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Sample records for water sediment domestic

  1. Contaminated Sediments in Water

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Contact Us Water: Contaminated Sediments You are here: Water Pollution Prevention & Control Sediments Contaminated Sediments in Water Contaminated ... Water Education & Training Grants & Funding Laws & Regulations Our Waters Pollution Prevention & Control Applications & Databases Low Impact Development Impaired ...

  2. Toxicity Identification Evaluation (Phase I) of water and sediment samples from a tropical reservoir contaminated with industrial and domestic effluents.

    PubMed

    Matos, Mariana de F; Botta, Clarice Maria Rispoli; Fonseca, Ana Lúcia

    2014-11-01

    The Funil Reservoir (Rio de Janeiro State, Brazil) is an environment degraded by constant discharge of nutrients and pollution coming from the most industrialized region of the country. As a consequence of eutrophication, there are continuous cyanobacteria blooms, which cause acute and chronic toxicity to zooplankton. In this context, Phase I of Toxicity Identification Evaluation (TIE) was performed on Daphnia similis using water and interstitial water from the reservoir, with the aim of identifying classes of compounds responsible for toxicity. The results indicated that water toxicity was due to cyanobacteria resulting from blooms in the reservoir and surfactants. Metals, especially copper, contributed to sediment toxicity. This research is the first attempt to describe the nature of toxicity in this reservoir using this method. PMID:25103213

  3. Domestic wash water reclamation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, J. B., Jr.; Batten, C. E.; Wilkins, J. R.

    1974-01-01

    System consists of filtration unit, reverse-osmosis module, tanks, pumps, plumbing, and various gauges, meters, and valves. After water is used in washing machine or shower, it is collected in holding tank. Water is pumped through series of five particulate filters. Pressure tank supplies processed water to commode water closet.

  4. 9. SEDIMENTATION CHAMBER, VIEW DOWNSTREAM. AFTER SEDIMENTATION, WATER FLOWS INTO ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. SEDIMENTATION CHAMBER, VIEW DOWNSTREAM. AFTER SEDIMENTATION, WATER FLOWS INTO ONE 8" CAST-IRON PIPELINE. - Kalaupapa Water Supply System, Waikolu Valley to Kalaupapa Settlement, Island of Molokai, Kalaupapa, Kalawao County, HI

  5. Domestic Water Use and Piped Water Supply (PWS)

    E-print Network

    Sohoni, Milind

    Domestic Water Use and Piped Water Supply (PWS) Om Damani (Adapting from the slides of Milind;11 #12;Agenda · Introduction to Piped water schemes (PWS) · Design of PWS ­ Define demand ­ Service level and Pipe diameter ­ Pump design ­ Cost optimization 12 #12;Water sources for different uses 13 #12

  6. Quantifying Urban Water Subsidies with Hydrological Tracers of Domestic Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bain, D. J.; Sikora, M. T.; Wozniak, E.; Fisher, K. R.; Carr, J.; Elliott, E. M.

    2011-12-01

    Connections between urban hydrological systems and human water infrastructure are well established. Interactions between these systems occur at a wide range of scales, from large inter-basin transfers to individual leaking pipes. However, much of the interest in these connections arises from practical considerations, for example, substantially altered in-stream flow or the presence/absence of sewage in surface water systems. Less recognized is that in smaller urban catchments, daily water flux through human water distribution systems is often much larger than low flow surface water flux from the catchment. As infrastructure ages and cross-connections grow, transfers from the substantial human fluxes to the catchment will increasingly subsidize urban water budgets. Tools for quantifying the contribution of this subsidy to urban hydrological systems can clarify both practical questions for urban managers and our understanding of flow generation in catchments. Stream water chemistry from a multi-year sampling campaign in Nine Mile Run (Pittsburgh, PA) is used to examine potential hydrological tracers of human domestic water. In particular, we examine the use of fluoride added in precise quantities as a dental health supplement as a tracer of human domestic water (e.g., drinking and waste water). While fluoride is not necessarily a conservative tracer, equilibrium reactions governing fluoride solubility generally require substantially higher cationic concentrations than those observed in surface water chemistry. Further, during periods where human subsidies dominate (e.g., water line breaks or hydrant flushes discharging to the stream) fluoride concentrations generally approach the concentration added to domestic water. We use multiple modeling approaches to demonstrate the appropriateness of fluoride as a tracer, infer contributions of human domestic water to the hydrologic budget, and explore fluoride dynamics in the Nine Mile Run basin. A fluoride tracer is particularly exciting due to applicability in a large number of urban systems fluoridating drinking waters and due to robust, high-frequency measurement capacity via off-the-shelf drinking water treatment technologies.

  7. Reutilization of industrial sedimentation plants as a domestic landfill

    SciTech Connect

    Viehweg, M.; Duetsch, M.; Wagner, J.; Edelmann, F.

    1995-12-31

    The methods and the investigation results for evaluation of the risk potential emanating from the mixed waste landfill Steinsee in Johanngeorgenstadt are described for the protected commodities of water, soil and air. The peculiarity of this mixed waste landfill is its layered structure (17th to 19th century near-surface mineworkings, granite weathering zone at the base of the landfill, washed-in tailings, and refuse dump). A network of measuring points has been installed in and around the landfill, and selective investigations have been made to ascertain the risk potential from the landfill. Based on the investigation results, it can be estimated that the continued use of the landfill is justifiable from the geological, hydrogeological and hydrological viewpoints, provided that permanent and continuous control is ensured by a monitoring system and that the overall situation can be improved in the short term by suitable technical measures. The waste being deposited now consists of domestic refuse, bulky refuse, sewage sludge, building rubble, excavated earth, broken up road surfacing, waste containing asbestos, industrial waste and power station ash.

  8. AMBIENT WATER, POREWATER, AND SEDIMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sediment assessments may be performed for a variety of purposes; these include: dredging and dredged sediment disposal, for evaluations of sediments as a capping material, to determine sediment quality, to assess biological impairment and to assess the status of environment monit...

  9. Sedimentation problem in water Conservancy in China

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, D.

    1984-12-01

    The state-of-the-art of river sedimentation management in China is reviewed. Attention is focused on the sediment load carried by main rivers in China; the related sediment problems encountered in developing water resources; and the methods in dealing with those problems. There are 50 rivers with annual maximum sediment load exceeding 10 million tons in China. There are more than 400,000 sq km of loess plateaus and hills in the drainage basin of the Yellow River. Inadequate conservation of soil and water leads to erosion, transportation and deposition of sediment, giving rise to much trouble in water conservation works. These problems include flood control, navigational concerns, reservoir sedimentation, and sediment problems of lowhead diversion dams or hydroelectric projects. Methods for dealing with sediment problems include water and soil conservation and use of turbid water with emphasis on terracing, strip cropping, forestation, grass and crop rotation. Several types of structures may be built along a gully such as small reservoirs, check dams, drop structures, drainage ditches, and irrigation canal systems for diverting hyperconcentrated flow into farmland or to warp land. Processes for diverting water while preventing sediment from entering water intakes at hydroelectric plants are becoming more advanced. 4 references, 3 figures, 2 tables.

  10. Inorganic chemicals in domestic water of the United Arab Emirates.

    PubMed

    Rizk, Zeinelabidin S

    2009-02-01

    The concentration of selected inorganic chemicals was determined for 396 samples of bottled water, desalinated water, and groundwater used for drinking and domestic purposes in the United Arab Emirates (UAE). The objective of this study was to compare the concentrations of inorganic chemicals in different domestic water types used in the UAE with the World Health Organization (WHO) limits for drinking water. Results of the present study revealed a wide variation in the concentrations of major, minor, and trace inorganic chemicals in domestic water of the UAE. For example, the bottled water sold for drinking is depleted in major ions and the total dissolved solids (TDS) in some brands do not exceed 100 mg/l. On the other hand, some of the domestic water used may contain as much as 3,000 mg/l TDS, which is above the WHO recommended limit for drinking water (500-1,500 mg/l TDS). Similarly, while bottled water is almost free of trace ions and minor constituents, some natural groundwater may have concentrations higher than the WHO recommended limits for drinking water. The cause of this variation is related to the different water sources and the large number of companies producing and distributing drinking and domestic water. Moreover, it is clear that the current controls on domestic water quality in some areas, namely conformance of pH and electrical conductivity measurements with prescribed ranges of values, are currently inadequate. These two parameters are not enough to judge if water is suitable for drinking or not and some consumers may receive domestic water of uncertain quality. PMID:18266056

  11. Socioeconomic differentials and availability of domestic water in South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dungumaro, Esther W.

    The past few decades has seen massive efforts to increasing provision of domestic water. However, water is still unavailable to many people most of them located in sub-Saharan Africa, South Asia and East Asia. Furthermore, availability of water varies greatly both spatially and temporary. While other people pay so dearly for domestic water others have an easy access to adequate clean water and sanitation. Accessibility and affordability of domestic water and sanitation is determined by a great variety of factors including socioeconomic status of households. The main objective of the paper is to inform on factors which need to be taken into account when coming up with projects to provide domestic water. It is more critical when the issue of water pricing comes into the equation. Water pricing has many facets, including equity, willingness to pay and affordability. In this premise, it is deemed important to understand the socioeconomic characteristics of the people before deciding on the amount of money they will have to pay for water consumption. It is argued that understanding people’s socioeconomic situation will greatly help to ensure that principles of sustainability and equity in water allocation and pricing are achieved. To do so, the paper utilized 2002 South Africa General Household Survey (GHS), to analyze socioeconomic variables and availability of domestic water. Analysis was mainly descriptive. However, logistic regression analysis was also utilized to determine the likelihood of living in a household that obtain water from a safe source. The study found that there is a strong relationship between availability of domestic water and socioeconomic conditions. Economic status, household size and to a lesser extent gender of head of household were found to be strong predictors of living in a household which obtained water from a safe source. The paper recommends that needs and priorities for interventions in water provision should take into account socioeconomic status of households.

  12. Domestic applications for aerospace waste and water management technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Disanto, F.; Murray, R. W.

    1972-01-01

    Some of the aerospace developments in solid waste disposal and water purification, which are applicable to specific domestic problems are explored. Also provided is an overview of the management techniques used in defining the need, in utilizing the available tools, and in synthesizing a solution. Specifically, several water recovery processes will be compared for domestic applicability. Examples are filtration, distillation, catalytic oxidation, reverse osmosis, and electrodialysis. Solid disposal methods will be discussed, including chemical treatment, drying, incineration, and wet oxidation. The latest developments in reducing household water requirements and some concepts for reusing water will be outlined.

  13. Sediment-Water Distribution of Organic Contaminants in Aquatic

    E-print Network

    Gobas, Frank

    Sediment-Water Distribution of Organic Contaminants in Aquatic Ecosystems: The Role of Organic The distribution between sediments and water plays a key role in the food-chain transfer of hydrophobic organic) sediment- water distribution coefficients of organic chemicals between bottom sediments and water

  14. Analysis Model for Domestic Hot Water Distribution Systems: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Maguire, J.; Krarti, M.; Fang, X.

    2011-11-01

    A thermal model was developed to estimate the energy losses from prototypical domestic hot water (DHW) distribution systems for homes. The developed model, using the TRNSYS simulation software, allows researchers and designers to better evaluate the performance of hot water distribution systems in homes. Modeling results were compared with past experimental study results and showed good agreement.

  15. Design package for solar domestic hot water system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    The initial design of a solar domestic hot water system is considered. The system performance specification and detailed design drawings are included. The hot water systems consist of the following subsystems: collector, storage, control, transport, auxiliary energy, and government-furnished site data acquisition. The two systems are installed at Tempe, Arizona, and San Diego, California.

  16. Par Pond Fish, Water, and Sediment Chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Paller, M.H.; Wike, L.D.

    1996-06-01

    The objectives of this report are to describe the Par Pond fish community and the impact of the drawdown and refill on the community, describe contaminant levels in Par Pond fish, sediments, and water and indicate how contaminant concentrations and distributions were affected by the drawdown and refill, and predict possible effects of future water level fluctuations in Par Pond.

  17. Prototype solar domestic hot water systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Construction of a double wall heat exchanger using soft copper tube coiled around a hot water storage tank was completed and preliminary tests were conducted. Solar transport water to tank potable water heat exchange tests were performed with a specially constructed test stand. Work was done to improve the component hardware and system design for the solar water heater. The installation of both a direct feed system and a double wall heat exchanger system provided experience and site data to enable informative decisions to be made as the solar market expands into areas where freeze protection is required.

  18. Legionella Infection Risk from Domestic Hot Water

    PubMed Central

    Montagna, M. Teresa; Romano-Spica, Vincenzo; Stampi, Serena; Stancanelli, Giovanna; Triassi, Maria; Neglia, Rachele; Marchesi, Isabella; Fantuzzi, Guglielmina; Tatò, Daniela; Napoli, Christian; Quaranta, Gianluigi; Laurenti, Patrizia; Leoni, Erica; De Luca, Giovanna; Ossi, Cristina; Moro, Matteo; D’Alcalà, Gabriella Ribera

    2004-01-01

    We investigated Legionella and Pseudomonas contamination of hot water in a cross-sectional multicentric survey in Italy. Chemical parameters (hardness, free chlorine, and trace elements) were determined. Legionella spp. were detected in 33 (22.6%) and Pseudomonas spp. in 56 (38.4%) of 146 samples. Some factors associated with Legionella contamination were heater type, tank distance and capacity, water plant age, and mineral content. Pseudomonas presence was influenced by water source, hardness, free chlorine, and temperature. Legionella contamination was associated with a centralized heater, distance from the heater point >10 m, and a water plant >10 years old. Furthermore, zinc levels of <20 ?g/L and copper levels of >50 ?g/L appeared to be protective against Legionella colonization. Legionella species and serogroups were differently distributed according to heater type, water temperature, and free chlorine, suggesting that Legionella strains may have a different sensibility and resistance to environmental factors and different ecologic niches. PMID:15109413

  19. Legionella infection risk from domestic hot water.

    PubMed

    Borella, Paola; Montagna, M Teresa; Romano-Spica, Vincenzo; Stampi, Serena; Stancanelli, Giovanna; Triassi, Maria; Neglia, Rachele; Marchesi, Isabella; Fantuzzi, Guglielmina; Tatò, Daniela; Napoli, Christian; Quaranta, Gianluigi; Laurenti, Patrizia; Leoni, Erica; De Luca, Giovanna; Ossi, Cristina; Moro, Matteo; Ribera D'Alcalà, Gabriella

    2004-03-01

    We investigated Legionella and Pseudomonas contamination of hot water in a cross-sectional multicentric survey in Italy. Chemical parameters (hardness, free chlorine, and trace elements) were determined. Legionella spp. were detected in 33 (22.6%) and Pseudomonas spp. in 56 (38.4%) of 146 samples. Some factors associated with Legionella contamination were heater type, tank distance and capacity, water plant age, and mineral content. Pseudomonas presence was influenced by water source, hardness, free chlorine, and temperature. Legionella contamination was associated with a centralized heater, distance from the heater point >10 m, and a water plant >10 years old. Furthermore, zinc levels of <100 microg/L and copper levels of >50 microg/L appeared to be protective against Legionella colonization [corrected]. Legionella species and serogroups were differently distributed according to heater type, water temperature, and free chlorine, suggesting that Legionella strains may have a different sensibility and resistance to environmental factors and different ecologic niches. PMID:15109413

  20. Uranium in US surface, ground, and domestic waters. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    Drury, J.S.; Reynolds, S.; Owen, P.T.; Ross, R.H.; Ensminger, J.T.

    1981-04-01

    The report Uranium in US Surface, Ground, and Domestic Waters comprises four volumes. Volumes 2, 3, and 4 contain data characterizing the location, sampling date, type, use, and uranium conentrations of 89,994 individual samples presented in tabular form. The tabular data in volumes 2, 3, and 4 are summarized in volume 1 in narrative form and with maps and histograms.

  1. Sediment mediated species interactions in coastal waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reise, Karsten

    2002-10-01

    Self-structuring in marine sediment communities is achieved by the mobility of the organisms, the trophic web, and biogenic transformations of the habitat. The latter are: bioconstruction and bioturbations, sediment stabilisation and destabilisation, with facilitating and inhibiting effects. This cursory overview intends to show that in near-shore mud and sand, biogenic habitat transformations pervade all community interactions. Consequently these deserve as much attention in benthic ecosystem analyses as do trophic pathways. Abundant phototrophs and suspension feeders tend to accumulate sediment and organic matter. Underneath phototrophic mats, composite layers of anaerobic microorganisms abound. Benthic animals provide anchorage to tufts of algae, and these in turn provide shelter and food for mobile benthos. Rooted plants slow down hydrodynamics and generate complex habitats above the sediment surface but below a meshwork of roots may inhibit burrowing animals. Abundant suspension feeders stabilise sediments, and may build loose hummocks, multi-species epibenthic thickets or solid reefs, accommodating diverse epibenthic assemblages. Their raised and rough surfaces enhance turbulence. Below the sediment surface, tubes and burrows of sessile or discretely motile animals provide microoxic habitats for diverse assemblages of small organisms. At the surface, mucus of motile organisms increases sediment cohesion. Accumulated dead hardparts of the benthos support epibionts when at the surface but cause resistance to the burrowers below. Reworking and irrigation of the sediment by the infauna increases oxygenation, and particulate and solute fluxes with the overlying water. Mounds and pits generated by resident burrowers as well as by large visiting grazers and predators further diversify the benthos. All these bioengineered structures and processes generate dynamic and complex habitat-mediated interaction webs, affecting and meshed into the trophic web, which they may rival in overall importance in the self-structuring of the benthos in coastal marine sediments.

  2. A model of the domestic hot water load

    SciTech Connect

    Lane, I.E.; Beute, N.

    1996-11-01

    The electrical load required to supply domestic hot water is an important load for two reasons: (1) It represents a large portion (30 to 50%) of the domestic load; (2) It is a load which can easily be controlled by the consumer or the supplier, because the use of the hot water need not coincide with the heating of hot water. A model representing the electrical system load due to hot water consumption from storage water heaters is provided. Variable parameters include the average amount of water used, the mean and deviation of distributions of usage times, thermostat settings, inlet water temperature and electrical heating element ratings. These parameters are used to estimate the after diversity electricity demand profile, and were verified for accuracy by comparison with measurements. The model enables this prediction of the effects of load control, examples of which are given in this paper. The model is also useful for evaluation of the response which could be expected from demand-side management options. These include changing the size of heating elements, reduction in water consumption and reduction in thermostat settings.

  3. Numerical simulation of sediment related processes in water quality model

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sediment is a major nonpoint-source pollutant, and the exchange of materials between water and sediment is an important component of the lake eutrophication process. Suspended sediment increases water surface reflectivity and light attenuation in the water column. Nutrients can be absorbed to sedime...

  4. Estimated Domestic, Irrigation, and Industrial Water Use in Washington, 2000

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lane, R.C.

    2004-01-01

    Since 1950, the U.S. Geological Survey has published a series of Circulars and other reports on the estimated use of water in the United States at 5-year intervals. This report presents State, regional, and county estimates of the amount of water used for domestic, irrigation, and industrial purposes in the State of Washington during the year 2000. Domestic water use was estimated to be 674 million gallons per day and the per-capita rate, 114 gallons per day. Crop-irrigation water use was estimated to be 3,005 million gallons per day and the application rate, 2.2 acre-feet per acre per year, or feet per year. Golf-course irrigation water use was estimated to be 23.6 million gallons per day and the application rate, 1.4 feet per year. Industrial water use was estimated to be 681 million gallons per day. Historically, these core categories account for about 92 percent of the estimated offstream water used in Washington.

  5. Patterns, structures and regulations of domestic water cycle systems in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Junying; Wang, Hao; Wang, Jianhua; Qin, Dayong

    2010-05-01

    Domestic water cycle systems serving as one critical component of artificial water cycle at the catchment's scale, is so closely related to public healthy, human rights and social-economic development, and has gained the highest priority in strategic water resource and municipal infrastructure planning. In this paper, three basic patterns of domestic water cycle systems are identified and analyzed, including rural domestic water system (i.e. primary level), urban domestic water system (i.e. intermediate level) and metropolitan domestic water system (i.e. senior level), with different "abstract-transport-consume-discharge" mechanisms and micro-components of water consumption (such as drinking, cooking, toilet flushing, showering or cleaning). The rural domestic water system is general simple with three basic "abstract-consume-discharge" mechanisms and micro-components of basic water consumption such as drinking, cooking, washing and sanitation. The urban domestic water system has relative complex mechanisms of "abstract-supply-consume-treatment-discharge" and more micro-components of water consumption such as bath, dishwashing or car washing. The metropolitan domestic water system (i.e. senior level) has the most complex mechanisms by considering internal water reuse, external wastewater reclamation, and nutrient recycling processes. The detailed structures for different water cycle pattern are presented from the aspects of water quantity, wastewater quality and nutrients flow. With the speed up of urbanization and development of social-economy in China, those three basic patterns are interacting, transforming and upgrading. According to the past experiences and current situations, urban domestic water system (i.e. intermediate level) is the dominant pattern based on indicator of system number or system scale. The metropolitan domestic water system (i.e. senior level) is the idealized model for the future development and management. Current domestic water system management efforts typically fail in China, because the approach is generally narrowly-focused and fragmented. This paper put forward a total-process control framework following the water and pollutants (or nutrients) flows along the dualistic domestic water cycle process. Five key objectives of domestic water cycle system regulation are identified including water use safety, water use equity, water saving, wastewater reduction and nutrient recycling. Comprehensive regulatory framework regarding administrative, economic, technical and social measures is recommended to promote sustainable domestic water usage and demand management. Considering the relatively low affordability in rural area, economic measures should be mainly applied in urban domestic water systems and metropolitan domestic water systems. Engineering or technological measures which are suitable to the three domestic water cycle systems are discussed respectively.

  6. Domestic water conservation practices in Tlemcen City (Algeria)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habi, Mohammed; Harrouz, Omar

    2014-03-01

    During the last three decades, citizens of an Algerian city are concerned with the problem of drinking water supply. Time discontinuation service became the rule. The central idea of the analysis based on interviews is to assess the role of water in the organization of the relationship between habitat and users. The fundamental question is how users, in particular women, incorporate water in their daily lives due to rationing. Having to deal with the discontinuous and frequent weak water supply, the inhabitants of the city of Tlemcen who are connected to the water supply system, as well as those connected to the water system of all Algerian towns, have developed an internal water storage system to sort out this problem. The imposed rationing has proved to be expensive for consumers. The water shortage pushed the consumers to invest in relatively expensive storage and pumping facilities to satisfy their domestic needs. As the frequency of the water supply is on a two times per week basis, the survey reveals a discrepancy in terms of volumes consumed and stored by each household. The use of water depends on the individual storage facility and the frequency of the supply. The life of the households, particularly that of the housewives, depends on the availability of water and thus on the schedules of the Company of Production of Water "Algerian Des Eaux'' (ADE). This is particularly the case when they are supplied during the night.

  7. Pumped Solar Domestic Hot Water (SDHW) system design guidelines

    SciTech Connect

    Arshad, K.; Said, S.A.M. )

    1989-01-01

    This article provides practical guidelines based on experience gained from the design, installation, and commissioning of a pumped Solar Domestic Hot Water (SDHW) system in Saudi Arabia. The authors believe that such information is not readily available and will be useful to designers and installers of SDHW systems within the region. Since the current motivation for buying SDHW systems in Saudi Arabia is not strictly economic, it is imperative that a professional reference be available, against which the soundness of any technical decisions could be confirmed prior to their implementation. The intent is to ensure that systems designed and installed will operate reliably, therefore enhancing customer satisfaction.

  8. The human right to water: the importance of domestic and productive water rights.

    PubMed

    Hall, Ralph P; Van Koppen, Barbara; Van Houweling, Emily

    2014-12-01

    The United Nations (UN) Universal Declaration of Human Rights engenders important state commitments to respect, fulfill, and protect a broad range of socio-economic rights. In 2010, a milestone was reached when the UN General Assembly recognized the human right to safe and clean drinking water and sanitation. However, water plays an important role in realizing other human rights such as the right to food and livelihoods, and in realizing the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women. These broader water-related rights have been recognized but have not yet been operationalized. This paper unravels these broader water-related rights in a more holistic interpretation of existing international human rights law. By focusing on an emerging approach to water services provision--known as 'domestic-plus' services--the paper argues how this approach operationalizes a comprehensive range of socio-economic rights in rural and peri-urban areas. Domestic-plus services provide water for domestic and productive uses around homesteads, which challenges the widespread practice in the public sector of planning and designing water infrastructure for a single-use. Evidence is presented to show that people in rural communities are already using their water supplies planned for domestic uses to support a wide range of productive activities. Domestic-plus services recognize and plan for these multiple-uses, while respecting the priority for clean and safe drinking water. The paper concludes that domestic-plus services operationalize the obligation to progressively fulfill a comprehensive range of indivisible socio-economic rights in rural and peri-urban areas. PMID:24337891

  9. Domestic water and sanitation as water security: monitoring, concepts and strategy

    PubMed Central

    Bradley, David J.; Bartram, Jamie K.

    2013-01-01

    Domestic water and sanitation provide examples of a situation where long-term, target-driven efforts have been launched with the objective of reducing the proportion of people who are water-insecure, most recently through the millennium development goals (MDGs) framework. Impacts of these efforts have been monitored by an increasingly evidence-based system, and plans for the next period of international policy, which are likely to aim at universal coverage with basic water and sanitation, are being currently developed. As distinct from many other domains to which the concept of water security is applied, domestic or personal water security requires a perspective that incorporates the reciprocal notions of provision and risk, as the current status of domestic water and sanitation security is dominated by deficiency This paper reviews the interaction of science and technology with policies, practice and monitoring, and explores how far domestic water can helpfully fit into the proposed concept of water security, how that is best defined, and how far the human right to water affects the situation. It is considered that they fit well together in terms both of practical planning of targets and indicators and as a conceptual framework to help development. The focus needs to be broad, to extend beyond households, to emphasize maintenance as well as construction and to increase equity of access. International and subnational monitoring need to interact, and monitoring results need to be meaningful to service providers as well as users. PMID:24080628

  10. TRACER STUDY OF SEDIMENT-WATER INTERACTIONS IN ESTUARIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rates of sediment bioturbation and advective exchange of water across the sediment-water interface in Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island were studied by radioactive tracer experiments. The 'biological pumping rate' of water across the interface (.7 + or - .3 cc/sq cm day) was calcula...

  11. The lipid geochemistry of interstitial waters of recent marine sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Saliot, A.; Brault, M.; Boussuge, C. )

    1988-04-01

    To elucidate the nature of biogeochemical processes occurring at the water-sediment interface, the authors have analyzed fatty acids, n-alkanes and sterols contained in interstitial waters collected from oxic and anoxic marine sediments in the eastern and western intertropical Atlantic Ocean and in the Arabian Sea. Lipid concentrations in interstitial waters vary widely and are generally much higher than concentrations encountered in the overlying sea water. Higher concentrations in interstitial water are observed in environments favorable for organic input and preservation of the organic matter in the water column and in the surficial sediment. The analysis of biogeochemical markers in the various media of occurrence of the organic matter such as sea water, suspended particles, settling particles and sediment is discussed in terms of differences existing between these media and bio-transformations of the organic matter at the water-sediment interface.

  12. Benthic invertebrate bioassays with toxic sediment and pore water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Giesy, John P.; Rosiu, Cornell J.; Graney, Robert L.; Henry, Mary G.

    1990-01-01

    The relative sensitivities of bioassays to determine the toxicity of sediments were investigated and three methods of making the sample dilutions required to generate dose-response relationships were compared. The assays studied were: (a) Microtox(R), a 15-min assay of Photobacterium phosphoreum bioluminescence inhibition by pore water; (b) 48-h Daphnia magna lethality test in pore water; (c) 10-d subchronic assay of lethality to and reduction of weight gain by Chironomus tentans performed in either whole sediment or pore water; (d) 168-h acute lethality assay of Hexagenia limbata in either whole sediment or pore water. The three methods of diluting sediments were: (a) extracting pore water from the toxic location and dilution with pore water from the control station; (b) diluting whole sediment from the toxic location with control whole sediment from a reference location, then extracting pore water; and (c) diluting toxic, whole sediment with whole sediment from a reference location, then using the whole sediment in bioassays. Based on lethality, H. limbata was the most sensitive organism to the toxicity of Detroit River sediment. Lethality of D. magna was similar to that of H. limbata in whole sediment and can be used to predict effects of whole sediment toxicity to H. limbata. The concentration required to cause a 50% reduction in C. tentans growth (10-d EC50) was approximately that which caused 50% lethality of D. magna (48-h LC50) and was similar to the toxicity that restricts benthic invertebrate colonization of contaminated sediments. While the three dilution techniques gave similar results with some assays, they gave very different results in other assays. The dose-response relationships determined by the three dilution techniques would be expected to vary with sediment, toxicant and bioassay type, and the dose-response relationship derived from each technique needs to be interpreted accordingly.

  13. The effect of domestic water filters on water fluoride content.

    PubMed

    Ong, Y S; Williams, B; Holt, R

    1996-07-20

    The effect of filtration on water fluoride level was investigated in a study using commercially available filters. Testing was carried out in London (low fluoride), Braintree (optimum fluoride, naturally occurring) and Birmingham (optimum fluoride, artificially adjusted). It was found that none of the filters removed fluoride. In Birmingham, but not in either Braintree or London, there was a small, clinically insignificant increase in fluoride levels with filtration using two of the five filters. It is concluded that the water filtration systems tested will not affect the advantage offered by optimum water fluoride levels. Fluoride dietary supplements should not be prescribed for children living in optimal fluoride areas, irrespective of whether they use household filters. PMID:8791840

  14. Description of 2005-10 domestic water use for selected U.S. cities and guidance for estimating domestic water use

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kenny, Joan F.; Juracek, Kyle E.

    2012-01-01

    Domestic water-use and related socioeconomic and climatic data for 2005-10 were used in an analysis of 21 selected U.S. cities to describe recent domestic per capita water use, investigate variables that potentially affect domestic water use, and provide guidance for estimating domestic water use. Domestic water use may be affected by a combination of several factors. Domestic per capita water use for the selected cities ranged from a median annual average of 43 to 177 gallons per capita per day (gpcd). In terms of year-to-year variability in domestic per capita water use for the selected cities, the difference from the median ranged from ± 7 to ± 26 percent with an overall median variability of ± 14 percent. As a percentage of total annual water use, median annual domestic water use for the selected cities ranged from 33 to 71 percent with an overall median of 57 percent. Monthly production and water sales data were used to calculate daily per capita water use rates for the lowest 3 consecutive months (low-3) and the highest 3 consecutive months (high-3) of usage. Median low-3 domestic per capita water use for 16 selected cities ranged from 40 to 100 gpcd. Median high-3 domestic per capita water use for 16 selected cities ranged from 53 to 316 gpcd. In general, the median domestic water use as a percentage of the median total water use for 16 selected cities was similar for the low-3 and high-3 periods. Statistical analyses of combined data for the selected cities indicated that none of the socioeconomic variables, including cost of water, were potentially useful as determinants of domestic water use at the national level. However, specific socioeconomic variables may be useful for the estimation of domestic water use at the State or local level. Different socioeconomic variables may be useful in different States. Statistical analyses indicated that specific climatic variables may be useful for the estimation of domestic water use for some, but not all, of the selected cities. National average public supply per capita water use declined from 185 gpcd in 1990 to 171 gpcd in 2005. National average domestic delivery per capita water use declined from 105 gpcd in 1990 to 99 gpcd in 2005. Average State domestic delivery per capita water use ranged from 51 to 189 gpcd in 2005. The average annual total per capita water use in 19 selected cities that provided data for each year declined from 167 gpcd in 2006 to 145 gpcd in 2010. During this time period, average per capita water use measured during the low-3 period each year declined from 115 to 102 gpcd, and average per capita use measured during the high-3 period declined from 250 to 211 gpcd. Continued collection of data on water deliveries to domestic populations, as well as updated estimates of the population served by these deliveries, is recommended for determination of regional and temporal trends in domestic per capita water use. Declines in various measures of per capita water use have been observed in recent years for several States with municipal water use data-collection programs. Domestic self-supplied water use historically has not been metered. Estimates of self-supplied domestic water use are made using estimates of the population that is not served by public water suppliers and per capita coefficients. For 2005, the average State domestic self-supplied per capita use in the United States ranged from 50 to 206 gpcd. The median domestic self-supplied per capita use was 76 gpcd for States in which standard coefficients were used, and 98 gpcd for States in which coefficients were based on domestic deliveries from public supply. In specific areas with scarce resources or increasing numbers of households with private wells, an assessment of domestic water use may require metering of households or development of more specific per capita coefficients to estimate water demand.

  15. Evaluation of a multifiltration water reclamation subsystem to reclaim domestic clothes wash water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, J. B., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    An evaluation has been performed of a multifiltration water reclamation subsystem to determine its capability to recover water from domestic clothes wash water. A total of 32.89 kg (72.5 lb) of clothes were washed during eight wash cycles which used 1.4 lb of detergent, 145 gallons of hot water and 133.9 gallons of cold water. Water recovered at a weighted average process rate of 3.81 gallons per hour met the majority of the 23 requirements established for potable water by the U.S. Public Health Service. Average power consumed during this evaluation was approximately 71 watt-hours per gallon of water recovered. Filter replacement, which was required primarily for the control of micro-organisms in the recovered water averaged 4.86 filters per 100 gallons of wash water processed. The subsystem removed approximately 98 percent and virtually 100 percent of the phosphates and surfactants, respectively, from the wash water.

  16. Numerical Simulation of a Solar Domestic Hot Water System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mongibello, L.; Bianco, N.; Di Somma, M.; Graditi, G.; Naso, V.

    2014-11-01

    An innovative transient numerical model is presented for the simulation of a solar Domestic Hot Water (DHW) system. The solar collectors have been simulated by using a zerodimensional analytical model. The temperature distributions in the heat transfer fluid and in the water inside the tank have been evaluated by one-dimensional models. The reversion elimination algorithm has been used to include the effects of natural convection among the water layers at different heights in the tank on the thermal stratification. A finite difference implicit scheme has been implemented to solve the energy conservation equation in the coil heat exchanger, and the energy conservation equation in the tank has been solved by using the finite difference Euler implicit scheme. Energy conservation equations for the solar DHW components models have been coupled by means of a home-made implicit algorithm. Results of the simulation performed using as input data the experimental values of the ambient temperature and the solar irradiance in a summer day are presented and discussed.

  17. Domestic wash-water reclamation using an aerospace-developed water recovery subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, J. B., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    A prototype aerospace distillation water recovery subsystem was tested to determine its capability to recover potable water from domestic wash water. A total of 0.0994 cu m (26.25 gallons) of domestic wash water was processed over a 7-day period at an average process rate of 0.0146 cu m per day (3.85 gallons per day). The subsystem produced water that met all United States Public Health Standards for drinking water with the exception of two standards which could not be analyzed at the required sensitivity levels. Average energy consumption for this evaluation to maintain both the recovery process and microbial control in the recovered water was approximately 3366 kilowatt-hours per cubic meter (12.74 kilowatt-hours per gallon) of water recovered. This condition represents a worst case energy consumption since no attempt was made to recover heat energy in the subsystem. An ultraviolet radiation cell installed in the effluent line of the subsystem was effective in controlling coliform micro-organisms within acceptable levels for drinking water. The subsystem recovered virtually 100 percent of the available water in the waste-water process. In addition, the subsystem removed 99.6 percent and 98.3 percent of the surfactants and phosphate, respectively, from the wash water.

  18. Expert Meeting Report: Recommendations for Applying Water Heaters in Combination Space and Domestic Water Heating Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Rudd, A.; Ueno, K.; Bergey, D.; Osser, R.

    2012-07-01

    The topic of this meeting was 'Recommendations For Applying Water Heaters In Combination Space And Domestic Water Heating Systems.' Presentations and discussions centered on the design, performance, and maintenance of these combination systems, with the goal of developing foundational information toward the development of a Building America Measure Guideline on this topic. The meeting was held at the Westford Regency Hotel, in Westford, Massachusetts on 7/31/2011.

  19. Comparing Sediment and Pore-water Measurements as Predictors of PCB Uptake by Oligochaetes from Sediments

    EPA Science Inventory

    There is an increasing amount of chemical and biological evidence that using sediment concentrations and commonly applied Koc values frequently overpredicts interstitial water concentrations of HOCs, and thereby overestimates uptake and/or effects of those chemicals on exposed or...

  20. Toxicity of silicon carbide nanowires to sediment-dwelling invertebrates in water or sediment exposures.

    PubMed

    Mwangi, Joseph N; Wang, Ning; Ritts, Andrew; Kunz, James L; Ingersoll, Christopher G; Li, Hao; Deng, Baolin

    2011-04-01

    Silicon carbide nanowires (SiCNW) are insoluble in water. When released into an aquatic environment, SiCNW would likely accumulate in sediment. The objective of this study was to assess the toxicity of SiCNW to four freshwater sediment-dwelling organisms: amphipods (Hyalella azteca), midges (Chironomus dilutus), oligochaetes (Lumbriculus variegatus), and mussels (Lampsilis siliquoidea). Amphipods were exposed to either sonicated or nonsonicated SiCNW in water (1.0?g/L) for 48?h. Midges, mussels, and oligochaetes were exposed only to sonicated SiCNW in water for 96?h. In addition, amphipods were exposed to sonicated SiCNW in whole sediment for 10 d (44% SiCNW on dry wt basis). Mean 48-h survival of amphipods exposed to nonsonicated SiCNW in water was not significantly different from the control, whereas mean survival of amphipods exposed to sonicated SiCNW in two 48-h exposures (0 or 15% survival) was significantly different from the control (90 or 98% survival). In contrast, no effect of sonicated SiCNW was observed on survival of midges, mussels, or oligochaetes. Survival of amphipods was not significantly reduced in 10-d exposures to sonicated SiCNW either mixed in the sediment or layered on the sediment surface. However, significant reduction in amphipod biomass was observed with the SiCNW either mixed in sediment or layered on the sediment surface, and the reduction was more pronounced for SiCNW layered on the sediment. These results indicated that, under the experimental conditions, nonsonicated SiCNW in water were not acutely toxic to amphipods, sonicated SiCNW in water were acutely toxic to the amphipods, but not to other organisms tested, and sonicated SiCNW in sediment affected the growth but not the survival of amphipods. PMID:21305577

  1. Toxicity of silicon carbide nanowires to sediment-dwelling invertebrates in water or sediment exposures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mwangi, Joseph N.; Wang, Ning; Ritts, Andrew; Kunz, James L.; Ingersoll, Christopher G.; Li, Hao; Deng, Baolin

    2011-01-01

    Silicon carbide nanowires (SiCNW) are insoluble in water. When released into an aquatic environment, SiCNW would likely accumulate in sediment. The objective of this study was to assess the toxicity of SiCNW to four freshwater sediment-dwelling organisms: amphipods (Hyalella azteca), midges (Chironomus dilutus), oligochaetes (Lumbriculus variegatus), and mussels (Lampsilis siliquoidea). Amphipods were exposed to either sonicated or nonsonicated SiCNW in water (1.0 g/L) for 48 h. Midges, mussels, and oligochaetes were exposed only to sonicated SiCNW in water for 96 h. In addition, amphipods were exposed to sonicated SiCNW in whole sediment for 10 d (44% SiCNW on dry wt basis). Mean 48-h survival of amphipods exposed to nonsonicated SiCNW in water was not significantly different from the control, whereas mean survival of amphipods exposed to sonicated SiCNW in two 48-h exposures (0 or 15% survival) was significantly different from the control (90 or 98% survival). In contrast, no effect of sonicated SiCNW was observed on survival of midges, mussels, or oligochaetes. Survival of amphipods was not significantly reduced in 10-d exposures to sonicated SiCNW either mixed in the sediment or layered on the sediment surface. However, significant reduction in amphipod biomass was observed with the SiCNW either mixed in sediment or layered on the sediment surface, and the reduction was more pronounced for SiCNW layered on the sediment. These results indicated that, under the experimental conditions, nonsonicated SiCNW in water were not acutely toxic to amphipods, sonicated SiCNW in water were acutely toxic to the amphipods, but not to other organisms tested, and sonicated SiCNW in sediment affected the growth but not the survival of amphipods.

  2. DISTRIBUTION OF ORGANIC WASTEWATER CONTAMINANTS BETWEEN WATER AND SEDIMENT IN SURFACE WATERS OF THE UNITED STATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Trace concentrations of pharmaceuticals and other organic wastewater contaminants have been determined in the surface waters of Europe and the United States. A preliminary report of substantially higher concentrations of pharmaceuticals in sediment suggests that bottom sediment ...

  3. Cold-Climate Solar Domestic Hot Water Systems Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Burch, J.; Salasovich, J.; Hillman, T.

    2005-11-01

    The Solar Heating and Lighting Sub-program has set the key goal to reduce the cost of saved energy [Csav, defined as (total cost, $)/(total discounted savings, kWh_thermal)] for solar domestic water heaters (SDWH) by at least 50%. To determine if this goal is attainable and prioritize R&D for cold-climate SDWH, life-cycle analyses were done with hypothetical lower-cost components in glycol, drainback, and thermosiphon systems. Balance-of-system (BOS, everything but the collector) measures included replacing metal components with polymeric versions and system simplification. With all BOS measures in place, Csav could be reduced more than 50% with a low-cost, selectively-coated, glazed polymeric collector, and slightly less than 50% with either a conventional selective metal-glass or a non-selective glazed polymer collector. The largest percent reduction in Csav comes from replacing conventional pressurized solar storage tanks and metal heat exchangers with un-pressurized polymer tanks with immersed polymer heat exchangers, which could be developed with relatively low-risk R&D.

  4. Methylantimony and -arsenic species in sediment pore water tested with the sediment or fauna incubation experiment.

    PubMed

    Duester, Lars; Vink, Jos P M; Hirner, Alfred V

    2008-08-15

    In this study, the speciation of arsenic (As) and antimony (Sb) across a water-sediment interface and the formation of mono-, di-, and trimethylated species overtime in a microfiltered pore water solution were examined. We used an experimental technique, known as the sediment or fauna incubation experiment (SOFIE), which enables the determination of chemical speciation across redox zones in undisturbed systems. Five different incubation experiments were run: Over a 76 day incubation period, pore water was sampled and speciated 5 times. These experiments revealed the complete methylated species pattern for arsenic and antimony in the microfiltered sediment pore water. This constitutes the first report of methylated As and Sb species in a true pore water solution of sediments. Predominant organic species were dimethylantimony (DMSb up to 2.7 microg/L) and dimethylarsenic (DMAs up to 4.3 microg/L) followed by monomethylated species (MMAs and MMSb). These data (i) indicate that methylation significantly influences the translocation of As and Sb in sediments, (ii) demonstrate good agreement between the occurrence of methylantimony and the occurrence of methylarsenic in the pore water, (iii) reveal that As transformation in sediments is faster than Sb transformation but is more susceptible to disturbances from acidification, and (iv) regarding the translocation of these elements and antimony in particular, methylation is clearly a relevant, and perhaps as yet underestimated, factor. PMID:18767637

  5. Promising freeze protection alternatives in solar domestic hot water systems

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, D.E.

    1997-12-31

    Since the gains associated with solar thermal energy technologies are comparatively small in relation to the required capital investment, it is vital to maximize conversion efficiency. While providing the necessary function of freeze protection, the heat exchanger commonly included in solar domestic water heating systems represents a system inefficiency. This thesis explores two alternate methods of providing freeze protection without resorting to a heat exchanger. Commonly, collectors are made of rigid copper tubes separated by copper or aluminum fins. Cracking damage can occur when water is allowed to freeze and expand inside the non compliant tubes. The possibility of making collectors out of an elastic material was investigated and shown to be effective. Since unlike copper, elastomers typically have low thermal conductivities, the standard collector performance prediction equations do not apply. Modified thermal performance prediction equations were developed which can be used for both low and high thermal conductivity materials to provide accurate predictions within a limited range of plate geometries. An elastomeric collector plate was then designed and shown to have comparable performance to a copper plate collector whose aperture area is approximately 33% smaller. Another options for providing freeze protection to an SDHW system is to turn it off during the winter. Choosing a three-season operating period means two things. First, the system will have different optimums such as slope and collector area. Second, the wintertime solar energy incident on the collector is unavailable for meeting a heating load. However, the system`s heat exchanger becomes unnecessary and removing it increases the amount of energy that arrives at the storage tank during those periods in which the system is operating.

  6. Domestic wash water reclamation for reuse as commode water supply using filtration: Reverse-osmosis separation technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, J. B., Jr.; Batten, C. E.; Wilkins, J. R.

    1974-01-01

    A combined filtration-reverse-osmosis water recovery system has been evaluated to determine its capability to reclaim domestic wash water for reuse as a commode water supply. The system produced water that met all chemical and physical requirements established by the U.S. Public Health Service for drinking water with the exception of carbon chloroform extractables, methylene blue active substances, and phenols. It is thought that this water is of sufficient quality to be reused as commode supply water. The feasibility of using a combined filtration and reverse-osmosis technique for reclaiming domestic wash water has been established. The use of such a technique for wash-water recovery will require a maintenance filter to remove solid materials including those less than 1 micron in size from the wash water. The reverse-osmosis module, if sufficiently protected from plugging, is an attractive low-energy technique for removing contaminants from domestic wash water.

  7. Comparison Between TRNSYS Software Simulation and F-Chart Program on Solar Domestic Hot Water System 

    E-print Network

    Haberl, J. S.; Baltazar, J. C.; Mao, C.

    2012-01-01

    This study presents the accuracy test of a TRNSYS Solar Domestic Hot Water (SDHW) System simulation. The testing is based on comparing the results with the F-Chart software. The selected system to carry out the tests was the Active Solar Domestic...

  8. Sediment Transport and Water Quality Model of Cedar Lake, Indiana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, S. C.; Jones, C. A.; Roberts, J. D.; Ahlmann, M.; Bucaro, D. A.

    2006-12-01

    The EPA-supported Environmental Fluid Dynamics Code, EFDC, is used to model hydrodynamics, sediment transport, and water quality in coastal regions, estuaries, rivers, and lakes. However, the empirical formulations used for sediment transport are not always adequate to accurately characterize cohesive sediment erosion and transport. New sediment transport subroutines have been incorporated into EFDC and the new model is called SNL-EFDC. The updated model provides an improved, coupled hydrodynamics, sediment transport, and water quality framework. The newly incorporated sediment transport subroutines facilitate direct use of measured erosion rate data from the Sediment Erosion with Depth Flume (SEDflume). Erosion rates are included as functions of both depth within the sediment bed and applied shear stresses. This bypasses problems associated with empirical erosion formulations often based on disaggregated particle size. Restoration alternatives are under consideration for Cedar Lake in Indiana and SNL-EFDC models its hydrodynamics, sediment transport, and water quality. The water quality model as implemented on Cedar Lake tracks algae, oxygen, temperature, carbon, phosphorous, and nitrogen kinetics, as well as, sediment bed diagenesis. Environmental conditions, wind, temperature, rainfall, and sunlight, were based on data collected in 2005. Tributary loading was modeled using L-THIA and provided influxes of water, nutrients (phosphorous, nitrogen, etc.), and sediments. The calibrated model was used to simulate a nine month period from March to November 2005. Results suggest that the model simulates sediments transport and associated water quality correctly. The calibrated model is being used to evaluate several restoration measures throughout the lake and watershed and their effect on water quality. Because Cedar Lake is a nitrogen limited lake, changes in the level of eutrophication from each measure are being tracked by calculating the Carlson trophic state index based on total phosphorus. To date, several dredging measures have been modeled and the measure resulting in the greatest benefit to water quality per unit dredge volume was identified. Several other restoration measures including nutrient inactivation, increasing dilution, creation of in-lake structures, aquatic vegetation restoration, institutional controls, fish community management, and reducing tributary loadings are currently being modeled and evaluated. As part of the Cedar Lake Ecosystem Restoration Feasibility Study currently being developed by the Chicago District of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, results from the EFDC-SNL model will be used to justify a recommended ecosystem restoration plan for implementation. Sandia National Laboratories is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy under Contract DE AC04 94AL85000.

  9. Microbiological Evaluation of Water Quality from Urban Watersheds for Domestic Water Supply Improvement

    PubMed Central

    Ibekwe, A. Mark; Murinda, Shelton E.; Graves, Alexandria K.

    2011-01-01

    Agricultural and urban runoffs may be major sources of pollution of water bodies and major sources of bacteria affecting the quality of drinking water. Of the different pathways by which bacterial pathogens can enter drinking water, this one has received little attention to date; that is, because soils are often considered to be near perfect filters for the transport of bacterial pathogens through the subsoil to groundwater. The goals of this study were to determine the distribution, diversity, and antimicrobial resistance of pathogenic Escherichia coli isolates from low flowing river water and sediment with inputs from different sources before water is discharged into ground water and to compare microbial contamination in water and sediment at different sampling sites. Water and sediment samples were collected from 19 locations throughout the watershed for the isolation of pathogenic E. coli. Heterotrophic plate counts and E. coli were also determined after running tertiary treated water through two tanks containing aquifer sand material. Presumptive pathogenic E. coli isolates were obtained and characterized for virulent factors and antimicrobial resistance. None of the isolates was confirmed as Shiga toxin E. coli (STEC), but as others, such as enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC). Pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) was used to show the diversity E. coli populations from different sources throughout the watershed. Seventy six percent of the isolates from urban sources exhibited resistance to more than one antimicrobial agent. A subsequent filtration experiment after water has gone through filtration tanks containing aquifer sand material showed that there was a 1 to 2 log reduction in E. coli in aquifer sand tank. Our data showed multiple strains of E. coli without virulence attributes, but with high distribution of resistant phenotypes. Therefore, the occurrence of E. coli with multiple resistances in the environment is a matter of great concern due to possible transfer of resistant genes from nonpathogenic to pathogenic strains that may result in increased duration and severity of morbidity. PMID:22408583

  10. Building America Top Innovations 2012: Model Simulating Real Domestic Hot Water Use

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2013-01-01

    This Building America Top Innovations profile describes Building America research that is improving domestic hot water modeling capabilities to more effectively address one of the largest energy uses in residential buildings.

  11. Sediment tracers in water erosion studies: Current approaches and challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzmán, Gema; Quinton, John N.; Nearing, Mark A.; Mabit, Lionel; Giráldez, Juan V.; Gómez, José A.

    2013-04-01

    The quest for alternative methods of soil losses assessment, due to water erosion to complement and enhance existing methods has directed attention to the use of tracing approaches because of the additional information they provide, such as sediment source identification, tracking of sediment movement across the landscape at various temporal and spatial scales and soil erosion rates. For these reasons, the utility and robustness of sediment tracing approaches using a wide range of substances and soil properties have been evaluated in numerous studies. A comprehensive literature review on tracing approaches used in water erosion studies was carried out in June 2011 using the Web of Science database and as search terms in the title or as keywords: "erosion AND tracer" OR "sediment AND tracer" OR "sediment AND tracking". The search excluded reviews and tillage and/or wind erosion studies. Only studies that used tracers to make a determination of water erosion or sedimentation rates, or in some cases relative erosion contribution, were considered in this study, and were further refined by manually checking that the articles corresponded to experiments involving sediment studies using tracers, as defined within the context of this review. Five distinct groups of tracing approaches were identified: fallout radionuclides, rare earth elements, soil magnetism and magnetic substances, other tracers, and sediment fingerprinting techniques. This abstract presents a synthesis of the current approaches of each of the tracing techniques identified in assessing soil erosion and sediment redistribution and a summary with the commonalities and differences between the approaches and identifying research gaps and future trends.

  12. Water recovery and solid waste processing for aerospace and domestic applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murawczyk, C.

    1973-01-01

    The work is described accomplished in compiling information needed to establish the current water supply and waste water processing requirements for dwellings, and for developing a preliminary design for a waste water to potable water management system. Data generated was used in formulation of design criteria for the preliminary design of the waste water to potable water recycling system. The system as defined was sized for a group of 500 dwelling units. Study tasks summarized include: water consumption, nature of domestic water, consumer appliances for low water consumption, water quality monitoring, baseline concept, and current and projected costs.

  13. Spectroscopic analyses of pollutants in water, sediment and fish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel-Gawad, Fagr Kh.; Ibrahim, Hanan S.; Ammar, Nabila S.; Ibrahim, Medhat

    2012-11-01

    Water ways in Egypt is suffering from continual discharge without adequate treatment especially in the Delta and greater Cairo area. Accordingly water, sediments and catfishes were collected from El Mouheet El Youmna drain in Giza. Cd, Cr, Pb and Zn were determined furthermore the molecular structure of sediment and catfish were conducted with FTIR spectroscopy. Although studied metals were lower in water, higher values are recorded in sediment and catfish samples. FTIR shows possible interaction among metals and organic structures mainly proteins. The bioaccumulation of Pb and Cd proportion was significantly increased in the liver tissues of catfish. A correlation coefficient among sediment and fish liver metals accumulation exist. This infers that the waste assimilation capacity for the drain is high, a phenomena that could be ascribed to dilution, sedimentation and continual water exchange. Furthermore, the genotoxicity affect in catfish genomic corroborates the genus diagnostic markers which attributed to long pollution. This is an indication that agriculture and industrial wastes discharged into the drain has badly a significant effect on the ecological balance.

  14. DETERMINATION OF OCTANOL/WATER DISTRIBUTION COEFFICIENTS, WATER SOLUBILITIES, AND SEDIMENT/WATER PARTITION COEFFICIENTS FOR HYDROPHOBIC ORGANIC POLLUTANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Octanol/water distribution coefficients, water solubilities, and sediment/water partition coefficients are basic to any assessment of transport or dispersion of organic pollutants. In addition, these determinations are prerequisites for many chemical or biological process studies...

  15. Bacterial Mercury Methylation At The Sediment-Water Interface Of Mercury Contaminated Sediments

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bench scale experiments were conducted to improve our understanding of bacterial mediation of mercury transformation (methylation), specifically those factors which govern the production of methyl mercury (MeHg) at the sediment-water interface. The greatest cause for concern re...

  16. Measure Guideline. Combination Forced-Air Space and Tankless Domestic Hot Water Heating Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Rudd, Armin

    2012-08-01

    This document describes design and application guidance for combination space and tankless domestic hot water heating systems (combination systems) used in residential buildings, based on field evaluation, testing, and industry meetings conducted by Building Science Corporation. As residential building enclosure improvements continue to drive heating loads down, using the same water heating equipment for both space heating and domestic water heating becomes attractive from an initial cost and space-saving perspective. This topic is applicable to single- and multi-family residential buildings, both new and retrofitted.

  17. Measure Guideline: Combination Forced-Air Space and Tankless Domestic Hot Water Heating Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Rudd, A.

    2012-08-01

    This document describes design and application guidance for combination space and tankless domestic hot water heating systems (combination systems) used in residential buildings, based on field evaluation, testing, and industry meetings conducted by Building Science Corporation. As residential building enclosure improvements continue to drive heating loads down, using the same water heating equipment for both space heating and domestic water heating becomes attractive from an initial cost and space-saving perspective. This topic is applicable to single- and multi-family residential buildings, both new and retrofitted.

  18. Development of Standardized Domestic Hot Water Event Schedules for Residential Buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Hendron, R.; Burch, J.

    2008-08-01

    The Building America Research Benchmark is a standard house definition created as a point of reference for tracking progress toward multi-year energy savings targets. As part of its development, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory has established a set of domestic hot water events to be used in conjunction with sub-hourly analysis of advanced hot water systems.

  19. Aggregation of fine particles at the sediment-water interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolzenbach, Keith D.; Newman, Kathleen A.; Wong, Charles S.

    1992-11-01

    The presence of a bottom sediment layer agitated by mechanical stirring or by resident organisms (tubificid oligochaetes) significantly increases the rate at which fine (1 ?m) cohesive particles are removed from suspension in laboratory columns. Measured rates of particle removal are equivalent to deposition velocities ranging from 0.23 m day-1 to 0.41 m day-1. These rates are an order of magnitude faster than deposition by gravitational settling or coagulation with larger particles in the water column as observed in experimental controls. It is hypothesized that the increased removal rate is the result of aggregation in a sediment layer at the bed-water interface characterized by loosely bound (fluffy), porous material hydrodynamically coupled to the water column. According to this hypothesis particle removal occurs when motion of the overlying water or organism activity causes suspended fine particles to collide with and stick to the interfacial sediment. This new hypothesis is supported by the mass and size distribution of tracer particles recovered in cores and sediment traps at a coastal site and by theoretical estimates of interfacial aggregation rates.

  20. 19. EMPTY SEDIMENTATION TANKS. TOP LAYER OF WATER FLOWS OVER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. EMPTY SEDIMENTATION TANKS. TOP LAYER OF WATER FLOWS OVER TRIANGULATED CHANNELS AND OUT THE RAISED DUCTS TO FILTRATION PLANT. MOVEABLE BOARDS ON BOTTOM ASSIST IN REMOVING SLUDGE. VIEW LOOKING NORTHEAST. FILTER CONTROL BUILDING AT REAR. - F. E. Weymouth Filtration Plant, 700 North Moreno Avenue, La Verne, Los Angeles County, CA

  1. Extraction and concentration of phenolic compounds from water and sediment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goldberg, M.C.; Weiner, Eugene R.

    1980-01-01

    Continuous liquid-liquid extractors are used to concentrate phenols at the ??g l-1 level from water into dichloromethane; this is followed by Kuderna-Danish evaporative concentration and gas chromatography. The procedure requires 5 h for 18 l of sample water. Overall concentration factors around 1000 are obtained. Overall concentration efficiencies vary from 23.1 to 87.1%. Concentration efficiencies determined by a batch method suitable for sediments range from 18.9 to 73.8%. ?? 1980.

  2. THE IMPACT OF URBAN STORM WATER RUNOFF AND DOMESTIC WASTE EFFLUENT ON WATER QUALITY OF LAKE TANA AND LOCAL

    E-print Network

    THE IMPACT OF URBAN STORM WATER RUNOFF AND DOMESTIC WASTE EFFLUENT ON WATER QUALITY OF LAKE TANA AND LOCAL GROUNDWATER NEAR THE CITY OF BAHIR DAR, ETHIOPIA A Thesis Presented to the Faculty of the Graduate areas, the main task of town planners and engineers is providing drainage structures to prevent flooding

  3. Solar heating and domestic hot water system installed at North Dallas High School. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-05-01

    This Document is the Final Technical Report of the Solar Energy System located at the North Dallas High School, Dallas, Texas. The system is designed as a retrofit in a three story with basement, concrete frame high school building. The building was air conditioned with an electric drive 300-ton chilled water central system in 1973. The building contains 126,000 square feet and the solar energy system will preheat 100 percent of domestic hot water and supply 47.5 percent of annual building heating requirements. During the building cooling seasons, the solar energy system will supply 100 percent of domestic hot water. The solar energy system consists of 4800 square feet (320 panels) Lennox/Honeywell flat plate liquid collector subsystem, and a 10,000 gallon steel tank storage subsystem circulating hot water producing 686.6 x 10/sup 6/ Btu/year (specified) building heating and domestic hot water heating. The start up date is December 4, 1979. Extracts from the site files, specification references for solar modification to existing building heating and domestic hot water systems, drawings, installation, operation and maintenance instructions are presented.

  4. IMPORTANCE OF INTERSTITIAL, OVERLYING WATER AND WHOLE SEDIMENT EXPOSURES TO BIOACCUMUALTION BY MARINE BIVALVES

    EPA Science Inventory

    During the performance of contaminated sediment studies using nonpolar pollutants, like polyclorinated biphenyls (PCBs), with marine organisms, the routes of exposure can include whole sediment, overlying waters and interstitial waters (assuming no feeding). These routes can be f...

  5. Water recovery and solid waste processing for aerospace and domestic applications. Volume 1: Final report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murray, R. W.

    1973-01-01

    A comprehensive study of advanced water recovery and solid waste processing techniques employed in both aerospace and domestic or commercial applications is reported. A systems approach was used to synthesize a prototype system design of an advanced water treatment/waste processing system. Household water use characteristics were studied and modified through the use of low water use devices and a limited amount of water reuse. This modified household system was then used as a baseline system for development of several water treatment waste processing systems employing advanced techniques. A hybrid of these systems was next developed and a preliminary design was generated to define system and hardware functions.

