Canyon, Utah.

  8. Water Resources Milind Sohoni

    E-print Network

    Sohoni, Milind

    TD 603 Water Resources Milind Sohoni www.cse.iitb.ac.in/sohoni/ Building Numerical Models () August of surface flow of water and infiltration which may include time to flow, movement of solids etc. () August

  9. Arkansas Water Resources Center

    E-print Network

    Soerens, Thomas

    By Marc A. Nelson, Research Professor, Keith Trost, Research Tech II, Arkansas Water Resources Center Table 4. Average Number of Algal Genera Identified in each Division ............................ 4 Table

  10. Water Resources Milind Sohoni

    E-print Network

    Sohoni, Milind

    TD 603 Water Resources Milind Sohoni www.cse.iitb.ac.in/sohoni/ Lecture 5: Aquifer () August 16 above and below the ground, which affect the water balance. surface features affect infiltration parameters related to water: Porosity, specific yield n, Sy : the maximum volume fraction of water

  11. Water Resources Milind Sohoni

    E-print Network

    Sohoni, Milind

    TD 603 Water Resources Milind Sohoni www.cse.iitb.ac.in/sohoni/ Lecture 7: Regional Groundwater than the unit situations that we saw. Surface water/Groundwater interactions. lakes and streams springs (seepage) Ambient water-table movements Seasonal changes Inteference with other water end-users. Inherent

  12. Water Resources Milind Sohoni

    E-print Network

    Sohoni, Milind

    TD 603 Water Resources Milind Sohoni www.cse.iitb.ac.in/sohoni/ Lecture 8: Wells () August 28, 2012 project, utilizing enhanced ground-water. Water lifted from storage, to accumulate overnight from aquifer. Water from shallow aquifer, of about 7-8m thickness. accounts for about 30% of irrigation Unique

  13. Water Resources Milind Sohoni

    E-print Network

    Sohoni, Milind

    TD 603 Water Resources Milind Sohoni www.cse.iitb.ac.in/sohoni/ Lecture 2: Water cycle, stocks and flows () July 28, 2013 1 / 30 #12;The basic movement of water source: USGS. () July 28, 2013 2 / 30 #12, humidity and air flow. Formation of liquid-water in the Atmosphere-Cloud-Formation Coming Down Rain

  14. Arkansas Water Resources Center

    E-print Network

    Soerens, Thomas

    that ground water contamination by pesticides is a widespread problem in the U. S. In response the EPAArkansas Water Resources Center Publication No. MSC-224 PESTICIDE GROUND WATER MONITORING PROJECT~~PLETION REPORT ARKANSAS STATE PLANT BOARD PESTICIDE GROUND WATER MONITORING PROJECT FOR MOST VULNERABLE AREAS

  15. Arkansas Water Resources Center

    E-print Network

    Soerens, Thomas

    with Modified DRASTIC Parameters to Predict Ground Water Contamination Introduction 16 Objectives 17 MethodologyArkansas Water Resources Center VULNERABILITY AND USE OF GROUND AND SURFACE WATERS IN THE SOUTHERN displacementexperimentalcondition ,.. 10 Project A2: Use of Fuzzy Logic with Modified DRASTIC Parameters to Predict Ground Water

  16. Arkansas Water Resources Center

    E-print Network

    Soerens, Thomas

    potential sources of contaminants, especially nitrate. A suJrvey of ground water nitrate conc4entrationsArkansas Water Resources Center NITRATE CONCENTRATIONS OF GROUND WATER BENTON COUNTY, ARKANSAS, Arkansas 72701 #12;ABSTRACT Because 'ground water in fractured c;3.rbonate aquifers is particularly

  17. Arkansas Water Resources Center

    E-print Network

    Soerens, Thomas

    ground water contamination, 3) use of vegetative filter strips of varying widths to reduce herbicides loads (TMDLs) 3. declining ground water levels, especially in eastern Arkansas and associated salt waterArkansas Water Resources Center Publication No. MSC-102.1998 ANNUAL PROGRAM REPORT for the Period

  18. Arkansas Water Resources Center

    E-print Network

    Soerens, Thomas

    caused concern regarding nitrate contamination of the ground water. In the study area of Pike and Howard application. If the lagoons are improperly constructed and leak, they can contaminate ground waterArkansas Water Resources Center RECONNAISSANCE SURVEY OF NITRATE CONCENTRATIONS IN GROUND WATER

  19. Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    and Conservation, 18 Water and Waste Water Treatment/Environmental Engineering #12;The survey revealed a broad baseWater Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2001 Introduction As noted in the 2000 annual report, the Maryland Water Resources Research Center was about to undergo a major administrative

  20. NASA Water Resources Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toll, David L.

    2011-01-01

    With increasing population pressure and water usage coupled with climate variability and change, water issues are being reported by numerous groups as the most critical environmental problems facing us in the 21st century. Competitive uses and the prevalence of river basins and aquifers that extend across boundaries engender political tensions between communities, stakeholders and countries. In addition to the numerous water availability issues, water quality related problems are seriously affecting human health and our environment. The potential crises and conflicts especially arise when water is competed among multiple uses. For example, urban areas, environmental and recreational uses, agriculture, and energy production compete for scarce resources, not only in the Western U.S. but throughout much of the U.S. and also in numerous parts of the world. Mitigating these conflicts and meeting water demands and needs requires using existing water resources more efficiently. The NASA Water Resources Program Element works to use NASA products and technology to address these critical water issues. The primary goal of the Water Resources is to facilitate application of NASA Earth science products as a routine use in integrated water resources management for the sustainable use of water. This also includes the extreme events of drought and floods and the adaptation to the impacts from climate change. NASA satellite and Earth system observations of water and related data provide a huge volume of valuable data in both near-real-time and extended back nearly 50 years about the Earth's land surface conditions such as precipitation, snow, soil moisture, water levels, land cover type, vegetation type, and health. NASA Water Resources Program works closely to use NASA and Earth science data with other U.S. government agencies, universities, and non-profit and private sector organizations both domestically and internationally. The NASA Water Resources Program organizes its projects under five functional themes. I) Streamflow and Flood Forecasting 2) Water Supply and Irrigation (includes evapotranspiration) 3) Drought 4) Water Quality 5) Climate and Water Resources. To maximize this activity NASA Water Resources Program works closely with other government agencies (e.g., the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA); the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA); the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS); the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), USAID, the Air Force Weather Agency (AFWA)), universities, non-profit national and international organizations, and the private sector. The NASA Water Resources program currently is funding 21 active projects under the functional themes (http://wmp.gsfc.nasa.gov & http://science.nasa.gov/earth-science/applied-sciences/).

  1. Water Resources of Wyoming

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This U.S Geological Survey (USGS) website contains water data including water quality samples and water use data, information on USGS projects, links to USGS educational sites, and a bibliography of USGS water resource publications. Projects and studies covered include: the Wyoming Drought Watch, which contains maps of daily streamflow conditions and historical streamflow data; algal-nutrient relations in the Yellowstone River; county water resource studies; estimating peak-streamflow characteristics at ungaged sites; the Integrating Aquatic Ecosystem Data project of the Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Program (EMAP); an aquifer; water-quality issues associated with irrigation drainage; watershed delineation; urban hydrology; and a pathogen indicator synoptic study.

  2. Water Resources Penn.

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Water Resources Penn.: The Office of Water Management plans, directs and coordinates departmental programs associated with the management and protection of the CommonwealthÂ?s water resources; administers and oversees departmental programs involving surface and groundwater quantity and quality planning, and soil and water conservation; coordinates policies, procedures and regulations which influence public water supply withdrawals and quality, sewage facilities planning, point source municipal and industrial discharges, encroachments upon waterways and wetlands, dam safety, earth disturbance activities and control of storm water and nonpoint source pollution; and coordinates the planning, design and construction of flood protection and stream improvement projects.

  3. Management Strategy to Reduce Tastes and Odors In Phoenix's Water Supply Lawrence A. Baker (Water Resources Center, U. of Minnesota), Paul Westerhoff (Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering, ASU),

    E-print Network

    Hall, Sharon J.

    Management Strategy to Reduce Tastes and Odors In Phoenix's Water Supply Lawrence A. Baker (Water Resources Center, U. of Minnesota), Paul Westerhoff (Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering, ASU and odors" (T&O) in drinking water. Removing T&Os within a water treatment plant is very expensive. In 1999

  4. Splash! Water Resource Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southwest Florida Water Management District, Brooksville.

    This set of activities is designed to bring water resource education into the middle school classroom using an interdisciplinary approach. The packet contains timely, localized information about the water resources of west central Florida. Each activity is aligned to middle-school Sunshine State Standards. These hands-on, minds-on activities can…

  5. Water Resource Management

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This portal, published by the University of Florida/Institute of Food and Agricultural Science (IFAS) Extension, offers a selection of links to information about water management issues. There is a 'Beginner's Guide to Water Management', which provides a basic introduction to the terminology and concepts used in water management. Other links access information on management in coastal waters, the impact of climate change on water resources, the use of stormwater as an alternative supply, wastewater management, and many others.

  6. Water Resources of Indiana

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This United States Geological Survey (USGS) page contains information about the water resources in the state of Indiana. The district staff measure streamflow and ground-water levels as well as collect water-quality data (pH and mercury levels) throughout the state. Information on this site includes daily streamflow conditions, Biological Resources Division research in the state, drought information, and studies of the Upper Illinois River basin and White River basin. There are links to other sites for additional information.

  7. Water Resources Milind Sohoni

    E-print Network

    Sohoni, Milind

    TD 603 Water Resources Milind Sohoni www.cse.iitb.ac.in/sohoni/ Lecture 1: A Perspective () July 20, 2012 1 / 17 #12;Outline Two parts: The technical side to water. -M. Sohoni The basic hydrological cycle. The societal side to water. -N. C. Narayanan () July 20, 2012 2 / 17 #12;Texts Applied Hydrogeology, by C. W

  8. Water Resources Milind Sohoni

    E-print Network

    Sohoni, Milind

    TD 603 Water Resources Milind Sohoni www.cse.iitb.ac.in/sohoni/ Analysis Framework for the 2009 / 16 #12;Vol II and Vol III Vol. II 1 Annexure I, Chap. 1: Bulk-water and tariffs-Principles. 2 Annexure I, Chap. 2: International Case Studies. 3 Annexure II: Report on water conservation technologies

  9. Water Resources Milind Sohoni

    E-print Network

    Sohoni, Milind

    TD 603 Water Resources Milind Sohoni www.cse.iitb.ac.in/sohoni/ Lecture 6: Mathematics, z). velocity vx (x, y, z, t) : in the x-direction. vx = Kx h/x saturated/water- table. Continuity Equation What is vx x + vy y + vz z ? It is the rate of accumulation of water at the point (x, y

  10. Water Resources Milind Sohoni

    E-print Network

    Sohoni, Milind

    TD 603 Water Resources Milind Sohoni www.cse.iitb.ac.in/sohoni/ Lecture 4: Groundwater () December in dried sample. Saturation: When these voids are fully filled with water. Specific Yield Sy : the ration of the colume of water that drains from a rock owing to gravity, to the total rock volumne. 00000000

  11. Water Resources Milind Sohoni

    E-print Network

    Sohoni, Milind

    TD 603 Water Resources Milind Sohoni www.cse.iitb.ac.in/sohoni/ Lecture 10: Minor Structures for Ground and Surface Water () March 23, 2010 1 / 31 #12;Classification by Purpose We may classify the velocity of water-flow (ii) increasing the infiltration coefficient (iii) explicit groundwater recharge

  12. Arkansas Water Resources Center

    E-print Network

    Soerens, Thomas

    Keywords -- Agriculture / Pesticides / Water Quality / Poultry Waste / Surface Runoff / Solute TransportArkansas Water Resources Center EFFECT OF LAND APPLICATION OF POULTRY WASTE ON PESTICIDE LOSS June and carbaryl are also used in poultry waste, but these pesticides have a relatively low solubility in water

  13. Water Resources Center

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Water Resources Center at the University of Minnesota was authorized by Congress as one of the nation's 54 water resources research institutes. The Center "provides leadership in freshwater management through cutting-edge research, educational opportunities for students and professionals, and community outreach." The center's homepage guides visitors through sections that include "Water Resources Science Graduate Program," "Publications," "News & Events," and "Research & Public Engagement." Members of the general public will want to look over the short publication "A Pocket Guide to Reducing Your Water Footprint." The guide helps individuals make smart water choices on a daily basis. Moving on, the "Publications" area contains the current issue of their quarterly newsletter, the "Minnegram," along with links to their biennial reports and research bulletins. Finally, visitors can wander through the "Water Links" area to look for information from other institutions, such as the Minnesota Geological Survey and the Environmental Protection Agency.

  14. Ohio Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    Ohio Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report FY 2011 Ohio Water Resources Center Annual (WRRI) for the State of Ohio. The WRC was originally established in 1959 as part of the Engineering of WRC is to promote innovative, water-related research in the State of Ohio through research grant

  15. JOINT SEMINAR ANNOUNCEMENT CEE 880 Environmental and Water Resources Engineering Seminar

    E-print Network

    Kamat, Vineet R.

    and Environmental Engineering University of Michigan Evaluating the Impacts of Hydraulic Fracturing: Michigan as a Case Study Abstract. Recent advances in directional drilling have made extraction of natural gas and oil from shale formations economically viable via high-volume hydraulic fracturing. Rapid growth

  16. Water Resources Research Center

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Visitors can access information on a variety of water issues in Arizona, including the Colorado River, riparian areas, water conservation, water rights, and recreation. The Arizona Water Resources Research Center (WRRC) provides FAQ’s, a stream gauge map and a directory of water-related agencies and organizations. Real-time temperature, precipitation, wind speed and direction, and humidity readouts are available via the new WRRC weather station. Other materials include news articles, research reports, presentations, and links to other water-related sites.

  17. Arkansas Water Resources Center

    E-print Network

    Soerens, Thomas

    Arkansas Water Resources Center STORMWATER POLLUTION PREVENTION BMP WORKSHOP, DEMONSTRATION University of Arkansas Fayetteville, Arkansas 72701 #12;Stormwater Pollution Prevention BMP Workshop Conservation Commission June 25, 2003 #12;Stormwater Pollution Prevention BMP Workshop, Demonstration

  18. Water Resources of Illinois

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This United States Geological Survey (USGS) website is dedicated to water resources and studies in the state of Illinois. It contains real-time and daily streamflow data for the state, historical data, precipitation data, flooding information, groundwater quality, radium and arsenic water pollution, and studies on the Illinois River basin and Illinois lakes. Links are provided for additional information.

  19. Water Resources Milind Sohoni

    E-print Network

    Sohoni, Milind

    TD 603 Water Resources Milind Sohoni www.cse.iitb.ac.in/sohoni/ Lecture 3: Watershed and Maps () July 23, 2013 1 / 18 #12;Domain Decomposition p1 p2 p3 p5 p4 surface water A1 A2 A3 A4 A5 salinity ingress water table q W(q) W(p2) The watershed W (x) of a point x is W (x) = {all points y from where

  20. Funds for water resources research

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Anonymous

    1969-01-01

    The Office of Water Resources Research, U.S. Department of the Interior, is now considering unsolicited proposals for research in the field of water resources, for fund allotment for fiscal year 1971 (begins in July 1970). Examples of priority research subjects are evaluation of social objectives in water policy, urban and metropolitan water resources problems, hydrologic systems analysis, and water resources

  1. ERDCSR-10-2 Water Resources Infrastructure

    E-print Network

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    and Development Center conducted an extensive literature review of topics related to vegetation on leveesERDCSR-10-2 Water Resources Infrastructure Literature Review ­ Vegetation on Levees Engineer is unlimited. #12;Water Resources Infrastructure ERDC SR-10-2 December 2010 Literature Review ­ Vegetation

  2. Arkansas Water Resources Center

    E-print Network

    Soerens, Thomas

    . It was determined by the chairman of the monitoring committee based upon the number of volunteers present, access-site or transported immediately to a central location for analysis. All volunteer monitors were trained to perform Watershed Partnership Chairman of the Monitoring Committee MSC-337 March 2007 ARKANSAS WATER RESOURCES

  3. Mahaweli Water Resources Project

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. C. De S. Hewavisenthi

    1992-01-01

    The Mahaweli Ganga is the most important river in Sri Lanka with a basin area equivalent to fifteen per cent of the country's land and carries the largest volume of discharge. A Master Plan for a comprehensive water resources development of the Mahaweli Basin was drawn up in 1968, and the work on a compressed but accelerated version of this

  4. Arkansas Water Resources Center

    E-print Network

    Soerens, Thomas

    Arkansas Water Resources Center ALGAL GROWTH POTENTIALS AND HEAVY METAL CONCENTRATIONS Wickliff Department of Geology University of Arkansas Fayetteville, AR 72701, Research Project Technical Completion Report Project G-1004-02 The research on which this report is based was financed in part

  5. Environmental and Water Resources Engineering Seminar Wednesday, March 13, 2013, 4:00 5:00 PM

    E-print Network

    Kamat, Vineet R.

    bacteria (ARB) and antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) have been established as contaminants of engineered Antibiotic Resistance Genes via Water and Wastewater Abstract. A wide variety of antibiotic resistant" disinfection and remain capable of disseminating resistance traits to downstream bacterial communities via

  6. WATER RESOURCES NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE

    E-print Network

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    ~ November 1973 Opportunities for cost effective research related to energy-water issues are abundant. Many. It would be impossible to list all fruitful avenues for energy-water research, but some important issues-economic impacts of energy use reductions? (9) How can the environmental impact of water-power develop- ment

  7. WATER RESOURCES ,'JEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE

    E-print Network

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    The Nebraska Institute is sponsoring a conference entitled liThe Role of Water in the Energy Crisis. 1I in which the water re- sources community can help solve or alleviate national and regional energy problems. Topics to be discussed will include various aspects of energy-water relationships (economic

  8. Selected Blog Sites Related to Water Resources and Environmental Resources

    E-print Network

    James, L. Allan

    Selected Blog Sites Related to Water Resources and Environmental Resources Water News: Circle Water Resources Association (JAWRA) - http://awramedia.org/mainblog/ WaterWired ­ personal blog (IWRM) ­ personal blog site of a water resources professional - http

  9. WATER RESOURCES NEWS NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE

    E-print Network

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    WATER RESOURCES NEWS NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE 212 AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERINGATER RE~nllRCES RJ::sr ARCIi ISSUES SIXTY A~l~J"AL REPQRI The 1970 annual report of the Office of Water provided practical methods for solving problems of salt water encroaching into a municipal well field. *A

  10. Water Resources Competitive Grants Program

    E-print Network

    Virginia Tech

    Water Resources Competitive Grants Program Fiscal Year 2012 Request for Proposals Pursuant to Section 104 of the Water Resources Research Act of 1984, as Amended Closing Date 4:00 PM, Eastern Time, August 15, 2012 (Institutes) Institute for Water Resources National Institutes for U.S. Army Corps

  11. Water Resources Working Group Report

    E-print Network

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    Water Resources Working Group Report This report provided content for the Wisconsin Initiative in February 2011. #12;Water Resources Working Group Wisconsin Initiative on Climate Change Impacts October 2010 #12;Water Resources Working Group Members ­ WICCI Tim Asplund (Co-Chair) - Wisconsin Department

  12. USGS Water Resources of Pennsylvania

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Water Resources of Pennsylvania provides information on current hydrologic conditions in Pennsylvania, including streamflow, ground-water, lake and reservoir, and drought conditions. There is also project information on water resources investigations and a watershed assistance program; USGS publications such as hydrologic data reports; maps and GIS data; and educational water science links.

  13. WATER RESOURCES NEWS NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE

    E-print Network

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    to all water resources efforts in the state. PHREATOPHYTE RESEARCP GRANT OBTAINED The N"ffiRI and the U and water content. 5. To estimate water usage of the phreatophyte communities using data on water on water usage by the phreatophytes will be collected in the present SGudy. It is expected

  14. Evaluation of a predictive ground-water solute-transport model at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho. Water-resources investigations (final). [Aqueous chemical and radioactive wastes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. D. Lewis; F. J. Goldstein

    1982-01-01

    Aqueous chemical and radioactive wastes discharged to shallow ponds and to shallow or deep wells on the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) since 1952 have affected the quality of the ground water in the underlying Snake River Plain aquifer. The aqueous wastes have created large and laterally dispersed concentration plumes within the aquifer. The waste plumes with the largest areal

  15. 1999 WATER RESOURCES SEMINARS "Spotlighting Water Research"

    E-print Network

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    , Associate Professor/Research Hydrogeologist April 21: "Water Quality at Confined Animal Waste Lagoons1999 WATER RESOURCES SEMINARS "Spotlighting Water Research" Wednesdays/3:00 to 3:50 p.m./116 L. W. Chase Hall/UNL East Campus January 13: KREMER LECTURE: "Locally Directed Resources Management Needs

  16. Water Resources Engineering MSCE Option For thesis, report, or courses-only options, the core courses and four engineering or other appropriate electives must

    E-print Network

    Gelfond, Michael

    Advanced Water Treatment (s, [ENVE 5307]) ENVE 5307 Physical and Chemical Wastewater Treatment (f) ENVE 5399 Biological Municipal Wastewater Treatment (s, [ENVE 5307]) Other environmental, civil, or other of the Environment (f,s) NRM 6305 Geospatial Technologies in Natural Resources Management (ss) GEOL 5428 GIS

  17. GROW: A National Civil Engineering Education Resource Library

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Muniram Budhu

    2001-12-01

    The Geotechnical, Rock & Water (GROW) Digital Library consists of geotechnical, rock & water engineering resources harvested from the web and elsewhere, and resources developed by the GROW team. The items developed by the GROW team focus on interactive educational resources for active learning that are "story-booked" to emphasize active learning and provide a learning experience.

  18. The role of the United States Water Resources Engineering Community in responding to the water related needs of the developing world 

    E-print Network

    Ormond, Timothy Paul

    1993-01-01

    , as well as nongovernmental organizations. These channels of assistaiice are herein collectively rcfcrrcd to as the United States Water Resources Enginccring Conuuunity (USWREC). Thc historical role of the USWREC ui developing countries is armlyzcd from... both the perspechve of the developing world (asscssiug the needs) and from the perspective of the U. S. (identifying its resources and potential for increased involvement). The developing country perspective includes a comprehensive survey...

  19. California Department of Water Resources

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Created by the California Legislature in 1956, the California Department of Water Resources (DWR) was designed "to plan and guide" the development of the State's water resources. The site serves as an information hub covering recent news, state water projects, a listing of water conditions and reports, and monthly activity reports for the very curious. In addition to supplying general information on California's water resources, this site provides access to the CALFED Bay-Delta Program (CALFED), the California Data Exchange Center hydrologic data (CDEC), and the California Environmental Resources Evaluation System (CERES).

  20. Water Resources of the Caribbean

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This branch of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) collects, compiles, analyzes, and distributes hydrologic information to promote best use and management of water resources for the benefit of the people and the natural environment. The water resources data includes real-time data of rainfall and streamflow, water level and discharge data, suspended sediment-discharge records, water-quality records, and ground-water-level records. The site also provides maps, water resources news, reports on USGS activities and projects in the Caribbean, a bibliographic reference search for the Caribbean region, and related USGS publications.

  1. OFFICE OF WATER RESOURCE CENTER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Resource Purpose: The Resource Center provides support to the management of the Immediate Office, Office of Groundwater and Drinking Water, Office of Science and Technology, Office of Wastewater Management, and Office of Wetlands, Oceans, and Watersheds. Support includes: ...

  2. Arkansas Water Resources Center

    E-print Network

    Soerens, Thomas

    evolution of arsenic in ground water: tracking sources and sinks in the alluvial aquifer of southeastern Arkansas, USA Basic Information Title: Flow and hydrochemical evolution of arsenic in ground water: ground water, geochemical evolution, arsenic, sediment/water interaction, alluvial aquifer, geochemical

  3. Arkansas Water Resources Center

    E-print Network

    Soerens, Thomas

    Submitted to the Arkansas Soil and Water Conservation Commission By M.A. Nelson L.W. Cash G.K. Trost to the Arkansas Soil and Water Conservation Commission M. A. Nelson, L. W. Cash, and G. K. Trost Arkansas Water Soil and Water Conservation Commission (ASWCC) and the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA

  4. Arkansas Water Resources Center

    E-print Network

    Soerens, Thomas

    Submitted to the Washington County Conservation District and Arkansas Soil and Water Conservation Commission & WATER CONSERVATION COMMISSION INTRODUCTION In Northwest Arkansas, nutrients transported by surface water storage structures. In 1991, the Arkansas Soil and Water Conservation Commission (ASWCC) and the U. S

  5. USGS Water Resources of Nebraska

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Water Resources of Nebraska provides hydrologic information, real-time water data, publications on water resources and USGS projects of Nebraska, an outreach section, and a Water Jeopardy game and coloring book that can be ordered. Publications include: Republican River Basin Project; Areas of Gain and Loss Along the Platte River; Peak-Flow Frequency Relations and Evaluation of the Peak-Flow Gaging Network in Nebraska; and High Plains Aquifer reports.

  6. Arkansas Water Resources Center

    E-print Network

    Soerens, Thomas

    CONJUNCTIVE WATER MANAGEMENT BY TARGET APPROACHES PREPARED FOR: WINTHROP ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION CONJUNCTIVE WATER MANAGEMENT BY TARGET APPROACHES PREPARED FOR:, WINTHROP ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION AND;" c by the Winthrop Rockefeller Foundation. Little Rock. and the International Agricultural Programs Office (through

  7. Arkansas Water Resources Center

    E-print Network

    Soerens, Thomas

    Submitted to the Arkansas Soil and Water Conservation Commission By Marc A. Nelson, Ph.D., P.E. L. Wade Cash of Moores Creek above Lincoln Lake 2003 Submitted to the Arkansas Soil and Water Conservation Commission M composting, and waste storage structures. In 1991, the Arkansas Soil and Water Conservation Commission (ASWCC

  8. Water Conservation Resource List.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    NJEA Review, 1981

    1981-01-01

    Alarmed by the growing water shortage, the New Jersey State Office of Dissemination has prepared this annotated list of free or inexpensive instructional materials for teaching about water conservation, K-l2. A tipsheet for home water conservation is appended. (Editor/SJL)

  9. D.C. Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    to identify city water and environmental resources and problems and contribute to their solution. In recent, the US Department of Interior WaterSMART program, revisions to the US Army Corps of Engineers' Principles

  10. Water resources data, Indiana, water year 1992

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stewart, James A.; Keeton, Charles R.; Benedict, Brian L.; Hammil, Lowell E.

    1993-01-01

    Water resources data for the 1992 water year for Indiana consist of records of discharge, stage, and water quality of streams and wells; reservoir stage and contents; and water levels in lakes and wells. This report contains records of discharge for 175 stream-gaging stations, stage for 7 stream stations, 1 sediment station, stage and contents for 1 reservoir, water quality for 3 streams, and water levels for 80 lakes and 94 observation wells. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey in Indiana in cooperation with State and Federal agencies.

  11. Water resources data, Indiana, water year 1993

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stewart, James A.; Keeton, Charles R.; Benedict, Brian L.; Hammil, Lowell E.

    1994-01-01

    Water resources data for the 1993 water year for Indiana consist of records of discharge, stage, and water quality of streams and wells; reservoir stage and contents; and water levels in lakes and wells. This report contains records of discharge for 175 stream-gaging station, stage for 5 stream station, 1 sediment station, stage and contents for 1 reservoir, water quality for 3 streams, and water levels for 80 lakes and 94 observation wells. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey in Indiana in cooperation with State and Federal agencies.

  12. Water Resources of West Virginia

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) website provides water data, reports on water use, and information on water resource programs and activities in West Virginia. The water data consists of real-time, old and historical data; National Weather Service stage data; and river basin real-time streamflow data. National Water Information System Website (NWISWeb) data includes surface-water, ground-water, water-quality and real-time data. There is also a drought watch section with more streamflow conditions and a link to acid rain information for West Virginia.

  13. Water Resources of Washington State

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This site contains information and water resource data on rivers and streams, ground water, and water quality. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) operates a satellite network of stream-gaging stations in the state, many of which form the backbone of flood-warning systems, and conducts studies of water resources, such as watersheds and aquifers. These studies help define the quantity and quality of the water, conditions of ecological habitat, and relations to land use and natural features. The site features publications and reports about the data and information from these studies. There is information on USGS projects related to regional water issues such as salmon recovery and the Endangered Species Act; floods, droughts and other natural hazards; and water availability. The site also provides water resource news such as a drought watch section and earthquake news for Washington State.

  14. Water resources data, Alaska, water year 2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jackson, M.L.; Castor, M.E.; Goetz, J.M.; Solin, G.L.; Wiles, J.M.

    2006-01-01

    Water resources data for the 2005 water year for Alaska consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stages of lakes; and water levels and water quality of ground water. This volume contains records for water discharge at 114 gaging stations; stage or contents only at 3 gaging stations; water quality at 37 gaging stations; and water levels for 41 observation wells. Also included are data for 55 crest-stage partial-record stations. Additional water data were collected at various sites not involved in the systematic data-collection program and are published as miscellaneous measurements and analyses. Some data collected during 2005 will be published in subsequent reports. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating State and Federal agencies in Alaska.

  15. Water Resources of New Jersey

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This website offers timely access to data and information provided by the New Jersey District of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), which collects basic hydrologic data and makes interpretive investigations of the water resources of New Jersey. There is information and data on ground water, surface water, water quality, and daily streamflow conditions. Links to online publications on water in New Jersey are also provided.

  16. Water Resources Data

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This portal provides access to a large selection of real-time and archived data on stream flow and water quality for surface and groundwater. Links are provided to the National Water Information System Web Interface (NWISWeb), which accesses data collected at approximately 1.5 million sites in all 50 states, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico. Data categories include current conditions information transmitted from selected surface and groundwater sites; descriptive site information; water flow and levels in streams, lakes, and springs; groundwater levels in wells; and chemical and physical data for all water sources. There is also a link to the 'Waterwatch' site, an interactive map that displays real-time stream-flow compared to historical conditions for the day of the year, as well as a link to the National Water Quality Assessment (NAWQA) data warehouse. Other links access materials on water use, acid rain, suspended sediment, and the Hydro-Climatic Data Network (HCDN).

  17. Arkansas Water Resources Center

    E-print Network

    Soerens, Thomas

    L~ortedly establish and describe the trophic status of a particular body of water. The precise meaning of qualifying' Possible Restoration Measures FFl-3 #12;INTRODUCTION.Trophic-state related problems associated with waters Pollution Con- trol Act. Various sections of PL 92-500 directly address the need for, trophic-state analyses

  18. Arkansas Water Resources Center

    E-print Network

    Soerens, Thomas

    Research Category: Water Quality Focus Category: Water Quality, Agriculture, Non Point Pollution with additives such as antibiotics and coccidiostats to promote growth and prevent intestinal diseases of some antibiotics in dry poultry waste can be as high as 150 mg/kg. As a result of land application

  19. Glaciers: A water resource

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meier, Mark; Post, Austin

    1995-01-01

    Most Americans have never seen a glacier, and most would say that glaciers are rare features found only in inaccessible, isolated wilderness mountains. Are they really so rare? Or are they really potentially important sources of water supply?

  20. Water Resources Research and Interdisciplinary Hydrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freeze, R. Allan

    1990-09-01

    Water Resource Research was born under the watchful eye of Walter Langbein, a modern-day Renaissance man whose interests spanned not only hydrology but all of the earth sciences, and not only the earth sciences but all of science. From its founding in1965 to the present day, the editors of WRR have always seen the journal as a medium of interdisciplinary interaction. On this 25th anniversary of WRR, I thought it might be worthwhile to look back on the interdisciplinary successes and failures of the past quarter decade, in our journal and in our science. There is no question that research in water resources is an interdisciplinary endeavor. At my university we have a graduate program in interdisciplinary hydrology on the books, and on those occasions when we gather together, there are students and faculty there from as many as seven different departments: geography, geology, soil science, forestry, civil engineering, mining engineering, and bioresource engineering. In addition, our campus hosts the Westwater Research Institute where physical scientists can get involved in interdisciplinary research with social scientists from regional and community planning, resource management, resource economics, commerce, and law. I suspect that many campuses have a similar breadth of water resources interests. It is this breadth that WRR is designed to serve.

  1. Water Resources Data, Indiana, Water Year 2003

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morlock, Scott E.; Nguyen, Hieu T.; Majors, Deborah K.

    2004-01-01

    Water resources data for the 2003 water year for Indiana consists of records of discharge, stage, and water quality of streams and wells; reservoir stage and contents; and water levels in lakes and wells. This report contains records of discharge for 148 stream-gaging stations, stage for 16 stream stations, stage and contents for 1 reservoir, water quality for 5 streams, water temperature at 17 sites, sediment analysis for 2 streams, water levels for 8 lakes and 88 observation wells. Also included are records of miscellaneous discharge measurements, miscellaneous levels and miscellaneous water-quality, not part of the systematic data-collection program. Data contained in this report represent that part of the National Water Information System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey in Indiana in cooperation with State and Federal agencies.

  2. Water resources data, Indiana, water year 2001

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stewart, James A.; Keeton, Charles R.; Hammil, Lowell E.; Nguyen, Hieu T.; Majors, Deborah K.

    2002-01-01

    Water resources data for the 2001 water year for Indiana consists of records of discharge, stage, and water quality of streams and wells; reservoir stage and contents; and water levels in lakes and wells. This report contains records of discharge for 163 stream-gaging stations, stage for 8 stream stations, stage and contents for 1 reservoir, water quality for 1 stream, water temperature at 11 sites, sediment analysis for 1 stream, water levels for 78 lakes and 88 observation wells. Also included are records of miscellaneous discharge measurements, miscellaneous levels and miscellaneous water-quality, not part of the systematic data-collection program. Data contained in this report represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey in Indiana in cooperation with State and Federal agencies.

  3. Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    in water resources, including the management of water resources among competing uses; controlling pollution Quality Focus Category: Water Quality, Sediments, Non Point Pollution Descriptors: AgricultureWater Resources Center Annual Technical Report FY 2001 Introduction Research Program Research

  4. USGS Water Resources of Montana

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    U.S. Geological Survey (USGS): Water Resources of Montana contains information on current activities such as data collection, investigations, and the National Water-Quality Assessment Program of the Northern Rockies and Yellowstone River. The hydrologic data includes realtime streamflow tables, Montana Flood-Frequency and Basin-Characteristic Data, and monthly water summaries. There is also a list of USGS water-related publications from the Montana district that can be ordered.

  5. Environmental Engineering and Water Chemistry

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    GK-12 Program,

    Students are introduced to the fundamentals of environmental engineering as well as the global air, land and water quality concerns facing today's environmental engineers. After a lesson and activity to introduce environmental engineering, students learn more about water chemistry aspects of environmental engineering. Specifically, they focus on groundwater contamination and remediation, including sources of contamination, adverse health effects of contaminated drinking water, and current and new remediation techniques. Several lab activities provide hands-on experiences with topics relevant to environmental engineering concerns and technologies, including removal efficiencies of activated carbon in water filtration, measuring pH, chromatography as a physical separation method, density and miscibility.

  6. Water resources data, Indiana, water year 2000

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stewart, James A.; Keeton, Charles R.; Hammil, Lowell E.; Nguyen, Hieu T.; Majors, Deborah K.

    2001-01-01

    Water resource data for the 2000 water year for Indiana consists of records of discharge, stage, and water quality of streams and wells; reservoir stage and contents; and water levels in lakes and wells. This report contains records of discharge for 166 stream-gaging stations, stage for 7 stream stations, stage and contents for 1 reservoir, water quality for 2 streams, sediment analysis for 1 stream, water levels for 79 lakes and 89 observation wells. Also included are records of miscellaneous discharge measurements, miscellaneous levels and miscellaneous water-quality, not part of the systematic data-collection program. Data contained in this report represent that part of the the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey in Indiana in cooperation with State and Federal agencies.

  7. Ohio Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    Ohio Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report FY 2012 Ohio Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report FY 2012 1 #12;Introduction Pursuant to the Water Resources Research Act of 1964, the Ohio Water Resources Center (Ohio WRC) is the federally-authorized and state-designated Water Resources

  8. Water Resources Data, Mississippi, Water Year 2002

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morris, F., III; Turnipseed, D.P.; Storm, J.B.

    2003-01-01

    Water resources data for the 2002 water year for Mississippi consist of records of surface water and ground water in the State. Specifically, it contains: (1) Discharge records for 91 streamflow-gaging stations, stage records for 22 of these gaging stations, discharge records for 91 partial-record stations or miscellaneous streamflow sites, including 13 flood hydrograph partial-record stations, 78 crest-stage partial-record stations, and 0 special study and miscellaneous sites; (2) stage only at 9 gaging stations; (3) water-quality records for 13 streamflow-gaging stations, 7 stage-only stations, and 3 water-quality monitor stations, 0 partial-record stations or miscellaneous sites, 97 short-term study sites, and 39 wells; and (4) water-level records for 18 observation wells. Records obtained from water-resources investigations are also included in special sections of the report. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey, and cooperating local, State, and Federal agencies in Mississippi.

  9. 1Prepared by BG Rahm & SJ Riha (NYS Water Resources Institute), D Yoxtheimer (Penn State Marcellus Center for Outreach and Research), E Boyer (PA Water Resources Research Center), D Carder (WVU Center for Alternative Fuels, Engines, and Emissions), K Davi

    E-print Network

    1Prepared by BG Rahm & SJ Riha (NYS Water Resources Institute), D Yoxtheimer (Penn State Marcellus and air quality issues associated with shale gas development in the Northeast1 Development of Marcellus time and space. Through a review of research and experience in the Marcellus shale region and elsewhere

  10. Taking stock of water resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuttle, William

    You can only manage what you measure. If this maxim is correct, then a recent report by the U.S. Geological Survey [2002] promises a vast improvement in water management in the United States. The report proposes a consolidated, national accounting of availability and use of fresh water. The proposed accounting clearly will be superior to the present absence of a nationwide assessment of fresh water resources. But is it enough? Traditionally, water managers have measured the availability of fresh water by comparing the volume of water available from various sources against estimated demand. The proposed national assessment adheres to this approach. Gauging water by volume is fine if we are only interested in whether our glasses will be full or empty. But throw an endangered species or wetland preservation into the mix, and the picture becomes less clear.

  11. Sanitary engineering and water economy in Europe

    PubMed Central

    Krul, W. F. J. M.

    1957-01-01

    The author deals with a wide variety of aspects of water economy and the development of water resources, relating them to the sanitary engineering problems they give rise to. Among those aspects are the balance between available resources and water needs for various purposes; accumulation and storage of surface and ground water, and methods of replenishing ground water supplies; pollution and purification; and organizational measures to deal with the urgent problems raised by the heavy demands on the world's water supply as a result of both increased population and the increased need for agricultural and industrial development. The author considers that at the national level over-all plans for developing the water economy of countries might well be drawn up by national water boards and that the economy of inter-State river basins should receive international study. In such work the United Nations and its specialized agencies might be of assistance. PMID:13472427

  12. Water Resources Research National Competitive Grants Program

    E-print Network

    Announcement No. G13AS00009 under Section 104(g) of the Water Resources Research Act of 1984, as Amended or call 970-226-9445. #12;i NATIONAL INSTITUTES FOR WATER RESOURCES U.S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY WATER RESOURCES of the Water Resources Research Act of 1984, as amended (http://water.usgs.gov/wrri/institutes.html). Proposals

  13. WATER RESOURCES PLANNING ACT Q:\\COMP\\WATER1\\WRPA

    E-print Network

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    103 WATER RESOURCES PLANNING ACT Q:\\COMP\\WATER1\\WRPA December 29, 2000 #12;Q:\\COMP\\WATER1\\WRPA December 29, 2000 #12;105 WATER RESOURCES PLANNING ACT [As Amended Through P.L. 106­580, Dec. 29, 2000 planning of water and related land resources, through the establishment of a water resources council

  14. Water Resources Outreach Program- Water Education Posters

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Users can choose to download or order six posters that depict water-resources topics and are drawn in a cartoon format. Written narrative on the back elaborates on the topic of each poster. They are available in color, or in black-and-white for coloring.

  15. Engineering Resources: The Engineers Forum on Sustainability

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Cosponsored by three prominent engineering societies, the Engineers Forum on Sustainability was founded to "help promote the principles and practice of sustainability." The forum's newsletter can be viewed at this site. It contains information on worldwide activities and developments in the field of sustainability, including educational initiatives, environmental protection programs, international conferences, and more. The July 2003 issue features a special guest article written by the President of the World Federation of Engineering Societies, who touches on issues of sustainable development, technology transfer, and the role of engineers in developing countries. The newsletter is released roughly three times a year.

  16. GIS IN WATER RESOURCES CE 413/513, 3 credits

    E-print Network

    Wright, Dawn Jeannine

    GIS IN WATER RESOURCES CE 413/513, 3 credits Prerequisites: Senior or graduate in Engineering or one previous GIS course CE 413 Instructor: Tracy Arras CE 513 Instructor: Wayne Huber Office: Owen 238 Learning Objectives · Demonstrate the basic concepts and operation of GIS for water resources Data models

  17. UCF's Research Cluster of Excellence in CDSLR uses engineering, biology, climatology, social science, and resource management to put

    E-print Network

    Central Florida, University of

    UCF's Research Cluster of Excellence in CDSLR uses engineering, biology, climatology, social science, and resource management to put science and engineering research into practice. Advancing with interdisciplinary skills in environmental communication, ecosystem science, and water resources engineering

  18. New England's Ground Water Resources

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This resource provides a detailed description of the ground water system in New England. Although it was written specifically for New England, most or all of it applies to other parts of the country also. The liberal use of diagrams helps to explain terms such as saturated and unsaturated zones, bedrock, water table, and zones of aeration and contribution. Types of aquifers are discussed as to their porosity, permeability and hydraulic conductivity. They include bedrock, soil, stratified drift, superficial deposits, unconsolidated materials, and confined aquifers along with discharge and recharge areas. There is also an explanation of a water budget including precipitation, evapotranspiration, infiltration and runoff.

  19. Clean water: a fading resource

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robert G. Wetzel

    1992-01-01

    Fresh waters of the world are collectively experiencing markedly accelerating rates of qualitative and quantitative degradation. The primary types of degradation are reviewed in a historical manner to illustrate the technological and social responses, and the rates at which they can be applied, under different societal structures. Effective utilization of extant freshwater resources is complicated by distributions of humans and

  20. Illinois Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    include: evaluation of water treatment technology, source water protection planning, mitigation of nitrateIllinois Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report FY 2004 Introduction The Illinois Water of Illinois water resources. In 2004, IWRC hosted Illinois Water, a biennial conference on water issues

  1. Water resources of Webster Parish

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Prakken, Lawrence B.; Griffith, Jason M.

    2011-01-01

    In 2005, about 9.52 million gallons per day (Mgal/d) of water were withdrawn in Webster Parish, Louisiana (fig. 1), including about 9.33 Mgal/d from groundwater sources and 0.19 Mgal/d from surface-water sources1 (table 1). Publicsupply use accounted for about 70 percent of the total water withdrawn. Other categories of use included industrial, rural domestic, livestock, general irrigation, and aquaculture (table 2). Water-use data collected at 5-year intervals from 1960 to 2005 indicate water withdrawals in Webster Parish decreased substantially from 1970 to 1980; surface-water withdrawals for industrial use decreased from about 37 to 0 Mgal/d because of a paper mill closure in 1979. From 1980 to 2000, total water withdrawals in the parish ranged from 7 to 8 Mgal/d (fig. 2). This fact sheet summarizes basic information on the water resources of Webster Parish, La. Information on groundwater and surface-water availability, quality, development, use, and trends is based on previously published reports listed in the Selected References section.

  2. Illinois Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    Illinois Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report FY 2012 Illinois Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report FY 2012 1 #12;Introduction The Illinois Water Resources Center serves the people of Illinois by providing science-based information and resources about the water research, legislation

  3. Water Resources Research National Competitive Grants Program

    E-print Network

    Goodman, Robert M.

    Announcement No. 11HQPA0008 under Section 104(g) of the Water Resources Research Act of 1984, as Amended or call 970-226-9445. #12;i NATIONAL INSTITUTES FOR WATER RESOURCES U.S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY WATER RESOURCES Resources Research Act of 1984, as amended (http://water.usgs.gov/wrri/institutes.html). Proposals involving

  4. Water Resources Research National Competitive Grants Program

    E-print Network

    Hanson, Stephen José

    Announcement No. G12AS20005 under Section 104(g) of the Water Resources Research Act of 1984, as Amended or call 970-226-9445. #12;i NATIONAL INSTITUTES FOR WATER RESOURCES U.S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY WATER RESOURCES established under the provisions of the Water Resources Research Act of 1984, as amended (http

  5. Colorado Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    Colorado Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2001 Introduction Drought because of the worst drought in decades. The Colorado State Engineers Water Supply Conditions Update in evaluating South Platte Basin conditions, was 73 percent of normal at the end of May. The Colorado Water

  6. Increasing life expectancy of water resources literature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heistermann, M.; Francke, T.; Georgi, C.; Bronstert, A.

    2014-06-01

    In a study from 2008, Larivičre and colleagues showed, for the field of natural sciences and engineering, that the median age of cited references is increasing over time. This result was considered counterintuitive: with the advent of electronic search engines, online journal issues and open access publications, one could have expected that cited literature is becoming younger. That study has motivated us to take a closer look at the changes in the age distribution of references that have been cited in water resources journals since 1965. Not only could we confirm the findings of Larivičre and colleagues. We were also able to show that the aging is mainly happening in the oldest 10-25% of an average reference list. This is consistent with our analysis of top-cited papers in the field of water resources. Rankings based on total citations since 1965 consistently show the dominance of old literature, including text books and research papers in equal shares. For most top-cited old-timers, citations are still growing exponentially. There is strong evidence that most citations are attracted by publications that introduced methods which meanwhile belong to the standard toolset of researchers and practitioners in the field of water resources. Although we think that this trend should not be overinterpreted as a sign of stagnancy, there might be cause for concern regarding how authors select their references. We question the increasing citation of textbook knowledge as it holds the risk that reference lists become overcrowded, and that the readability of papers deteriorates.

  7. Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report FY 2007 Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report FY 2007 1 #12;Introduction The Rhode Island Water Resources Center has supported one information transfer project, "Clean Drinking Water in Rhode Island" and one research project "Enhancing Drinking Water

  8. Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2003 Introduction The Florida Water for Wetlands and Water Resources Research in 1995. Historically, since 1964, the WRRC as a separate or combined center has been a university-wide focus for water-resources research and has served as the Water

  9. Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 1999 Introduction ABSTRACT The FY 1999 Oregon Water Resources Research Institute (OWRRI) program included four research projects funded Coastal Lakes: Water Quality Status and Management Implications Based on Nutrient Loading OWRRI sponsored

  10. Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report FY 2003 Introduction Research Program Research priorities for the Illinois Water Resources Center (IWRC) include: Watershed and stream protection; integrated water management for multiple users; wetland processes; and emerging issues, including other

  11. OVERVIEW OF USEPA'S WATER SUPPLY & WATER RESOURCES DIVISION PROGRAM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The United States Environmental Protection Agency's (USEPA) Water Supply and Water Resources Division (WSWRD) conducts a wide range of research on regulated and unregulated contaminants in drinking water, water distribution systems, homeland security, source water protection, and...

  12. ENGINEERING BULLETIN: SUPERCRITICAL WATER OXIDATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    This engineering bulletin presents a description and status of supercritical water oxidation technology, a summary of recent performance tests, and the current applicability of this emerging technology. his information is provided to assist remedial project managers, contractors ...

  13. ENGINEERING BULLETIN: SUPERCRITICAL WATER OXIDATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    This engineering bulletin presents a description and status of supercritical water oxidation technology, a summary of recent performance tests, and the current applicability of this emerging technology. This information is provided to assist remedial project managers, contractors...

  14. Water Resources Division training catalog

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hotchkiss, W.R.; Foxhoven, L.A.

    1984-01-01

    The National Training Center provides technical and management sessions nesessary for the conductance of the U.S. Geological Survey 's training programs. This catalog describes the facilities and staff at the Lakewood Training Center and describes Water Resources Division training courses available through the center. In addition, the catalog describes the procedures for gaining admission, formulas for calculating fees, and discussion of course evaluations. (USGS)

  15. Talking sustainability:Federal initiatives target major water resources concerns 

    E-print Network

    Lee, Leslie

    2011-01-01

    by congressional funding. The following Texas Water Resources Institute (TWRI) projects have impacted major water resource problems in Texas and beyond. Ogallala Aquifer Project The Ogallala Aquifer, stretching from South Dakota to Texas, covers 174..., Texas Tech University, and West Texas A&M University; about 85 engineers and scientists are on the research team. The researchers have been tasked with?among numerous other objectives?improving water management for crops to decrease dependence...