  6. Occurrence and significance of polychlorinated biphenyls in water, sediment pore water and surface sediments of Umgeni River, KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Gakuba, Emmanuel; Moodley, Brenda; Ndungu, Patrick; Birungi, Grace

    2015-09-01

    The Umgeni River is one of the main sources of water in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa; however; there is currently a lack of information on the presence and distribution of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in its sediment, sediment pore water and surface water. This study aims to determine the occurrence and significance of selected PCBs in the surface water, sediment pore water and surface sediment samples from the Umgeni River. Liquid-liquid and soxhlet extractions were used for water or pore water, and sediments, respectively. Extracts were cleaned up using a florisil column and analysed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The total concentrations of eight polychlorinated biphenyls were 6.91-21.69 ng/mL, 40.67-252.30 ng/mL and 102.60-427.80 ng/g (dry weight), in unfiltered surface water, unfiltered sediment pore water and surface sediments, respectively. The percentage contributions of various matrices were 4, 36 and 60 % for unfiltered surface water, unfiltered pore water and sediment, respectively. The highest concentrations of PCBs were found in water, pore water and sediment collected from sampling sites close to the Northern Wastewater Treatment Works. The highest chlorinated biphenyl, PCB 180, was the most abundant at almost all sampling sites. To our knowledge, this is the first report on occurrence of polychlorinated biphenyls in the Umgeni River water, pore water and sediment system and our results provide valuable information regarding the partitioning of the PCBs between the water and sediment systems as well as the organic chemical quality of the water. PMID:26266899

  7. Solar heating, cooling and domestic hot water system installed at Columbia Gas System Service Corp. , Columbus, Ohio. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1980-11-01

    The Solar Energy System located at the Columbia Gas Corporation, Columbus, Ohio, has 2978 ft/sup 2/ of Honeywell single axis tracking, concentrating collectors and provides solar energy for space heating, space cooling and domestic hot water. A 1,200,000 Btu/h Bryan water-tube gas boiler provides hot water for space heating. Space cooling is provided by a 100 ton Arkla hot water fired absorption chiller. Domestic hot water heating is provided by a 50 gallon natural gas domestic storage water heater. Extracts are included from the site files, specification references, drawings, installation, operation and maintenance instructions.

  8. Solar heating, cooling and domestic hot water system installed at Columbia Gas System Service Corporation, Columbus, Ohio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    The solar energy system installed in the building has 2,978 sq ft of single axis tracking, concentrating collectors and provides solar energy for space heating, space cooling and domestic hot water. A 1,200,000 Btu/hour water tube gas boiler provides hot water for space heating. Space cooling is provided by a 100 ton hot water fired absorption chiller. Domestic hot water heating is provided by a 50 gallon natural gas domestic storage water heater. Extracts from the site files, specification references, drawings, installation, operation and maintenance instructions are included.

  9. Estimate of self-supplied domestic water use in Nebraska during 1980

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Steele, E.K.

    1985-01-01

    No data base of actual measurements exists for self-supplied, domestic water use in Nebraska, because Nebraska laws do not require drilling permits, well registration, or reporting of volumes withdrawn from domestic wells. Self-supplied, domestic water use of 31,280 acre-ft in Nebraska during 1980 was computed from estimates of gal/day/capita use for each county. This represents an average of 95 gal/day/capita. During 1980, county use volumes ranged from 30 acre-ft in Hooker and Pawnee Counties to 1,380 acre-ft in Douglas County, and Hydrologic Unit use volumes ranged from < 5 acre-ft to 2,270 acre-ft. Natural Resources Districts ' (NRD) use volumes ranged from 360 acre-ft in Middle Niobrara NRD to 3,530 acre-feet in the Lower Elkhorn NRD for the same period. (Author 's abstract)

  10. Preliminary design package for Sunspot Domestic Hot Water Heating System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The design review includes a drawing list, auto-control logic, measurement definitions, and other document pertaining to the solar heated prototype hot water systems and two heat exchangers. The hot water systems consist of the following subsystems: collector, storage, control transport, auxiliary energy, and site data acquisition.

  11. Comparison of six generic solar domestic hot water systems

    SciTech Connect

    Farrington, R.B.; Murphy, L.M.; Noreen, D.L.

    1980-04-01

    The cost effectiveness of residential solar water heating is explored by analyzing six different system types. A figure of merit (that considers both performance and cost) is calculated for each system, providing information for both researchers and industry. Thermosyphon water heaters are determined to be the most cost effective option, and their wider application is recommended once a reliable draindown technique is developed.

  12. 30 CFR 77.216-3 - Water, sediment, or slurry impoundments and impounding structures; inspection requirements...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Water, sediment, or slurry impoundments and... COAL MINES Surface Installations § 77.216-3 Water, sediment, or slurry impoundments and impounding structures; inspection requirements; correction of hazards; program requirements. (a) All water, sediment,...

  13. 30 CFR 77.216 - Water, sediment, or slurry impoundments and impounding structures; general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Water, sediment, or slurry impoundments and... WORK AREAS OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Surface Installations § 77.216 Water, sediment, or slurry... structures which impound water, sediment, or slurry shall be required if such an existing or...

  14. 30 CFR 77.216-3 - Water, sediment, or slurry impoundments and impounding structures; inspection requirements...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Water, sediment, or slurry impoundments and... COAL MINES Surface Installations § 77.216-3 Water, sediment, or slurry impoundments and impounding structures; inspection requirements; correction of hazards; program requirements. (a) All water, sediment,...

  15. 30 CFR 77.216 - Water, sediment, or slurry impoundments and impounding structures; general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Water, sediment, or slurry impoundments and... WORK AREAS OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Surface Installations § 77.216 Water, sediment, or slurry... structures which impound water, sediment, or slurry shall be required if such an existing or...

  16. 30 CFR 77.216 - Water, sediment, or slurry impoundments and impounding structures; general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Water, sediment, or slurry impoundments and... WORK AREAS OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Surface Installations § 77.216 Water, sediment, or slurry... structures which impound water, sediment, or slurry shall be required if such an existing or...

  17. 30 CFR 77.216-3 - Water, sediment, or slurry impoundments and impounding structures; inspection requirements...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Water, sediment, or slurry impoundments and... COAL MINES Surface Installations § 77.216-3 Water, sediment, or slurry impoundments and impounding structures; inspection requirements; correction of hazards; program requirements. (a) All water, sediment,...

  18. 30 CFR 77.216 - Water, sediment, or slurry impoundments and impounding structures; general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Water, sediment, or slurry impoundments and... WORK AREAS OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Surface Installations § 77.216 Water, sediment, or slurry... structures which impound water, sediment, or slurry shall be required if such an existing or...

  19. 30 CFR 77.216 - Water, sediment, or slurry impoundments and impounding structures; general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Water, sediment, or slurry impoundments and... WORK AREAS OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Surface Installations § 77.216 Water, sediment, or slurry... structures which impound water, sediment, or slurry shall be required if such an existing or...

  20. 30 CFR 77.216-3 - Water, sediment, or slurry impoundments and impounding structures; inspection requirements...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Water, sediment, or slurry impoundments and... COAL MINES Surface Installations § 77.216-3 Water, sediment, or slurry impoundments and impounding structures; inspection requirements; correction of hazards; program requirements. (a) All water, sediment,...

  1. 30 CFR 77.216-3 - Water, sediment, or slurry impoundments and impounding structures; inspection requirements...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Water, sediment, or slurry impoundments and... COAL MINES Surface Installations § 77.216-3 Water, sediment, or slurry impoundments and impounding structures; inspection requirements; correction of hazards; program requirements. (a) All water, sediment,...

  2. 30 CFR 77.216-3 - Water, sediment, or slurry impoundments and impounding structures; inspection requirements...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Water, sediment, or slurry impoundments...Installations § 77.216-3 Water, sediment, or slurry impoundments...program requirements. (a) All water, sediment, or slurry impoundments...immediately after a specified rain event approved by the...

  3. 30 CFR 77.216-3 - Water, sediment, or slurry impoundments and impounding structures; inspection requirements...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Water, sediment, or slurry impoundments...Installations § 77.216-3 Water, sediment, or slurry impoundments...program requirements. (a) All water, sediment, or slurry impoundments...immediately after a specified rain event approved by the...

  4. 30 CFR 77.216-3 - Water, sediment, or slurry impoundments and impounding structures; inspection requirements...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Water, sediment, or slurry impoundments...Installations § 77.216-3 Water, sediment, or slurry impoundments...program requirements. (a) All water, sediment, or slurry impoundments...immediately after a specified rain event approved by the...

  5. 30 CFR 77.216-3 - Water, sediment, or slurry impoundments and impounding structures; inspection requirements...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Water, sediment, or slurry impoundments...Installations § 77.216-3 Water, sediment, or slurry impoundments...program requirements. (a) All water, sediment, or slurry impoundments...immediately after a specified rain event approved by the...

  6. 30 CFR 77.216-3 - Water, sediment, or slurry impoundments and impounding structures; inspection requirements...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Water, sediment, or slurry impoundments...Installations § 77.216-3 Water, sediment, or slurry impoundments...program requirements. (a) All water, sediment, or slurry impoundments...immediately after a specified rain event approved by the...

  7. Assessment of physico-chemical properties and metal contents of water and sediments of Bodo Creek, Niger Delta, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Vincent-Akpu, Ijeoma Favour; Tyler, Andrew N.; Wilson, Clare; Mackinnon, Gillian

    2015-01-01

    Some physico-chemical properties and the concentrations of the metals Fe, Mn, Ni, Cd, Cr, Co, Cu, Pb, and Zn in water and sediments were examined from September 2011 to January 2012 in Bodo Creek, where oil spills have been recurrent. Temperature, pH, total dissolved solid, conductivity, salinity, dissolved oxygen, biological oxygen demand (BOD), chemical oxygen demand (COD), total hardness, sulfate, nitrate, and phosphate were determined in surface water. Particle size, total organic matter (TOM), and pH were also determined in the sediments. The parameters were within permissible limits except the mean values of BOD, COD, total hardness, and sulfate that exceeded levels permissible for domestic use. The sediments consisted mainly of sand, with TOM ranging from 0.2% to 5.5%. With the exception of cadmium that was below detection limit, metal levels (mg kg?1) in the sediments were 12 (Mn), 1070 (Fe), 10 (Cu), 10 (Zn), 5.3 (Cr), 1.1 (Pb), 1.0 (Ni), and 0.5 (Co) while in water they were 24, 98, 21, 6.9, 4.0, 0.6, 0.18, and 0.16, respectively. The latter were higher than World Health Organization recommended permissible levels for both surface and drinking water. PMID:26681819

  8. Domestic hot water consumption of the developed and developing communities in South Africa

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, J.P.

    1999-07-01

    Domestic hot water consumption for five different types of dwellings in the developed and developing communities of the Johannesburg Metropolitan Area, South Africa, are determined with measurements over a period of one year (1996) in more than 770 dwellings. The hot water consumption was taken monthly with the exception of 310 dwellings where the measurements were logged, resulting in hourly hot water consumptions. The results of the two types of measurements are presented: first, hot water consumption per person per day for the different months of a year; second, hourly hot water consumption per person per day as a function of winter weekdays.

  9. Solar heating and domestic hot water system installed at North Dallas High School

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    The solar energy system located at the North Dallas High School, Dallas, Texas is discussed. The system is designed as a retrofit in a three story with basement, concrete frame high school building. Extracts from the site files, specification references for solar modification to existing building heating and domestic hot water systems, drawings, installation, operation and maintenance instructions are included.

  10. Commissioning the Domestic Hot Water System on a Large University Campus: A Case Study 

    E-print Network

    Chen, H.; Bensouda, N.; Claridge, D.; Bruner, H.

    2004-01-01

    The Texas A&M University (TAMU) main campus in College Station consists of 110 buildings with 12.5 million square feet of gross building space. Seventy-one of these buildings are connected to the main campus domestic hot water (DHW) distribution...

  11. Remote Sensing of Suspended Sediments and Shallow Coastal Waters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Rong-Rong; Kaufman, Yoram J.; Gao, Bo-Cai; Davis, Curtiss O.

    2002-01-01

    Ocean color sensors were designed mainly for remote sensing of chlorophyll concentrations over the clear open oceanic areas (case 1 water) using channels between 0.4 and 0.86 micrometers. The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) launched on the NASA Terra and Aqua Spacecrafts is equipped with narrow channels located within a wider wavelength range between 0.4 and 2.5 micrometers for a variety of remote sensing applications. The wide spectral range can provide improved capabilities for remote sensing of the more complex and turbid coastal waters (case 2 water) and for improved atmospheric corrections for Ocean scenes. In this article, we describe an empirical algorithm that uses this wide spectral range to identifying areas with suspended sediments in turbid waters and shallow waters with bottom reflections. The algorithm takes advantage of the strong water absorption at wavelengths longer than 1 micrometer that does not allow illumination of sediments in the water or a shallow ocean floor. MODIS data acquired over the east coast of China, west coast of Africa, Arabian Sea, Mississippi Delta, and west coast of Florida are used in this study.

  12. Numerical Simulation of Sediment-Associated Water Quality Processes for a Mississippi Delta Lake

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Three major sediment-associated processes were presented to describe the effects of sediment on lake water quality processes: the effect of suspended sediment on the light intensity for the growth of phytoplankton (PHYTO), the adsorption–desorption of nutrients by sediment, and the release of nutrie...

  13. Report on water quality, sediment and water chemistry data for water and sediment samples collected from source areas to Melton Hill and Watts Bar reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Tomaszewski, T.M.; Bruggink, D.J.; Nunn, D.L.

    1995-08-18

    Contamination of surface water and sediments in the Clinch River and Watts Bar Reservoir (CR/WBR) system as a result of past and present activities by the US Department of Energy (DOE) on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) and also activities by non-ORR facilities are being studied by the Clinch River Environmental Restoration Program (CR-ERP). Previous studies have documented the presence of heavy metals, organics, and radionuclides in the sediments of reservoirs in the vicinity. In support of the CR-ERP, during the summer of 1991, TVA collected and evaluated water and sediment samples from swimming areas and municipal water intakes on Watts Bar Reservoir, Melton Hill Reservoir and Norris Reservoir, which was considered a source of less-contaminated reference or background data. Despite the numerous studies, until the current work documented by this report, relatively few sediment or water samples had been collected by the CR-ERP in the immediate vicinity of contaminant point sources. This work focused on water and sediment samples taken from points immediately downstream from suspected effluent point sources both on and off the ORR. In August and September, 1994, TVA sampled surface water and sediment at twelve locations in melton Hill and Watts Bar Reservoirs.

  14. Solar domestic hot water system installed at Texas City, Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1980-12-01

    This is the final technical report of the solar energy system located at LaQuinta Motor Inn, Texas City, Texas. The system was designed to supply 63 percent of the total hot water load for a new 98 unit motor inn. The solar energy system consists of a 2100 square feet Raypack liquid flat plate collector subsystem and a 2500 gallon storage subsystem circulating hot water producing 3.67 x 10 to the 8th power Btu/year. Abstracts from the site files, specification references, drawings, installation, operation, and maintenance instructions are included.

  15. Solar domestic hot water system installed at Texas City, Texas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    This is the final technical report of the solar energy system located at LaQuinta Motor Inn, Texas City, Texas. The system was designed to supply 63 percent of the total hot water load for a new 98 unit motor inn. The solar energy system consists of a 2100 square feet Raypack liquid flat plate collector subsystem and a 2500 gallon storage subsystem circulating hot water producing 3.67 x 10 to the 8th power Btu/year. Abstracts from the site files, specification references, drawings, installation, operation, and maintenance instructions are included.

  16. Can control of soil erosion mitigate water pollution by sediments?

    PubMed

    Rickson, R J

    2014-01-15

    The detrimental impact of sediment and associated pollutants on water quality is widely acknowledged, with many watercourses in the UK failing to meet the standard of 'good ecological status'. Catchment sediment budgets show that hill slope erosion processes can be significant sources of waterborne sediment, with rates of erosion likely to increase given predicted future weather patterns. However, linking on-site erosion rates with off-site impacts is complicated because of the limited data on soil erosion rates in the UK and the dynamic nature of the source-pathway-receptor continuum over space and time. Even so, soil erosion control measures are designed to reduce sediment production (source) and mobilisation/transport (pathway) on hill slopes, with consequent mitigation of pollution incidents in watercourses (receptors). The purpose of this paper is to review the scientific evidence of the effectiveness of erosion control measures used in the UK to reduce sediment loads of hill slope origin in watercourses. Although over 73 soil erosion mitigation measures have been identified from the literature, empirical data on erosion control effectiveness are limited. Baseline comparisons for the 18 measures where data do exist reveal erosion control effectiveness is highly variable over time and between study locations. Given the limitations of the evidence base in terms of geographical coverage and duration of monitoring, performance of the different measures cannot be extrapolated to other areas. This uncertainty in effectiveness has implications for implementing erosion/sediment risk reduction policies, where quantified targets are stipulated, as is the case in the EU Freshwater Fish and draft Soil Framework Directives. Also, demonstrating technical effectiveness of erosion control measures alone will not encourage uptake by land managers: quantifying the costs and benefits of adopting erosion mitigation is equally important, but these are uncertain and difficult to express in monetary terms. PMID:23815978

  17. Mineralogical Evidence of Galvanic Corrosion in Domestic, Drinking Water Pipes

    EPA Science Inventory

    Drinking water distribution system (DWDS) piping contains numerous examples of galvanically-coupled metals (e.g., soldered copper pipe joints, copper-lead pipes joined during partial replacements of lead service lines). The possible role of galvanic corrosion in the release of l...

  18. A sediment resuspension and water quality model of Lake Okeechobee

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    James, R.T.; Martin, J.; Wool, T.; Wang, P.-F.

    1997-01-01

    The influence of sediment resuspension on the water quality of shallow lakes is well documented. However, a search of the literature reveals no deterministic mass-balance eutrophication models that explicitly include resuspension. We modified the Lake Okeeehobee water quality model - which uses the Water Analysis Simulation Package (WASP) to simulate algal dynamics and phosphorus, nitrogen, and oxygen cycles - to include inorganic suspended solids and algorithms that: (1) define changes in depth with changes in volume; (2) compute sediment resuspension based on bottom shear stress; (3) compute partition coefficients for ammonia and ortho-phosphorus to solids; and (4) relate light attenuation to solids concentrations. The model calibration and validation were successful with the exception of dissolved inorganic nitrogen species which did not correspond well to observed data in the validation phase. This could be attributed to an inaccurate formulation of algal nitrogen preference and/or the absence of nitrogen fixation in the model. The model correctly predicted that the lake is lightlimited from resuspended solids, and algae are primarily nitrogen limited. The model simulation suggested that biological fluxes greatly exceed external loads of dissolved nutrients; and sedimentwater interactions of organic nitrogen and phosphorus far exceed external loads. A sensitivity analysis demonstrated that parameters affecting resuspension, settling, sediment nutrient and solids concentrations, mineralization, algal productivity, and algal stoichiometry are factors requiring further study to improve our understanding of the Lake Okeechobee ecosystem.

  19. Application of ecological modelling to investigate the impact of domestic waste water to one natural river system in tropical area (the nhue river, outskirts of hanoi, vietnam)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trinh Anh, D.; Bonnet, M. P.; Prieur, N.

    2003-04-01

    Water quality modelling has been employed as an effective tool to investigate the ecological situation of surface water sources. Within a researching collaboration of Vietnamese and French scientists, one portion, 40 km, of the Nhue river, outskirts of Hanoi city, northern Vietnam, has been investigated since the river has been highly impacted from anthropogenic activities and one 1-D ecological river model was formed based on the investigation. In this paper, biochemical process equations integrated with hydraulic conditions and human alterations are presented as the basis for ecological variation of this river system. Investigation showed that at the origin the river water remains untouched (nutrients are low in natural tropical water) while downstream the river is full of domestic pollutants (organic materials and nutrients). From the hydraulic, biological, chemical data and fieldwork experiments, the sensitivity analysis and parameter estimation have been carried out to verify the biochemical processes and optimise this model. Most calculations (simulation, sensitivity functions and parameter estimation) were performed with AQUASIM, a computer program designed for simulation and data analysis of 1-D river and other aquatic systems. The other supporting calculations for system analysis were implemented with IDENT based on output of a sensitivity analysis carried out with AQUASIM. The simulation results accomplished with available data indicate that the sediment exchanges and biodegradation processes emerge as the most important features that influence the water quality of the river where water is usually overloaded by domestic wastewater and where hydraulic characters are less pronounced. The model construction and simulation results have also pointed out that the river water quality has been spoiled dramatically after the main open-air sewer of the Hanoi city, the To Lich river, excesses to the Nhue. Beside, a metal speciation module was proposed to integrate with existing biochemical model in order to simulate the metal fractions in water column and metal exchange between river water and sediment.

  20. 30 CFR 77.216-5 - Water, sediment or slurry impoundments and impounding structures; abandonment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., sediment, or slurry impoundment and impounding structure which meets the requirements of 30 CFR 77.216(a... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Water, sediment or slurry impoundments and... AND SURFACE WORK AREAS OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Surface Installations § 77.216-5 Water, sediment...

  1. Bacteriological quality and risk assessment of the imported and domestic bottled mineral water sold in Fiji.

    PubMed

    Zeenat, A; Hatha, A A M; Viola, L; Vipra, K

    2009-12-01

    Considering the popularity of bottled mineral water among indigenous Fijians and tourists alike, a study was carried out to determine the bacteriological quality of different bottled waters. A risk assessment was also carried out. Seventy-five samples of bottled mineral water belonging to three domestic brands and 25 samples of one imported brand were analysed for heterotrophic plate count (HPC) bacteria and faecal coliforms. HPC counts were determined at 22 degrees C and 37 degrees C using R2A medium and a membrane filtration technique was used to determine the faecal coliform (FC) load in 100 ml of water on mFC agar. Between 28 and 68% of the samples of the various domestic brands failed to meet the WHO standard of 100 colony forming units (cfu) per 100 ml at 22 degrees C and 7% of these also tested positive for faecal coliforms. All imported bottled mineral water samples were within WHO standards. A risk assessment of the HPC bacteria was carried out in terms of beta haemolytic activity and antibiotic resistance. More than 50% of the isolates showed beta haemolytic activity and were multi-drug resistant. While the overall quality of the product was generally good, there is a need to enforce stringent quality standards for the domestic bottlers to ensure the safety of consumers. PMID:19590131

  2. A novel tracer technique for the assessment of fine sediment dynamics in urban water management systems.

    PubMed

    Spencer, K L; Droppo, I G; He, C; Grapentine, L; Exall, K

    2011-04-01

    Urban storm water run off can reduce the quality of receiving waters due to high sediment load and associated sediment-bound contaminants. Consequently, urban water management systems, such as detention ponds, that both modify water quantity through storage and improve water quality through sediment retention are frequently-used best management practices. To manage such systems effectively and to improve their efficiency, there is a need to understand the dynamics (transport and settling) of sediment, and in particular the fine sediment fraction (<63 ?m) and its associated contaminants within urban storm water management systems. This can be difficult to achieve, as modelling the transport behaviour of fine-grained and cohesive sediment is problematic and field-based measurements can be costly, time-consuming and unrepresentative. The aim of this study was to test the application of a novel cohesive sediment tracer and to determine fine sediment transport dynamics within a storm water detention pond. The cohesive sediment tracer used was a holmium labelled montmorillonite clay which flocculated and had similar size and settling velocity to the natural pond sediment it was intended to mimic. The tracer demonstrated that fine sediment was deposited across the entire pond, with the presence of reed beds and water depth being important factors for maximising sediment retention. The results of the sediment tracer experiment were in good agreement with those of a mathematical sediment transport model. Here, the deposited sediment tracer was sampled by collecting and analysing surface pond sediments for holmium. However, analysis and sampling of the three dimensional suspended tracer 'cloud' may provide more accurate information regarding internal pond sediment dynamics. PMID:21420140

  3. Surface water transport and distribution of uranium in contaminated sediments near a nuclear weapons processing facility 

    E-print Network

    Batson, Vicky Lynn

    1994-01-01

    sediments was assessed by an eight-step sequential extraction procedure to gauge U chemical lability and its propensity for transport. Comparisons were drawn between the easily dispersible, or water dispersible clay fraction (WDC) of the floodplain sediments...

  4. Dynamics of particle clouds in ambient currents with application to open-water sediment disposal

    E-print Network

    Gensheimer, Robert James, III

    2010-01-01

    Open-water sediment disposal is used in many applications around the world, including land reclamation, dredging, and contaminated sediment isolation. Timely examples include the land reclamation campaign currently underway ...

  5. THE RELATIONSHIP OF BIOACCUMULATIVE CHEMICALS IN WATER AND SEDIMENT TO RESIDUES IN FISH: A VISUALIZATION APPROACH

    EPA Science Inventory

    A visualization approach is developed and presented for depicting and interpreting bioaccumulation relationships and data, i.e., bioaccumulation factors (BAFs), biota-sediment accumulation factors (BSAFs) and chemical residues in fish, using water-sediment chemical concentration ...

  6. Assessing the fate of dredged sediments placed in open-water sites, Northern Chesapeake Bay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Halka, Jeffrey; Panageotou, William; Sanford, Lawrence; Yu-Chou, Shenn

    1994-01-01

    An integrated series of field studies and experiments have been carried out on dredged sediments placed in open water sites in Northern Chesapeake Bay. The studies include: (1) examination of the potential for fluidized sediment flow, (2) quantifying the volumetric changes that the sediments undergo during dredging process and subsequent to deposition, (3) estimating parameters for cohesive sediment erosion models from field data on currents and suspended sediment concentrations, and (4) incorporating the erosion model parameters and sediment transport equation into a 3-D hydrodynamic model for the upper Chesapeake Bay to predict transport directions and setting sites of eroded sediments under a variety of seasonal weather and river flow conditions.

  7. Survey of the Mutagenicity of Surface Water, Sediments, and Drinking Water from the Penobscot Indian Nation.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Survey of the Mutagenicity of Surface Water, Sediments, andDrinking Water from the Penobscot Indian NationSarah H. Warren, Larry D. Claxton,1, Thomas J. Hughes,*, Adam Swank,Janet Diliberto, Valerie Marshall, Daniel H. Kusnierz, Robert Hillger, David M. DeMariniNational Health a...

  8. Field Evaluation Of Arsenic Speciation In Sediments At The Ground Water/Surface Water Interface

    EPA Science Inventory

    The speciation and mineralogy of sediments contaminated with arsenic at the ground water/surface water interface of the Ft. Devens Super Fund Site in Ft. Devens, MA were determined using X-ray absorption fine structure and X-ray diffraction spectroscopy. Speciation and mineralog...

  9. Hydrogeologic, water-quality, streamflow, bottom-sediment analyses, and biological data near the Wayne County landfill, Wayne County, Tennessee

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Quinones, F.; Bradfield, Arthur D.; Wescott, J.B.

    1992-01-01

    This report summarizes the data collected as part of a hydrogeologic investigation to determine the effects of the Wayne County landfill on local water quality. The investigation was conducted from 1988 through 1989 by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Tennessee Department of Health and Environment, Division of Superfund. The landfill was closed in November 1984 after allegations that contaminants from the landfill were affecting the quality of water from domestic wells in the Banjo Branch-Hardin Hollow valley. Test well construction data; water-quality data for selected wells, seeps, and surface-water sites: streamflow data from Banjo Branch; analyses of bottom-sediment samples: and biological data for the study area are documented in this report.

  10. Evaluation of toxicity: Whole-sediment versus overlying-water exposures with amphipod Hyalella azteca

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ingersoll, C.G.; Ivey, C.D.; Brunson, E.L.; Hardesty, D.K.; Kemble, N.E.

    2000-01-01

    A laboratory study was conducted to evaluate the toxicity of whole-sediment versus overlying-water exposures to the amphipod Hyalella azteca using field-collected sediments. Severe toxic effects (5-63% survival) were observed with amphipods exposed for 10 d in direct contact with sediment. In contrast, amphipods exposed only to overlying water in these sediment exposures did not exhibit any toxic effects.

  11. Environmental assessment for the domestic water supply upgrades and consolidation on the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-06-01

    The domestic water systems on the Savannah River Site (SRS) are currently in need of upgrading to ensure compliance with the Safe Drinking Water Act and South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) Drinking Water Regulations. The SRS has 28 separate goundwater-based drinking water systems in use across the site. These aging systems were designed and constructed in the 1950s and are now facing increasing difficulties in meeting cur-rent regulations. Audits of the systems conducted by SCDHEC in 1986, 1988, 1991, and 1993 identified shortfalls in meeting the requirements for secondary maximum containment levels (MCLS) and SCDHEC design standards. Secondary MCLs are those items, such as odor or appearance, that do not pose a direct health impact. SRS has committed to SCDHEC to correct the drinking water discrepancies and construct two new consolidated inter-area drinking water systems. Upgrading the SRS drinking water systems would be necessary to support site activities regardless of the makeup or the mission at SRS. As such, the proposed upgrade and consolidation of SRS domestic water systems is treated as part of the ``No Action`` alternative for the Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for Reconfiguration of the Nuclear Weapons Complex .

  12. Case study of the effectiveness of passive grease trap for management on domestic kitchen waste water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nidzamuddin, M. Y.; Juffrizal, K.; Mustapha, F.; Zulfattah, Z. M.; Tan, C. F.; Taha, M. M.; Hidayah, I.; Hilwa, M. Z.

    2015-05-01

    Household waste, generally known as trash or garbage is mostly includes food wastes, product packaging, and other miscellaneous inorganic wastes that are coming from domestic household. Grease waste such as oil and fats can contaminate water and also clot on pipes provoking blockages. Thus, waste water from kitchen sink need a proper way of filtration. Grease trap developed in this paper is viable in trapping the grease residue. The experiments have been conducted in controlled environment and the objectives are to investigate the effectiveness of grease trap by proving the existence of retention time and the expected ratio of collected water and oil during experiment process using a prototype model.

  13. Integrating the simulation of domestic water demand behaviour to an urban water model using agent based modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koutiva, Ifigeneia; Makropoulos, Christos

    2015-04-01

    The urban water system's sustainable evolution requires tools that can analyse and simulate the complete cycle including both physical and cultural environments. One of the main challenges, in this regard, is the design and development of tools that are able to simulate the society's water demand behaviour and the way policy measures affect it. The effects of these policy measures are a function of personal opinions that subsequently lead to the formation of people's attitudes. These attitudes will eventually form behaviours. This work presents the design of an ABM tool for addressing the social dimension of the urban water system. The created tool, called Urban Water Agents' Behaviour (UWAB) model, was implemented, using the NetLogo agent programming language. The main aim of the UWAB model is to capture the effects of policies and environmental pressures to water conservation behaviour of urban households. The model consists of agents representing urban households that are linked to each other creating a social network that influences the water conservation behaviour of its members. Household agents are influenced as well by policies and environmental pressures, such as drought. The UWAB model simulates behaviour resulting in the evolution of water conservation within an urban population. The final outcome of the model is the evolution of the distribution of different conservation levels (no, low, high) to the selected urban population. In addition, UWAB is implemented in combination with an existing urban water management simulation tool, the Urban Water Optioneering Tool (UWOT) in order to create a modelling platform aiming to facilitate an adaptive approach of water resources management. For the purposes of this proposed modelling platform, UWOT is used in a twofold manner: (1) to simulate domestic water demand evolution and (2) to simulate the response of the water system to the domestic water demand evolution. The main advantage of the UWAB - UWOT model integration is that it allows the investigation of the effects of different water demand management strategies to an urban population's water demand behaviour and ultimately the effects of these policies to the volume of domestic water demand and the water resources system. The proposed modelling platform is optimised to simulate the effects of water policies during the Athens drought period of 1988-1994. The calibrated modelling platform is then applied to evaluate scenarios of water supply, water demand and water demand management strategies.

  14. Concentrations of Elements in Sediments and Selective Fractions of Sediments, and in Natural Waters in Contact with Sediments from Lake Roosevelt, Washington, September 2004

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Paulson, Anthony J.; Wagner, Richard J.; Sanzolone, Richard F.; Cox, Steven E.

    2006-01-01

    Twenty-eight composite and replicate sediment samples from 8 Lake Roosevelt sites were collected and analyzed for 10 alkali and alkaline earth elements, 2 non-metals, 20 metals, and 4 lanthanide and actinide elements. All elements were detected in all sediment samples except for silver (95 percent of the elements detected for 1,008 analyses), which was detected only in 4 samples. Sequential selective extraction procedures were performed on single composite samples from the eight sites. The percentage of detections for the 31 elements analyzed ranged from 76 percent for the first extraction fraction using a weak extractant to 93 percent for the four-acid dissolution of the sediments remaining after the third sequential selective extraction. Water samples in various degrees of contact with the sediment were analyzed for 10 alkali and alkaline earth elements, 5 non-metals, 25 metals, and 16 lanthanide and actinide elements. The filtered water samples included 10 samples from the reservoir water column at 8 sites, 32 samples of porewater, 55 samples from reservoir water overlying sediments in 8 cores from the site incubated in a field laboratory, and 24 water samples that were filtered after being tumbled with sediments from 8 sites. Overall, the concentrations of only 37 percent of the 6,776 analyses of the 121 water samples were greater than the reporting limit. Selenium, bismuth, chromium, niobium, silver, and zirconium were not detected in any water samples. The percentage of concentrations for the water samples that were above the reporting limit ranged from 14 percent for the lanthanide and actinide elements to 77 percent for the alkali and alkaline earth elements. Concentrations were greater than reporting limits in only 23 percent of the analyses of reservoir water and 29 percent of the analyses of reservoir water overlying incubation cores. In contrast, 47 and 48 percent of the concentrations of porewater and water samples tumbled with sediments, respectively, were greater than the reporting limit.

  15. 50 CFR 300.65 - Catch sharing plan and domestic management measures in waters in and off Alaska.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 11 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Catch sharing plan and domestic management measures in waters in and off Alaska. 300.65 Section 300.65 Wildlife and Fisheries INTERNATIONAL FISHING AND RELATED ACTIVITIES INTERNATIONAL FISHERIES REGULATIONS Pacific Halibut Fisheries § 300.65 Catch sharing plan and domestic...

  16. 50 CFR 300.65 - Catch sharing plan and domestic management measures in waters in and off Alaska.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Catch sharing plan and domestic management measures in waters in and off Alaska. 300.65 Section 300.65 Wildlife and Fisheries INTERNATIONAL FISHING AND RELATED ACTIVITIES INTERNATIONAL FISHERIES REGULATIONS Pacific Halibut Fisheries § 300.65 Catch sharing plan and domestic...

  17. Solar heating and domestic hot water system installed at Kansas City, Fire Stations, Kansas City, Missouri

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    The solar system was designed to provide 47 percent of the space heating, 8,800 square feet area and 75 percent of the domestic hot water (DHW) load. The solar system consists of 2,808 square feet of Solaron, model 2001, air, flat plate collector subsystem, a concrete box storage subsystem which contains 1,428 cubic feet of 0.5 inch diameter pebbles weighing 71.5 tons, a DHW preheat tank, blowers, pumps, heat exchangers, air ducting, controls and associated plumbing. Two 120 gallon electric DHW heaters supply domestic hot water which is preheated by the solar system. Auxiliary space heating is provided by three electric heat pumps with electric resistance heaters and four 30 kilowatt electric unit heaters. There are six modes of system operation.

  18. Quality of Water from Domestic Wells in Principal Aquifers of the United States, 1991-2004: Overview of Major Findings

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    DeSimone, Leslie A.; Hamilton, Pixie A.; Gilliom, Robert J.

    2009-01-01

    More than 43 million people - about 15 percent of the U.S. population - rely on domestic wells as their source of drinking water (Hutson and others, 2004). The quality and safety of water from domestic wells, also known as private wells, are not regulated by the Federal Safe Drinking Water Act or, in most cases, by state laws. Rather, individual homeowners are responsible for maintaining their domestic well systems and for monitoring water quality. The lack of regular monitoring of domestic wells makes periodic assessments at national, regional, and local scales important sources for providing information about this key source of drinking water. This study from the National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) assesses water-quality conditions for about 2,100 domestic wells. The sampled wells are located in 48 states and in parts of 30 regionally extensive aquifers used for water supply in the United States. As many as 219 properties and contaminants, including pH, major ions, nutrients, trace elements, radon, pesticides, and volatile organic compounds (VOCs), were measured. Fecal indicator bacteria and additional radionuclides were analyzed for a smaller number of wells. The large number of contaminants assessed and the broad geographic coverage of the present study provides a foundation for an improved understanding of the quality of water from the major aquifers tapped by domestic supply wells in the United States.

  19. Applying a Domestic Water-cooled Air-conditioner in Subtropical Cities 

    E-print Network

    Lee, W.; Chen, H.

    2006-01-01

    , China HVAC Technologies for Energy Efficiency, Vol. IV-9-4 Applying a Domestic Water-cooled Air-conditioner in Subtropical Cities WL Lee Hua Chen Assistant Professor Research Associate The Hong Kong Polytechnic University Hong Kong bewll...) and district cooling systems (DCS) to buildings. There is no exception for Hong Kong. In 1998, the Energy Efficiency Office (EEO) of the Hong Kong SAR Government has started to explore the possibility of wider application of WACS and DCS...

  20. Heteroaggregation and sedimentation rates for nanomaterials in natural waters.

    PubMed

    Quik, J T K; Velzeboer, I; Wouterse, M; Koelmans, A A; van de Meent, D

    2014-01-01

    Exposure modeling of engineered nanomaterials requires input parameters such as sedimentation rates and heteroaggregation rates. Here, we estimate these rates using quiescent settling experiments under environmentally relevant conditions. We investigated 4 different nanomaterials (C60, CeO2, SiO2-Ag and PVP-Ag) in 6 different water types ranging from a small stream to seawater. In the presence of natural colloids, sedimentation rates ranged from 0.0001 m d(-1) for SiO2-Ag to 0.14 m d(-1) for C60. The apparent rates of heteroaggregation between nanomaterials and natural colloids were estimated using a novel method that separates heteroaggregation from homoaggregation using a simplified Smoluchowski-based aggregation-settling equation applied to data from unfiltered and filtered waters. The heteroaggregation rates ranged between 0.007 and 0.6 L mg(-1) day(-1), with the highest values observed in seawater. We argue that such system specific parameters are key to the development of dedicated water quality models for ENMs. PMID:24119930

  1. Physical extraction of microorganisms from water-saturated, packed sediment.

    PubMed

    Ugolini, Fabio; Schroth, Martin H; Bürgmann, Helmut; Zeyer, Josef

    2014-05-01

    Microbial characterization of aquifers should include samples of both suspended and attached microorganisms (biofilms). We investigated the effect of shear, sonication, and heat on the extraction of microorganisms from water-saturated, packed sediment columns containing established biofilms. Shear was studied by increasing flow velocity of the column eluent, sonication by treating the columns with ultrasound at different power levels, and heat by warming up the column eluent to different temperatures. Effluent cell concentrations were used as a measure of extraction efficiency. Dissolved organic carbon and adenosine tri-phosphate (ATP) concentrations were used to corroborate cell-extraction results. Additionally, ATP was used as an indicator of cell-membrane integrity. Extraction quality was determined by comparing terminal-restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) profiles of extracted bacterial communities with destructively sampled sediment-community profiles. Sonication and heat increased the extraction efficiency up to 200-fold and yielded communities comparable to the sediment community. These treatments showed high potential for in-situ application in aquifers. PMID:24961067

  2. Summary report on water quality, sediment and water chemistry data for water and sediment samples collected from source areas to Melton Hill and Watts Bar reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Tomaszewski, T.M.; Bruggink, D.J.; Nunn, D.L.

    1995-08-01

    Contamination of surface water and sediments in the Clinch River and Watts Bar Reservoir (CR/WBR) system as a result of past and present activities by the US Department of Energy (DOE) on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) and also activities by non-ORR facilities are being studied by the Clinch River Environmental Restoration Program (CR-ERP). Previous studies have documented the presence of heavy metals, organics, and radionuclides in the sediments of reservoirs in the vicinity. In support of the CR-ERP, during the summer of 1991, TVA collected and evaluated water and sediment samples from swimming areas and municipal water intakes on Watts Bar Reservoir, Melton Hill Reservoir (which is considered part of the Clinch River and Watts Bar Reservoir System), and Norris Reservoir, which was considered a source of less-contaminated reference or background data. Results of this study indicated that the levels of contamination in the samples from the Watts Bar and Melton Hill Reservoir sites did not pose a threat to human health. Despite the numerous studies, until the current work documented by this report, relatively few sediment or water samples had been collected by the CR-ERP in the immediate vicinity of contaminant point sources. This work focused on water and sediment samples taken from points immediately downstream from suspected effluent point sources both on and off the ORR. In August and September, 1994, TVA sampled surface water and sediment at twelve locations in Melton Hill and Watts Bar Reservoirs. Eleven of the sampling sites were selected based on existence of pollutant discharge permits, known locations of hazardous waste sites, and knowledge of past practices. The twelfth sample site was selected as a relatively less contaminated reference site for comparison purposes.

  3. Sediments can be important in regulating stream water P concentrations, and this has implications for establishing

    E-print Network

    David, Mark B.

    concentrations at low discharge. Relationships between Benthic Sediments andWater Column Phosphorus in Illinois nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) additions to surface waters (Diaz, 2001). These nutrients can cause phosphatase activity; BLS, Black Slough; DDW, distilled- deionized water; DRP,

  4. Radioactive dating: Studies on ground water and sediments. (Latest citations from the Selected Water Resources Abstracts database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-10-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning radioactive dating of ground water and sediments. Articles discuss ground water movement and recharge; and lake, marine, and glacial sediments. Citations address dating techniques using isotopes of carbon, lead, uranium, radium, and tritium. Studies on sedimentation rate, water quality, aquifer characteristics, geological survey, and glacial history are presented. (Contains a minimum of 103 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  5. Evaluating Domestic Hot Water Distribution System Options with Validated Analysis Models

    SciTech Connect

    Weitzel, E.; Hoeschele, E.

    2014-09-01

    A developing body of work is forming that collects data on domestic hot water consumption, water use behaviors, and energy efficiency of various distribution systems. Transient System Simulation Tool (TRNSYS) is a full distribution system developed that has been validated using field monitoring data and then exercised in a number of climates to understand climate impact on performance. In this study, the Building America team built upon previous analysis modeling work to evaluate differing distribution systems and the sensitivities of water heating energy and water use efficiency to variations of climate, load, distribution type, insulation and compact plumbing practices. Overall, 124 different TRNSYS models were simulated. The results of this work are useful in informing future development of water heating best practices guides as well as more accurate (and simulation time efficient) distribution models for annual whole house simulation programs.

  6. A multilayer shallow water system for polydisperse sedimentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández-Nieto, E. D.; Koné, E. H.; Morales de Luna, T.; Bürger, R.

    2013-04-01

    This work considers the flow of a fluid containing one disperse substance consisting of small particles that belong to different species differing in size and density. The flow is modelled by combining a multilayer shallow water approach with a polydisperse sedimentation process. This technique allows one to keep information on the vertical distribution of the solid particles in the mixture, and thereby to model the segregation of the particle species from each other, and from the fluid, taking place in the vertical direction of the gravity body force only. This polydisperse sedimentation process is described by the well-known Masliyah-Lockett-Bassoon (MLB) velocity functions. The resulting multilayer sedimentation-flow model can be written as a hyperbolic system with nonconservative products. The definitions of the nonconservative products are related to the hydrostatic pressure and to the mass and momentum hydrodynamic transfer terms between the layers. For the numerical discretization a strategy of two steps is proposed, where the first one is also divided into two parts. In the first step, instead of approximating the complete model, we approximate a reduced model with a smaller number of unknowns. Then, taking advantage of the fact that the concentrations are passive scalars in the system, we approximate the concentrations of the different species by an upwind scheme related to the numerical flux of the total concentration. In the second step, the effect of the transference terms defined in terms of the MLB model is introduced. These transfer terms are approximated by using a numerical flux function used to discretize the 1D vertical polydisperse model, see Bürger et al. [ R. Bürger, A. García, K.H. Karlsen, J.D. Towers, A family of numerical schemes for kinematic flows with discontinuous flux, J. Eng. Math. 60 (2008) 387-425]. Finally, some numerical examples are presented. Numerical results suggest that the multilayer shallow water model could be adequate in situations where the settling takes place from a suspension that undergoes horizontal movement.

  7. Metabolism of niclosamide in sediment and water systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Graebing, P.W.; Chib, J.S.; Hubert, T.D.; Gingerich, W.H.

    2004-01-01

    A series of experiments analyzed the kinetics and mechanisms of [ 14C]niclosamide degradation. The aerobic aquatic metabolism of [ 14C]niclosamide was studied in nonsterile river water/sediment mixtures. Test systems, maintained under aerobic conditions, were treated with niclosamide and incubated in the dark at 25.0 ?? 1.0 ??C for 30 days. Half-lives of 4.9 and 5.4 days were calculated for the chlorosalicylic acid- and chloronitroaniline-labeled test systems, respectively. From 0 to 21 days after treatment (DAT), the only metabolism product observed in either test system was aminoniclosamide. At the final sampling interval, five peaks were resolved from the chlorosalicylic acid label, and three peaks were resolved from the chloronitroaniline label test substance. By 30 DAT, sediment-bound residues represented ???70% of the observed radioactivity. For the anaerobic aquatic metabolism of [14C]niclosamide, test systems were incubated under anaerobic conditions for 365 days. Half-lives of 0.65 day for the chlorosalicylic acid label and 2.79 days for the chloronitroaniline label were calculated. From 0 to 3 DAT, niclosamide was first transformed into aminoniclosamide. Aminoniclosamide is readily formed, as it was observed in the chlorosalicylic acid label 0 DAT sampling. Several minor metabolites were observed in the water and sediment extracts. None of these metabolites were formed to a significant amount until the parent niclosamide dissipated below the detection limit. Two of the byproducts from these metabolism studies are polar unknowns eluting at 3 and 5 min by HPLC, similar to the unknowns observed in aqueous photolysis studies.

  8. 30 CFR 77.216-1 - Water, sediment or slurry impoundments and impounding structures; identification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Water, sediment or slurry impoundments and... AND SURFACE WORK AREAS OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Surface Installations § 77.216-1 Water, sediment or..., operating, or controlling the structure, shall be located on or immediately adjacent to each water,...

  9. 30 CFR 77.216-1 - Water, sediment or slurry impoundments and impounding structures; identification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Water, sediment or slurry impoundments and... AND SURFACE WORK AREAS OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Surface Installations § 77.216-1 Water, sediment or..., operating, or controlling the structure, shall be located on or immediately adjacent to each water,...

  10. 30 CFR 77.216-1 - Water, sediment or slurry impoundments and impounding structures; identification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Water, sediment or slurry impoundments and... AND SURFACE WORK AREAS OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Surface Installations § 77.216-1 Water, sediment or..., operating, or controlling the structure, shall be located on or immediately adjacent to each water,...

  11. 30 CFR 77.216-1 - Water, sediment or slurry impoundments and impounding structures; identification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Water, sediment or slurry impoundments and... AND SURFACE WORK AREAS OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Surface Installations § 77.216-1 Water, sediment or..., operating, or controlling the structure, shall be located on or immediately adjacent to each water,...

  12. 30 CFR 77.216-1 - Water, sediment or slurry impoundments and impounding structures; identification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Water, sediment or slurry impoundments and... AND SURFACE WORK AREAS OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Surface Installations § 77.216-1 Water, sediment or..., operating, or controlling the structure, shall be located on or immediately adjacent to each water,...

  13. 30 CFR 77.216-4 - Water, sediment or slurry impoundments and impounding structures; reporting requirements...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... reporting period. (4) Storage capacity of the impounding structure. (5) The volume of the impounded water... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Water, sediment or slurry impoundments and....216-4 Water, sediment or slurry impoundments and impounding structures; reporting...

  14. Degradation, Fate and Bioavailability of Sulfamethazine in Pond Water and Sediment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Antibiotics from animal agriculture are found in surface waters and stream sediments. We investigated the degradation and fate of sulfamethazine in small pond water and sediment microcosms. Sulfamethazine [14C-phenyl] was added to the water phase directly, or in a dilute swine manure solution that s...

  15. Relevance of scavenging kinetics to modeling of sediment-water interactions in natural waters

    SciTech Connect

    Nyffeler, U.P.; Santschi, P.H.; Li, Y.H.

    1986-03-01

    The uptake of radioactive trace metals by suspended particles in natural aquatic systems is often slow and the time constants for scavenging are of the same order of magnitude as the residence times of particles in the water column. Therefore, models simulating removal of radioactive trace metals from water to sediments in shallow aquatic systems with short particle residence times need to include sorption (i.e. scavenging) kinetics. The authors present a numerical kinetic transport model designed to simulate tracer movements from a well mixed water column where particles are generated by both primary production and sediment resuspension processes. Tracers are allowed to penetrate into underlying sediments by diffusion and particle and pore water mixing. All model parameters can be experimentally determined either in the ecosystem itself or in separate laboratory experiments. Limited sensitivity analyses and simulations of actual experiments indicate that under conditions of particle cycling in the sediments and the water, tracer removal can be affected and even be limited by the slow kinetics of tracer uptake by suspended particles. The model is also useful in identifying and quantifying critical pathways in the complicated web of interrelated processes of an aquatic ecosystem.

  16. STAND, A DYNAMIC MODEL FOR SEDIMENT TRANSPORT AND WATER QUALITY. (R825758)

    EPA Science Inventory

    We introduce a new model–STAND (Sediment-Transport-Associated Nutrient Dynamics)–for simulating stream flow, sediment transport, and the interactions of sediment with other attributes of water quality. In contrast to other models, STAND employs a fully dynamic ba...

  17. Laboratory experiments on dam-break flow of water-sediment mixtures

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dams induce sedimentation and store significant amounts of sediment as they age; therefore, dam failures often involve the release of sediment-laden water to the downstream floodplain. In particular, tailings dams, which are constructed to impound mining wastes, can cause devastating damage when the...

  18. Underwater MASW to evaluate stiffness of water-bottom sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Park, C.B.; Miller, R.D.; Xia, J.; Ivanov, J.; Sonnichsen, G.V.; Hunter, J.A.; Good, R.L.; Burns, R.A.; Christian, H.

    2005-01-01

    The multichannel analysis of surface waves (MASW) is initially intended as a land survey method to investigate the near-surface materials for their elastic properties. The acquired data are first analyzed for dispersion characteristics and, from these the shear-wave velocity is estimated using an inversion technique. Land applications show the potential of the MASW method to map 2D bedrock surface, zones of low strength, Poisson's ratio, voids, as well as to generate shear-wave profiles for various othe geotechnical problems. An overview is given of several underwater applications of the MASW method to characterize stiffness distribution of water-bottom sediments. The first application details the survey under shallow-water (1-6 m) in the Fraser River (Canada). The second application is an innovative experimental marine seismic survey in the North Atlantic Ocean near oil fields in Grand Bank offshore Newfoundland.

  19. Discharge, suspended sediment, bedload, and water quality in Clear Creek, western Nevada, water years 2010-12

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Huntington, Jena M.; Savard, Charles S.

    2015-01-01

    During this study, total annual sediment loads ranged from 355 tons per year in 2010 to 1,768 tons per year in 2011 and were significantly lower than the previous study (water years 2004–07). Bedload represented between 29 and 38 percent of total sediment load in water years 2010–12, and between 72 and 90 percent of the total sediment load in water years 2004–07, which indicates a decrease in bedload between study periods. Annual suspended-sediment loads in water years 2010–12 indicated no significant change from water years 2004–07. Mean daily discharge was significantly lower in water years 2010–12 than in waters years 2004–07 and may be the reason for the decrease in bedload that resulted in a lower total sediment load.

  20. Patterns of domestic water use in rural areas of Zimbabwe, gender roles and realities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makoni, Fungai S.; Manase, Gift; Ndamba, Jerry

    This paper presents practical experiences into the pattern of domestic water use, benefits and the gender realities. The study was undertaken in two districts of Zimbabwe, Mt Darwin and Bikita covering a total of 16 villages. The study aimed to assess the patterns of domestic water use, benefits derived from its use among the gender groups. Methodology for participatory assessment (MPA) was used for data collection and was done in a participatory manner. Traditionally most people in Zimbabwe are subsistence farmers who rely on rain fed agriculture. Where primary water sources are available such as shallow wells, family wells, deep wells and boreholes households use the water for household water and sanitation, irrigate small family gardens as well as their livestock. The survey established that women and men usually rank uses of water differently. In the two districts it was evident that women are playing more roles in water use and it is apparent that women are most often the users, managers and guardians of household water and hygiene. Women also demonstrated their involvement in commercial use of water, using water for livestock watering (20%) as well as brick moulding (21%). These involvement in commercial use were influenced by survival economics as well as the excess and reliability of the supply. The different roles and incentives in water use of women and men was demonstrated in how they ranked the benefits of water and sanitation. Men ranked clean drinking water among others as a top priority while women ranked improved health and hygiene and reduced distance as top priority. Overall the benefits highlighted by the communities and especially women were meeting the practical needs such as better access to water and reducing their work load. The assessment demonstrated the active role of women in water sources management highlighting quality, reliability and restrictions to their use. Though the communities gave the impression that decision making in the sitting and construction of water points was equally among the gender groups, however it was evident that men have a greater role than women in public decision making.

  1. Evaluating Domestic Hot Water Distribution System Options With Validated Analysis Models

    SciTech Connect

    Weitzel, E.; Hoeschele, M.

    2014-09-01

    A developing body of work is forming that collects data on domestic hot water consumption, water use behaviors, and energy efficiency of various distribution systems. A full distribution system developed in TRNSYS has been validated using field monitoring data and then exercised in a number of climates to understand climate impact on performance. This study builds upon previous analysis modelling work to evaluate differing distribution systems and the sensitivities of water heating energy and water use efficiency to variations of climate, load, distribution type, insulation and compact plumbing practices. Overall 124 different TRNSYS models were simulated. Of the configurations evaluated, distribution losses account for 13-29% of the total water heating energy use and water use efficiency ranges from 11-22%. The base case, an uninsulated trunk and branch system sees the most improvement in energy consumption by insulating and locating the water heater central to all fixtures. Demand recirculation systems are not projected to provide significant energy savings and in some cases increase energy consumption. Water use is most efficient with demand recirculation systems, followed by the insulated trunk and branch system with a central water heater. Compact plumbing practices and insulation have the most impact on energy consumption (2-6% for insulation and 3-4% per 10 gallons of enclosed volume reduced). The results of this work are useful in informing future development of water heating best practices guides as well as more accurate (and simulation time efficient) distribution models for annual whole house simulation programs.

  2. Quantitative bacterial examination of domestic water supplies in the Lesotho Highlands: water quality, sanitation, and village health.

    PubMed Central

    Kravitz, J. D.; Nyaphisi, M.; Mandel, R.; Petersen, E.

    1999-01-01

    Reported are the results of an examination of domestic water supplies for microbial contamination in the Lesotho Highlands, the site of a 20-year-old hydroelectric project, as part of a regional epidemiological survey of baseline health, nutritional and environmental parameters. The population's hygiene and health behaviour were also studied. A total of 72 village water sources were classified as unimproved (n = 23), semi-improved (n = 37), or improved (n = 12). Based on the estimation of total coliforms, which is a nonspecific bacterial indicator of water quality, all unimproved and semi-improved water sources would be considered as not potable. Escherichia coli, a more precise indicator of faecal pollution, was absent (P < 0.001) in most of the improved water sources. Among 588 queried households, only 38% had access to an "improved" water supply. Sanitation was a serious problem, e.g. fewer than 5% of villagers used latrines and 18% of under-5-year-olds had suffered a recent diarrhoeal illness. The study demonstrates that protection of water sources can improve the hygienic quality of rural water supplies, where disinfection is not feasible. Our findings support the WHO recommendation that E. coli should be the principal microbial indicator for portability of untreated water. Strategies for developing safe water and sanitation systems must include public health education in hygiene and water source protection, practical methods and standards for water quality monitoring, and a resource centre for project information to facilitate programme evaluation and planning. PMID:10593031

  3. Estimating suspended sediment concentrations in surface waters of the Amazon River wetlands from Landsat images

    SciTech Connect

    Mertes, L.A.K.; Smith, M.O.; Adams, J.B. )

    1993-03-01

    A method has been developed, based on spectral mixture analysis, to estimate the concentration of suspended sediment in surface waters of the Amazon River wetlands from Landsat MSS and TM images. Endmembers were derived from laboratory reflectance measurements of water-sediment mixtures with a range of sediment concentrations. Using these references spectra, the authors applied a linear mixture analysis to multispectral images after accounting for instrument and atmosphere gains and offsets. Sediment concentrations were estimated for individual pixels from the mixture analysis results based on a nonlinear calibration curve relating laboratory sediment concentrations and reflectance to endmember fractions. The uncertainty in the sediment concentrations derived from this analysis for three Amazon images is predicted to be within [plus minus] 20 mg/L, and the concentrations fall within a range of concentrations of suspended sediment that were measured at several times and places in the field over the past 15 years. The emphasis of their work is to use the patterns of sediment concentrations to compute the approximate volumes of sediment that are transferred between the main channel and floodplain of the Amazon River. However, the methodology can be applied universally if the optical properties of water and sediment at the site are known, and it is, therefore, useful for the study of suspended sediment concentrations in surface waters of wetlands elsewhere.

  4. [Changes of bacterial community structure on reusing domestic sewage of Daoxianghujing Hotel to landscape water].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jing-nan; Wang, Xiao-dan; Zhai, Zhen-hua; Ma, Wen-lin; Li, Rong-qi; Wang, Xue-lian; Li, Yan-hong

    2010-05-01

    A 16S rDNA library was used to evaluate the bacterial diversity and identify dominant groups of bacteria in different treatment pools in the domestic sewage system of the Beijing Daoxianghujing Hotel. The results revealed that there were many types of bacteria in the hotel domestic sewage, and the bacterial Shannon-Weaver diversity index was 3.12. In addition, epsilon Proteobacteria was found to be the dominant group with the ratio of 32%. In addition, both the CFB phylum, Fusobacteria, gamma Proteobacteria and Firmicutes were also reached to 9%-15%. After treated with the reclaimed water station, the bacterial Shannon-Weaver diversity index was reduced to 2. 41 and beta Proteobacteria became the dominant group and occupied 73% of the total clones. However, following artificial wetland training, the bacterial Shannon-Weaver diversity index in the sample increased to 3.38, Actinobacteria arrived to 33% and became the most dominant group; Cyanobacteria reached to 26%, and was the second dominant group. But, the control sample comprised 38% Cyanobacteria, and mainly involved in Cyanobium, Synechoccus and Microcystis, with ratios of 47.1%, 17.6% and 8.8%, respectively. Some bacteria of Microcystis aenruginosa were also detected, which probably resulted in the light bloom finally. Therefore, the bacterial diversity and community structures changed in response to treatment of the hotel domestic sewage; there was no cyanobacteria bloom explosion in the treated water. This study will aid in investigation the changes of microbial ecology in different types of water and providing the useful information for enhancing the cyanobacteria blooms control from ecological angle. PMID:20623868

  5. Modeling sedimentation-filtration basins for urban watersheds using Soil and Water Assessment Tool

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sedimentation-filtration (SedFil) basins are one of the storm-water best management practices (BMPs) that are intended to mitigate water quality problems in urban creeks and rivers. A new physically based model of variably saturated flows was developed for simulating flow and sediment in SedFils wi...

  6. PRIMARY RESEARCH PAPER Water column oxygen demand and sediment oxygen flux

    E-print Network

    Mallin, Michael

    PRIMARY RESEARCH PAPER Water column oxygen demand and sediment oxygen flux: patterns of oxygen dissolved oxygen (DO) levels often occur during summer in tidal creeks along the southeastern coast of the USA. We analyzed rates of oxygen loss as water-column biochemical oxygen demand (BOD5) and sediment

  7. Study of spatial variability of surficial shallow water sediment properties with wavelet correlation

    E-print Network

    Study of spatial variability of surficial shallow water sediment properties with wavelet acoustics. Near surface sediments affect acoustic wave fields in shallow water waveguides and govern and space. The wavelet method is successfully used in studies of turbulent flows and convection processes

  8. Suspended sediment control and water quality conservation through riparian vegetation:

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavanelli, D.; Cavazza, C.; Correggiari, S.

    2009-04-01

    Soil erosion and Suspended Sediment River are strongly related in the Apennines catchments which are generally characterised by a clayey lithology and impermeable soils and extensive and severe erosion and slope stability problems. In fact the suspended sediment yield represents one of the most reliable tools to assess real basin soil loss (Pavanelli and Pagliarani, 2002; Pavanelli and Rigotti, 2007) from the surface rain erosive features in a mountain watershed, as rills and interrills erosion, gullies, bad-lands (calanchi basins). Suspended sediment yield is known to imply several detrimental consequences: soil losses from agricultural land, worsening of the quality of the water, clogging of water supply filters and reservoir siltation. In addition, suspended sediment yield is also one of the main vector for pollutants and nutrients: various studies have already proved how nitrogen content has been constantly rising in aquifers and surface waters [Böhlke and Denver, 1995]. Finer particles and their aggregates have been proved to be the preferential vehicle for particulate nitrogen [Droppo et al., 1997; Ongley et al., 1992]. In one research [Pavanelli and al. 2006] four Apennines torrents (Gaiana, Sillaro, Savena and Lavino) with mountain basins ranging from 8.7 to 139 Km2 were monitored via automatic sampling devices, the samples of water collected were analysed to characterise suspended solids in terms of their grain size distribution and total nitrogen with respect to the source of eroded area in the catchment. Preliminary results [Pavanelli and al. 2007] seem to show the existence of a direct relationship between nitrogen concentration and finer particle concentration (<20 ?m), with the maximum nitrogen loss values being related to factors like the presence of clayey formations, their position within the catchment and the availability of suspended particles. The results seem to indicate hillsides as main sources of suspended sediment to the torrents monitored. The problem of controlling the river suspended sediment concentration can be tackled by increasing the riparian vegetation able to hold back the ground eroded by the slopes, but it is necessary to know where the critical zones are. The aim of the work is to propose a method allow us to detect the risk of soil erosion areas near the river and the functionality of existing riparian vegetation along river as buffers / filters towards the eroded soil from the hill slopes. The proposed methodology is supposed has been designed for water pollution control from suspended solids, pollutants and nutrients coming from hills and an improvement of the quality of the river environment. The methodology was applied on the riparian vegetation of the Gaiana torrent where it was related to soil cover and erosion areas of the hillslope, thus correlating the impact of human activities. The Gaiana catchment area is 8.6 km2 and the mean altitude is 237 a.m.s.l., the average rainfall is of 784 mm.. It is a typical Apennines streams, about 35 km south of Bologna, Italy. The main trunk stream is 6 km long and the whole drainage network is organized in a dendritic pattern, typical of clayey lithology of the basins. The main erosion processes active in the area are caused by precipitation and surface runoff: sheet wash, concentrated water erosion and badlands watersheds (calanchi), which represent about 15% of the basin area. The vegetation of the Gaiana basin is constituted by crops (39%), woods (37%), rock outcrops(i.e. badlands)(15%), bushes (5%) and pastures(3%). The stages of the study are to spot critical areas made up of streambank and the eroded areas on the slopes near the river, with the support of aerial photos and satellite images, survey and a geographic information system. The Gaiana riparian vegetation map has been drawn and, on a strip buffer 200 metres wide along river, the Vegetation cover and the Geomorphology maps (scale 1:5000) has been drawn, after photogrammetric interpretation of aerial photography and satellite images . The two maps have been overlapped to

  9. U.S. Biofuel Policies and Domestic Shifts in Agricultural Land Use and Water Balances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teter, J.; Yeh, S.; Mishra, G. S.