  16. Evaluation of a predictive ground-water solute-transport model at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho. US Geological Survey water-resources investigation 82-25

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. D. Lewis; F. J. Goldstein

    1982-01-01

    In 1973, a digital chemical solute-transport modeling study at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) had been used to project chloride and tritium waste plumes for 1980. The model indicated that for the conditions assumed, the wastes would be at or near the INEL southern boundary by 1980. Eight wells were drilled during the summer of 1980 near the southern

  17. Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2013 Water Resources Research Center of Agriculture and Life Sciences, the University of Arizona Water Resources Research Center (WRRC) has a mission to promote understanding of critical state and regional water management and policy issues through research

  18. Illinois Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    Illinois Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report FY 2011 Illinois Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report FY 2011 1 #12;Introduction The Illinois Water Resources Center seeks to develop solutions to water challenges of importance to Illinois, the Midwest and the nation. The Center's mission

  19. Water Resources Research National Competitive Grants Program

    E-print Network

    Gilbes, Fernando

    Announcement No. G12AS20005 under Section 104(g) of the Water Resources Research Act of 1984, as Amended Collins, CO 80525 or call 970-226-9445. #12;i NATIONAL INSTITUTES FOR WATER RESOURCES U.S. GEOLOGICAL of the Water Resources Research Act of 1984, as amended (http://water.usgs.gov/wrri/institutes.html). Proposals

  20. EAWAG: An Environmental Science and Engineering Resource.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Stanton

    1980-01-01

    Interviewed is the director of a Swiss research and teaching institute in the field of water resources, water pollution control, and waste management. Topics include lake studies, research programs and priorities, advisory services, and the organizational structure of EAWAG. (BT)

  1. Reshaping national water politics: The emergence of the Water Resources Development Act of 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Reuss, M.

    1991-10-01

    While focusing on the legislative evolution of one act, albeit an act of potentially substantial importance to the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, the history provides an overview of the development of Federal water resources policy. It also helps define the many constituencies, political concerns, and bureaucratic activities that determine the Federal role in water management. The work was done for the Army Corps of Engineers' Institute for Water Resources, which oversaw the project. Federal role in water resources management, Scientific management, Congressional prerogatives, Federal domination, Regional planning, Changing values, User fee and cost recovery, Coalition and compromises and sharing the burden.

  2. Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    over states rights to water and priority uses. Research areas in this program have included droughtWater Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2003 Introduction Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2003-2004 WATER PROBLEMS AND ISSUES OF MISSOURI The water

  3. Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    Focus Category: Treatment, Waste Water, Water Quality Descriptors: Treatment, toxic substances, waterWater Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2003 Introduction The 38th year of the Massachusetts Water Resources Research Center (WRRC) was another year of transition. Dr. David Reckhow continued

  4. Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    water filters for point-of-use treatment for drinking water. Dr. Kelly G. Pennell of Brown University. This water filter was designed to treat microbiological contaminants and will also be tested for removingWater Resources Center Annual Technical Report FY 2009 Water Resources Center Annual Technical

  5. A DEMONSTRATION OF AREAWIDE WATER RESOURCES PLANNING

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Metropolitan Washington Council of Governments Framework Water Resources Planning Model developed and tested under this study is a comprehensive analytical tool for use in areawide water resources management planning. The physical simulation portion was formed by linking comp...

  6. Integrated Water Resources Science and Services

    E-print Network

    an intensive effort to partner with the private sector and the water resource management community on multipleIntegrated Water Resources Science and Services (IWRSS) June, 2009 In the news nearly every day, water resources are widely considered to be one of the most significant challenges facing societies

  7. Illinois Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    Illinois Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report FY 2009 Illinois Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report FY 2009 1 #12;Introduction The Illinois Water Resources Center is located on the University of Illinois Campus in Urbana-Champaign and serves people throughout Illinois. The state spans from

  8. Illinois Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    Illinois Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report FY 2007 Illinois Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report FY 2007 1 #12;Introduction The Illinois Water Resources Center (IWRC) is located on the University of Illinois campus in Urbana-Champaign and serves people throughout Illinois. The state spans from

  9. Summary Analysis [United States Water Resources Council].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roose, John B.; Cobb, Gary D.

    This report contains a summary and analysis of public response to the Water Resources Council proposed principles and standards and its accompanying draft environmental impact statement for planning the use of water and related land resources as well as planning and evaluating water and related land resources programs and projects. Both written…

  10. Research on Texas Water and Recreation Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas A and M Univ., College Station. Texas Agricultural Experiment Station.

    The need for research pertaining to the best use of water and recreation resources in Texas is emphasized in these four papers presented at the 1968 Experiment Station Conference, College Station, Texas. "Parameters of Water Resources in Texas" identifies and elaborates upon the important elements presently constituting the water resources

  11. Water Resource Uses and Issues in Texas.

    E-print Network

    McNeely, John G.; Lacewell, Ronald D.

    1978-01-01

    Water Resource Uses and Issues in Texas The Texas A&M University System The Texas Agricultural Experiment Station Neville P. Clarke. Director, College Station, Texas Acknowledgments This study of the Texas water situation completes a series... Water Deuelopment in Texas August 1978 - B-1189: Wafer Resource Uses and Issues in Texas. The present publication considers the implications of ground-water over- drafts and impending full utilization of surface-water resources in Texas. Princi- gal...

  12. Water resources in the Japanese Islands

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. Takagi

    2005-01-01

    Due to its limited land area and limited range of natural resources (particularly fuel), Japan has developed a highly efficient economy in terms of resource utilization. This also applies to water resources. For sustainable use of water resources in the Japanese Islands, integrated and unified analyses of the data of groundwater by the nation and local governments have been needed.

  13. Front Range Infrastructure Resources Project: water-resources activities

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robson, Stanley G.; Heiny, Janet S.

    1998-01-01

    Infrastructure, such as roads, buildings, airports, and dams, is built and maintained by use of large quantities of natural resources such as aggregate (sand and gravel), energy, and water. As urban area expand, local sources of these resource are becoming inaccessible (gravel cannot be mined from under a subdivision, for example), or the cost of recovery of the resource becomes prohibitive (oil and gas drilling in urban areas is costly), or the resources may become unfit for some use (pollution of ground water may preclude its use as a water supply). Governmental land-use decision and environmental mandates can further preclude development of natural resources. If infrastructure resources are to remain economically available. current resource information must be available for use in well-reasoned decisions bout future land use. Ground water is an infrastructure resource that is present in shallow aquifers and deeper bedrock aquifers that underlie much of the 2,450-square-mile demonstration area of the Colorado Front Range Infrastructure Resources Project. In 1996, mapping of the area's ground-water resources was undertaken as a U.S. Geological Survey project in cooperation with the Colorado Department of Natural Resources, Division of Water Resources, and the Colorado Water Conservation Board.

  14. Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 1999 Introduction WATER PROBLEMS AND ISSUES OF MISSOURI The water problems and issues in the State of Missouri can be separated into three general areas: 1) water quality, 2) water quantity, and 3) water policy. Each of Missouri's specific

  15. Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    have raised serious questions over states rights to water and priority uses. Research areasWater Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2002 Introduction Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2002 Introduction WATER PROBLEMS AND ISSUES OF MISSOURI

  16. Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    have raised serious questions over states rights to water and priority uses. Research areasWater Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2001 Introduction Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2001 Introduction WATER PROBLEMS AND ISSUES OF MISSOURI

  17. Illinois Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    Illinois Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report FY 2006 #12;Introduction The Illinois Water of Illinois water resources. In 2006, IWRC supported two continuing research projects with state funding with 104G money. We held the 2006 Illinois Water conference, a conference that showcases research

  18. Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    District: Fifth Research Category: None Focus Category: Treatment, Waste Water, Surface Water DescriptorsWater Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2003 Introduction The Minnesota WRRI program is a component of the University of Minnesotas Water Resources Center (WRC). The WRC

  19. Slowflow Signatures of Sustainable Water Resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartz, S. S.; Smith, B.

    2012-12-01

    Land transformation changes the sustainability of water resources by (a) altering the vegetation, impervious landcover, and drainage of the land surface hydrology system; (b) increasing withdrawals from surface and groundwater systems to support human water use; and (c) re-engineering the water budget through water and wastewater infrastructure that conveys interbasin water transfers and modifies both recharge and subsurface drainage. Slowflow derived from observed streamflow integrates watershed-scale hydrologic forcings and cumulative landscape changes. Multiple slowflow indices derived from USGS streamflow records are used to frame an endpoint mixing model of dominant hydrologic processes and human hydrologic alteration. Multimetric slowflow fingerprints can support more refined process-based inferences, distinguishing, e.g., changes in hydrologic response - (runoff and recharge) from changes in hydraulic response (effective aquifer drainage) in regional streamflow analysis. Examples drawn from USGS streamflow records along the urban-rural landuse gradient in the watersheds of the Baltimore Ecosystem Study (an NSF Urban Long Term Ecological Research site in the Baltimore Metropolitan area) and piedmont Hydroclimatic Data Network (HCDN) basins in the Chesapeake Bay watershed, are used to illustrate multimetric fingerprinting of slowflow response. Within the inherent limits of equifinality in observed streamflow response, multimetric slowflow analysis can refine the signature and attribution of hydroclimatic variability and human hydrologic alteration inferred from regional streamflow information.

  20. NASA Earth Resources Survey Symposium. Volume 1-D: Water resources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Conference papers on water resources and management are summarized. Summaries cover land use, flood control and prediction, watersheds and the effects of snow melt, soil moisture content, and the usefulness of satellite remote sensors in detecting ground and surface water.

  1. International Center for Integrated Water Resources Management (ICIWRM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stakhiv, E. Z.; Valdes, J. B.

    2007-12-01

    The USACE Institute of Water Resources and the University of Arizona have signed a memorandum of understanding to promote the creation of an International Center for Integrated Water Resources Management (ICIWRM) that will, upon completion, create a virtual teaching and research center with academic institutions, government agencies and NGOs for integrated water resources management, interdisciplinary scientific research, and capacity-building/development for developing and emerging countries; and post-disaster/conflict nations and regions. Some of the topics in which the Center will be involved include: integrated water resources management and sustainable development in arid and semi-arid zones, infrastructure development and related engineering design standards and procedures, capacity building, development and training, water policy, governance and institutional aspects, water security, including within the context of the Millennium Development Goals. The new Center will also be working with multilateral organizations such as the UNESCO International Hydrology Program.

  2. Contamination of water resources by pathogenic bacteria

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Water-borne pathogen contamination in water resources and related diseases are a major water quality concern throughout the world. Increasing interest in controlling water-borne pathogens in water resources evidenced by a large number of recent publications clearly attests to the need for studies that synthesize knowledge from multiple fields covering comparative aspects of pathogen contamination, and unify them in a single place in order to present and address the problem as a whole. Providing a broader perceptive of pathogen contamination in freshwater (rivers, lakes, reservoirs, groundwater) and saline water (estuaries and coastal waters) resources, this review paper attempts to develop the first comprehensive single source of existing information on pathogen contamination in multiple types of water resources. In addition, a comprehensive discussion describes the challenges associated with using indicator organisms. Potential impacts of water resources development on pathogen contamination as well as challenges that lie ahead for addressing pathogen contamination are also discussed. PMID:25006540

  3. Institute of Water Resources Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    : surface water flow in the Fenton and its tributaries, ground water levels in the alluvial aquifer adjacent Managment and Engineering & CT DEP). The surface-ground water interactions will be measured, Toxic Substances, Waste Water Descriptors: Contaminant transport, Drugs, Pharmaceuticals, Personal

  4. Water resources thesaurus: A vocabulary for indexing and retrieving the literature of water resources research and development

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    U.S. Geological Survey

    1980-01-01

    This Water Resources Thesaurus encompasses such broad research areas as the hydrologic cycle, supply of and demand for water, conservation and best use of available supplies of water, methods of increasing supplies, and the economic, legal, social, engineering, recreational, biological, geographical, ecological, and qualitative aspects of water resources. This volume represents a major revision of the previous edition of the Thesaurus, published in 1971. The principal source of terms for this edition has been the indexing used in Selected Water Resources Abstracts (SWRA). Since its inception in 1968, SWRA has indexed tens of thousands of publications. Its indexing terminology has been developed by expert abstracters and researchers, and represents the range of disciplines related to research, development, and management of water resources.

  5. Water resources data, Arizona, water year 2004

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fisk, G.G.; Duet, N.R.; McGuire, E.H.; Angeroth, C.E.; Castillo, N.K.; Smith, C.F.

    2005-01-01

    The USGS Arizona Water Science Center water data report includes records on both surface water and ground water in the State for water year 2004. Specifically, it contains: (1) Discharge records for 206 streamflow-gaging stations and 21 crest-stage, partial-record streamflow stations; (2) stage and (or) content records for 8 lakes and reservoirs; (3) water-quality records for 20 streamflow-gaging stations; (4) ground-water levels and compaction values for 14 stations; and (5) water levels for 18 wells.

  6. Uncertainty Management in Urban Water Engineering Adaptation to Climate Change

    EPA Science Inventory

    Current water resource planning and engineering assume a stationary climate, in which the observed historical water flow rate and water quality variations are often used to define the technical basis. When the non-stationarity is considered, however, climate change projection co...

  7. Arkansas Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    Arkansas, 4. saline ground water contamination, 5. development of efficient septic systems, 6. wetlands for the training of scientists in water resources. Through the years, projects have included irrigation, ground water modeling, non-point source pollution, quality of ground water and surface water, efficient septic

  8. Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    of contaminants to shallow ground waters is the main water quality problem in the Coastal Plain. Average annual. Ground water is the major water supply source for the Atlantic Coastal Plain, a province. Ground water protection is particularly important given the increasing reliance on this resource

  9. Classification of Geothermal Resources - An engineering approach

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, K.C.

    1996-01-24

    Geothermal resources have been classified into low, intermediate and high enthalpy resources by their reservoir temperatures. The temperature ranges used are arbitrary and there is not a general agreement. Geothermal resources should be classified by two independent thermodynamic properties of their fluids at the wellhead. They should reflect the fluids availability to do work. By setting the triple point of water as the sink condition, and normalising the fluids specific exergies by the maximum specific exergy of dry saturated steam, geothermal resources can be classified into high, medium, and low category resources by their specific exergy indices (SEI) of greater than 0.5, between 0.05 and 0.5, and less than 0.05. These correspond to geothermal fluids having exergies greater than that of dry saturated steam at 1 bar absolute, between saturated water and dry saturated steam at 1 bar absolute, and less than saturated water at 1 bar absolute respectively.

  10. Water Budgets: Foundations for Effective Water-Resources and

    E-print Network

    Water Budgets: Foundations for Effective Water-Resources and Environmental Management U Survey3. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service4. U.S. Geological Survey5. #12;Water Budgets: Foundations for Effective Water-Resources and Environmental Management By Richard W. Healy, Thomas C. Winter, James W. La

  11. USGS Water Resources of South Dakota

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Water Resources of South Dakota site contains hydrologic data, including realtime streamflow, precipitation, and water use data. There are USGS water resources publications and information on projects such as the Black Hills Hydrology Study; the National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Volatile Organic Chemicals National Synthesis; the Belle Fourche Watershed Assessment Study; and the Sensitivity of Ground Water to Contamination project in Lawrence County, South Dakota.

  12. Water Resources Data, Arizona, Water Year 2003

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fisk, G.G.; Duet, N.R.; Evans, D.W.; Angeroth, C.E.; Castillo, N.K.; Longsworth, S.A.

    2004-01-01

    The Arizona District water data report includes records on both surface water and ground water in the State for water year 2003. Specifically, it contains: (1) discharge records for 203 streamflow-gaging stations, for 29 crest-stage, partial-record streamflow stations, and 50 miscellaneous sites; (2) stage and (or) content only records for 9 lakes and reservoirs; (3) water-quality records for 29 streamflow-gaging stations; (4) ground-water levels and compaction values for 14 stations; and (5) water levels for 19 wells.

  13. WATER RESOURCES NEWS NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE

    E-print Network

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    -maker responsible for meetin~ current and forseeable metropolitan water and related needs.) - $92,784 Colorado St ate Univel'S i ty , Fort Collins, Colorado -- Metropolitan Water Intelligence Systems and water distribution systems.) - $100,000 Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado -- Water Law

  14. Center for Water Resources Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    Center for Water Resources Annual Technical Report FY 2010 Center for Water Resources Annual. They connect with the faculty from the California State University system; private colleges and universities, youth, and nutrition interests and issues. ANR Initiative to improve Water Quality, Quantity

  15. Illinois Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    Illinois Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report FY 2005 Introduction The Illinois Water of Illinois water resources. In 2005, IWRC supported two research projects with state funding and monitored four projects funded with 104G money. We co-sponsored the Governor's Conference on the Illinois River

  16. SPECIFIC V.FL \\\\ - KARST WATER RESOURCES

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Vujica Yevjevich

    Karst water resources have many particular features that often clearly distinguish them from water resources of other, less pervious geologic formations. Therefore, it is common to talk about their specificities. Features of karst terrains of Southern Turkey (the Taurus Mountain Range) are used here to demonstrate versatilities of specific problems of karst water resour­ ces. The sizes of karst aquifers,

  17. Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    resource topic. The library s catalog is available online and searchable via the Internet, making the WRL collection available online to the public when it developed Wisconsin s Water Library (www.wri.wisc.edu) and the Water Resources Library (WRL), a nationally unique collection of documents covering every major water

  18. Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    resource topic. The library's catalog is available online and searchable via the Internet, making the WRL available online to the public when it launched "Wisconsin's Water Library" (www.wri.wisc.edu) and the Water Resources Library (WRL), a nationally unique collection of documents covering every major water

  19. Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2005 Introduction Over the period and federal agencies. WRRC also co-sponsored an American Water Resources Association Specialty Conference held, raised awareness of water-related hazards. WRRC organized a community seminar in February 2005 dealing

  20. Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    Elemental Sulfur. Other projects conducted at WRRC include the Massachusetts Water Watch PartnershipWater Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2006 #12;Introduction This report covers the period March 1, 2006 to February 28, 2007, the 41st year of the Massachusetts Water Resources Research

  1. Water resource management: an Indian perspective.

    PubMed

    Khadse, G K; Labhasetwar, P K; Wate, S R

    2012-10-01

    Water is precious natural resource for sustaining life and environment. Effective and sustainable management of water resources is vital for ensuring sustainable development. In view of the vital importance of water for human and animal life, for maintaining ecological balance and for economic and developmental activities of all kinds, and considering its increasing scarcity, the planning and management of water resource and its optimal, economical and equitable use has become a matter of the utmost urgency. Management of water resources in India is of paramount importance to sustain one billion plus population. Water management is a composite area with linkage to various sectors of Indian economy including the agricultural, industrial, domestic and household, power, environment, fisheries and transportation sector. The water resources management practices should be based on increasing the water supply and managing the water demand under the stressed water availability conditions. For maintaining the quality of freshwater, water quality management strategies are required to be evolved and implemented. Decision support systems are required to be developed for planning and management of the water resources project. There is interplay of various factors that govern access and utilization of water resources and in light of the increasing demand for water it becomes important to look for holistic and people-centered approaches for water management. Clearly, drinking water is too fundamental and serious an issue to be left to one institution alone. It needs the combined initiative and action of all, if at all we are serious in socioeconomic development. Safe drinking water can be assured, provided we set our mind to address it. The present article deals with the review of various options for sustainable water resource management in India. PMID:25151722

  2. How predictable are water resources?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, P.

    2010-10-01

    Peter Mason, technical director of international dams and hydropower at MWH, explains how some water resources might be more predictable than generally supposed. Some years ago the writer examined the levels of Lake Victoria in east Africa as part of a major refurbishment project. This revealed a clear cyclic behavior in lake level and hence in discharges from the lake down the Nile system and up into Egypt. A recent study by the writer demonstrated that 20-year mean flows in the Kafue River in Zambia corresponded well to reconstructed rainfall records based on regional tree ring records. The Rio Parana has a catchment area of 3,100,000km 2 and a mean stream flow of 21,300m 3/sec. In the wider context an improved understanding of apparent periodicities in the natural record would seem to offer at least one planning scenario to be considered in terms of investment and even for the long term planning of aid and famine relief.

  3. Computing Resources at Chemical and Biochemical Engineering

    E-print Network

    Computing Resources at Chemical and Biochemical Engineering Note that use of all Rutgers University computer systems is subject to the Rutgers University Computing Services' Acceptable Use Policy, viewable undergraduates. To obtain a departmental Windows NT user account, see Getting and using computer accounts

  4. Water Resources of the United States

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This is the homepage for the Water Resources Division of the United States Geological Survey. It offers links to a variety of issues concerning water resources. The main links include: news, features, water data, publications and products, technical resources, programs, local information, and contacts. Also featured are links to other divisions within the United States Geological Survey, and FirstGov, a clearinghouse for all branches of the federal government.

  5. WATER RESOURCES NE:BRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE

    E-print Network

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    OF THE DIRECTOR · · · The energy crisis facing the nation is multi-faceted. Water's role is an important one but often misunderstood. There are two sides to the energy-water coin. The most well-known is the energy but exceedingly important, is energy consumption as it relates to the use of water in cities, industries

  6. Citizen's guide to coastal water resource management

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, J.; Miller, T.

    1988-01-01

    Contents include: taking the initiative; water-quality standards; Coastal Area Management Act; dredge-and-fill permits under Section 404; sediment and erosion control; other environmental laws; nonregulatory ways to help protect water resources.

  7. Water resources and the urban environment

    SciTech Connect

    Loucks, E.D. [ed.

    1998-07-01

    140 abstracts from the conference cover topics such as urban stormwater management; geographic information systems, hydrologic and hydraulic computer modeling; groundwater analysis and management; drinking water supply and quality; and international water resources issues.

  8. Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    Contamination, Management and Planning Descriptors: Nitrate Contamination, Willamette Silt, Ground-waterth Research Category: Ground-water Flow and Transport Focus Category: Groundwater, NitrateWater Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2003 Introduction In 2003, Oregons

  9. Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    of the Missouri River have raised serious questions over states' rights to water and priority uses. Research areasWater Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2000 Introduction WATER PROBLEMS AND ISSUES OF MISSOURI The water problems and issues in the State of Missouri can be separated into three

  10. Texas Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    Texas Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report FY 1999 Introduction The FY 99 research Basic Project Information Category Data Title Value Assessment in Surface Water Transfers: Deterministic program was focused on statewide efforts in water supply and water quality (TMDL) planning. The project

  11. Water Resources, Development and Management Service

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2004-05-10

    The world's food production depends on the availability of water, a precious but finite resource. Users can learn about the need for more efficient usage of water for irrigation, and about the activities of the Water Resources Development and Management Service, which is concerned with sustainable use and conservation of water in agriculture. Links to other sites related to irrigation practices and food production are also provided.

  12. Water Resources, Development and Management Service

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The world\\'s food production depends on the availability of water, a precious but finite resource. Users can learn about the need for more efficient usage of water for irrigation, and about the activities of the Water Resources Development and Management Service, which is concerned with sustainable use and conservation of water in agriculture. Links to other sites related to irrigation practices and food production are also provided.

  13. Multi-National Collaborative Modeling of Water Dependent Resources in the Tigris-Euphrates River Basin

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. Passell; J. D. Roach; M. D. Reno; G. T. Klise; V. C. Tidwell

    2010-01-01

    A team of scientists and engineers from the Iraq Ministry of Water Resources, the Iraq Transition Assistance Office of the U.S. Department of State, UNESCO, and Sandia National Laboratories collaborated to build a systems model of Iraqi water resources and related systems, including transboundary water systems, surface water and reservoirs, agriculture, salinity, municipal and industrial uses, and issues related to

  14. Ground water: the hidden resource

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vandas, Stephen; Farrar, Frank, (artist)

    1996-01-01

    Ground water is water underground in saturated zones beneath the land surface. Contrary to popular belief, ground water does not form underground "rivers." It fills the pores and fractures in underground materials such as sand, gravel, and other rock. If ground water flows from rock materials or can be removed by pumping from the saturated rock materials In useful amounts, the rock materials are called aquifers. Ground water moves slowly, typically at rates of 7 to 60 centimeters per day in an aquifer. As a result, water could remain in an aquifer for hundreds or thousands of years. Ground water is the source of about 40 percent of water used for public supplies and about 38 percent of water used for agriculture in the United States.

  15. Climate Change and Water Resources Management: A Federal Perspective

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brekke, Levi D.; Kiang, Julie E.; Olsen, J. Rolf; Pulwarty, Roger S.; Raff, David A.; Turnipseed, D. Phil; Webb, Robert S.; White, Kathleen D.