    2014-12-01

    Policies promoting domestic biofuels production could lead to significant changes in cropping patterns. Types of direct and indirect land use change include: switching among crops (displacement), expanding cropped area (extensification), and altering water/soil management practices (e.g. irrigation, tillage) (intensification). Most studies of biofuels water use impacts calculate the water intensity of biofuels in liters of irrigated/total evapotranspired water per unit energy of biofuels. But estimates based on this approach are sensitive to assumptions (e.g. co-product allocation, system boundaries), and do not convey policy-relevant information, as highlighted by the issue of land use change. We address these shortcomings by adopting a scenario-based approach that combines economic modeling with crop-water modeling of major crops and biofuel feedstocks. This allows us to holistically compare differences in water balances across policy scenarios in an integrated economic/agricultural system. We compare high spatial resolution water balance estimates under three hypothetical policy scenarios: 1) a counterfactual no-policy scenario, 2) modified Renewable Fuels Standard mandates (M-RFS2), & 3) a national Low Carbon Fuel Standard plus a modified RFS2 scenario (LCFS+RFS2). Differences between scenarios in crop water balances (i.e. transpiration, evaporation, runoff, groundwater infiltration, & irrigation) are regional and are a function of changes in land use patterns (i.e. displacement, intensification, & extensification), plus variation in crop water-use characteristics. Cropped land area increases 6.2% and 1.6% under M-RFS2 and LCFS+RFS2 scenarios, respectively, by 2030. Both policy scenarios lead to reductions in net irrigation volumes nationally compared to the no-policy scenario, though more irrigation occurs in regions of the Midwest and West. The LCFS+RFS2 reduces net irrigation water use by 3.5 times more than M-RFS2. However, both policies drive extensification and hence greater net transpiration (i.e. economically useful water consumption), at the expense of groundwater infiltration, which recharges surface & groundwater stocks. Our study illustrates potential tradeoffs in water resource availability that might result from domestic policies promoting bioenergy.

  10. Detection of Legionella spp. from Domestic Water in the Prefecture of Arta, Greece.

    PubMed

    Dimitriadi, Dimitra; Velonakis, Emmanuel

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this research was the isolation of Legionella spp. from domestic water supply networks in the Prefecture of Arta. A total of 100 water samples, from 25 houses, were collected. Half of the samples concerned the cold water and half the hot water supply. Purpose was to detect colonization of the water networks with Legionella spp. >500?cfu/L by using the method of filtration (ISO 11731). Out of 100 samples, 6 samples from 3 houses were positive for Legionella spp. Legionella pneumophila serogroup 2-14 was isolated in 5 of 6 samples, whereas in the sixth sample Legionella anisa was identified. Only three of the samples had residual chloride over 0.2?mg/L, rate which is necessary for potable water, according to the Greek hygienic practice. Concerning the temperature of hot water, the mean temperature of the negative for Legionella samples was higher compared to the mean temperature of the positive for Legionella samples (49.9°C versus 45.5°C). It is estimated that there is risk of infection through the use of showers. The low concentration of chloride and the temperature, which was found within the limits favorable to developing Legionella spp. (20-45°C), provide fertile ground for proliferation of the bacteria. PMID:24744922

  11. Detection of Legionella spp. from Domestic Water in the Prefecture of Arta, Greece

    PubMed Central

    Dimitriadi, Dimitra; Velonakis, Emmanuel

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this research was the isolation of Legionella spp. from domestic water supply networks in the Prefecture of Arta. A total of 100 water samples, from 25 houses, were collected. Half of the samples concerned the cold water and half the hot water supply. Purpose was to detect colonization of the water networks with Legionella spp. >500?cfu/L by using the method of filtration (ISO 11731). Out of 100 samples, 6 samples from 3 houses were positive for Legionella spp. Legionella pneumophila serogroup 2–14 was isolated in 5 of 6 samples, whereas in the sixth sample Legionella anisa was identified. Only three of the samples had residual chloride over 0.2?mg/L, rate which is necessary for potable water, according to the Greek hygienic practice. Concerning the temperature of hot water, the mean temperature of the negative for Legionella samples was higher compared to the mean temperature of the positive for Legionella samples (49.9°C versus 45.5°C). It is estimated that there is risk of infection through the use of showers. The low concentration of chloride and the temperature, which was found within the limits favorable to developing Legionella spp. (20–45°C), provide fertile ground for proliferation of the bacteria. PMID:24744922

  12. Risk factors for contamination of domestic hot water systems by legionellae.

    PubMed Central

    Alary, M; Joly, J R

    1991-01-01

    To assess risk factors associated with the contamination of the domestic environment by legionellae, 211 houses in the Quebec City area were randomly selected and water samples were collected from the hot water tank, the shower heads, and the most frequently used faucet. After centrifugation, concentrated samples were seeded in triplicate on BCYE and GPV media. Data on the characteristics of the hot water system and plumbing in the house and on the personal habits of the occupants were collected for each house. Among these 211 houses, hot water was provided by either an oil or gas heater in 33 and by an electric heater in 178. Legionellae were isolated from none of the samples from houses with oil or gas heaters and from 39% (69 of 178) of those with electric water heaters (P less than 0.0001). This association remained highly significant after control for water temperature and other variables in a stratified analysis. In the 178 houses with an electric heater, 12% of the faucets, 15% of the shower heads, and 37% of the water heaters were contaminated. Legionella pneumophila serogroups 2 and 4 were the most frequently isolated strains. Logistic regression showed that factors associated with electric water heater contamination were (i) location of the house in older districts of the city (P less than 0.0001), (ii) old age of the water heater (P = 0.003), and (iii) low water temperature (P = 0.05). Contamination of the water heater was the only factor significantly associated with the contamination of peripheral outlets (P less than 0.0001).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1768104

  13. Cryptosporidium and Giardia in Humans, Domestic Animals, and Village Water Sources in Rural India.

    PubMed

    Daniels, Miles E; Shrivastava, Arpit; Smith, Woutrina A; Sahu, Priyadarshi; Odagiri, Mitsunori; Misra, Pravas R; Panigrahi, Pinaki; Suar, Mrutyunjay; Clasen, Thomas; Jenkins, Marion W

    2015-09-01

    Cryptosporidium parvum and Giardia lamblia are zoonotic enteric protozoa of significant health concern where sanitation, hygiene, and water supplies are inadequate. We examined 85 stool samples from diarrhea patients, 111 pooled fecal samples by species across seven domestic animal types, and water from tube wells (N = 207) and ponds (N = 94) across 60 villages in coastal Odisha, India, for Cryptosporidium oocysts and Giardia cysts to measure occurrence, concentration/shedding, and environmental loading rates. Oocysts/cysts were detected in 12% of diarrhea patients. Detection ranged from 0% to 35% for Cryptosporidium and 0% to 67% for Giardia across animal hosts. Animal loading estimates indicate the greatest contributors of environmental oocysts/cysts in the study region are cattle. Ponds were contaminated with both protozoa (oocysts: 37%, cysts: 74%), as were tube wells (oocysts: 10%, cysts: 14%). Future research should address the public health concern highlighted from these findings and investigate the role of domestic animals in diarrheal disease transmission in this and similar settings. PMID:26123963

  14. Cryptosporidium and Giardia in Humans, Domestic Animals, and Village Water Sources in Rural India

    PubMed Central

    Daniels, Miles E.; Shrivastava, Arpit; Smith, Woutrina A.; Sahu, Priyadarshi; Odagiri, Mitsunori; Misra, Pravas R.; Panigrahi, Pinaki; Suar, Mrutyunjay; Clasen, Thomas; Jenkins, Marion W.

    2015-01-01

    Cryptosporidium parvum and Giardia lamblia are zoonotic enteric protozoa of significant health concern where sanitation, hygiene, and water supplies are inadequate. We examined 85 stool samples from diarrhea patients, 111 pooled fecal samples by species across seven domestic animal types, and water from tube wells (N = 207) and ponds (N = 94) across 60 villages in coastal Odisha, India, for Cryptosporidium oocysts and Giardia cysts to measure occurrence, concentration/shedding, and environmental loading rates. Oocysts/cysts were detected in 12% of diarrhea patients. Detection ranged from 0% to 35% for Cryptosporidium and 0% to 67% for Giardia across animal hosts. Animal loading estimates indicate the greatest contributors of environmental oocysts/cysts in the study region are cattle. Ponds were contaminated with both protozoa (oocysts: 37%, cysts: 74%), as were tube wells (oocysts: 10%, cysts: 14%). Future research should address the public health concern highlighted from these findings and investigate the role of domestic animals in diarrheal disease transmission in this and similar settings. PMID:26123963

  15. 30 CFR 77.216-2 - Water, sediment, or slurry impoundments and impounding structures; minimum plan requirements...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...and under design storm conditions, sediment or slurry level, water level and other information pertinent to the impoundment...prudent engineering practices for the maximum volume of water, sediment, or slurry which can be impounded...

  16. 30 CFR 77.216-2 - Water, sediment, or slurry impoundments and impounding structures; minimum plan requirements...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...and under design storm conditions, sediment or slurry level, water level and other information pertinent to the impoundment...prudent engineering practices for the maximum volume of water, sediment, or slurry which can be impounded...

  17. 30 CFR 77.216-2 - Water, sediment, or slurry impoundments and impounding structures; minimum plan requirements...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...and under design storm conditions, sediment or slurry level, water level and other information pertinent to the impoundment...prudent engineering practices for the maximum volume of water, sediment, or slurry which can be impounded...

  18. Sediment contact tests as a tool for the assessment of sediment quality in German waters.

    PubMed

    Feiler, Ute; Höss, Sebastian; Ahlf, Wolfgang; Gilberg, Daniel; Hammers-Wirtz, Monika; Hollert, Henner; Meller, Michael; Neumann-Hensel, Helga; Ottermanns, Richard; Seiler, Thomas-Benjamin; Spira, Denise; Heininger, Peter

    2013-01-01

    A sediment contact test (SCT) battery consisting of five ecotoxicological test systems was applied to 21 native freshwater sediments characterized by a broad variety of geochemical properties and anthropogenic contamination. Higher plants (Myriophyllum aquaticum), nematodes (Caenorhabditis elegans), oligochaetes (Lumbriculus variegatus), zebrafish embryos (Danio rerio), and bacteria (Arthrobacter globiformis), representing various trophic levels and exposure pathways, were used as test organisms. The test battery detected sediment toxicity caused by anthropogenic pollution, whereas the various tests provided site-specific, nonredundant information to the overall toxicity assessment. Based on the toxicity pattern derived from the test battery, the sediments were classified according to a newly proposed classification system for sediment toxicity assessment. The SCT-derived classification generally agreed well with the application of consensus-based sediment quality guidelines (SQGs), especially with regard to sediments with high toxic potential. For sediments with low to medium toxic potential, the SQGs often underestimated the toxicity that was detected by the SCTs, underpinning the need for toxicity tests in sediment quality assessment. PMID:23027525

  19. Analysis of mitochondrial D-loop region casts new light on domestic water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) phylogeny.

    PubMed

    Kierstein, Gerold; Vallinoto, Marcelo; Silva, Artur; Schneider, Maria Paula; Iannuzzi, Leopoldo; Brenig, Bertram

    2004-02-01

    The phylogeny of water buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis) is still a matter of discussion, especially if the two types of domestic water buffalo (swamp and river) derived from different domestication events or if they are products of human selection. To obtain more insight, we analyzed the entire mitochondrial D-loop region of 80 water buffaloes of four different breeds, i.e., 19 swamp buffaloes (Carabao) and 61 river buffaloes (Murrah, Jafarabadi, and Mediterranean), sampled in Brazil and Italy. We detected 36 mitochondrial haplotypes with 128 polymorphic sites. Pooled with published data of South-East Asian and Australian water buffaloes and based on comprehensive median-joining network and population demography analyses we show evidence that both river and swamp buffaloes decent from one domestication event, probably in the Indian subcontinent. However, the today swamp buffaloes have an unravelled mitochondrial history, which can be explained by introgression of wild water buffalo mtDNA into domestic stocks. We are also discussing indications for an independent domestication of buffaloes in China. PMID:14715223

  20. Factors Affecting Domestic Water Consumption in Rural Households upon Access to Improved Water Supply: Insights from the Wei River Basin, China

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Liangxin; Liu, Guobin; Wang, Fei; Geissen, Violette; Ritsema, Coen J.

    2013-01-01

    Comprehensively understanding water consumption behavior is necessary to design efficient and effective water use strategies. Despite global efforts to identify the factors that affect domestic water consumption, those related to domestic water use in rural regions have not been sufficiently studied, particularly in villages that have gained access to improved water supply. To address this gap, we investigated 247 households in eight villages in the Wei River Basin where three types of improved water supply systems are implemented. Results show that domestic water consumption in liters per capita per day was significantly correlated with water supply pattern and vegetable garden area, and significantly negatively correlated with family size and age of household head. Traditional hygiene habits, use of water appliances, and preference for vegetable gardening remain dominant behaviors in the villages with access to improved water supply. Future studies on rural domestic water consumption should pay more attention to user lifestyles (water appliance usage habits, outdoor water use) and cultural backgrounds (age, education). PMID:23977190

  1. Ecological impacts of lead mining on Ozark streams: Toxicity of sediment and pore water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Besser, J.M.; Brumbaugh, W.G.; Allert, A.L.; Poulton, B.C.; Schmitt, C.J.; Ingersoll, C.G.

    2009-01-01

    We studied the toxicity of sediments downstream of lead-zinc mining areas in southeast Missouri, using chronic sediment toxicity tests with the amphipod, Hyalella azteca, and pore-water toxicity tests with the daphnid, Ceriodaphnia dubia. Tests conducted in 2002 documented reduced survival of amphipods in stream sediments collected near mining areas and reduced survival and reproduction of daphnids in most pore waters tested. Additional amphipod tests conducted in 2004 documented significant toxic effects of sediments from three streams downstream of mining areas: Strother Creek, West Fork Black River, and Bee Fork. Greatest toxicity occurred in sediments from a 6-km reach of upper Strother Creek, but significant toxic effects occurred in sediments collected at least 14 km downstream of mining in all three watersheds. Toxic effects were significantly correlated with metal concentrations (nickel, zinc, cadmium, and lead) in sediments and pore waters and were generally consistent with predictions of metal toxicity risks based on sediment quality guidelines, although ammonia and manganese may also have contributed to toxicity at a few sites. Responses of amphipods in sediment toxicity tests were significantly correlated with characteristics of benthic invertebrate communities in study streams. These results indicate that toxicity of metals associated with sediments contributes to adverse ecological effects in streams draining the Viburnum Trend mining district.

  2. Control of water erosion and sediment in open cut coal mines in tropical areas

    SciTech Connect

    Ueda, T.; Nugraha, C.; Matsui, K.; Shimada, H.; Ichinose, M.; Gottfried, J.

    2005-07-01

    The purpose is to reduce the environmental impacts from open cut mining in tropical areas, such as Indonesia and Vietnam. Research conducted on methods for the control of water erosion and sediment from open cut coal mines is described. Data were collected on climate and weathering in tropical areas, mechanism of water erosion and sedimentation, characteristics of rocks in coal measures under wet conditions, water management at pits and haul roads and ramps, and construction of waste dumps and water management. The results will be applied to the optimum control and management of erosion and sediments in open cut mining. 6 refs., 8 figs.

  3. Cold-Climate Solar Domestic Hot Water Systems: Cost/Benefit Analysis and Opportunities for Improvement

    SciTech Connect

    Burch, J.; Hillman, T.; Salasovich, J.

    2005-01-01

    To determine potential for reduction in the cost of saved energy (COSE) for cold-climate solar domestic hot water (SDHW) systems, COSE was computed for three types of cold climate water heating systems. For each system, a series of cost-saving measures was considered: (1) balance of systems (BOS): tank, heat exchanger, and piping-valving measures; and (2) four alternative lower-cost collectors. Given all beneficial BOS measures in place, >50% reduction of COSE was achievable only with selective polymer collectors at half today's selective collector cost. In all three system types, today's metal-glass selective collector achieved the same COSE as the hypothesized non-selective polymer collector.

  4. Enhancement of natural circulation type domestic solar hot water system performance by using a wind turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramasamy, K. K.; Srinivasan, P. S. S.

    2011-08-01

    Performance improvement of existing 200 litres capacity natural convection type domestic solar hot water system is attempted. A two-stage centrifugal pump driven by a vertical axis windmill having Savonius type rotor is added to the fluid loop. The windmill driven pump circulates the water through the collector. The system with necessary instrumentation is tested over a day. Tests on Natural Circulation System (NCS) mode and Wind Assisted System (WAS) mode are carried out during January, April, July and October, 2009. Test results of a clear day are reported. Daily average efficiency of 25-28 % during NCS mode and 33-37 % during WAS mode are obtained. With higher wind velocities, higher collector flow rates and hence higher efficiencies are obtained. In general, WAS mode provides improvements in efficiency when compared to NCS mode.

  5. Chemistry of calcium carbonate-rich shallow water sediments in the Bahamas

    SciTech Connect

    Morse, J.W.; Zullig, J.J.; Bernstein, L.D.; Millero, F.J.; Milne, P.; Mucci, A.; Choppin, G.R.

    1985-02-01

    The geochemistry of calcium carbonate-rich sediments from a variety of environments throughout the Bahamas was investigated with particular emphasis on the factors that control the pore water chemistry. Most sediments are supersaturated with respect to aragonite, the most abundant carbonate component. Experimental studies indicate that the observed in situ calcium carbonate ion activity products can often be produced as reversible metastable equilibria between the sediments and seawater. This is interpreted as being the result of interactions between the solutions and the minor high Mg-calcite component present in these sediments. Although the overlying waters are more supersaturated than the pore waters, carbonate dissolution, not precipitation, dominates in these sediments as a result of organic matter oxidation and the resulting increase in P/sub CO/sub 2//. The carbonate sediments of the Bahamas are remarkable for their purity, with the exception of special environments such as mangrove swamps and tidal flats with algal mats. Organic matter and heavy metal content is extremely low. Only minor sulfate reduction is occurring in most sediments. Phosphate is undetectable in all pore waters, probably as a result of adsorption on carbonate mineral surfaces. Other dissolved pore water components such as ammonia and DOC are much lower than typically found in shallow water fine-grained terrigeneous sediments.

  6. Determining the optimum solar water pumping system for domestic use, livestock water, or irrigation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    For several years we have field tested many different types of solar powered water pumping systems. In this paper, several steps are given to select a solar-PV water pumping system. The steps for selection of stand-alone water pumping system were: deciding whether a wind or solar water pumping sys...

  7. 30 CFR 77.216-2 - Water, sediment, or slurry impoundments and impounding structures; minimum plan requirements...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Water, sediment, or slurry impoundments and... COAL MINES Surface Installations § 77.216-2 Water, sediment, or slurry impoundments and impounding... under design storm conditions, sediment or slurry level, water level and other information pertinent...

  8. 30 CFR 77.216-2 - Water, sediment, or slurry impoundments and impounding structures; minimum plan requirements...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Water, sediment, or slurry impoundments and... COAL MINES Surface Installations § 77.216-2 Water, sediment, or slurry impoundments and impounding... under design storm conditions, sediment or slurry level, water level and other information pertinent...

  9. 30 CFR 77.216-2 - Water, sediment, or slurry impoundments and impounding structures; minimum plan requirements...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Water, sediment, or slurry impoundments and... COAL MINES Surface Installations § 77.216-2 Water, sediment, or slurry impoundments and impounding... under design storm conditions, sediment or slurry level, water level and other information pertinent...

  10. 30 CFR 77.216-2 - Water, sediment, or slurry impoundments and impounding structures; minimum plan requirements...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Water, sediment, or slurry impoundments and... COAL MINES Surface Installations § 77.216-2 Water, sediment, or slurry impoundments and impounding... under design storm conditions, sediment or slurry level, water level and other information pertinent...

  11. Microbiological evaluation of bottled non-carbonated ("still") water from domestic brands in Greece.

    PubMed

    Venieri, D; Vantarakis, A; Komninou, G; Papapetropoulou, M

    2006-03-01

    The microbiological quality of 1,527 samples of bottled non-carbonated ('still') mineral water, purchased from retail outlets and derived from 10 manufacturing companies in Greece, was investigated during the period 1995-2003. Applying the membrane filter technique, the aliquots of water samples (250 ml) were analyzed for the presence and enumeration of total coliforms, Escherichia coli, Enterococcus spp. and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Also, aerobic bacteria were counted as Heterotrophic Plate Count (HPC) ml(-1) at 22 and 37 degrees C. Positive samples for the parameters tested varied significantly among brands with an overall percentage of 13.95% bottled water samples noncompliant with the Greek water regulation. Microorganisms isolated from the samples tested were identified as species of Pseudomonas, Aeromonas, Pasteurella, Citrobacter, Flavobacterium, Providencia and Enterococcus. The most frequent isolated microorganism during the period of the study was P. aeruginosa. Generally, bacterial load of the samples tested ranged in low levels. The purpose of the current study was to evaluate the microbiological quality of the bottled water provided by domestic brands in the Greek market during the period 1995-2003. PMID:16271413

  12. Occurrence and Potential Human-Health Relevance of Volatile Organic Compounds in Drinking Water from Domestic Wells in the United States

    E-print Network

    Figures 3 #12;Abstract BACKGROUND: As the population and demand for safe drinking water from domesticOccurrence and Potential Human-Health Relevance of Volatile Organic Compounds in Drinking Water, USGS. Article descriptor: Exposure assessment Key words: domestic wells, drinking-water quality, human

  13. Levels of PAHs in the waters, sediments, and shrimps of Estero de Urias, an estuary in Mexico, and their toxicological effects.

    PubMed

    Jaward, Foday M; Alegria, Henry A; Galindo Reyes, Jose G; Hoare, Armando

    2012-01-01

    PAHs were measured in water, sediment, and shrimps of Estero de Urias, an estuary in Sinaloa, Mexico, during the rainy and dry seasons, and analyzed for eleven PAHs routinely detected in samples. Phenanthrene was the most dominant congener in the water, sediment, and shrimp samples comprising about 38, 24, and 25%, respectively, of the eleven PAHs detected, followed by pyrene and naphthalene in water and sediment samples, and pyrene and fluorine in the shrimp samples. Total PAH concentrations ranged from 9 to 347?ng/L in water, 27 to 418?ng/g in sediments, and 36 to 498?ng/g in shrimps. The sources of contamination are closely related to human activities such as domestic and industrial discharge, automobile exhausts, and street runoff. High concentrations were also measured during the rainy season and during the first quarter of the year. Toxicity tests were also carried out, exposing fish embryos and juvenile shrimps to some of these PAHs. Fish embryos exposed to PAHs showed exogastrulation, while juvenile shrimps showed significantly lower growth rates than controls. DNA and protein alterations were also observed. These toxicity tests indicate that PAH concentrations measured could be dangerous to some aquatic organisms, particularly during early stages of development. PMID:22997501

  14. Levels of PAHs in the Waters, Sediments, and Shrimps of Estero de Urias, an Estuary in Mexico, and Their Toxicological Effects

    PubMed Central

    Jaward, Foday M.; Alegria, Henry A.; Galindo Reyes, Jose G.; Hoare, Armando

    2012-01-01

    PAHs were measured in water, sediment, and shrimps of Estero de Urias, an estuary in Sinaloa, Mexico, during the rainy and dry seasons, and analyzed for eleven PAHs routinely detected in samples. Phenanthrene was the most dominant congener in the water, sediment, and shrimp samples comprising about 38, 24, and 25%, respectively, of the eleven PAHs detected, followed by pyrene and naphthalene in water and sediment samples, and pyrene and fluorine in the shrimp samples. Total PAH concentrations ranged from 9 to 347?ng/L in water, 27 to 418?ng/g in sediments, and 36 to 498?ng/g in shrimps. The sources of contamination are closely related to human activities such as domestic and industrial discharge, automobile exhausts, and street runoff. High concentrations were also measured during the rainy season and during the first quarter of the year. Toxicity tests were also carried out, exposing fish embryos and juvenile shrimps to some of these PAHs. Fish embryos exposed to PAHs showed exogastrulation, while juvenile shrimps showed significantly lower growth rates than controls. DNA and protein alterations were also observed. These toxicity tests indicate that PAH concentrations measured could be dangerous to some aquatic organisms, particularly during early stages of development. PMID:22997501

  15. Microbiological evaluation of water quality from urban watersheds for domestic water supply improvement

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Agricultural and urban runoffs may be major sources of pollution of water bodies and major sources of bacteria affecting the quality of drinking water. Of the different pathways by which bacterial pathogens can enter drinking water, one has received little attention to date; that is, because soils ...

  16. The role of domestic tap water on Acanthamoeba keratitis in non-contact lens wearers and validation of laboratory methods.

    PubMed

    Koltas, Ismail Soner; Eroglu, Fadime; Erdem, Elif; Yagmur, Meltem; Tan?r, Ferdi

    2015-09-01

    Acanthamoeba is increasingly recognized as an important cause of keratitis in non-contact lens wearers while contact lens wear is the leading risk factor for Acanthamoeba keratitis (AK). It is unlikely that the Acanthamoeba colonization is a feature which is effective only in patient's homes with infectious keratitis since the organism has been isolated from domestic tap water. Two hundred and thirty-one (231) corneal scrapings were taken from infectious keratitis cases, and four contact lens solutions and domestic tap waters were taken from 22 out of 44 AK-diagnosed patient's homes. Microscopic examination, culture, PCR, real-time PCR and DNA sequencing analyses were used for AK-diagnosed samples. The real-time PCR was the most sensitive (100 %) one among the methods used in diagnosis of AK. The 44 (19.0 %) out of 231 corneal scrapings, 4/4 (100 %) contact lens solution and 11/22 (50 %) of domestic tap water samples were found to be positive by real-time PCR for Acanthamoeba. A. griffini (T3), A. castellanii (T4) and A. jacobsi (T15) genotypes were obtained from corneal scrapings, contact lens solutions and domestic tap water samples taken from the patient's homes diagnosed with AK. The isolation of Acanthamoeba containing 6/22 (27.3 %) A. griffini (T3), 14/22 (63.6 %) A. castellanii (T4) and 2/22 (9.1 %) A. jacobsi (T15) from the domestic tap water outlets of 22 of 44 (50 %) of patient's homes revealed that is a significant source of these organisms. A. griffini (T3) and A. jacobsi (T15) genotypes have not been determined from AK cases in Turkey previously. Thus, we conclude that Acanthamoeba keratitis is associated with exposition of patients who has ocular trauma or ocular surface disease to domestic tap water in endemic or potentially endemic countries. PMID:26017346

  17. ECO: a generic eutrophication model including comprehensive sediment-water interaction.

    PubMed

    Smits, Johannes G C; van Beek, Jan K L

    2013-01-01

    The content and calibration of the comprehensive generic 3D eutrophication model ECO for water and sediment quality is presented. Based on a computational grid for water and sediment, ECO is used as a tool for water quality management to simulate concentrations and mass fluxes of nutrients (N, P, Si), phytoplankton species, detrital organic matter, electron acceptors and related substances. ECO combines integral simulation of water and sediment quality with sediment diagenesis and closed mass balances. Its advanced process formulations for substances in the water column and the bed sediment were developed to allow for a much more dynamic calculation of the sediment-water exchange fluxes of nutrients as resulting from steep concentration gradients across the sediment-water interface than is possible with other eutrophication models. ECO is to more accurately calculate the accumulation of organic matter and nutrients in the sediment, and to allow for more accurate prediction of phytoplankton biomass and water quality in response to mitigative measures such as nutrient load reduction. ECO was calibrated for shallow Lake Veluwe (The Netherlands). Due to restoration measures this lake underwent a transition from hypertrophic conditions to moderately eutrophic conditions, leading to the extensive colonization by submerged macrophytes. ECO reproduces observed water quality well for the transition period of ten years. The values of its process coefficients are in line with ranges derived from literature. ECO's calculation results underline the importance of redox processes and phosphate speciation for the nutrient return fluxes. Among other things, the results suggest that authigenic formation of a stable apatite-like mineral in the sediment can contribute significantly to oligotrophication of a lake after a phosphorus load reduction. PMID:23844160

  18. ECO: A Generic Eutrophication Model Including Comprehensive Sediment-Water Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Smits, Johannes G. C.; van Beek, Jan K. L.

    2013-01-01

    The content and calibration of the comprehensive generic 3D eutrophication model ECO for water and sediment quality is presented. Based on a computational grid for water and sediment, ECO is used as a tool for water quality management to simulate concentrations and mass fluxes of nutrients (N, P, Si), phytoplankton species, detrital organic matter, electron acceptors and related substances. ECO combines integral simulation of water and sediment quality with sediment diagenesis and closed mass balances. Its advanced process formulations for substances in the water column and the bed sediment were developed to allow for a much more dynamic calculation of the sediment-water exchange fluxes of nutrients as resulting from steep concentration gradients across the sediment-water interface than is possible with other eutrophication models. ECO is to more accurately calculate the accumulation of organic matter and nutrients in the sediment, and to allow for more accurate prediction of phytoplankton biomass and water quality in response to mitigative measures such as nutrient load reduction. ECO was calibrated for shallow Lake Veluwe (The Netherlands). Due to restoration measures this lake underwent a transition from hypertrophic conditions to moderately eutrophic conditions, leading to the extensive colonization by submerged macrophytes. ECO reproduces observed water quality well for the transition period of ten years. The values of its process coefficients are in line with ranges derived from literature. ECO’s calculation results underline the importance of redox processes and phosphate speciation for the nutrient return fluxes. Among other things, the results suggest that authigenic formation of a stable apatite-like mineral in the sediment can contribute significantly to oligotrophication of a lake after a phosphorus load reduction. PMID:23844160

  19. Phytoremediation of domestic wastewaters in free water surface constructed wetlands using Azolla pinnata.

    PubMed

    Akinbile, Christopher O; Ogunrinde, Temitope A; Che Bt Man, Hasfalina; Aziz, Hamidi Abdul

    2016-01-01

    Two constructed wetlands, one with Azolla pinnata plant (CW1) and the other without (CW2) for treating domestic wastewaters were developed. Fifteen water parameters which include: Dissolved Oxygen (DO), Biochemical Oxygen Demand (BOD5), Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD), Total Suspended Solid (TSS), Total Phosphorus (TP), Total Nitrogen (TN), Ammoniacal Nitrogen (NH3N), Turbidity, pH, Electrical Conductivity (EC), Iron (Fe), Magnesium (Mg), Manganese (Mn), and heavy metals such as Lead (Pb) and Zinc (Zn) were analyzed using standard laboratory procedures. The experiments were conducted in two (dry and wet) seasons simultaneously. Results showed considerable reductions in all parameters and metals including Zn in CW1 compared with CW2 in the two seasons considered while Pb and Mn were not detected throughout the study. Zn concentration levels reduced significantly in both seasons just as removal efficiencies of 70.03% and 64.51% were recorded for CW1 while 35.17% and 33.45% were recorded for CW2 in both seasons. There were no significant differences in the removal efficiencies of Fe in both seasons as 99.55%, 59.09%, 88.89%, and 53.56% were recorded in CW1 and CW2 respectively. Azolla pinnata has proved effective in domestic wastewater phytoremediation studies. PMID:26121232

  20. Toxicity tests of effluents with marsh plants in water and sediment

    SciTech Connect

    Walsh, G.E.; Weber, D.E.; Simon, T.L.; Brashers, L.K.

    1991-01-01

    Methods are described for toxicity testing of water and sediment with two varieties of the freshwater marsh plant Echinochloa crusgalli (Linneaus) Palisot de Beauvois (Poaceae), and complex effluents. Two tests are described: a seed germination and early seedling growth test in water, and a survival and seedling growth test in natural and synthetic sediments. Effects of effluents from a sewage treatment plant, tannery, textile mill, pulp and paper mill, coking plant and sewage treatment plant included inhibition of germination, chlorophyll synthesis and growth. The tests with rooted marsh plants were sensitive to pollutants and detected toxicity of a range of pollutants in water and sediment. Synthetic sediments similar to natural sediments allowed toxicity tests to be done under carefully controlled conditions of particle size distribution, organic content, pH, electrode potential (Eh) and cation exchange capacity (CEC).

  1. Summary of Suspended-Sediment Concentration Data, San Francisco Bay, California, Water Year 2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Buchanan, Paul A.; Lionberger, Megan A.

    2007-01-01

    Suspended-sediment concentration data were collected by the U.S. Geological Survey in San Francisco Bay during water year 2005 (October 1, 2004-September 30, 2005). Optical sensors and water samples were used to monitor suspended-sediment concentration at two sites in Suisun Bay, three sites in San Pablo Bay, two sites in Central San Francisco Bay, and three sites in South San Francisco Bay. Sensors were positioned at two depths at most sites. Water samples were collected periodically and analyzed for concentrations of suspended sediment. The results of the analyses were used to calibrate the output of the optical sensors so that a record of suspended-sediment concentrations could be derived. This report presents the data-collection methods used and summarizes, in graphs, the suspended-sediment concentration data collected from October 2004 through September 2005. Calibration curves and plots of the processed data for each sensor also are presented.

  2. [Effects of waste water sediments on the levels of heavy metals ion the soil and plants].

    PubMed

    Siniagina, N A; Sul'din, B V; Tumanov, A N; Chetvergov, E V

    2004-01-01

    Field small-plot experiments studied the effects of sediments of waste water from Saransk disposal systems. The content of toxic heavy metals (lead, arsenic, and cadmium) in the waste-water sediments, was shown to be not greater than their maximum permissible concentrations (32, 2, and 10 mg per kg of dried soil, respectively). With the use of waste-water sediments, the content of manganese, copper, tin, nickel, vanadium, beryllium, cobalt, iron, and chromium was found to correspond to their baseline level in the soil and plants. PMID:15141618

  3. A multi-level pore-water sampler for permeable sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Martin, J.B.; Hartl, K.M.; Corbett, D.R.; Swarzenski, P.W.; Cable, J.E.

    2003-01-01

    The construction and operation of a multi-level piezometer (multisampler) designed to collect pore water from permeable sediments up to 230 cm below the sediment-water interface is described. Multisamplers are constructed from 1 1/2 inch schedule 80 PVC pipe. One-quarter-inch flexible PVC tubing leads from eight ports at variable depths to a 1 1/2 inch tee fitting at the top of the PVC pipe. Multisamplers are driven into the sediments using standard fence-post drivers. Water is pumped from the PVC tubing with a peristaltic pump. Field tests in Banana River Lagoon, Florida, demonstrate the utility of multisamplers. These tests include collection of multiple samples from the permeable sediments and reveal mixing between shallow pore water and overlying lagoon water.

  4. Assessing the occurrence and distribution of pyrethroids in water and suspended sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hladik, M.L.; Kuivila, K.M.

    2009-01-01

    The distribution of pyrethroid insecticides in the environment was assessed by separately measuring concentrations in the dissolved and suspended sediment phases of surface water samples. Filtered water was extracted by HLB solid-phase extraction cartridges, while the sediment on the filter was sonicated and cleaned up using carbon and aluminum cartridges. Detection limits for the 13 pyrethroids analyzed by gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry were 0.5 to 1 ng L-1 for water and 2 to 6 ng g for the suspended sediments. Seven pyrethroids were detected in six water samples collected from either urban or agricultural creeks, with bifenthrin detected the most frequently and at the highest concentrations. In spiked water samples and field samples, the majority of the pyrethroids were associated with the suspended sediments.

  5. A vacuum-operated pore-water extractor for estuarine and freshwater sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Winger, P.V.; Lasier, P.J.

    1991-01-01

    A vacuum-operated pore-water extractor for estuarine and freshwater sediments was developed and constructed from a fused-glass air stone attached with aquarium airline tubing to a 30 or 60 cc polypropylene syringe. Pore water is extracted by inserting the air stone into the sediment and creating a vacuum by retracting and bracing the syringe plunger. A hand-operated vacuum pump attached to a filtration flask was also evaluated as an alternative vacuum source. The volume and time to extract pore water varies with the number of devices and the sediment particle size. Extraction time is longer for fine sediments than for sandy sediments. Four liters of sediment generally yield between 500 and 1,500 mL of pore water. The sediment that surrounds and accumulates on the air stone acts as a filter, and, except for the first few milliliters, the collected pore water is clear. Because there is no exposure to air or avenue for escape, volatile compounds andin situ characteristics are retained in the extracted pore water.

  6. Relationship between mineral content of domestic hot water and microbial contamination.

    PubMed

    Borella, Paola; Montagna, M Teresa; Romano-Spica, Vincenzo; Stampi, Serena; Stancanelli, Giovanna; Triassi, Maria; Marchesi, Isabella; Bargellini, Annalisa; Neglia, Rachele; Paglionico, Natalia; Spilotros, Giovanna; Moscato, Umberto; Casati, Giulia; Legnani, Pier Paolo; Sacchetti, Rossella; Ossi, Cristina; Moro, Matteo; Ribera, Gabriella

    2003-01-01

    The relationship between Legionella and Pseudomonas spp contamination and mineral content of domestic hot waters was investigated in a cross-sectional Italian survey. Pseudomonas spp contamination was associated with elevated Ca, but lower Fe and free chlorine content in the water. Waters with Cu concentrations > 50 microg/L prevented Legionella spp colonisation (OR = 0.14, 95% CI = 0.02-1.13), whereas the risk of legionellae occurrence increased in waters with Mn levels > 3 microg/L (OR = 2.37, 95% CI = 1.06-5.30). Furthermore, Mn was positively associated with the risk of colonisation by eterotrophic bacteria growing at either 22 and 36 degrees C. Legionella species and serogroups were differently distributed according to Cu and Mn concentrations, suggesting that Legionella strains may have a different sensibility/resistance to trace elements. A specific action of Cu as decontamination factor is suggested and the consideration of Mn as a risk indicator for bacterial colonisation and biofilm presence is proposed. PMID:14650627

  7. Design, Simulation, and Analysis of Domestic Solar Water Heating Systems in Phoenix, Arizona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Fresart, Edouard Thomas

    Research was conducted to quantify the energy and cost savings of two different domestic solar water heating systems compared to an all-electric water heater for a four-person household in Phoenix, Arizona. The knowledge gained from this research will enable utilities to better align incentives and consumers to make more informed decisions prior to purchasing a solar water heater. Daily energy and temperature data were collected in a controlled, closed environment lab. Three mathematical models were designed in TRNSYS 17, a transient system simulation tool. The data from the lab were used to validate the TRNSYS models, and the TRNSYS results were used to project annual cost and energy savings for the solar water heaters. The projected energy savings for a four-person household in Phoenix, Arizona are 80% when using the SunEarthRTM system with an insulated and glazed flat-plate collector, and 49% when using the FAFCO RTM system with unglazed, non-insulated flat-plate collectors. Utilizing all available federal, state, and utility incentives, a consumer could expect to recoup his or her investment after the fifth year if purchasing a SunEarth RTM system, and after the eighth year if purchasing a FAFCO RTM system. Over the 20-year analysis period, a consumer could expect to save 2,519 with the SunEarthRTM system, and 971 with the FAFCORTM system.

  8. Integration of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Legionella pneumophila in drinking water biofilms grown on domestic plumbing materials.

    PubMed

    Moritz, Miriam M; Flemming, Hans-Curt; Wingender, Jost

    2010-06-01

    Drinking water biofilms were grown on coupons of plumbing materials, including ethylene-propylene-diene-monomer (EPDM) rubber, silane cross-linked polyethylene (PE-X b), electron-ray cross-linked PE (PE-X c) and copper under constant flow-through of cold tap water. After 14 days, the biofilms were spiked with Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Legionella pneumophila and Enterobacter nimipressuralis (10(6) cells/mL each). The test bacteria were environmental isolates from contamination events in drinking water systems. After static incubation for 24 h, water flow was resumed and continued for 4 weeks. Total cell count and heterotrophic plate count (HPC) of biofilms were monitored, and P. aeruginosa, L. pneumophila and E. nimipressuralis were quantified, using standard culture-based methods or culture-independent fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). After 14 days total cell counts and HPC values were highest on EPDM followed by the plastic materials and copper. P. aeruginosa and L. pneumophila became incorporated into drinking water biofilms and were capable to persist in biofilms on EPDM and PE-X materials for several weeks, while copper biofilms were colonized only by L. pneumophila in low culturable numbers. E. nimipressuralis was not detected in any of the biofilms. Application of the FISH method often yielded orders of magnitude higher levels of P. aeruginosa and L. pneumophila than culture methods. These observations indicate that drinking water biofilms grown under cold water conditions on domestic plumbing materials, especially EPDM and PE-X in the present study, can be a reservoir for P. aeruginosa and L. pneumophila that persist in these habitats mostly in a viable but non-culturable state. PMID:20556878

  9. DEVELOPING MODEL OF BENTHIC-WATER CONTAMINANT TRANSPORT IN BIOTURBATED SEDIMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chemicals entering marine waters are incorporated into distinct compartments and these reservoirs are in exchange with one another. he chemo-dynamic storage compartments in marine systems include sediment to the depth of bioturbation (0-50 cm), suspended sediments, dissolved phas...

  10. AUTOMATED LONG-TERM REMOTE MONITORING OF SEDIMENT-WATER INTERFACIAL FLUX

    EPA Science Inventory

    Advective flux across the sediment-water interface is temporally and spatially heterogeneous in nature. For contaminated sediment sites, monitoring spatial as well as temporal variation of advective flux is of importance to proper risk management. This project was conducted to ...

  11. IMPACT OF STORM-WATER OUTFALLS ON SEDIMENT QUALITY IN CORPUS CHRISTI BAY, TEXAS, USA

    EPA Science Inventory

    To determine the quality of sediments and extent of contaminant impacts, a Sediment Quality Triad (SQT) study was conducted at 36 sites in the Corpus Christi Bay, Texas, USA, system. Fifteen of the 36 sites were located near storm-water outfalls, but 13 other sites (i.e., industr...

  12. A probe for sampling interstitial waters of stream sediments and bog soils

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nowlan, G.A.; Carollo, C.

    1974-01-01

    A probe for sampling interstitial waters of stream sediments and bog soils is described. Samples can be obtained within a stratigraphic interval of 2-3 cm, to a depth of 60-80 cm, and with little or no contamination of the samples by sediment or air. ?? 1974.

  13. Processing of combined domestic bath and laundry waste waters for reuse as commode flushing water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hypes, W. D.; Batten, C. E.; Wilkins, J. R.

    1975-01-01

    An experimental investigation of processes and system configurations for reclaiming combined bath and laundry waste waters for reuse as commode flush water was conducted. A 90-min recycle flow was effective in removing particulates and in improving other physical characteristics to the extent that the filtered water was subjectively acceptable for reuse. The addition of a charcoal filter resulted in noticeable improvements in color, turbidity, and suds elimination. Heating and chlorination of the waste waters were investigated for reducing total organism counts and eliminating coliform organisms. A temperature of 335.9 K (145 F) for 30 min and chlorine concentrations of 20 mg/l in the collection tank followed by 10 mg/l in the storage tank were determined to be adequate for this purpose. Water volume relationships and energy-use rates for the waste water reuse systems are also discussed.

  14. Towards the development of a combined Norovirus and sediment transport model for coastal waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barry, K.; O'Kane, J. P. J.

    2009-04-01

    Sewage effluent in coastal waters used for oyster culture poses a risk to human health. The primary pathogen in outbreaks of gastroenteritis following consumption of raw oysters is the Norovirus or "winter vomiting bug". The Norovirus is a highly infectious RNA virus of the Caliciviridae taxonomic family. It has a long survival time in coastal waters (T90 = 30 days in winter). Oysters selectively concentrate Norovirus in their digestive ducts. The virus cannot be removed by conventional depuration. The primary goal of the research is to quantify the risk of Norovirus infection in coastal waters through physically-based high-resolution numerical modelling. Cork Harbour and Clew Bay in Ireland provide case studies for the research. The models simulate a number of complex physical, chemical and biological processes which influence the transport and decay of the virus as well as its bioaccumulation in oyster tissue. The current phase of the research is concerned with the adsorption of the virus to suspended sediment in the water column. Adsorbed viruses may be taken out of the water column when sedimentation occurs and, subsequently, be added to it with resuspension of the bed sediment. Preliminary simulations of the Norovirus-sediment model indicate that suspended sediment can influence the transport of the virus in coastal waters when a high sediment-water partitioning coefficient is used and the model is run under calm environmental conditions. In this instance a certain fraction of the adsorbed viruses are taken out of the water column by sedimentation and end up locked in the bed sediment. Subsequently, under storm conditions, a large number of viruses in the bed are released into the water column by erosion of the bed and a risk of contamination occurs at a time different to when the viruses were initially released into the body of water.

  15. Ecological risk assessment of urban creek sediments contaminated by untreated domestic wastewater: potential contribution of antimicrobials and a musk fragrance.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Ikumi; Kimura, Kumiko; Kameda, Yutaka; Nakada, Norihide; Yamamoto, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    Despite the fact that some hydrophobic pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) have been found to accumulate in river sediments, little is known about the contribution of these compounds to the toxicity of the whole sediment. We sampled river sediments from two urban creeks with an unsewered drainage area to investigate the toxicity for a benthic organism, Chironomus yoshimatsui. The concentrations of selected hydrophobic PPCPs, triclosan (TCS), triclocarban (TCC) and galaxolide (HHCB) were analysed using gas chromatographic mass spectroscopy or liquid chromatographic mass spectroscopy and were found to lie within the range 50 to 200 ng g(-1). The toxicity of the three individual contaminants for the chironomid was also determined. The toxicity of TCC was found to be the strongest, with an NOEC value of 2.5 microg g(-1). Combining the toxicity and measured environmental concentration, the ecological risk was assessed and the contribution of these contaminants to the whole sediment toxicity estimated, assuming additivity. The hazard quotient of all three compounds, determined without assessment factor, ranged between 0.01 and 0.1. The combined contribution of the three compounds to total sediment toxicity was as high as 8.2%, but other unknown factors may also make an important contribution. PMID:24191491

  16. Analysis of space heating and domestic hot water systems for energy-efficient residential buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Dennehy, G

    1983-04-01

    An analysis of the best ways of meeting the space heating and domestic hot water (DHW) needs of new energy-efficient houses with very low requirements for space heat is provided. The DHW load is about equal to the space heating load in such houses in northern climates. The equipment options which should be considered are discussed, including new equipment recently introduced in the market. It is concluded that the first consideration in selecting systems for energy-efficient houses should be identification of the air moving needs of the house for heat distribution, heat storage, ventilation, and ventilative cooling. This is followed, in order, by selection of the most appropriate distribution system, the heating appliances and controls, and the preferred energy source, gas, oil, or electricity.

  17. Contamination of nonylphenolic compounds in creek water, wastewater treatment plant effluents, and sediments from Lake Shihwa and vicinity, Korea: Comparison with fecal pollution

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Choi, Minkyu; Furlong, Edward T.; Moon, Hyo-Bang; Yu, Jun; Choi, Hee-Gu

    2011-01-01

    Nonylphenolic compounds (NPs), coprostanol (COP), and cholestanol, major contaminants in industrial and domestic wastewaters, were analyzed in creek water, wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) effluent, and sediment samples from artificial Lake Shihwa and its vicinity, one of the most industrialized regions in Korea. We also determined mass discharge of NPs and COP, a fecal sterol, into the lake, to understand the linkage between discharge and sediment contamination. Total NP (the sum of nonylphenol, and nonylphenol mono- and di-ethoxylates) were 0.32–875 ?g L-1 in creeks, 0.61–87.0 ?g L-1 in WWTP effluents, and 29.3–230 ?g g-1 TOC in sediments. Concentrations of COP were 0.09–19.0 ?g L-1 in creeks, 0.11–44.0 ?g L-1 in WWTP effluents, and 2.51–438 ?g g-1 TOC in sediments. The spatial distributions of NPs in creeks and sediments from the inshore region were different from those of COP, suggesting that Lake Shihwa contamination patterns from industrial effluents differ from those from domestic effluents. The mass discharge from the combined outfall of the WWTPs, located in the offshore region, was 2.27 kg d-1 for NPs and 1.00 kg d-1 for COP, accounting for 91% and 95% of the total discharge into Lake Shihwa, respectively. The highest concentrations of NPs and COP in sediments were found in samples at sites near the submarine outfall of the WWTPs, indicating that the submarine outfall is an important point source of wastewater pollution in Lake Shihwa.

  18. Remote sensing of suspended sediment water research: principles, methods, and progress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Ping; Zhang, Jing

    2011-12-01

    In this paper, we reviewed the principle, data, methods and steps in suspended sediment research by using remote sensing, summed up some representative models and methods, and analyzes the deficiencies of existing methods. Combined with the recent progress of remote sensing theory and application in water suspended sediment research, we introduced in some data processing methods such as atmospheric correction method, adjacent effect correction, and some intelligence algorithms such as neural networks, genetic algorithms, support vector machines into the suspended sediment inversion research, combined with other geographic information, based on Bayesian theory, we improved the suspended sediment inversion precision, and aim to give references to the related researchers.

  19. Spatial Variability of Metals in Surface Water and Sediment in the Langat River and Geochemical Factors That Influence Their Water-Sediment Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Wan Ying; Aris, Ahmad Zaharin; Zakaria, Mohamad Pauzi

    2012-01-01

    This paper determines the controlling factors that influence the metals' behavior water-sediment interaction facies and distribution of elemental content (75As, 111Cd, 59Co, 52Cr, 60Ni, and 208Pb) in water and sediment samples in order to assess the metal pollution status in the Langat River. A total of 90 water and sediment samples were collected simultaneously in triplicate at 30 sampling stations. Selected metals were analyzed using ICP-MS, and the metals' concentration varied among stations. Metal concentrations of water ranged between 0.08–24.71??g/L for As, <0.01–0.53??g/L for Cd, 0.06–6.22??g/L for Co, 0.32–4.67??g/L for Cr, 0.80–24.72??g/L for Ni, and <0.005–6.99??g/L for Pb. Meanwhile, for sediment, it ranged between 4.47–30.04?mg/kg for As, 0.02–0.18?mg/kg for Cd, 0.87–4.66?mg/kg for Co, 4.31–29.04?mg/kg for Cr, 2.33–8.25?mg/kg for Ni and 5.57–55.71?mg/kg for Pb. The average concentration of studied metals in the water was lower than the Malaysian National Standard for Drinking Water Quality proposed by the Ministry of Health. The average concentration for As in sediment was exceeding ISQG standards as proposed by the Canadian Sediment Quality Guidelines. Statistical analyses revealed that certain metals (As, Co, Ni, and Pb) were generally influenced by pH and conductivity. These results are important when making crucial decisions in determining potential hazardous levels of these metals toward humans. PMID:22919346

  20. Three-dimensional acoustic propagation through shallow water internal, surface gravity and bottom sediment waves

    E-print Network

    Shmelev, Alexey Alexandrovich

    2011-01-01

    This thesis describes the physics of fully three-dimensional low frequency acoustic interaction with internal waves, bottom sediment waves and surface swell waves that are often observed in shallow waters and on continental ...

  1. TOXICITY TESTS OF EFFLUENTS WITH MARSH PLANTS IN WATER AND SEDIMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Methods are described for toxicity testing of water and sediment with the rooted marsh plants, Echinochloa crusgalli var. crusgalli and var. zelavensis (freshwater) and Spartina alterniflora (estuarine). ive industrial effluents, a sewage treatment plant effluent and a herbicide ...

  2. MONITORING OXIDATION-REDUCTION PROCESSES IN GROUND WATERS, SEDIMENTS, AND SOILS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The overall goal of this project is to develop recommendations and technical guidelines for evaluating redox processes in contaminated ground water, sediment, and soil systems. One specific goal is to evaluate existing methodologies for determining Dissolved Oxygen (DO) concentra...

  3. HEXACHLOROBENZENE UPTAKE BY FATHEAD MINNOWS AND MACRO INVERTEBRATES IN RECIRCULATING SEDIMENT/WATER SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas), the worm, Lumbriculus variegatus, and the amphipods Hyalella azteca and Gammarus lacustris were exposed to hexachlorobenzene (HCB) in water with and without a bed of HCB-spiked sediment. ater HCB concentrations were maintained by recirculatio...

  4. Trace metal contamination of waters, sediments, and organisms of the Swan Lake area of Galveston Bay 

    E-print Network

    Park, Junesoo

    1995-01-01

    facility (Gulf Coast Waste Disposal Authority) is located north of the Wah Chang Ditch. Consequently there have been concerns about possible metal contamination in this area. I determined trace metal concentrations in water, sediments, and organisms (oyster...

  5. 20 Spatially significant effects of selective tropical forestry on water, nutrient and sediment flows

    E-print Network

    Chappell, Nick A

    20 Spatially significant effects of selective tropical forestry on water, nutrient and sediment, Universiti Teknologi, Johor Bahru, Malaysia N. A. Rahim Forestry Research Institute of Malaysia, Kuala Lumpur. Kasran Forestry Research Institute of Malaysia, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia INTRODUCTION Selective forestry

  6. 30 CFR 77.216-5 - Water, sediment or slurry impoundments and impounding structures; abandonment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    This plan shall provide for major slope stability, include a schedule for the plan's implementation and, except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section, contain provisions to preclude the probability of future impoundment of water, sediment, or...

  7. 30 CFR 77.216-5 - Water, sediment or slurry impoundments and impounding structures; abandonment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    This plan shall provide for major slope stability, include a schedule for the plan's implementation and, except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section, contain provisions to preclude the probability of future impoundment of water, sediment, or...

  8. 30 CFR 77.216-5 - Water, sediment or slurry impoundments and impounding structures; abandonment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    This plan shall provide for major slope stability, include a schedule for the plan's implementation and, except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section, contain provisions to preclude the probability of future impoundment of water, sediment, or...

  9. Development of a standard operating procedure for the collection of pyrethroids in water and sediment matrices

    EPA Science Inventory

    Through a Regional Applied Research Effort grant to the United States Geological Survey, Region 9 collaborated with ORD on this project to develop a standard operating procedure for collection of water and sediment samples for pyrethroid analysis.

  10. PRECISION OF DIALYSIS (PEEPER) SAMPLING OF CADMIUM IN MARINE SEDIMENT INTERSTITIAL WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Isolating and analyzing interstitial water (IW) during sediment toxicity tests enables researchers to relate concentrations of contaminants to responses of organisms, particularly when IW is a primary route of exposure to bioavailable contaminants by benthic dwelling organisms. W...

  11. VISUALIZING THE RELATIONSHIP OF PBTS IN WATER AND SEDIMENT TO RESIDUES IN FISH

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bioaccumulation of persistent bioaccumulative toxicants (PBTs) in aquatic organisms results from uptake of the chemicals through several different exposure routes associated with water, sediment, and biota. This paper presents an approach for depicting and interpreting bioaccumul...

  12. METAL SPECIATION IN SOIL, SEDIMENT, AND WATER SYSTEMS VIA SYNCHROTRON RADIATION RESEARCH

    EPA Science Inventory

    Metal contaminated environmental systems (soils, sediments, and water) have challenged researchers for many years. Traditional methods of analysis have employed extraction methods to determine total metal content and define risk based on the premise that as metal concentration in...

  13. The effects of water flow and sedimentation on interactions between massive Porites and algal turf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gowan, Jennifer C.; Tootell, Jesse S.; Carpenter, Robert C.

    2014-09-01

    Interactions between scleractinian corals and benthic algae can be an important process structuring reef communities, yet interaction dynamics are not fixed and may be influenced by abiotic factors such as sedimentation, a process often underlying reef degradation. However, rates of sedimentation and the effects of trapped sediments may be influenced by water flow. The first goal of this study was to quantify gradients in sedimentation and flow along fringing and back reefs of the north shore of Moorea, French Polynesia, and determine whether such gradients correlate with changes in the frequency and outcomes of massive Porites-algal turf interactions. On the back reef, the frequency of Porites-algal turf interactions and the competitive success of algal turfs increased significantly with decreasing flow. Sedimentation, however, was not a significant driver of the observed patterns. Along fringing reefs, in the absence of a flow gradient, it was the gradient in sedimentation that best explained spatial variation in Porites-algal turf interaction frequencies and the competitive success of algal turfs. The second goal was to quantify the separate and combined effects of flow and sedimentation on Porites-algal turf interactions in a laboratory setting. The combined effects of low flow and sedimentation significantly increased the area of Porites tissue damaged when in contact with algal turf, while high flow attenuated the negative effects of sedimentation. Together, these results implicate flow and sedimentation as important drivers of biological interactions between massive Porites and algal turf.

  14. Temporal dynamics of water and sediment exchanges between the Curuaí floodplain and the Amazon River, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourgoin, Laurence Maurice; Bonnet, Marie-Paule; Martinez, Jean-Michel; Kosuth, Pascal; Cochonneau, Gerard; Moreira-Turcq, Patricia; Guyot, Jean-Loup; Vauchel, Philippe; Filizola, Naziano; Seyler, Patrick

    2007-03-01

    SummaryThe fluvial transport and storage of sediments within channel-floodplain systems can act as important sinks of sediments. In this study, we document the role of an Amazonian floodplain (Curuaí) for sediment storage. Located on the right bank of the Amazon River, 900 km upstream of the mouth, the complex system contains more than 30 interconnected lakes linked to the mainstream by permanent and temporary channels. With an open-water area varying between 600 km 2 and 2500 km 2, it represents ˜13% of the total flooded area of the Amazon River, between Manaus and Óbidos. For the period 2000-2003, daily liquid and solid fluxes exchanged between the floodplain system and the Amazon River were determined using an hydrological model based on a network of gauging, meteorological and sediment monitoring stations and satellite data including radar altimetry data. Sediment accumulation occurs during the five months of the flood rise, from December to April. The export of sediments to the mainstream occurs during the low water stage while depositional processes in lakes and channels are disrupted by the wind induced re-suspension of sediments. The mean average sediment storage calculated varies between 558 and 828 × 10 3 t yr -1 corresponding to 5.4 (±19%) × 10 3 t km -1 yr -1 of sediment deposited along the 130 km reach between Juruti and Santarem. This annual storage represents between 41% and 53% of the annual flux of sediments entering this floodplain through the main channels. The associated mean specific sedimentation rate is ˜517 (±23%) t km -2 yr -1 leading to a sediment accretion rate of 1.6 mm yr -1 ± 23%.

  15. Determination of pentachlorophenol in water and aquifer sediments by high-performance liquid chromatography

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goerlitz, D.F.

    1981-01-01

    Methods for the determination of pentachlorophenol (PCP) in water and aquifer sediments are presented. Reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromotography employing ion suppression and gradient elution is used. PCP can be determined directly in water at a lower limit of detection Of 0.2 micrograms per liter. For extracts of sediment, PCP can be determined to a lower limit of 1.0 micrograms per kilogram.

  16. Effects of sediment transport and seepage direction on hydraulic properties at the sediment-water interface of hyporheic settings

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rosenberry, D.O.; Pitlick, J.

    2009-01-01

    Relations between seepage flux and hydraulic properties are difficult to quantify in fluvial settings because of the difficulty in measuring these variables in situ. Tests conducted in a 1.5-m diameter by 1.5-m tall sediment-filled tank indicate that hydraulic gradient increased and hydraulic conductivity (K) decreased following the onset of downward seepage but both parameters were little changed following the onset of upward seepage. Reductions in K during downward seepage were more pronounced when surface-water current was sufficient to mobilize sediment on the bed. Averaged ratios of K determined during upward seepage to K determined during downward seepage (Kup/Kdown) through a sand-and-gravel bed increased from 1.4 to 1.7 with increasing surface-water velocity, and decreased to slightly greater than 1 when the sediment bed became fully mobile. Kup/Kdown for tests conducted with a silt veneer on the bed surface was greater than 2 for all but the fastest surface-water velocities. Substantial reductions in K also were associated with a silt floc that formed on the bed surface during and following test runs. Although the silt floc was typically less than 0.5 mm in thickness, most of the hydraulic gradient was distributed across this thin layer. K of the thin silt floc was reduced by two to three orders of magnitude relative to the underlying sediment. Directional bias in K and relation between K and surface-water velocity require the presence or absence of a layer of lower-K sediment at or near the bed surface, without which no reduction in K and corresponding increase in hydraulic gradient can occur at the bed surface. The lack of prior observation of the consistent bias in K associated with seepage direction is somewhat surprising given the numerous studies where K has been measured in fluvial settings, but may be explained by the small value of the bias relative to the typical uncertainty associated with field determinations of K. If shown to exist in field settings, this bias and its relation to fluvial processes will be relevant to many studies conducted in hyporheic settings that require determination of fluxes across the sediment-water interface.

  17. ENTRAINMENT OF SEDIMENTS AND DREDGED MATERIALS IN SHALLOW LAKE WATERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Results of recent laboratory experiments concerned with the ntrainment and deposition of sediment is in lakes are reported. rom these experiments and other recent work, quantitative descriptions and parameterizations of entrainment and deposition processes are made. n the interpr...

  18. Accumulation of radium in sediments from continued disposal of produced water and hydraulic fracturing flowback water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warner, N. R.; Menio, E. C.; Landis, J. D.; Vengosh, A.; Lauer, N.; Harkness, J.; Kondash, A.

    2014-12-01

    Recent public interest in high volume slickwater hydraulic fracturing (HVHF) has drawn increased interest in wastewater management practices by the public, researchers, industry, and regulators. The management of wastes, including both fluids and solids, poses many engineering challenges, including elevated total dissolved solids and elevated activities of naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM). One management option for wastewater in particular, which is used in western Pennsylvania, USA, is treatment at centralized waste treatment facilities [1]. Previous studies conducted from 2010-2012 indicated that one centralized facility, the Josephine Brine Treatment facility, removed the majority of radium from produced water and hydraulic fracturing flowback fluid (HFFF) during treatment, but low activities of radium remained in treated effluent and were discharged to surface water [2]. Despite the treatment process and radium reduction, high activities (200 times higher than upstream/background) accumulated in stream sediments at the point of effluent discharge. Here we present new results from sampling conducted at two additional centralized waste treatment facilities (Franklin Brine Treatment and Hart Brine Treatment facilities) and Josephine Brine Treatment facility conducted in June 2014. Preliminary results indicate radium is released to surface water at very low (<50 pCi/L) to non-detectable activities, however; radium continues to accumulate in sediments surrounding the area of effluent release. Combined, the data indicate that 1) radium continues to be released to surface water streams in western Pennsylvania despite oil and gas operators voluntary ban on treatment and disposal of HFFF in centralized waste treatment facilities, 2) radium accumulation in sediments occurred at multiple brine treatment facilities and is not isolated to a single accidental release of contaminants or a single facility. [1] Wilson, J. M. and J. M. VanBriesen (2012). "Oil and Gas Produced Water Management and Surface Drinking Water Sources in Pennsylvania." Environmental Practice 14(04): 288-300. [2] Warner, N. R., C. A. Christie, R. B. Jackson and A. Vengosh (2013). "Impacts of Shale Gas Wastewater Disposal on Water Quality in Western Pennsylvania." ES&T 47(20): 11849-11857.

  19. Reservoir sediments: a sink or source of chemicals at the surface water-groundwater interface.

    PubMed

    Ammar, Rawaa; Kazpard, Véronique; Wazne, Mahmoud; El Samrani, Antoine G; Amacha, Nabil; Saad, Zeinab; Chou, Lei

    2015-09-01

    This study delineates the physical, chemical, and biological effects resulting from anthropogenic and endogenic activities in a sensitive dammed reservoir situated in a semi-arid region. The reservoir is characterized by two major flow regimes: a wet fill hydrologic regime and a dry spill one. A seasonal sampling campaign was carried out over a period of 2 years (2011-2013) where water samples were collected across the water column and from piezometers just outside the perimeter of the reservoir. Similarly, sediments were collected from the corresponding areas beneath the water column. The water samples were analyzed for environmental isotopic ratios, elemental composition, and physical, biological and chemical parameters, whereas the sediment and algal samples were subjected to physical, mineralogical, spectroscopic, and microscopic analyses. This investigation indicated that the dam had resulted in the alteration of the biogeochemical cycle of nutrients as well as the degradation of the sediment and water quality. The hydrological and biogeochemical processes were found to induce vertical downward transport of chemicals towards the fine grained calcareous sediments during the fill mode, whereas the sediments acted as a source of a chemical flux upward through the water column and downward towards the groundwater during the spill mode. The geomorphological characteristics of the reservoir enhanced the strong hydrological connectivity between the surface water and the groundwater where the reservoir responded quickly to natural and anthropogenic changes in the upper watershed. The water and sediments in the sensitive spill mode were of poor quality and should receive more attention due to the potential hazard for the associated hydro-project and the sustainability of the agricultural soil in the long term. Thus, a safe water and sediment management plan should be implemented in order to improve the dam functionality and to safeguard the precious water resources. PMID:26293891

  20. LIQUID AND GAS CHROMATOGRAPHIC ANALYSIS OF DIETHYL PHTHALATE IN WATER AND SEDIMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Diethyl phthalate was determined in water and sediment by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and in water by gas-liquid chromatography with electron capture detection (GLC-ECD). Water samples were extracted with hexane, using a high-speed homogenizer-ultrasonic apparat...

  1. CHANGES IN TRACE METAL CONCENTRATIONS IN DETROIT RIVER WATER AND SEDIMENT SINCE THE 1980S

    EPA Science Inventory

    Water samples werre collected from the Trenton Channel of the Detroit River between March 1995 and June 1996. Both unfiltered and filtered samples were collected. Sediments were collected by MDEQ between 1993 and 1996. Water results were compared to those for water samples collec...

  2. Radium isotopes as a tracer of sediment-water column exchange in the North Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burt, W. J.; Thomas, H.; Pätsch, J.; Omar, A. M.; Schrum, C.; Daewel, U.; Brenner, H.; Baar, H. J. W.

    2014-08-01

    Sediment-water column exchange plays an important role in coastal biogeochemistry. We utilize short-lived radium isotopes (224Ra and 223Ra) to understand and quantify the dominant processes governing sediment-water column exchange throughout the North Sea. Our comprehensive survey, conducted in September 2011, represents the first of its kind conducted in the North Sea. We find that two main sources regulate surface Ra distributions: minor coastal input from rivers and shallow mudflats and North Sea sediments as the dominant source. Pore waters show 100-fold larger activities than the water column. North Sea sediment characteristics such as porosity and mean grain size, as well as turbulence at the sediment-water interface, are the dominant factors contributing to variability of Ra efflux. Ra inventory and mass balance approaches consistently yield high benthic Ra effluxes in the southern North Sea, driven by strong tidal and wind mixing, which in turn cause high sediment irrigation rates. These results exceed incubation-based Ra flux estimates and the majority of previously reported Ra flux estimates for other regions. Ra-based estimates of benthic alkalinity fluxes compare well to observed values, and the high rates of Ra efflux imply a potentially significant exchange of other products of sedimentary reactions, including carbon and nutrient species. Passive tracer simulations lend strong support to the Ra source attribution and imply seasonal variation in the surface water Ra distribution depending on stratification conditions.

  3. Spatial variability of sediment ecotoxicity in a large storm water detention basin.

    PubMed

    Merchan, Carolina Gonzalez; Perrodin, Yves; Barraud, Sylvie; Sébastian, Christel; Becouze-Lareure, Céline; Bazin, Christine; Kouyi, Gislain Lipeme

    2014-04-01

    Detention basins are valuable facilities for urban storm water management, from both the standpoint of flood control and the trapping of pollutants. Studies performed on storm water have shown that suspended solids often constitute the main vector of pollutants (heavy metals, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH), etc.). In order to characterise the ecotoxicity of urban sediments from storm water detention basins, the sediments accumulated over a 6-year period were sampled at five different points through the surface of a large detention basin localised in the east of Lyon, France. A specific ecotoxicological test battery was implemented on the solid phase (raw sediment) and the liquid phase (interstitial water of sediments). The results of the study validated the method formulated for the ecotoxicological characterization of urban sediments. They show that the ecotoxicological effect of the sediments over the basin is heterogeneous and greater in areas often flooded. They also show the relationship between, on one hand, the physical and chemical characteristics of the sediments and, on the other hand, their ecotoxicity. Lastly, they contribute to a better understanding of the dynamics of the pollution close to the bottom of detention basins, which can be useful for improving their design. The results of this research raise particularly the issue of using oil separators on the surface of detention basins. PMID:24243265

  4. Assessing domestic water use habits for more effective water awareness campaigns during drought periods: a case study in Alicante, eastern Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    March, H.; Hernández, M.; Saurí, D.

    2015-05-01

    The design of water awareness campaigns could benefit from knowledge of the specific characteristics of domestic water use and the factors that may influence certain water consumption habits. This paper investigates water use in 450 households in 10 municipalities of drought-prone Alicante (Spain). We aim to increase knowledge about existing domestic water behaviors and therefore help to improve the design and implementation of future water awareness campaigns and even to consolidate reductions in water use after drought periods. The survey suggests that awareness campaigns should revise their scope and their channels of diffusion on a regular basis. In a more specific way, for the Alicante case we propose policy-oriented recommendations on the scope of action for further reductions.

  5. Chloride/bromide and chloride/fluoride ratios of domestic sewage effluents and associated contaminated ground water

    SciTech Connect

    Vengosh, A.; Pankratov, I.

    1998-09-01

    To establish geochemical tools for tracing the origin of ground water contamination, the authors examined the variations of Cl/Br and Cl/F (weight) ratios in (1) domestic waste water from the Dan Region Sewage Reclamation Project and from reservoirs in the central coast of Israel; (2) associated contaminated ground water; and (3) pristine ground water from the Mediterranean coastal aquifer of Israel. The data show that supply water, anthropogenic NaCl and fluoridation control the Cl/Br and Cl/F ratios of domestic waste water, and conventional sewage treatment does not affect the anthropogenic inorganic signals. The Cl/Br ratios of ground water contaminated with sewage effluent reflect conservative mixing proportions of sewage and regional ground water components. Sensitivity tests demonstrate that it is possible to detect and distinguish sewage contamination from marine ratios after a sewage contribution of 5 to 15% is mixed with regional ground water. Mixing with Br-enriched fresh water however, would reduce this sensitivity. Since the high Cl/Br signal of sewage effluents is distinguishable from other anthropogenic sources with low Cl/Br ratios and from natural contamination sources, Cl/Br ratios can therefore be a useful inorganic tracer for identification of the origin of contaminated ground water. The Cl/F ratios of sewage-contaminated ground water were higher than those in the original sewage effluent, which suggests retention of fluoride into the aquifer solid phase.

  6. Sediment-water distribution of contaminants of emerging concern in a mixed use watershed.

    PubMed

    Fairbairn, David J; Karpuzcu, M Ekrem; Arnold, William A; Barber, Brian L; Kaufenberg, Elizabeth F; Koskinen, William C; Novak, Paige J; Rice, Pamela J; Swackhamer, Deborah L

    2015-02-01

    This study evaluated the occurrence and distribution of 15 contaminants of emerging concern (CECs) in stream water and sediments in the Zumbro River watershed in Minnesota and compared these with sub-watershed land uses. Sixty pairs of sediment and water samples were collected across all seasons from four stream sites for over two years and analyzed for selected personal care products, pesticides, human and veterinary medications, and phytoestrogens. Spatial and temporal analyses indicate that pharmaceuticals and personal care products (urban/residential CECs) are significantly elevated in water and/or sediment at sites with greater population density (>100 people/km(2)) and percentage of developed land use (>8% of subwatershed area) than those with less population density and land area under development. Significant spatial variations of agricultural pesticides in water and sediment were detectable, even though all sites had a high percentage of agricultural land use. Seasonality in CEC concentration was observed in water but not in sediment, although sediment concentrations of three CECs did vary between years. Average measured non-equilibrium distribution coefficients exceeded equilibrium hydrophobic partitioning-based predictions for 5 of the 7 detected CECs by at least an order of magnitude. Agreement of measured and predicted distribution coefficients improved with increasing hydrophobicity and in-stream persistence. The more polar and degradable CECs showed greater variability in measured distributions across different sampling events. Our results confirm that CECs are present in urban and agricultural stream sediments, including those CECs that would typically be thought of as non-sorptive based on their log Kow values. These results and the observed patterns of sediment and water distributions augment existing information to improve prediction of CEC fate and transport, leading to more accurate assessments of exposure and risk to surface water ecosystems. PMID:25461092

  7. A generic method for projecting and valuing domestic water uses, application to the Mediterranean basin at the 2050 horizon.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neverre, Noémie; Dumas, Patrice

    2014-05-01

    The aim is to be able to assess future domestic water demands in a region with heterogeneous levels of economic development. This work offers an original combination of a quantitative projection of demands (similar to WaterGAP methodology) and an estimation of the marginal benefit of water. This method is applicable to different levels of economic development and usable for large-scale hydroeconomic modelling. The global method consists in building demand functions taking into account the impact of both the price of water and the level of equipment, proxied by economic development, on domestic water demand. Our basis is a 3-blocks inverse demand function: the first block consists of essential water requirements for food and hygiene; the second block matches intermediate needs; and the last block corresponds to additional water consumption, such as outdoor uses, which are the least valued. The volume of the first block is fixed to match recommended basic water requirements from the literature, but we assume that the volume limits of blocks 2 and 3 depend on the level of household equipment and therefore evolve with the level of GDP per capita (structural change), with a saturation. For blocks 1 and 2 we determine the value of water from elasticity, price and quantity data from the literature, using the point-extension method. For block 3, we use a hypothetical zero-cost demand and maximal demand with actual water costs to linearly interpolate the inverse demand function. These functions are calibrated on the 24 countries part of the Mediterranean basin using data from SIMEDD, and are used for the projection and valuation of domestic water demands at the 2050 horizon. They enable to project total water demand, and also the respective shares of the different categories of demand (basic demand, intermediate demand and additional uses). These projections are performed under different combined scenarios of population, GDP and water costs.

  8. Effect of sediment settling on controlling golden mussel invasion in water transfer project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Mengzhen; Wang, Zhaoyin; Bogen, Jim; Pan, Baozhu

    2013-04-01

    Inter-basin water transfer projects have been widely used to solve uneven distribution of water resources and water shortage in China. Along with the transferring of water resources, golden mussel (Limnoperna fortunei), the filter-collector macro-invertebrate species originating from southern China has also been inadvertently transferred to new aquatic environment, resulting in quick and uncontrolled spread of the species. The golden mussels are invasive by nature and endowed with a strong byssus for attaching onto their habitat, allowing them to easily invade natural and artificial aquatic systems, which was resulted in high-density golden mussel attachment that causes serious bio-fouling. Invasion and bio-fouling by golden mussels in water transfer systems has drawn attention widely because it has resulted in high resistance to water flow, corrosion of pipe walls and even clogging of tunnels, as well as causing water pollution and ecological imbalance in the regions that receive water infested with golden mussels. Field investigation was conducted along the East River, which is the main drinking water resource for Cantong province and Hongkong, China, to study the natural habitats of golden mussels. Surveys of water transfer tunnels which carry water from the East River to several big cities in Cantong province were done to study golden mussel invasion and attachment in tunnels. It is found that in the natural habitat, golden mussels mainly attach to bedrock and bank stones and solid surfaces facing upstream, while no golden mussels are attached on the surfaces facing downstream and suffering sediment deposition. In the water transfer tunnels, golden mussel attachment densities of 40,000 individuals/m2 mainly occurred on the portion of tunnel walls which face downwards and thus avoid sedimentation. An experiment was designed to study the effect of sediment settling on golden mussel attachment. The results showed that settling of fine sediment particles affects golden mussels by preventing them from filtering food and oxygen from water, and in this way killing them. The attachment density decreased with increased sediment deposition. Golden mussel density decreased by about 70-90% when the sedimentation rate increased by 3-6 times. Therefore, spraying with fine sediment or creating hyper-concentration of sediment water to treat golden mussels before they enter tunnels is recommended as an effective strategy for controlling golden mussel invasion and high-density bio-fouling. Key words: golden mussel invasion; bio-fouling; sediment settling; habitat; controlling strategy

  9. Sediment size distribution and composition in a reservoir affected by severe water level fluctuations.

    PubMed

    López, Pilar; López-Tarazón, José A; Casas-Ruiz, Joan P; Pompeo, Marcelo; Ordoñez, Jaime; Muñoz, Isabel

    2016-01-01

    The reservoir sediments are important sinks for organic carbon (OC), the OC burial being dependent on two opposite processes, deposition and mineralization. Hence factors such as severe water level fluctuations are expected to influence the rate of OC accumulation as they may affect both deposition and mineralization. The Barasona Reservoir has been historically threatened by siltation, whilst the use of water for irrigation involves a drastic decrease of the water level. In this context, we have studied the physical and chemical characteristics (grain size, major and minor elemental compositions, organic and inorganic carbon, and nitrogen) of the recent sediments of the Barasona Reservoir and the relationships among them in order to: a) elucidate the main processes governing OC accumulation, b) evaluate the rate of OC mineralization and c) approach the effect of drought on the sediment characteristics in this system. Our results indicated that Barasona sediments were dominated by fine silts (>60%) and clays (>20%), the mean particle size decreasing from tail to dam. Desiccation increased particle sorting and size distribution became bimodal, but no effect on average size was observed. Attending to the composition, Barasona sediments were very homogeneous with low concentrations of nitrogen (TN) and phosphorus (<1.2gkg(-1)dw and <0.6gkg(-1)dw, respectively) and high concentration of OC (?36gkg(-1)dw). TN was negatively related to dry weight. Sediment mixing due to drastic changes in water level may have favoured the observed homogeneity of Barasona sediments affecting carbon, major ions and grain size. The high amount of OC deposited in Barasona sediment suggested that the adsorption of OC onto fine particles was more important than in boreal lakes. The rate of oxygen consumption by wet sediment ranged from 2.26 to 3.15mgO2m(-2)day(-1), values close to those compiled for Mediterranean running waters. PMID:26105704

  10. Using multiple combined analytical techniques to characterize water extractable organic nitrogen from Lake Erhai sediment.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhang; Shengrui, Wang; Haichao, Zhao; Yanping, Li; Shouliang, Huo; Weibin, Qian; Yanli, Yang; Jie, Cheng

    2016-01-15

    In this study, UV-vis absorbance, fluorescence, and FT-IR spectroscopy were combined to characterize the components and structure of the water extractable organic nitrogen (WEON) in Lake Erhai sediment. Lake Erhai sediment WEON comprised predominantly high molecular weight WEON, with the fraction with a molecular weight>1kDa accounting for 87.7% of the total. It was mainly composed of humic acid-like substances, with fewer simple aromatic proteins. Large amounts of aliphatic and amide compounds were detected by IR in the sediments. There were more polymerizable aromatic rings and carbonyl, carboxyl, hydroxyl, and ester compounds in the high molecular weight WEON than in the low molecular weight WEON. Additionally, fluorescence regional integration results implied that the ratio PIII+V,n/PI+II+IV,n can be indirectly taken as an indicator for WEON content in Erhai sediments. Furthermore, the composition and structural characteristics of the WEON were found to be closely related with their properties in the sediment. The large amount of aliphatic compounds in the sediment as well as the relatively high humification and aromatic degree in high molecular weight WEON, stabilizes the WEON in Lake Erhai sediment. Compared with other lake sediments of different trophic statues (such as Lake Dianchi, Lake Poyang, Lake Taihu and Lake Donghu), Erhai sediment exhibited a higher degree of humification, which benefited for reducing sediment WEON releasing risk. And it can be regarded as the reason why the nutrient content in Erhai sediment is very high, but its water quality is still good. PMID:26519594

  11. A conceptual model for river water and sediment dispersal in the Santa Barbara Channel, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Warrick, J.A.; Mertes, L.A.K.; Washburn, L.; Siegel, D.A.

    2004-01-01

    The ephemeral Santa Clara River delivers large amounts of freshwater and sediment to the eastern Santa Barbara Channel during brief, episodic discharge events. This discharge into the channel was characterized here with shipboard measurements during floods of 1997 and 1998. Within approximately 1-km of the river mouth, the river discharge quickly stratifies into a freshened, turbid surface plume and a bottom nephloid layer. Observations immediately off the Santa Clara River mouth on a peak day of river discharge revealed that sediment rapidly settled from the freshened surface waters, as suspended sediment in the freshened surface plume contained only ???6% of the sediment mass expected if the sediment mixed conservatively. On the two subsequent days the reduction of sediment mass in the surface plume continued at ???50% per day. These observations suggest that river sediment undergoes rapid initial settling within ???1-km of the river mouth, followed by somewhat slower rates of settling. Although we did not measure sedimentation or bottom boundary layer processes, our mass balance results suggest that almost all of the river sediment either escapes along or deposits upon the inner shelf seabed.

  12. Soil, Groundwater, Surface Water, and Sediments of Kennedy Space Center, Florida: Background Chemical and Physical Characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shmalzer, Paul A.; Hensley, Melissa A.; Mota, Mario; Hall, Carlton R.; Dunlevy, Colleen A.

    2000-01-01

    This study documented background chemical composition of soils, groundwater, surface; water, and sediments of Kennedy Space Center. Two hundred soil samples were collected, 20 each in 10 soil classes. Fifty-one groundwater wells were installed in 4 subaquifers of the Surficial Aquifer and sampled; there were 24 shallow, 16 intermediate, and 11 deep wells. Forty surface water and sediment samples were collected in major watershed basins. All samples were away from sites of known contamination. Samples were analyzed for organochlorine pesticides, aroclors, chlorinated herbicides, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), total metals, and other parameters. All aroclors (6) were below detection in all media. Some organochlorine pesticides were detected at very low frequencies in soil, sediment, and surface water. Chlorinated herbicides were detected at very low frequencies in soil and sediments. PAH occurred in low frequencies in soiL, shallow groundwater, surface water, and sediments. Concentrations of some metals differed among soil classes, with subaquifers and depths, and among watershed basins for surface water but not sediments. Most of the variation in metal concentrations was natural, but agriculture had increased Cr, Cu, Mn, and Zn.

  13. Contamination of estuarine water, biota, and sediment by halogenated organic compounds: A field study

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pereira, W.E.; Rostad, C.E.; Chiou, C.T.; Brinton, T.I.; Barber, L.B., II; Demcheck, D.K.; Demas, C.R.

    1988-01-01

    Studies conducted in the vicinity of an industrial outfall in the Calcasieu River estuary, Louisiana, have shown that water, bottom and suspended sediment, and four different species of biota are contaminated with halogenated organic compounds (HOC) including haloarenes. A "salting-out" effect in the estuary moderately enhanced the partitioning tendency of the contaminants into biota and sediments. Contaminant concentrations in water, suspended sediments, and biota were found to be far below the values predicted on the basis of the assumption of phase equilibria with respect to concentrations in bottom sediment. Relative concentration factors of HOC between biota (catfish) and bottom sediment increased with increasing octanol/estuarine water partition coefficients (Kow*), maximizing at log Kow* of about 5, although these ratios were considerably less than equilibrium values. In contrast, contaminant concentrations in water, biota, and suspended sediments were much closer to equilibrium values. Bioconcentration factors of HOC determined on the basis of lipid content for four different biotic species correlated reasonably well with equilibrium triolein/water partition coefficients (Ktw).

  14. Water Velocity and Bioturbation Alter Sediment Resuspension and Biogeochemistry in an Experimental Freshwater Mesocosm System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spivak, A.; Vanni, M. J.

    2010-12-01

    Processes such as bioturbation and resuspension can affect organic matter decomposition by altering sediment redox conditions. Increased oxygen availability may, in turn, affect remineralization rates and larger scale processes such as benthic-pelagic coupling. However, relatively few studies have explicitly tested the simultaneous effects of bioturbation and water velocity on benthic biogeochemistry and sediment resuspension. Using a mesocosm system we conducted two experiments testing the effects of bioturbator identity on particulate and dissolved nutrient dynamics before and after a resuspension event (i.e. water velocity held constant at 0.12 m s-1 for 2 hr; Expt. 1) and rates of sediment resuspension with increasing water velocity (0.00 - 0.20 m s-1; Expt. 2). We manipulated bioturbator identity across four levels as sediments were undisturbed (control), manually punctured (2% of surface area), or disturbed by one of two fish species, either bluegill or catfish. For Expt. 1, the bioturbation treatments were applied for several days and measurements were made before and after the resuspension event. Initially, water column chlorophyll and total suspended sediment (TSS) concentrations were highest in the catfish treatments. Bioturbator identity did not affect the stoichiometry of TSS as strongly; C:N was unaffected by our treatments while N:P was lowest in the disturbed treatments. After the resuspension event, there was no difference in TSS concentrations or stoichiometric ratios across the bioturbation treatments. Dissolved nutrient flux rates were insensitive to the bioturbation treatments and were more strongly influenced by the resuspension event. For instance, sediment NO3- fluxes were negative (i.e. net flux into sediments) until after the resuspension event when they became positive. In Expt. 2, we gradually increased water velocity from 0.00 - 0.20 m s-1 and measured TSS concentrations only. TSS was initially highest in catfish treatments and lowest in the control treatments. However, once the water velocity was greater than 0.08 m s-1 there was no difference in TSS concentrations across the bioturbation treatments. Sediment resuspension rates were highest in control and manually disturbed treatments, possibly because these treatments had the lowest initial TSS concentrations. Overall, our results indicate that bioturbation and water velocity affect sediment nutrient dynamics and resuspension. By extension, disturbances that affect surficial sediments may also impact algal growth rates by altering nutrient and light levels. Thus it is important to consider how benthic animal communities and species identity interact with water velocity to influence sediment biogeochemical processes.

  15. Extending the analytical window for water-soluble organic matter in sediments by aqueous Soxhlet extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Frauke; Koch, Boris P.; Witt, Matthias; Hinrichs, Kai-Uwe

    2014-09-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) in marine sediments is a complex mixture of thousands of individual constituents that participate in biogeochemical reactions and serve as substrates for benthic microbes. Knowledge of the molecular composition of DOM is a prerequisite for a comprehensive understanding of the biogeochemical processes in sediments. In this study, interstitial water DOM was extracted with Rhizon samplers from a sediment core from the Black Sea and compared to the corresponding water-extractable organic matter fraction (<0.4 ?m) obtained by Soxhlet extraction, which mobilizes labile particulate organic matter and DOM. After solid phase extraction (SPE) of DOM, samples were analyzed for the molecular composition by Fourier Transform Ion-Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry (FT-ICR MS) with electrospray ionization in negative ion mode. The average SPE extraction yield of the dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in interstitial water was 63%, whereas less than 30% of the DOC in Soxhlet-extracted organic matter was recovered. Nevertheless, Soxhlet extraction yielded up to 4.35% of the total sedimentary organic carbon, which is more than 30-times the organic carbon content of the interstitial water. While interstitial water DOM consisted primarily of carbon-, hydrogen- and oxygen-bearing compounds, Soxhlet extracts yielded more complex FT-ICR mass spectra with more peaks and higher abundances of nitrogen- and sulfur-bearing compounds. The molecular composition of both sample types was affected by the geochemical conditions in the sediment; elevated concentrations of HS- promoted the early diagenetic sulfurization of organic matter. The Soxhlet extracts from shallow sediment contained specific three- and four-nitrogen-bearing molecular formulas that were also detected in bacterial cell extracts and presumably represent proteinaceous molecules. These compounds decreased with increasing sediment depth while one- and two-nitrogen-bearing molecules increased, resulting in a higher similarity of both sample types in the deep sediment. In summary, Soxhlet extraction of sediments accessed a larger and more complex pool of organic matter than present in interstitial water DOM.

  16. Sequestration of priority pollutant PAHs from sediment pore water employing semipermeable membrane devices

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williamson, K.S.; Petty, J.D.; Huckins, J.N.; Lebo, J.A.; Kaiser, E.M.

    2002-01-01

    Semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDs) were employed to sample sediment pore water in static exposure studies under controlled laboratory conditions using (control pond and formulated) sediments fortified with 15 priority pollutant polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PPPAHs). The sediment fortification level of 750 ng/g was selected on the basis of what might be detected in a sediment sample from a contaminated area. The sampling interval consisted of 0, 4, 7, 14, and 28 days for each study. The analytical methodologies, as well as the extraction and sample cleanup procedures used in the isolation, characterization, and quantitation of 15 PPPAHs at different fortification levels in SPMDs, water, and sediment were reported previously (Williamson, M.S. Thesis, University of Missouri - Columbia, USA; Williamson et al., Chemosphere (This issue - PII: S0045-6535(02)00394-6)) and used for this project. Average (mean) extraction recoveries for each PPPAH congener in each matrix are reported and discussed. No procedural blank extracts (controls) were found to contain any PPPAH residues above the method quantitation limit, therefore, no matrix interferences were detected. The focus of this publication is to demonstrate the ability to sequester environmental contaminants, specifically PPPAHs, from sediment pore water using SPMDs and two different types of fortified sediment.

  17. Acclimation of Hydrilla verticillata to sediment anoxia in vegetation restoration in eutrophic waters.

    PubMed

    Wu, Juan; Dai, Yanran; Rui, Shengyang; Cui, Naxin; Zhong, Fei; Cheng, Shuiping

    2015-12-01

    Sediment anoxia generally results from intense organic enrichment and is a limiting factor in the restoration of vegetation in eutrophic waters. To investigate the effect of sediment anoxia on a typical pollution-tolerant submerged macrophyte species, Hydrilla verticillata, and acclimation mechanisms in the plant, a gradient of sediment anoxia was simulated with additions of sucrose to the sediment, which can stimulate increased concentrations of total nitrogen, NH4 (+) and Fe in pore water. H. verticillata growth was significantly affected by highly anoxic conditions, as indicated by reduced total biomass in the 0.5 and 1 % sucrose treatments. However, slight anoxia (0.1 % sucrose addition) promoted growth, and the shoot biomass was 22.64 % higher than in the control. In addition to morphologic alterations, H. verticillata showed physiological acclimations to anoxia, including increased anaerobic respiration and changes in carbon and nitrogen metabolism in roots. The soluble protein and soluble carbohydrate contents in roots of the 1 % treatment were both significantly higher compared with those in the control. The increase in alcohol dehydrogenase activity and pyruvate content in the roots suggested that H. verticillata has a well-developed capacity for anaerobic fermentation. This study suggests that highly anoxic sediments inhibit the growth of H. verticillata and the species has a degree of tolerance to anoxic conditions. Further in situ investigations should be conducted on the interactions between sediment conditions and macrophytes to comprehensively evaluate the roles of sediment in the restoration of vegetation in eutrophic waters. PMID:26423394

  18. Presence of pyrethroid pesticides in water and sediments of Ebro River Delta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feo, M. L.; Ginebreda, A.; Eljarrat, E.; Barceló, D.

    2010-11-01

    SummaryThe distribution of pyrethroid insecticides of the Ebro River Delta (NE Spain) was assessed by measuring concentrations in surface water and sediment samples. Pyrethroid extraction from water was carried out by ultrasound-assisted emulsification-extraction (UAEE), while the sediment was sonicated and cleaned up using Florisil cartridge. Method detection of limits (MLODs) for the 12 pyrethroids analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometer in negative chemical ionization (GC-NCI-MS) ranged from 0.03 to 35.8 ng L -1 for water and 2.6 to 62.4 pg g -1 for sediment. Recoveries values were in the range of 47-105% for water and 51-105% for sediments, showing satisfactory robustness of the method for analyzing pyrethroids in water and sediment samples. Cypermethrin was detected in 22 water samples collected from Ebro River Delta, while deltamethrin was present only in three water samples at concentrations ranging from 0.73 ng L -1 to 57.2 ng L -1 and 2 ng L -1 to 58.8 ng L -1 for cypermethrin and deltamethrin, respectively. These concentration levels were higher than median lethal concentration (LC50) values found for deltamethrin and lower than LC50 values found for cypermethrin when short time toxic effects are considered. In sediment samples only cypermethrin was detected at concentration levels ranged from 8.27 ng g -1 to 71.9 ng g -1. These levels were higher than its LC50 values. Environmental dynamic behaviour and fate were also evaluated for cypermethrin measuring the sediment/water partition coefficient (ranging from 5.0 to 6.3) and kinetic data (half-life ranging between 13 and 50 days). Results were in good agreement to those reported in literature

  19. A review of surface-water sediment fractions and their interactions with persistent manmade organic compounds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Witkowski, P.J.; Smith, J.A.; Fusillo, T.V.; Chiou, C.T.

    1987-01-01

    This paper reviews the suspended and surficial sediment fractions and their interactions with manmade organic compounds. The objective of this review is to isolate and describe those contaminant and sediment properties that contribute to the persistence of organic compounds in surface-water systems. Most persistent, nonionic organic contaminants, such as the chlorinated insecticides and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), are characterized by low water solubilities and high octanol-water partition coefficients. Consequently, sorptive interactions are the primary transformation processes that control their environmental behavior. For nonionic organic compounds, sorption is primarily attributed to the partitioning of an organic contaminant between a water phase and an organic phase. Partitioning processes play a central role in the uptake and release of contaminants by sediment organic matter and in the bioconcentration of contaminants by aquatic organisms. Chemically isolated sediment fractions show that organic matter is the primary determinant of the sorptive capacity exhibited by sediment. Humic substances, as dissolved organic matter, contribute a number of functions to the processes cycling organic contaminants. They alter the rate of transformation of contaminants, enhance apparent water solubility, and increase the carrying capacity of the water column beyond the solubility limits of the contaminant. As a component of sediment particles, humic substances, through sorptive interactions, serve as vectors for the hydrodynamic transport of organic contaminants. The capabilities of the humic substances stem in part from their polyfunctional chemical composition and also from their ability to exist in solution as dissolved species, flocculated aggregates, surface coatings, and colloidal organomineral and organometal complexes. The transport properties of manmade organic compounds have been investigated by field studies and laboratory experiments that examine the sorption of contaminants by different sediment size fractions. Field studies indicate that organic contaminants tend to sorb more to fine-grained sediment, and this correlates significantly with sediment organic matter content. Laboratory experiments have extended the field studies to a wider spectrum of natural particulates and anthropogenic compounds. Quantitation of isotherm results allows the comparison of different sediment sorbents as well as the estimation of field partition coefficients from laboratory-measured sediment and contaminant properties. Detailed analyses made on the basis of particle-size classes show that all sediment fractions need to be considered in evaluating the fate and distribution of manmade organic compounds. This conclusion is based on observations from field studies and on the variety of natural organic sorbents that demonstrate sorptive capabilities in laboratory isotherm experiments.

  20. Heavy Metals in Water and Sediment: A Case Study of Tembi River

    PubMed Central

    Shanbehzadeh, Saeed; Vahid Dastjerdi, Marzieh; Hassanzadeh, Akbar; Kiyanizadeh, Toba

    2014-01-01

    This study was carried out to examine heavy metals concentration in water and sediment of upstream and downstream of the entry of the sewage to the Tembi River, Iran. Samples were collected from upstream and downstream and were analyzed for Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, Pb, Ni, and Zn by atomic absorption spectrophotometer. The results indicated that the average concentration of the metals in water and sediment on downstream was more than that of upstream. The comparison of the mean concentrations of heavy metals in water of the Tembi River with drinking water standards and those in the water used for agriculture suggests that the mean concentration of Cu and Zn lies within the standard range for drinking water and the mean concentration of Mn, Zn, and Pb lies within the standard range of agricultural water. The highest average concentration on downstream for Pb in water and for Mn in sediment was 1.95 and 820.5?ppm, respectively. Also, the lowest average concentration on upstream was identified for Cd in water and sediment 0.07 and 10?ppm, respectively. With regard to the results, it gets clear that using the water for recreational purposes, washing, and fishing is detrimental to human health and the environment. PMID:24616738

  1. Mercury cycling in stream ecosystems. 2. Benthic methylmercury production and bed sediment - Pore water partitioning

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Marvin-DiPasquale, M.; Lutz, M.A.; Brigham, M.E.; Krabbenhoft, D.P.; Aiken, G.R.; Orem, W.H.; Hall, B.D.

    2009-01-01

    Mercury speciation, controls on methylmercury (MeHg) production, and bed sediment - pore water partitioning of total Hg (THg) and MeHg were examined in bed sediment from eight geochemically diverse streams where atmospheric deposition was the predominant Hg input. Across all streams, sediment THg concentrations were best described as a combined function of sediment percent fines (%fines; particles < 63 ??m) and organic content. MeHg concentrations were best described as a combined function of organic content and the activity of the Hg(II)-methylating microbial community and were comparable to MeHg concentrations in streams with Hg inputs from industrial and mining sources. Whole sediment tin-reducible inorganic reactive Hg (Hg(II)R) was used as a proxy measure for the Hg(II) pool available for microbial methylation. In conjunction with radiotracer-derived rate constants of 203Hg(II) methylation, Hg(II)R was used to calculate MeHg production potential rates and to explain the spatial variability in MeHg concentration. The %Hg(II)R (of THg) was low (2.1 ?? 5.7%) and was inversely related to both microbial sulfate reduction rates and sediment total reduced sulfur concentration. While sediment THg concentrations were higher in urban streams, %MeHg and %Hg(II)R were higher in nonurban streams. Sediment pore water distribution coefficients (log Kd's) for both THg and MeHg were inversely related to the log-transformed ratio of pore water dissolved organic carbon (DOC) to bed sediment %fines. The stream with the highest drainage basin wetland density also had the highest pore water DOC ?? 2009 American Chemical Society.

  2. Contaminants in surface water and sediments near the Tynagh silver mine site, County Galway, Ireland.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, A; Phillips, D H; Bowen, J; Sen Gupta, B

    2015-04-15

    A former silver mine in Tynagh, Co. Galway, Ireland is one of the most contaminated mine sites in Europe with maximum concentrations of Zn, As, Pb, Mn, Ni, Cu, and Cd far exceeding guideline values for water and sediment. The aims of this research were to 1) further assess the contamination, particularly metals, in surface water and sediment around the site, and 2) determine if the contamination has increased 10 years after the Environmental Protection Agency Ireland (EPAI) identified off-site contamination. Site pH is alkaline to neutral because CaCO3-rich sediment and rock material buffer the exposed acid generating sulphide-rich ore. When this study was compared to the previous EPAI study conducted 10 years earlier, it appeared that further weathering of exposed surface sediment had increased concentrations of As and other potentially toxic elements. Water samples from the tailings ponds and adjacent Barnacullia Stream had concentrations of Al, Cd, Mn, Zn and Pb above guideline values. Lead and Zn concentrations from the tailings pond sediment were 16 and 5 times higher, respectively, than concentrations reported 10 years earlier. Pb and Zn levels in most sediment samples exceeded the Expert Group (EGS) guidelines of 1000 and 5000 mg/kg, respectively. Arsenic concentrations were as high as 6238 mg/kg in the tailings ponds sediment, which is 62 and 862 times greater than the EGS and Canadian Soil Quality Guidelines (CSQG), respectively. Cadmium, Cu, Fe, Mn, Pb and Zn concentrations in water and sediment were above guideline values downstream of the site. Additionally, Fe, Mn and organic matter (OM) were strongly correlated and correlated to Zn, Pb, As, Cd, Cu and Ni in stream sediment. Therefore, the nearby Barnacullia Stream is also a significant pathway for contaminant transport to downstream areas. Further rehabilitation of the site may decrease the contamination around the area. PMID:25634731

  3. Analytical Methods for Measuring Mercury in Water, Sediment and Biota

    SciTech Connect

    Lasorsa, Brenda K.; Gill, Gary A.; Horvat, Milena

    2012-06-07

    Mercury (Hg) exists in a large number of physical and chemical forms with a wide range of properties. Conversion between these different forms provides the basis for mercury's complex distribution pattern in local and global cycles and for its biological enrichment and effects. Since the 1960’s, the growing awareness of environmental mercury pollution has stimulated the development of more accurate, precise and efficient methods of determining mercury and its compounds in a wide variety of matrices. During recent years new analytical techniques have become available that have contributed significantly to the understanding of mercury chemistry in natural systems. In particular, these include ultra sensitive and specific analytical equipment and contamination-free methodologies. These improvements allow for the determination of total mercury as well as major species of mercury to be made in water, sediments and soils, and biota. Analytical methods are selected depending on the nature of the sample, the concentration levels of mercury, and what species or fraction is to be quantified. The terms “speciation” and “fractionation” in analytical chemistry were addressed by the International Union for Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC) which published guidelines (Templeton et al., 2000) or recommendations for the definition of speciation analysis. "Speciation analysis is the analytical activity of identifying and/or measuring the quantities of one or more individual chemical species in a sample. The chemical species are specific forms of an element defined as to isotopic composition, electronic or oxidation state, and/or complex or molecular structure. The speciation of an element is the distribution of an element amongst defined chemical species in a system. In case that it is not possible to determine the concentration of the different individual chemical species that sum up the total concentration of an element in a given matrix, meaning it is impossible to determine the speciation, it is a useful practice to do fractionation instead. Fractionation is the process of classification of an analyte or a group of analytes from a certain sample according to physical (e.g. size, solubility) or chemical (e.g. bonding, reactivity) properties."

  4. Responses of wetland plants to effluents in water and sediment

    SciTech Connect

    Walsh, G.E.; Weber, D.E.; Nguyen, M.T.; Esry, L.K.

    1991-01-01

    Responses of two wetland vascular plants, Echinochloa crusgalli and Sesbania macrocarpa, exposed to effluents from a coke plant, a pulp mill, a wastewater treatment plant, and the herbicide, hexazinone, were measured in three types of tests: seed germination and early growth, seedling survival and growth in hydroponic culture, and seedling survival and growth in sand and synthetic sediments with clay, silt, and sand, 3, 5, 7.5, or 10% organic contents. There was no effect of effluents or herbicide on germination and survival was affected only by the herbicide. When compared to controls, growth rates were reduced significantly in all tests except for E. crusgalli exposed to effluent from a wastewater treatment plant. There, the effluent stimulated growth in sediments. Increasing concentrations of organic matter in sediments had little effect on toxicity of effluents, but did cause reduced effects of hexazinone.

  5. [Water provision for domestic ducks kept indoors--a review on the basis of the literature and our own experiences].

    PubMed

    Knierim, U; Bulheller, M A; Kuhnt, K; Briese, A; Hartung, J

    2004-03-01

    The wild ancestors of the domestic pekin and muscovy ducks are anatomically, physiologically and behaviourally well adapted to living on and at the water. The domestic ducks kept for fattening purposes still show clear preferences for open water and make use of water for foraging and feeding, drinking, for general exploration, locomotion and preening, even without prior experience. For hygienic, labour, technical and economical reasons ducks are nowadays mostly kept in closed buildings without access to open water. This significantly restricts their freedom to show their natural behaviour. An obvious consequence of this restriction is a deteriorated plumage condition, especially with regard to cleanliness. According to the Council of Europe recommendations, water shall be provided in a way that allows the ducks to cover their head with water and shake it about their body without difficulty. To date, however, there is a lack of solutions satisfying behavioural, hygienic, health, labour and economical requirements to about equally tolerable degrees. The presently available types of different water provisions are presented and discussed on the basis of existing literature as well as experiences and first results from an ongoing research project. The provision of shallow bathing water with daily water exchange promises to be a practicable solution. However, longer term research on possible negative effects of the decreased hygienic quality of the water on duck health is necessary before final conclusions can be drawn. PMID:15195960

  6. Intersex and alterations in reproductive development of a cichlid, Tilapia guineensis, from a municipal domestic water supply lake (Eleyele) in Southwestern Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Adeogun, Aina O; Ibor, Oju R; Adeduntan, Sherifat D; Arukwe, Augustine

    2016-01-15

    The objectives of this study were to develop and validate biomarker techniques for aquatic environmental monitoring of endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) in Nigeria aquatic ecosystems, using the Eleyele Lake, which is a major source of domestic water supply to Ibadan and its surrounding towns, as a model aquatic environment and Tilapia guineensis, as a model organism. A total of 55 male and 28 female fish were used for this study. No significant difference in condition factor was observed between the sexes. Evaluation of gross gonadal morphology of the sampled fish showed 33% intersex prevalence in the sampled population, of which respective 71 and 29% were males and females, with visible testis and ovary developing alongside phenotypic females and males. Plasma concentrations of luteinizing hormone (LH), follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), 11-ketotestosterone (11-KT) and 17?-estradiol (E2) were performed, showing that male fish had significantly higher plasma LH and E2 concentrations, compared to females. Vitellogenin (Vtg) and zona radiata proteins (Zrp) mRNA levels were significantly higher in males, compared to female fish. Contaminant analysis revealed that PCB 81, 123, 138 and 196 were the only PCB congeners detected in sediment and fish muscle (PCB153 in sediment), while dieldrin was the only organochlorine compound (OC) detected in Eleyele sediment. These responses were used in a multivariate analysis, showing that two principal components were extracted and accounted for 74% of total variation in the dataset. The principal component analysis (PCA) showed that male fish variables were positively correlated with PCB congeners 18 and 123, while female fish showed positive correlations with congener 81, 138, 189, 196, indicating sex-specific pattern of association between PCBs concentrations and biomarker expression. In addition, strong positive correlation between male fish and LH, E2, FSH and Vtg was observed, while female fish positively correlated with 11-KT and GSI. These relationships suggest feminization and masculinization of male and female fish, respectively. PMID:26410712

  7. Grazing Land Management Strongly Controls Water Quality, Sediment and Channel Dynamics in Tallgrass Prairie Headwater Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grudzinski, B. G.; Daniels, M. D.

    2013-12-01

    In the prairie remnants of North America, watershed sediment regimes are heavily influenced by livestock grazing practices. Despite dramatic declines in stream water quality and ecosystem function concomitant with increasing gazing pressures, there have been no studies to quantitatively assess the relationship between various grazing treatments and sediment production in natural grassland ecosystems. In this study, we evaluate suspended sediment transport and channel morphology in the Flint Hills physiographic province using a paired whole-watershed approach, including 2 replicates of high density cattle grazing, 2 replicates of low density cattle grazing, 3 replicates of bison grazing and 3 replicates of no grazing. As expected, results demonstrate that cattle grazing operations increase e-coli, sediment concentrations and increase channel width. However, no significant differences in e-coli, suspended sediment dynamics or channel geomorphology were found between bison grazed and ungrazed watersheds.

  8. Sediment microbial communities in Great Boiling Spring are controlled by temperature and distinct from water communities

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Jessica K; Peacock, Joseph P; Dodsworth, Jeremy A; Williams, Amanda J; Thompson, Daniel B; Dong, Hailiang; Wu, Geng; Hedlund, Brian P

    2013-01-01

    Great Boiling Spring is a large, circumneutral, geothermal spring in the US Great Basin. Twelve samples were collected from water and four different sediment sites on four different dates. Microbial community composition and diversity were assessed by PCR amplification of a portion of the small subunit rRNA gene using a universal primer set followed by pyrosequencing of the V8 region. Analysis of 164?178 quality-filtered pyrotags clearly distinguished sediment and water microbial communities. Water communities were extremely uneven and dominated by the bacterium Thermocrinis. Sediment microbial communities grouped according to temperature and sampling location, with a strong, negative, linear relationship between temperature and richness at all taxonomic levels. Two sediment locations, Site A (87–80?°C) and Site B (79?°C), were predominantly composed of single phylotypes of the bacterial lineage GAL35 (p?=36.1%), Aeropyrum (p?=16.6%), the archaeal lineage pSL4 (p?=15.9%), the archaeal lineage NAG1 (p?=10.6%) and Thermocrinis (p?=7.6%). The ammonia-oxidizing archaeon ‘Candidatus Nitrosocaldus' was relatively abundant in all sediment samples <82?°C (p?=9.51%), delineating the upper temperature limit for chemolithotrophic ammonia oxidation in this spring. This study underscores the distinctness of water and sediment communities in GBS and the importance of temperature in driving microbial diversity, composition and, ultimately, the functioning of biogeochemical cycles. PMID:23235293

  9. Sediment microbial communities in Great Boiling Spring are controlled by temperature and distinct from water communities.

    PubMed

    Cole, Jessica K; Peacock, Joseph P; Dodsworth, Jeremy A; Williams, Amanda J; Thompson, Daniel B; Dong, Hailiang; Wu, Geng; Hedlund, Brian P

    2013-04-01

    Great Boiling Spring is a large, circumneutral, geothermal spring in the US Great Basin. Twelve samples were collected from water and four different sediment sites on four different dates. Microbial community composition and diversity were assessed by PCR amplification of a portion of the small subunit rRNA gene using a universal primer set followed by pyrosequencing of the V8 region. Analysis of 164 178 quality-filtered pyrotags clearly distinguished sediment and water microbial communities. Water communities were extremely uneven and dominated by the bacterium Thermocrinis. Sediment microbial communities grouped according to temperature and sampling location, with a strong, negative, linear relationship between temperature and richness at all taxonomic levels. Two sediment locations, Site A (87-80 °C) and Site B (79 °C), were predominantly composed of single phylotypes of the bacterial lineage GAL35 (\\[pmacr]=36.1%), Aeropyrum (\\[pmacr]=16.6%), the archaeal lineage pSL4 (\\[pmacr]=15.9%), the archaeal lineage NAG1 (\\[pmacr]=10.6%) and Thermocrinis (\\[pmacr]=7.6%). The ammonia-oxidizing archaeon 'Candidatus Nitrosocaldus' was relatively abundant in all sediment samples <82 °C (\\[pmacr]=9.51%), delineating the upper temperature limit for chemolithotrophic ammonia oxidation in this spring. This study underscores the distinctness of water and sediment communities in GBS and the importance of temperature in driving microbial diversity, composition and, ultimately, the functioning of biogeochemical cycles. PMID:23235293

  10. Threshold events in spring discharge: Evidence from sediment and continuous water level measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herman, Ellen K.; Toran, Laura; White, William B.

    2008-03-01

    SummaryIn September 2004, three major hurricanes, Frances, Ivan, and Jeanne, traveled up the eastern United States from the Gulf Coast bringing large amounts of rain to Central Pennsylvania. Monitoring equipment in place at Arch Spring, Blair County, PA captured the effects of these storms on the karstic spring flow. Together these storms revealed a quantitative limit for the carrying capacity of the conduit system. Ivan was a much more devastating storm to the area because rain fell on ground already saturated by Frances, but the net stage increase at the spring was greater during the earlier Frances storm, a 74 cm stage increase versus a 54 cm increase. Storm water not transported through the Arch Spring system was diverted into surface channels during these storms. Suspended sediment collected by an automatic sampler during Frances reveals another threshold crossed. Concurrent with increasing stage and high conductance water, maximum sediment concentrations (933 mg/L) exceed previous fluxes by up to an order of magnitude. The timing of the sediment pulse indicates that high sediment concentrations occur not only when the storm water reaches the spring, but also when stored water is being flushed out of the karst spring system. Sediment previously deposited in the conduit system is flushed only when adequate flows occur, indicating that sediment transport in karst is marked by thresholds and is a strongly non-linear process.

  11. Sedimentation patterns on a cold-water coral mound off Mauritania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eisele, Markus; Frank, Norbert; Wienberg, Claudia; Titschack, Jürgen; Mienis, Furu; Beuck, Lydia; Tisnerat-Laborde, Nadine; Hebbeln, Dierk

    2014-01-01

    An unconformity-bound glacial sequence (135 cm thick) of a coral-bearing sediment core collected from the flank of a cold-water coral mound in the Banda Mound Province off Mauritania was analysed. In order to study the relation between coral framework growth and its filling by hemipelagic sediments, U-series dates obtained from the cold-water coral species Lophelia pertusa were compared to 14C dates of planktonic foraminifera of the surrounding matrix sediments. The coral ages, ranging from 45.1 to 32.3 ka BP, exhibit no clear depositional trend, while on the other hand the 14C dates of the matrix sediment provide ages within a much narrower time window of <3000 yrs (34.6-31.8 cal ka BP), corresponding to the latest phase of the coral growth period. In addition, high-resolution computer tomography data revealed a subdivision of the investigated sediment package into three distinct parts, defined by the portion and fragmentation of corals and associated macrofauna as well as in the density of the matrix sediments. Grain size spectra obtained on the matrix sediments show a homogeneous pattern throughout the core sediment package, with minor variations. These features are interpreted as indicators of redeposition. Based on the observed structures and the dating results, the sediments were interpreted as deposits of a mass wasting event, namely a debris flow. During this event, the sediment unit must have been entirely mixed; resulting in averaging of the foraminifera ages from the whole unit and giving randomly distributed coral ages. In this context, for the first time mass wasting is proposed to be a substantial process of mound progradation by exporting material from the mound top to the flanks. Hence, it may not only be an erosional feature but also widening the base of the mound, thus allowing further vertical mound growth.

  12. Analysis of pesticides in surface water and sediment from Yolo Bypass, California, 2004-2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smalling, Kelly L.; Orlando, James L.; Kuivila, Kathryn M.

    2005-01-01

    Inputs to the Yolo Bypass are potential sources of pesticides that could impact critical life stages of native fish. To assess the direct inputs during inundation, pesticide concentrations were analyzed in water, in suspended and bed-sediment samples collected from six source watersheds to the Yolo Bypass, and from three sites within the Bypass in 2004 and 2005. Water samples were collected in February 2004 from the six input sites to the Bypass during the first flood event of the year representing pesticide inputs during high-flow events. Samples were also collected along a transect across the Bypass in early March 2004 and from three sites within the Bypass in the spring of 2004 under low-flow conditions. Low-flow data were used to understand potential pesticide contamination and its effects on native fish if water from these areas were used to flood the Bypass in dry years. To assess loads of pesticides to the Bypass associated with suspended sediments, large-volume water samples were collected during high flows in 2004 and 2005 from three sites, whereas bed sediments were collected from six sites in the fall of 2004 during the dry season. Thirteen current-use pesticides were detected in surface water samples collected during the study. The highest pesticide concentrations detected at the input sites to the Bypass corresponded to the first high-flow event of the year. The highest pesticide concentrations at the two sites sampled within the Bypass during the early spring were detected in mid-April following a major flood event as the water began to subside. The pesticides detected and their concentrations in the surface waters varied by site; however, hexazinone and simazine were detected at all sites and at some of the highest concentrations. Thirteen current-use pesticides and three organochlorine insecticides were detected in bed and suspended sediments collected in 2004 and 2005. The pesticides detected and their concentrations varied by site and sediment sample type. Trifluralin, p,p'-DDE, and p,p'-DDT were highest in the bed sediments, whereas oxyfluorfen and thiobencarb were highest in the suspended sediments. With the exception of the three organochlorine insecticides, suspended sediments had higher pesticide concentrations compared with bed sediments, indicating the potential for pesticide transport throughout the Bypass, especially during high-flow events. Understanding the distribution of pesticides between the water and sediment is needed to assess fate and transport within the Bypass and to evaluate the potential effects on native fish.

  13. Eutrophication in the northern Adriatic Sea: Pore water and sediment studies

    SciTech Connect

    Hammond, D.E.; Berelson, W.M. ); Giordani, P.; Langone, L.; Frignani, M.; Ravaioli, M. )

    1990-01-09

    The northern Adriatic Sea has been plagued by problems of eutrophication. This area is relatively shallow (maximum depth = 60m), becoming stratified during the summer months which inhibits oxygen transport to bottom waters. Anthropogenic nutrient loading in rivers entering the northern Adriatic (Po River being the largest) has increased nutrient input to this system and stimulated algal growth. Cores were collected for studies of pore water and solid phase chemistry at 6 stations in this region. [sup 210]Pb was used to constrain sediment accumulation rates and a range of 0-0.5 cm/yr was determined at different stations. Excess [sup 234]Th was only found in the upper 1-2 cm, suggesting that bioturbation is largely restricted to shallow depths. Pore water profiles show evidence of irrigation, and mean diffusive fluxes for oxygen, silica phosphate and ammonia are generally 20-90% of the fluxes obtained from benthic chamber measurements. This is consistent with previous work in this area in which studies of radon fluxes indicated that irrigation plays an important role in sediment-water exchange. Pore water profiles in the northern portion of the study area (near the Po River Delta) were markedly different than profiles in the south; sediments in the north are substantially more acidic and have high concentrations of dissolved iron and phosphate. From the alkalinity vs. TCO[sub 2] relationship in sediment pore waters it appears that differences in reactions involving the reduction of iron oxides and the exchange of magnesium for iron in clays are responsible for this regional difference in pore water properties. Sediments close to the Po apparently undergo more iron-magnesium exchange, while more distal sediments are limited in their ability to do so. Other pore water observations are limited in their ability to do so. Other pore water observations and trends regarding the shape of the silica profiles (which show shallow maxima) will be discussed.

  14. BENTHIC INVERTEBRATE BIOASSAYS WITH TOXIC SEDIMENT AND PORE WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The relative sensitivities of bioassays to determine the toxicity of sediments were investigated and three methods of making the sample dilutions required to generate dose-response relationships were compared. he assays studied were: (a) Microtox, a 15-min assay of Photobacterium...

  15. Field Evaluation Of Arsenic Transport Across The Ground Water/Surface Water Interface: Speciation In Sediment Material

    EPA Science Inventory

    The solubility and mobility of arsenic in ground water are influenced by a variety of processes in the northeastern US subjective to geogenic and anthropogenic sources. This presentation will discuss the speciation of arsenic in sediment profiles resulting from ground water disc...

  16. Low-Cost Solar Domestic Hot Water Systems for Mild Climates

    SciTech Connect

    Burch, J.; Christensen, C.; Merrigan, T.; Hewett, R.; Jorgensen, G.

    2005-01-01

    In FY99, Solar Heating and Lighting set the goal to reduce the life-cycle cost of saved-energy for solar domestic hot water (SDHW) systems in mild climates by 50%, primarily through use of polymer technology. Two industry teams (Davis Energy Group/SunEarth (DEG/SE) and FAFCO) have been developing un-pressurized integral-collector-storage (ICS) systems having load-side heat exchangers, and began field-testing in FY04. DEG/SE?s ICS has a rotomolded tank and thermoformed glazing. Based upon manufacturing issues, costs, and poor performance, the FAFCO team changed direction in late FY04 from an un-pressurized ICS to a direct thermosiphon design based upon use of pool collectors. Support for the teams is being provided for materials testing, modeling, and system testing. New ICS system models have been produced to model the new systems. A new ICS rating procedure for the ICS systems is undergoing testing and validation. Pipe freezing, freeze protection valves, and overheating have been tested and analyzed.

  17. Normalized rare earth elements in water, sediments, and wine: identifying sources and environmental redox conditions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Piper, David Z.; Bau, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The concentrations of the rare earth elements (REE) in surface waters and sediments, when normalized on an element-by-element basis to one of several rock standards and plotted versus atomic number, yield curves that reveal their partitioning between different sediment fractions and the sources of those fractions, for example, between terrestrial-derived lithogenous debris and seawater-derived biogenous detritus and hydrogenous metal oxides. The REE of ancient sediments support their partitioning into these same fractions and further contribute to the identification of the redox geochemistry of the sea water in which the sediments accumulated. The normalized curves of the REE that have been examined in several South American wine varietals can be interpreted to reflect the lithology of the bedrock on which the vines may have been grown, suggesting limited fractionation during soil development.

  18. Laboratory measurements of physical, chemical, and optical characteristics of Lake Chicot sediment waters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witte, W. G.; Whitlock, C. H.; Usry, J. W.; Morris, W. D.; Gurganus, E. A.

    1981-01-01

    Reflectance, chromaticity, diffuse attenuation, beam attenuation, and several other physical and chemical properties were measured for various water mixtures of lake bottom sediment. Mixture concentrations range from 5 ppm to 700 ppm by weight of total suspended solids in filtered deionized tap water. Upwelled reflectance is a nonlinear function of remote sensing wave lengths. Near-infrared wavelengths are useful for monitoring highly turbid waters with sediment concentrations above 100 ppm. It is found that both visible and near infrared wavelengths, beam attenuation correlates well with total suspended solids ranging over two orders of magnitude.

  19. Phosphite flux at the sediment-water interface in northern Lake Taihu.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Huimin; Geng, Jinju; Ren, Hongqiang; Xu, Zhaoyi

    2016-02-01

    Phosphite (H2PO3(-), HPO3(2-), +3 valence), a reduced form of phosphorus (P), has been widely detected in water environments. The role of phosphite in the P biogeochemical cycle has not been investigated systematically and quantitative results on phosphite fluxes are lacking. In this study, intact sediment core simulation was employed to measure the flux of phosphite at the sediment-water interface in northern Lake Taihu. Phosphite fluxes (?molm(-)(2)d(-1)) ranged from -38.21±1.14 to 7.10±2.18, with an annual average of -4.72±10.40. On the whole, phosphite migrated from water into sediment and the sediment was primarily a sink. The highest seasonal negative phosphite fluxes (?molm(-)(2)d(-1)) occurred in winter (-10.44±18.63), followed by summer (-8.04±5.61) and spring (-2.61±4.17). In autumn, phosphite flux was 2.20±4.07. Higher annual average negative fluxes of phosphite (?molm(-)(2)d(-1)) appeared in site ZSB (-12.70±17.96), which contained the highest content of total soluble P. The average yearly migration of phosphite in Lake Taihu from water to sediment was estimated to be (4.04±8.88)×10(6)moly(-1). The transfer of phosphite from water into sediment usually occurs in winter may due to the season's natural tendency to create more favorable conditions for phosphite biogeochemical reactions. Phosphite fluxes showed significant negative correlations with the original phosphite concentration in water (r=-0.840, p<0.01), as well as organic matter (r=-0.720, p<0.01) and phosphate bound to Ca (Ca-Ps) (r=-0.632, p<0.05) in sediment. These results indicate that microbiological processes and P species bound to Ca may play an important role in the P redox cycle. No significant correlations between phosphite fluxes and dissolved oxygen or oxidation-reduction potential were observed. PMID:26580728

  20. A new device for collection of interstitial water from wetland sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Euliss, N.H., Jr.; Barnes, R.K.