    2009-01-01

    Many challenges, including climate change, face the Nation's water managers. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) has provided estimates of how climate may change, but more understanding of the processes driving the changes, the sequences of the changes, and the manifestation of these global changes at different scales could be beneficial. Since the changes will likely affect fundamental drivers of the hydrological cycle, climate change may have a large impact on water resources and water resources managers. The purpose of this interagency report prepared by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation), and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) is to explore strategies to improve water management by tracking, anticipating, and responding to climate change. This report describes the existing and still needed underpinning science crucial to addressing the many impacts of climate change on water resources management.

  16. WATER RESOURCES NEWS NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE

    E-print Network

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    for construction of waste treatment facilities to control water pollu- tion, primarily for industrial, recreational cent of impurities in waste. In the mid '80's improved treatment could give many industries closed re- ing, University of Nebraska, Lincol~cycling s~sterns for waste and water Nebraska 68503

  17. Climate Change and Water Resources in the

    E-print Network

    Vuille, Mathias

    Climate Change and Water Resources in the Tropical Andes Mathias Vuille Inter-American Development Bank Environmental Safeguards Unit TECHNICAL NOTE No. IDB-TN-515 March 2013 #12;Climate Change-American Development Bank Felipe Herrera Library Vuille, Mathias. Climate change and water resources in the tropical

  18. Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    topic. The library's catalog is available online and searchable via the Internet, making the WRL available online to the public when it launched "Wisconsin's Water Library" (www Resources Library (WRL), a nationally unique collection of documents covering every major water resource

  19. Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    topic. The library's catalog is available online and searchable via the Internet, making the WRL collection available online to the public when it developed Wisconsin's Water Library" (www Resources Library (WRL), a nationally unique collection of documents covering every major water resource

  20. Protecting Water Resources and Managing Stormwater

    E-print Network

    New Hampshire, University of

    Protecting Water Resources and Managing Stormwater A BiRd'S EyE ViEW foR NEW HAMPSHiRE Co, endorsement or recommendation. Protecting Water Resources and Managing Stormwater: A Birds Eye View For New of New Hampshire Stormwater Center design and production by: tricia Miller, MillerWorks Graphic design

  1. 3. Water Resources and Water Supply

    Microsoft Academic Search

    George H. Ward

    Of all of the elements of the Texas economy, society, and environment considered in this book, water is most closely coupled with climate. It is also the quintessential limiting factor for human development of the state. Simply put, \\

  2. Assessing Water and Carbon Footprints for Sustainable Water Resource Management

    EPA Science Inventory

    The key points of this presentation are: (1) Water footprint and carbon footprint as two sustainability attributes in adaptations to climate and socioeconomic changes, (2) Necessary to evaluate carbon and water footprints relative to constraints in resource capacity, (3) Critical...

  3. Overview of the Environmental and Water Resources Institute's "Guidelines For Integrated Water Resources Management" Project

    SciTech Connect

    Gerald Sehlke

    2005-03-01

    Integrated Water Resources Management is a systematic approach to optimizing our understanding, control and management of water resources within a basin to meet multiple objectives. Recognition of the need for integrating water resources within basins is not unique to the Environmental and Water Resources Institute’s Integrated Water Resources Management Task Committee. Many individuals, governments and other organizations have attempted to develop holistic water resources management programs. In some cases, the results have been very effective and in other cases, valiant attempts have fallen far short of their initial goals. The intent of this Task Committee is to provide a set of guidelines that discusses the concepts, methods and tools necessary for integrating and optimizing the management of the physical resources and to optimize and integrate programs, organizations, infrastructure, and socioeconomic institutions into comprehensive water resources management programs.

  4. Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    that lead and copper standards for drinking water are exceeded). The IWRC base research program operates centers that would provide research and other forms of technical assistance to drinking water systemsWater Resources Center Annual Technical Report FY 1999 Introduction Research Program Research

  5. Arkansas Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    the optimum number and timing of storm and baseflow water quality sampling to determine pollutant loadsArkansas Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report FY 1999 Introduction Research Program Basic Pollution Loads Project Number C-02 Start Date 09/01/1998 End Date 08/31/1999 Research Category Water

  6. Water Resources of New Hampshire and Vermont

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Water Resources of New Hampshire and Vermont provides the latest information on drought conditions and rainfall data for the area; water data including streamflow and ground-water levels; and streamflow maps showing watersheds. There are also U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) publications, including reports on USGS projects; USGS news and events; and educational links.

  7. Water resource impacts of alternative strategies

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1995-10-01

    This portion of the Energy Vision 2020 draft report summarizes the differences among TVA`s final strategies with respect to potential impacts on water resources. Three water-quality impacts were considered: (1) human health impacts by ingestion, (2) impacts on water supply and waste assimilation, and (3) impacts on fish, aquatic life, and aquatic biodiversity.

  8. USGS Water Resources of South Carolina

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This site contains drought watch information, publications, and water data. There is information on programs such as bioremediation, the May River Project, and the National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Santee River Basin and Coastal Drainages Study Unit. An education section contains earth science, mapping, and water resources.

  9. Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    : September 1, 2000 to August 31, 2002 Summary Nitrate contamination of ground water and streams is common of this process as a nitrogen sink. Introduction Contamination of ground water and streams by nitrate is a problemWater Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2001 Introduction The Minnesota WRRI

  10. PROCEEDINGS OF SYMPOSIUM WATER RESOURCES NEEDS

    E-print Network

    District of Columbia, University of the

    . Among the more critical of these presently not meeting the demand are' the ones relating to water uses-- particularly for water supply, waste disposal, and recreation. The Potomac River and its tributaries#12;PROCEEDINGS OF SYMPOSIUM ON WATER RESOURCES NEEDS FACING THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA June 20, 1974

  11. USGS Water Resources of New York

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Water Resources of New York provides drought information for New York State, water reports and past news items, water data including streamflow and ground-water conditions, maps and publications, and an education section with water science links. There is also information on current water studies and research, including the National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) programs for the Hudson River Basin, Delaware River Basin, Lake Erie/Lake St. Clair Basin, and the Long Island-New Jersey coast.

  12. Glossary of Water Resource Terms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Titelbaum, Olga Adler

    Twelve reference sources were used in the compilation of this glossary of water pollution control terminology. Definitions for 364 words, acronyms, and phrases are included with cross references. (KP)

  13. Observing Changes in Water Resources

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2012-03-23

    In this video segment adapted from the College of Menominee Nation, tribal members observe lower water levels in lakes and streams and call for global, collaborative solutions to address climate change.

  14. Managing water resources for crop production

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, J. S.; Batchelor, C. H.

    1997-01-01

    Increasing crop production to meet the food requirements of the world's growing population will put great pressure on global water resources. Given that the vast freshwater resources that are available in the world are far from fully exploited, globally there should be sufficient water for future agricultural requirements. However, there are large areas where low water supply and high human demand may lead to regional shortages of water for future food production. In these arid and semi-arid areas, where water is a major constraint on production, improving water resource management is crucial if Malthusian disasters are to be avoided. There is considerable scope for improvement, since in both dryland and irrigated agriculture only about one-third of the available water (as rainfall, surface, or groundwater) is used to grow useful plants. This paper illustrates a range of techniques that could lead to increased crop production by improving agricultural water use efficiency. This may be achieved by increasing the total amount of water available to plants or by increasing the efficiency with which that water is used to produce biomass. Although the crash from the Malthusian precipice may ultimately be inevitable if population growth is not addressed, the time taken to reach the edge of the precipice could be lengthened by more efficient use of existing water resources.

  15. Conserving Water Resources Through Integrated Water Management

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David H. Paul

    1989-01-01

    Today we face the challenges ofproviding goodfood, good air, and good water for a humanpopulation that is doubling every 40-50 years. The challenges are real and were evident enough during 1988 for Time magazine to dedicate its first 1989 issue to „Planet of the Year….Endangered Earth”.Great technological progress has been made over the past few years, enabling many industries and

  16. Science for Stewardship of California's Water Resources

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    U.S. Geological Survey

    2009-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is the primary Federal agency responsible for scientific evaluation of the natural resources of the United States, including its water. To meet the demands of a growing California, the U.S. Geological Survey's California Water Science Center provides essential science to help Federal, State, and local water agencies evaluate and manage California's critical water resources; adapt to a changing climate; assess, predict, and mitigate natural hazards, such as mudslides and debris flows; and protect the health of rivers, forests, wetlands, and other habitats. The following are some of the ways the USGS is working with other agencies to protect California's water resources and assure that Californians have safe and reliable water supplies for now and in the future.

  17. Advancing Cyberinfrastructure to support high resolution water resources modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarboton, D. G.; Ogden, F. L.; Jones, N.; Horsburgh, J. S.

    2012-12-01

    Addressing the problem of how the availability and quality of water resources at large scales are sensitive to climate variability, watershed alterations and management activities requires computational resources that combine data from multiple sources and support integrated modeling. Related cyberinfrastructure challenges include: 1) how can we best structure data and computer models to address this scientific problem through the use of high-performance and data-intensive computing, and 2) how can we do this in a way that discipline scientists without extensive computational and algorithmic knowledge and experience can take advantage of advances in cyberinfrastructure? This presentation will describe a new system called CI-WATER that is being developed to address these challenges and advance high resolution water resources modeling in the Western U.S. We are building on existing tools that enable collaboration to develop model and data interfaces that link integrated system models running within an HPC environment to multiple data sources. Our goal is to enhance the use of computational simulation and data-intensive modeling to better understand water resources. Addressing water resource problems in the Western U.S. requires simulation of natural and engineered systems, as well as representation of legal (water rights) and institutional constraints alongside the representation of physical processes. We are establishing data services to represent the engineered infrastructure and legal and institutional systems in a way that they can be used with high resolution multi-physics watershed modeling at high spatial resolution. These services will enable incorporation of location-specific information on water management infrastructure and systems into the assessment of regional water availability in the face of growing demands, uncertain future meteorological forcings, and existing prior-appropriations water rights. This presentation will discuss the informatics challenges involved with data management and easy-to-use access to high performance computing being tackled in this project.

  18. Graduate School of Creative Science and Engineering Department of Earth Sciences, Resources and Environmental Engineering

    E-print Network

    Kaji, Hajime

    and Environmental Engineering Master's Program Doctoral Program Graduate School of Creative Science and Engineering Department of Earth Sciences, Resources and Environmental Engineering Research Area Research and Environmental Engineering Master's Program Doctoral Program Research Area Research Instruction Application

  19. SMALL SYSTEM STUDIES (WATER SUPPLY AND WATER RESOURCES DIVISION)

    EPA Science Inventory

    To support and help in the struggle to improve the quality of drinking water in the U.S. and abroad (China and South America), the National Risk Management Research Laboratory's Water Supply and Water Resources Division (WSWRD) uses the USEPA Test and Evaluation (T&E) Facility lo...

  20. University of Wisconsin Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    : groundwater, surface water, groundwater/surface water interactions, and drinking water initiatives. Faculty Quality Lead Institute: University of Wisconsin Water Resources Institute Principal Investigators: JohnUniversity of Wisconsin Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2000 Introduction

  1. Texas Water Resources: Vulnerability from Contaminants 

    E-print Network

    Dwivedi, Dipankar

    2012-10-02

    Numerical models of flow and transport are commonly applied for the sustainable management of water resources and for the selection of appropriate remediation techniques. However, these numerical models are not always ...

  2. Water Resource System Optimization by Geometric Programming 

    E-print Network

    Meier, W. L.; Shih, C. S.; Wray, D. J.

    1971-01-01

    have increased considerably. Secondly, planning and design analyses have become more complicated because of a desire by planners to represent more completely the problem to be solved. In a recent appraisal of Federal Water Resources Research activities...

  3. Center for Water Resources Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    of Ethanol on Anaerobic Production of Tert-Butyl Alcohol (TBA) from MTBE in Groundwater Kate M. Scow, Douglas, Department of Land, Air and Water Resources, University of California, Davis #12;Tertiary butyl alcohol (TBA

  4. The National Park Service: Water Resources Division

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This portal provides access to a variety of materials on water resource programs in the National Park System (NPS). The homepage features links to news releases, announcements, and topics of current interest. Other links access information on various water resource issues, arranged by topic: fisheries, hydrology, laws and regulations, watersheds, wetlands, and many others. The documents pertaining to these topics include technical reports, fact sheets, planning documents, program information, and other webpages. Some of these items are available in downloadable, printable format (PDFs). The Water Quality page features the Environmental Contaminants Encyclopedia, a searchable reference on waterborne contaminants and their impacts on fish, wildlife, invertebrates, and other non-human living resources. There is also a page for students and teachers that provides access to information on volunteer projects and information about interpretative and educational activities involving water resources in the National Park system.

  5. USGS Water Resources Maps and GIS Information

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This portal, sponsored by the United States Geological Survey (USGS), provides access to maps and Geographic Information Systems (GIS) datasets for water resources in the United States. There is an extensive selection of datasets on irrigation, groundwater resources and issues, surficial and subsurface geology, hydrology, water contaminants, stream flow, and many other topics. There are also links to the Geospatial Data Clearinghouse, the EarthExplorer Landsat imagery site, the National Map Seamless Server, and other mapping and data download sites.

  6. Help with Bolivia's water resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The Regional State Corporation for Development (CORDECO) in Cochabamba, Bolivia, is seeking geoscientists who can help plan and carry out a variety of hydrological projects. Water pollution, erosion control, basin management, and small-scale irrigation programs are all within the scope of these projects, as are land control and reclamation, river regulation and control, and village water supplies.CORDECO will welcome scientists and graduate students who have relevant experience. CORDECO will provide local office and fieldwork facilities (including technicians) and will cover the projects' expenses. The participating scientists must arrange for their subsistence and travel expenses to and from Bolivia to be paid by their own institutions. It is not necessary for the participating scientists to know Spanish.

  7. Strategy of Water Resources Planning Under Risk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Z.; Ye, M.

    2007-12-01

    In water resources systems analysis, risk, caused by uncertainty, is an important issue to consider, whereas definition of risk and its measure is controversial (many definitions are available in different research fields). The problem of computing the degree of risk in water resources planning is very difficult, and has received more and more attentions from more hydrologists. This study discussed the necessity of risk analysis on decision-making associated with problems of managing regional water quantity. A new concept of risk function for regional water resource planning was introduced, and a theory of risk analysis of water resource systems was developed and implemented numerically. The developed methodology is general and can be used to tackle many kinds of decision-making problems. When loss (or benefit) volumes of an action set and probabilities of nature state of decision environments are given, non-inferior planning strategy or strategies can be derived by ordering the size of risk degrees calculated by the proposed risk function. This method was illustrated in a case study at the Huanghuaihai basin, China, one of the major food-producing areas in north China. In the last several decades, problems of water shortage and pollution are severe, and extreme weather conditions frequently occur. How to reasonably allocate the limited fresh water in the future under uncertainty is an urgent task. In this research, alternative strategies of water resource planning were investigated and risk of the strategies was assessed to facilitate the decision-making of Chinese government. The developed methodology selected the optimum choice of water resources planning strategies to avoid the risk of water shortage. This research has practicably provided support of decision-making of the Chinese central and local governments and organizations in their regional and national planning.

  8. KE Basin water dispositioning engineering study

    SciTech Connect

    Hunacek, G.S.; Gahir, S.S.

    1994-09-23

    This engineering study is a feasibility study of KE Basin water treatment to an acceptable level and dispositioning the treated water to Columbia River, ground through ETF or to air through evaporation.

  9. University of Wisconsin Extension: Water Resources Programs

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The University of Wisconsin Extension provides "information about water quality and natural resources education programs in Wisconsin." Users can find out about monitoring the water quality of streams, river cleanups, and other volunteer projects. Teachers can learn how to educate their students about runoff pollution through the construction of a watershed model. The website presents numerous water related initiatives including the Multi-Agency Land and Water Education Grant Program, Give Water a Hand for young people taking action in their community, and the Landowner Assessment and Project Evaluation (LOAPE) Program.

  10. Water Resources of Hawaii and the Pacific

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The mission of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) District Office in Honolulu, Hawaii is to assess water resources for the Hawaiian islands and the Western Pacific - the quality and quantity of surface-water and ground-water in this region. Information is provided about water use, streamflow, ground-water levels, well drilling, flood frequency, isotope hydrology, benthic invertebrates, contamination, the Iao aquifer on Maui island, rainfall amounts and storm monitoring. There is real-time data available as well as on-line reports and abstracts relating to hydrologic conditions in these areas.

  11. Towards sustainable development of still water resources

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mark Everard

    1999-01-01

    Evidence suggests a net decline in the quality and quantity of still waters over most of the developed world. A strategy predicated on merely ‘sustaining’ them as isolated resources is ultimately unsustainable. True sustainable development takes account of the ecological, social and economic values of still waters within the context of living catchments. Catchment management has begun to move thinking

  12. World Water Resources Assessment for 2050

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oki, T.; Agata, Y.; Kanae, S.; Musiake, K.; Saruhashi, T.

    2003-04-01

    nticipated water scarcity in the first half of this century is one of the most concerned international issues to be assessed adequately. However, even though the issue has an international impact and world wide monitoring is critical, there are limited number of global estimates at present. In this study, annual water availability was derived from annual runoff estimated by land surface models using Total Runoff Integrating Pathways (TRIP) with 0.5 degree by 0.5 degree longitude/latitude resolution globally. Global distribution of water withdrawal for each sector in the same horizontal spatial resolution was estimated based on country-base statistics of municipal water use, industrial water use, and agricultural intake, using global geographical information system with global distributions of population and irrigated crop land area. The total population under water stress estimated for 1995 corresponded very well with former estimates, however, the number is highly depend on how to assume the ratio how much water from upstream of the region can be considered as ``available'' water resources within the region. It suggests the importance of regional studies evaluating the the water quality deterioration in the upper stream, the real consumption of water resources in the upper stream, and the accessibility to water. The last factor should be closely related to how many large scale water withdrawal schemes are implemented in the region. Further studies by an integrated approach to improve the accuracy of future projections on both the natural and social sides of the water resources should be promoted. About the future projection of the global water resources assessment, population growth, climatic change, and the increase of water consumption per capita are considered. Population growth scenario follows the UN projection in each country. Change in annual runoff was estimated based on the climatic simulation by a general circulation model by the Center of Climate System Study, U of Tokyo, and the National Institute for Environmental Studies, coupled with TRIP. The increase in unit consumption of water was related to the predicted growth of GDP. With the increase of population only, future population under strong water scarcity, with water scarcity index is larger than 0.4, will increase by 90% in 2050 compared to the current situation in 1995. Consideration of the climatic change due to the global warming will relax this situation, and only 74% will be under the strong water scarcity according to the future projection used in this study.

  13. Water Resources Data, New Mexico, Water Year 2000

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ortiz, David; Lange, Kathy; Beal, Linda

    2001-01-01

    Water-resources data for the 2000 water year for New Mexico consist of records of discharge and water quality of streams; stage, contents, and water quality of lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality in wells and springs. This report contains discharge records for 185 gaging stations; stage and contents for 26 lakes and reservoirs; water quality for 34 gaging stations, 56 wells, and 41 partial-record stations and miscellaneous sites; and water levels at 136 observation wells. Also included are 79 crest-stage, partial-record stations. Additional water data were collected at various sites not involved in the systematic data-collection program and are published as miscellaneous measurements. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System collected by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating Federal, State, and local agencies in New Mexico.

  14. Water Resources Data, New Mexico, Water Year 1997

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ortiz, David; Lange, Kathy; Beal, Linda

    1998-01-01

    Water resources data for the 1997 water year for New Mexico consist of records of discharge and water quality of streams; stage, contents, and water quality of lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality in wells and springs. This report contains discharge records for 171 gaging stations; stage and contents for 27 lakes and reservoirs; water quality for 46 gaging stations and 19 wells; and water levels in 124 observation wells. Also included are 35 crest-stage, partial-record stations. Additional water data were collected at various sites not involved in the systematic data-collection program, and are published as miscellaneous measurements. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System collected by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating Federal, State, and local agencies in New Mexico.

  15. Water Resources Data, New Mexico, Water Year 1996

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ortiz, David; Lange, K.M.

    1997-01-01

    Water resources data for the 1996 water year for New Mexico consist of records of discharge and water quality of streams; stage, contents, and water quality of lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality in wells and springs. This report contains discharge records for 172 gaging stations; stage and contents for 26 lakes and reservoirs; water quality for 51 gaging stations and 19 wells; and water levels at 126 observation wells. Also included are 82 crest-stage partial-record stations. Additional water data were collected at various sites not involved in the systematic data collection program, and are published as miscellaneous measurements. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System collected by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating State and Federal agencies in New Mexico.

  16. Resources for Small Water Systems in Texas 

    E-print Network

    Dozier, Monty; Theodori, Gene L.; Jensen, Ricard

    2007-03-28

    an application is received. Applica- tions for competitive funding programs are reviewed and scored using program-specifi c criteria and processes. Eligible projects may in- clude colonia infrastructure, community plan- ning for public infrastructure, and water... Texas (Alice) and the High Plains (Levelland) provide on- site training and technical assistance. ORCA staff at these fi eld offi ces can help communi- ties develop loan and grant applications for water and wastewater systems. The Texas Engineering...

  17. 30 CFR 402.6 - Water-Resources Research Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Water-Resources Research Program. 402.6 Section...GEOLOGICAL SURVEY, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR WATER-RESOURCES RESEARCH PROGRAM AND THE WATER-RESOURCES TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM...

  18. 30 CFR 402.6 - Water-Resources Research Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Water-Resources Research Program. 402.6 Section...GEOLOGICAL SURVEY, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR WATER-RESOURCES RESEARCH PROGRAM AND THE WATER-RESOURCES TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM...

  19. 30 CFR 402.6 - Water-Resources Research Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Water-Resources Research Program. 402.6 Section...GEOLOGICAL SURVEY, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR WATER-RESOURCES RESEARCH PROGRAM AND THE WATER-RESOURCES TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM...

  20. 30 CFR 402.6 - Water-Resources Research Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Water-Resources Research Program. 402.6 Section...GEOLOGICAL SURVEY, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR WATER-RESOURCES RESEARCH PROGRAM AND THE WATER-RESOURCES TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM...

  1. 30 CFR 402.6 - Water-Resources Research Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Water-Resources Research Program. 402.6 Section...GEOLOGICAL SURVEY, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR WATER-RESOURCES RESEARCH PROGRAM AND THE WATER-RESOURCES TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM...

  2. Louisiana Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    Louisiana Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2002 Introduction This report presents a description of the activities of the Louisiana Water Resources Research Institute Pardue. The Louisiana Water Resources Research Institute (LWRRI) is unique among academic research

  3. 59 FR- Procedure for Evaluating Water Resource Projects

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    1994-08-16

    ...DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Procedure for Evaluating Water Resource Projects AGENCY...on procedures for evaluating water resource projects to meet the...determine whether or not proposed water resource projects are...

  4. A DEMONSTRATION OF AREAWIDE WATER RESOURCES PLANNING. USERS MANUAL

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report documents a demonstration of areawide water resources planning by the Metropolitan Washington, DC. Council of Governments (MWCOG). The MWCOG Framework Water Resources Planning Model is a comprehensive analytical tool for use in areawide water resources management plan...

  5. Native Waters: An American Indian Water Resource Education Project

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2004-01-01

    This community education initiative supports the efforts of Native American tribal leaders, educators, and students to develop contemporary, scientifically accurate, and culturally sensitive water education resources, programs, and networking opportunities. A traveling exhibit provides a Native American point of view on protection and conservation of water resources. A teachers' guide is provided to accompany the exhibit. Other materials include learning opportunities for students and educators, news articles, publications, scholarship information, and links to related information.

  6. Ground water and surface water; a single resource

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Winter, Thomas C.; Harvey, Judson W.; Franke, O. Lehn; Alley, William M.

    1998-01-01

    The importance of considering ground water and surface water as a single resource has become increasingly evident. Issues related to water supply, water quality, and degradation of aquatic environments are reported on frequently. The interaction of ground water and surface water has been shown to be a significant concern in many of these issues. Contaminated aquifers that discharge to streams can result in long-term contamination of surface water; conversely, streams can be a major source of contamination to aquifers. Surface water commonly is hydraulically connected to ground water, but the interactions are difficult to observe and measure. The purpose of this report is to present our current understanding of these processes and activities as well as limitations in our knowledge and ability to characterize them.

  7. Water resources of Claiborne Parish, Louisiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fendick, Robert B., Jr.; Prakken, Lawrence B.; Griffith, Jason M.