    1992-01-01

    A sampler for collection of interstitial water from wetland sediments is described. It differs from other sampling devices because it does not have to be filled with solution to facilitate diffusion, it does not have to be removed from the wetland to collect samples, and it can be used to draw repeated samples over time from identical locations. The device facilitates 'in situ' measurement of a wide range of abiotic parameters such as electrical conductivity, redox potential, and pH in wetland sediments. The device has application in ecological investigations of sediment-borne wildlife diseases, studies of benthic invertebrates, measurement of nutrient exchange, and other aspects of wetland ecology.

  1. Mercury and methylmercury contents in mine-waste calcine, water, and sediment collected from the Palawan Quicksilver mine, Philippines

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gray, J.E.; Greaves, I.A.; Bustos, D.M.; Krabbenhoft, D.P.

    2003-01-01

    The Palawan Quicksilver mine, Philippines, produced about 2,900 t of mercury during mining of cinnabar ore from 1953 to 1976. More than 2,000,000 t of mine-waste calcines (retorted ore) were produced during mining, much of which were used to construct a jetty in nearby Honda Bay. Since 1995, high Hg contents have been found in several people living near the mine, and 21 of these people were treated for mercury poisoning. Samples of mine-waste calcine contain high total Hg concentrations ranging from 43-660 ??g/g, whereas total Hg concentrations in sediment samples collected from a mine pit lake and local stream vary from 3.7-400 ??g/g. Mine water flowing through the calcines is acidic, pH 3.1-4.3, and total Hg concentrations ranging from 18-31 ??g/l in this water significantly exceed the 1.0-??g/l drinking water standard for Hg recommended by the World Health Organization (WHO). Total Hg contents are generally lower in water samples collected from surrounding domestic wells, the mine pit lake, Honda Bay, and the nearby stream, varying from 0.008-1.4 ??g/l. Methylmercury concentrations in water draining mine calcines range from <0.02-1.4 ng/l, but methylmercury is highest in the pit lake water, ranging from 1.7-3.1 ng/l. Mercury methylation at the Palawan mine is similar to or higher than that found in other mercury mines worldwide. Much of the methylmercury generated in Palawan mine-waste calcines and those in Honda Bay is transferred to water, and then to marine fish and seafood. A food source pathway of Hg to humans is most likely in this coastal, high fish-consuming population.

  2. COSOLVENT EFFECTS ON PHENANTHRENE SORPTION-DESORPTION ON A FRESH-WATER SEDIMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study evaluated the effects of the water-miscible cosolvent methanol on the sorption-desorption of phenanthrene by the natural organic matter (NOM) of a fresh-water sediment. A biphasic pattern was observed in the relationship between the log of the carbon-normalized sorpti...

  3. DEVELOPMENT AND DEMONSTRATION OF A BIDIRECTIONAL ADVECTIVE FLUX METER FOR SEDIMENT-WATER INTERFACE

    EPA Science Inventory

    A bidirectional advective flux meter for measuring water transport across the sediment-water interface has been successfully developed and field tested. The flow sensor employs a heat-pulse technique combined with a flow collection funnel for the flow measurement. Because the dir...

  4. Developing Water Quality Critera for Suspended and Bedded Sediments-Illustrative Example Application.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U. S. EPA's Framework for Developing Suspended and Bedded Sediments (SABS) Water Quality Criteria (SABS Framework) provides a consistent process, technical methods, and supporting materials to enable resource managers to develop ambient water quality criteria for one of the m...

  5. TOXICITY OF CADMIUM IN WATER AND SEDIMENT SLURRIES TO 'DAPHNIA MAGNA'

    EPA Science Inventory

    Daphnia magna Straus were exposed to cadmium for 48 h in water and in equilibrated water sediment slurries using breakers and recirculating test chambers. Differences in toxicity based on dissolved and free cadmium (Cd(2+)) between the two levels of tested total solids 100 and 10...

  6. Land conversion to bioenergy production: water budget and sediment output in a semiarid grassland

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Switchgrass based bioenergy production has been considered a feasible alternative of land use for the mixed-grass prairie and marginal croplands in the High Plains. However, little is known of the effect of this land use change on the water cycle and associated sediment output in this water controll...

  7. An Integrated Assessment of Sediment Remediation in a Midwestern U.S. Stream Using Sediment Chemistry, Water Quality, Bioassessment and Fish Biomarkers

    EPA Science Inventory

    A comprehensive biological, sediment and water quality study of the lower Little Scioto River near Marion, Ohio, USA was undertaken in July 2007 to evaluate the effectiveness of removal of creosote-contaminated sediment. The study area covered 7.5 river miles (RMs) of the river, ...

  8. Energy use and domestic hot water consumption - Phase 1. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Goldner, F.S.

    1994-11-01

    New York State Energy Research & Development Authority has sponsored a project to develop comprehensive operating data on combined domestic hot water (DHW) and heating systems to be used in system design and specifications. The new, more precise DHW flow data (broken down on a per capita basis) result in a better foundation for sizing decisions. Thirty New York City multifamily buildings with combined steam heating and DHW plants were instrumented to monitor apartment, outdoor, boiler and DHW temperatures, and burner on-off times. In nine buildings, which had been upgraded, additional data collected were: stack temperature, DHW flow in 15-minute increments, oil and boiler make-up water flows, and DHW temperature before and after the mixing valve and on the return line. The data set collected for 14 months amounts to a data base of over 110 megabytes. This report presents DHW demand patterns, seasonal variations, weekday vs. weekend consumption, consumption vs. occupancy levels, coincidence of 15-, 60-, 120-, and 180- minute demand periods, and average vs. peak demand levels, as well as figures for energy to generate DHW. The format of guidelines presented in this report differs from those currently in use. The {open_quotes}Low - Medium - High{close_quotes} (LMH) users set of guidelines provide a range, rather than a specific, singular gallonage standard. By providing LMH tables and guidelines for their application the design engineer or contractor can then use these as a tool from which to select the appropriate level that matches the site being served. Values are presented for both New York sizing guidelines (developed from this study), as well as a set of {open_quote}National{close_quote} figures (derived from a compilation of studies conducted in other cities). The LMH approach and {open_quote}National{close_quote} guidelines were adopted for inclusion in the 1995 ASHRAE Handbook revision.

  9. Magnetic field-enhanced sedimentation of nanopowder magnetite in water flow.

    PubMed

    Bakhteeva, Iu; Medvedeva, I; Byzov, I; Zhakov, S; Yermakov, A; Uimin, M; Shchegoleva, N

    2015-01-01

    Sedimentation dynamics of magnetite (?-Fe3O4) nanopowder (10-20?nm) in water in a gradient magnetic field Bmax=0.3 T, (dB/dz)max=0.13?T/cm was studied for different water flow speeds and starting particle concentrations (0.1 and 1.0?g/l). The aggregates formation in water was monitored under the same conditions. In cyclical water flow, the velocity of particle sedimentation increases significantly in comparison to its rate in still water, which corresponds to the intensified aggregate formation. However, at a water flow speed more than 0.1?cm/s sedimentation velocity slows down, which might be connected to aggregate destruction in a faster water flow. Correlation between sedimentation time and the nanoparticle concentration in water does not follow the trend expected for spherical superparamagnetic particles. In our case sedimentation time is shorter for c=0.1?g/l in comparison with that for c=1?g/l. We submit that such a feature is caused by particle self-organization in water into complex structures of fractal type. This effect is unexplained in the framework of existing theoretical models of colloids systems, so far. Provisional recommendations are suggested for the design of a magnetic separator on the permanent magnets base. The main device parameters are magnetic field intensity B?0.1?T, magnetic field gradient (dB/dz)max?(0.1-0.2)?T/cm, and water flow speed V<0.15?cm/s. For particle concentration c=1 g/l, purification of water from magnetite down to ecological and hygienic standards is reached in 80?min, for c=0.1 g/l the time is reduced down to 50?min. PMID:25650300

  10. A comparison of solids collected in sediment traps and automated water samplers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bartsch, L.A.; Rada, R.G.; Sullivan, J.F.

    1996-01-01

    Sediment traps are being used in some pollution monitoring programs in the USA to sample suspended solids for contaminant analyses. This monitoring approach assumes that the characteristics of solids obtained in sediment traps are the same as those collected in whole-water sampling devices. We tested this assumption in the upper Mississippi River, based on the inorganic particle-size distribution (determined with a laser particle- analyzer) and volatile matter content of solids (a surrogate for organic matter). Cylindrical sediment traps (aspect ratio 3) were attached to a rigid mooring device and deployed in a flowing side channel in Navigation Pool 7 of the upper Mississippi River. On each side of the mooring device, a trap was situated adjacent to a port of an autosampler that collected raw water samples hourly to form 2-d composite samples. Paired samples (one trap and one raw water, composite sample) were removed from each end of the mooring device at 2-d intervals during the 30-d study period and compared. The relative particle collection efficiency of paired samplers did not vary temporally. Particle-size distributions of inorganic solids from sediment traps and water samples were not significantly different. The volatile matter content of solids was lesser in sediment traps (mean, 9.5%) than in corresponding water samples (mean, 22.7%). This bias may have been partly due to under-collection of phytoplankton (mainly cyanobacteria), which were abundant in the water column during the study. The positioning of water samplers and sediment traps in the mooring device did not influence the particle-size distribution or total solids of samples. We observed a small difference in the amount of organic matter collected by water samplers situated at opposite ends of the mooring device.

  11. Analysis of Nitrogen Pollution Load by Domestic Waste Water Treatment in the Tedori River Alluvial Fan Areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maruyama, Toshisuke; Noto, Fumikazu; Takahashi, Tsuyoshi; Tsuchihara, Takeo; Tanaka, Tadashi

    An evaluation of the environment nitrogen pollution load with regard to domestic waste water treatment on the Tedori River Alluvial Fan Areas was conducted. The literature-based water quality data collected before and after the treatment and the basic outflow pollution unit was determined for the several water treatment systems. Next these data were applied for the entire alluvial fan areas resulting in an estimated total nitrogen pollution load of as 186 ton/year. 58% of the total nitrogen pollution load was estimated to be from the private residences that were not connected to the public sewage system (connecting ratio 90.5%) which thus had relation to the pollution of groundwater and water quality in the drainage canal in the region under consideration. The nitrogen pollution load was higher in the urban area more than the rural. The rural domestic waste water system accounted for about 17.9% of the total pollution load, which carried a high probability of groundwater pollution because of seepage or percolation. The pollution load from the direct flow of the public sewage treatment water to the middle stream of the Tedori River, together with the water from small companies and untreated water from local family dwellings made up about 3-10% of total pollution.

  12. Impact of Persistent Degassing of Kilauea Volcano on Domestic Water Supplies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, D. M.; Macomber, T.

    2010-12-01

    In March, 2008, a small explosive eruption in the summit crater of Kilauea Volcano marked the initiation of a new, persistently degassing vent at Kilauea. Emission rates of sulfur dioxide initially exceeded 1000 tons per day but declined to a longer term rate of ~800 tons per day. Because of its location farther inland, the plume from this vent generated more severe and more frequent adverse air quality impacts on the surrounding and downwind communities than has the longer lived degassing vents at Pu'u O'o. Because many residents on Hawaii Island derive their domestic water supply from roof catchment systems, deposition of aerosols produced in the volcanic plume could pose a significant health threat to the community. In order to quantify that risk, a program of screening of water catchment systems was undertaken in three communities: Lower Puna, upwind of the vent; Volcano Village, immediately adjacent to the Kilauea summit; and Hawaiian Ocean View Estates, located ~65 km downwind from the vent. An aggregate of 439 samples were collected and analyzed for pH, and fluoride, chloride and sulfate ion concentrations; the median values and extrema are shown in Table I below. The pH values for the catchments proved not to be a good indicator of plume influence: the Volcano and Ocean View communities showed a bimodal distribution of values reflecting residents managing their water systems (median pH = 6.2 and 7.2 respectively) and those that didn't (median pH = 4.5 and 4.3 respectively); however, the lower extremes for pH gave values of 2.9 and 3.3 respectively. Chloride values were also variable due to the use of sodium hypochlorite to treat for biological contaminants. The median values for fluoride and sulfate show a progressive increase from the Puna catchments to Volcano and Ocean View. We believe that these values are consistent with the relative exposure of the communities to the volcanic plume: although the Volcano community is closer to the source, wind conditions conducive to exposure are infrequent whereas the more distant Ocean View community is exposed to a more dilute plume but at a much higher frequency. Even though the median values are within accepted limits for drinking water, the extreme values observed are cause for concern: the pH values are well below those recommended for drinking water and the fluoride values are approaching WHO recommended drinking water levels. With even modest increases in plume output or exposure times, some of the community catchment systems can accumulate sufficient acid or fluoride ion concentrations to pose a significant health threat if drinking water is drawn from those catchments. Continued monitoring of catchment water quality is recommended.Table I. Catchment Water Supply Analytical Results Concentrations in parts per million

  13. Occurrence of ionophore antibiotics in water and sediments of a mixed-landscape watershed.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung-Chul; Carlson, Kenneth

    2006-07-01

    Analytical methods for quantifying three ionophore antibiotics, monensin, salinomycin, and narasin, were developed for water and sediment matrices. Sample preparation was based on solid-phase extraction (SPE) and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) was used to separate and detect the compounds. Recoveries ranged from 83% to 117% for water and from 51% to 105% for sediment in three different concentrations with less than 10% of relative standard deviation. The statistical detection limit was 0.001-0.003 microg/L for water and 0.4-3.6 microg/kg for sediment. Ionophore antibiotics are only used to treat coccidiostats for broilers or turkeys, and to increase growth and feed efficiency for beef and dairy cattle. Since they are not used for human purposes, these compounds can act as markers for the transport of animal pharmaceuticals to the watershed. The occurrence of three ionophore compounds was determined at five sampling sites along the Cache la Poudre River in Northern Colorado representing pristine, urban, and agriculture landscapes. Statistical analysis demonstrates that the measured concentration was significantly different among sampling sites in different sampling events for both water and sediment. In addition, significant differences were observed among different sampling times at each sampling site. Furthermore, all three ionophores were found in the sediments at much higher concentrations than in water indicating the importance of this matrix when determining environmental impacts. PMID:16790258

  14. Determination of organochlorine pesticide residue in sediment and water from the Densu river basin, Ghana.

    PubMed

    Kuranchie-Mensah, Harriet; Atiemo, Sampson Manukure; Palm, Linda Maud Naa-Dedei; Blankson-Arthur, Sarah; Tutu, Anita Osei; Fosu, Paul

    2012-01-01

    The distribution of organochlorine pesticides in the aquatic ecosystem from the Densu river revealed varying levels of concentration in water and the sediment samples. Three locations were sampled along the river to evaluate the levels of organochlorine pesticide residue in the river. Sediment and surface water samples were extracted by soxhlet and liquid-liquid extraction respectively and analyzed using Gas Chromatograph coupled with electron capture detector. The detectable organochlorine pesticides were gamma-hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH), delta-hexachlorocyclohexane, heptachlor, aldrin and dieldrin. The other pesticides that were investigated are gamma-chlordane, alpha endosulfan, endosulfan sulfate, p,p'-DDT and its metabolite p,p'-DDE, methoxychlor, endrin and its metabolite endrin aldehyde and endrin ketone. The order of increasing frequency of detection of samples was higher in sediment than water. In sediment, the mean concentration ranged from 0.030 ?g kg(-1) dry weight (endrin) to 10.98 ?g kg(-1) dry weight (aldrin). The highest detected concentration of organochlorine in water was endosulfan sulfate with mean concentration of 0.185 ?g L(-1). Analysis of variance indicated significant differences for most organochlorine pesticide residue in the sediment sampled from the various locations. Some of the levels of organochlorine pesticides detected in water were relatively high compared to guideline values set by World Health Organization and Australia and thus could be harmful if the trend is not checked. PMID:22123529

  15. Microbial Response to Experimentally Controlled Redox Transitions at the Sediment Water Interface

    PubMed Central

    Frindte, Katharina; Allgaier, Martin; Grossart, Hans-Peter; Eckert, Werner

    2015-01-01

    The sediment–water interface of freshwater lakes is characterized by sharp chemical gradients, shaped by the interplay between physical, chemical and microbial processes. As dissolved oxygen is depleted in the uppermost sediment, the availability of alternative electron acceptors, e.g. nitrate and sulfate, becomes the limiting factor. We performed a time series experiment in a mesocosm to simulate the transition from aerobic to anaerobic conditions at the sediment–water interface. Our goal was to identify changes in the microbial activity due to redox transitions induced by successive depletion of available electron acceptors. Monitoring critical hydrochemical parameters in the overlying water in conjunction with a new sampling strategy for sediment bacteria enabled us to correlate redox changes in the water to shifts in the active microbial community and the expression of functional genes representing specific redox-dependent microbial processes. Our results show that during several transitions from oxic-heterotrophic condition to sulfate-reducing condition, nitrate-availability and the on-set of sulfate reduction strongly affected the corresponding functional gene expression. There was evidence of anaerobic methane oxidation with NOx. DGGE analysis revealed redox-related changes in microbial activity and expression of functional genes involved in sulfate and nitrite reduction, whereas methanogenesis and methanotrophy showed only minor changes during redox transitions. The combination of high-frequency chemical measurements and molecular methods provide new insights into the temporal dynamics of the interplay between microbial activity and specific redox transitions at the sediment–water interface. PMID:26599000

  16. Summary of Suspended-Sediment Concentration Data, San Francisco Bay, California, Water Year 2006

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Buchanan, Paul A.; Lionberger, Megan A.

    2009-01-01

    Suspended-sediment concentration data were collected by the U.S. Geological Survey in San Francisco Bay during water-year 2006 (October 1, 2005-September 30, 2006). Optical sensors and water samples were used to monitor suspended-sediment concentration at two sites in Suisun Bay, one site in San Pablo Bay, two sites in Central San Francisco Bay, and one site in South San Francisco Bay. Sensors were positioned at two depths at most sites to help define the vertical variability of suspended sediments. Water samples were collected periodically and analyzed for concentrations of suspended sediment. The results of the analyses were used to calibrate the output of the optical sensors so that a record of suspended-sediment concentrations could be derived. This report presents the data-collection methods used and summarizes, in graphs, the suspended-sediment concentration data collected from October 2005 through September 2006. Calibration curves and plots of the processed data for each sensor also are presented.

  17. Thesis proposal CSF Brazil 2014 Modeling of water transfer and suspended sediments in the Amazons river continuum

    E-print Network

    Bordenave, Charles

    to model water flow, sediments and pollutants at large scale basin catchments and used to test the impact of different climate scenarios to predict the impact on the water flow and pollutants transport. This modelThesis proposal CSF Brazil 2014 Title: Modeling of water transfer and suspended sediments

  18. Methods for determination of inorganic substances in water and fluvial sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fishman, Marvin J., (Edited By); Friedman, Linda C.

    1989-01-01

    Chapter Al of the laboratory manual contains methods used by the U.S. Geological Survey to analyze samples of water, suspended sediments, and bottom material for their content of inorganic constituents. Included are methods for determining the concentration of dissolved constituents in water, the total recoverable and total of constituents in water-suspended sediment samples, and the recoverable and total concentrations of constituents in samples of bottom material. The introduction to the manual includes essential definitions and a brief discussion of the use of significant figures in calculating and reporting analytical results. Quality control in the water-analysis laboratory is discussed, including the accuracy and precision of analyses, the use of standard-reference water samples, and the operation of an effective quality-assurance program. Methods for sample preparation and pretreatment are given also. A brief discussion of the principles of the analytical techniques involved and their particular application to water and sediment analysis is presented. The analytical methods of these techniques are arranged alphabetically by constituent. For each method, the general topics covered are the application, the principle of the method, the interferences, the apparatus and reagents required, a detailed description of the analytical procedure, reporting results, units and significant figures, and analytical precision data, when available. More than 126 methods are given for the determination of 70 inorganic constituents and physical properties of water, suspended sediment, and bottom material.

  19. The marine geochemistry of actinium-227: Evidence for its migration through sediment pore water

    SciTech Connect

    Nozaki, Yoshiyuki; Yamada, Masatoshi ); Nikaido, Hirofumi )

    1990-10-01

    {sup 227}Ac with a half life of 21.8 years has a potential utility as a tracer of deep water circulation and mixing studies on time scales less than 100 years. Here the authors present the first measurement of {sup 227}Ac profile in the pore water of Northwest Pacific deep-sea sediment and in the {approximately}10,000 m long water column of Izu-Ogasawara Trench. The results clearly show that {sup 227}Ac is supplied from the sediment to the overlying water through migration in the pore water. The model calculation indicates that the molecular diffusion alone through sediment porewater can support only a half of the standing crop of excess {sup 227}Ac in the water column and the enhanced supply of {sup 227}Ac by particle mixing is necessary to account for the remainder. Thus, bioturbation in the deep sea plays an important role in controlling the flux of some short-lived radionuclides such as {sup 227}Ac and {sup 228}Ra across the sediment-water interface.

  20. Comparative studies on extraction of sediment interstitial waters: Discussion and comment on the current state of interstitial water studies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Manheim, F. T.

    1974-01-01

    The implication by Murthy and Ferrell (1972)that interstitial water studies are in a confused state is criticized on the basis that the authors have not drawn on a considerable body of data, especially Soviet studies since the 1950's, and results of the Deep Sea Drilling Project. Pressure filtration systems for extracting interstitial waters are currently the methods of choice for marine studies and have achieved substantial reliability and reproducibility. Although gaps and problems remain, many aspects of interstitial composition of marine sediments have been clarified; these include the substantial constancy of composition of interstitial waters in deep sea pelagic deposits, depletion of interstitial cations owing to authigenic mineral formation in more rapidly accumulated (especially terrigenous) sediments, and special phenomena in sediments overlying salt deposits. ?? 1974.

  1. Diffusive release of uranium from contaminated sediments into capillary fringe pore water

    SciTech Connect

    Rod, Kenton A.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Flury, Markus; Pierce, Eric M.; Harsh, James B.

    2012-10-01

    Despite remediation efforts at the former nuclear weapons facility at the Hanford site (Washington State), leaching of uranium (U) from contaminated sediments to the ground water persists at the Hanford 300 Area. Flooding of contaminated capillary fringe sediments due to seasonal changes in the Columbia River stage has been identified as a reason of continued U supply to ground water. We investigated the release of U from Hanford capillary fringe sediments to pore water. Contaminated Hanford sediments were packed into reservoirs of centrifugal filter devices and saturated with Columbia River water for 3 to 84 days at varying solution-to-solid ratios (1:3, 1:1, 5:1, 10:1, 25:1 mL:g). After specified times, samples were centrifuged to a gravimetric water content of 0.11 ± 0.06 g g-1. Within the first three days, there was an initial rapid release of 6-9% of total U from the sediments into the pore water, independent of the solution-to-solid ratio. After 14 days of reaction, however, the experiments with the narrowest solution-to-solid ratios (1:3 and 1:1 mL:g) showed a decline in dissolved U concentrations. The removal of U from the solution phase was accompanied by removal of Ca and HCO3-. Geochemist workbench simulations, conducted using measured solution concentrations from experiments, indicated that calcite could precipitate in the 1:3 solution-to-solid ratio experiment. After the rapid initial release in the first three days for the 5:1, 10:1, and 25:1 solution-to-solid ratio experiments, there was sustained release of U into the pore water. Up to 22% of total U was released on day 84 for the 25:1 solution-to-solid ratio reaction. This sustained release of U from the sediments had diffusion-limited kinetics.

  2. Microbial and chemical contamination of water, sediment and soil in the Nakivubo wetland area in Kampala, Uganda.

    PubMed

    Fuhrimann, Samuel; Stalder, Michelle; Winkler, Mirko S; Niwagaba, Charles B; Babu, Mohammed; Masaba, Godfrey; Kabatereine, Narcis B; Halage, Abdullah A; Schneeberger, Pierre H H; Utzinger, Jürg; Cissé, Guéladio

    2015-07-01

    The reuse of domestic and industrial wastewater in urban settings of the developing world may harm the health of people through direct contact or via contaminated urban agricultural products and drinking water. We assessed chemical and microbial pollutants in 23 sentinel sites along the wastewater and faecal sludge management and reuse chain of Kampala, Uganda. Water samples were examined for bacteria (thermotolerant coliforms (TTCs), Escherichia coli and Salmonella spp.) and helminth eggs. Physico-chemical parameters were determined. Water, sediment and soil samples and edible plants (yams and sugar cane) were tested for heavy metals. Water samples derived from the Nakivubo wetland showed mean concentrations of TTCs of 2.9?×?10(5) colony-forming units (CFU)/100 mL. Mean E. coli was 9.9?×?10(4) CFU/100 mL. Hookworm eggs were found in 13.5% of the water samples. Mean concentrations of iron (Fe), copper (Cu) and cadmium (Cd) were 21.5, 3.3 and 0.14 mg/L, respectively. In soil samples, we found a mean lead (Pb) concentration of 132.7 mg/L. In yams, concentrations of Cd, chromium (Cr) and Pb were 4.4, 4.0 and 0.2 mg/L, while the respective concentrations in sugar cane were 8.4, 4.3 and 0.2 mg/L. TTCs and E. coli in the water, Pb in soil, and Cd, Cr and Pb in the plants were above national thresholds. We conclude that there is considerable environmental pollution in the Nakivubo wetland and the Lake Victoria ecosystem in Kampala. Our findings have important public health implications, and we suggest that a system of sentinel surveillance is being implemented that, in turn, can guide adequate responses. PMID:26122126

  3. Water volume and sediment accumulation in Lake Linganore, Frederick County, Maryland, 2009

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sekellick, Andrew J.; Banks, S.L.

    2010-01-01

    To assist in understanding sediment and phosphorus loadings and the management of water resources, a bathymetric survey was conducted at Lake Linganore in Frederick County, Maryland in June 2009 by the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the City of Frederick and Frederick County, Maryland. Position data and water-depth data were collected using a survey grade echo sounder and a differentially corrected global positioning system. Data were compiled and edited using geographic information system software. A three-dimensional triangulated irregular network model of the lake bottom was created to calculate the volume of stored water in the reservoir. Large-scale topographic maps of the valley prior to inundation in 1972 were provided by the City of Frederick and digitized. The two surfaces were compared and a sediment volume was calculated. Cartographic representations of both water depth and sediment accumulation were produced along with an area/capacity table. An accuracy assessment was completed on the resulting bathymetric model. Vertical accuracy at the 95-percent confidence level for the collected data, the bathymetric surface model, and the bathymetric contour map was calculated to be 0.95 feet, 1.53 feet, and 3.63 feet, respectively. The water storage volume of Lake Linganore was calculated to be 1,860 acre-feet at full pool elevation. Water volume in the reservoir has decreased by 350 acre-feet (about 16 percent) in the 37 years since the dam was constructed. The total calculated volume of sediment deposited in the lake since 1972 is 313 acre-feet. This represents an average rate of sediment accumulation of 8.5 acre-feet per year since Linganore Creek was impounded. A sectional analysis of sediment distribution indicates that the most upstream third of Lake Linganore contains the largest volume of sediment whereas the section closest to the dam contains the largest amount of water. In comparison to other Maryland Piedmont reservoirs, Lake Linganore was found to have one of the lowest sedimentation rates at 0.26 cubic yards per year per acre of drainage area. Sedimentation rates in other comparable Maryland reservoirs were Prettyboy Reservoir (filling at a rate of 2.26 cubic yards per year per acre), Loch Raven Reservoir (filling at a rate of 0.88 cubic yards per year per acre) and Piney Run Reservoir (filling at a negligible rate).

  4. QUANTITATIVE VS. CONVENTIONAL PCR FOR DETECTION OF HUMAN ADENOVIRUSES IN WATER AND SEDIMENT SAMPLES

    PubMed Central

    STAGGEMEIER, Rodrigo; BORTOLUZZI, Marina; HECK, Tatiana Moraes da Silva; SPILKI, Fernando Rosado; ALMEIDA, Sabrina Esteves de Matos

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Human Adenoviruses (HAdV) are notably resistant in the environment. These agents may serve as effective indicators of fecal contamination, and may act as causative agents of a number of different diseases in human beings. Conventional polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and, more recently, quantitative PCR (qPCR) are widely used for detection of viral agents in environmental matrices. In the present study PCR and SYBR(r)Green qPCR assays were compared for detection of HAdV in water (55) and sediments (20) samples of spring and artesian wells, ponds and streams, collected from dairy farms. By the quantitative methodology HAdV were detected in 87.3% of the water samples and 80% of the sediments, while by the conventional PCR 47.3% and 35% were detected in water samples and sediments, respectively. PMID:26422153

  5. Laboratory upwelled radiance and reflectance spectra of Kerr reservoir sediment waters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witte, W. G.; Whitlock, C. H.; Morris, W. D.; Gurganus, E. A.

    1982-01-01

    Reflectance, chromaticity, and several other physical and chemical properties were measured for various water mixtures of bottom sediments taken from two sites at Kerr Reservoir, Virginia. Mixture concentrations ranged from 5 to 1000 ppm by weight of total suspended solids (TSS) in filtered deionized tap water. The two sets of radiance and reflectance spectra obtained were similar in shape and magnitude for comparable values of TSS. Upwelled reflectance was observed to be a nonlinear function of TSS with the degree of curvature a function of wavelength. Sediment from the downstream site contained a greater amount of particulate organic carbon than from the upstream site. No strong conclusions can be made regarding the effects of this difference on the radiance and reflectance spectra. Near-infrared wavelengths appear useful for measuring highly turbid water with concentrations up to 1000 ppm or more. Chromaticity characteristics do not appear useful for monitoring sediment loads above 150 ppm.

  6. QUANTITATIVE VS. CONVENTIONAL PCR FOR DETECTION OF HUMAN ADENOVIRUSES IN WATER AND SEDIMENT SAMPLES.

    PubMed

    Staggemeier, Rodrigo; Bortoluzzi, Marina; Heck, Tatiana Moraes da Silva; Spilki, Fernando Rosado; Almeida, Sabrina Esteves de Matos

    2015-08-01

    SUMMARYHuman Adenoviruses (HAdV) are notably resistant in the environment. These agents may serve as effective indicators of fecal contamination, and may act as causative agents of a number of different diseases in human beings. Conventional polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and, more recently, quantitative PCR (qPCR) are widely used for detection of viral agents in environmental matrices. In the present study PCR and SYBR(r)Green qPCR assays were compared for detection of HAdV in water (55) and sediments (20) samples of spring and artesian wells, ponds and streams, collected from dairy farms. By the quantitative methodology HAdV were detected in 87.3% of the water samples and 80% of the sediments, while by the conventional PCR 47.3% and 35% were detected in water samples and sediments, respectively. PMID:26422153

  7. Diffusive release of uranium from contaminated sediments into capillary fringe pore water

    SciTech Connect

    Rod, Kenton A.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Flury, Markus; Pierce, Eric M; Harsh, James B.

    2012-01-01

    Despite remediation efforts at the former nuclear weapons facility, leaching of uranium (U) from contaminated sediments to the ground water persists at the Hanford site 300 Area. Flooding of contaminated capillary fringe sediments due to seasonal changes in the Columbia River stage has been identified as a source for U supply to ground water. We investigated U release from Hanford capillary fringe sediments by packing sediments into reservoirs of centrifugal filter devices and saturated with Columbia River water for 3 to 84 days at varying solution-to-solid ratios. After specified times, samples were centrifuged. Within the first three days, there was an initial rapid release of 6-9% of total U, independent of the solution-to-solid ratio. After 14 days of reaction, however, the experiments with the narrowest solution-to-solid ratios showed a decline in dissolved U concentrations. The removal of U from the solution phase was accompanied by removal of Ca and HCO3-. Geochemical modeling indicated that calcite could precipitate in the narrowest solution-to-solid ratio experiment. After the rapid initial release in the first three days for the wide solution-to-solid ratio experiments, there was sustained release of U into the pore water. This sustained release of U from the sediments had diffusion-limited kinetics.

  8. Microbial diversity in shallow-water hydrothermal sediments of Kueishan Island, Taiwan as revealed by pyrosequencing.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li; Cheung, Man Kit; Kwan, Hoi Shan; Hwang, Jiang-Shiou; Wong, Chong Kim

    2015-11-01

    Kueishan Island is a young volcanic island in the southernmost edge of the Okinawa Trough in the northeastern part of Taiwan. A cluster of hydrothermal vents is located off the southeastern tip of the Island at water depths between 10 and 80?m. This paper presents the results of the first study on the microbial communities in bottom sediments collected from the shallow-water hydrothermal vents of Kueishan Island. Small-subunit ribosomal RNA gene-based high-throughput 454 pyrosequencing was used to characterize the assemblages of bacteria, archaea, and small eukaryotes in sediment samples collected at various distances from the hydrothermal vents. Sediment from the vent area contained the highest diversity of archaea and the lowest diversity of bacteria and small eukaryotes. Epsilonproteobacteria were the most abundant group in the vent sediment, but their abundance decreased with increasing distance from the vent area. Most Epsilonproteobacteria belonged to the mesophilic chemolithoautotrophic genera Sulfurovum and Sulfurimonas. Recent reports on these two genera have come from deep-sea hydrothermal vents. Conversely, the relative contribution of Gammaproteobacteria to the bacterial community increased with increasing distance from the vent area. Our study revealed the contrasting effects of venting on the benthic bacterial and archaeal communities, and showed that the sediments of the shallow-waters hydrothermal vents were dominated by chemoautotrophic bacteria. The present work broadens our knowledge on microbial diversity in shallow-water hydrothermal vent habitats. PMID:26132902

  9. Diffusive release of uranium from contaminated sediments into capillary fringe pore water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rod, Kenton A.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Flury, Markus; Pierce, Eric M.; Harsh, James B.

    2012-10-01

    Despite remediation efforts at the former nuclear weapons facility, leaching of uranium (U) from contaminated sediments to the ground water persists at the Hanford site 300 Area. Flooding of contaminated capillary fringe sediments due to seasonal changes in the Columbia River stage has been identified as a source for U supply to ground water. We investigated U release from Hanford capillary fringe sediments by packing sediments into reservoirs of centrifugal filter devices and saturating them with Columbia River water for 3 to 84 days at varying solution-to-solid ratios. After specified times, samples were centrifuged. Within the first three days, there was an initial rapid release of 6-9% of total U, independent of the solution-to-solid ratio. After 14 days of reaction, however, the experiments with the narrowest solution-to-solid ratios showed a decline in dissolved U concentrations. The removal of U from the solution phase was accompanied by removal of Ca and HCO3-. Geochemical modeling indicated that calcite could precipitate in the narrowest solution-to-solid ratio experiment. After the rapid initial release in the first three days for the wide solution-to-solid ratio experiments, there was sustained release of U into the pore water. This sustained release of U from the sediments had diffusion-limited kinetics.

  10. Diffusive release of uranium from contaminated sediments into capillary fringe pore water.

    PubMed

    Rod, Kenton A; Wellman, Dawn M; Flury, Markus; Pierce, Eric M; Harsh, James B

    2012-10-01

    Despite remediation efforts at the former nuclear weapons facility, leaching of uranium (U) from contaminated sediments to the ground water persists at the Hanford site 300 Area. Flooding of contaminated capillary fringe sediments due to seasonal changes in the Columbia River stage has been identified as a source for U supply to ground water. We investigated U release from Hanford capillary fringe sediments by packing sediments into reservoirs of centrifugal filter devices and saturating them with Columbia River water for 3 to 84days at varying solution-to-solid ratios. After specified times, samples were centrifuged. Within the first three days, there was an initial rapid release of 6-9% of total U, independent of the solution-to-solid ratio. After 14days of reaction, however, the experiments with the narrowest solution-to-solid ratios showed a decline in dissolved U concentrations. The removal of U from the solution phase was accompanied by removal of Ca and HCO(3)(-). Geochemical modeling indicated that calcite could precipitate in the narrowest solution-to-solid ratio experiment. After the rapid initial release in the first three days for the wide solution-to-solid ratio experiments, there was sustained release of U into the pore water. This sustained release of U from the sediments had diffusion-limited kinetics. PMID:23041367

  11. Identification of Water-Quality Trends Using Sediment Cores from Dillon Reservoir, Summit County, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Greve, Adrienne I.; Spahr, Norman E.; Van Metre, Peter C.; Wilson, Jennifer T.

    2001-01-01

    Since the construction of Dillon Reservoir, in Summit County, Colorado, in 1963, its drainage area has been the site of rapid urban development and the continued influence of historical mining. In an effort to assess changes in water quality within the drainage area, sediment cores were collected from Dillon Reservoir in 1997. The sediment cores were analyzed for pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and trace elements. Pesticides, PCBs, and PAHs were used to determine the effects of urban development, and trace elements were used to identify mining contributions. Water-quality and streambed-sediment samples, collected at the mouth of three streams that drain into Dillon Reservoir, were analyzed for trace elements. Of the 14 pesticides and 3 PCBs for which the sediment samples were analyzed, only 2 pesticides were detected. Low amounts of dichloro-diphenyldichloroethylene (DDE) and dichloro-diphenyldichloroethane (DDD), metabolites of dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT), were found at core depths of 5 centimeters and below 15 centimeters in a core collected near the dam. The longest core, which was collected near the dam, spanned the entire sedimentation history of the reservoir. Concentrations of total combustion PAH and the ratio of fluoranthene to pyrene in the core sample decreased with core depth and increased over time. This relation is likely due to growth in residential and tourist populations in the region. Comparisons between core samples gathered in each arm of the reservoir showed the highest PAH concentrations were found in the Tenmile Creek arm, the only arm that has an urban area on its shores, the town of Frisco. All PAH concentrations, except the pyrene concentration in one segment in the core near the dam and acenaphthylene concentrations in the tops of three cores taken in the reservoir arms, were below Canadian interim freshwater sediment-quality guidelines. Concentrations of arsenic, cadmium, chromium, copper, lead, and zinc in sediment samples from Dillon Reservoir exceeded the Canadian interim freshwater sediment-quality guidelines. Copper, iron, lithium, nickel, scandium, titanium, and vanadium concentrations in sediment samples decreased over time. Other elements, while no trend was evident, displayed concentration spikes in the down-core profiles, indicating loads entering the reservoir may have been larger than they were in 1997. The highest concentrations of copper, lead, manganese, mercury, and zinc were detected during the late 1970's and early 1980's. Elevated concentrations of trace elements in sediment in Dillon Reservoir likely resulted from historical mining in the drainage area. The downward trend identified for copper, iron, lithium, nickel, scandium, titanium, and vanadium may be due in part to restoration efforts in mining-affected areas and a decrease in active mining in the Dillon Reservoir watershed. Although many trace-element core-sediment concentrations exceeded the Canadian probable effect level for freshwater lakes, under current limnological conditions, the high core-sediment concentrations do not adversely affect water quality in Dillon Reservoir. The trace-element concentrations in the reservoir water column meet the standards established by the Colorado Water Quality Control Commission. Although many trace-element core-sediment concentrations exceeded the Canadian probable effect level for freshwater lakes, under current limnological conditions, the high core-sediment concentrations do not adversely affect water quality in Dillon Reservoir. The trace-element concentrations in the reservoir water column meet the standards established by the Colorado Water Quality Control Commission.

  12. Stratigraphic controls on fluid and solute fluxes across the sediment-water interface of an estuary

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sawyer, Audrey H.; Lazareva, Olesya; Kroeger, Kevin D.; Crespo, Kyle; Chan, Clara S.; Stieglitz, Thomas; Michael, Holly A.

    2014-01-01

    Shallow stratigraphic features, such as infilled paleovalleys, modify fresh groundwater discharge to coastal waters and fluxes of saltwater and nutrients across the sediment–water interface. We quantify the spatial distribution of shallow surface water–groundwater exchange and nitrogen fluxes near a paleovalley in Indian River Bay, Delaware, using a hand resistivity probe, conventional seepage meters, and pore-water samples. In the interfluve (region outside the paleovalley) most nitrate-rich fresh groundwater discharges rapidly near the coast with little mixing of saline pore water, and nitrogen transport is largely conservative. In the peat-filled paleovalley, fresh groundwater discharge is negligible, and saltwater exchange is deep (?1 m). Long pore-water residence times and abundant sulfate and organic matter promote sulfate reduction and ammonium production in shallow sediment. Reducing, iron-rich fresh groundwater beneath paleovalley peat discharges diffusely around paleovalley margins offshore. In this zone of diffuse fresh groundwater discharge, saltwater exchange and dispersion are enhanced, ammonium is produced in shallow sediments, and fluxes of ammonium to surface water are large. By modifying patterns of groundwater discharge and the nature of saltwater exchange in shallow sediments, paleovalleys and other stratigraphic features influence the geochemistry of discharging groundwater. Redox reactions near the sediment–water interface affect rates and patterns of geochemical fluxes to coastal surface waters. For example, at this site, more than 99% of the groundwater-borne nitrate flux to the Delaware Inland Bays occurs within the interfluve portion of the coastline, and more than 50% of the ammonium flux occurs at the paleovalley margin.

  13. Total and Methyl Mercury Distribution in Water, Sediment, and Fish tissue in New England Streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chalmers, A. T.; Krabbenhoft, D. P.

    2001-05-01

    Conditions that are conducive to the methylation of mercury are of particular concern because methyl mercury (MeHg) is the most toxic mercury species and is rapidly bioaccumulated and biomagnified in wildlife and man. The New England Coastal Basins study unit, as part of the U.S. Geological Survey's National Water Quality Assessment program, has evaluated relations between concentrations of total mercury (HgT) and MeHg in stream water and bed sediment, and HgT in fish tissue at sites with a variety of watershed characteristics. Fifty-five stream sites from Rhode Island to Maine were sampled for water and bed sediment during 1998 - 2000. A subset of 27 sites was sampled for fish tissue. Sediment, water, and fish tissue samples were collected during summer low flow conditions within a week of each other to show patterns of MeHg accumulation and partitioning relative to site and watershed conditions. Concentrations of HgT in water and bed sediment ranged from 1 to 13 nanograms per liter (ng/L) and from 7 to 3,100 nanograms per gram (ng/g) dry weight, respectively. Concentrations of MeHg in water and sediment ranged from 0.04 to 1.8 ng/L and from 1 to 38 ng/g dry weight, respectively, and were positively correlated with concentrations of organic carbon. Methylation efficiency, as estimated by MeHg/HgT, ranged from 0.003 to 0.282 for sediment and water samples, with a median value of 0.071. Methylation efficiency was highest at sampling sites with low urbanization and high organic carbon concentrations. HgT concentrations in fish tissue (mixed sunfish species) ranged from 42 to 349 ng/g wet weight and were positively correlated with concentrations of MeHg in water and bed sediment. A positive relation was not observed between HgT concentrations in fish tissue and HgT concentrations in water and bed sediment. These preliminary results indicate a high potential for mercury bioaccumulation in aquatic organisms in New England streams.

  14. Environmental pollution impact on water and sediments of Kumaun lakes, Lesser Himalaya, India: a comparative study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Brijraj K.

    2005-12-01

    A study of the water and sediment chemistry of the Nainital, Bhimtal, Naukuchiyatal and Sattal Lakes of Kumaun, has shown that the water of these lakes are alkaline and that electrical conductivity, total dissolved solid and bicarbonate HCO{3/-} are much higher in Nainital than in the other three lakes. The weathering of limestone lithology and anthropogenic pollution, the latter due to the very high density of population in the Nainital valley, are the primary sources of enhanced parameters. The low pH of Nainital Lake water is due to low photosynthesis and enhanced respiration, increasing CO2 in the water and the consequent enhancement of Ca2+ and HCO{3/-}. The dissolved oxygen in Nainital Lake is less compared to other lakes, indicating anoxic conditions developing at the mud water interface at depth. The PO{4/3-} content in Nainital is higher (124 ?g/l), showing an increasing trend over time leading to eutrophic conditions. The trace metals (Cu, Co, Zn, Ni, Mn, and Sr) are present in greater amounts in the water of Nainital Lake than in the other three lakes, though Fe and Cr are high in Bhimtal and Fe in Naukuchiyatal. The higher abundance is derived from the leaching of Fe Mg from metavolcanic and metabasic rocks. Most of the heavy metals (Cr, Ni, Cu, Mn, Fe, Sr, and Zn) significantly enrich the suspended sediments of the lakes compared to the bed sediments which due to their adsorption on finer particles and owing to multiple hydroxide coating and organic content, except for Fe, which is enriched in the bed sediments. The high rate of sedimentation, 11.5 mm/year in Nainital, compared to Bhimtal with 4.70 mm/year, Naukuchiyatal with 3.72 mm/year, and Sattal with 2.99 mm/year, has resulted in shorter residence time, poor sorting of grains, and lesser adsorption of heavy metals, leading consequently, their depletion in the bed sediments of Nainital Lake.

  15. Changes in hyporheic exchange, water temperature and macroinvertebrates following sediment-filled dam removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, G. B.; Grant, G. E.

    2006-12-01

    Solute transport across the sediment-water interface is strongly affected by the volume, composition, and morphology of in-channel sediment. Given the dynamic nature of sediment movement it is often difficult to directly evaluate the effects of sediment loading on solute transport and related physical or biological processes. One situation where these effects can be evaluated is after the removal of a sediment-filled dam. In this paper, we describe downstream changes in hyporheic exchange, diurnal temperature flux, and benthic macroinvertebrate community composition following the removal of a small sediment-filled dam in Oregon. Dam removal increased downstream turbidity for short periods of time as fine sediment eroded from the reservoir and reduced hyporheic exchange by less than 30%, but produced no discernable changes in diurnal temperature or macroinvertebrates. Deposition of 470 m3 of gravel and cobble from the upstream reservoir produced a greater than 50x increase in hyporheic residence time, significantly reduced diurnal temperature fluctuations through the downstream reach, and had lasting impacts to the macroinvertebrate community.

  16. Analytical assessment about the simultaneous quantification of releasable pharmaceutical relevant inorganic nanoparticles in tap water and domestic waste water.

    PubMed

    Krystek, Petra; Bäuerlein, Patrick S; Kooij, Pascal J F

    2015-03-15

    For pharmaceutical applications, the use of inorganic engineered nanoparticles is of growing interest while silver (Ag) and gold (Au) are the most relevant elements. A few methods were developed recently but the validation and the application testing were quite limited. Therefore, a routinely suitable multi element method for the identification of nanoparticles of different sizes below 100 nm and elemental composition by applying asymmetric flow field flow fraction (AF4) - inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS) is developed. A complete validation model of the quantification of releasable pharmaceutical relevant inorganic nanoparticles based on Ag and Au is presented for the most relevant aqueous matrices of tap water and domestic waste water. The samples are originated from locations in the Netherlands and it is of great interest to study the unwanted presence of Ag and Au as nanoparticle residues due to possible health and environmental risks. During method development, instability effects are observed for 60 nm and 70 nm Ag ENPs with different capping agents. These effects are studied more closely in relation to matrix effects. Besides the methodological aspects, the obtained analytical results and relevant performance characteristics (e.g. measuring range, limit of detection, repeatability, reproducibility, trueness, and expanded uncertainty of measurement) are determined and discussed. For the chosen aqueous matrices, the results of the performance characteristics are significantly better for Au ENPs in comparison to Ag ENPs; e.g. repeatability and reproducibility are below 10% for all Au ENPs respectively maximal 27% repeatability for larger Ag ENPs. The method is a promising tool for the simultaneous determination of releasable pharmaceutical relevant inorganic nanoparticles. PMID:24856919

  17. Sediment Mobilization From Reservoirs Can Cause Short Term Oxygen Depletion In Downstream Receiving Waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, C.; Schenk, L.; Bragg, H.; Singer, M.; Hume, N.

    2013-12-01

    Reservoir management can cause incidences of short-term sediment mobilization, e.g. during dam removal or drawdown for maintenance or habitat purposes. Much of the associated planning focuses on predicting, quantifying, and mitigating the physical impacts of sediment mobilization, transport, and deposition. Sediment pulses can cause multiple regulatory and management concerns, such as turbidity or suspended sediment concentrations that may exceed State standards, geomorphic change and effects on property or infrastructure, or wildlife impacts such as stress to fish via gill abrasion or burial of critical habitat. Water-quality issues associated with sediment mobilization, including nutrient and contaminant transport, are often given less attention, presumably because their effects are less immediate or because of resource constraints. Recent experience with large pulses of sediment from several western reservoirs involving dam removals and temporary drawdowns indicates that oxygen demand, leading to depletion of downstream dissolved oxygen (DO), can also be a significant short-term concern. During the October 2011 Condit Dam removal on the White Salmon River in Washington, DO in receiving waters about 4.5 km downstream of the dam dropped to less than 1 mg/L within 2 hours of the demolition; in response, salmonids were observed to be in distress, apparently gulping for air at the water surface. DO remained low for at least 24 hours in this reach, and dead fish were observed. In December 2012, during a drawdown designed to aid juvenile-salmonid migration through Fall Creek Reservoir in Oregon, DO dropped precipitously about 1.5 km downstream as turbidity peaked, and a muted DO decrease was also observed approximately 14 miles further downstream despite a large dilution from unaffected sources. Laboratory experiments and modeling using sediments from reservoirs proposed for removal on the Klamath River, California, demonstrated the likelihood for downstream DO depletion stemming from a combination of chemical (< 2 hr) and biological (days-weeks) oxidation processes, depending on rates of sediment mobilization. Such depletion could contribute to fish stress or mortality for tens of kilometers downstream of the dams and for the duration of the sediment mobilization. Although modeling DO demand and measuring stream DO response during periods of elevated sediment concentration remains an area requiring further research, planning for large sediment mobilizing events could better anticipate and mitigate short-term, acute stresses on fish and aquatic life by recognizing the potential for transient, but significant, DO-related impacts.

  18. HPLC-PFD determination of priority pollutant PAHs in water, sediment, and semipermeable membrane devices

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williamson, K.S.; Petty, J.D.; Huckins, J.N.; Lebo, J.A.; Kaiser, E.M.

    2002-01-01

    High performance liquid chromatography coupled with programmable fluorescence detection was employed for the determination of 15 priority pollutant polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PPPAHs) in water, sediment, and semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDs). Chromatographic separation using this analytical method facilitates selectivity, sensitivity (ppt levels), and can serve as a non-destructive technique for subsequent analysis by other chromatographic and spectroscopic techniques. Extraction and sample cleanup procedures were also developed for water, sediment, and SPMDs using various chromatographic and wet chemical methods. The focus of this publication is to examine the enrichment techniques and the analytical methodologies used in the isolation, characterization, and quantitation of 15 PPPAHs in different sample matrices.

  19. Water and sediment transport modeling of a large temporary river basin in Greece.

    PubMed

    Gamvroudis, C; Nikolaidis, N P; Tzoraki, O; Papadoulakis, V; Karalemas, N

    2015-03-01

    The objective of this research was to study the spatial distribution of runoff and sediment transport in a large Mediterranean watershed (Evrotas River Basin) consisting of temporary flow tributaries and high mountain areas and springs by focusing on the collection and use of a variety of data to constrain the model parameters and characterize hydrologic and geophysical processes at various scales. Both monthly and daily discharge data (2004-2011) and monthly sediment concentration data (2010-2011) from an extended monitoring network of 8 sites were used to calibrate and validate the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) model. In addition flow desiccation maps showing wet and dry aquatic states obtained during a dry year were used to calibrate the simulation of low flows. Annual measurements of sediment accumulation in two reaches were used to further calibrate the sediment simulation. Model simulation of hydrology and sediment transport was in good agreement with field observations as indicated by a variety of statistical measures used to evaluate the goodness of fit. A water balance was constructed using a 12 year long (2000-2011) simulation. The average precipitation of the basin for this period was estimated to be 903 mm yr(-1). The actual evapotranspiration was 46.9% (424 mm yr(-1)), and the total water yield was 13.4% (121 mm yr(-1)). The remaining 33.4% (302 mm yr(-1)) was the amount of water that was lost through the deep groundwater of Taygetos and Parnonas Mountains to areas outside the watershed and for drinking water demands (6.3%). The results suggest that the catchment has on average significant water surplus to cover drinking water and irrigation demands. However, the situation is different during the dry years, where the majority of the reaches (85% of the river network are perennial and temporary) completely dry up as a result of the limited rainfall and the substantial water abstraction for irrigation purposes. There is a large variability in the sediment yield within the catchment with the highest annual sediment yield (3.5 t ha(-1)yr(-1)) to be generated from the western part of the watershed. The developed methodology facilitated the simulation of hydrology and sediment transport of the catchment providing consistent results and suggesting its usefulness as a tool for temporary rivers management. PMID:25497675

  20. Sediment and water discharge rates of Turkish Black Sea rivers before and after hydropower dam construction

    SciTech Connect

    Hay, B.J. )

    1994-06-01

    Presently, the water discharge rate to the Black Sea by Turkish rivers is approximately 41 km[sup 3]/yr. The sediment discharge rate of Turkish rivers to the Black Sea is 28 x 10[sup 6] t/yr. Before construction of the hydroelectric dams, the sediment discharge rate was approximately 70 x 10[sup 6] t/yr. The sharp reduction in sediment load is largely a result of the dams near the mouths of the Yesil Irmak and Kizil Irmak rivers. Before the construction of dams, Turkish rivers contributed approximately one third of the total amount of sediment received by the Black Sea from all surrounding rivers. The life-span of the major reservoirs varies from approximately only one century (Yesil Irmak river reservoirs) to several thousand years (Sakarya river reservoirs). Life-span for the large Altinkaya Dam reservoir is estimated with approximately 500 yr.

  1. Zinc, copper, cadmium, and lead concentrations in water, sediment, and Anadara senilis in a tropical estuary.

    PubMed

    Bakary, Inza; Yao, Koffi Marcellin; Etchian, Olivier Assoi; Soro, Metongo Bernard; Trokourey, Albert; Bokra, Yobou

    2015-12-01

    Spatial and seasonal contaminations of zinc, copper, cadmium, and lead were assessed simultaneously in water, sediment, and in the bivalve Arca senilis from the Milliardaires Bay (Cote d'Ivoire) between February and October 2008. The metal load in sediments doubled from the dry season to the rainy season. On the contrary, metal concentrations in waters decreased significantly from the dry season to the rainy season. Zn and Pb concentrations in A. senilis showed similar seasonal variation with sediments. On the other hand, A. senilis regulated Cu concentrations by eliminating about twelve times the concentration accumulated during the dry season. Apparent Zn, Cu, Cd, and Pb concentration gradients were observed, but no significant differences between stations for sediment, water, and A. senilis. Concentrations in sediment increased from stations close to Abidjan Harbor towards farther stations, while concentrations in A. senilis showed a reverse gradient. The distribution gradient of A. senilis indicates pollution from local sources, but a transplant experiment is needed to better understand the observed spatial trend. Zn and Cu concentrations may pose little risk to human health and the environment, but they are the highest on the regional scale. On the contrary, Cd and Pb concentrations in A. senilis exceeded the maximum allowable limits set by the European Commission. Complementary studies including chemical speciation should be considered to provide a more accurate assessment of the risk of heavy metals to the environment. PMID:26581608

  2. Widespread potential for microbial MTBE degradation in surface-water sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bradley, P.M.; Landmeyer, J.E.; Chapelle, F.H.

    2001-01-01

    Microorganisms indigenous to stream and lake bed sediments, collected from 11 sites throughout the United States, demonstrated significant mineralization of the fuel oxygenate, methyl-tert-butyl ether (MTBE). Mineralization of [U-14C]MTBE to 14CO2 ranged from 15 to 66% over 50 days and did not differ significantly between sediments collected from MTBE contaminated sites and from sites with no history of MTBE exposure. This result suggests that even the microbial communities indigenous to newly contaminated surface water systems will exhibit some innate ability to attenuate MTBE under aerobic conditions. The magnitude of MTBE mineralization was related to the sediment grain size distribution. A pronounced, inverse correlation (p < 0.001; r2 = 0.73) was observed between the final recovery of 14CO2 and the percentage content of silt and clay sized grains (grain diameter < 0.125 mm). The results of this study indicate that the microorganisms that inhabit the bed sediments of streams and lakes can degrade MTBE efficiently and that this capability is widespread in the environment. Thus aerobic bed sediment microbial processes may provide a significant environmental sink for MTBE in surface water systems throughout the United States and may contribute to the reported transience of MTBE in some surface waters.

  3. Analysis of bacterial diversity and metals in produced water, seawater and sediments from an offshore oil and gas production platform.

    PubMed

    Yeung, C William; Law, Brent A; Milligan, Tim G; Lee, Kenneth; Whyte, Lyle G; Greer, Charles W

    2011-10-01

    Produced water is one of the largest waste products routinely discharged into the ocean from offshore oil and gas platforms. This study analyzed bacterial communities and metals in the produced water, surrounding seawater, and sediment around the Thebaud platform. The bacterial community within the produced water was different from the seawater (SAB=13.3), but the discharge had no detectable effect on the bacterial communities in the seawater (SAB>97). In contrast, genomic analysis of sediments revealed that the bacterial community from 250 m was different (SAB=70) from other locations further from the discharge, suggesting that the produced water had a detectable effect on the bacterial community in the sediment closest to the discharge. These near-field sediments contained elevated concentrations of manganese and iron that are associated with the produced water effluent. The results suggested that the discharge of produced water has influenced the bacterial community structure of sediments adjacent to the platform. PMID:21864859

  4. Partitioning of Total Dissolved Salts, Boron and Selenium in Pariette Wetland Water, Sediments and Benthic Organisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobson, A. R.; Jones, C. P.; Vasudeva, P.; Powelson, D.; Grossl, P.

    2014-12-01

    The Pariette Wetlands located in the Uinta Basin, UT, were developed by the BLM in part to mitigate salinity associated with irrigation drainage and runoff from flowing to the Green River, a tributary of the Colorado River. The wetlands are fed by runoff from upstream agricultural irrigation, and natural subsurface and overland flow through the Uintah formation, which is seleniferous, and saline. Concentrations of Total Dissolved Salts (TDS), boron (B) and selenium (Se) in the wetlands exceed the total maximum daily loads developed to meet the US EPA's water quality planning and management regulations (40CFR 130). This is of concern because the wetlands are home to populations of migratory birds, waterfowl, raptors, and numerous small mammals. A mass balance of the Se concentrations of water flowing into and out of the wetlands indicates that 80% of the Se is stored or lost within the system. Additional data suggest that the majority of the Se is associated with the sediments. Little information is available regarding the TDS and B. Therefore we will determine the whether B and other salts are accumulating in the wetland systems, and if so where. We sampled water, sediment, benthic organisms, and wetland plants, in 4 of the 23 ponds from the flood control inlet to water flowing out to the Green River. Sediments were collected at 3 depths (0-2 cm, 2-7 cm, and 7+ cm) at 3-4 locations within each pond including the inlet, outlet and at least one site near a major wetland plant community. Benthic organisms were sampled from the 0-2 cm and 2-7 cm sediment layers. Sediment and organism samples were digested with HNO3 and HClO4 prior to analysis of total Se by HGAAS. Hot water extractable B and DPTA extractable B were analyzed by ICP-AES. TDS was estimated from EC in the sediment and organisms extracts and direct analysis in the water. Preliminary results found that Se in the sediments decreases with depth. Se concentrations in the benthic organisms is approximately 4 times higher than in the associated sediments. Data from this study will contribute to a water quality risk assessment to the wetland fish and birds.

  5. Occurrence of arsenic in sediment pore waters in the central Kanto Plain, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hachinohe, Shoichi; Hamamoto, Hideki; Ishiyama, Takashi; Hossain, Sushmita; Oguchi, Chiaki T.

    2014-05-01

    The Kanto Plain is known as the largest plain in Japan, where marine sediments are widely developed because of cyclic iteration of global sea-level changes even 50 km or more inland from the present shoreline. In this area, dependence on groundwater for water requirements is relatively high; in particular, around 40 % of the municipal water supply is dependent on groundwater. Arsenic levels greater than that permitted by the environmental standards of Japan have been detected in groundwater in this area. Therefore, to evaluate occurrences of arsenic and other related elements in pore waters contained in natural sediment layers, we measured the levels of various inorganic chemical substances such as arsenic (As), iron (Fe), and sulfur (S) and major dissolved ions such as sulfate (SO42-), calcium (Ca2+), and sodium (Na+). Pore waters were collected from sediment samples that were obtained by a drilling from the river bottom down to 44 m depth; pore water samples were obtained immediately after extraction of sediments. The sedimentary facies in the vertical profile are continental, transitional, and marine, including two aquifers. The upper aquifer (15-20 m) contains fine to medium sand, whereas the lower aquifer (37-44 m) contains medium to coarse and gravelly sand. Arsenic and other inorganic elements were measured by an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (ICP/MS) and an inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometer (ICP/AES), and major dissolved ions were measured by an ion chromatograph analyzer. The total content of chemical elements was measured by X-ray fluorescence analysis using solid sediment samples. We obtained the following results. The arsenic concentrations in pore waters in marine silt and clay sediments (approximately 0.04 mg/L) were about five times higher than that in continental sediments (approximately 0.008 mg/L). The highest concentration of arsenic (0.074 mg/L) was detected at a depth of 13 m, which is immediately above the upper aquifer. Visual observations confirmed that this level is under oxidizing conditions. Thus, it regards that arsenic was adsorbed to iron hydroxide in the sediments. On the other hand, in the top part of the section, from the river bottom to a depth of approximately 3 m, arsenic concentrations in the pore waters were clearly high and decreased gradually and continuously with depth. This is considered to be the result of anthropogenic impact on the river.

  6. Local scale marine modelling of Fukushima releases. Assessment of water and sediment contamination and sensitivity to water circulation description.

    PubMed

    Periáñez, R; Suh, Kyung-Suk; Min, Byung-Il

    2012-11-01

    The dispersion of (137)Cs released from Fukushima nuclear power plant to the sea after the March 11th 2011 tsunami has been studied using numerical models. The 3D dispersion model consists of an advection/diffusion equation with terms describing uptake/release reactions between water and seabed sediments. The dispersion model has been fed with daily currents provided by HYCOM and JCOPE2 ocean models. Seabed sediment (137)Cs patterns obtained using both current data set have been compared. The impact of tides and of atmospheric deposition has been evaluated as well. It has been also found that a 2-step kinetic model (two consecutive reversible reactions) for describing water/sediment interactions produces better results than a 1-step model (one single reversible reaction). PMID:23021937

  7. Impact of water column acidification on protozoan bacterivory at the lake sediment-water interface

    SciTech Connect

    Tremaine, S.C.; Mills, A.L. )

    1991-03-01

    Although the impact of acidification on planktonic grazer food webs has been extensively studied, little is known about microbial food webs either in the water column or in the sediments. Protozoan-bacterium interactions were investigated in a chronically acidified (acid mine drainage) portion of a lake in Virginia. The authors determined the distribution, abundance, apparent specific grazing rate, and growth rate of protozoa over a pH range of 3.6 to 6.5. Protozoan abundance was lower at the most acidified site, while abundance, in general, was high compared with other systems. Specific grazing rates were uncorrelated with pH and ranged between 0.02 and 0.23 h{sup {minus}1}, values similar to those in unacidified systems. The protozoan community from an acidified station was not better adapted to low-pH conditions than a community from an unacidified site (multivariate analysis of variance on growth rates for each community incubated at pHs 4, 5, and 6). Both communities had significantly lower growth rates at pHs 4 and 5 than at pH 6. Reduced protozoan growth rates coupled with high grazing rates and relatively higher bacterial yields (ratio of bacterial-protozoan standing stock) at low pH indicate reduced net protozoan growth efficiency and a metabolic cost of acidification to the protozoan community. However, the presence of an abundant, neutrophilic protozoan community and high bacterial grazing rates indicates that acidification of Lake Anna has not inhibited the bacterium-protozoan link of the sediment microbial food web.

  8. Degradation of metolachlor in bare and vegetated soils and in simulated water-sediment systems.

    PubMed

    Mersie, Wondi; McNamee, Clyde; Seybold, Cathy; Wu, Jigang; Tierney, Dennis

    2004-11-01

    A study was conducted to determine the half-life (t1/2), degradation rate, and metabolites of metolachlor in a water-sediment system and in soil with and without switchgrass. Metolachlor degradation in a laboratory was determined in sediment from Bojac sandy loam soil incubated at 24 degrees C. The study also was conducted in a greenhouse on tilted beds filled with Bojac soil and planted with switchgrass. In both experiments, samples were collected at days 0, 7, 14, 28, 42, 56, and 112 and analyzed for metolachlor and its major metabolites. The water-sediment oxidation-reduction potential took 28 d to reach -371 mV and the pH increased from 5.6 to 6.5 by the last sampling day (day 112). The average soil temperature of the tilted beds with or without switchgrass during the study was 21degrees C and the soil moisture content was 23% by volume. The t1/2 of metolachlor was 34 d in sediment and 8 d in the water phase. The t1/2 of metolachlor in soil from the switchgrass filter strip (6 d) was not different from that in soil without grass (9.6 d). The metolachlor metabolites ethanesulfonic acid (ESA) and oxanilic acid (OA) were detected in the water-sediment system and in soil from tilted beds. In both sediment and soil from tilted beds, the two metabolites peaked by day 56 of incubation and declined after that, indicating transformation to other products. In the water-sediment system, greater quantities of OA and ESA were detected in sediment than in the aqueous phase. The production of OA and ESA in the watersediment system occurred in the first 28 d, when the system was at an aerobic redox state. Metolachlor can degrade in sediment and the relatively high soil temperature and moisture level accelerated its breakdown in beds with and without switchgrass. Under warm and moist soil conditions, the presence of switchgrass has no effect on the degradation of metolachlor. PMID:15559277

  9. Physicochemical and Analytical Data for Tributary Water, Lake Water, and Lake Sediment, Lake Arrowhead, Clay and Archer Counties, Texas, 2006

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilson, Jennifer T.; Musgrove, MaryLynn; Haynie, Monti M.; Van Metre, Peter C.

    2008-01-01

    Lake Arrowhead is a reservoir about 24 kilometers southeast of Wichita Falls, Texas, that provides drinking water for the city of Wichita Falls and surrounding areas. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the City of Wichita Falls, did a study in 2006 to assess conditions contributing to elevated arsenic concentrations in Lake Arrowhead. This report describes the sampling and analytical methods, quality assurance, and physicochemical and analytical data. Physiochemical properties were measured in and water samples were collected from five tributaries to Lake Arrowhead (Little Wichita River, West Little Post Oak Creek, East Little Post Oak Creek, Deer Creek, and an unnamed tributary) immediately after storms. Lake water measuring and sampling were done approximately monthly from January through September 2006 at three deep-water sites and seasonally, in January and August 2006, at three shallow-water sites. Cores of lake bottom sediment were collected from five sites on August 30, 2006. Arsenic concentrations in tributary water samples ranged from 1.5 to 6.3 and 0.5 to 4.8 micrograms per liter for unfiltered and filtered samples, respectively. The highest arsenic concentrations were in samples collected from the West Little Post Oak Creek sampling site. Physicochemical properties in lake water varied with depth and season. Dissolved arsenite plus arsenate concentrations in lake water samples generally were between 3 and 5 micrograms per liter. Arsenite concentrations typically were below the laboratory reporting level of 0.6 microgram per liter. There were no detections of monomethylarsonate or dimethylarsinate. The concentration of arsenic in lake sediment samples ranged from 4.4 to 11.2 milligrams per kilogram, with a median of 6.4 milligrams per kilogram. The median arsenic concentration of the five top-interval sediment samples was 8.8 milligrams per kilogram, which generally is higher than the concentrations estimated to be on suspended sediment in the tributaries. Sediment concentrations of seven trace elements were compared to two consensus-based sediment quality guidelines for each: the threshold effect concentration and the probable effect concentration. Arsenic concentration exceeded the threshold effect concentration in one top-interval sediment sample.

  10. Sediment discharge in the Lake Tahoe basin, California, 1972 water year

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kroll, Carl G.

    1973-01-01

    Streamflow and fluvial-sediment discharge data are being collected at selected streams and highway gutters in the Lake Tahoe basin to determine the extent of erosion from highway cuts and to evaluate the effects of various land treatment practices to reduce erosion. Precipitation in the Lake Tahoe area during 1972 was 77 percent of normal; consequently, runoff was well below normal. Seventy-six percent of the total annual runoff during the 1972 water year occurred from March through June 1972. Sediment samples were collected during the year at streamflow gaging stations and at gutter stations at highway cuts to define the range of transport conditions. The major part (87 percent) of the annual suspended-sediment discharge during the 1972 water year occurred during the snowmelt runoff period, March through June.

  11. NUMERICAL MODELING OF WATER QUALITY AND SEDIMENT RELATED PROCESSES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A three-dimensional water quality model was developed for simulating temporal and spatial variations of water quality with respect to phytoplankton, nutrients, and dissolved oxygen. Four major interacting systems were simulated, including phytoplankton dynamics, the nitrogen and phosphorus cycles, a...

  12. A guide to the proper selection and use of federally approved sediment and water-quality samplers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Davis, Broderick E.; Federal Interagency Sedimentation Project

    2005-01-01

    As interest in the health of rivers and streams increases3, and new water-quality regulations4 are promulgated, interest in sediment and water-quality sampling equipment and technologies has increased. While much information on the subject exists, a comprehensive summary document of sediment sampling equipment and technology is lacking. This report seeks to provide such a summary.

  13. Solving the problem at the source: Controlling Mn release at the sediment-water interface via hypolimnetic oxygenation.

    PubMed

    Bryant, Lee D; Hsu-Kim, Heileen; Gantzer, Paul A; Little, John C

    2011-12-01

    One of the primary goals of hypolimnetic oxygenation systems (HOx) from a drinking water perspective is to suppress sediment-water fluxes of reduced chemical species (e.g., manganese and iron) by replenishing dissolved oxygen (O(2)) in the hypolimnion. Manganese (Mn) in particular is becoming a serious problem for water treatment on a global scale. While it has been established that HOx can increase sediment O(2) uptake rates and subsequently enhance the sediment oxic zone via elevated near-sediment O(2) and mixing, the influence of HOx on sediment-water fluxes of chemical species with more complicated redox kinetics like Mn has not been comprehensively evaluated. This study was based on Mn and O(2) data collected primarily in-situ to characterize both the sediment and water column in a drinking-water-supply reservoir equipped with an HOx. While diffusive Mn flux out of the sediment was enhanced by HOx operation due to an increased concentration driving force across the sediment-water interface, oxygenation maintained elevated near-sediment and porewater O(2) levels that facilitated biogeochemical cycling and subsequent retention of released Mn within the benthic region. Results show that soluble Mn levels in the lower hypolimnion increased substantially when the HOx was turned off for as little as ?48 h and the upper sediment became anoxic. Turning off the HOx for longer periods (i.e., several weeks) significantly impaired water quality due to sediment Mn release. Continual oxygenation maintained an oxic benthic region sufficient to prevent Mn release to the overlying source water. PMID:22000717

  14. The distribution and speciation of antimony in river water, sediment and biota in Yodo River, Japan.

    PubMed

    Kawamoto, Y; Morisawa, S

    2003-11-01

    In 1993, the Japanese government set the guideline concentration of 2 microg l(-1) for antimony in natural water and drinking water as an item for precautionary monitoring in consideration of its chronic toxicity, however in 1999 the guideline value was tentatively canceled to examine the health risk of antimony through the accumulation of more information and data for detailed risk assessment. In this study, the distribution of antimony in the river water environment including water, sediment, aquatic plants and fishes was surveyed in the Yodo River basin. The characteristics of antimony distribution between river water and sediment were determined by the batch sorption experiments, focusing on the difference in oxidation state. This study suggests that biota in the Yodo River basin have antimony at concentrated levels. Some of the sewage treatment plants seemed to influence the concentration of antimony in river water. It was shown that the pentavalent antimony is dominant in river water and especially paramount downstream of the sewage treatment plants, though the trivalent antimony is dominant in industrial use. According to the sorption experiments of antimony on river sediment, the trivalent antimony is sorbed faster and more in partition than the pentavalent antimony. PMID:14733388

  15. Aluminum forms in stream sediment: Relation to bedrock geology and water chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, R.R.; Bogle, M.A.; Zeiler, M.A.; Mulholland, P.J.; Elwood, J.W.; Cook, R.B.

    1987-01-01

    Longitudinal gradients in sediment and water chemistry were characterized in a high elevation stream in the southern Appalachian Mountains, USA, to elucidate the geochemical behavior of aluminum across gradients in pH (4.5 to 6.5) and elevation (1120 to 1895 m). Observed gradients are driven in part by the presence of pyritic bedrock, which occurs at higher elevations and yields acidity when exposed to oxidation by landslide activity. Exchangeable Al in sediment (estimated using potassium chloride) varied in response to monomeric Al in streamwater and thus decreased downstream. Organic Al in sediment (estimated using sodium pyrophosphate) did not vary in proportion to the organic carbon content of sediment. Amorphous Al in sediment (estimated as the difference between oxalate- and pyrophosphate-extractable Al) and Al extractable with acidified streamwater (pH 4.5) was lowest at the more acidic sites. These results suggest that increases in soluble Al in downstream reaches during episodic pH depressions could be due in part to the release of adsorbed and/or precipitated Al in sediment.

  16. Transport of anthropogenic uranium from sediments to surface waters during episodic storm events

    SciTech Connect

    Batson, V.L. |; Bertsch, P.M.; Herbert, B.E.

    1996-09-01

    Remobilization of sediment-associated uranium (U) from contaminated floodplain sediments to a stream adjacent to a nuclear weapons processing facility during episodic rain events was investigated. In addition, U solid phase associations in suspended sediments were assessed by a sequential chemical extraction procedure to gauge U chemical lability. Mass flux estimates determined from base flow measurements potentially underestimate the amount of U transported from contaminated terrestrial sources to surface water systems. Erosional processes can effectively mobilize sediment-associated contaminants during storms or flooding. During the various storm events measured, approximately 1500 to 2800% more U was exported to Upper Three Runs Creek (UTRC) relative to base flow measurements. Sequential extraction results suggest the suspended a sediment load transports the bulk of U in labile forms predominantly as acid soluble (specifically adsorbed), MnO{sub 2} occluded and organically bound phases. This implies that U may be available to the ecosystem under a range of environmental conditions likely to be encountered within depositional environments (e.g., Eh and pH) or as a result of industrial processes. This study demonstrates the need to evaluate contaminant transport during storm events from exposed contaminated sediments, or from industrial waste stockpiles subject to erosion. 49 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  17. Solar heating, cooling, and domestic hot water system installed at Kaw Valley State Bank and Trust Company, Topeka, Kansas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    The building has approximately 5600 square feet of conditioned space. Solar energy was used for space heating, space cooling, and preheating domestic hot water (DHW). The solar energy system had an array of evacuated tube-type collectors with an area of 1068 square feet. A 50/50 solution of ethylene glycol and water was the transfer medium that delivered solar energy to a tube-in-shell heat exchanger that in turn delivered solar heated water to a 1100 gallon pressurized hot water storage tank. When solar energy was insufficient to satisfy the space heating and/or cooling demand, a natural gas-fired boiler provided auxiliary energy to the fan coil loops and/or the absorption chillers. Extracts from the site files, specification references, drawings, and installation, operation and maintenance instructions are presented.

  18. PARTITIONING STUDIES OF DIOXIN BETWEEN SEDIMENT AND WATER: THE MEASUREMENT OF KOC FOR LAKE ONTARIO

    EPA Science Inventory

    A desorption experiment is described in which the sediment-to-water partition coefficient for 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin is measured for a sample from Lake Ontario. fter a contact period of 4 days, the logarithm of the partition coefficient on an organic carbon basis, Lo...

  19. Selenium in water, sediment, plants, invertebrates, and fish in the Blackfoot River drainage

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hamilton, S.J.; Buhl, K.J.

    2004-01-01

    Nine stream sites in the Blackfoot River watershed in southeastern Idaho were sampled in September 2000 for water, surficial sediment, aquatic plants, aquatic invertebrates, and fish. Selenium was measured in these aquatic ecosystem components, and a hazard assessment was performed on the data. Water quality characteristics such as pH, hardness, and specific conductance were relatively uniform among the nine sites examined. Selenium was elevated in water, sediment, aquatic plants, aquatic invertebrates, and fish from several sites suggesting deposition in sediments and food web cycling through plants and invertebrates. Selenium was elevated to concentrations of concern in water at eight sites (>5 ??g/L), sediment at three sites (>2 ??g/g), aquatic plants at four sites (>4 ??g/g), aquatic invertebrates at five sites (>3 ??g/g), and fish at seven sites (>4 ??g/g in whole body). The hazard assessment of selenium in the aquatic environment suggested low hazard at Sheep Creek, moderate hazard at Trail Creek, upper Slug Creek, lower Slug Creek, and lower Blackfoot River, and high hazard at Angus Creek, upper East Mill Creek, lower East Mill Creek, and Dry Valley Creek. The results of this study are consistent with results of a previous investigation and indicate that selenium concentrations from the phosphate mining area of southeastern Idaho were sufficiently elevated in several ecosystem components to cause adverse effects to aquatic resources in the Blackfoot River watershed. ?? 2004 Kluwer Academic Publishers.

  20. Sediment Quality in Near Coastal Waters of the Gulf of Mexico: Influence of Hurricane Katrina

    EPA Science Inventory

    The results from this study represent a synoptic analysis of sediment quality in coastal waters of Lake Pontchartrain and Mississippi Sound two months after the landfall of Hurricane Katrina. Post-hurricane conditions were compared to pre-hurricane (2000-2004) conditions, for se...

  1. Evaluation Of Selected Sorption Materials For Capping Mercury-Contaminated Fresh Water Sediments

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fate and transport of mercury (Hg) and methylmercury (MeHg) within the aquatic environment involves many complex and interconnected pathways. MeHg is formed mainly at the sediment-water interface, just below which there is a transition from oxic to anoxic conditions. The format...

  2. LABORATORY EVALUATION OF METHODS TO SEPARATE FINE GRAINED SEDIMENT FROM STORM WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    A literature survey had been conducted by the St. Anthony Falls Hydraulic laboratory to assess various methods for separation of sediment from storm water at construction sites. Two methods have shown some promise in this application, and a research program was initiated with the...

  3. ASSESSING WATER QUALITY CHANGES IN THE LAKES OF THE NORTHEASTERN UNITED STATES USING SEDIMENT DIATOMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Diatom assemblages were selected as indicators of lake condition and to assess historical lake water quality changes in 257 lakes in the northeastern United States. The "top" (surface sediments, present-day) and "bottom" (generally from >30 cm deep, representing historical condit...

  4. Heavy metals in water, sediments and submerged macrophytes in ponds around the Dianchi Lake, China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhixiu; Yao, Lu; Liu, Guihua; Liu, Wenzhi

    2014-09-01

    Through retaining runoff and pollutants such as heavy metals from surrounding landscapes, ponds around a lake play an important role in mitigating the impacts of human activities on lake ecosystems. In order to determine the potential for heavy metal accumulation of submerged macrophytes, we investigated the concentrations of 10 heavy metals (i.e., As, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb, and Zn) in water, sediments, and submerged macrophytes collected from 37 ponds around the Dianchi Lake in China. Our results showed that both water and sediments of these ponds were polluted by Pb. Water and sediments heavy metal concentrations in ponds received urban and agricultural runoff were not significantly higher than those in ponds received forest runoff. This result indicates that a large portion of heavy metals in these ponds may originate from atmospheric deposition and weathering of background soils. Positive relationships were found among heavy metal concentrations in submerged macrophytes, probably due to the coaccumulation of heavy metals. For most heavy metals, no significant relationships were found between submerged macrophytes and their water and sediment environments. The maximum concentrations of Cr, Fe and Ni in Ceratophyllum demersum were 4242, 16,429 and 2662mgkg(-1), respectively. The result suggests that C. demersum is a good candidate species for removing heavy metals from polluted aquatic environments. PMID:25011115

  5. Evidence for changes in Holocene sediment flux in Semer Water and Raydale, North Yorkshire, UK

    E-print Network

    Available online xxxx Keywords: Lake sediments Gully erosion Magnetic properties Organic geochemistry gullied drainage basin of Semer Water in North Yorkshire, England. The results obtained so far are limited to the likelihood of increased erosion during the Bronze Age. Geomorphological studies point to periods

  6. Survey of Contaminants in Suspended Sediment and Water in the Fraser River Basin

    E-print Network

    #12;Survey of Contaminants in Suspended Sediment and Water in the Fraser River Basin - ­ -- -- ­ -- - 7 The Fraser River Basin M. Sekela, R Brewer, C. Baldazzi, G. Moyle and T. Tuominen Science Division River and supporting the field operations. We are greatly indebted to C. MacDonal~ G. McGdlivary, I

  7. KINETIC STUDIES OF THE REDUCTION OF AROMATIC AZO COMPOUNDS IN ANAEROBIC SEDIMENT/WATER SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The reductive transformation of azobenzene and selected derivatives was investigated in anaerobic sediment/water systems. The azo compounds exhibited pseudo-first-order disappearance kinetics through at least three half-lives. The reduction kinetics of these compounds was studied...

  8. Including Sediment-Associated Bacteria Resuspension and Settling in SWAT Predictions of Microbial Water Quality

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Streambed sediments have been shown to serve as environmental reservoirs for bacteria, including pathogenic strains. The Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) has been augmented with bacteria subroutine in 2005. Bacteria die-off is the only in-stream process considered in the current SWAT. The purpo...

  9. Biodegradation screening of chemicals in an artificial matrix simulating the water-sediment interface.

    PubMed

    Baginska, Ewelina; Haiss, Annette; Kümmerer, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    Biodegradation is the most important attenuation process for most of organic chemicals in the environment. This process decides whether the organic substance itself or its degradation products rests in the environment and should be considered for a further risk assessment. This work presents the development of a water sediment screening test, based on OECD guideline 308, with a high significance to environmental conditions and with a good reproducibility and consistency of results. The increased reproducibility was achieved by creating an artificial and standardized medium, based on the existing OECD guidelines OECD 302C, 301D and 218. Each test consisted of five different series: blank, quality control, test, toxicity control and abiotic control. Biodegradation was assessed by measurement of pressure difference in closed vessels using the OxiTop(®) system. Aniline, diethylene glycol and sodium acetate were used to optimize and validate test conditions. Additionally, two pharmaceuticals: Acetaminophen and ciprofloxacin (CIP) were tested as an example of possible test application. Acetaminophen was mainly removed from the system by biodegradation whereas CIP was removed from water phase by sorption onto sediment. Water sediment test proved to be a promising tool for the biodegradation investigation of chemicals in the water-sediment interface. PMID:25460767

  10. Relationship between water chemistry and sediment mineralogy in the Cerro Prieto geothermal field: a preliminary report

    SciTech Connect

    Valette-Silver, J.N.; Thompson, J.M.; Ball, J.W.

    1981-01-01

    The chemical compositions of waters collected from the Cerro Prieto geothermal production wells and hydrothermal emanations are different. Compared to the Cerro Prieto well waters, the surficial waters generally contain significantly less potassium, slightly less calcium and chloride, and significantly more magnesium and sulfate. In comparison to the unaltered sediments, the changes in the mineralogy of the altered sediments appear to be controlled by the type of emanation (well, spring, mud pot, geyser, fumarole, or cold pool). However, an increase in quartz and potassium feldspar percentages seems to be characteristic of the majority of the sediments in contact with geothermal fluids. Preliminary attempts to model the chemical processes occurring in the Cerro Prieto geothermal field using chemical equilibrium calculations are reported. For this purpose the chemical compositions of thermal waters (well and surficial emanation) were used as input data to make calculations with SOLMNEQ and WATEQ2 computer programs. Then the theoretical mineral composition of altered sediments was predicted and compared to the mineralogy actually observed in the solid samples.

  11. TEMPERATURE COEFFICIENT FOR MODELING DENITRIFICATION IN SURFACE WATER SEDIMENTS USING THE MASS TRANSFER COEFFICIENT

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    With the cost of water quality research at the watershed level, modeling has become an important tool for researchers. When modeling nitrate transport within drainage networks, denitrification within the sediments needs to be accounted for. Birgand et al. developed an equation using a term called a ...

  12. Field Validation of Molybdenum Accumulation in Sediments as an Indication of Hypoxic Water Conditions

    EPA Science Inventory

    Accumulation of authigenic molybdenum (Mo) in marine sediments has often been used as qualitative indicator of periods of hypoxic bottom water, but rarely, if ever, used quantitatively. Laboratory experiments have shown that the accumulation rate of Mo may serve as a quantitative...

  13. WATER EROSION PREDICTION PROJECT (WEPP) TECHNOLOGY FOR ASSESSMENT OF RUNOFF, SOIL LOSS AND SEDIMENT YIELD POTENTIAL

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Water Erosion Prediction Project (WEPP) model is a process-based, distributed parameter, continuous simulation computer program for estimation of runoff, soil loss and sediment yield from fields and small watersheds. In addition to having large databases for application to a multitude of U.S. s...

  14. 30 CFR 77.216-4 - Water, sediment or slurry impoundments and impounding structures; reporting requirements...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Water, sediment or slurry impoundments and impounding structures; reporting requirements; certification. 77.216-4 Section 77.216-4 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS, SURFACE COAL MINES AND...

  15. Author's personal copy Infaunal burrow ventilation and pore-water transport in muddy sediments

    E-print Network

    Shull, David H.

    Author's personal copy Infaunal burrow ventilation and pore-water transport in muddy sediments D: bioturbation bioirrigation biogeochemistry benthic ecology radon Boston Harbor a b s t r a c t The ventilation ventilation behavior of tube-dwelling organisms with their geochemical conse- quences. The classic cylinder

  16. Molybdenum Accumulation in Marine Sediments as an Indicator of Hypoxic Water Conditions (NACAETAC)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Direct monitoring of hypoxic water column conditions over large spatial and temporal extents is difficult due to the substantial logistical and financial investment required. Recent studies have indicated that concentrations of molybdenum (Mo) in marine sediments may serve as a u...

  17. 30 CFR 77.216-1 - Water, sediment or slurry impoundments and impounding structures; identification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    30 ? Mineral Resources ? 1 ? 2010-07-01 ? 2010-07-01 ? false ? Water, sediment or slurry impoundments and impounding structures; identification. ? 77.216-1 ? Section 77.216-1 ? Mineral Resources ? MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR ? COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ?...

  18. Phytoremediation Of Mercury And Methylmercury Contaminated Sediments By Water Hyacinth (Eichhornia crassipes)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Phytoremediation has potential to be implemented at mercury (Hg) and methylmercury (MeHg) contaminated sites. Water hyacinths (Eichhornia crassipes) were investigated for their ability to assimilate Hg and MeHg into plant biomass, in both aquatic and sediment-associated f...

  19. Bench-Scale Investigation Of Mercury Phytoremediation By Water Hyacinths (Eichhornia crassipes) In Heavily Contaminated Sediments

    EPA Science Inventory

    Phytoremediation has the potential to be implemented at mercury (Hg) and methylmercury (MeHg) contaminated sites. Water hyacinths (Eichhornia crassipes) were investigated for their ability to assimilate Hg and MeHg into plant biomass, in both aquatic and sediment-associat...

  20. 5/28/2015 1 Fluorometric Determination of Chlorophyll in waters and sediments of

    E-print Network

    Boynton, Walter R.

    5/28/2015 1 Fluorometric Determination of Chlorophyll in waters and sediments of Fresh/Estuarine/Coastal Areas. 1. SCOPE and APPLICATION 1.1 This is an acetone extraction method to determine chlorophyll should be used by analysts experienced in the theory and application of chlorophyll analysis. A three

  1. Spectrophotometric Determination of Chlorophyll in waters and sediments of Fresh/Estuarine/Coastal Areas.

    E-print Network

    Boynton, Walter R.

    5/28/2015 1 Spectrophotometric Determination of Chlorophyll in waters and sediments of Fresh/Estuarine/Coastal Areas. 1. SCOPE and APPLICATION 1.1 This is an acetone extraction method to determine chlorophyll and application of chlorophyll analysis. A three month training period with an analyst experienced in the analysis

  2. Phytoremediation of Mercury- and Methyl Mercury-Contaminated Sediments by Water Hyacinth (Eichhornia crassipes)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Phytoremediation has the potential for implementation at Hg- (Hg) and methylHg (MeHg)-contaminated sites. Water hyacinths (Eichhornia crassipes) were investigated for their ability to assimilate Hg and MeHg into plant biomass, in both aquatic and sediment-associated forms...

  3. Distribution of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in water and surface sediments from Daya Bay, China.

    PubMed

    Zhou, J L; Maskaoui, K

    2003-01-01

    Marine culture is thriving in China and represents a major component of the regional economy in coastal zones, yet the environmental quality of many of those areas has never been studied. This paper attempts to investigate the quality status of Daya Bay, a key aquaculture area in China. The levels of 16 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were determined in water and sediment samples of the bay. The total concentrations of 16 PAHs varied from 4228 to 29325 ng l(-1) in water, and from 115 to 1134 ng g(-1) dry weight in sediments. In comparison to many other marine systems studied, the PAH levels in Daya Bay waters were relatively high, and at six sites they were sufficiently high (> 10 microg l (-1)) to cause acute toxicity. The PAH composition pattern in sediments suggest dominance by medium to high molecular weight compounds, and the ratio of certain related PAHs indicate important pyrolytic and petrogenic sources. Further analysis showed that the distribution coefficient (KD) increased with the particular organic carbon content of sediments, consistent with the PAH partition theory. The organic carbon normalised distribution coefficient (K(oc)) also increased with the compounds' octanol/water partition coefficient (K(ow)), confirming the potential applicability of the linear free energy relationships in the modelling and prediction of PAH behaviour in marine environments. PMID:12521113

  4. The impact of wave loads and pore-water pressure generation on initiation of sediment transport

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clukey, E.C.; Kulhawy, F.H.; Liu, P.L.-F.; Tate, G.B.

    1985-01-01

    The build-up of pore-water pressure by waves can lead to sediment liquefaction and subsequent transport by traction currents. This process was investigated by measuring pore-water pressures both in a field experiment and laboratory wave tank tests. Liquefaction was observed in the wave tank tests. The results suggest that sand is less susceptible than silts to wave-induced liquefaction because of the tendency to partially dissipate pore-water pressures. However, previous studies have determined that pore-water pressures must approach liquefaction before current velocities necessary to initiate transport are reduced. Once liquefaction has occurred more sediment can be transported. ?? 1985 Springer-Verlag New York Inc.

  5. Evaluation of the dual differential radiometer for remote sensing of sediment and chlorophyll in turbid waters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witte, W. G.

    1975-01-01

    The dual differential radiometer (DDR) was tested to determine its capability for measuring suspended sediment and chlorophyll in turbid waters. Measurements were obtained from a boat dock and from a helicopter with combinations of sample and reference filters with peak transmissions at various wavelengths. Water samples were taken concurrently and were analyzed for light scattering, particle count, and total chlorophyll. Least-squares estimates of the linear relationship between DDR output and the water parameters yielded correlation coefficients of less than 0.7. Under the turbid water conditions of the present tests, the DDR did not accurately measure either suspended sediment or chlorophyll. A precise knowledge of the spectral signatures of various pollutants might enable appropriate filters to be selected for tuning the DDR to monitor a particular pollutant.

  6. Methane in water columns and sediments of the north western Sea of Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vereshchagina, Olga F.; Korovitskaya, Elena V.; Mishukova, Galina I.

    2013-02-01

    This paper presents the results of methane measurements in water and sediments, first performed along the north western continental slope and abyssal plain of the Sea of Japan. Methane concentrations in the study area were very low. However, some features of its distribution are revealed. The highest dissolved methane concentrations (10-14 nmol kg-1) are characteristic of the pycnocline layer at a depth of 30-50 m in the northern shallow stations. With increasing depth, the methane is reduced to minimum values (0.5-1.0 nmol kg-1). The greatest variability in methane concentrations was observed in the layers at 0-500 m, which can be explained by the hydrodynamic conditions of the environment on the slope. Methane plumes (1.7 and 1.3 nmol kg-1) on the northern section were recorded at the depth of 1250 and 1495 m, respectively. Plumes (1.2 nmol kg-1) are also observed on near bottom layers at the deepest (more than 3000 m) stations. CH4 concentration in bottom sediments is also low (from 1 nmol kg-1 at 7 cm level to 752 nmol kg-1 at the 53 cm level of the core sediment in the northern part). Reduced sediments in the southern part of the study region have maximal methane concentration for sediment (2549 nmol kg-1) at the horizon 44 cm bsf (below sea floor) with a smell of H2S. These results assume a close relation of CH4 with sediment properties. A few stations with maximum methane (86-101 nmol kg-1) in the surface sediment layer are at the foot of a steep slope. Herewith, the highest abundance of some pericarid species was observed at the points with the highest values of methane concentrations in the surface sediment layer. Weak methane seepage can cause anoxic marine waters. Methane emission from water to the atmosphere is low because its concentration is close to equilibrium in surface water. An improved formula for calculating the methane flux of water into the atmosphere, taking into account high wind speeds, is presented in the paper.

  7. Speciation of metals in bed sediments and water of Qaraaoun Reservoir, Lebanon.

    PubMed

    Korfali, Samira Ibrahim; Jurdi, Mey S

    2011-07-01

    Determination of only total element in sediments does not give an accurate estimate of the likely environmental impacts. Speciation study of metals in sediment provides information on the potential availability of metals (toxic) to biota under various environmental conditions. In water, the toxic metal specie is the free hydrated metal ion. The toxicity of metals depends especially on their chemical forms rather than their total metal content. The present study focuses on Qaraaoun Reservoir, Lebanon. Earlier studies focused only on total metal concentrations in sediment and water. The objective of this study was to determine metal speciation (Fe, Cr, Ni, Zn, Cu, Pb, Cd) in the (operationally defined) sediment chemical fractions and metal speciation in reservoir water. This would reflect on metal bioavailability and toxicity. Water samples and bed sediments were collected from nine sites during the dry season and a sequential chemical fraction scheme was applied to the <75-?m sieve sediment fraction. Metal content in each fraction was determined by the FAAS technique. The data showed that the highest percentages of total metal content in sediment fractions were for: Fe in residual followed by reducible, Cr and Ni in residual and in reducible, Cu in organic followed by exchangeable, Zn in residual and in organic, Pb in organic and carbonate, Cd was mainly in carbonate. Total metal content in water was determined by ICP-MS technique and aqueous metal speciation was predicted using AQUACHEM software interfaced to PHREEQC geochemical computer model. The water speciation data predicted that a high percentage of Pb and Ni were present as carbonate complex species and low percentages as free hydrated ions, highest percentage of Zn as carbonate complex species followed by free hydrated ion, highest percentage of Cd as free hydrated ion followed by carbonate complex species. The sensitivity attempt of free hydrated ion of Ni, Zn, Pb, and Cd in reservoir water revealed dependence of Zn and Cd on pH and alkalinity, while Ni and Pb were only dependent on pH. PMID:20865319

  8. Distribution of total mercury and methyl mercury in water, sediment, and fish from South Florida estuaries

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kannan, K.; Smith, R.G., Jr.; Lee, R.F.; Windom, H.L.; Heitmuller, P.T.; Macauley, J.M.; Summers, J.K.

    1998-01-01

    Concentrations of total mercury and methyl mercury were determined in sediment and fish collected from estuarine waters of Florida to understand their distribution and partitioning. Total mercury concentrations in sediments ranged from 1 to 219 ng/g dry wt. Methyl mercury accounted for, on average, 0.77% of total mercury in sediment. Methyl mercury concentrations were not correlated with total mercury or organic carbon content in sediments. The concentrations of total mercury in fish muscle were between 0.03 and 2.22 (mean: 0.31) ??g/g, wet wt, with methyl mercury contributing 83% of total mercury. Methyl mercury concentrations in fish muscle were directly proportional to total mercury concentrations. The relationship of total and methyl mercury concentrations in fish to those of sediments from corresponding locations was fish-species dependent, in addition to several abiotic factors. Among fish species analyzed, hardhead catfish, gafftopsail catfish, and sand seatrout contained the highest concentrations of mercury. Filtered water samples from canals and creeks that discharge into the Florida Bay showed mercury concentrations of 3-7.4 ng/L, with methyl mercury accounting for <0.03-52% of the total mercury. Consumption of fish containing 0.31 ??g mercury/g wet wt, the mean concentration found in this study, at rates greater than 70 g/day, was estimated to be hazardous to human health.

  9. Controls of the water and sediment fluxes on alluvial fans morphology: theory and experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerit, Laure; Delorme, Pauline; Métivier, François; Lajeunesse, Eric; Devauchelle, Olivier; Barrier, Laurie

    2015-04-01

    Alluvial fans are major sedimentary bodies that make the transition between the reliefs in erosion and the sedimentary basins, where deposition occurs. Understanding their dynamics of formation and evolution is a great problem of sediment transport, which leads to a better understanding of the control exerted by the water and sediment fluxes on the fan morphology. At the cost of several simplifications, we propose a totally predictive model for one-dimensional fans composed by one grain size and built under laminar flow. In this simplified context, it is possible to propose a unique relationship between the water flux, the sediment flux, the grain size and the slope of the fan. The theory is validated by one-dimension experiments, performed with glass beads and glycerine: the fan grows quasi-statically and maintains its slope just above the threshold for sediment transport. In addition, at leading order, the sediment discharge only controls the velocity at which the fan grows. These main predictions are then successfully tested in two-dimensional experiments.

  10. Probabilistic risk evaluation for triclosan in surface water, sediments, and aquatic biota tissues.

    PubMed

    Lyndall, Jennifer; Fuchsman, Phyllis; Bock, Michael; Barber, Timothy; Lauren, Darrel; Leigh, Katrina; Perruchon, Elyse; Capdevielle, Marie

    2010-07-01

    Triclosan, an antimicrobial compound used in personal care products, occurs in the aquatic environment due to residual concentrations in municipal wastewater treatment effluent. We evaluate triclosan-related risks to the aquatic environment, for aquatic and sediment-dwelling organisms and for aquatic-feeding wildlife, based on measured and modeled exposure concentrations. Triclosan concentrations in surface water, sediment, and biota tissue are predicted using a fugacity model parameterized to run probabilistically, to supplement the limited available measurements of triclosan in sediment and tissue. Aquatic toxicity is evaluated based on a species sensitivity distribution, which is extrapolated to sediment and tissues assuming equilibrium partitioning. A probabilistic wildlife exposure model is also used, and estimated doses are compared with wildlife toxicity benchmarks identified from a review of published and proprietary studies. The 95th percentiles of measured and modeled triclosan concentrations in surface water, sediment, and biota tissues are consistently below the 5th percentile of the respective species sensitivity distributions, indicating that, under most scenarios, adverse affects due to triclosan are unlikely. PMID:20821705

  11. Cycling of mercury across the sediment-water interface in seepage lakes: Chapter 13, Advances in Chemistry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hurley, James P.; Krabbenhoft, David P.; Babiarz, C.L.; Andren, Anders

    1994-01-01

    The magnitude and direction of Hg fluxes across the sediment—water interface were estimated by groundwater, dry bulk sediment, sediment pore water, sediment trap, and water-column analyses in two northern Wisconsin seepage lakes. Little Rock Lake (Treatment Basin) received no groundwater discharge during the study period (1988—1990), and Follette Lake received continuous groundwater discharge. In Little Rock Lake, settling of particulate matter accounted for the major Hg delivery mechanism to the sediment—water interface. Upward diffusion of Hg from sediment pore waters below 2—4-cm sediment depth was apparently a minor source during summer stratification. Time-series comparisons suggested that the observed buildup of Hg in the hypolimnion of Little Rock Lake was attributable to dissolution and diffusion of Hg from recently fallen particulate matter close to the sediment—water interface. Groundwater inflow represented an important source of new Hg, and groundwater outflow accounted for significant removal of Hg from Pallette Lake. Equilibrium speciation calculations revealed that association of Hg with organic matter may control solubility in well-oxygenated waters, whereas in anoxic environments sulfur (polysulfide and bisulfide) complexation governs dissolved total Hg levels.

  12. Silicone rubber passive samplers for measuring pore water and exchangeable concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons concentrations in sediments.

    PubMed

    Yates, Kyari; Pollard, Pat; Davies, Ian; Webster, Lynda; Moffat, Colin

    2013-10-01

    The use of a silicone rubber passive sampler for the assessment of the availability of lipophilic organic contaminants in sediments is described. The passive sampler accumulated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from sediments with an equilibration time of 20 days for most PAHs. The method was used to measure the free dissolved concentrations in pore water of 30 PAHs (parent and alkylated), their water exchangeable concentrations and sediment-water partition coefficients in field sediments from a Scottish sea loch that supports fish farming. Fluoranthene and pyrene dominated the PAH concentration composition in the pore waters. The water exchangeable concentration reflected the pyrogenic pollution pattern found in the sediments and indicated that a proportion of the PAHs were not available for exchange with the aqueous phase. Strong linear relationships between organic carbon normalised sediment-water partition coefficients (logK(oc)) and corresponding octanol-water partition coefficients of PAHs were obtained. The logK(oc) values obtained are on average, 0.6 log units higher than literature values commonly used in sediment risk assessments, consequently direct measurements of logK(oc) in field sediments should be used to improve the reliability of risk assessments. PMID:23872250

  13. Tungsten in groundwaters, surface waters, and associated sediments: Closing some of the knowledge gaps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johannesson, K. H.; Haug, T. J.; Helz, G. R.; Datta, S.

    2014-12-01

    Interest in the geochemistry of tungsten (W) in the environment is on the rise in part due to the United States Environmental Protection Agency's (USEPA) recent recognition that it represents an emerging contaminant of environmental concern. As such, we undertook a multi-year investigation of W in groundwaters and surface waters to help augment the relatively sparse understanding of the biogeochemistry of W in environmental waters. We quantified W concentrations in natural waters and sediments from a variety of settings, including shallow and deep groundwater flow systems, river waters, estuaries, and marine sediments and associated porewaters. In addition, we measured the equilibrium constants for the formation of thiotungstate ions in laboratory experiments to investigate the possible formation of these thioanions in sulfidic waters. Earlier investigations showed that the chemically similar element molybdenum (Mo) forms thiomolybdate ions in sulfidic waters. Our investigations indicate that pH-related adsorption/desorption reactions and the available quantity of Fe(III) oxide/oxyhydroxide minerals in substrate sediments are important controls on the amount of dissolved W in the environment with higher pH and lower Fe(III) oxide/oxyhydroxide content both favoring greater W mobility. Moreover, W is mobile in oxic, suboxic, and anoxic, including sulfidic waters occurring as the tungstate oxyanion and/or various thiotungstate anions depending of the dissolved sulfide concentrations. Specifically, thiotungstate anions predominate over the tungstate oxyanion for natural waters where dissolved sulfide concentrations attain millimolal levels. Investigation of sediments from a Louisiana salt marsh indicates that W is sequestered into pyrite similar to Mo.

  14. Sediment-water gas exchange in two Swedish lakes measured by Eddy Correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kokic, J.; Sahlee, E.; Brand, A.; Sobek, S.

    2014-12-01

    Lake sediments are hotspots for carbon (C) cycling, acting both as sinks and sources through C burial and production of carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane. The fate of this CO2 in the water column is controlled by bottom water turbulence, a factor not accounted for in current estimates of sediment CO2 fluxes. This study is aimed to quantify the turbulent CO2 flux across the sediment-water interface (SWI) by measuring the oxygen (O2) flux with the non-invasive Eddy Correlation (EC) method that combines measurements of 3D velocity (ADV) and O2 fluctuations with a microsensor. Using the metabolic relation (respiratory quotient, RQ) of O2 and CO2 derived from a sediment incubation experiment we present the first estimates of turbulent lake sediment CO2 flux from two boreal lakes in Sweden (Erssjön and Erken, 0.07 km2 and 23.7 km2 respectively). Only ~10 % of the total dataset was extracted for flux calculations due to poor signal-to-noise ratio in the velocity and O2 signals. The sediment in Lake Erssjön was both consuming and producing O2, related to bacterial respiration and photosynthesis. Mean O2 flux was -0.19 and 0.17 ?mol O2 m-2 sec-1, comparing to 0.04 ?mol O2 m-2 sec-1 derived from the sediment incubation experiment. Fluxes for Lake Erken are still to be determined. Experimentally derived RQ of the both lake sediments were close to unity implying that in-situ CO2 fluxes are of similar magnitude as O2 fluxes, varying between -0.15 and 0.18 ?mol C m-2 sec-1. The first measurement of turbulent sediment O2 flux and estimate of turbulent CO2 flux from a small boreal lake show higher and more variable fluxes than previously found in experimental studies. The low amount of data extracted for flux calculations (~10%) point towards the difficulties in EC measurement in low-turbulence environments. On-going work focuses on the turbulence structure in lakes and its influence on the gas fluxes at the SWI.

  15. Mineral composition and heavy metal contamination of sediments originating from radium rich formation water.

    PubMed

    Bzowski, Zbigniew; Michalik, Bogus?aw

    2015-03-01

    Radium rich formation water is often associated with fossil fuels as crude oil, natural gas and hard coal. As a result of fossil fuels exploitation high amount of such water is released into environment. In spite of the high radium content such waters create a serious radiation risk neither to humans nor biota directly. First and foremost due to very high mineralization they are not drinkable at all. But after discharge chemical and physical conditions are substantially changed and sediments which additionally concentrated radium are arising. Due to features of technological processes such phenomenon is very intensive in underground coal mining where huge volume of such water must be pumped into surface in order to keep underground galleries dry. Slightly different situation occurs in oil rigs, but finally also huge volume of so called process water is pumped into environment. Regardless their origin arising sediments often contain activity concentration of radium isotopes exceeding the clearance levels set for naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM) (Council Directive, 2013). The analysis of metals and minerals content showed that besides radioactivity such sediments contain high amount of metals geochemically similar to radium as barium, strontium and lead. Correlation analysis proved that main mechanism leading to sediment creation is co-precipitation radium with these metals as a sulfate. The absorption on clay minerals is negligible even when barium is not present in significant quantities. Owing to very low solubility of sulfates radium accumulated in this way should not migrate into environment in the neighborhood of a site where such sediment were deposited. PMID:25434264

  16. Behavior of pesticides in sediment/water systems in outdoor mesocosms.

    PubMed

    Bromilow, Richard H; de Carvalho, Renato F; Evans, Avis A; Nicholls, Peter H

    2006-01-01

    The distribution of eight pesticides between sediment and water held in 1-m square outdoor stainless-steel mesocosms was studied, simulating both spring and autumn applications. Pesticide behavior was largely independent of rate of application, chosen in the first three experiments to be 4% or 40% of the normal field rate so as to simulate spray drift or partial overspray. Following application by spray to the water surface, all compounds were uniformly distributed in the 30 cm of overlying water within 24 h. The lipophilic pesticides (chlorpyrifos, pendimethalin, and permethrin) moved into the sediment within 30 d but with little penetration below 2.5 cm depth, and only chlorpyrifos persisted beyond 30 d. The mass balance of these lipophilic pesticides at 1 d was only 26.3% to 61%, with these initial losses attributed to processes such as volatilization. Isoproturon and chlorotoluron persisted for around 120 d, remaining largely in the overlying water with a maximum of 15% in the sediment. Permethrin and difenoconazole were much less persistent in these mesocosms, with very little ever found in the sediment in contrast to previous findings in laboratory-scale stirred systems as used in registration tests. The polar mecoprop remained almost entirely in the water phase and was rapidly degraded. Two further experiments examined also the influence of the submerged plant Lagarosiphon major in the mesocosms, the first experiment simulating a full-rate overspray with chlorpyrifos and linuron and the second a repeat in spring of the earlier main autumn experiment. Both chlorpyrifos and linuron applied in the autumn were quite persistent over the winter period, with about 20% still remaining after 152 d. Uptake into L. major was correlated with pesticide lipophilicity, but was only a small factor compared to uptake by sediment and degradation in these lightly vegetated systems. PMID:16393891

  17. Dissipation of six acid herbicides in water and sediment of two Canadian prairie wetlands.

    PubMed

    Degenhardt, Dani; Cessna, Allan J; Raina, Renata; Farenhorst, Annemieke; Pennock, Dan J

    2011-09-01

    In the present study, an ephemeral (E) and a semipermanent (SP) wetland were divided into halves using a polyvinyl curtain and one-half of each wetland was treated with dicamba (3,6-dichloro-o-anisic acid), bromoxynil (3,5-dibromo-4-hydroxy-benzonitrile), MCPA [(4-chloro-2-methylphenoxy)acetic acid], 2,4-D [(2,4-dichlorophenoxy)acetic acid], mecoprop-P (R)-2-(4-chloro-o-tolyloxy)propionic acid], and dichlorprop [(RS)-2-(2,4-dichlorophenoxy)propionic acid] such that concentrations in the water simulated an overspraying event, thus representing a worst-case scenario for wetland contamination. Water and sediment samples were taken over the 77-d study period to monitor herbicide concentrations. The dissipation of all six herbicides could be described by first-order reaction kinetics. In water, the field half-life (DT50) values ranged from 2.3 d (bromoxynil) to 31 d (dichlorprop). All six herbicides were detected in sediment samples from both wetlands. Overall, the phenoxypropionic acids (mecoprop-P and dichlorprop) were more persistent than the phenoxyacetic acids (2,4-D and MCPA) in both sediment and water. Use of bromide ion as a conservative tracer indicated that infiltration through sediment was an important route of water loss in both wetlands, especially in wetland E. Because strong correlations were found between the mass of each herbicide and bromide ion mass in wetland SP (r(2) ?= 0.59-0.76) and wetland E (r(2) ?= 0.80-0.95), it is likely that herbicide dissipation was due, in part, to mass lost by way of infiltration through sediment. PMID:21688306

  18. Anthropogenic stable cesium in water and sediment of a shallow estuary, St. Louis Bay, Mississippi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bera, Gopal; Yeager, Kevin M.; Shim, MooJoon; Shiller, Alan M.

    2015-05-01

    St. Louis Bay (SLB), Mississippi, is a small, shallow estuary with moderate local residential and industrial development. Dissolved, stable Cs (i.e., 133Cs) was significantly enriched in bay waters (up to 1570 nM) as compared to river (<1 nM) and ocean waters (2.3 nM). A TiO2 refinery, located on the north shore of the bay, is the likely source of the Cs, given that the highest Cs concentrations were found in waters and in surface sediments (up to 49 ?g/g) near the refinery outfall. This setting presented a unique opportunity to study remobilization of Cs in a shallow estuarine system, where sediment resuspension is frequent. Remobilization (up to ?3 fold increase) of dissolved Cs was observed during sediment resuspension events. A weak correlation between Cs and clay %; strong correlations among Cs, silt % and particulate organic carbon (POC); and simple numerical approaches indicate that desorption from resuspended particulate matter is the likely mechanism of Cs remobilization. Cs-enriched SLB waters can be traced to nearshore Mississippi Sound waters, but not into Mississippi Bight waters further offshore. The findings from this study also suggest that caution needs to be taken when interpreting the radio-cesium distribution in shallow estuarine and coastal systems.

  19. Radiological impact of surface water and sediment near uranium mining sites.

    PubMed

    Ivanova, K; Stojanovska, Z; Badulin, V; Kunovska, B; Yovcheva, M

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study is to assess the radiological impact of surface water and sediment around uranium mining sites 20 years after their closing. The areas under observations are 31 former classical underground uranium mining and exploratory sites in Bulgaria, named as objects. The extraction and processing of uranium ores in the Republic of Bulgaria were ended in 1992. To assess the radiological impact of radionuclides field expeditions were performed to sample water and bottom sediment. The migration of uranium through surface water was examined as one of the major pathways for contamination spread. The range of uranium concentration in water flowing from the mining sites was from 0.012 to 6.8 mgU l(-1) with a geometric mean of 0.192 mgU l(-1). The uranium concentrations in water downstream the mining sites were approximately 3 times higher than the background value (upstream). The concentrations of Unat, (226)Ra, (210)Pb, and (232)Th in the sediment of downstream river were higher than those upstream by 3.4, 2.6, 2, and 1.7 times, respectively. The distribution coefficient of uranium reflects its high mobility in most of the sites. In order to evaluate the impact on people as well as site prioritization for more detailed assessment and water management, screening dose assessments were done. PMID:26505204

  20. Periphytic biofilm: A buffer for phosphorus precipitation and release between sediments and water.

    PubMed

    Lu, Haiying; Wan, Juanjuan; Li, Jiuyu; Shao, Hongbo; Wu, Yonghong

    2016-02-01

    The influence of periphytic biofilm on phosphorus (P) content and species between water and sediment interfaces was evaluated in a simulated experiment. Results showed that the concentration of all P species (TP, TDP, DIP, PP, and DOP) in overlying water decreased to significantly low levels (<0.05 mg L(-1)) in the presence of periphytic biofilms, while the TP increased (>1.8 mg L(-1)) in the control (without periphytic biofilm). Periphytic biofilm increased the water pH (maximal value at about 10) favoring co-precipitation between P and metal salt. The presence of periphytic biofilm also slowed the loss of P fractions such as Fe/Al-P and Ca-P from sediment. In addition, the P content of periphytic biofilms, mainly in forms of Fe/Al-P and Ca-P, increased by 100% after 60 d. These results suggested that periphytic biofilm was capable of entrapping P from water, attenuating P release, and storing P as a sink, thereby forming a buffer for P release and precipitation. This study not only offers some valuable insights into the role of periphytic biofilms or similar microbial aggregates in P biogeochemical processes in water-sediment interfaces, but also contributes to the management of water eutrophication from internal P loadings. PMID:26583287

  1. Water and sediment characteristics associated with avian botulism outbreaks in wetlands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rocke, Tonie E.; Samuel, Michael D.

    1999-01-01

    Avian botulism kills thousands of waterbirds annually throughout North America, but management efforts to reduce its effects have been hindered because environmental conditions that promote outbreaks are poorly understood. We measured sediment and water variables in 32 pairs of wetlands with and without a current outbreak of avian botulism. Wetlands with botulism outbreaks had greater percent organic matter (POM) in the sediment (P = 0.088) and lower redox potential in the water (P = 0.096) than paired control wetlands. We also found that pH, redox potential, temperature, and salinity measured just above the sediment-water interface were associated (P ? 0.05) with the risk of botulism outbreaks in wetlands, but relations were complex, involving nonlinear and multivariate associations. Regression models indicated that the risk of botulism outbreaks increased when water pH was between 7.5 and 9.0, redox potential was negative, and water temperature was >20°C. Risk declined when redox potential increased (>100), water temperature decreased (10-15°C), pH was 9.0, or salinity was low (<2.0 ppt). Our predictive models could allow managers to assess potential effects of wetland management practices on the risk of botulism outbreaks and to develop and evaluate alternative management strategies to reduce losses from avian botulism.

  2. Phosphorus partitioning between sediment and water in the riparian wetland in response to the hydrological regimes.

    PubMed

    Wang, ZhaoDe; Li, Shuai; Zhu, Jun; Zhang, ZhiJian

    2013-02-01

    Water quality in watersheds is severely impacted by nutrient enrichment as a result of agricultural activities. Understanding hydrological effects on P dynamics can optimize the ecological function of riparian wetlands to reduce nonpoint source pollution. The XiaZhuHu wetlands were selected for field P investigation, and two typical hydrological batch studies of 35 d each (a static column observation simulating the dry season, and a steady-flow flume observation simulating the rainy season) were conducted to understand sediment P dynamics and evaluate capacity of P immobilization. The average equilibrium P concentration of 0.02 mg L(-1) among the 31 sampled sediments was generally lower than the average dissolved reactive P concentrations in the overlying water, indicating an ecological role as a P sink. In static simulation observation, there was a fast-pace sorption process during the first 3d followed by a slower paced process, and the mass of P adsorbed per unit sediment surface (MPAS) reached 0.16 mg cm(-2). The temporal curves of P equilibrium between flowthrough water and top sediment (5 cm) were characterized as a quasi "V"-pattern, and the MPAS ranged from -0.04 to 0.46 mg cm(-2) during the steady-flow observation. The newly-trapped P was mainly found in Al-bound P and subsequently as Fe-bound P, which would be helpful for sediment P immobilization. Based on our findings, the sediment of the tested wetlands could retain external P from agricultural land by as much as 10-30 times the area of itself, which accounts for approximately 3.3-10% of the watershed area. PMID:23200842

  3. Distribution Characteristics of Phosphorus in the Sediments and Overlying Water of Poyang Lake

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lingqing; Liang, Tao

    2015-01-01

    Phosphorus (P) is a key indicator of the aquatic organism growth and eutrophication in lakes. The distribution and speciation of P and its release characteristics from sediments were investigated by analyzing sediment and water samples collected during high flow and low flow periods. Results showed that the average concentrations (ranges) of total phosphorus (TP) in the surface and deep water were 0.06 mg L-1 (0.03–0.13 mg L-1) and 0.15 mg L-1 (0.06–0.33 mg L-1), respectively, while the average concentration (range) of TP in sediments was 709.17 mg kg-1 (544.76–932.11 mg kg-1). The concentrations of TP and different forms of P varied spatially in the surface sediments, displaying a decreasing trend from south to north. P also varied topographically from estuarine areas to lake areas. The vertical distribution of TP and different forms of P were observed to decrease as depth increased. The P concentrations during the low flow period were higher than those during the high flow period. Inorganic phosphorus (IP) was the dominant form of P, accounting for 61%–82% of TP. The concentration of bioavailable phosphorus in sediments was relatively large, indicating a high risk of release to overlying water. The simulation experiment of P release from sediments showed that the release was relatively fast in the first 0-5 min and then decreased to a plateau after 1 hr. Approximately 84–89% of the maximum amount of P was released during the first hour. PMID:25938758

  4. Upwelling of hydrothermal solutions through ridge flank sediments shown by pore water profiles

    SciTech Connect

    Maris, C.R.P.; Bender, M.L.

    1982-05-07

    High calcium ion and low magnesium ion concentrations in sediment pore waters in cores from the Galapagos Mounds Hydrothermal Field on the flank of the Galapagos Spreading Center are believed to be due to a calcium-magnesium exchange reaction between circulating seawater and basement basalt. The nonlinearity of the calcium ions and magnesium ion gradients indicates that these discharging hydrothermal solutions on the ridge flank are upwelling at the rate of about 1 centimeter per year through the pelagic sediments of the Mounds Field and at about 20 centimeters per year through the hydrothermal mounds themselves.

  5. Magnesium-rich minerals in sediment and suspended particulates of South Florida water bodies: implications for turbidity.

    PubMed

    Harris, W G; Fisher, M M; Cao, X; Osborne, T; Ellis, L

    2007-01-01

    Fine sediments in shallow water bodies such as Lake Okeechobee are prone to resuspension. Predominantly inorganic "mud" sediment that covers approximately 670 km2 of the lake has been recognized as a persistent source of turbidity. The objective of this study was to determine if mineral components of sediments in Lake Okeechobee and water conveyances of the northern Everglades also occur as suspended sediment and hence constitute a potential abiotic contributor to turbidity. Sediment samples were collected from nine stations within the lake and eight locations north of Water Conservation Area 2A in the Everglades. Water samples were also collected at selected locations. The silt and clay mineralogy of sediment and suspended particles was determined using X-ray diffraction, thermogravimetry, scanning-electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray elemental microanalysis, and high-resolution transmission-electron microscopy. Clay fractions of the lake sediment contained the Mg silicate minerals sepiolite and palygorskite, along with smectite, dolomite, calcite, and kaolinite. Sediment silt fractions were dominated by carbonates and/or quartz, with smaller amounts of Ca phosphates and sepiolite. Mineralogy of the mud sediment was similar to that reported for geologic phosphate deposits. This suggests that the mud sediment might have accumulated by stream transport of minerals from these deposits. Suspended solids and mud-sediment mineralogy were similar, except that smectite was more abundant in suspended solids. Everglade samples also contained Mg-rich minerals. The small size, low density, and fibrous or platy nature of the prevalent mud sediment minerals make them an abiotic, hydrodynamically sensitive source of persistent turbidity in a shallow lake. Mitigation efforts focused exclusively on P-induced biogeochemical processes do not address the origin or effects of these minerals. Ecological management issues such as turbidity control, P retention, geologic P input, and suitability of dredging are related to mud-sediment properties and provenance. PMID:17940267

  6. Holocene sediment dynamics on a cool-water carbonate shelf: Otway, southeastern Australia

    SciTech Connect

    Boreen, T.D.; James, N.P. )

    1993-07-01

    The Otway Shelf is covered by cool waters and veneered by bryozoan-dominated carbonate sediments. Radiocarbon dating and stratigraphy of shelf vibracores and slope gravity cores document late Pleistocene/Holocene deposition. Shelf sediments of the late Pleistocene high-stand are rare, either never having been deposited or having been removed during the following sea-level fall. During the subsequent lowstand the shelf was exposed, facies shifted basinward, and beach/dune complexes were constructed near the shelf edge. The deep shelf was characterized by nondeposition and hardground formation, and the shelf margin became locally erosional. Upper-slope bryozoan/sponge assemblages continued to grow actively, and lower-slope foraminifera and nannofossil ooze was increasingly enriched in hemipelagic terrigenous mud swept off the wide shelf. Coarse shelf debris and lowstand dune sands were erosively reworked and transported onto the upper slope and redistributed to deep-slope aprons during early transgression. The late Quaternary shelf record resembles that of flat-topped, warm-water platforms with Holocene sediment overlying Pleistocene/Tertiary limestone, but for different reasons. The slow growth potential, uniform profile of sediment production and distribution, and inability of constituent organisms to construct rigid frameworks favor maintenance of a shallow ramp profile and makes the cool-water carbonate system an excellent modern analog for interpretation of many ancient ramp successions.

  7. Determining the microstructure and fluxes across a sediment-water interface using a submersible robotic system

    SciTech Connect

    Vitre, R. De; Carignan, R.