    2013-01-01

    This fact sheet summarizes basic information on the water resources of Claiborne Parish. Information on groundwater and surface-water availability, quality, development, use, and trends is based on previously published reports listed in the Cited References section. In 2010, about 2.60 million gallons per day (Mgal/d) of water were withdrawn in Claiborne Parish, Louisiana, including about 2.42 Mgal/d from groundwater sources and 0.18 Mgal/d from surface-water sources. Public-supply use accounted for about 84 percent of the total water withdrawn. Other categories of use included industrial, rural domestic, livestock, and general irrigation. Water-use data collected at 5-year intervals from 1960 to 2010 indicated that total water withdrawals in the parish have ranged from about 2.6 to 3.9 Mgal/d.

  8. Linking water resources to food security through virtual water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamea, Stefania

    2014-05-01

    The largest use of global freshwater resources is related to food production. While each day we drink about 2 liters of water, we consume (eating) about 4000 liters of ''virtual water'', which represents the freshwater used to produce crop-based and livestock-based food. Considering human water consumption as a whole, most part originates from agriculture (85.8%), and only minor parts come from industry (9.6%) or households (4.6%). These numbers shed light on the great pressure of humanity on global freshwater resources and justify the increasing interest towards this form of environmental impact, usually known as ''water footprint''. Virtual water is a key variable in establishing the nexus between water and food. In fact, water resources used for agricultural production determine local food availability, and impact the international trade of agricultural goods. Trade, in turn, makes food commodities available to nations which are not otherwise self-sufficient, in terms of water resources or food, and it establishes an equilibrium between food demand and production at the global scale. Therefore, food security strongly relies on international food trade, but also on the use of distant and foreign water resources, which need to be acknowledged and investigated. Virtual water embedded in production and international trade follows the fate of food on the trade network, generating virtual flows of great magnitude (e.g., 2800 km3 in 2010) and defining local and global virtual water balances worldwide. The resulting water-food nexus is critical for the societal and economic development, and it has several implications ranging from population dynamics to the competing use of freshwater resources, from dietary guidelines to globalization of trade, from externalization of pollution to policy making and to socio-economic wealth. All these implications represent a great challenge for future research, not only in hydrology but in the many fields related to this interdisciplinary topic. Virtual water and water footprint accounting provide the tools for understanding such implications and to describe, quantify, and investigate the inextricable link existing between water resources and food security.

  9. WATER: Water Activities Teaching Environmental Responsibility: Teacher Resource, Environmental Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kramer, Ed, Ed.; And Others

    This activity book was developed as part of an effort to protect water quality of the Stillwater River, Ohio, through a Watershed Protection Project. It is designed to raise teachers' and students' awareness and trigger a sense of stewardship towards the preservation of water resources. The activities are generally appropriate for elementary age…

  10. Higher Resolution for Water Resources Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumenil-Gates, L.

    2009-12-01

    The Earth system science community is providing an increasing range of science results for the benefit of achieving the Millennium Development Goals. In addressing questions such as reducing poverty and hunger, achieving sustainable global development, or by defining adaptation strategies for climate change, one of the key issues will be the quantitative description and understanding of the global water cycle, which will allow useful projections of available future water resources for several decades ahead. The quantities of global water cycle elements that we observe today - and deal with in hydrologic and atmospheric modeling - are already very different from the natural flows as human influence on the water cycle by storage, consumption and edifice has been going on for millennia, and climate change is expected to add more uncertainty. In this case Tony Blair’s comment that perhaps the most worrying problem is climate change does not cover the full story. We shall also have to quantify how the human demand for water resources and alterations of the various elements of the water cycle may proceed in the future: will there be enough of the precious water resource to sustain current and future demands by the various sectors involved? The topics that stakeholders and decision makers concerned with managing water resources are interested in cover a variety of human uses such as agriculture, energy production, ecological flow requirements to sustain biodiversity and ecosystem services, or human cultural aspects, recreation and human well-being - all typically most relevant at the regional or local scales, this being quite different from the relatively large-scale that the IPCC assessment addresses. Halfway through the Millennium process, the knowledge base of the global water cycle is still limited. The sustainability of regional water resources is best assessed through a research program that combines high-resolution climate and hydrologic models for expected future scenarios (as in the IPCC ensembles) with appropriate observational data under current conditions in order to benchmark the models’ accuracy. Expected future changes in water availability could then be characterized and appropriate adaptation action designed in co-operation with the water use community. In situ observations of water cycle variables can also be used and developed together with remote sensing data from space to provide initial data for global seasonal or decadal forecasting and monitoring of global change in less well observed regions of the world.

  11. Geothermal Water Use: Life Cycle Water Consumption, Water Resource Assessment, and Water Policy Framework

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, Jenna N.

    2014-06-10

    This report examines life cycle water consumption for various geothermal technologies to better understand factors that affect water consumption across the life cycle (e.g., power plant cooling, belowground fluid losses) and to assess the potential water challenges that future geothermal power generation projects may face. Previous reports in this series quantified the life cycle freshwater requirements of geothermal power-generating systems, explored operational and environmental concerns related to the geochemical composition of geothermal fluids, and assessed future water demand by geothermal power plants according to growth projections for the industry. This report seeks to extend those analyses by including EGS flash, both as part of the life cycle analysis and water resource assessment. A regional water resource assessment based upon the life cycle results is also presented. Finally, the legal framework of water with respect to geothermal resources in the states with active geothermal development is also analyzed.

  12. Geothermal Water Use: Life Cycle Water Consumption, Water Resource Assessment, and Water Policy Framework

    DOE Data Explorer

    Schroeder, Jenna N.

    This report examines life cycle water consumption for various geothermal technologies to better understand factors that affect water consumption across the life cycle (e.g., power plant cooling, belowground fluid losses) and to assess the potential water challenges that future geothermal power generation projects may face. Previous reports in this series quantified the life cycle freshwater requirements of geothermal power-generating systems, explored operational and environmental concerns related to the geochemical composition of geothermal fluids, and assessed future water demand by geothermal power plants according to growth projections for the industry. This report seeks to extend those analyses by including EGS flash, both as part of the life cycle analysis and water resource assessment. A regional water resource assessment based upon the life cycle results is also presented. Finally, the legal framework of water with respect to geothermal resources in the states with active geothermal development is also analyzed.

  13. Water Exploration: An Online High School Water Resource Education Program

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. K. Ellins; L. R. McCall; S. Amos; R. F. McGowan; A. Mote; K. Negrito; B. Paloski; C. Ryan; B. Cameron

    2010-01-01

    The Institute for Geophysics at The University of Texas at Austin and 4empowerment.com, a Texas-based for-profit educational enterprise, teamed up with the Texas Water Development Board to develop and implement a Web-based water resources education program for Texas high school students. The program, Water Exploration uses a project-based learning approach called the Legacy Cycle model to permit students to conduct

  14. NASA's Applied Sciences for Water Resources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doorn, Bradley; Toll, David; Engman, Ted

    2011-01-01

    The Earth Systems Division within NASA has the primary responsibility for the Earth Science Applied Science Program and the objective to accelerate the use of NASA science results in applications to help solve problems important to society and the economy. The primary goal of the Earth Science Applied Science Program is to improve future and current operational systems by infusing them with scientific knowledge of the Earth system gained through space-based observation, assimilation of new observations, and development and deployment of enabling technologies, systems, and capabilities. This paper discusses one of the major problems facing water resources managers, that of having timely and accurate data to drive their decision support tools. It then describes how NASA?s science and space based satellites may be used to overcome this problem. Opportunities for the water resources community to participate in NASA?s Water Resources Applications Program are described.

  15. Water resources planning for rivers draining into Mobile Bay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    April, G. C.

    1976-01-01

    The application of remote sensing, automatic data processing, modeling and other aerospace related technologies to hydrological engineering and water resource management are discussed for the entire river drainage system which feeds the Mobile Bay estuary. The adaptation and implementation of existing mathematical modeling methods are investigated for the purpose of describing the behavior of Mobile Bay. Of particular importance are the interactions that system variables such as river flow rate, wind direction and speed, and tidal state have on the water movement and quality within the bay system.

  16. Cooperative water resource technology transfer program

    SciTech Connect

    D'itri, F.M.

    1982-06-01

    This cooperative water resource technology transfer program sought to develop/present educational programs (conferences/seminars/workshops) and technology transfer brochures to enhance public awareness/appreciation of state water quality problems and to stress economic tradeoffs needed to resolve given problems. Accomplishments of this program for the different conferences held 1979-1981 are described (inland lake eutrophication: causes, effects, and remedies; contamination of groundwater supplies by toxic chemicals: causes, effects, and prevention; supplemental irrigation; stormwater management; cooperative research needs for renovation and reuse of municipal water in agriculture; selection and management of vegetation for slow rate and overland flow land application systems to treat municipal wastewater; effects of acid precipitation on ecological systems: Great Lakes region; water competition in Michigan; Michigan natural resources outlook.

  17. Game Theory in water resources management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsanevaki, Styliani Maria; Varouchakis, Emmanouil; Karatzas, George

    2015-04-01

    Rural water management is a basic requirement for the development of the primary sector and involves the exploitation of surface/ground-water resources. Rational management requires the study of parameters that determine their exploitation mainly environmental, economic and social. These parameters reflect the influence of irrigation on the aquifer behaviour and on the level-streamflow of nearby rivers as well as on the profit from the farming activity for the farmers' welfare. The question of rural water management belongs to the socio-political problems, since the factors involved are closely related to user behaviour and state position. By applying Game Theory one seeks to simulate the behaviour of the system 'surface/ground-water resources to water-users' with a model based on a well-known game, "The Prisoner's Dilemma" for economic development of the farmers without overexploitation of the water resources. This is a game of two players that have been extensively studied in Game Theory, economy and politics because it can describe real-world cases. The present proposal aims to investigate the rural water management issue that is referred to two competitive small partnerships organised to manage their agricultural production and to achieve a better profit. For the farmers' activities water is required and ground-water is generally preferable because consists a more stable recourse than river-water which in most of the cases in Greece are of intermittent flow. If the two farmer groups cooperate and exploit the agreed water quantities they will gain equal profits and benefit from the sustainable availability of the water recourses (p). If both groups overexploitate the resource to maximize profit, then in the medium-term they will incur a loss (g), due to the water resources reduction and the increase of the pumping costs. If one overexploit the resource while the other use the necessary required, then the first will gain great benefit (P), and the second will suffer a significant loss (G). According to Game Theory both parties, due to lack of confidence, will not cooperate and will eventually overexploit the resource, although their long-term interests would be the rational management. The lack of cooperation between the two players leads in the 3rd preference of each player, while cooperation secures their 2nd preference. In addition, the administrative authorities may intervene in the game by setting penalties (fines, irrigation block) on players who have "unorthodox" behaviour to ensure collaborative strategy. Game Theory techniques obtain the equilibrium point of the system as the outcome of interaction among stakeholders through a process of supply-demand under cooperation and conflict. For every strategy, functions will be formed such that to be used for any agricultural product and in different regions based on rural water costs. Thus, the game applies under variable annual strategies and time intervals providing the accumulated profit of the stakeholders with respect to the environmental cost. The outcome will provide a useful decision-making tool for both stakeholders and administrative authorities for optimal water resources management in relation to the agricultural development.

  18. Impact of climate change on water resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Dan; Werners, Saskia; Ludwig, Fulco

    2014-05-01

    Climate change will affect hydrological regimes of rivers, and have a direct impact on availability, renewability, and quality of water resources. To better understand current and future water resources in the Pearl River basin, here we assess the impact of climate change on river discharge, and identify whether climate change will lead to increasing water availability or scarcity at the catchment scale. The Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) model is used for hydrological simulation driven by WATCH (the Integrated Project Water and Global Change) forcing data (1958-2001), WATCH forcing data ERA interim (1979-2001) and ten bias-corrected projected climate scenarios from MPI-ESM-LR, HadGEM2-ES, CNRM-CM5, IPSL-CM5A-LR and EC-EARTH forced by RCP4.5 and RCP8.5 (1961-2099). All subbasins except Yujiang basin show a decrease in streamflow from 1961 to 2099. The results also indicate that the wet season will become more wet, and the dry season will become drier over the whole Pearl River basin after 2030. Highly uneven spatial and temporal distribution of water resources may result in water shortages and severe hazards in this region.

  19. Ocean and Resources Engineering is the application of ocean science and engineering to the challenging conditions

    E-print Network

    Frandsen, Jannette B.

    Ocean and Resources Engineering is the application of ocean science and engineering to the challenging conditions found in the ocean environment. Motions of and forces on floating structures due resources are among some of the consid- erations that set ocean and resources engineering apart from

  20. Entropy, recycling and macroeconomics of water resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karakatsanis, Georgios; Mamassis, Nikos; Koutsoyiannis, Demetris

    2014-05-01

    We propose a macroeconomic model for water quantity and quality supply multipliers derived by water recycling (Karakatsanis et al. 2013). Macroeconomic models that incorporate natural resource conservation have become increasingly important (European Commission et al. 2012). In addition, as an estimated 80% of globally used freshwater is not reused (United Nations 2012), under increasing population trends, water recycling becomes a solution of high priority. Recycling of water resources creates two major conservation effects: (1) conservation of water in reservoirs and aquifers and (2) conservation of ecosystem carrying capacity due to wastewater flux reduction. Statistical distribution properties of the recycling efficiencies -on both water quantity and quality- for each sector are of vital economic importance. Uncertainty and complexity of water reuse in sectors are statistically quantified by entropy. High entropy of recycling efficiency values signifies greater efficiency dispersion; which -in turn- may indicate the need for additional infrastructure for the statistical distribution's both shifting and concentration towards higher efficiencies that lead to higher supply multipliers. Keywords: Entropy, water recycling, water supply multipliers, conservation, recycling efficiencies, macroeconomics References 1. European Commission (EC), Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), International Monetary Fund (IMF), Organization of Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), United Nations (UN) and World Bank (2012), System of Environmental and Economic Accounting (SEEA) Central Framework (White cover publication), United Nations Statistics Division 2. Karakatsanis, G., N. Mamassis, D. Koutsoyiannis and A. Efstratiades (2013), Entropy and reliability of water use via a statistical approach of scarcity, 5th EGU Leonardo Conference - Hydrofractals 2013 - STAHY '13, Kos Island, Greece, European Geosciences Union, International Association of Hydrological Sciences, International Union of Geodesy and Geophysics 3. United Nations (UN) (2012), World Water Development Report 4, UNESCO Publishing

  1. Integrated water resources modelling for assessing sustainable water governance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skoulikaris, Charalampos; Ganoulis, Jacques; Tsoukalas, Ioannis; Makropoulos, Christos; Gkatzogianni, Eleni; Michas, Spyros

    2015-04-01

    Climatic variations and resulting future uncertainties, increasing anthropogenic pressures, changes in political boundaries, ineffective or dysfunctional governance of natural resources and environmental degradation are some of the most fundamental challenges with which worldwide initiatives fostering the "think globally, act locally" concept are concerned. Different initiatives target the protection of the environment through sustainable development; Integrated Water Resources Management (IWRM) and Transboundary Water Resources Management (TWRM) in the case of internationally shared waters are frameworks that have gained wide political acceptance at international level and form part of water resources management planning and implementation on a global scale. Both concepts contribute in promoting economic efficiency, social equity and environmental sustainability. Inspired by these holistic management approaches, the present work describes an effort that uses integrated water resources modelling for the development of an integrated, coherent and flexible water governance tool. This work in which a sequence of computer based models and tools are linked together, aims at the evaluation of the sustainable operation of projects generating renewable energy from water as well as the sustainability of agricultural demands and environmental security in terms of environmental flow under various climatic and operational conditions. More specifically, catchment hydrological modelling is coupled with dams' simulation models and thereafter with models dedicated to water resources management and planning,while the bridging of models is conducted through geographic information systems and custom programming tools. For the case of Mesta/Nestos river basin different priority rules in the dams' operational schedule (e.g. priority given to power production as opposed to irrigation needs and vice versa), as well as different irrigation demands, e.g. current water demands as opposed to those defined in the River Basin Management Plan (RBMP), are thoroughly examined in order to ascertain the river's capability to cover multi water demands and the potential of further infrastructure development. Due to the transboundary nature of the river basin in question, different scenarios quantify the maximum water volumes that could be further exploited in the upper part of the basin in order to avoid adverse consequences to the downstream regional economy, power productivity and environmental flow, and in terms of water governance to satisfy the need to balance water use between socio-economic activities and ecosystems.

  2. Water Resources Data System State Climate Office

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Water Resources Data System is a "clearinghouse of hydrological and climatological data for the State of Wyoming" provided by the University of Wyoming. Online data include a water quality database, climatological data (such as snow depth and precipitation), and earthquake and landslide data. A water library link contains research briefs, publications, a reference shelf, newsletters, and other related documents. Additional links on the main page include US Geological Survey stream flow conditions, the state climatologist office, data clearinghouses, and other Wyoming-specific informational sites.

  3. Utilization and conservation of USSR water resources

    Microsoft Academic Search

    N. V. Razin; G. G. Gangardt

    1967-01-01

    Conclusions  \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a 1. \\u000a \\u000a Difficulties in securing fresh water for certain regions of the country are beginning to hold back the normal increases of\\u000a production.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a 2. \\u000a \\u000a The studies of the integrated utilization and conservation of water resources in the USSR have demonstrated that the problem\\u000a of a guaranteed fresh water supply to industry, urban settlements, and rural and fishing economies, assuming the

  4. Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    problems are even more critical in Hawai'i and the Pacific because of their geographic isolation and small resources. To support the technology transfer mission of WWRC, an Island Director's workshop small amounts for technology transfer and administration. The grants provided through the USGS Water

  5. Emerging climate services for water resources planning

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The author’s perspective on new or experimental forecasts and data products that may be important for water resource planning were shared. Everyone who lives and works with the consequences of weather and climate have known or suspected for years that climate is shifting, have been adapting, and wa...

  6. Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    by the Maryland Water Resources Research Center deal with the Bay. These projects are directed locally at streams, rivers, and wetlands. Last summer's drought had an adverse effect on one of our projects along by the Center deals with finding out how different types of vegetation affect the health of wetlands. The Center

  7. Georgia Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    Support System (LVDSS) Advanced Training Program (sponsored by the World Bank and Governments of Kenya District, and a graduate student fellowship sponsored by a private company was continued in its second year, and private businesses of Georgia who have active interests in the water resources issues of the state

  8. GIS and Water Resources Modeling Workshop

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Merwade, Venkatesh

    This site from Venkatesh Merwade of Purdue university offers tutorials relating to GIS and water resources modeling. Topic areas covered are hydraulic and hydrologic modeling, GIS and hydrologic modeling and downloading geospatial and temporal data for hydroloic/hydraulic modeling. All tutorials have links for necessary datasets.

  9. Texas Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    at Texas Tech University, researched the biotransformation of pharmaceuticals and personal care products and personal care products (PPCPs) at an effluent-dominated wastewater application site. Andrew Leidner Sciences at Texas A&M University, and a member of the National Institutes for Water Resources, provides

  10. Climate change and global water resources

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nigel W. Arnell

    1999-01-01

    By 2025, it is estimated that around 5 billion people, out of a total population of around 8 billion, will be living in countries experiencing water stress (using more than 20% of their available resources). Climate change has the potential to impose additional pressures in some regions. This paper describes an assessment of the implications of climate change for global

  11. Water Intensity of Electricity from Geothermal Resources

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. S. Mishra; W. E. Glassley

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND Electricity from geothermal resources could play a significant role in the United States over the next few decades; a 2006 study by MIT expects a capacity of 100GWe by 2050 as feasible; approximately 10% of total electricity generating capacity up from less than 1% today. However, there is limited research on the water requirements and impacts of generating electricity

  12. Water: a strategic resource. Student essay

    SciTech Connect

    Thornton, R.E.

    1986-04-15

    Availability of fresh water has been taken for granted throughout our history. In fact, the United States has been blessed with what was once thought to be a limitless natural resource, fresh water. The sources for this fresh water are precipitation, surface water, and ground water. Today, these sources are under relentless pressure from chronic pollution and over-usage. The federal government has begun the process of studying and doumenting the problems associated with our water supply but, to date, its efforts are far to little, too late. Budget constraints and funding projections only add to the already bleak picture. We are learning that water problems can't be contained and that they cross state, local, and private boundaries. This problem of area pollution has drawn considerable concern within the Department of Defense (DOD) as more and more of our installations are finding their water environment jeopardized. Solutions for the preservation cleansing and protection of our fresh-water systems are going to be expensive and technically complicated to accomplish and administer. Action is needed now.

  13. 18 CFR 701.76 - The Water Resources Council Staff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    18 ? Conservation of Power and Water Resources ? 2 ? 2012-04-01 ? 2012-04-01 ? false ? The Water Resources Council Staff. ? 701.76 ? Section 701.76 ? Conservation of Power and Water Resources ? WATER RESOURCES COUNCIL ? COUNCIL ORGANIZATION ? Headquarters Organization ? § 701.76 ? The...

  14. 18 CFR 701.76 - The Water Resources Council Staff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    18 ? Conservation of Power and Water Resources ? 2 ? 2010-04-01 ? 2010-04-01 ? false ? The Water Resources Council Staff. ? 701.76 ? Section 701.76 ? Conservation of Power and Water Resources ? WATER RESOURCES COUNCIL ? COUNCIL ORGANIZATION ? Headquarters Organization ? § 701.76 ? The...

  15. SUSTAINABLE WATER RESOURCES MANAGEMENT IN NEOTECTONIC BASIN SYSTEMS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    I. MARIOLAKOS; I. FOUNTOULIS; E. SPYRIDONOS; E. CAPOURANI; E. ANDREADAKIS

    Facing the threat of water scarcity, numerous techniques and methods have been introduced, aiming at more effective water resources exploitation. A well promising way to cope with water shortage is to develop and apply combined management techniques for the existing surface water and groundwater resources. Natural resources management requires thorough understanding of the natural processes controlling each resource and human

  16. California Institute for Water Resources Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    California Institute for Water Resources Annual Technical Report FY 2013 California Institute for Water Resources Annual Technical Report FY 2013 1 #12;Introduction The California Institute for Water and Natural Resources (ANR). The Institute is enabled by the federal Water Resources Research Act (WRRA

  17. California Institute for Water Resources Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    California Institute for Water Resources Annual Technical Report FY 2012 California Institute for Water Resources Annual Technical Report FY 2012 1 #12;Introduction The California Institute for Water and Natural Resources (UCANR), enabled by the federal Water Resources Research Act (WRRA), with the mission

  18. Water resources review: Wheeler Reservoir, 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Wallus, R.; Cox, J.P.

    1990-09-01

    Protection and enhancement of water quality is essential for attaining the full complement of beneficial uses of TVA reservoirs. The responsibility for improving and protecting TVA reservoir water quality is shared by various federal, state, and local agencies, as well as the thousands of corporations and property owners whose individual decisions affect water quality. TVA's role in this shared responsibility includes collecting and evaluating water resources data, disseminating water resources information, and acting as a catalyst to bring together agencies and individuals that have a responsibility or vested interest in correcting problems that have been identified. This report is one in a series of status reports that will be prepared for each of TVA's reservoirs. The purpose of this status report is to provide an up-to-date overview of the characteristics and conditions of Wheeler Reservoir, including: reservoir purposes and operation; physical characteristics of the reservoir and the watershed; water quality conditions: aquatic biological conditions: designated, actual, and potential uses of the reservoir and impairments of those uses; ongoing or planned reservoir management activities. Information and data presented here are form the most recent reports, publications, and original data available. 21 refs., 8 figs., 29 tabs.

  19. Indiana Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    Indiana Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2013 Indiana Water Resources the activities of the Indiana Water Resources Research Center (IWRRC) for the period March 1, 2013 to February 28 of Indiana as related to water research and education; (2) to chair the dedicated water community at Purdue

  20. Indiana Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    Indiana Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2012 Indiana Water Resources the activities of the Indiana Water Resources Research Center (IWRRC) for the period March 1, 2012 to February 28 in the State of Indiana as related to water research and education; (2) to chair the dedicated water community

  1. Indiana Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    Indiana Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2007 Indiana Water Resources Overview: This report covers the activities of the Indiana Water Resources Research Center (IWRRC) to continue to engage the water community in the State of Indiana as related to water research and education

  2. New York State Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    vitality with respect to water infrastructure and its effect on private and public investmentNew York State Water Resources Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2013 New York State Water Water Resources Institute (WRI) is to improve the management of water resources in New York State

  3. Missouri Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    raised serious questions over states rights to water and priority uses. Research areas in this programMissouri Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2008 Missouri Water Resources Introduction Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2008-2009 WATER PROBLEMS AND ISSUES

  4. Colorado Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    Colorado Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2005 Introduction Water water are two examples. Colorado State Legislature and Department of Natural Resources requested our Collins. The Colorado Water Resources Research Institute serves to connect the water expertise in Colorado

  5. Second Forum on Energy & Water Sustainability: Increasing Resource Productivity

    E-print Network

    Keller, Arturo A.

    Second Forum on Energy & Water Sustainability: Increasing Resource Productivity April 10, 2009 on Energy & Water Sustainability in 2007 successfully brought together policy-makers, researchers, energy of energy and water sustainability, considering the important linkages between these two resources

  6. Colorado Water Resources Research Institute Special Report No. 16

    E-print Network

    Colorado Water Resources Research Institute Special Report No. 16 Colorado Department;Colorado Water Resources Research Institute Special Report No. 16 Colorado State University is an equal Commission (Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment) WQCD Water Quality Control Division

  7. Engineering aspects of water pollution control systems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. G. Dalbke; A. J. Turk

    1967-01-01

    The importance of proper engineering when providing pollution control systems is emphasized. Organization of engineering projects is described in detail. Included are discussions of: (1) collection and evaluation of available data; (2) establishment of survey and test program; (3) integration and evaluation of findings; (4) establishment of pollution control and water utilization systems; and (5) specification and detailed design preparation.

  8. Sustainable Water Resources in Semiarid Agroecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reedy, R. C.; Favreau, G.; Gates, J. B.; Mukherjee, A.; Scanlon, B. R.; Zheng, C.

    2009-12-01

    Developing sustainable water resources management in agroecosystems is difficult in semiarid regions with limited or sporadic water inputs and heavy reliance on irrigation. Sustainable water management needs to consider both water quantity and water quality. Conversion of natural ecosystems to rain-fed agroecosystems has increased groundwater recharge in many semiarid regions in Australia, SW US, and W. Africa; however, such changes are not sustainable because rising water tables may ultimately reach the land surface and direct evaporation would cause salinization, as found in dryland salinity in Australia. In addition, increased recharge mobilizes pre-existing salt reservoirs that accumulated in soil profiles over millennia since the previous glaciation in Australia and the SW US. Increased recharge can also mobilize pre-existing nutrient reservoirs to underlying aquifers or create new reservoirs from soil organic nitrogen as in SW US and W. Africa. It is much more difficult to develop sustainable water management in irrigated agroecosystems as shown by water table declines of up to 1 m/yr in the north China Plain and up to 1.4 m/yr in the US High Plains. In addition to mobilizing pre-existing salts, irrigation also adds salts and nutrients to the system through irrigation water and fertilizers as seen in the US High Plains and Rajasthan, India. Various approaches are being considered to make agricultural water management more sustainable. Approaches include switching from rain-fed to groundwater fed irrigated agriculture in the US High Plains to prevent water tables from reaching the land surface, proposed expansion of irrigation with fresh groundwater in west Africa to reduce water tables, deficit irrigation and rotation of irrigation with rain-fed agriculture to reduce overexploitation of aquifers in irrigated areas in the US High Plains and parts of India, improved timing of fertilizer applications to reduce leaching, and consideration of nutrients in irrigation water and from soil organic nitrogen in recommended fertilizer application rates in the US High Plains and W. Africa. Quantification of increased recharge under agroecosystems relative to natural ecosystems can be used to estimate the level of irrigation that can be supported sustainably. Deficit irrigation in parts of the US High Plains has resulted in incipient soil salinization because of insufficient water to flush salts through the system. Proposed programs to achieve sustainability need to consider tradeoffs between water quantity and water quality.

  9. COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING & MINERAL RESOURCES TRANSFER REQUEST FORM

    E-print Network

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING & MINERAL RESOURCES TRANSFER REQUEST FORM Name. ___Engineering majors offered do not match my interests. ___I have other obligations and the curriculum is too intensive. ___Courses I want to take are not offered enough. ___Engineering is not challenging enough for me

  10. Quantitative water quality with ERTS-1. [Kansas water resources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yarger, H. L.; Mccauley, J. R.; James, G. W.; Magnuson, L. M.; Marzolf, G. R.

    1974-01-01

    Analyses of ERTS-1 MSS computer compatible tapes of reservoir scenes in Kansas along with ground truth show that MSS bands and band ratios can be used for reliable prediction of suspended loads up to at least 900 ppm. The major reservoirs in Kansas, as well as in other Great Plains states, are playing increasingly important roles in flood control, recreation, agriculture, and urban water supply. Satellite imagery is proving useful for acquiring timely low cost water quality data required for optimum management of these fresh water resources.

  11. Water Resources Data, California, Water Year 1989. Volume 5. Ground-Water Data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lamb, C.E.; Johnson, J.A.; Fogelman, R.P.; Grillo, D.A.

    1990-01-01

    Water resources data for the 1989 water year for California consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage and contents in lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality in weils. Volume 5 contains water levels for 1,037 observation wells and water-quality data for 254 monitoring wells. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperatine State and Federal agencies in California.

  12. Water Resources Data for California, Water Year 1988. Volume 5. Ground-Water Data for California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lamb, C.E.; Fogelman, R.P.; Grillo, D.A.

    1989-01-01

    Water resources data for the 1988 water year for California consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage and contents in lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water-quality in wells. Volume 5 contains water levels for 980 observation wells and water-quality data for 239 observation monitoring wells. These data represent that part of the National water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating State and Federal agencies in California.

  13. Water Resources Data for California, Water Year 1987. Volume 5. Ground-water Data for California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lamb, C.E.; Fogelman, R.P.; Grillo, D.A.

    1989-01-01

    Water resources data for the 1987 water year for California consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage and contents in lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality in wells. Volume 5 contains water levels for 786 observation wells and water-quality data for 168 observation wells. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating State and Federal agencies in California.

  14. Water resources of Ponape, Caroline Islands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Van der Brug, Otto

    1984-01-01

    Ponape is the third largest island in the western Pacific, with a land area of 129 square miles. The island is volcanic, nearly circular in shape, and covered with lush tropical vegetation. The mountainous interior has the highest peaks in the western Pacific. Annual rainfall at Kolonia and other coastal areas is 191 inches. Inland at higher elevations, the rainfall is considerably higher. The upper Nanpil River basin averages about 340 inches annually. Runoff-to-rainfall ratios for Ponapean streams show that about two thirds of the rain falling on the island runs off. Flow-duration curves show the similarity of the geology, vegetation, and rainfall of the drainage basins and indicate little ground-water contribution to surface runoff. Surface-water quality is excellent as shown by 53 chemical anlyses of water from 19 streams. Water of the Nanpil River, the source of water for the central water system, is especially low in dissolved elements and solids. This report summarizes in one volume all the hydrologic data collected and provides analyses that may be used by planning and public works officials as a basis for making decisions on the development and management of their water resources. (USGS)

  15. Climate change, water resources and child health.

    PubMed

    Kistin, Elizabeth J; Fogarty, John; Pokrasso, Ryan Shaening; McCally, Michael; McCornick, Peter G

    2010-07-01

    Climate change is occurring and has tremendous consequences for children's health worldwide. This article describes how the rise in temperature, precipitation, droughts, floods, glacier melt and sea levels resulting from human-induced climate change is affecting the quantity, quality and flow of water resources worldwide and impacting child health through dangerous effects on water supply and sanitation, food production and human migration. It argues that paediatricians and healthcare professionals have a critical leadership role to play in motivating and sustaining efforts for policy change and programme implementation at the local, national and international level. PMID:20403822

  16. Integrated Water Resources Planning in Cyprus

    Microsoft Academic Search

    George Socratous

    \\u000a Water is by far the most precious resource in Cyprus. It is a prerequisite for progress. All aquifers in Cyprus, as of 1970,\\u000a are overexploited beyond their safe yield. As a result sea intruded into most of the coastal aquifers. The depletion of both\\u000a the quantity and quality of groundwater coupled with the concurrent increase in the demand necessitated the

  17. The nexus between integrated natural resources management and integrated water resources management in southern Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Twomlow, Stephen; Love, David; Walker, Sue

    The low productivity of smallholder farming systems and enterprises in the drier areas of the developing world can be attributed mainly to the limited resources of farming households and the application of inappropriate skills and practices that can lead to the degradation of the natural resource base. This lack of development, particularly in southern Africa, is of growing concern from both an agricultural and environmental perspective. To address this lack of progress, two development paradigms that improve land and water productivity have evolved, somewhat independently, from different scientific constituencies. One championed by the International Agricultural Research constituency is Integrated Natural Resource Management (INRM), whilst the second championed predominantly by Environmental and Civil Engineering constituencies is Integrated Water Resources Management (IWRM). As a result of similar objectives of working towards the millennium development goals of improved food security and environmental sustainability, there exists a nexus between the constituencies of the two paradigms, particularly in terms of appreciating the lessons learned. In this paper lessons are drawn from past INRM research that may have particular relevance to IWRM scientists as they re-direct their focus from blue water issues to green water issues, and vice-versa. Case studies are drawn from the management of water quality for irrigation, green water productivity and a convergence of INRM and IWRM in the management of gold panning in southern Zimbabwe. One point that is abundantly clear from both constituencies is that ‘one-size-fits-all’ or silver bullet solutions that are generally applicable for the enhancement of blue water management/formal irrigation simply do not exist for the smallholder rainfed systems.

  18. INTERGRATING SOURCE WATER PROTECTION AND DRINKING WATER TREATMENT: U.S. ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY'S WATER SUPPLY AND WATER RESOURCES DIVISION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Water Supply and Water Resources Division (WSWRD) is an internationally recognized water research organization established to assist in responding to public health concerns related to drinking water supplies. WSWRD has evolved from...

  19. INTEGRATING SOURCE WATER PROTECTION AND DRINKING WATER TREATMENT: U.S. ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY'S WATER SUPPLY AND WATER RESOURCES DIVISION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Water Supply and Water Resources Division (WSWRD) is an internationally recognized water research organization established to assist in responding to public health concerns related to drinking water supplies. WSWRD has evolved from...

  20. Kansas Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    Kansas Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2009 Kansas Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2009 1 #12;Introduction The Kansas Water Resources Institute-federal funds from state and other sources. KWRI is administered by the Kansas Center for Agricultural Resources

  1. Kansas Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    Kansas Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2008 Kansas Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2008 1 #12;Introduction The Kansas Water Resources Institute from state and other sources. KWRI is administered by the Kansas Center for Agricultural Resources

  2. Kansas Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    Kansas Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2013 Kansas Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2013 1 #12;Introduction The Kansas Water Resources Institute-federal funds from state and other sources. KWRI is administered by the Kansas Center for Agricultural Resources

  3. Kansas Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    Kansas Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2007 Kansas Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2007 1 #12;Introduction The Kansas Water Resources Institute from state and other sources. KWRI is administered by the Kansas Center for Agricultural Resources

  4. Kansas Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    Kansas Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2011 Kansas Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2011 1 #12;Introduction The Kansas Water Resources Institute-federal funds from state and other sources. KWRI is administered by the Kansas Center for Agricultural Resources

  5. Kansas Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    Kansas Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2010 Kansas Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2010 1 #12;Introduction The Kansas Water Resources Institute-federal funds from state and other sources. KWRI is administered by the Kansas Center for Agricultural Resources

  6. Kansas Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    Kansas Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2012 Kansas Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2012 1 #12;Introduction The Kansas Water Resources Institute-federal funds from state and other sources. KWRI is administered by the Kansas Center for Agricultural Resources

  7. Indiana Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    Indiana Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2011 Indiana Water Resources of the Indiana Water Resources Research Center (IWRRC) for the period March 1, 2011 to February 28, 2012 program of the IWRRC have been: (1) to continue to engage the water community in the State of Indiana

  8. Indiana Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    Indiana Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2008 Indiana Water Resources Overview: This report covers the activities of the Indiana Water Resources Research Center (IWRRC of the IWRRC have been: (1) to continue to engage the water community in the State of Indiana as related

  9. Indiana Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    Indiana Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2010 Indiana Water Resources the activities of the Indiana Water Resources Research Center (IWRRC) for the period March 1, 2010 to February 28 of Indiana as related to water research and education with a major focus on the Wabash River and Wabash River

  10. Indiana Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    Indiana Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2009 Indiana Water Resources of the Indiana Water Resources Research Center (IWRRC) for the period March 1, 2009 to February 28, 2010 program of the IWRRC have been: (1) to continue to engage the water community in the State of Indiana

  11. Missouri Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    states rights to water and priority uses. Research areas in this program have included drought planningMissouri Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2009 Missouri Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2009 1 #12;Introduction Water Resources Research Center Annual

  12. Missouri Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    states rights to water and priority uses. Research areas in this program have included drought planningMissouri Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2007 Missouri Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2007 1 #12;Introduction Water Resources Research Center Annual

  13. Center for Water Resources Research Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    of proposed modifications in state water rights management policy relative to groundwater in the BerylCenter for Water Resources Research Annual Technical Report FY 2007 Center for Water Resources Research Annual Technical Report FY 2007 1 #12;Introduction The Utah Center for Water Resources Research

  14. Louisiana Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    Louisiana Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2013 Louisiana Water a description of the activities of the Louisiana Water Resources Research Institute for the period of March 1, 2013 to February 28, 2014 under the direction of Dr. John Pardue. The Louisiana Water Resources

  15. Louisiana Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    Louisiana Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2011 Louisiana Water a description of the activities of the Louisiana Water Resources Research Institute for the period of March 1, 2011 to February 28, 2012 under the direction of Dr. John Pardue. The Louisiana Water Resources

  16. Florida Water Resources Research Centter Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    for Florida agencies and water management districts, promotes water-resources research by seeking external such as the water management districts. Research Program Basic Information Title: Phosphorus Contamination Potential Point Pollution, Water Quality, Hydrogeochemistry Descriptors: Waste Disposal, Leaching, Adsorption

  17. Conservation of Water and Related Land Resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caldwell, Lynton K.

    1984-04-01

    The author was quite clear about the purpose of this book and clearly achieved his intent. In his preface, the author states, “The purpose of this book is to acquaint the reader with a broad understanding of the topics relevant to the management of the nation's water and related land resources.” The book is a product of the author's 20 years of work as a teacher, consultant, researcher, and student of watershed management and hydrology and has served as a text for a course entitled Soil and Water Conservation, which the author has taught at the State University of New York, College of Environmental Science and Forestry at Syracuse, New York. But it was also written with the intent to be of use “to informal students of water and land related resources on the national level as well.” The objectives of Black's course at Syracuse and its larger purpose define the scope of the book which, again in the author's words, have been “(1) to acquaint students with principles of soil and water conservation; (2) to stimulate an appreciation for an integrated, comprehensive approach to land management; (3) to illustrate the influence of institutional, economic, and cultural forces on the practice of soil and water conservation; and (4) to provide information, methods, and techniques by which soil and water conservation measures are applied to land, as well as the basis for predicting and evaluating results.” The book is written in straightforward nontechnical language and provides the reader with a set of references, a table of cases, a list of abbreviations, and an adequate index. It impresses this reviewer as a very well edited piece of work.

  18. EngineeringJobs.com: A National Index of Engineering Jobs and Resources

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    EngineeringJobs.com is a wonderful resource for engineers seeking employment and employers looking for engineers. Job seekers can explore over 100 career databases and companies; post resumes; send a resume to special recruiters; research companies; or explore the engineering tools, references, societies, and organizations. Company pages are listed alphabetically. Employers can review posted resumes or list job openings.

  19. Benjamin M. Statler College of Engineering and Mineral Resources Freshman Engineering Study Lab Weeks

    E-print Network

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    Benjamin M. Statler College of Engineering and Mineral Resources ­ Freshman Engineering Study Lab Weeks Fall 2013 Engineering students are required to attend study labs during the spring semester, 2013 Finals Week Study Lab and OCE forms must be turned in to G111 Engineering Sciences Building within

  20. Remote water cooled heat engine

    SciTech Connect

    Webby, C.W.

    1982-03-02

    A method of operating a heat engine is described where heated gas is introduced into a venturi or a convergent/divergent nozzle. The heated gas is cooled in a low pressure region by fluid injection, the resultant mixture then being passed through the divergent or diffuser part of the venturi or nozzle to a working apparatus. A heat engine is also disclosed which operates according to this method which includes a heat source coupled to a venturi or convergent/divergent nozzle. The nozzle can be substituted by a loop or cyclone. Means are provided to inject fluid into the gas stream in the nozzle loop or cyclone.

  1. GEOGRAPHY 347 -WATER AS A RESOURCE Course Description -Fall, 2012

    E-print Network

    James, L. Allan

    , including the economics of water, water rights law, and legislative controls such as the Clean Water ActGEOGRAPHY 347 - WATER AS A RESOURCE Course Description - Fall, 2012 Instructor: Dr. Allan James website: http://people.cas.sc.edu/ajames/347/index.html Textbook: Watersheds and Water Resources; 2010

  2. Colorado Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    Colorado Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 1999 Introduction WATER Water Institute Program for FY1999, the Advisory Council on Water Research Policy (ACWRP) for the Colorado Water Resources Research Institute (CWRRI) was activated. The Council held its initial meeting

  3. A new modeling approach for water resources policy analysis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Slobodan P. Simonovic; Hussam Fahmy

    1999-01-01

    Water resources policy analysis deals with the protection of people from the harmful effects of water and assurance of a consistent, adequate supply of usable water. Population and regulatory pressures, political and economic instabilities, and climatic variations can all be expected to further stress water supply resources. Developing policy for managing water systems for human needs in such an environment

  4. Water resources data, Maryland and Delaware, water year 2001, volume 2. ground-water data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smigaj, Michael J.; Saffer, Richard W.; Pentz, Robert H.; Marchand, Elizabeth H.

    2002-01-01

    Water resources data for the 2001 water year for Maryland and Delaware consist of records of water levels and water quality of ground-water wells. This report (Volume 2. Ground-Water Data) contains water levels at 379 observation wells, discharge records for 5 springs, and water quality at 238 wells and 10 springs. Locations of ground-water level wells are shown on figures 5 and 6. Locations of groundwater- quality sites are shown on figure 7. The data in this report represent that part of the National Water Data System collected by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating State, local, and Federal agencies in Maryland and Delaware.

  5. Monty C. Dozier, Assistant Professor and Extension Water Resources Specialist

    E-print Network

    . If the water is unsafe, use only bottled water, or boil or disinfect your water for cooking, cleaning or bathing. Until your water supply is tested and found to be safe, use only bottled, boiled or treated waterER-002 6-06 Monty C. Dozier, Assistant Professor and Extension Water Resources Specialist Courtney

  6. Accelerated Capacity Development in Water Resources Education: the experiences of the Ethiopian Institute of Water Resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alamirew, T.; Mekonnen, G.; Viglione, A.

    2012-04-01

    Ethiopia recently recognises that the water resources development is the major entry point in poverty alleviation and sustainable development. Water in Ethiopia plays a key role in the Water-Energy-Food-nexus. Over 98% of the electricity in the country is generated using hydropower and yet about 2000 MW has been developed. Out of the 3.5 Mha potentially irrigable land, only 0.25 Mha has been developed to date. Access to drinking water supply coverage is among the lowest in the world. One of the limiting factors in harnessing the resource base is the absence of water professionals to face the fast growing demand in education, research, development in the water sector. Recognising this, in collaboration with University of Connecticut of the United States, Addis Ababa University launched the Ethiopian Institute of Water Resources (EIWR) by enrolling 18 PhD and 24 MSc students. The program is unique in that much of the course instructors are coming from US and European Universities, but deliver courses together with Ethiopian collaborators. This is supposed to facilitate knowledge and experience transfer from the US/EU scientist to Ethiopian counterparts. The theses/dissertations are designed to focus on Ethiopia's immediate hydrological problems on selected basins, and will be coordinated by three advisors for each PhD - one from US/EU, one from Ethiopian Universities, and one water professional from the sector. We report here the lessons learned in setting up the EIWR institute and the education program.

  7. Optimality versus stability in water resource allocation.

    PubMed

    Read, Laura; Madani, Kaveh; Inanloo, Bahareh

    2014-01-15

    Water allocation is a growing concern in a developing world where limited resources like fresh water are in greater demand by more parties. Negotiations over allocations often involve multiple groups with disparate social, economic, and political status and needs, who are seeking a management solution for a wide range of demands. Optimization techniques for identifying the Pareto-optimal (social planner solution) to multi-criteria multi-participant problems are commonly implemented, although often reaching agreement for this solution is difficult. In negotiations with multiple-decision makers, parties who base decisions on individual rationality may find the social planner solution to be unfair, thus creating a need to evaluate the willingness to cooperate and practicality of a cooperative allocation solution, i.e., the solution's stability. This paper suggests seeking solutions for multi-participant resource allocation problems through an economics-based power index allocation method. This method can inform on allocation schemes that quantify a party's willingness to participate in a negotiation rather than opt for no agreement. Through comparison of the suggested method with a range of distance-based multi-criteria decision making rules, namely, least squares, MAXIMIN, MINIMAX, and compromise programming, this paper shows that optimality and stability can produce different allocation solutions. The mismatch between the socially-optimal alternative and the most stable alternative can potentially result in parties leaving the negotiation as they may be too dissatisfied with their resource share. This finding has important policy implications as it justifies why stakeholders may not accept the socially optimal solution in practice, and underlies the necessity of considering stability where it may be more appropriate to give up an unstable Pareto-optimal solution for an inferior stable one. Authors suggest assessing the stability of an allocation solution as an additional component to an analysis that seeks to distribute water in a negotiated process. PMID:24412983

  8. Graduate Opportunities in Earth Systems Modeling and Climate Impacts on Hydrology and Water Resources

    E-print Network

    Resources The Department of Biological Systems Engineering at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State on hydrology and water resources. Our research focuses on studying the relationship between large scale://www.bse.vt.edu/graduate/apply/ for instructions. Interested students contact Dr. V. Sridhar for details (Department of Biological Systems

  9. AOIPS water resources data management system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merritt, E. S.; Shotwell, R. L.; Place, M. C.; Belknap, N. J.

    1976-01-01

    A geocoded data management system applicable for hydrological applications was designed to demonstrate the utility of the Atmospheric and Oceanographic Information Processing System (AOIPS) for hydrological applications. Within that context, the geocoded hydrology data management system was designed to take advantage of the interactive capability of the AOIPS hardware. Portions of the Water Resource Data Management System which best demonstrate the interactive nature of the hydrology data management system were implemented on the AOIPS. A hydrological case study was prepared using all data supplied for the Bear River watershed located in northwest Utah, southeast Idaho, and western Wyoming.

  10. A Report on the Effectiveness of Texas Water Resources

    E-print Network

    Ruesink, L. E.

    A readership survey conducted in May 1977 found that readers of Texas Water Resources find it useful, attractive and informative. The bulletin is published by the Texas Water Resources Institute to generate public awareness and understanding...

  11. Louisiana Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    . Louisiana's vast wetlands maLouisiana Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2005 Introduction This report presents a description of the activities of the Louisiana Water Resources Research Institute

  12. A Report on the Effectiveness of Texas Water Resources 

    E-print Network

    Ruesink, L. E.

    1977-01-01

    A readership survey conducted in May 1977 found that readers of Texas Water Resources find it useful, attractive and informative. The bulletin is published by the Texas Water Resources Institute to generate public awareness ...

  13. Modeling Water Resource Systems under Climate Change: IGSM-WRS

    E-print Network

    Strzepek, K.

    Through the integration of a Water Resource System (WRS) component, the MIT Integrated Global System Model (IGSM) framework has been enhanced to study the effects of climate change on managed water-resource systems. ...

  14. Development of Optimization Systems Analysis Technique for Texas Water Resources 

    E-print Network

    Hann, R. W.

    1969-01-01

    This report summarizes the results of the research project, Development of Optimization - Systems Analysis Techniques for Texas Water Resources. Several analytical models which were obtained and modified for use in evaluating water resource...

  15. Hazardous Waste Sites in Arizona: Impacts on Water Resources

    E-print Network

    Cushing, Jim. M.

    Impact on Sustainability of Water Resources #12;Groundwater Contamination Source Zone Contaminant Plume Small above- ground footprint Large subsurface footprint #12;Groundwater Contamination Sites in Tucson1 Hazardous Waste Sites in Arizona: Impacts on Water Resources Sustainability Mark L. Brusseau

  16. Water resources of Kosrae, Caroline Islands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Van der Brug, Otto

    1984-01-01

    Kosrae is a high volcanic island about 42 square miles in area and the easternmost of the Caroline Islands. Mount Finkol (Mt. Crozer), at 2,065 feet, is the highest point on the island. Mountainous ridges descend sharply to narrow coastal strips which support a population of 5,500 people. Many streams, some quite large relative to the size of the island, drain radially from the interior. The average annual discharge of surface water amounts to almost 7 million gallons per square mile per day. Annual rainfall for coastal areas on Kosrae averages about 200 inches, and is similar to the rainfall for coastal areas on the island of Ponape, about 340 statute miles to the northwest. Rainfall in the interior was estimated at 225 inches per year of which about two thirds runs off as streamflow. Surface-water quality is very good as shown by 42 chemical analyses of water from 12 streams. This report summarizes in one volume the hydrologic data collected and provides interpretations that can be used by planning and public works officials as a basis for making decisions on the development and management of their water resources. (USGS)

  17. "Modeling for effective and sustainable water resources management."