    1995-12-31

    The properties of the sediment-water interface in a freshwater lake have been investigated using in situ macro and microscale techniques. Benthic chambers as well as an underwater robotic system -- equipped with a real time video camera, microelectrodes (O{sub 2}, pH, Ca, and a Hg-Au electrode) and data acquisition hardware -- have been used to study in situ the microstructure, fluxes across and the properties of the sediment-water interface. The authors have in particular investigated: (a) differences between microprofiles measured in situ and those measured in undisturbed sediment cores, (b) the existence and the thickness of the Diffusive Boundary Layer (DBL) at both a shallow littoral and a deep hypolimnetic site, and (c) temporal and spatial changes in site specific microprofiles. By comparing the data obtained using a microscale technique (microelectrode based high resolution concentration-depth profiles) and the data obtained using a macroscale in situ technique (Benthic Chambers) the authors have been able to gain new insight into the mechanisms with govern the transport of dissolved species across the sediment-water interface.

  8. Fate of sulfur(IV) dechlorinating agents in natural waters: effect of suspended sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Kijak, P.J.; Helz, G.R.

    1988-10-01

    To investigate the fate of SO/sub 2/ in dechlorinated waste water effluents, oxidation rates were measured in nonilluminated solutions at near-neutral pH and 25/degrees/C. River water was simulated with 0.01 M NaCl, 0.001 M buffer, and 1 g/L standard sediment MESS-1. Components leached from the sediment catalyzed the oxidation of S(IV) by O/sub 2/, but the particles themselves exerted a slight inhibitory effect. Sulfate was the major reaction product. Some nonoxidative loss of S(IV) to particles was observed at high-sediment concentrations (20 g/L). Sulfur(IV) reductively dissolved 25% of the Cu from the sediment, possibly an environmentally harmful process. Iron and manganese dissolutions were insignificant. The rate of loss of S(IV) from air-saturated solutions covering a 50-fold S(IV) concentration range as well as described by the empirical equation (time in s and concentrations in M) -d(SO/sub 3//sup 2 -/)/dt = (5 /times/ 10/sup -8/)((S(IV))/(1 + (H/sup +/)/K/sub a/))/sup 1/2/ K/sub a/ being the second ionization constant of H/sub 2/SO/sub 3/. The rate of loss of S(IV) was a factor of 2 faster in actual effluent/river water mixtures, likely caused by higher trace metal concentrations in these mixtures.

  9. Sorption of PFOA and PFOS to Ground Water Sediment

    EPA Science Inventory

    During its years of operation, the Washington County Sanitary Landfill near St. Paul, Minnesota accepted both municipal and industrial solid waste. Several years of ground water monitoring performed by the MPCA indicates that, some of the waste disposed of at this landfill contai...

  10. Erosion by water and sediment control: Amendment techniques

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil erosion by water and wind are worldwide problems and serious threats to profitability and sustainability of agriculture. Soil amendments are effective means for controlling soil erosion and improving crop production. Soil amendments are materials added to soil to improve chemical, physical, a...

  11. Solar heating and domestic hot water system installed at Kansas City, Fire Station, Kansas City, Missouri. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1980-07-01

    This document is the final report of the solar energy heating and hot water system installed at the Kansas City Fire Station, Number 24, 2309 Hardesty Street, Kansas City, Missouri. The solar system was designed to provide 47 percent of the space heating, 8800 square feet area and 75 percent of the domestic hot water (DHW) load. The solar system consists of 2808 square feet of Solaron, model 2001, air, flat plate collector subsystem, a concrete box storage subsystem which contains 1428 cubic feet of 1/2 inch diameter pebbles weighing 71 1/2 tons, a DHW preheat tank, blowers, pumps, heat exchangers, air ducting, controls and associated plumbing. Two 120-gallon electric DHW heaters supply domestic hot water which is preheated by the solar system. Auxiliary space heating is provided by three electric heat pumps with electric resistance heaters and four 30-kilowatt electric unit heaters. There are six modes of system operation. This project is part of the Department of Energy PON-1 Solar Demonstration Program with DOE cost sharing $154,282 of the $174,372 solar system cost. The Final Design Review was held March 1977, the system became operational March 1979 and acceptance test was completed in September 1979.

  12. Characterization of domestic gray water from point source to determine the potential for urban residential reuse: a short review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwin, Golda A.; Gopalsamy, Poyyamoli; Muthu, Nandhivarman

    2014-03-01

    This study aims to discern the domestic gray water (GW) sources that is least polluting, at the urban households of India, by examining the GW characteristics, comparing with literature data, reuse standards and suitable treatment technologies. In view of this, the quantitative and qualitative characteristics of domestic GW originating from bath, wash basin, laundry and kitchen sources are determined and compared with established standards for reuse requirements. Quality of different gray water sources is characterized with respect to the physical, chemical, biological, nutrient, ground element and heavy metal properties. The pollutant loads indicate that the diversion techniques are not suitable for household application and, therefore, treatment is necessary prior to storage and reuse. It is observed that the total volume of GW generated exceeds the reuse requirement for suggested reuse such as for flushing and gardening/irrigation. In spite of generating less volume, the kitchen source is found to be the major contributor for most of the pollutant load and, therefore, not recommended to be considered for treatment. It is concluded that treatment of GW from bathroom source alone is sufficient to meet the onsite reuse requirements and thereby significantly reduce the potable water consumption by 28.5 %. Constructed wetland systems and constructed soil filters are suggested as suitable treatment alternatives owing to its ability to treat highly variable pollutant load with lower operational and maintenance cost, which is more practical for tropical and developing countries.

  13. Development of a gas backup heater for solar domestic hot-water systems. Final report, April 1978-April 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Morrison, D.J.; Grunes, H.E.; de Winter, F.; Armstrong, P.R.

    1980-06-01

    A comprehensive program was undertaken to develop a unique gas fired backup for solar domestic hot water systems. Detailed computer design tools were written. A series of heat transfer experiments were performed to characterize the performance of individual components. A full scale engineering prototype, including the solar preheat tank and solar heat exchanger, was designed, fabricated and subjected to limited testing. Firing efficiency for the backup system was found to be 81.4% at a firing rate of 50,000 Btu/h. Long term standby losses should be negligible.

  14. Chemical quality of water and suspended sediment from the Slave River, NWT, 1990--1994

    SciTech Connect

    Stephens, G.R.; Peddle, J.; McCarthy, L.H.; Williams, T.G.; Robertson, K.; Gregor, D.J.

    1995-12-31

    The Slave River basin, straddling the Alberta-Northwest Territories (NWT) border, faces potential contamination from industrial development and agricultural practices. The Slave River Environmental Monitoring Program was established in 1990 to assess the water and suspended sediment quality in the territorial portion of the river at Fort Smith, NWT. The number of ``above detect`` data for polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and chlorinated phenolics (CPs) in water was small, while concentrations of those compounds above analytical detection limits were very low. No pesticides were detected in the water during the five-year monitoring period; however, levels of metals were often observed in measurable concentrations, frequently above water quality guidelines. While concentrations were relatively high, the metals were probably not due to anthropogenic activity. Concentrations of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons in suspended sediment often exceeded the ``Lowest Effect Level`` guideline established for bottom sediment by the Ontario Ministry of the Environment, but were always well below the ``Severe Effect Level``. Metal levels in suspended sediment varied over the monitoring period and no trends were discernible. The low number of ``above detect`` data for pesticides and chlorinated phenolics in the suspended sediment suggest little potential adverse impact. Concentrations of dioxins and furans were measured, but the levels were very small and the contributing homologues had minimal toxic potential. No detectable levels of 2,3,7,8-TCDD were observed. It was concluded from the extensive data collected during the five-year program that impact from upstream industrial and agricultural sources is, at the present time, negligible.

  15. Decline of Yangtze River water and sediment discharge: Impact from natural and anthropogenic changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, S. L.; Xu, K. H.; Milliman, J. D.; Yang, H. F.; Wu, C. S.

    2015-07-01

    The increasing impact of both climatic change and human activities on global river systems necessitates an increasing need to identify and quantify the various drivers and their impacts on fluvial water and sediment discharge. Here we show that mean Yangtze River water discharge of the first decade after the closing of the Three Gorges Dam (TGD) (2003-2012) was 67?km3/yr (7%) lower than that of the previous 50 years (1950-2002), and 126?km3/yr less compared to the relatively wet period of pre-TGD decade (1993-2002). Most (60-70%) of the decline can be attributed to decreased precipitation, the remainder resulting from construction of reservoirs, improved water-soil conservation and increased water consumption. Mean sediment flux decreased by 71% between 1950-1968 and the post-TGD decade, about half of which occurred prior to the pre-TGD decade. Approximately 30% of the total decline and 65% of the decline since 2003 can be attributed to the TGD, 5% and 14% of these declines to precipitation change, and the remaining to other dams and soil conservation within the drainage basin. These findings highlight the degree to which changes in riverine water and sediment discharge can be related with multiple environmental and anthropogenic factors.

  16. Water and sediment quality parameters in the Chalan Beel, the largest wetland of Bangladesh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayeed, Md. Abu; Hossain, Mostafa Ali Reza; Wahab, Md. Abdul; Hasan, Md. Tawheed; Simon, Kumar Das; Mazumder, Sabuj Kanti

    2015-07-01

    A study was conducted to investigate the status of the water and sediment quality in the Chalan Beel-a major fresh water fish reservoir of the country for a period of one year from July 2007 to June 2008. The mean values of water quality parameters (depth: 214.73±152.22 cm, temperature 27.68±4.26°C, transparency 123±82 cm, pH 9.7±0.47, total alkalinity 137±42 mg/L, conductivity 307±147 ?s/cm, total dissolved solids 183±89 mg/L, ammonia-N 0.27±0.39 mg/L, nitrate-N 0.09±0.07 mg/L, phosphate-P 2.01±2.53 mg/L) and sediment quality parameters (pH 7.21±0.35, organic matter 2.59±0.52%, total nitrogen 0.09±0.04%, available phosphorus 5.4±3.6 Meq./100 g and exchangeable potassium 0.43±0.14 Meq./100 g) were within the range recommended for most of the inland fishes of Bangladesh. Although the water and sediment quality parameters except ammonia and phosphate are in the suitable range, the overall results suggest that better management techniques should be practiced in order to overcome the declining trend of associated aquatic life (fauna and flora) of this important fresh water body of Bangladesh.

  17. Comparison of techniques for the isolation of sediment pore water for toxicity testing

    SciTech Connect

    Ankley, G.T.; Schubauer-Berigan, M.K.; Monson, P.D.

    1994-12-31

    The objective of this study was to define an interstitial (pore) water isolation technique suitable for sediment toxicity testing and Toxicity Identification Evaluation (TIE) research. Pore water was prepared from sediments from two sites (Saginaw River, Keweenaw Waterway) using five different techniques, and the samples were compared with respect to toxicity to Ceriodaphnia dubia and several inorganic chemical parameters. Methods evaluated were: high speed g and low speed centrifugation, syringe extraction, compression, and dialysis. Both high speed and low speed centrifugation resulted in adequate volumes of pore water for routine testing with relatively minimal effort, while the other three techniques were labor intensive and/or yielded small quantities of pore water. Filtration of samples either during preparation or subsequent to initial isolation resulted in significant losses of toxicity. Low speed centrifugation generally resulted in much higher metal concentrations compared to samples prepared by high speed centrifugation or dialysis. Based on these studies, as well as the work of others, recommend that sediment pore water for toxicity testing and/or TIE analyses be prepared by centrifugation without subsequent filtration.

  18. Town Lake bottom sediments : a chronicle of water quality changes in Austin, Texas, 1960-98

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Van Metre, Peter C.; Mahler, B.J.

    1999-01-01

    Town Lake, the last in the chain of Highland Lakes on the Colorado River, runs through the center of Austin, Texas. On any given day, grebes and coots dot the water, rowers skim alongside, and the sparkle of the sun on the water can be admired from the adjacent hike and bike path and from the windows of nearby office buildings. During the summer months, crowds gather along the shores of Town Lake to watch as many as 1 million Mexican Free-Tail bats emerge from under the Congress Avenue bridge. But below the lazily moving azure water lies a bed of sediment about 1 meter (m) thick?sediment that has been deposited gradually since the reservoir was formed in 1959 and that has been recording changes in water quality since that time. What can this sediment tell us about the history of water quality in the Colorado River? And what does it say about the effects of the rapid urbanization of Austin and the future health of our environment?

  19. Decline of Yangtze River water and sediment discharge: Impact from natural and anthropogenic changes.

    PubMed

    Yang, S L; Xu, K H; Milliman, J D; Yang, H F; Wu, C S

    2015-01-01

    The increasing impact of both climatic change and human activities on global river systems necessitates an increasing need to identify and quantify the various drivers and their impacts on fluvial water and sediment discharge. Here we show that mean Yangtze River water discharge of the first decade after the closing of the Three Gorges Dam (TGD) (2003-2012) was 67?km(3)/yr (7%) lower than that of the previous 50 years (1950-2002), and 126?km(3)/yr less compared to the relatively wet period of pre-TGD decade (1993-2002). Most (60-70%) of the decline can be attributed to decreased precipitation, the remainder resulting from construction of reservoirs, improved water-soil conservation and increased water consumption. Mean sediment flux decreased by 71% between 1950-1968 and the post-TGD decade, about half of which occurred prior to the pre-TGD decade. Approximately 30% of the total decline and 65% of the decline since 2003 can be attributed to the TGD, 5% and 14% of these declines to precipitation change, and the remaining to other dams and soil conservation within the drainage basin. These findings highlight the degree to which changes in riverine water and sediment discharge can be related with multiple environmental and anthropogenic factors. PMID:26206169

  20. Decline of Yangtze River water and sediment discharge: Impact from natural and anthropogenic changes

    PubMed Central

    Yang, S. L.; Xu, K. H.; Milliman, J. D.; Yang, H. F.; Wu, C. S.

    2015-01-01

    The increasing impact of both climatic change and human activities on global river systems necessitates an increasing need to identify and quantify the various drivers and their impacts on fluvial water and sediment discharge. Here we show that mean Yangtze River water discharge of the first decade after the closing of the Three Gorges Dam (TGD) (2003–2012) was 67?km3/yr (7%) lower than that of the previous 50 years (1950–2002), and 126?km3/yr less compared to the relatively wet period of pre-TGD decade (1993–2002). Most (60–70%) of the decline can be attributed to decreased precipitation, the remainder resulting from construction of reservoirs, improved water-soil conservation and increased water consumption. Mean sediment flux decreased by 71% between 1950–1968 and the post-TGD decade, about half of which occurred prior to the pre-TGD decade. Approximately 30% of the total decline and 65% of the decline since 2003 can be attributed to the TGD, 5% and 14% of these declines to precipitation change, and the remaining to other dams and soil conservation within the drainage basin. These findings highlight the degree to which changes in riverine water and sediment discharge can be related with multiple environmental and anthropogenic factors. PMID:26206169

  1. Molecular identification of the occurrence of magnetotactic bacteria in fresh water sediments (Czech Republic)

    PubMed Central

    Rulík, Martin; Chaudhary, Prem Prashant

    2014-01-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria (MTB) are of considerable interest because of their importance in the manufacture of various bioinspired materials. In order to find out the status of magnetotactic bacteria at three different sediment in Czech Republic, samples collected from both standing and running freshwaters were subjected to molecular diversity analysis by using 16S rRNA gene approach. Total community DNA from sediment sample was isolated and used for PCR, cloning and sequence analysis. Of the 24 analyzed sequences, six clones are closely related to Magnetobacterium sp. affiliated with the Nitrospira phylum which showed the dominance of Magnetobacterium phylotypes in the sample. This study will provide useful insight about the community structure of MTB in this particular geographical region. However more detailed and specific studies are warranted in order to properly assess the community structure of MTB’s in fresh water sediments. PMID:25763029

  2. Bottom sediments and pore waters near a hydrothermal vent in Lake Baikal (Frolikha Bay)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Granina, L.Z.; Klerkx, J.; Callender, E.; Leermakers, M.; Golobokova, L.P.

    2007-01-01

    We discuss the redox environments and the compositions of bottom sediments and sedimentary pore waters in the region of a hydrothermal vent in Frolikha Bay, Lake Baikal. According to our results, the submarine vent and its companion nearby spring on land originate from a common source. The most convincing evidence for their relation comes from the proximity of stable oxygen and hydrogen isotope compositions in pore waters and in the spring water. The isotope composition indicates a meteoric origin of pore waters, but their major- and minor-element chemistry bears imprint of deep water which may seep through permeable faulted crust. Although pore waters near the submarine vent have a specific enrichment in major and minor constituents, hydrothermal discharge at the Baikal bottom causes a minor impact on the lake water chemistry, unlike the case of freshwater geothermal lakes in the East-African Rift and North America. ?? 2007.

  3. Fern Spore Longevity in Saline Water: Can Sea Bottom Sediments Maintain a Viable Spore Bank?

    PubMed Central

    de Groot, G. Arjen; During, Heinjo

    2013-01-01

    Freshwater and marine sediments often harbor reservoirs of plant diaspores, from which germination and establishment may occur whenever the sediment falls dry. Therewith, they form valuable records of historical inter- and intraspecific diversity, and are increasingly exploited to facilitate diversity establishment in new or restored nature areas. Yet, while ferns may constitute a considerable part of a vegetation’s diversity and sediments are known to contain fern spores, little is known about their longevity, which may suffer from inundation and - in sea bottoms - salt stress. We tested the potential of ferns to establish from a sea or lake bottom, using experimental studies on spore survival and gametophyte formation, as well as a spore bank analysis on sediments from a former Dutch inland sea. Our experimental results revealed clear differences among species. For Asplenium scolopendrium and Gymnocarpium dryopteris, spore germination was not affected by inundated storage alone, but decreased with rising salt concentrations. In contrast, for Asplenium trichomanes subsp. quadrivalens germination decreased following inundation, but not in response to salt. Germination rates decreased with time of storage in saline water. Smaller and less viable gametophytes were produced when saline storage lasted for a year. Effects on germination and gametophyte development clearly differed among genotypes of A. scolopendrium. Spore bank analyses detected no viable spores in marine sediment layers. Only two very small gametophytes (identified as Thelypteris palustris via DNA barcoding) emerged from freshwater sediments. Both died before maturation. We conclude that marine, and likely even freshwater sediments, will generally be of little value for long-term storage of fern diversity. The development of any fern vegetation on a former sea floor will depend heavily on the deposition of spores onto the drained land by natural or artificial means of dispersal. PMID:24223951

  4. Effects of suspended sediment on the biodegradation and mineralization of phenanthrene in river water.

    PubMed

    Xia, Xinghui; Zhou, Zhui; Zhou, Chuanhui; Jiang, Guohua; Liu, Ting

    2011-01-01

    High suspended sediment (SPS) concentration commonly exists in many Asian rivers. Furthermore, climate change can cause high floods and lead to the resuspension of sediments and soil erosion, resulting in high SPS concentration in many natural waters. This research studied the impact of the presence of SPS and organic C composition of SPS on the biodegradation and mineralization of phenanthrene (PHE). Three sediments, including original sediment (OS), 375 degrees C (S375), and 600 degrees C (S600) combusted sediment, were studied. A flask-based 14C-respirometer system was applied to study the mineralization of [14C]PHE by Agrobacterium sp. The mineralization rate of PHE in the absence of SPS was significantly lower than that with the presence of OS and S600 but higher than that with S375, suggesting that the effect of the presence of sediment on PHE mineralization depended on its organic C composition. The residual levels of PHE in the S375 and OS systems were about 1.5 times that of the S600 system after incubation for 2 d. After 26-d incubation, the mineralization rates of PHE were 34.64, 29.40, and 14.00% in the OS, S600, and S375 systems, respectively. The first-order rate constants of the OS and S600 systems were about three times that of the S375 system. The net influence of SPS on the biodegradation and mineralization rates of PHE was dependent on its effects on compound bioavailability and bacteria population. This study suggested that black C played a key role in reducing the mineralization rates of PHE in sediments-even without aging. PMID:21488500

  5. Evaluating the metallic pollution of riverine water and sediments: a case study of Aras River.

    PubMed

    Nasehi, F; Hassani, A H; Monavvari, M; Karbassi, A R; Khorasani, N

    2013-01-01

    Metallic pollution caused by elements Zn, Cu, Fe, Pb, Ni, Cd, and Hg in water and sediments of Aras River within a specific area in Ardabil province of Iran is considered. Water and sediment samples were collected seasonally and once respectively from the five selected stations. Regarding WHO published permissible values, only Ni concentration in spring and summer water samples has exceeded the acceptable limit up to four times greater than the limit. The concentration of metals Ni, Pb, and Fe in river water shows a direct relationship with river water discharge and the amount of precipitation. Enhanced soil erosion, bed load dissolution, and runoffs may play a key role in remarkable augmentation of metallic ions concentration. Furthermore, excessive use of pesticides which contain a variety of metallic ions (mainly Cu) in spring and summer may also result in an increase in the metals' concentration. The potential risk of Ni exposure to the water environment of the study area is assigned to juice, dairy products, edible oil, and sugar cane factories as well as soybean crop lands which are located within the sub-basin of Aras River in the study area. Regarding the sediment samples, the bioavailable metal concentrations indicate an ascending order from the first station towards the last one. In comparison with earth crust, sedimental and igneous rocks the reported metallic concentration values, except for Cd, lie within the low-risk status. Regarding Cd, the reported values in some stations (S2, S4, and S5) are up to ten times greater than that of shale which may be considered as a remarkable risk potential. The industrial and municipal wastewater generated by Parsabad moqan industrial complex and residential areas, in addition to the discharges of animal husbandry centers, may be addressed as the key factors in the sharp increase of metallic pollution potential in stations 4 and 5. PMID:22318740

  6. Spatial and seasonal variability of sediment oxygen consumption and nutrient fluxes at the sediment water interface in a sub-tropical lagoon (New Caledonia).

    PubMed

    Grenz, C; Denis, L; Pringault, O; Fichez, R

    2010-01-01

    In order to quantify the spatial and seasonal variations of sediment oxygen consumption and nutrient fluxes, we performed a spatial survey in the south west lagoon of New Caledonia during the two major seasons (dry and wet) based on a network of 11 sampling stations. Stations were selected along two barrier reef to land transects representing most types of sediments encountered in the lagoon. Fluxes were measured using ex-situ sediment incubations and compared to sediment characteristics. Sediment oxygen consumption (SOC) varied between 500 and 2000 micromol m(-2)h(-1), depending on season and stations. Nutrient effluxes from sediment were highly variable with highest fluxes measured in muddy sediments near the coast. Inter-sample variability was as high as seasonal differences so that no seasonally driven temperature effect could be observed on benthic nutrient fluxes in our temperature range. Nutrient fluxes, generally directed from the sediment to the water column, varied between -5.0 and 70.0 micromol m(-2)h(-1) for ammonia and between -2.5 and+12.5 micromol m(-2)h(-1) for PO(4) and NO(2+3). SOC and nutrient fluxes were compared to pelagic primary production rates in order to highlight the tight coupling existing between the benthic and pelagic compartments in this shallow tropical lagoon. Under specific occasions of low pelagic productivity, oxygen sediment consumption and related carbon and nutrient fluxes could balance nearly all net primary production in the lagoon. These biogeochemical estimates point to the functional importance of sediment biogeochemistry in the lagoon of New Caledonia. PMID:20638691

  7. Multiwall carbon nanotubes increase the microbial community in crude oil contaminated fresh water sediments.

    PubMed

    Abbasian, Firouz; Lockington, Robin; Palanisami, Thavamani; Megharaj, Mallavarapu; Naidu, Ravi

    2016-01-01

    Since crude oil contamination is one of the biggest environmental concerns, its removal from contaminated sites is of interest for both researchers and industries. In situ bioremediation is a promising technique for decreasing or even eliminating crude oil and hydrocarbon contamination. However, since these compounds are potentially toxic for many microorganisms, high loads of contamination can inhibit the microbial community and therefore reduce the removal rate. Therefore, any strategy with the ability to increase the microbial population in such circumstances can be of promise in improving the remediation process. In this study, multiwall carbon nanotubes were employed to support microbial growth in sediments contaminated with crude oil. Following spiking of fresh water sediments with different concentrations of crude oil alone and in a mixture with carbon nanotubes for 30days, the microbial profiles in these sediments were obtained using FLX-pyrosequencing. Next, the ratios of each member of the microbial population in these sediments were compared with those values in the untreated control sediment. This study showed that combination of crude oil and carbon nanotubes can increase the diversity of the total microbial population. Furthermore, these treatments could increase the ratios of several microorganisms that are known to be effective in the degradation of hydrocarbons. PMID:26372939

  8. Level and degradation of Deepwater Horizon spilled oil in coastal marsh sediments and pore-water.

    PubMed

    Natter, Michael; Keevan, Jeff; Wang, Yang; Keimowitz, Alison R; Okeke, Benedict C; Son, Ahjeong; Lee, Ming-Kuo

    2012-06-01

    This research investigates the level and degradation of oil at ten selected Gulf saltmarsh sites months after the 2010 BP Macondo-1 well oil spill. Very high levels (10-28%) of organic carbon within the heavily oiled sediments are clearly distinguished from those in pristine sediments (<3%). Dissolved organic carbon in contaminated pore-waters, ranging up to hundreds of mg/kg, are 1 to 2 orders of magnitude higher than those at pristine sites. Heavily oiled sediments are characterized by very high sulfide concentrations (up to 80 mg/kg) and abundance of sulfate reducing bacteria. Geochemical biomarkers and stable carbon isotope analyses fingerprint the presence of oils in sediments. Ratios of selected parameters calculated from the gas chromatograph spectra are in a remarkable narrow range among spilled oils and initial BP crude. At oiled sites dominated by C(4) plants, ?(13)C values of sediments (-20.8 ± 2.0‰) have been shifted significantly lower compared to marsh plants (-14.8 ± 0.6‰) due to the inflow of isotopically lighter oil (-27 ± 0.2‰). Our results show that (1) lighter compounds of oil are quickly degraded by microbes while the heavier fractions of oil still remain and (2) higher inputs of organic matter from the oil spill enhance the key microbial processes associated with sulfate reducing bacteria. PMID:22571231

  9. Calcium carbonate dissolution in deep sea sediments: reconciling microelectrode, pore water and benthic flux chamber results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jahnke, Richard A.; Jahnke, Deborah B.

    2004-01-01

    We report the benthic fluxes of O 2, titration alkalinity (TA), Ca 2+, NO 3-, PO 43-, and Si(OH) 4 from in situ benthic flux chamber incubations on the Ceara Rise and Cape Verde Plateau and compare them to previously published results. We find within analytical uncertainty that the TA flux is twice the calcium flux, suggesting that dissolution/precipitation of CaCO 3 is the principal mechanism controlling benthic TA and Ca 2+ fluxes. At sites where the sediments contain significant (>35%) CaCO 3 and the overlying waters are supersaturated with respect to CaCO 3, the ratios of the total dissolution rate to the remineralization rate are significantly less than at all other study sites. We propose that these observations can be explained by precipitation of fresh CaCO 3 at the supersaturated sediment surface followed by redissolution deeper in the sediments because of metabolically-produced CO 2. A numerical simulation is presented to demonstrate the feasibility of this explanation. In addition, surface exchange reactions in high-CaCO 3 sediments coupled with high rates of particle mixing may also impact rates of metabolic dissolution and depress chamber-derived estimates of carbonate alkalinity and calcium benthic fluxes. These results suggest that at supersaturated, high CaCO 3 locations, previous models of sediment diagenesis may have overestimated the impact of metabolic dissolution on the preservation of CaCO 3 deposited on the sea floor.

  10. Contribution of 222Rn in domestic water supplies to 222Rn in indoor air in Colorado homes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lawrence, E.P.; Wanty, R.B.; Nyberg, P.

    1992-01-01

    The contribution of 222Rn from domestic water wells to indoor air was investigated in a study of 28 houses near Conifer, CO. Air concentrations determined by alpha-track detectors (ATDs) and continuous radon monitors were compared with the predictions of a single-cell model. In many of the houses, the water supply was shown to contribute significantly to levels of indoor 222Rn. The data from the ATD study were augmented with a continuous monitoring study of a house near Lyons, CO. The well water in that house has the highest known concentration of 222Rn in water yet reported (93 MBq m-3). The temporal pattern in the indoor 222Rn concentration corresponds to water-use records. In general, it is difficult to quantify the proportion of indoor radon attributable to water use. Several lines of evidence suggest that the single-cell model underestimates this proportion. Continuous- monitoring data, although useful, are impractical due to the cost of the equipment. We propose a protocol for 222Rn measurement based on three simultaneous integrating radon detectors that may help estimate the proportion of indoor 222Rn derived from the water supply.

  11. Extraction of amino acids from soils and sediments with superheated water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, C. N.; Ponnamperuma, C.

    1974-01-01

    A method of extraction for amino acids from soils and sediments involving superheated water has been investigated. About 75-97 per cent of the amino acids contained in four soils of a soil profile from Illinois were extracted by this method. Deep penetration of water into soil aggregates and partial hydrolysis of peptide bonds during this extraction by water at high temperature are likely mechanisms responsible for the release of amino acids from samples. This extraction method does not require subsequent desalting treatments when analyses are carried out with an ion-exchange amino acid analyzer.

  12. Marine sediment tolerances for remote sensing of atmospheric aerosols over water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitlock, C. H.

    1982-01-01

    In surveying the literature, it is pointed out that there is a need to quantify the turbidity below which reflectance from the water column is negligible in comparison with atmospheric effects to allow the monitoring of aerosol optical depth over water bodies. Data that partially satisfy this need are presented. Laboratory measurements of reflectance upwelled from the water column are given for mixtures with various types of sediment at wavelengths between 400 and 1600 nm. The results of the study described here are a quantitative endorsement of the recommendations of Morell and Gordon (1980).

  13. A method for measuring vertical accretion, elevation, and compaction of soft, shallow-water sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cahoon, D.R.; Marin, P.E.; Black, B.K.; Lynch, J.C.

    2000-01-01

    High-resolution measures of vertical accretion, elevation, and compaction of shallow-water sediments are fundamental to understanding the processes that control elevation change and the mechanisms of progradation (e.g., development of mudflats and intertidal wetlands) in coastal systems. Yet, measurements of elevation by traditional survey methods often are of low accuracy because of the compressible nature of the substrates. Nor do they provide measures of vertical accretion or sediment compaction. This paper evaluates the use in shallow-water systems of an approach designed to measure these variables in vegetated wetlands. The approach employs simultaneous measures of elevation from temporary benchmarks using a sedimentation-erosion table (SET) and vertical accretion from marker horizons with sediment cores collected with a cryogenic coring apparatus. The measures are made with a level of resolution sufficient to distinguish between the influence of surface and subsurface processes on elevation, thus providing quantitative estimates of shallow subsidence. The SET-marker horizon approach was evaluated on a developing splay created by an artificial crevasse of a distributary in the Mississippi River delta. The approach provided high-resolution measures of vertical accretion (48.3 ' 2.0 cm.) and elevation (36.7 ' 1.6 cm) over a 4-year period, with the difference between the two indicating the amount of shallow subsidence. In addition, by laying new marker horizons in later years, the approach provided rates not only of shallow subsidence (3.9 ' 0.5 cm y-1) but also compaction of newly deposited seiments (2.1 ' 0.6 cm y-1) and compaction of underlying sediments (1.8 ' 2.0 cm y-1 ) over a two-year period. Hence, the SET-marker horizon approach has widespread applicability in both emergent wetland and shallow water environments for providing high resolution measures of the processes controlling elevation change.

  14. Analysis of marine sediment, water and biota for selected organic pollutants

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, H.E.; Ray, L.E.; Giam, C.S.

    1981-12-01

    The concentrations of various organic pollutants (benzo(a)pyrene (BaP), hexachlorobenzene (HCB) and pentachlorophenol (PCP) were determined in samples of water, sediment and biota (flounder, killifish, shrimp, crabs, and squid) from San Luis Pass, Texas. Sediment was also analyzed for polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), phthalic acid esters (PAEs) and various pesticides. Only PCP was detectable in water. In sediment, the relative concentrations were PAEs >> BaP > (PCBs approx. HCB) > PCP. In biota, BaP was not detectable in any animal; HCB was highest in crabs and PCP was highest in all others (flounder, killifish, shrimp and squid). The relative concentrations of HCB and PCP were different in the different organisms. The differences between the relative concentrations in the biota and in sediment are discussed. The results of this study are compared to values measured at other sites. This study is part of a larger effort to identify and quantitate pollutants in various Texas estuaries and to serve as a basis for monitoring marine pollution.

  15. Treatment of drinking water residuals: comparing sedimentation and dissolved air flotation performance with optimal cation ratios.

    PubMed

    Bourgeois, J C; Walsh, M E; Gagnon, G A

    2004-03-01

    Spent filter backwash water (SFBW) and clarifier sludge generally comprise the majority of the waste residual volume generated and in relative terms, these can be collectively referred to as combined filter backwash water (CFBW). CFBW is essentially a low-solids wastewater with metal hydroxide flocs that are typically light and slow to settle. This study evaluates the impact of adding calcium and magnesium carbonates to CFBW in terms of assessing the impacts on the sedimentation and DAF separation processes. Representative CFBW samples were collected from two surface water treatment plants (WTP): Lake Major WTP (Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, Canada) and Victoria Park WTP (Truro, Nova Scotia, Canada). Bench-scale results indicated that improvements in the CFBW settled water quality could be achieved through the addition of the divalent cations, thereby adjusting the monovalent to divalent (M:D) ratios of the wastewater. In general, the DAF process required slightly higher M:D ratios than the sedimentation process. The optimum M:D ratios for DAF and sedimentation were determined to be 1:1 and 0.33:1, respectively. It was concluded that the optimisation of the cation balance between monovalent cations (e.g., Na(+), K(+)) and added divalent cations (i.e., Ca(2+), Mg(2+)) aided in the settling mechanism through charge neutralisation-precipitation. The increase in divalent cation concentrations within the waste residual stream promoted destabilisation of the negatively charged colour molecules within the CFBW, thereby causing the colloidal content to become more hydrophobic. PMID:14975650

  16. Instability of bottom-water redox conditions during accumulation of Quaternary sediment in the Japan Sea

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Piper, D.Z.; Isaacs, C.M.

    1996-01-01

    The concentrations of Cd, Cr, Cu, Mo, Ni, Sb, U, V, and Zn were measured in early Quaternary sediment (1.32 to 1.08 Ma) from the Oki Ridge in the Japan Sea. The elements were partitioned between a detrital fraction, composed of terrigenous and volcaniclastic aluminosilicate debris, and a marine fraction, composed of biogenic and hydrogenous debris derived from seawater. The most important factors controlling minor-element accumulation rates in the marine fraction were (1) primary productivity in the photic zone, which largely controlled the flux of particulate organic-matter-bound minor elements settling through the water column and onto the seafloor, and (2) bottom-water redox, which determined the suite of elements that accumulated directly from seawater. This marine fraction of minor elements on Oki Ridge recorded six periods of high minor-element abundance. Assuming a constant bulk sediment accumulation rate, each period lasted roughly 5,000 to 10,000 years with a 41,000-year cycle. Accumulation rates of individual elements such as Cd, Mo, and U suggest sulfate-reducing conditions were established in the bottom water during the 10,000-year periods; accumulation rates of Cr and V during the intervening periods are indicative of less reducing, denitrifying conditions. Interelement ratios, for example, Cu:Mo, V:Cr, and Sb:Mo, further reflect bottom-water instability, such that bottom-water redox actually varied from sulfate reducing to denitrifying during the periods of highest minor-element accumulation rates; it varied from denitrifying to oxidizing during the intervening periods. Sediment lithology supports these interpretations of the minor-element distributions; the sediment is finely laminated for several of the periods represented by Cd, Mo, and U maxima and weakly laminated to bioturbated for the intervening periods. The geochemistry of this sediment demonstrates the unambiguous signal of Mo, principally, but of several other minor elements as well in recording sulfate-reducing conditions in bottom water. The forcing function that altered their accumulation, that is, that altered primary productivity and bottom water redox conditions, is problematic. Currently held opinion suggests that O2 depletion was most strongly developed during glacial advances. Low sea level during such times is interpreted to have enhanced primary productivity and restricted bottom-water advection.

  17. Fine-grained sediment lofting from turbidity currents generated during melt water events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hesse, R.

    2003-04-01

    Turbidity currents generated from bed load carrying fresh-water discharges into the sea contain a fluid that is less dense than ambient seawater. From experiments it is known that such currents will eventually lift up from their substrate either in part or as a whole when their density is decreased below that of seawater through the settling of suspended sediment from the top or deposition from the bottom of the flows. In the Labrador Sea, sand and gravel carrying turbidity currents generated by melt-water discharges from the Hudson Strait ice outlet of the Pleistocene Laurentide ice sheet supplied a huge abyssal plain with sediment. It is postulated that during flow on the slope, rise and the proximal part of the sand plain these currents lost much of their fines by means of suspended sediment lofting from their top layers. This led to the formation of a conspicuous depositional facies of stacked graded mud layers which contain ice-rafted debris (IRD). Fine-grained sediment lofting and deposition of graded layers from the resulting interflows is a suitable process for this peculiar facies allowing incorporation of IRD because it is slow enough in contrast to low-density turbidity currents. The IRD-spiked graded mud facies is only found in Heinrich layers within 300 km radius from the Hudson Strait ice terminus. Through the link with the lofted mud facies the sand-carrying turbidity currents that formed the abyssal plain must also be restricted to Heinrich events supporting the notion that these ice-rafting events are times of maximum melt-water generation. Melt-water discharge from ice outlets during Heinrich events therefore took place not only in the form of turbid surface plumes and large hyperpycnal flows but also as interflows at intermediate depths, whereas iceberg melting was probably a minor source of melt water in the cold Labrador Sea.

  18. Reconstructing bottom water temperatures from measurements of temperature and thermal diffusivity in marine sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miesner, F.; Lechleiter, A.; Müller, C.

    2015-07-01

    Continuous monitoring of oceanic bottom water temperatures is a complicated task, even in relatively easy-to-access basins like the North or Baltic seas. Here, a method to determine annual bottom water temperature variations from inverse modeling of instantaneous measurements of temperatures and sediment thermal properties is presented. This concept is similar to climate reconstructions over several thousand years from deep borehole data. However, in contrast, the presented method aims at reconstructing the recent temperature history of the last year from sediment thermal properties and temperatures from only a few meters depth. For solving the heat equation, a commonly used forward model is introduced and analyzed: knowing the bottom water temperature variations for the preceding years and the thermal properties of the sediments, the forward model determines the sediment temperature field. The bottom water temperature variation is modeled as an annual cosine defined by the mean temperature, the amplitude and a phase shift. As the forward model operator is non-linear but low-dimensional, common inversion schemes such as the Newton algorithm can be utilized. The algorithms are tested for artificial data with different noise levels and for two measured data sets: from the North Sea and from the Davis Strait. Both algorithms used show stable and satisfying results with reconstruction errors in the same magnitude as the initial data error. In particular, the artificial data sets are reproduced with accuracy within the bounds of the artificial noise level. Furthermore, the results for the measured North Sea data show small variances and resemble the bottom water temperature variations recorded from a nearby monitoring site with relative errors smaller than 1 % in all parameters.

  19. Sediment color tool for targeting arsenic-safe aquifers for the installation of shallow drinking water tubewells.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Mohammed; Bhattacharya, Prosun; Frape, Shaun K; Jacks, Gunnar; Islam, M Mainul; Rahman, M Moklesur; von Brömssen, Mattias; Hasan, M Aziz; Ahmed, Kazi Matin

    2014-09-15

    In rural Bangladesh, drinking water supply mostly comes from shallow hand tubewells installed manually by the local drillers, the main driving force in tubewell installation. This study was aimed at developing a sediment color tool on the basis of local driller's perception of sediment color, arsenic (As) concentration of tubewell waters and respective color of aquifer sediments. Laboratory analysis of 521 groundwater samples collected from 144 wells during 2009 to 2011 indicate that As concentrations in groundwater were generally higher in the black colored sediments with an average of 239 ?g/L. All 39 wells producing water from red sediments provide safe water following the Bangladesh drinking water standard for As (50 ?g/L) where mean and median values were less than the WHO guideline value of 10 ?g/L. Observations for off-white sediments were also quite similar. White sediments were rare and seemed to be less important for well installations at shallow depths. A total of 2240 sediment samples were collected at intervals of 1.5m down to depths of 100 m at 15 locations spread over a 410 km(2) area in Matlab, Bangladesh and compared with the Munsell Color Chart with the purpose of direct comparison of sediment color in a consistent manner. All samples were assigned with Munsell Color and Munsell Code, which eventually led to identify 60 color shade varieties which were narrowed to four colors (black, white, off-white and red) as perceived and used by the local drillers. During the process of color grouping, participatory approach was considered taking the opinions of local drillers, technicians, and geologists into account. This simplified sediment color tool can be used conveniently during shallow tubewell installation and thus shows the potential for educating local drillers to target safe aquifers on the basis of the color characteristics of the sediments. PMID:24984232

  20. Lethal and sublethal effects of ammonia to juvenile Lampsilis mussels (Unionidae) in sediment and water-only exposures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Newton, T.J.; Bartsch, M.R.

    2007-01-01

    We compared the sensitivity of two juvenile unionid mussels (Lampsilis cardium and Lampsilis higginsii) to ammonia in 96-h water-only and sediment tests by use of mortality and growth measurements. Twenty mussels were placed in chambers buried 2.5 cm into reference sediments to approximate pore-water exposure (sediment tests) or elevated above the bottom of the experimental units (water-only tests). In the sediment tests, a pH gradient existed between the overlying water (mean 8.0), sediment-water interface (mean 7.7), and 2.5 cm depth (mean 7.4). We assumed that mussels were exposed to ammonia in pore water and report effect concentrations in pore water, but if they were exposed to the higher pH water, more of the ammonia would be in the toxic un-ionized (NH 3) form. The only differences in toxicity and growth between mussel species occurred in some of the water-only tests. In sediment tests, median lethal concentrations (LC50s) ranged from 124 to 125 ??g NH3-N/L. In water-only tests, LC50s ranged from 157 to 372 ??g NH3-N/L. In sediment tests, median effective concentrations (EC50s based on growth) ranged from 30 to 32 ??g NH3-N/L. Juvenile mussels in the water-only tests grew poorly and did not exhibit a dose-response relation. These data demonstrate that growth is a sensitive and valuable endpoint for studies on ammonia toxicity with juvenile freshwater mussels and that growth should be measured via sediment tests. ?? 2007 SETAC.

  1. A possible case of caprine-associated malignant catarrhal fever in a domestic water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) in Switzerland

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Malignant catarrhal fever (MCF) is a fatal herpesvirus infection, affecting various wild and domestic ruminants all over the world. Water buffaloes were reported to be particularly susceptible for the ovine herpesvirus-2 (OvHV-2) causing the sheep-associated form of MCF (SA-MCF). This report describes the first case of possibly caprine-associated malignant catarrhal fever symptoms in a domestic water buffalo in Switzerland. Case presentation The buffalo cow presented with persistent fever, dyspnoea, nasal bleeding and haematuria. Despite symptomatic therapy, the buffalo died and was submitted to post mortem examination. Major findings were an abomasal ulceration, a mild haemorrhagic cystitis and multifocal haemorrhages on the epicardium and on serosal and mucosal surfaces. Eyes and oral cavity were not affected. Histopathology revealed a mild to moderate lymphohistiocytic vasculitis limited to the brain and the urinary bladder. Although these findings are typical for MCF, OvHV-2 DNA was not detected in peripheral blood lymphocytes or in paraffin-embedded brain, using an OvHV-2 specific real time PCR. With the aid of a panherpesvirus PCR, a caprine herpesvirus-2 (CpHV-2) sequence could be amplified from both samples. Conclusions To our knowledge, this is the first report of malignant catarrhal fever in the subfamily Bovinae, where the presence of CpHV-2 could be demonstrated. The etiological context has yet to be evaluated. PMID:22132808

  2. Marine sediment and interstitial water: Effects on bioavailability of cadmium to gills of the clam Protothaca staminea

    SciTech Connect

    Hardy, J.T.; Schmidt, R.L.; Apts, C.W.

    1981-12-01

    A study was made to determine first, the kinetics of cadmium sorption on a natural marine sediment and second, the degree to which this sorption as well as interstitial water might effect bioavailability of cadmium to gills of the clam Protothaca staminea. Surface sediment from Sequim Bay, Washington was labelled with Cd 109 and total cadmium concentration determined by radioassay. Gills were added to three types of exposures: 1) control (0.45 um filtered seawater, 2) sediment interstitial water and 3) washed sediment. Prepared samples of gills were counted in a liquid scintillation counter. Results show that addition of a small quantity of washed sediment to the exposure system reduced cadmium accumulation by gills to only 17% of the control. Interstitial water had no significant effect. 1 table, 3 figures (JMT)

  3. Method for relating suspended-chemical concentrations to suspended-sediment particle-size classes in storm-water runoff

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rinella, Joseph F.; McKenzie, Stuart W.

    1982-01-01

    A method has been developed to relate suspended-chemical concentrations (associated with suspended sediments) in storm-water runoff to suspended-sediment particle-size classes. These classes are based on settling velocities in quiescent native water. This method requires processing 20 liters of water having a suspended-sediment concentration greater than 500 milligrams per liter. However, samples with suspended-sediment concentrations as low as 250 milligrams per liter may be analyzed, if sample volumes are increased to 50 liters. The time required for one person to separate suspended sediments into particle-size classes ranges from 6 to 14 hours. This report outlines procedures for processing metal, nutrient, and organic samples. (USGS)

  4. An estimate of the influence of sediment concentration and type on remote sensing penetration depth for various coastal waters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitlock, C. H.

    1976-01-01

    Under the assumptions of collimated light, a homogenous water column, zero molecular scattering, and constant ratio of volume scattering function to scattering coefficient, estimates of the remote sensing depth parameter, Z90, are made for various coastal waters at 540 nm. Calculations indicate that sediment concentration and type have a strong influence on remote sensing depth when concentrations are below 5 mg/theta. Above 5 mg/theta, the absorption coefficient of the sediments becomes large in comparison to that of water, causing Z90 values to be less than 2 m with only small differences between various sediment types.

  5. Tracing and modelling water and sediment dynamics in a conventional irrigated bed system under different scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzmán, Gema; Laguna, Ana; Cañasveras, Juan Carlos; Boulal, Hakim; Gómez-Macpherson, Helena; Barrón, Vidal; Giráldez, Juan Vicente; Gómez, José Alfonso

    2013-04-01

    Water erosion is a threat to the future of southern Spain agriculture, even in the more controlled irrigated agricultural systems, which requires more precise information to establish rational soil and water conservation strategies. This report describes the application of three iron oxides (magnetite, hematite and goethite) as tracers in several experiments in a furrow irrigated-cotton cropland and the use of an erosion model, KINEROS2 to sediment data obtained during an erosion experiment with different soil management options. The bed system with cotton planted on the top of the furrows was irrigated in July 2009 using sprinklers. The selected plot consisted of ten furrows under conventional management. The sprinkler irrigation had an intensity of 18 mm/h during 9 hours, when the cotton crop covered the 50 % of soil surface. Each furrow was divided in three sections (upper, medium, and lower) of 2.9 m2. The first 2 cm of each section was tagged using a different iron oxide. Among tagged sections, areas of 10.3 m2 without any tracer were left. More details of the experiment design can be found in Guzmán 2012. Soil samples before and after the rainfall simulations were collected as well as sediment samples during the irrigation. Experimental data were used to calibrate and validate an erosion model: KINEROS2 that gives information about total runoff and total soil losses along the furrow-shoulder system. Calibration of the model was made considering wheel traffic in the corresponding furrows. Once identified the model parameters with the water and sediment yield data KINEROS2 was used to generate data for a combination of possible scenarios. The results evaluate the combined use of three iron oxides as unexpensive sediment tracers that can provide additional information to the traditional measurements in water erosion experiments with model analysis. The results provide insight on the influence of slopes, lengths and crop covered fractions, helpful for improving soil conservation techniques in these agricultural systems. Guzmán Díaz, María Gema. Development of sediment tracers to study soil redistribution and sediment dynamic due to water erosion. 2012. Universidad de Córdoba, Servicio de Publicaciones, pp: 181

  6. A central solar domestic hot water system - Performance and economic analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, D.; Tamir, A.; Kudish, A. I.

    1980-02-01

    A solar-assisted central hot water system was retrofitted onto one of the student dormitory complexes. The system consisted of twenty commercial solar collectors, of the pipe and plate type, and central hot water tank connected to two dormitory buildings. The system has two loops: (1) a solar loop, in which the heated water circulates between the collector panels and the central hot water tank, and (2) a consumer loop, where the solar-heated water circulates between the central hot water tank and the dormitory. The solar-heated water circulates through the individual electric hot water tanks which serve as individual hot water storage and booster units, and the mains water is introduced at the bottom of the central tank to replace consumed water. The description of the system, the design and its performance, together with an economic analysis, are presented.

  7. Sediment and Lower Water Column Oxygen Consumption in the Seasonally-hypoxic Region of the Louisiana Continental Shelf

    EPA Science Inventory

    We report sediment and bottom water respiration rates from 10 cruises from 2003-2007 on the Louisiana Continental Shelf (LSC) where summer hypoxia regularly occurs. Cruises were conducted during spring (5 cruises), summer (3 cruises) and fall (2 cruises). Cruise average sediment ...

  8. Human land uses enhance sediment denitrification and N2O production in Yangtze lakes primarily by influencing lake water quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, W.; Yao, L.; Wang, Z.; Xiong, Z.; Liu, G.

    2015-10-01

    Sediment denitrification in lakes alleviates the effects of eutrophication through the removal of nitrogen to the atmosphere as N2O and N2. However, N2O contributes notably to the greenhouse effect and global warming. Human land uses (e.g. agricultural and urban areas) strongly affect lake water quality and sediment characteristics, which, in turn, may regulate lake sediment denitrification and N2O production. In this study, we investigated sediment denitrification and N2O production and their relationships to within-lake variables and watershed land uses in 20 lakes from the Yangtze River basin in China. The results indicated that both lake water quality and sediment characteristics were significantly influenced by watershed land uses. N2O production rates increased with increasing background denitrification rates. Background denitrification and N2O production rates were positively related to water nitrogen concentrations but were not significantly correlated with sediment characteristics and plant community structure. A significant positive relationship was observed between background denitrification rate and percentage of human-dominated land uses (HDL) in watersheds. Structural equation modelling revealed that the indirect effects of HDL on sediment denitrification and N2O production in Yangtze lakes were mediated primarily through lake water quality. Our findings also suggest that although sediments in Yangtze lakes can remove large quantities of nitrogen through denitrification, they may also be an important source of N2O, especially in lakes with high nitrogen content.

  9. Evaluation Of The Physical Stability, Ground Water Seepage Control, And Faunal Changes Associated With An AquaBlok® Sediment Cap

    EPA Science Inventory

    Active sediment caps are being considered for addressing contaminated sediment areas in surface-water bodies. A demonstration of an active cap designed to reduce advective transport of contaminants using AquaBlok® (active cap material) was initiated in a small study a...

  10. Bacterial concentration and diversity in fresh tropical shrimps (Penaeus notialis) and the surrounding brackish waters and sediment.

    PubMed

    Dabadé, D Sylvain; Wolkers-Rooijackers, Judith C M; Azokpota, Paulin; Hounhouigan, D Joseph; Zwietering, Marcel H; Nout, M J Rob; den Besten, Heidy M W

    2016-02-01

    This study aimed at determining bacterial concentration and diversity in fresh tropical shrimps (Penaeus notialis) and their surrounding brackish waters and sediment. Freshly caught shrimp, water and sediment samples were collected in Lakes Nokoue and Aheme in Benin (West Africa) during two periods with different water salinity and temperature. We used complementary culture-dependent and culture-independent methods for microbiota analysis. During both sampling periods, total mesophilic aerobic counts in shrimp samples ranged between 4.4 and 5.9logCFU/g and were significantly higher than in water or sediment samples. In contrast, bacterial diversity was higher in sediment or water than in shrimps. The dominant phyla were Firmicutes and Proteobacteria in shrimps, Firmicutes, Proteobacteria, and Actinobacteria in water, and Proteobacteria and Chloroflexi in sediment. At species level, distinct bacterial communities were associated with sediment, water and shrimps sampled at the same site the same day. The study suggests that the bacterial community of tropical brackish water shrimps cannot be predicted from the microbiota of their aquatic environment. Thus, monitoring of microbiological quality of aquatic environments might not reflect shrimp microbiological quality. PMID:26656527

  11. Experimental investigation on effects of acid/base waters on the bottom sediment of Kaita Cove (Hiroshima, Japan)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Touch, Narong; Hibino, Tadashi; Ueno, Kohei; Fukui, Shogo

    2013-12-01

    The decomposition of organic matter existing in bottom sediment produces reduced substances, and this has an influence on the water environment. Recently, it has been pointed out that the water environment can be improved after covering the bottom sediment with alkaline material. In this study, we experimentally investigate the effects of acid and base waters (hydrogen peroxide and calcium oxide solutions, respectively) on bottom sediment. The bottom sediment of Kaita Cove (Hiroshima, Japan) was mixed and stirred with the acid or base water, and then the dissolved carbon content (DCC), the pH, and the ammonium nitrogen (NH4-N) of the overlying solution were analyzed along with the particle size distribution, particulate carbon content (PCC), and particulate nitrogen content (PNC) of the sediment. It was found that particulate organic matter was decomposed under acid water conditions, leading to large decreases in PCC and PNC, and to large increases in pH, DCC, and NH4-N. Importantly, there were no variations in PCC, PNC, or particle size under base water conditions. However, there were increases in NH4-N, and large amounts of DCC remained in the overlying solution. It is evident from the experimental results that base water conditions enhanced both the elution of nutrient salts and the dissolved organic matter from the sediment, but retarded the decomposition of organic matter. These are considered as important factors associated with the improvement of water environments.

  12. Trace metals in water, sediment and bivalves of a tropical estuary, west coast of India.

    PubMed

    Parvez Al-Usmani, S M; Jagtap, T G; Patil, D N

    2015-10-15

    Trace metal pollution was studied in water, sediment and three selected bivalves in Mandovi and Chapora estuaries of Goa. The trace metal in water and sediment of Mandovi was higher than in Chapora. The concentration in the tissues was in the range of 1205.2-2506.7ppm for Paphia malabarica, 1906.2-2802.6ppm for Perna viridis and 778.7-1607.5ppm for Saccostrea cucullata in Mandovi estuary. Tha values for Chapora were 199.4-625.8ppm for P. malabarica, 812.6-1220.2 for P. viridis and 392.5-418.6ppm for S. cucullata. The anthropogenic input of metal in Mandovi estuary appears to be mainly responsible for the high accumulation of trace metals. These bivalves have potential to serve as indicator for metal contamination in seafood of Goa. PMID:26228069

  13. Root Plasticity of Populus euphratica Seedlings in Response to Different Water Table Depths and Contrasting Sediment Types

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lijuan; Zhao, Chengyi; Li, Jun; Liu, Zhihui; Wang, Jianghong

    2015-01-01

    Riparian plants in arid regions face a highly variable water environment controlled by hydrological processes. To understand whether riparian plants adapt to such environments through plastic responses, we compared the root traits, biomass allocation and growth of Populus euphratica Oliv. Seedlings grown in lysimeters filled with clay or clay/river sand sediments under inundation and varying water table conditions. We hypothesized that adaptive phenotypic plasticity is likely to develop or be advantageous in seedlings of this species to allow them to adapt desert floodplain environments. Growth was significantly reduced by inundation. However, rather than following relatively fixed trait and allocation patterns, the seedlings displayed adaptive mechanisms involving the development of adventitious roots to enhance plant stability and obtain oxygen, together with a lower proportion of root biomass. At the whole-plant level, at deeper water table depths, seedlings allocated more biomass to the roots, and total root length increased with decreasing water table depths, regardless of the sediment, consistent with optimal partitioning theory. The sediment type had a significant effect on seedling root traits. P. euphratica displayed very different root traits in different sediment types under the same hydrological conditions, showing a greater first-order root number in clay sediment under shallower water table conditions, whereas rooting depth was greater in clay/river sand sediment under deep water table conditions. In clay sediment, seedlings responded to lower water availability via greater root elongation, while the root surface area was increased through increasing the total root length in clay/river sand sediment, suggesting that seedlings facing deeper water tables are not always likely to increase their root surface area to obtain more water. Our results indicate that P. euphratica seedlings are able to adapt to a range of water table conditions through plastic responses in root traits and biomass allocation. PMID:25742175

  14. A Comparison of Domestic Water Heating Options in the Austin Electric Service Area 

    E-print Network

    Vliet, G. C.; Hood, D. B.

    1985-01-01

    the operation of (1) a conventional electric resistance water heater (ERWH), (2) a heat pump water heater (HPWH), and (3) a heat recovery water heater (HRWH). Data from a previously conducted field test of solar water heaters (SWH) in the Austin area was used...

  15. Event sedimentation in low-latitude deep-water carbonate basins, Anegada passage, northeast Caribbean

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chaytor, Jason D.; ten Brink, Uri S.

    2015-01-01

    The Virgin Islands and Whiting basins in the Northeast Caribbean are deep, structurally controlled depocentres partially bound by shallow-water carbonate platforms. Closed basins such as these are thought to document earthquake and hurricane events through the accumulation of event layers such as debris flow and turbidity current deposits and the internal deformation of deposited material. Event layers in the Virgin Islands and Whiting basins are predominantly thin and discontinuous, containing varying amounts of reef- and slope-derived material. Three turbidites/sandy intervals in the upper 2 m of sediment in the eastern Virgin Islands Basin were deposited between ca. 2000 and 13 600 years ago, but do not extend across the basin. In the central and western Virgin Islands Basin, a structureless clay-rich interval is interpreted to be a unifite. Within the Whiting Basin, several discontinuous turbidites and other sand-rich intervals are primarily deposited in base of slope fans. The youngest of these turbidites is ca. 2600 years old. Sediment accumulation in these basins is low (?1) for basin adjacent to carbonate platform, possibly due to limited sediment input during highstand sea-level conditions, sediment trapping and/or cohesive basin walls. We find no evidence of recent sediment transport (turbidites or debris flows) or sediment deformation that can be attributed to the ca. M7.2 1867 Virgin Islands earthquake whose epicentre was located on the north wall of the Virgin Islands Basin or to recent hurricanes that have impacted the region. The lack of significant appreciable pebble or greater size carbonate material in any of the available cores suggests that submarine landslide and basin-wide blocky debris flows have not been a significant mechanism of basin margin modification in the last several thousand years. Thus, basins such as those described here may be poor recorders of past natural hazards, but may provide a long-term record of past oceanographic conditions in ocean passages.

  16. River sediment and flow characteristics near a bank filtration water supply: Implications for riverbed clogging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldschneider, Alexandra A.; Haralampides, Katy A.; MacQuarrie, Kerry T. B.

    2007-09-01

    SummaryRiverbed clogging is an important issue related to the sustainable exploitation of riverbank filtration well fields. In this research, several complementary field techniques are employed to assess the current state and possible evolution of riverbed clogging at a site in the Saint John River, New Brunswick. The study is conducted in regions of the riverbed that have previously been identified as allowing recharge to the semi-confined aquifer that has been used since 1955 to supply water to the City of Fredericton. Flow velocity measurements, video imaging, and suspended sediment and bed sediment analyses conducted during the low flow (summer) period indicate that part of the recharge area closest to the well field, about 20% of the total area, is affected by bed armoring with cobbles and boulders. Consistent with previous studies, with increasing distance from the riverbank the sediment size decreases and the armor layer disappears. Previous research indicates that turbulent impacting of fine particles into the voids between the cobbles and boulders of the armor layer may reduce infiltration by up to 95%; however, the suspended sediment load in the river is mainly composed of organic matter, and the measured concentrations of suspended sediment (up to 3 mg/L) are not considered high enough to create such large reductions in infiltration. Additionally, the mineral fraction of the suspended sediment would not be expected to settle under the calculated average shear velocity of 0.012 m/s. Other sources of particulate matter, such as the degradation of aquatic vegetation on the riverbed, may be more significant with respect to riverbed clogging; however, annual peak flows may also create bed shear stresses that serve to limit long-term clogging effects.

  17. Persistence and distribution of 4-nonylphenol in water, sediment, macrophytes, and wall material of littoral enclosures

    SciTech Connect

    Heinis, L.J.; Tunell, R.; Liber, K.; Knuth, M.L.

    1994-12-31

    Eighteen enclosures (5 m x 10 m) were constructed in the littoral zone of a 2-ha pond near Duluth, MN. Each enclosure consisted of 5 m of natural shoreline and three walls of an inert plastic. The enclosures had an average surface area of 31.9 m{sup 2} , an average depth of 0.6 m and an average water volume of 33.1 m{sup 3}. The enclosure waters were treated with the alkyl phenol ethoxylate precursor and degradation product 4-nonylphenol. Application was accomplished by sub-surface injection over a 20-day period with a 2 day frequency. Nominal aqueous concentrations were 0, 3, 30, 100 and 300 {mu}g/L. Concentrations of 4-nonylphenol were monitored during and after application in the water, sediment, macrophytes, and enclosure wall material. Average maximum water concentrations ranged from 96.5% of nominal to 62.0% of nominal and average minimum water concentrations ranged from 33.3% of nominal to 29.5% of nominal during the application period. Water concentrations decreased exponentially after application ended. Sediment concentrations during the application period were constant from 8 to 20 d and peak concentrations occurred 48 d after application began. Macrophyte concentrations peaked 21 d after initial application with a steady decline through 76 d. Enclosure wall material concentrations reached a peak 3 h before the final application. A gradual decline occurred until 34 d after initial application followed by a more rapid dissipation.