    E-print Network

    Acton, Scott

    ecological and social impacts. For instance, ponded water within a reservoir may enhance the habitat watershed-stream-aquifer systems, ecologically sensitive stormwater designs, and integration of public ecology, civil engineering, and chemical engineering. #12;RECENT RESEARCH DEVELOPMENTS · Developed

  18. Increasing Awareness of Sustainable Water Management for Future Civil Engineers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilic, Suzana; Karleusa, Barbara; Deluka-Tibljas, Aleksandra

    2010-05-01

    There are more than 1.2 billion people around the world that do not have access to drinking water. While there are plans under the United Nations Millennium Development Goals to halve this number by 2015, there are a number of regions that will be exposed to water scarcity in the coming future. Providing sufficient water for future development is a great challenge for planners and designers of water supply systems. In order to design sustainable water supplies for the future, it is important to learn how people consume water and how water consumption can be reduced. The education of future civil engineers should take into account not only technical aspects of the water supply but also the accompanying social and economical issues, and appreciated the strengths and weaknesses of traditional solutions. The Faculty of Civil Engineering, at the University of Rijeka, has begun incorporating a series of activities that engage undergraduate students and the local community to develop a mutual understanding of the future needs for sustainable management. We present one of the activities, collaboration with the Lancaster Environment Centre at Lancaster University in the UK through the field course Water and environmental management in Mediterranean context. The course, which is designed for the Lancaster University geography students, features a combination of field trips and visits to provide an understanding of the socio-economic and environmental context of water management in two counties (Istra and Primorsko-Goranska). Students from Lancaster visit the Croatian water authority and a regional water company, where they learn about current management practices and problems in managing water supplies and demand through the year. They make their own observations of current management practices in the field and learn about water consumption from the end users. One day field visit to a village in the area that is still not connected to the main water supply system is organised together with civil engineering students from the University of Rijeka. The aims of this field visit are: to learn about traditional water supply from an underground storage of rain water called cisterna; and to find out from inhabitants about their current water usage habits and expectations, and how these might change when they get water from the main water supply system. This joint activity has been beneficial for both groups of students. The engineering students become aware of the importance of the social aspects in designing the water supply system, while the geography students learn about the engineering challenges entailed. Both groups learn that water consumption increases with the provision of water through pipeline systems and that this needs to be taken into account in the design of water supply and management of water resources. Importantly, they learn the benefits of traditional sustainable water supply methods, which could be implemented as primary or additional sources of water supply in other areas.In summary, both groups of students develop their professional knowledge and skills as well as generic and transferable skills, which are very important for those who will continue to a career in the design and management of water systems.

  19. Niche engineering reveals complementary resource use

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Greater resource use by diverse communities might result from species occupying different, complementary niches. Niche partitioning is difficult to directly demonstrate, however, because differences among species in the resources they use are often difficult to separate from other species-specific t...

  20. Indiana Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    Indiana Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2005 Introduction This report covers the activities of the Indiana Water Resources Research Center for the period March 1, 2005. The objectives of the fiscal year 2005 program of the Indiana Water Resources Research Center (IWRRC) have been

  1. Indiana Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    Indiana Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2006 #12;Introduction This report covers the activities of the Indiana Water Resources Research Center for the period March 1, 2006. The objectives of the fiscal year 2006 program of the Indiana Water Resources Research Center (IWRRC) have been

  2. Louisiana Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    Louisiana Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2000 Introduction This report presents a description of the activities of the Louisiana Water Resources Research Institute for the period of March 1, 2000 to February 28, 2001. The Louisiana Water Resources Research Institute (LWRRI

  3. Virginia Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    Virginia Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2011 Virginia Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2011 1 #12;Introduction The Virginia Water Resources Research Center (VWRRC) was established at Virginia Tech in 1965 as a federally authorized program. In 1982

  4. Virginia Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    Virginia Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2009 Virginia Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2009 1 #12;Introduction The Virginia Water Resources Research Center (VWRRC) was established at Virginia Tech in 1965 as a federally authorized program. In 1982

  5. Virginia Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    Virginia Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2010 Virginia Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2010 1 #12;Introduction The Virginia Water Resources Research Center (VWRRC) was established at Virginia Tech in 1965 as a federally authorized program. In 1982

  6. Title II Water Resources Research for fiscal year 1973

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Anonymous

    1971-01-01

    The Department of Interiors Office of Water Resources Research is now accepting unsolicited research proposals in the field of water resources research for consideration of support beginning on or after July 1, 1972, as explained in Title II of the amended Water Resources Research Act of 1964. Title II of the Act authorizes the Secretary of the Interior to make

  7. Puerto Rico Water Resources and Environmental Research Institute

    E-print Network

    Gilbes, Fernando

    Section 104 of the Water Resources Research Act of 1984, as Amended ANNOUNCEMENT 11HQPA0002 Revised Centre Avenue Fort Collins, CO 80525 or call 970-226-9445. #12;PUERTO RICO WATER RESOURCES under the provisions of section 104 of the Water Resources Research Act of 1984 (Public Law 98

  8. Research on water resources decision support system integrated with facilities

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Li Gongquan; Xiao Keyan

    2011-01-01

    Water Resources and Facilities closely linked to Agricultural production is one of critical factors of restricting sustainable development. The existing system has not integrated all of the spatial data about water resources. This article introduces design and implementation of water resources Decision supports system integrated with facilities in detail. The system design goal and basic principle are put forward firstly.

  9. California Institute for Water Resources Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    California Institute for Water Resources Annual Technical Report FY 2011 California Institute for Water Resources Annual Technical Report FY 2011 1 #12;Introduction Across California, the University. The California Institute for Water Resources (CIWR) is a special program within UCANR, enabled by the federal

  10. Virgin Islands Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    transfer project "An Intensive Short Course on Water Resources, Coastal Hazards and Coral Reef DegradationVirgin Islands Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2001 Introduction The Water Resources Research Institute (WRRI) at the University of the Virgin Islands (UVI) is one of the 54

  11. Kansas Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    Kansas Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2006 #12;Introduction The Kansas Water Resources Institute is part of a national network of water resource institutes in every/Geological Survey (USGS) and non-federal funds from state and other sources. KWRI is administered by the Kansas

  12. Integrating Economics into Water Resources Systems Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howitt, R.

    2012-12-01

    The need to integrate economic and hydro-engineering models has been long recognized and is the subject of several articles and literature surveys. However difficulties of obtaining sufficient precision of economic data to span the significant differences in both spatial and temporal scales presents challenges, and opportunities for the use of new technologies. Most hydrologic models run on a daily time step, or at a minimum, monthly, whereas many economic models, particularly of agriculture, are estimated on an annual time step. The asymmetry in difficulty of downscaling versus aggregating is briefly reviewed, and an example of down-scaling irrigation water value functions to a monthly time step, using information from crop water use models is presented. Similarly, the spatial cell resolution of hydro-engineering models is usually much finer than economic models, which are usually aggregated at the level that prices or production quantities are reported. A method of downscaling regional measures of crop production and water use to the field level using the additional information from remote sensing measurements is demonstrated in the context of agricultural production in California's central valley. A problem that arises is that for spatial crop production the available data from Landsat measurements processed by NAAS in pixel form is very noisy when overlaid onto a field level boundary GIS layer. For complex cropping systems such as those found in California, it is not uncommon to have three different categories of pixel identification in the same field. The approach discussed uses a cross-entropy approach and additional data from locally measured sources, to estimate the most likely uniform crop in any given field. In addition, constraints on the combination of different sized fields and the total regional acreage measured by local county commissioners provides additional information and structure on the estimates. Initial results show significant noise in the estimates, but given the consistency of the sampling method and relative stability of crop types grown in a given region, this seems a natural application for improved estimates from sequential filtering. Over time with improved ground-truthing, we can expect steadily improving precision of field level crop estimates. Using these approaches, economic analysts can construct models of water value functions that are able to be empirically estimated on spatial and temporal scales that are compatible with hydro-economic models.

  13. ORE 601 Ocean and Resources Engineering Laboratory Designation

    E-print Network

    Frandsen, Jannette B.

    and observational platforms and vessels. PO: 3, 5, 6, 9 3. have basic understanding of mooring system design Design, construction and evaluation of an engineering system. Laboratory and field experience and dataORE 601 Ocean and Resources Engineering Laboratory Designation Core course Catalog Description

  14. Modeling the Dynamic Water Resource Needs of California's Coastal Watersheds

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. Alford

    2009-01-01

    Many watersheds face formidable water supply challenges when it comes to managing water availability to meet diverse water supply and ecosystem management objectives. California's central coast watersheds are no exception, and both the scarcity of water resources during drier water years and mandates to establish minimum instream flows for salmon habitat have prompted interests in reassessing water management strategies for

  15. Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    Focus Category: Treatment, Waste Water, Water Quality Descriptors: Treatment, toxic substances, water Category: Water quality Focus Category: Treatment, toxic substances, water quality, wastewater. Principal health risks to animals and humans. Among the five pollutants of primary concern to MWRA's Toxic

  16. Indiana Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    Indiana Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2003 Introduction Efforts at the Indiana Water Resources Research Center (IWRRC) over FY 2003 have focused on water quality issues, and the planning of a state-wide water summit that will provide local Indiana policy makers with the best

  17. Idaho Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    ; and private water interests. The IWRRI is the only mechanism in the state that provides an autonomous agencies and private water interests to provide the objective expertise to address the needs of the stateIdaho Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2012 Idaho Water Resources

  18. Idaho Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    ; and private water interests. The IWRRI is the only mechanism in the state that provides an autonomous agencies and private water interests to provide the objective expertise to address the needs of the stateIdaho Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2013 Idaho Water Resources

  19. Missouri Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    raised serious questions over states rights to water and priority uses. Research areas in this programMissouri Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2006 #12;Introduction WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH CENTER ANNUAL TECHNICAL REPORT FY 2006-2007 WATER PROBLEMS AND ISSUES OF MISSOURI

  20. Florida Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    Florida Water Management District and Florida Geologic Survey) to investigate arsenic mobilization duringFlorida Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2010 Florida Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2010 1 #12;Introduction The mission of the Florida Water

  1. Oklahoma Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    Oklahoma Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2007 Oklahoma Water. The Oklahoma Water Resources Research Institute (OWRRI) is located within the ISE and is responsible for developing and coordinating water research funding to address the needs of Oklahoma. To guide it in meeting

  2. Climate Change in Colorado A Synthesis to Support Water Resources

    E-print Network

    Neff, Jason

    Climate Change in Colorado A Synthesis to Support Water Resources Management and Adaptation A REPORT FOR THE COLORADO WATER CONSERVATION BOARD #12;Climate Change in Colorado A Synthesis to Support Water Resources Management and Adaptation A REPORT BY THE WESTERN WATER ASSESSMENT FOR THE COLORADO

  3. Understanding Water Conservation in Williamstown: Protecting a "Plentiful" Resource

    E-print Network

    Aalberts, Daniel P.

    Understanding Water Conservation in Williamstown: Protecting a "Plentiful" Resource, an international organization committed to water conservation practice and advocacy, the global population tripled's quote embodies one of the greatest difficulties facing the contemporary movement for water conservation

  4. [Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Part B permit application: Volume 6, Revision 3: Engineering Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-01-01

    This report is part of revision 3 to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act part B permit application for the WIPP facility. Engineering drawings and details are included on the following: fire protection sprinkler system and fire water collection system; fault analysis and protective device coordination; primary power distribution, area electrical diagrams; paving details; fencing plan; railroad access plan; and access road plans.

  5. [Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Part B permit application: Volume 6, Revision 3: Engineering Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-03-01

    This report is part of revision 3 to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act part B permit application for the WIPP facility. Engineering drawings and details are included on the following: fire protection sprinkler system and fire water collection system; fault analysis and protective device coordination; primary power distribution, area electrical diagrams; paving details; fencing plan; railroad access plan; and access road plans.

  6. An Empirical Study on Groupware Support for Water Resources Ontology Integration

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Juliana Lucas De Rezende; Jairo Francisco De Souza; Elder Bomfim; Jano Moreira De Souza; Otto Corręa Rotunno Filho

    2006-01-01

    \\u000a In this paper we discuss groupware support for ontology integration and present an experiment carried out with a group of\\u000a specialists in the Water Resources domain and in Ontology Engineering. The main goals of this experiment are to create, in\\u000a a collaborative way, a well-formed ontology for a Water Resources domain and evaluate the ontology integration process. The\\u000a motivation of

  7. Uncertainty Management in Urban Water Engineering Adaptation to Climate Change - abstract

    EPA Science Inventory

    Current water resource planning and engineering assume a stationary climate, in which the observed historical water flow rate and water quality variations are often used to define the technical basis. When the non-stationarity is considered, however, climate change projection co...

  8. Storm water management for society and nature via service learning, ecological engineering and ecohydrology

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Theodore A. Endreny

    2004-01-01

    A framework for urban storm?water management that moves beyond flood control to improve societal and ecological services will maximize the functions and benefits of water resources management. Theoretical constructs for such work originate from the integration of ecological engineering, ecohydrology and service learning paradigms. Implementation consists of simulating, monitoring and reporting how storm?water design decisions to infiltrate or directly discharge

  9. Environmental resource document for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    Irving, J.S.

    1993-07-01

    This document contains information related to the environmental characterization of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The INEL is a major US Department of Energy facility in southeastern Idaho dedicated to nuclear research, waste management, environmental restoration, and other activities related to the development of technology. Environmental information covered in this document includes land, air, water, and ecological resources; socioeconomic characteristics and land use; and cultural, aesthetic, and scenic resources.

  10. Environmental resource document for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Irving, J.S.

    1993-07-01

    This document contains information related to the environmental characterization of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The INEL is a major US Department of Energy facility in southeastern Idaho dedicated to nuclear research, waste management, environmental restoration, and other activities related to the development of technology. Environmental information covered in this document includes land, air, water, and ecological resources; socioeconomic characteristics and land use; and cultural, aesthetic, and scenic resources.

  11. UNL School of Natural Resources 2003 Water and Natural Resources Seminars

    E-print Network

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    . Knox, Department of Biology, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN. Apr. 30 "Water and War: IssuesUNL School of Natural Resources 2003 Water and Natural Resources Seminars Spring Semester 2003 Room Field Management for the Lincoln Water System," Jerry Obrist, Director, Lincoln Water System, Lincoln

  12. Areas of Specialization Aerospace Engineering

    E-print Network

    Kamat, Vineet R.

    Electrochemical Engineering Materials Microfabricated Systems Nanotechnology Polymers & Complex Fluids Sustainable Energy Tissue Engineering Civil & Environmental Engineering Civil Engineering Construction & Management Sustainability Global Environmental & Energy Systems Water Quality Process Engineering Water Quality & Resources

  13. Water Resources Management Issues in Turkey and Recommendations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emin Baris, Mehmet; Ayfer Karadag, Aybike

    The prevailing trends towards rising population, increasing urbanization, spread of more water intensive life styles as well as widespread use of water intensive agriculture sweeping around the world are going to make water resources even scarcer especially in countries like Turkey with scarce water resources and high development and population growth rate, economic and social aspects of water resources become even more important. Turkey, like many countries today, faces challenges in efficiently developing and managing its limited water resources while maintaining water quality and protecting the environment. To add to the challenge, Turkey will need to continue to develop its water resources in order for its economic and social development to keep pace with its rapidly growing and urbanizing population. This article deals with water resources management problems in Turkey and provides recommendations on water resources management issues at the country level. Its objectives are to summarize key water resources management issues to review institutional and legal framework and to provide suggestions for effective water resources management in Turkey.

  14. 42 43division of engineering & applied science ENGenious ISSUE 10 2013 CAMPUS RESOURCE CAMPUS RESOURCE

    E-print Network

    42 43division of engineering & applied science ENGenious ISSUE 10 2013 CAMPUS RESOURCE CAMPUS about cutting- edge research. But our scientists and engineers also think long and hard, and care deeply: Oftentimes we work with faculty in individual consultations. Teaching is a very personal act. In addition

  15. Oklahoma Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    on the water cycle in a tallgrass prairie ecosystem. 2. We co-hosted the 7th annual Water Research Symposium. Chris Zou was awarded a 104G grant entitled Eastern Redcedar Encroachment and Water Cycle in TallgrassOklahoma Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2009 Oklahoma Water

  16. Water resources by orbital remote sensing: Examples of applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martini, P. R. (principal investigator)

    1984-01-01

    Selected applications of orbital remote sensing to water resources undertaken by INPE are described. General specifications of Earth application satellites and technical characteristics of LANDSAT 1, 2, 3, and 4 subsystems are described. Spatial, temporal and spectral image attributes of water as well as methods of image analysis for applications to water resources are discussed. Selected examples are referred to flood monitoring, analysis of water suspended sediments, spatial distribution of pollutants, inventory of surface water bodies and mapping of alluvial aquifers.

  17. WATER RESOURCES FOR BACOG: LOOKING BELOW TO PLAN FOR ABOVE

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Joel D. Peters; Janet L. Agnoletti

    The Barrington Area Council of Governments (BACOG) Water Resources Committee is studying groundwater resources in the region for the purpose establishing a plan for development. By analyzing data layers in GIS including subsurface bedrock, groundwater wells, wetlands, watersheds, land use, zoning, and population, BACOG will project the amount of population growth that current water resources will sustain, while providing recommendations

  18. Virgin Islands Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    Virgin Islands Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2000 Introduction The Virgin Islands Water Resources Research Institute (WRRI) is a unit of the University of the Virgin. Lastly, in addition to its continuous activity of serving as an information resource center to the Virgin

  19. Kansas Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    Kansas Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2000 Introduction The Kansas Water Resources Research Institute (KWRRI) is managed by Kansas State University. Within K-State, KWRRI is administratively under the Kansas Center for Agricultural Resources and the Environment (KCARE). Dr. Bill Hargrove

  20. Total Water Management: The New Paradigm for Urban Water Resources Planning

    EPA Science Inventory

    There is a growing need for urban water managers to take a more holistic view of their water resource systems as population growth, urbanization, and current resource management practices put different stresses on local water resources and urban infrastructure. Total Water Manag...

  1. Indiana Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    Indiana Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2001 Introduction Efforts at the Indiana Water Resources Research Center (IWRRC) over the last year 2002-2003 have focused: Indiana Project Number: IN3561 Title: Information Infrastructure for the NIWR Water Science Support

  2. Water Resources Research Institute of the University of North Carolina

    E-print Network

    Water Resources Research Institute of the University of North Carolina Annual Technical Report FY 2000 Introduction SUMMARY The North Carolina Water Resources Research Institute program for 2000-2001 (Federal Fiscal Year 2000) continued to focus on three broad areas of concern: surface waters, groundwater

  3. Working Paper 123 Water Resources and Irrigation Development in

    E-print Network

    Menke, William

    #12;#12;Working Paper 123 Water Resources and Irrigation Development in Ethiopia Seleshi Bekele., Ayana, M.; Alamirew, T. 2007. Water Resources and Irrigation Development in Ethiopia. Colombo, Sri Lanka: International Water Management Institute. 78p. (Working Paper 123) / irrigation programs / irrigation potential

  4. Louisiana Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    problem. Louisiana's vast wetlands make up approximately 40% of the nation's wetlands. These areasLouisiana Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2010 Louisiana Water a description of the activities of the Louisiana Water Resources Research Institute for the period of March 1

  5. Louisiana Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    Louisiana Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2003 Introduction This report presents a description of the activities of the Louisiana Water Resources Research Institute for the period of March 1, 2003 to February 28, 2004 under the direction of Dr. John Pardue. The Louisiana Water

  6. Louisiana Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    problem. Louisiana's vast wetlands make up approximately 40% of the nation's wetlands. These areasLouisiana Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2008 Louisiana Water a description of the activities of the Louisiana Water Resources Research Institute for the period of March 1

  7. Louisiana Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    problem. Louisiana's vast wetlands make up approximately 40% of the nation's wetlands. These areasLouisiana Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2012 Louisiana Water a description of the activities of the Louisiana Water Resources Research Institute for the period of March 1

  8. Louisiana Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    Louisiana Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2004 Introduction This report presents a description of the activities of the Louisiana Water Resources Research Institute for the period of March 1, 2004 to February 28, 2005 under the direction of Dr. John Pardue. The Louisiana Water

  9. Louisiana Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    problem. Louisiana's vast wetlands make up approximately 40% of the nation's wetlands. These areasLouisiana Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2007 Louisiana Water a description of the activities of the Louisiana Water Resources Research Institute for the period of March 1

  10. Fiscal year 1990 program report: Louisiana Water Resources Research Institute

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Constant

    1991-01-01

    The 1990 cooperative research program of the Louisiana Water Resources Research Institute (LWRRI) addressed priority water resources problem areas identified for Louisiana - management of surface water supplies, groundwater control and restoration, wastewater treatment alternatives, and treatment of point and nonpoint sources of pollution. Four research projects funded to address these priority issues were: (1) A Feasibility Analysis of the

  11. D.C. Water Resource Research Center Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    environmental problems related to the Anacostia River. Non-point source pollution, storm water problems, toxicD.C. Water Resource Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2001 Introduction This report summarizes the activities of the DC water Resources Research Institute (WRRI) for the period of March 1, 2001

  12. Virginia Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    Virginia Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 1999 Introduction During the FY 1999 reporting period the Virginia Water Resources Research Center (Water Center) used the Section 104 were supported from university (Virginia Tech) funds, direct state appropriations, and extramural

  13. South Carolina Water Resources Research Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    South Carolina Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2009 South Carolina Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2009 1 #12;Introduction The South Carolina projects and programs across South Carolina. The Water Center also serves as a conduit for information

  14. South Carolina Water Resources Research Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    South Carolina Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2007 South Carolina Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2007 1 #12;Introduction The South Carolina projects and programs across South Carolina. The Water Center also serves as a conduit for information

  15. South Carolina Water Resources Research Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    South Carolina Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2012 South Carolina Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2012 1 #12;Introduction The South Carolina for research and educational projects and programs across South Carolina. The Water Center also serves

  16. South Carolina Water Resources Research Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    South Carolina Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2010 South Carolina Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2010 1 #12;Introduction The South Carolina projects and programs across South Carolina. The Water Center also serves as a conduit for information

  17. Colorado Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    Colorado Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2003 Introduction FY 2003 Colorado Water Resources Research Institute Research Program Lysimeter Installation The addition of a lysimeter to collect water data in Colorado should improve the quality of data available for the purpose

  18. Colorado Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    Colorado Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2004 Introduction Colorado is a headwaters state, so Colorado water managers and users must base choices and usage on unpredictable supplies conflicts within the state and meeting agreements with downstream states. Colorado Water Resources Research

  19. Kansas Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    Kansas Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2002 Introduction Research, and other federal sources > Be recognized in Kansas as a major institution to go to for water resources to discuss the output from the Water and the Future of Kansas Conference and to develop the prioritized list

  20. Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    reports. The research funded projects included the enhancement of water conservation by conducting a water The research grants focused on the areas of water conservation and groundwater treatment for nitrates. #12;URI Water Conservation Program Development Basic Information Title: URI Water Conservation Program

  1. Bibliography of selected water-resources publications by the U.S. Geological Survey for North Carolina, 1886-1995

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Winner, M.D., Jr.

    1996-01-01

    More than 660 selected publications, written by scientists, engineers, and technicians of the U.S. Geological Survey during the period 1886-1995, compose the bulk of information about North Carolina?s water resources. The bibliography includes interpretive reports on water resources, ground water, surface water, water quality, and public-water supply and water use, as well as data reports on the same subjects. The interpretive reports are organized by geographic areas of the State. These areas include statewide, physiographic province, major river basin, and county. The data reports are listed by water-resource topic, and the introduction to each topic provides historical notes for data-collection and publication activities. Summary tables list Water-Supply Paper numbers for reports containing ground-water, surface-water, and water-quality data by calendar year or water year. A concluding section discusses the availability of U.S. Geological Survey publications.

  2. Cooperative water resource allocation based on equitable water rights

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lizhong Wang; Liping Fang; Keith W. Hipel

    2003-01-01

    A comprehensive methodology is developed to achieve equitable, efficient and sustainable water allocation in a river basin. Water allocation is carried out in two steps: (1) allocation of initial water rights to water stakeholders and users based on existing water rights systems or agreements; and (2) reallocation of water and net benefits through water transfers to promote equitable cooperation of

  3. The Electronic Clearinghouse for Exemplary Engineering Technology Resources

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Electronic Clearinghouse for Exemplary Engineering Technology Resources (or NETEC) is a site created with substantial funding from the National Science Foundation. Drawing on the teaching experiences and resources developed by many concerned persons in industry and academic settings, the Clearinghouse contains everything from course materials for material engineering to journal articles that deal with the science (and art) of teaching in the subfields of engineering. First-time visitors may wish to register on the homepage, and then proceed to browse through the â??Clearinghouse Resourcesâ?ť area. Here they can click on an alphabetized list of terms, such as digital electronics and skill standards, and look through the available materials. Of course, there is a great deal more available here than the very fine educational resources, as visitors can also look over online job boards and mentorship opportunities.

  4. Nebraska Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    ;Assessing the occurrence of Arsenic in groundwater: Implications for Small Water Supply Systems in Nebraska of focus included irrigation use efficiency, water quality remediation, arsenic in water supply systems Basic Information Title: Assessing the occurrence of Arsenic in gr

  5. Student attitudes surveyed in an introductory environmental resources engineering course

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Doreen M. Espinoza; Jeffrey W. White; Elizabeth A. Eschenbach; Eileen M. Cashman

    2004-01-01

    An undergraduate engineering survey course has been redesigned to improve environmental resources engineering and environmental sciences student retention and recruitment. A student survey, containing Likert scale and open-response questions, was developed to measure attitudes and beliefs about the course, major, profession, and abilities. We report results from post-course and paired pre- and post-course surveys. Multivariate analysis of variance on Likert

  6. A stochastic optimization approach for integrated urban water resource planning.

    PubMed

    Huang, Y; Chen, J; Zeng, S; Sun, F; Dong, X

    2013-01-01

    Urban water is facing the challenges of both scarcity and water quality deterioration. Consideration of nonconventional water resources has increasingly become essential over the last decade in urban water resource planning. In addition, rapid urbanization and economic development has led to an increasing uncertain water demand and fragile water infrastructures. Planning of urban water resources is thus in need of not only an integrated consideration of both conventional and nonconventional urban water resources including reclaimed wastewater and harvested rainwater, but also the ability to design under gross future uncertainties for better reliability. This paper developed an integrated nonlinear stochastic optimization model for urban water resource evaluation and planning in order to optimize urban water flows. It accounted for not only water quantity but also water quality from different sources and for different uses with different costs. The model successfully applied to a case study in Beijing, which is facing a significant water shortage. The results reveal how various urban water resources could be cost-effectively allocated by different planning alternatives and how their reliabilities would change. PMID:23552255

  7. Institute of Water Resources Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    , nutrients, nitrogen,denitrification eutrophication, biological treatment, bacteria,activated sludge: water quality, water chemistry, wastewater treatment, toxic substances wastewater, organic compounds

  8. Architecture of a Federated Query Engine for Heterogeneous Resources

    PubMed Central

    Bradshaw, Richard L.; Matney, Susan; Livne, Oren E.; Bray, Bruce E.; Mitchell, Joyce A.; Narus, Scott P.

    2009-01-01

    The Federated Utah Research and Translational Health e-Repository (FURTHeR) is a Utah statewide informatics platform for the new Center for Clinical and Translational Science at the University of Utah. We have been working on one of FURTHeR’s key components, a federated query engine for heterogeneous resources, that we believe has the potential to meet some of the fundamental needs of translational science to access and integrate diverse biomedical data and promote discovery of new knowledge. The architecture of the federated query engine for heterogeneous resources is described and demonstrated. PMID:20351825

  9. Transaction Risk versus Transaction Costs in Water Transfers Water Resources Research, Vol. 29, No. 9, pp. 3103-3107, September, 1993

    E-print Network

    Pasternack, Gregory B.

    expansion or water conservation). The importance of the uncertainty of transfer completion is examined and Environmental Engineering University of California Davis, CA 95616 ABSTRACT Transaction cost has been a frequent water transfer applications to California's State Water Resources Control Board during the period 1981

  10. NEW YORK STATE WATER RESOURCES INSTITUTE

    E-print Network

    Wang, Z. Jane

    ://wri.eas.cornell.edu Email: nyswri@cornell.edu Private Water Well Testing in Areas Impacted by Marcellus Shale Gas Drilling Purpose Private water well owners are responsible for their own water quality. Even in the absence to all private water supplies can be found at http

  11. Arkansas Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    evolution of arsenic in ground water: tracking sources and sinks in the alluvial aquifer of southeastern Arkansas, USA Basic Information Title: Flow and hydrochemical evolution of arsenic in ground water: ground water, geochemical evolution, arsenic, sediment/water interaction, alluvial aquifer, geochemical

  12. Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    and bacteria in the subsurface poses a potential threat to public health. Contamination of water supplies ground water was responsible for 43% of waterborne disease outbreaks occurring in the U.S. In New England, greater than 96% of all drinking water supplies in violation of drinking water standards are contaminated

  13. Review of Water Resources and Desalination Technologies

    Microsoft Academic Search

    James E. Miller; JAMES E

    2003-01-01

    Water shortages affect 88 developing countries that are home to half of the world's population. In these places, 80-90% of all diseases and 30% of all deaths result from poor water quality. Furthermore, over the next 25 years, the number of people affected by severe water shortages is expected to increase fourfold. Low cost methods to desalinate brackish water and

  14. Development of approaches to integrated water resources management 

    E-print Network

    Geng, Guoting

    2010-01-01

    There is a growing need to manage water resources in a sustainable way, particularly in semi arid areas, with dramatic social and economic development as well as rapid population growth. Optimising water allocation in a ...

  15. Analysis of U.S. Water Resources under Climate Change

    E-print Network

    Blanc, E.

    The MIT Integrated Global System Model (IGSM) framework, extended to include a Water Resource System (WRS) component, is applied to an integrated assessment of effects of alternative climate policy scenarios on U.S. water ...

  16. The Wealth of Water: The Value of an Essential Resource

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rathburn, Melanie K.; Baum, Karina J.

    2011-01-01

    Many students take water availability for granted and yet, by 2025, two-thirds of the world will not have access to clean drinking water. This case study is designed to encourage students to think about water as a limited natural resource and is used to highlight how the exploitation of water can have far-reaching social, political, and economic…

  17. Virgin Islands Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    Category: Hydrology, Non Point Pollution, Water Quality Descriptors: Principal Investigators: R. Heath the concentration of the pollutants and the water flow that transports the pollutant into the receiving watersVirgin Islands Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2005 Introduction

  18. Water Resources Research Institute of the University of North Carolina

    E-print Network

    , and urban water management. The Institute program also emphasized technology transfer in the form and regulatory activities regarding water quality and water resource management in North Carolina. The problem) water quality implications of animal waste operations; and 4) soil erosion and sediment pollution

  19. Training days: TWRI coordinates water resources training programs

    E-print Network

    Jensen, Ric

    2008-01-01

    (APEX), Water Rights Analysis Package (WRAP), and EPANET. In other training programs, the institute is working with Texas AgriLife Research, Texas AgriLife Extension Service, state and federal agencies, and various universities to conduct training...tx H2O | pg. 2 Training days TWRI coordinates water resources training programs | pg. 2 Story by Ric Jensen tx H2O | pg. 3 H elping water professionals learn how to manage water resources is the goal of new training programs coordinated...

  20. Collaborative Water Resource Decision Support: Results of a Field Experiment

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Timothy Nyerges; Piotr Jankowski; David Tuthill; Kevin Ramsey

    2006-01-01

    This article presents results of an empirical study about the use of a group-based geographic information system (GIS), called WaterGroup, developed as a collaborative spatial decision support system. WaterGroup was designed to enable stakeholder groups to participate in the solution of conjunctive water resource administration decision problems being addressed by the Idaho Department of Water Resources in the Boise River

  1. Training days: TWRI coordinates water resources training programs 

    E-print Network

    Jensen, Ric

    2008-01-01

    and administer short courses on water-related geographic information systems, remote sensing technology, and computer simulation models. Planned or anticipated topics include the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT), Agricultural Policy Economic Extender... director and instructor for the SWAT model courses, emphasized that newly developed models give professionals expanded capabilities to better manage water resources. ?We are developing several state-of-the-art water resources models and management...

  2. Institutional considerations in reallocation and transfer of water resources 

    E-print Network

    Thaman, Bill Joseph

    1994-01-01

    opportunities to fine-tune reservoir operations. Recent efforts have focused on real- time data acquisition and water control and management decision-support systems. T es of Stora e Reallocation United States Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) reallocation... Gage. 102 106 117 118 122 LIST OF TABLES TABLE 2-1 Corps of Engineers Total Reservoir Storage. 2-2 Corps of Engineers M&I Water-Supply Storage . . . . . . 2-3 Storage Reallocation Studies . . 4-1 Distribution of Surface Water Diversions...

  3. Quantitative determination of engine water ingestion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parikh, P.; Hernan, M.; Sarohia, V.

    1986-01-01

    This paper describes a novel non-intrusive optical technique for determination of liquid mass flux in a droplet laden airstream. The technique was developed for quantitative determination of engine water ingestion resulting from heavy rain or wheel spray. Independent measurements of the liquid water content (LWC) of the droplet laden aircraft and of the droplet velocities were made at the simulated nacelle inlet plane for the liquid mass flux determination. The liquid water content was measured by illuminating and photographing the droplets contained within a thin slice of the flow field by means of a sheet of light from a pulsed YAG laser. A fluorescent dye introduced in the water greatly improved the droplet image definition. The droplet velocities were determined from double exposed photographs of the moving droplet field. The technique was initially applied to a steady spray generated in a wind tunnel. It was found that although the spray was initially steady, the aerodynamic breakup process was inherently unsteady. This resulted in a wide variation of the instantaneous liquid water content of the droplet laden airstream. The standard deviation of ten separate LWC measurements was 31 percent of the average. However, the liquid mass flux calculated from the average LWC and droplet velocities came within 10 percent of the known water ingestion rate.

  4. Communicating and Learning in Engineering Online Resources 1 4th year Projects: Progress (or Preliminary) Report

    E-print Network

    Sekercioglu, Y. Ahmet

    Communicating and Learning in Engineering Online Resources 1 4th year Projects: Progress (or's surname at the end of the report. Consult the online referencing resources or the online tutorials in Engineering Online Resources 2 #12;

  5. Nebraska Water Conference Council's Annual Water & Natural Resources Tour

    E-print Network

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    in the Platte River valley and ground water contamination in southwestern Grand Island. ` The ongoing drought cycle. Ground water level changes and related ground water/surface water interaction research; travel on city streets past Grand Island municipal wells potentially impacted by ground water

  6. Communicating and Learning in Engineering Online Resources 1 Studying effectively

    E-print Network

    Sekercioglu, Y. Ahmet

    Communicating and Learning in Engineering Online Resources 1 Studying effectively Effective study a comprehensive time management system. Memory and Study practices We really only learn and remember material to understand and remember. Check that you actually understand what you are learning by explaining it to someone

  7. Water resources data, Maryland and Delaware, water year 1999, Volume 1. surface-water data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    James, Robert W.; Saffer, Richard W.; Tallman, Anthony J.

    2000-01-01

    Water resources data for the 1999 water year for Maryland and Delaware consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage and contents of lakes and reservoirs. This volume (Volume 1. Surface-Water Data) contains records for water discharge at 111 gaging stations; stage and contents of 1 reservoir; and water quality at 17 gaging stations. Also included are stage and discharge for 3 creststage partial-record stations, discharge only for 27 low-flow partial-record stations, and stage only for 5 tidal crest-stage partial-record stations. Additional water data were collected at various sites not involved in the systematic data-collection program and are published as miscellaneous measurements. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating State, local, and Federal agencies in Maryland and Delaware.

  8. Water resources data, Maryland and Delaware, water year 1998, volume 1. surface-water data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    James, Robert W., Jr.; Saffer, Richard W.; Tallman, Anthony

    1999-01-01

    Water resources data for the 1998 water year for Maryland and Delaware consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage and contents of lakes and reservoirs. This volume (Volume 1. Surface-Water Data) contains records for water discharge at 105 gaging stations; stage and contents of 1 reservoir; and water quality at 16 gaging stations. Also included are stage and discharge for 3 creststage partial-record stations, discharge only for 9 low-flow partial-record stations, and stage only for 5 tidal crest-stage partial-record stations. Additional water data were collected at various sites not involved in the systematic data-collection program and are published as miscellaneous measurements. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating State, local, and Federal agencies in Maryland and Delaware.

  9. Water resources data, Maryland and Delaware, water year 2001, volume 1. surface-water data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    James, Robert W.; Saffer, Richard W.; Pentz, Robert H.; Tallman, Anthony J.

    2002-01-01

    Water resources data for the 2001 water year for Maryland and Delaware consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage and contents of lakes and reservoirs. This volume (Volume 1. Surface-Water Data) contains records for water discharge at 128 gaging stations; stage and contents of 1 reservoir; and water quality at 20 gaging stations. Also included are stage and discharge for 3 creststage partial-record stations and stage only for 10 tidal crest-stage partial-record stations. Additional water data were collected at various sites not involved in the systematic data-collection program and are published as miscellaneous measurements. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating State, local, and Federal agencies in Maryland and Delaware.

  10. Potential Impact of the Development of Lignite Reserves on Water Resources of East Texas

    E-print Network

    James, W. P.; Slowey, J. F.; Garret, R. L.; Ortiz, C.; Bright, J.; King, T.

    This study was conducted for the Office of Water Resources Research and Technology in the U.S. Department of the Interior by the Texas Engineering Experiment Station at Texas A&M University. The project was concerned with identifying potential...

  11. PERCEPTION OF LAKE WATER RESOURCE MANAGEMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Lakes, impoundments, and reservoirs are complex environments. Many interacting factors determine water quality and recreational use potential. Each lake or reservoir is different and presents unique problems to water supply treatment operation and to full enjoyment by the public....

  12. Water--1970. Chemical Engineering Progress Symposium Series No. 107, Volume 67, 1971.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cecil, Lawrence K., Ed.

    Due to the tremendous interest in all phases of environmental control, particularly with reference to water pollution control, the American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE) is attempting to provide the lay public with accurate information about water resources so they may react with proper knowledge and constructive activity. This anthology…

  13. Allocation priority management of agricultural water resources based on the theory of virtual water

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Chen Liang

    2011-01-01

    Based on the analysis of two factors including agricultural products consumption demands of residents and water resources constraints on agricultural production, paper set up the model of allocation priority of water resources in agricultural production for the first time, and obtain the allocation priority order of water resources in agricultural production in Zhejiang province. The conclusion is that the allocation

  14. Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    on water quality issues including water recycling, operation of wastewater treatment facilities, wind of Environmental Services and several private sector organizations. Research Program The USGS/WRRIP grant nationally. The third (A Win-Win Approach...) simulates the conservation effects of efficient water pricing

  15. Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    Information Title: Development of a Kenaf-Based Biosorptive Water Treatment Process Project Number: B-20 Start surface waters and groundwaters currently undergoing treatment or scheduled for treatment contain organic contain contamination levels requiring treatment. The treatment of these waters pose both technical

  16. Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    in either supporting or contradicting critical freshwater supply/demand projections that have dictated water-Support Tool for Managing the Pipe Network..." of a city water-supply system that may find applicability in any of the aging water-supply infrastructures of American population centers; · The development of a plan

  17. State of ISRAEL Water Resources Management

    E-print Network

    Einat, Aharonov

    Actions for Closing the Gap ­Between Supply and Demand Long Term Water saving and efficient use of water Supply System #12;State of ISRAEL Complexity of the water distribution system · Different Sources Nature769 Agriculture474433359 Industry888888 Demand Domestic744721661 Total Supply120010411160 Drought

  18. U.S. Geological Survey: Water Resources of Alabama

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This website contains water data, publications, and links to current weather in Alabama and weather radar and satellite images. The water streamflow data includes daily streamflow conditions of the United States, national water conditions, current streamflow conditions, current rain gauges of Alabama Power, a current river summary, and current drought conditions in Alabama. The publications are about water-resource activities in Alabama, the J.B. Converse Lake Watershed Assessment, the National Water-Quality Assessment Programs for the Lower-Tennessee and Mobile river basins, and water resource programs of the USGS.

  19. Engineering new paths to water data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beran, Bora; Piasecki, Michael

    2009-04-01

    Considering the scope of water resources research, data can be available from many different sources that use different nomenclature, storage technologies, interfaces and even languages, which make its discovery a hard and time-consuming task. This paper addresses the development of an ontology-aided, clustered search mechanism that enables querying multiple hydrologic and environmental data repositories through a single interface regardless of the heterogeneity that exists between these sources.

  20. Basin-wide cooperative water resources allocation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lizhong Wang; Liping Fang; Keith W. Hipel

    2008-01-01

    Abstract The Cooperative Water Allocation Model,(CWAM) is designed,within a general mathematical,programming,frame- work,for modeling,equitable and,efficient water allocation among,competing,users at the basin level and,applied to a large-scale water allocation problem in the South Saskatchewan River Basin located in southern Alberta, Canada. This comprehensive,model,consists of two main steps: initial water rights allocation and subsequent,water and net benefits real- location. Two mathematical programming approaches,

  1. http://www.cemr.wvu.edu/freshman UPDATED 12/15/2010 COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING AND MINERAL RESOURCES FRESHMAN ENGINEERING

    E-print Network

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    http://www.cemr.wvu.edu/freshman UPDATED 12/15/2010 COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING AND MINERAL RESOURCES ­ FRESHMAN ENGINEERING STUDY LAB POLICY SPRING 2011 The College of Engineering and Mineral Resources (CEMR, and Engineering courses, students need more structure to develop good study skills, and students learn as much

  2. Water resources and the urban environment--98

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, T.E. [ed.

    1998-07-01

    This report contains all the papers presented at the meeting. There are 25 sessions and one poster session in the document. The Sessions are: (1) Landfill gas/groundwater interactions; (2) Urban solids management; (3) Local issues; (4) Surface water quality studies 1; (5) Reductive treatment of hazardous wastes with zero-valent iron; (6) Water reuse 1; (7) Biosolids management; (8) GIS information systems 1; (9) Drinking water distribution; (10) Anaerobic treatment; (11) Water reuse 2; (12) Municipal wastewater treatment technology; (13) GIS information systems 2; (14) Drinking water treatment 1; (15) Risk-based site remediation; (16) Small urban watersheds; (17) Disinfection; (18) Air pollution control and risk assessment; (19) Drinking water treatment 2; (20) Biological wastewater treatment; (21) Wastewater treatment; (22) Decentralized small-scale alternative wastewater management systems; (23) General environmental issues; (24) Drinking water treatment 3; and (25) Groundwater remediation. Papers have been processed separately for inclusion on the database.

  3. Water resources data for North Carolina, water year 1996. Volume 2. Ground-water records. Water-data report (Annual), 1 October 1995-30 September 1996

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. G. Smith; E. D. George; P. L. Breton

    1997-01-01

    Water-resource data for the 1996 water year for North Carolina include records of ground-water levels and water quality of ground water. This report contains ground-water level data from 95 observation wells.

  4. Impact of gari consumption on the water resource of Nigeria

    Microsoft Academic Search

    O. Adeoti; T. A. Ayelegun; B. A. Oyewole

    The consumption of gari (or roasted cassava granule) is connected to a chain of impacts on the water resource in the country where cassava crop is grown, processed and consumed. The aim of this paper is to assess the impact of gari consumption on the water resource of Nigeria. The paper elaborates on two types of impact: evaporation of infiltrated

  5. Maryland Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    Maryland Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2010 Maryland Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2010 1 #12;Introduction During Funding Year 2010, the Maryland continues to be a major focus of concern for Maryland, and several of the Center's projects addressed

  6. Louisiana Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    problem. #12;Louisiana's vast wetlands make up approximately 40% of the nation's wetlands. These areasLouisiana Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2006 #12;Introduction This report presents a description of the activities of the Louisiana Water Resources Research Institute

  7. Louisiana Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    that are important in Louisiana with it's vast wetland areas, agricultural base, and threatened ecosystemsLouisiana Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 1999 Introduction Research Program The 1999 program of the Louisiana Water Resources Research Institute (LWRRI) addressed several

  8. Louisiana Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    Louisiana Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2001 Introduction This report presents a description of the activities of the Louisiana Water Resources Research Institute for the period of March 1, 2001 to February 28, 2002 under the direction of Dr. Joseph N. Suhayda. The Louisiana

  9. Citizen Involvement in Water Resources Issues in New England

    E-print Network

    Gold, Art

    @uidaho.edu Arthur J. Gold Professor/Natural Resource Program Leader University of Rhode Island Kingston, Rhode Island agold@uri.edu Alyson McCann Water Quality Coordinator University of Rhode Island Kingston, Rhode Island alyson@uri.edu Introduction As water resources planning and management moves forward

  10. Virgin Islands Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    Virgin Islands Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2002 Introduction The University of the Virgin Islands, a land grant university and Historically Black College or University-wide community through its academic, research and public service programs. The Water Resources Research Institute

  11. Virginia Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    Virginia Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2004 Introduction-grant universities. In 1965, the VWRRC was housed in Virginia Tech . In 1982, the Virginia General Assembly member for Virginia Tech faculty at the Universities Council on Water Resources (UCOWR). The VWRRC

  12. Virginia Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    Virginia Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2005 Introduction The Virginia Water Resources Research Center (VWRRC) at Virginia Tech is both a federally authorized program within of Virginia. Activities and programs of the VWRRC are in accordance with the state legislative mandate

  13. SYSTEM DYNAMICS: SYSTEMIC FEEDBACK MODELING FOR WATER RESOURCES MANAGEMENT

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ali Kerem SAYSEL

    Water resources planning and management requires analytic methods to guide decision making on development, use and consumption of water resources. Many econometric and operational research methods are prescriptive in nature, i.e. they evaluate the optimum or best outcomes achievable under rigid assumptions and based on specific preferences of the decision making authorities. However, apart from the complexity of hydrodynamic processes

  14. South Carolina Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    South Carolina Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2003 Introduction from Greenville to the confluence with the Saluda River and into Lake Greenwood. As South Carolina University Pinnacle Consulting Group, Inc. South Carolina Water Resources Center, Clemson University South

  15. Scientific and technological considerations in water resources policy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    William C. Ackermann; David J. Allee; Jaime Amorocho; Yacov Y. Haimes; Warren A. Hall; Elwood Mead; Richard A. Meserve; Ruth Patrick; Philip M. Smith

    1978-01-01

    Most important domestic problems faced in the United States today are affected by policies for the management of our water resources. Energy, the environment, food production, regional economic development, even our international balance of trade, are all affected directly or indirectly by water resources management. Often there is too much or too little management, or it occurs in the wrong

  16. Vermont Water Resources and Lake Studies Center Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    awarded under the State Water Resources Research Institute Program is 01HQGR0115. Research Program The Vermont Water Resources and Lake Studies Center supported two major research projects during FY2004 was lead by Drs. Suzanne N. Levine and Leslie A. Morrissey. Cyanobacterial (blue-green algal) blooms have

  17. Mississippi Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    Mississippi Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2005 Introduction The FY 2005 Annual Technical Report for the Mississippi Water Resources Research Institute summarizes USGS and Pesticide Runoff Losses from Golf Courses and Residential Lawns in the South Atlantic-Gulf Region Basic

  18. Managing Colorado River Water Resources In a Nonstationary Climate (Invited)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. Rajagopalan; K. C. Nowak; J. R. Prairie; E. A. Zagona

    2010-01-01

    Traditional water resources management assumes that history will repeat itself in more or less the same manner. This assumption with limited observations, which is often the case, leads to a biased view of system risk and to less than optimal management policies. This can be quite consequential if history does not repeat itself. Colorado River water resources management is in

  19. Water: Our Most Precious Resource WATER. It's everywhere. It's always there when

    E-print Network

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    #12;#12;Water: Our Most Precious Resource 3 WATER. It's everywhere. It's always there when we need it. In fact it is so common that it's easy to forget just how important our nation's water resources, which provide recreation, electrical power, protection against floods and, in many cases, the water

  20. Cultural Waters: Values of Water Resources in Hidalgo, Mexico 

    E-print Network

    Hurst, Kristin

    2013-04-08

    The availability of clean water is fundamental to the survival of all living things. Humans have altered fresh water cycles in a number of ways that affect both water quality and quantity. This has led to a global water crisis where an estimated...