  18. Endocrine disrupting chemicals in New Orleans surface waters and Mississippi Sound sediments

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guangdi; Ma, Peng; Zhang, Qiang; Lewis, John; Lacey, Michelle; Furukawa, Yoko; O’Reilly, Susan E.; Meaux, Shelley; McLachlan, John; Zhang, Shaoyuan

    2012-01-01

    Endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs), represented by steroid hormones, organochlorine pesticides (OCPs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and bisphenol A have been determined in four sediment cores from the Gulf of Mexico, from New Orleans surface water (Lake Pontchartrain and Mississippi river), and from the influent and effluent of a New Orleans municipal sewage treatment plant. During the five-month monitoring of selected EDCs in the Mississippi river (MR) and Lake Pontchartrain (LP) in 2008, 21 of 29 OCPs in MR and 17 of 29 OCPs in LP were detected; bisphenol A was detected in all of the samples. Steroid hormones (estrone, 17?-estradiol and 17?-ethinylestradiol) were detected occasionally. Total EDC (OCPs + PCBs + steroid hormones + bisphenol A) concentrations in the two surface water samples were found to vary from 148 to 1112 ng L?1. Strong correlation of the distribution of total OCPs, total PCBs and total EDCs between solid and water phases was found in LP, while moderate or no correlation existed in MR. OCPs, PCBs, steroid hormones, and bisphenol A were all detected in the ocean sediments, and total EDCs were measured in the range of 77 to 1796 ng g?1 dry sediment weight. The EDCs were also found in untreated and treated municipal sewage samples with a removal efficiency of 83% for OCPs but no removal efficiency for 17?-ethinylestradiol. PMID:22438038

  19. Quantification of Salmonella Typhi in water and sediments by molecular-beacon based qPCR.

    PubMed

    Rani, Neetika; Vajpayee, Poornima; Bhatti, Saurabh; Singh, Smriti; Shanker, Rishi; Gupta, Kailash Chand

    2014-10-01

    A molecular-beacon based qPCR assay targeting staG gene was designed for specific detection and quantification of S. Typhi and validated against water and sediment samples collected from the river Ganga, Yamuna and their confluence on two days during Mahakumbha mela 2012-2013 (a) 18 December, 2012: before six major religious holy dips (Makar Sankranti, Paush Poornima, Mauni Amavasya, Basant Panchami, Maghi Poornima and Mahashivratri) (b) 10 February, 2013: after the holy dip was taken by over 3,00,00,000 devotees led by ascetics of Hindu sects at Sangam on 'Mauni Amavasya' (the most auspicious day of ritualistic mass bathing). The assay could detect linearly lowest 1 genomic equivalent per qPCR and is highly sensitive and selective for S. Typhi detection in presence of non specific DNA from other bacterial strains including S. Paratyphi A and S. Typhimurium. It has been observed that water and sediment samples exhibit S. Typhi. The mass holy dip by devotees significantly affected the water and sediment quality by enhancing the number of S. Typhi in the study area. The qPCR developed in the study might be helpful in planning the intervention and prevention strategies for control of enteric fever outbreaks in endemic regions. PMID:25042245

  20. Yeast diversity associated to sediments and water from two Colombian artificial lakes.

    PubMed

    Silva-Bedoya, L M; Ramírez-Castrillón, M; Osorio-Cadavid, E

    2014-01-01

    In Colombia, knowledge of the yeast and yeast-like fungi community is limited because most studies have focused on species with clinical importance. Sediments and water represent important habitats for the study of yeast diversity, especially for yeast species with industrial, biotechnological, and bioremediation potential. The main purpose of this study was to identify and compare the diversity of yeast species associated with sediment and water samples from two artificial lakes in Universidad del Valle (Cali-Colombia). Yeast samplings were performed from fifteen sediment samples and ten water samples. Grouping of similar isolates was initially based on colony and cell morphology, which was then complemented by micro/mini satellite primed PCR banding pattern analysis by using GTG5 as single primer. A representative isolate for each group established was chosen for D1/D2 domain sequencing and identification. In general, the following yeast species were identified: Candida albicans, Candida diversa, Candida glabrata, Candida pseudolambica, Cryptococcus podzolicus, Cryptococcus rajasthanensis, Cryptococcus laurentii, Williopsis saturnus, Hanseniaspora thailandica, Hanseniaspora uvarum, Rhodotorula mucilaginosa, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Torulaspora delbrueckii, Torulaspora pretoriensis, Tricosporon jirovecii, Trichosporon laibachii and Yarrowia lypolitica. Two possible new species were also found, belonging to the Issatchenkia sp. and Bullera sp. genera. In conclusion, the lakes at the Universidad del Valle campus have significant differences in yeast diversity and species composition between them. PMID:24948924

  1. Yeast diversity associated to sediments and water from two Colombian artificial lakes

    PubMed Central

    Silva-Bedoya, L.M.; Ramírez-Castrillón, M.; Osorio-Cadavid, E.

    2014-01-01

    In Colombia, knowledge of the yeast and yeast-like fungi community is limited because most studies have focused on species with clinical importance. Sediments and water represent important habitats for the study of yeast diversity, especially for yeast species with industrial, biotechnological, and bioremediation potential. The main purpose of this study was to identify and compare the diversity of yeast species associated with sediment and water samples from two artificial lakes in Universidad del Valle (Cali-Colombia). Yeast samplings were performed from fifteen sediment samples and ten water samples. Grouping of similar isolates was initially based on colony and cell morphology, which was then complemented by micro/mini satellite primed PCR banding pattern analysis by using GTG5 as single primer. A representative isolate for each group established was chosen for D1/D2 domain sequencing and identification. In general, the following yeast species were identified: Candida albicans, Candida diversa, Candida glabrata, Candida pseudolambica, Cryptococcus podzolicus, Cryptococcus rajasthanensis, Cryptococcus laurentii, Williopsis saturnus, Hanseniaspora thailandica, Hanseniaspora uvarum, Rhodotorula mucilaginosa, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Torulaspora delbrueckii, Torulaspora pretoriensis, Tricosporon jirovecii, Trichosporon laibachii and Yarrowia lypolitica. Two possible new species were also found, belonging to the Issatchenkia sp. and Bullera sp. genera. In conclusion, the lakes at the Universidad del Valle campus have significant differences in yeast diversity and species composition between them. PMID:24948924

  2. Reducing sediment and phosphorus in tributary waters with alum and polyacrylamide.

    PubMed

    Mason, L B; Amrhein, C; Goodson, C C; Matsumoto, M R; Anderson, M A

    2005-01-01

    The Salton Sea is the largest inland water body in California, covering an area of 980 km(2). Inflow to the Salton Sea (1.6 km(3) yr(-1)) is predominately nutrient-rich agricultural wastewater, which has led to eutrophication. Because internal phosphorus release from the bottom sediments is comparatively low and external phosphorus loading to the Salton Sea is high, reduction of tributary phosphorus is expected to reduce algal blooms, increase dissolved oxygen, and reduce odors. Removing both dissolved phosphorus and phosphorus-laden sediment from agricultural drainage water (ADW) should decrease eutrophication. Both alum and polyacrylamide (PAM) are commonly used in wastewater treatment to remove phosphorus and sediment and were tested for use in tributary waters. Laboratory jar tests determined PAM effectiveness (2 mg L(-1)) for turbidity reduction as cationic > anionic = nonionic. Although cationic PAM was the most effective at reducing turbidity at higher speeds, there was no observed difference between the neutral and anionic PAMs at velocity gradients of 18 to 45 s(-1). Alum (4 mg L(-1) Al) reduced turbidity in low energy systems (velocity gradients < 10 s(-1)) by 95% and was necessary to reduce soluble phosphorus, which comprises 47 to 100% of the total P concentration in the tributaries. When PAM was added with alum, the anionic PAM became ineffective in aiding flocculation. The nonionic PAM (2 mg L(-1)) + alum (4 mg L(-1) Al) is recommended to reduce suspended solids in higher energy systems and reduce soluble P by 93%. PMID:16221819

  3. Spatial Profiles of Sediment Denitrification at the Ground Water Surface Water Interface in Cobb Mill Creek on the Eastern Shore of Virginia

    E-print Network

    Lawrence, Deborah

    Spatial Profiles of Sediment Denitrification at the Ground Water ­ Surface Water Interface in Cobb lower under base flow conditions. Synthesis of hydrological and biogeochemical ground water and stream concentrations of NO3 - were maintained along deep, oxidized ground water flow paths approximately greater than

  4. Contamination of sediments and water of a wet dune slack (SW Portugal)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conceição Freitas, Maria; Rosário Carvalho, Maria; Andrade, César; Cruces, Aanabela; Moreira, Sandra

    2015-04-01

    Lagoa da Sancha (LS), located in the Portuguese SW coast, is a small (0.12km2) wet dune slack with a shallow (<1m) open-water body, which occasionally dries out in summer. This environment is part of a Natural Reserve since 2000. It collects inputs from a 35km2 watershed essentially draining Cenozoic sandy materials. The main anthropogenic activities in the catchment area are related to agriculture and hog raising; however, an industrial waste disposal located proximal to LS, infilling an abandoned quarry, has been recently discovered. Field surveys have been conducted in March 2014 in order to collect sediment and water samples in LS as well as in the industrial waste disposal (TW3); riverine water and sediments and underground water have also been collected. Sedimentological (texture, pH, calcium carbonate and organic matter content) and geochemical (major elements, metals and organic compounds) analysis have been performed. Results show that riverine and groundwater have neutral pH and low to medium mineralization of NaCl to CaHCO3 types. The only metal found in high concentrations is iron, with a maximum value of 1200 ug/L. The texture and composition of alluvial sediments are compatible with the geologic background. LS bottom sediments areCaCO3-free organic muds, hyperacid and low organic; they present high contents of heavy metals, organic compounds (101 to 102 mg/kg) and S (2700 mg/kg). Also, the LS hydrosome presents pH values < 3, electric conductivity up to ? 8 mS/cm and very high concentrations of dissolved metals (iron attains 20000 ug/L and the heavy metals content is up to 3 orders of magnitude higher than in both the surface and groundwater). Dissolved hydrocarbon species (fraction C4-C10) reach 11 ug/L and bromoform 17 ug/L. Chemical analysis to TW3 revealed the presence of a large diversity of organic compounds in concentrations of up to 105 mg/kg. Hydrocarbon species and very high S content were only found in the soil and water of the waste disposal and in Sancha water and sediments, indicating that the lowland contamination probably originates by groundwater transport. In order to identify the hydrocarbon and S contamination plume, groundwater flowlines were drawn using the Modflow software and the particle tracking method. Results show that the Sancha lagoon is in the pathway of groundwater infiltrated in the hydrocarbon contaminated waste diposal area.

  5. Global suspended sediment and water discharge dynamics between 1960 and 2010: Continental trends and intra-basin sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Sagy; Kettner, Albert J.; Syvitski, James P. M.

    2014-04-01

    Establishing a quantitative description of global riverine fluxes is one of the main goals of contemporary hydrology and geomorphology. Here we study changes in global riverine water discharge and suspended sediment flux over a 50-year period, 1960-2010, applying a new version of the WBMsed (WBMsed v.2.0) global hydrological water balance model. A new floodplain component is introduced to better represent water and sediment dynamics during periods of overbank discharge. Validated against data from 16 globally distributed stations, WBMsed v.2.0 simulation results show considerable improvement over the original model. Normalized departure from an annual mean is used to quantify spatial and temporal dynamics in both water discharge and sediment flux. Considerable intra-basin variability in both water and sediment discharge is observed for the first time in different regions of the world. Continental-scale analysis shows considerable variability in water and sediment discharge fluctuations both in time and between continents. A correlation analysis between predicted continental suspended sediment and water discharge shows strong correspondence in Australia and Africa (R2 of 0.93 and 0.87 respectively), moderate correlation in North and South America (R2 of 0.64 and 0.73 respectively) and weak correlation in Asia and Europe (R2 of 0.35 and 0.24 respectively). We propose that yearly changes in intra-basin precipitation dynamics explain most of these differences in continental water discharge and suspended sediment correlation. The mechanism proposed and demonstrated here (for the Ganges, Danube and Amazon Rivers) is that regions with high relief and soft lithology will amplify the effect of higher than average precipitation by producing an increase in sediment yield that greatly exceeds increase in water discharge.

  6. Contamination and potential sources of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) in water and sediment from the artificial Lake Shihwa, Korea.

    PubMed

    Moon, Hyo-Bang; Choi, Minkyu; Yu, Jun; Jung, Rae-Hong; Choi, Hee-Gu

    2012-08-01

    Concentrations of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) were determined in water and sediment collected from the artificial Lake Shihwa and surrounding creeks. Total concentrations of 23 PBDE congeners in water and sediment ranged from 0.16 to 11.0ngL(-1) and from 1.3 to 18700ngg(-1)dryweight, respectively. The concentrations of BDE 209 in water and sediment were 1-2 orders of magnitude higher than the total concentrations of other PBDE congeners. The concentrations of total PBDEs and BDE 209 in sediments were the highest compared to previously reported worldwide levels. The highest concentrations of PBDEs in water and sediments were found in creeks near industrial complexes. The PBDE concentrations gradually decreased with increasing distance from the creeks to the inshore and then offshore regions of the lake. BDE 209 was a major congener, accounting for 80% of the total PBDEs in water and sediment, consistent with a high consumption of deca-BDE for the brominated flame retardant market in Korea. Non-parametric multidimensional scaling ordination showed that surrounding creeks are major pathways of PBDE contamination associated with deca-BDE technical mixtures used in industrial complexes around Lake Shihwa. A significant correlation between total organic carbon and total PBDE concentration was found in sediments, and the correlation coefficients for individual PBDE congeners relatively increased from lower to higher brominated congeners. PMID:22542081

  7. Sediment toxicity of a rapidly biodegrading nonionic surfactant: Comparing the equilibrium partitioning approach with measurements in pore water.

    PubMed

    Droge, Steven T J; Postma, Jaap F; Hermens, Joop L M

    2008-06-01

    The equilibrium partitioning theory (EqP) assumes that the toxicity of nonionic surfactants in sediment can be predicted from water-only toxicity data as long as the effect concentrations are properly normalized for chemical activity. Therefore, in marine sediment toxicity tests with the model alcohol ethoxylate (AE), C12EO8, freely dissolved concentrations were both measured via solid-phase microextraction and predicted using sorption coefficients. In fully equilibrated test systems (including the overlying water), both methods showed that concentrations in the pore water of the spiked sediment layer causing 50% mortality (LC50) to the amphipod Corophium volutator were in the same range as LC50 values for amphipods exposed to AE in seawater only. In the sediment systems, AE concentrations in the pore water remained constant up to 15 days, while concentrations in the water overlying the sediment decreased to less than 1% of initial concentrations within 6 days due to biodegradation. In such disequilibrated test systems, C. volutator survived pore water dissolved concentrations that were above the LC50. Apparently, this burrowing amphipod is able to exploit the low chemical activity in the overlying water as a refuge from sediment exposure. PMID:18589990

  8. Diversity of active aerobic methanotrophs along depth profiles of arctic and subarctic lake water column and sediments.

    PubMed

    He, Ruo; Wooller, Matthew J; Pohlman, John W; Quensen, John; Tiedje, James M; Leigh, Mary Beth

    2012-10-01

    Methane (CH(4)) emitted from high-latitude lakes accounts for 2-6% of the global atmospheric CH(4) budget. Methanotrophs in lake sediments and water columns mitigate the amount of CH(4) that enters the atmosphere, yet their identity and activity in arctic and subarctic lakes are poorly understood. We used stable isotope probing (SIP), quantitative PCR (Q-PCR), pyrosequencing and enrichment cultures to determine the identity and diversity of active aerobic methanotrophs in the water columns and sediments (0-25 cm) from an arctic tundra lake (Lake Qalluuraq) on the north slope of Alaska and a subarctic taiga lake (Lake Killarney) in Alaska's interior. The water column CH(4) oxidation potential for these shallow (?2 m deep) lakes was greatest in hypoxic bottom water from the subarctic lake. The type II methanotroph, Methylocystis, was prevalent in enrichment cultures of planktonic methanotrophs from the water columns. In the sediments, type I methanotrophs (Methylobacter, Methylosoma and Methylomonas) at the sediment-water interface (0-1 cm) were most active in assimilating CH(4), whereas the type I methanotroph Methylobacter and/or type II methanotroph Methylocystis contributed substantially to carbon acquisition in the deeper (15-20 cm) sediments. In addition to methanotrophs, an unexpectedly high abundance of methylotrophs also actively utilized CH(4)-derived carbon. This study provides new insight into the identity and activity of methanotrophs in the sediments and water from high-latitude lakes. PMID:22592821

  9. Diversity of active aerobic methanotrophs along depth profiles of arctic and subarctic lake water column and sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    He, Ruo; Wooller, Matthew J.; Pohlman, John W.; Quensen, John; Tiedje, James M.; Leigh, Mary Beth

    2012-01-01

    Methane (CH4) emitted from high-latitude lakes accounts for 2–6% of the global atmospheric CH4 budget. Methanotrophs in lake sediments and water columns mitigate the amount of CH4 that enters the atmosphere, yet their identity and activity in arctic and subarctic lakes are poorly understood. We used stable isotope probing (SIP), quantitative PCR (Q-PCR), pyrosequencing and enrichment cultures to determine the identity and diversity of active aerobic methanotrophs in the water columns and sediments (0–25 cm) from an arctic tundra lake (Lake Qalluuraq) on the north slope of Alaska and a subarctic taiga lake (Lake Killarney) in Alaska's interior. The water column CH4 oxidation potential for these shallow (~2m deep) lakes was greatest in hypoxic bottom water from the subarctic lake. The type II methanotroph, Methylocystis, was prevalent in enrichment cultures of planktonic methanotrophs from the water columns. In the sediments, type I methanotrophs (Methylobacter, Methylosoma and Methylomonas) at the sediment-water interface (0–1 cm) were most active in assimilating CH4, whereas the type I methanotroph Methylobacter and/or type II methanotroph Methylocystis contributed substantially to carbon acquisition in the deeper (15–20 cm) sediments. In addition to methanotrophs, an unexpectedly high abundance of methylotrophs also actively utilized CH4-derived carbon. This study provides new insight into the identity and activity of methanotrophs in the sediments and water from high-latitude lakes.

  10. Macrophytes in shallow lakes: relationships with water, sediment and watershed characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Kissoon, La Toya T; Jacob, Donna L; Hanson, Mark A; Herwig, Brian R; Bowe, Shane E; Otte, Marinus L

    2013-01-01

    We examined macrophyte-environment relationships in shallow lakes located within the Prairie Parkland and Laurentian Mixed Forest provinces of Minnesota. Environmental variables included land cover within lake watersheds, and within-lake, water and sediment characteristics. CCA indicated that sediment fraction smaller than 63 ?m (f<63), open water area, turbidity, and percent woodland and agricultural cover in watersheds were significant environmental variables explaining 36.6% of variation in macrophyte cover. When Province was added to the analysis as a spatial covariate, these environmental variables explained 30.8% of the variation in macrophyte cover. CCA also indicated that pH, f<63, percent woodland cover in watersheds, open water area, emergent vegetation area, and organic matter content were significant environmental variables explaining 43.5% of the variation in macrophyte biomass. When Province was added to the analysis as a spatial covariate, these environmental variables explained 39.1% of the variation in macrophyte biomass. The f<63 was the most important environmental variable explaining variation for both measures of macrophyte abundance (cover and biomass) when Province was added as a spatial covariate to the models. Percent woodland in watersheds, turbidity, open water area, and Ca+Mg explained 34.5% of the variation in macrophyte community composition. Most species showed a negative relationship with turbidity and open water area except for Potamogeton richardsonii, Stuckenia pectinata, and filamentous algae. Our study further demonstrates the extent to which macrophyte abundance and community composition are related to site- and watershed-scale variables including lake morphology, water and sediment characteristics, and percent land cover of adjacent uplands. PMID:23997402

  11. Policy Analysis of Water Availability and Use Issues for Domestic Oil Shale and Oil Sands Development

    SciTech Connect

    Ruple, John; Keiter, Robert

    2010-12-31

    Oil shale and oil sands resources located within the intermountain west represent a vast, and as of yet, commercially untapped source of energy. Development will require water, and demand for scarce water resources stands at the front of a long list of barriers to commercialization. Water requirements and the consequences of commercial development will depend on the number, size, and location of facilities, as well as the technologies employed to develop these unconventional fuels. While the details remain unclear, the implication is not – unconventional fuel development will increase demand for water in an arid region where demand for water often exceeds supply. Water demands in excess of supplies have long been the norm in the west, and for more than a century water has been apportioned on a first-come, first-served basis. Unconventional fuel developers who have not already secured water rights stand at the back of a long line and will need to obtain water from willing water purveyors. However, uncertainty regarding the nature and extent of some senior water claims combine with indeterminate interstate river management to cast a cloud over water resource allocation and management. Quantitative and qualitative water requirements associated with Endangered Species protection also stand as barriers to significant water development, and complex water quality regulations will apply to unconventional fuel development. Legal and political decisions can give shape to an indeterminate landscape. Settlement of Northern Ute reserved rights claims would help clarify the worth of existing water rights and viability of alternative sources of supply. Interstate apportionment of the White River would go a long way towards resolving water availability in downstream Utah. And energy policy clarification will help determine the role oil shale and oil sands will play in our nation’s future.

  12. Perfluorinated Chemicals in Surface Waters and Sediments from Northwest Georgia, USA, and Their Bioaccumulation in Lumbriculus variegatus

    EPA Science Inventory

    Concentrations of perfluorinated chemicals (PFCs) were measured in surface waters and sediments from the Coosa River watershed in northwest Georgia, USA, to examine their distribution downstream of a suspected source. Samples from eight sites were analyzed using liquid chromatogr...

  13. METAL-COLLOID PARTITIONING IN ARTIFICIAL INTERSTITIAL WATERS OF MARINE SEDIMENTS: INFLUENCES OF SALINITY, PH AND COLLOIDAL ORGANIC CARBON CONCENTRATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    For decades, heavy metals have been deposited into marine sediments as a result of anthropogenic activities. Depending on their bioavailability, these metals may represent a risk to benthic organisms. Dissolved interstitial water metal concentrations have been shown to be better ...

  14. PREDICTING THE TOXICITY OF BULK SEDIMENTS TO AQUATIC ORGANISMS WITH AQUEOUS TEST FRACTIONS: PORE WATER VERSUS ELUTRIATE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of this research was to evaluate the acute toxicity of bulk sediment vs. pore water or elutriate to fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas), cladocerans (Ceriodaphnia dubia), amphipods (Hyalella azteca), and oligochaetes (Lumbriculus variegatus). otal of 29 different ...

  15. Method 440.0 Determination of Carbon and Nitrogen in Sediments and Particulatesof Estuarine/Coastal Waters Using Elemental Analysis

    EPA Science Inventory

    Elemental analysis is used to determine particulate carbon (PC) and particulate nitrogen (PN) in estuarine and coastal waters and sediment. The method measures the total carbon and nitrogen irrespective of source (inorganic or organic).

  16. Study on Seasonal Variation of Metal Ion (Beryllium) Concentration in Water, Sediment and its Distribution in a Stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhat, P. N.; Soundararajan, S.; Sharma, D. N.

    2015-06-01

    This study was aimed at determination of the beryllium concentration and its temporal variation in stream water and sediment (mud). The metal ion distribution in the stream of length 3.2 km, near the beryllium facility was evaluated. Beryllium in stream water and sediment was estimated by Graphite Furnace Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometer (GFAAS). The beryllium concentration in water and sediment, varied in the range of 0.01-0.2 ng/ml and 600-30,000 ng/g respectively. The distribution coefficient (Kd) calculated for each locations was observed to be in the range of 500-212,500. The variation of the beryllium concentration at sampling locations of stream, selected for the study, with respect to distance may be due to sorption capacity of the matrix and other reactions of the metal ion involved in water and sediments.

  17. Comparing the Accumulation of PCBs by Passive Samplers and Mussels from the Water Column at a Contaminated Sediment Site

    EPA Science Inventory

    Passive samplers, including semi-permeable membrane devices (SPMDs), solid phase microextraction (SPME) and polyethylene devices (PEDs), provide innovative tools for measuring hydrophobic organic contaminants (HOCs) originating from contaminated waters and sediments. Because the...

  18. RFID tags as a direct tracer for water and sediment dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sommerer, Erik; Plate, Simon; Güntner, Andreas

    2014-05-01

    RFID (Radio Frequency IDentification) is a wireless automatic identification system to track objects with widespread application in industrial operations, but also selected applications in ecological research (animal tracking) and for hydro-sedimentological studies (sediment transport with RFID tags embedded in bedload material). In this study, for the first time, we test and apply RFID tags as a direct tracer to track water pathways, erosion patterns and sediment transport on the surface at the hillslope and headwater scale. The RFID system used here consists of tags with a size of 12 x 2 mm and a combination of mobile and stationary antennas. The transport pathways and velocities of the RFID tags can be individually assessed due to their unique identification numbers. The study area is a badland of easily erodible marls and carbonates located in the Villacarli catchment (42 km²) in the Central Spanish Pyrenees. The badlands have been identified as one of the main sediment sources for siltation of the downstream Barasona Reservoir. More than 700 tags were placed in different terrain units using three experimental setups, including lab experiments: (i) intensive feasibility tests ranging from laboratory flume experiments to tracer studies under natural channel and slope conditions to compare the transport of RFID tags relative to colored particles of the natural sediment; (ii) several transects across the badland to investigate sediment transfer characteristics on different morphological units (i.e. channel, rills, slopes); (iii) a raster of 99 RFID tags covering a slope flank with vegetated and unvegetated parts to reveal the influence of vegetation to erosion and transport processes. The detection of transported tags was carried out with a mobile antenna system to map the spatial distribution of tags after selected rainfall events and with two stationary antennas in channel cross-sections for time-continuous observation of tag passage. From the observations, we derived transport distances and velocities for a one year period. The transport behavior of the RFID tags was similar to the micrite limestone material of the badland. These results indicate the important role of terrain position and vegetation patches for erosion patterns, sediment transfer and the associated time scales along the catchment. We assess the potentials and limitations of the RFID technique as a direct tracer for assessing water and sediment connectivity along hillslopes to first order channels.

  19. Contaminants at the sediment-water interface: implications for environmental impact assessment and effects monitoring.

    PubMed

    Milligan, T G; Law, B A

    2013-06-01

    Many contaminants in aquatic environments are associated with loosely packed aggregates of particulate material called flocs. Flocculation allows contaminants to accumulate at the sediment-water interface and it packages them in a form that is readily available for ingestion by filter feeding organisms. Unfortunately, most samplers being used for environmental assessment and monitoring suspend this material on impact and fail to sample this critical component of the seabed. In this study we use a slo-corer to collect seabed samples with an undisturbed surface layer and a Gust microcosm erosion chamber to erode the surface of the cores at increasing shear stresses. Results from two different sites, one impacted by tailings from historic gold mining and the other by open-pen salmon aquaculture, showed the levels of metals suspended at stresses below 0.24 Pa were greater than in the underlying sediment. Sampling this highly mobile surface layer is critical for determining the total contaminant load in bottom sediments and, more importantly, this layer represents the most readily available material for suspension. The loss of this layer during sampling could lead to inaccurate measurements of contaminant levels during environmental assessment and effects monitoring. A re-evaluation of the ISO standard for bottom sediment sampling is recommended. PMID:23647260

  20. [Quality evaluation multiapproach of sediments in water bodies in Southern Italy].

    PubMed

    Isidori, M; Leoni, T; Parrella, A

    2003-01-01

    This study reports the toxicity of sediments from rivers and canals collected at two six-month intervals from 19 sampling points of the province of Naples in Southern Italy. The toxicity of the pore-water from sediments was determined with a battery composed of different freshwater microbiotests. The toxicity varied substantially from station to station, but none of the Toxkit tests was either the most or the least sensitive for all stations. Chemical analyses were accomplished on some heavy metals. Furthermore, the in situ biological communities of macroinvertebrates were assessed. Most of tested sediments were found to be very toxic for several if not all the microbiotests as well as the biological communities (EBI). Comparison between toxicological data and heavy metals revealed a positive correlation for zinc and copper. This study confirms that only an integrated approach is suitable for the evaluation of contaminated sediments and that single parameters are not always able to define a situation of environmental deterioration. PMID:15049552

  1. Influence of oyster culture on biogeochemistry and bacterial community structure at the sediment-water interface.

    PubMed

    Azandégbé, Afi; Poly, Franck; Andrieux-Loyer, Françoise; Kérouel, Roger; Philippon, Xavier; Nicolas, Jean-Louis

    2012-10-01

    Bacterial community structure and some biogeochemical parameters were studied in the sediment of two Pacific oyster farming sites, Aber Benoît (AB) and Rivière d'Auray (RA) in Brittany (France), to examine the ecological impact of oysters and to evaluate the emission of sulfide and ammonia from sediment. At AB, the organic matter accumulated in the sediment beneath the oyster tables was rapidly mineralized, with strong fluxes of ammonia and sulfide that reached 1014 and 215 ?mol m(-2) h(-1), respectively, in June 2007. At RA, the fluxes were about half as strong on average and better distributed through the year. The ammonia and sulfide concentrations in the overlying water never reached levels that would be toxic to oysters in either site, nor did hypoxia occur. Total culturable bacteria (TCB) varied greatly according to the temperature: from 1.6 × 10(4) to 9.4 × 10(7) cell g(-1) sediment. Inversely, the bacterial community structure remained surprising stable through the seasons, marginally influenced by the presence of oysters and by temperature. Bacterial communities appeared to be characteristic of the sites, with only one common phylotype, Vibrio aestuarianus, a potential oyster pathogen. These data refine the hypothesis of seawater toxicity to oysters because of ammonia and sulfide fluxes and show that the measured environmental factors had only a weak influence on bacterial community structure. PMID:22571367

  2. Transfer of chemical elements from a contaminated estuarine sediment to river water. A leaching assay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abreu, Manuela; Peres, Sara; Magalhães, M. Clara F.

    2014-05-01

    Wastes of a former Portuguese steel industry were deposited during 40 years on the left bank of the Coina River, which flows into the estuary of the Tagus River near Lisbon. The aim of this study was to evaluate the release of the chemical elements from the contaminated sediment to the river water. A leaching experiment (four replicates) was performed using 1.6 kg/replicate of sediment from a landfill located in the Coina River bank, forming a lagoon subject to tidal influence. River water coming from this lagoon was collected during low tide. This water (200 mL) was added to the moist sediment, contained in cylindrical reactors, and was collected after 24 h of percolation. The leaching experiments were conducted for 77 days being leachates collected at time zero, after 28, 49 and 77 days with the sediment always moist. The sediment was characterized for: pH, electric conductivity (EC), total organic carbon (TOC), extractable phosphorus and potassium, mineral nitrogen, iron from iron oxides (crystalline and non-crystalline) and manganese oxides. Multi-elemental analysis was also made by ICP-INAA. Leachates and river water were analysed for pH, EC, hydrogencarbonate and sulfatetot by titrations, chloride by potentiometry, and multi-elemental composition by ICP-MS. The sediment presented pH=7.2, EC=18.5 dS/m, TOC=147.8 g/kg, high concentrations of extractable phosphorous (62.8 mg/kg) and potassium (1236.8 mg/kg), mineral nitrogen=11.3 mg/kg. The non-crystalline fraction of iron oxides corresponds to 99% (167.5 g Fe/kg) of the total iron oxides, and manganese from manganese oxides was low (52.7 mg/kg). Sediment is considered contaminated. It contained high concentrations (g/kg) of Zn (2.9), Pb (0.9), Cr (0.59), Cu (0.16), As (0.07), Cd (0.005), and Hg (0.001), which are above Canadian values for marine sediments quality guidelines for protection of aquatic life. River water had: pH=8.2, EC=28.6 dS/m, csulfate=1.23 g/L, and [Cl-]=251.6 mg/L. The concentrations of Cd (0.001 mg/L) and Hg (0.02 mg/L) were above Canadian water quality guidelines for protection of aquatic life. Leachates had pH?7.9 and EC=38.7 dS/m (mean values), and high concentrations of hydrogencarbonate (723.7 mg/L), sulfatetot (1.8 g/L) and chloride (252.2 mg/L). Over the experiment, only pH (7.6-8.0) and EC (35.7-55.2 dS/m) values showed statistical differences, increasing over time. Regarding multi-elemental contamination, statistical differences were found between some elements concentrations (Co, Cu, Cr, Mn, Ni, Sb, U, V, W, Zn) in the leachates/kg of sediment collected after river water percolation in the four periods. However, only the concentrations of Ni (4.7-9.2 µg/kg), Sb (0.08-0.14 µg/kg), W (0.16-1.1 µg/kg) and Zn (1.72-5.74 µg/kg) have increased. The concentration of the elements in the leachates when compared to the same elements concentration in the sediments corresponds to a fraction lower than 1%. When comparing the concentrations of the elements in the leachates and in the river water used for sediments leaching, the values in leachates are in general lower, being the highest obtained for Ni, W and U, which correspond to 62, 61 and 50% of the river water values, respectively. Chemical elements transfer from sediments to river water can be considered very low.

  3. Water recovery and solid waste processing for aerospace and domestic applications. Volume 2: Appendices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murray, R. W.

    1973-01-01

    Water and sewage treatment systems are presented with concentration on the filtration of water. Equipment is described for organic removal, solids removal, nutrient removal, inorganic removal, and disinfection of the water. Such things as aseline hardware, additional piping connections, waste disposal, and costs involved are also reported.

  4. Morphodynamics of Rivers and Turbidity Currents:an Elegant Conversation between Water and Sediment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, Gary

    2007-11-01

    The flow of a fluid over erodible boundaries such as sediment or bedrock is capable of creating a kaleidoscope of beautiful patterns, including dunes, bars, meandering, alluvial fans and canyons. The key to the formation of these morphologies is an interaction between the fluid flow and the erodible boundary. The mathematical formulation of the problem involves a coupling between the relevant equations of fluid flow and an equation that describes the evolution of the boundary. The flow changes the boundary via differential erosion/deposition, and the boundary changes the flow by offering a modified bed boundary condition. While the fluid can be as esoteric as liquid methane, and the sediment can be granular particles of ice, as on Titan, the case of interest here is water flow associated with rivers and turbidity currents over an erodible bed composed of natural sediment on Earth. Turbidity currents are the deep-sea analogs of river flows: they consist of bottom-hugging currents driven by the presence of sediment in suspension, which makes the water in the flow heavier than the ambient water. In the case of the great majority of such problems, the fluid mechanics simplify in that the temporal terms can be neglected from all equations except the one that describes the evolution of the boundary. Here the general problem is discussed, and then interest is focused on cyclic steps, a universal rhythmic bedform associated with swift (Froude-supercritical) flow that can be found in mountain bedrock streams, gullies, steep alluvial river flows, and in the deep ocean. A single, unified mathematical formulation provides an explanation of all of these features.

  5. Holocene Salnia sediments of West Caicos, British West Indies: stratigraphy, mineralogy, and pore-water geochemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Rosoff, D.B.; Dwyer, G.S.; Leaver, J.; Perkins, R.D.; Lloyd, R.M.

    1989-03-01

    A study of east Salina on West Caicos, British West Indies, has shown it to be the site of active gypsum and dolomite formation. East salina, 3 km long and 0.25 km wide, is situated in an elongate depression between Holocene oolitic dunes to the east and eolianite ridges of Pleistocene age to the west. The thickness of the Holocene sediment package in the salina ranges from 3 m in the center to less than 0.5 m at the edges. The salina sediments exhibit an overall restrictive-upward sequence which grades from open-marine packstone and grainstone at the base through algally laminated mud and into a gypsum mush in the uppermost part of the section. A thin algal mat encrusted with gypsum and ephemeral halite covers the salina surface. This sequence is virtually identical in scale and appearance to prograding sabkha sequences reported from the Persian Gulf. Carbonate phases present in these sediments include aragonite, high- and low-magnesium calcite, and protodolomite. Protodolomite is found as an alteration product in the open-marine sediments and within a thin, lithified Holocene basal layer that overlies laminated calichecrust on the underlying Pleistocene bed rock. Analyses of pore waters reveal that they approach normal marine salinity at the base of the salina sequence and become hypersaline upward. Mineralogical changes in the salina sequence are reflected in the ionic character of the pore waters. Field observations indicate that interstitial water within the sequence is under hydraulic head and rises and falls with the tides.

  6. Nitrification in lake sediment with addition of drinking water treatment residuals.

    PubMed

    Wang, Changhui; Liu, Juanfeng; Wang, Zhixin; Pei, Yuansheng

    2014-06-01

    Drinking water treatment residuals (WTRs), non-hazardous by-products generated during potable water production, can effectively reduce the lake internal phosphorus (P) loading and improve water quality in lakes. It stands to reason that special attention regarding the beneficial reuse of WTRs should be given not only to the effectiveness of P pollution control, but also to the effects on the migration and transformation of other nutrients (e.g., nitrogen (N)). In this work, based on laboratory enrichment tests, the effects of WTRs addition on nitrification in lake sediment were investigated using batch tests, fluorescence in situ hybridization, quantitative polymerase chain reaction and phylogenetic analysis techniques. The results indicated that WTRs addition had minor effects on the morphologies of AOB and NOB; however, the addition slightly enhanced the sediment nitrification potential from 12.8 to 13.2 ?g-N g(-1)-dry sample h(-1) and also increased the ammonia oxidation bacteria (AOB) and nitrite oxidizing bacteria (NOB) abundances, particularly the AOB abundances (P < 0.05), which increased from 1.11 × 10(8) to 1.31 × 10(8) copies g(-1)-dry sample. Moreover, WTRs addition was beneficial to the enrichment of Nitrosomonas and Nitrosospira multiformis and promoted the emergence of a new Nitrospira cluster, causing the increase in AOB and NOB diversities. Further analysis showed that the variations of nitrification in lake sediment after WTRs addition were primarily due to the decrease of bioavailable P, the introduction of new nitrifiers and the increase of favorable carriers for microorganism attachment in sediments. Overall, these results suggested that WTRs reuse for the control of lake internal P loading would also lead to conditions that are beneficial to nitrification. PMID:24681379

  7. A marine bioassay test set to assess marine water and sediment quality-its need, the approach and first results.

    PubMed

    Peters, C; Becker, S; Noack, U; Pfitzner, S; Bülow, W; Barz, K; Ahlf, W; Berghahn, R

    2002-10-01

    There is a need for establishing a marine bioassay test set to assess marine water and sediment samples in Germany. The selected marine bioassay test set, two tests for the water phase (with the luminescence bacteria Vibrio fischeri and the algae Phaeodactylum tricornutum Bohlin) and a whole sediment test with the marine amphipod Corophium volutator (Pallas) is described and first results are shown. PMID:12463685

  8. Inter-lab testing of Hyalella azteca water and sediment methods: 4 Results from 10- to 42-d tests conducted with sediment substrates

    EPA Science Inventory

    Over the past four years, USEPA Duluth, USGS Columbia, the Illinois Natural History Survey, and Environment Canada have been conducting studies to refine the USEPA and ASTM International methods for conducting 10- to 42-d water or sediment toxicity exposures with the amphipod Hya...

  9. TOXICITY OF SEDIMENTS AND SEDIMENT PORE WATERS FROM THE GRAND CALUMET RIVER-INDIANA HARBOR, INDIANA AREA OF CONCERN

    EPA Science Inventory

    The assessment of contaminated sediments is a difficult task due to the complex nature of the sediment matrix and the potential for exposure of aquatic organisms to in-place contaminants is several routes. ifferential species sensitivity also precludes the completion of a meaning...

  10. Significance of fine-grained sediment lofting from melt-water generated turbidity currents for the timing of glaciomarine sediment transport into the deep sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hesse, Reinhard; Khodabakhsh, Saeed

    2006-04-01

    Sediment lofting from turbidity currents is a process that occurs in density currents generated from fresh-water discharges into the sea and other gravity currents that can produce reversed buoyancy. Settling of suspended sediment from the top or deposition from the bottom of the flows may lower the density below that of ambient seawater causing the currents to lift up from their substrate either in part or as a whole through buoyancy reversal, as is well known from experiments. Fine-grained sediment lofting on a large scale during times of Heinrich events has been inferred for ice-proximal regions of the northwest Labrador Sea adjacent to the margin of the Late Pleistocene Laurentide Ice Sheet (LIS). The evidence comes from a distinct depositional facies of stacked graded mud layers containing ice-rafted debris (IRD). The significance of the lofted fine-grained depositional facies arises from its genetic link to large sand and gravel transporting turbidity currents that were generated by melt-water discharges from the Hudson Strait outlet of the LIS and are the likely source of the lofted sediment. The observed lofted depositional facies is exclusively found in Heinrich layers. Through this stratigraphic relationship the lofted facies ties the main pulses of sediment supply in the Labrador Basin to Heinrich events. Heinrich events thus appear to be the times of the main depositional activity in the Labrador Sea, a hitherto unknown aspect of these phenomenal events besides their known role as intense iceberg discharges.

  11. Immobilization of U(VI) from Oxic Groundwater by Hanford 300 Area Sediments and Effects of Columbia River Water

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmed, B.; Cao, Bin; Mishra, Bhoopesh; Boyanov, Maxim I.; Kemner, Kenneth M.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Beyenal, Haluk

    2012-09-23

    Regions within the U.S. Department of Energy Hanford 300 Area (300 A) site experience periodic hydrologic influences from the nearby Columbia River as a result of changing river stage, which causes changes in groundwater elevation, flow direction and water chemistry. An important question is the extent to which the mixing of Columbia River water and groundwater impacts the speciation and mobility of uranium (U). In this study, we designed experiments to mimic interactions among U, oxic groundwater or Columbia River water, and 300 A sediments in the subsurface environment of Hanford 300 A. The goals were to investigate mechanisms of: 1) U immobilization in 300 A sediments under bulk oxic conditions and 2) U remobilization from U-immobilized 300 A sediments exposed to oxic Columbia River water. Initially, 300 A sediments in column reactors were fed with U(VI)-containing oxic 1) synthetic groundwater (SGW), 2) organic-amended SGW (OA-SGW), and 3) de-ionized (DI) water to investigate U immobilization processes. After that, the sediments were exposed to oxic Columbia River water for U remobilization studies. The results reveal that U was immobilized by 300 A sediments predominantly through reduction (80-85%) when the column reactor was fed with oxic OA-SGW. However, U was immobilized by 300 A sediments through adsorption (100%) when the column reactors were fed with oxic SGW or DI water. The reduced U in the 300 A sediments fed with OA-SGW was relatively resistant to remobilization by oxic Columbia River water. Oxic Columbia River water resulted in U remobilization (?7%) through desorption, and most of the U that remained in the 300 A sediments fed with OA-SGW (?93%) was in the form of uraninite nanoparticles. These results reveal that: 1) the reductive immobilization of U through OA-SGW stimulation of indigenous 300 A sediment microorganisms may be viable in the relatively oxic Hanford 300 A subsurface environments and 2) with the intrusion of Columbia River water, desorption may be the primary process resulting in U remobilization from OA-SGW-stimulated 300 A sediments at the subsurface of the Hanford 300 A site.

  12. Immobilization of U(VI) from oxic groundwater by Hanford 300 Area sediments and effects of Columbia River water.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Bulbul; Cao, Bin; Mishra, Bhoopesh; Boyanov, Maxim I; Kemner, Kenneth M; Fredrickson, Jim K; Beyenal, Haluk

    2012-09-01

    Regions within the U.S. Department of Energy Hanford 300 Area (300 A) site experience periodic hydrologic influences from the nearby Columbia River as a result of changing river stage, which causes changes in groundwater elevation, flow direction and water chemistry. An important question is the extent to which the mixing of Columbia River water and groundwater impacts the speciation and mobility of uranium (U). In this study, we designed experiments to mimic interactions among U, oxic groundwater or Columbia River water, and 300 A sediments in the subsurface environment of Hanford 300 A. The goals were to investigate mechanisms of: 1) U immobilization in 300 A sediments under bulk oxic conditions and 2) U remobilization from U-immobilized 300 A sediments exposed to oxic Columbia River water. Initially, 300 A sediments in column reactors were fed with U(VI)-containing oxic 1) synthetic groundwater (SGW), 2) organic-amended SGW (OA-SGW), and 3) de-ionized (DI) water to investigate U immobilization processes. After that, the sediments were exposed to oxic Columbia River water for U remobilization studies. The results reveal that U was immobilized by 300 A sediments predominantly through reduction (80-85%) when the column reactor was fed with oxic OA-SGW. However, U was immobilized by 300 A sediments through adsorption (100%) when the column reactors were fed with oxic SGW or DI water. The reduced U in the 300 A sediments fed with OA-SGW was relatively resistant to remobilization by oxic Columbia River water. Oxic Columbia River water resulted in U remobilization (?7%) through desorption, and most of the U that remained in the 300 A sediments fed with OA-SGW (?93%) was in the form of uraninite nanoparticles. These results reveal that: 1) the reductive immobilization of U through OA-SGW stimulation of indigenous 300 A sediment microorganisms may be viable in the relatively oxic Hanford 300 A subsurface environments and 2) with the intrusion of Columbia River water, desorption may be the primary process resulting in U remobilization from OA-SGW-stimulated 300 A sediments at the subsurface of the Hanford 300 A site. PMID:22683408

  13. Sedimentation and chemical quality of surface water in the Heart River drainage basin, North Dakota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Maderak, Marion L.

    1966-01-01

    The Heart River drainage basin of .southwestern North Dakota comprises an area of 3,365 square miles and lies within the Missouri Plateau of the Great Plains province. Streamflow of the Heart River and its tributaries during 1949-58 was directly proportional to .the drainage area. After the construction of Heart Butte Dam in 1949 and Dickinson Dam in 1950, the mean annual streamflow near Mandan was decreased an estimated 10 percent by irrigation, evaporation from the two reservoirs, and municipal use. Processes that contribute sediment to the Heart River are mass wasting, advancement of valley heads, and sheet, lateral stream, and gully erosion. In general, glacial deposits, terraces, and bars of Quaternary age are sources of sand and larger sediment, and the rocks of Tertiary age are sources of clay, silt. and sand. The average annual suspended-sediment discharges near Mandan were estimated to be 1,300,000 tons for 1945-49 and 710,000 tons for 1970-58. The percentage composition of ions in water of the Heart River, based on average concentrations in equivalents per million for selected ranges of streamflow, changes with flow and from station to station. During extremely low flows the water contains a large percentage of sodium and about equal percentages of bicarbonate and .sulfate, and during extremely high flows the water contains a large percentage of calcium plus magnesium and bicarbonate. The concentrations, in parts per million, of most of the ions vary inversely with flow. The water in the reservoirs--Edward Arthur Patterson Lake and Lake Tschida--during normal or above-normal runoff is of suitable quality for public use. Generally, because of medium or high salinity hazards, the successful long-term use of Heart River water for irrigation will depend on a moderate amount of leaching, ,adequate drainage, ,and the growing of crops that have moderate or good salt tolerance.

  14. Transport of sludge-derived organic pollutants to deep-sea sediments at deep water dump site 106

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Takada, H.; Farrington, J.W.; Bothner, Michael H.; Johnson, C.G.; Tripp, B.W.

    1994-01-01

    Linear alkylbenzenes (LABs), coprostanol and epi-coprostanol, were detected in sediment trap and bottom sediment samples at the Deep Water Dump Site 106 located 185 km off the coast of New Jersey, in water depths from 2400 to 2900 m. These findings clearly indicate that organic pollutants derived from dumped sludge are transported through the water column and have accumulated on the deep-sea floor. No significant difference in LABs isomeric composition was observed among sludge and samples, indicating little environmental biodegradation of these compounds. LABs and coprostanol have penetrated down to a depth of 6 cm in sediment, indicating the mixing of these compounds by biological and physical processes. Also, in artificially resuspended surface sediments, high concentrations of LABs and coprostanols were detected, implying that sewage-derived organic pollutants initially deposited on the deep-sea floor can be further dispersed by resuspension and transport processes. Small but significant amounts of coprostanol were detected in the sediment from a control site at which no LABs were detected. The coprostanol is probably derived from feces of marine mammals and sea birds and/or from microbial or geochemical transformations of cholesterol. Polcyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in sediment trap samples from the dump site were largely from the sewage sludge and had a mixed petroleum and pyrogenic composition. In contrast, PAHs in sediments in the dump site were mainly pyrogenic; contributed either from sewage sludge or from atmospheric transport to the overlying waters. & 1994 American Chemical Society.

  15. INFLUENCE OF COLLOIDS ON SEDIMENT-WATER PARTITION COEFFICIENTS OF POLYCHLOROBIPHENYL CONGENERS IN NATURAL WATERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Laboratory studies have shown that speciation of hydrophobic organic pollutants in aquatic systems is too complex to model as a linear, two-phase sorption equilibrium due to ill-defined phases and slow kinetics. his complexity is manifested in an inverse variation in sediment-wat...

  16. INFLUENCE OF COLLOIDS ON SEDIMENT-WATER PARTITION COEFFICIENTS OF POLYCHLORBIPHENYL CONGENERS IN NATURAL WATERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Laboratory studies have shown that speciation of hydrophobic organic pollutants in aquatic systems is too complex to model as a linear, two-phase sorption equilibrium, due to ill-defined phases and slow kinetics. his complexity is manifested in an inverse variation in sediment-wa...

  17. Influences on domestic well water testing behavior in a Central Maine area with frequent groundwater arsenic occurrence.

    PubMed

    Flanagan, Sara V; Marvinney, Robert G; Zheng, Yan

    2015-02-01

    In 2001 the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) adopted a new standard for arsenic (As) in drinking water of 10 ?g/L, replacing the old standard of 50 ?g/L. However, for the 12% of the U.S. population relying on unregulated domestic well water, including half of the population of Maine, it is solely the well owner's responsibility to test and treat the water. A mailed household survey was implemented in January 2013 in 13 towns of Central Maine with the goal of understanding the population's testing and treatment practices and the key behavior influencing factors in an area with high well-water dependency and frequent natural groundwater As. The response rate was 58.3%; 525 of 900 likely-delivered surveys to randomly selected addresses were completed. Although 78% of the households reported that their well has been tested, half of it was more than 5 years ago. Among the 58.7% who believe they have tested for As, most do not remember the results. Better educated, higher income homeowners who more recently purchased their homes are most likely to have included As when last testing. While households agree that water and As-related health risks can be severe, they feel low personal vulnerability and there are low testing norms overall. Significant predictors of including As when last testing include: having knowledge that years of exposure increases As-related health risks (risk knowledge), knowing who to contact to test well water (action knowledge), believing that regular testing does not take too much time (instrumental attitude), and having neighbors who regularly test their water (descriptive norm). Homeowners in As-affected communities have the tendency to underestimate their As risks compared to their neighbors. The reasons for this optimistic bias require further study, but low testing behaviors in this area may be due to the influence of a combination of norm, ability, and attitude factors and barriers. PMID:24875279

  18. Preparation of low water-sorption lightweight aggregates from harbor sediment added with waste glass.

    PubMed

    Wei, Yu-Ling; Lin, Chang-Yuan; Ko, Kuan-Wei; Wang, H Paul

    2011-01-01

    A harbor sediment is successfully recycled at 1150 °C as low water-absorption lightweight aggregate via addition of waste glass powder. Sodium content in the waste glass is responsible for the formation of low-viscosity viscous phases during firing process to encapsulate the gases generated for bloating pellet samples. Water sorption capacity of the lightweight products can be considerably reduced from 5.6% to 1.5% with the addition of waste glass powder. Low water-absorption property of lightweight products is beneficial for preparing lightweight concrete because the water required for curing the cement would not be seized by lightweight aggregate filler, thus preventing the failure of long-term concrete strength. PMID:21367431

  19. Fate and stereoselective behavior of benalaxyl in a water-sediment microcosm.

    PubMed

    Liu, Mingke; Liu, Donghui; Xu, Yangguang; Jing, Xu; Zhou, Zhiqiang; Wang, Peng

    2015-06-01

    The environmental behavior and stereoselectivity of the chiral fungicide benalaxyl and its chiral metabolite benalaxyl acid in water, sediment, and water-sediment microcosms were studied. The microcosms were incubated at 25 °C with light or under darkness. The influencing factors such as light and microorganism were investigated. The results showed that benalaxyl had half-lives of >21 days in the microcosm system and that the metabolite benalaxyl acid could exist in the microcosm for >70 days. Benalaxyl was mainly transformed through microbial degradation, and thus sediment microorganisms played a major role in the dissipation of benalaxyl in the aquatic microcosm. The stereoselective behavior of benalaxyl and benalaxyl acid was also investigated. (-)-Benalaxyl was preferentially degraded in the microcosm, resulting in an enrichment of the more toxic enantiomer (+)-benalaxyl, which may cause higher risk to the aquatic system. Moreover, (-)-benalaxyl acid was preferentially formed in the microcosm. The enantioselectivity of the enantiomers in the microcosm should be taken into consideration for an accurate risk assessment. PMID:26009811

  20. Protozoan grazing on bacteria at the sediment-water interface of an acidified lake

    SciTech Connect

    Tremaine, S.C.

    1988-01-01

    Protozoan grazing on bacteria has been hypothesized to link the detrital and grazer food chains in aquatic ecosystems. The current study of protozoan bacterivory, evaluated methods, quantified bacterivory, and evaluated the role of protozoa at the sediment-water interface of an acidified lake ecosystem, Lake Anna, Virginia. Three limnetic methods for determining protozoan bacterivory were tested for applicability at the sediment-water interface. The eucaryote inhibitor, cycloheximide, was found unsatisfactory because it did not uniformly inhibit growth of target eucaryotes, and because it inhibited non-target anaerobic procaryotes. The filtration method was found to have limited application in sediment systems due to filtrational loss of particle-associated bacteria. The dilution method was tested for violations of its critical assumptions: bacterial growth is exponential; grazing mortality is proportional to the dilution factor; and bacterial growth rates are unaltered under experimental conditions. These assumptions were found not to be violated, and this method was used in subsequent grazing experiments. Carbon loading to the acidified arm of Lake Anna was 41 {times} 10{sup 6} g C {times} y{sup {minus}1}. This appears to be adequate carbon loading to support bacterial production and, in turn, protozoan bacterivory and production. Though there is no direct evidence that zooplankton graze on protozoa in this system, however, there is sufficient protozoan production to support an additional trophic level.

  1. Effect of redox conditions on MTBE biodegradation in surface water Sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bradley, P.M.; Chapelle, F.H.; Landmeyer, J.E.

    2001-01-01

    Microbial degradation of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) was observed in surface water-sediment microcosms under anaerobic conditions. The efficiency and products of anaerobic MTBE biodegradation were dependent on the predominant terminal electron-accepting conditions. In the presence of substantial methanogenic activity, MTBE biodegradation was nominal and involved reduction of MTBE to the toxic product, tert-butyl alcohol (TBA). In the absence of significant methanogenic activity, accumulation of [14C]TBA generally decreased, and mineralization of [U-14C]MTBE to 14CO2 generally increased as the oxidative potential of the predominant terminal electron acceptor increased in the order of SO4, Fe(III), Mn(IV) < NO3 < O2. Microbial mineralization of MTBE to CO2 under Mn(IV)or SO4-reducing conditions has not been reported previously. The results of this study indicate that microorganisms inhabiting the sediments of streams and lakes can degrade MTBE effectively under a range of anaerobic terminal electron-accepting conditions. Thus, anaerobic bed sediment microbial processes may provide a significant environmental sink for MTBE in surface water systems throughout the United States.

  2. Variations of marine pore water salinity and chlorinity in Gulf of Alaska sediments (IODP Expedition 341)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    März, Christian; Mix, Alan C.; McClymont, Erin; Nakamura, Atsunori; Berbel, Glaucia; Gulick, Sean; Jaeger, John; Schneider (LeVay), Leah

    2014-05-01

    Pore waters of marine sediments usually have salinities and chlorinities similar to the overlying sea water, ranging around 34-35 psu (Practical Salinity Units) and around 550 mM Cl-, respectively. This is because these parameters are conservative in the sense that they do not significantly participate in biogeochemical cycles. However, pore water studies carried out in the frame of the International Ocean Discovery Program (IODP) and its predecessors have shown that salinities and chlorinities of marine pore waters can substantially deviate from the modern bottom water composition in a number of environmental settings, and various processes have been suggested to explain these phenomena. Also during the recent IODP Expedition 341 that drilled five sites in the Gulf of Alaska (Northeast Pacific Ocean) from the deep Surveyor Fan across the continental slope to the glaciomarine shelf deposits, several occurrences of pore waters with salinities and chlorinities significantly different from respective bottom waters were encountered during shipboard analyses. At the pelagic Sites U1417 and U1418 (~4,200 and ~3,700 m water depth, respectively), salinity and chlorinity maxima occur around 20-50 m sediment depth, but values gradually decrease with increasing drilling depths (down to 30 psu in ~600 m sediment depth). While the pore water freshening at depth is most likely an effect of clay mineral dehydration due to increasing burial depth, the shallow salinity and chlorinity maxima are interpreted as relicts of more saline bottom waters that existed in the North Pacific during the Last Glacial Maximum (Adkins et al., 2002). In contrast, the glaciomarine slope and shelf deposits at Site U1419 to U1421 (~200 to 1,000 m water depth) are characterised by unexpectedly low salinitiy and chlorinity values (as low as 16 psu and 295 mM Cl-, respectively) already in very shallow sediment depths (~10 m), and their records do not show systematic trends with sediment depth. Freshening of pore waters in continental margin settings has been reported in association with dissociating gas hydrate deposits (Hesse, 2003), but neither seismic profiles nor sediment records showed any indications for the presence of gas hydrates at the Gulf of Alaska sites. An alternative and intriguing explanation for these almost brackish waters in the glaciomarine shelf and slope deposits is the presence of glacial meltwater that could either be "fossil" (stored in the glaciomarine sediments since the last glacial termination) or "recent" (i.e., actively flowing from currently melting glaciers of the St. Elias Mountain Range along permeable layers within the shelf deposits). As these relatively fresh waters are found at three distinct drill sites, it can be assumed that they are distributed all along the Gulf of Alaska shelf and slope, and similar findings have been reported at other glaciated continental margins, e.g., off East Greenland (DeFoor et al., 2011) and Antarctica (Mann and Gieskes, 1975; Chambers, 1991; Lu et al., 2010). While a recent review has highlighted the importance of fresh and brackish water reservoirs in continental shelf deposits worldwide (Post et al., 2013), we suggest that climatic and depositional processes affecting glaciated continental margins (e.g., the release of huge amounts of fresh water from ice sheets and glaciers during glacial terminations, and the rapid deposition of unconsolidated sediments on the adjacent shelf) are particularly favourable for the storage and/or flow of meltwater below the present sea floor. Adkins JF, McIntyre K, Schrag DP (2002) The salinity, temperature, and d18O of the glacial deep ocean. Science 298, 1769-1773. Chambers SR (1991) Solute distributions and stable isotope chemistry of interstitial waters from Prydz Bay, Antarctica. Proceedings of the Ocean Drilling Program 119, 375-392. DeFoor W, Person M, Larsen HC, Lizarralde D, Cohen D, Dugam B (2011) Ice sheet-derived submarine groundwater discharge on Greenland's continental shelf. Water Resources Research 47, W07549. Hesse R (200

  3. The significance of morphogenetic analysis in the assessment of soil-water conditions in Quaternary sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falkowska, Ewa

    2015-10-01

    The landform pattern of the Polish Lowlands, which originated during and after the Warta Glaciation, is closely connected with areal deglaciation and directions of geomorphological landform evolution. Landscape-shaping processes were significant for the creation of sediment configuration and sediment characteristics of particular landforms and thus for properties of sediments. Determination of the relationships between the origin of a landform and its physical/geochemical properties can facilitate the evaluation of geological conditions carried out for land use planning that should take into account the sensitivity of the geological environment (soil, groundwater) to the migration of contaminants. The aim of this research was to find geomorphological means of identifying physicochemical and hydrogeological properties of Quaternary sediments that enable fast and precise assessment of long-term and recent soil-water conditions. The investigations were conducted in two areas of the Polish Lowlands that were formed during the Warta Glaciation. During geological mapping of distinguished landforms, 169 samples of sediments were collected for laboratory testing. The samples were analyzed for particle size, calcium carbonate, organic matter content, pH, permeability coefficient, CEC, and adsorption of Cd and Pb. The results show that these distinguished glacial landforms are characterized by the recurrence of superficial lithological profiles with typical physicochemical parameters. Thus, the morphogenesis of postglacial areas of central Poland formed during the Warta Glaciation has influenced the ability of surface deposits to retain contamination. A total of seven insulation classes of landforms in terms of differentiated insulating abilities of deposits, as well as the ranges of values for each insulating parameter, have been identified.

  4. Redox processes in pore water of anoxic sediments with shallow gas.

    PubMed

    Ramírez-Pérez, A M; de Blas, E; García-Gil, S

    2015-12-15

    The Ría de Vigo (NW Spain) has a high organic matter content and high rates of sedimentation. The microbial degradation of this organic matter has led to shallow gas accumulations of methane, currently distributed all along the ría. These peculiar characteristics favor the development of anoxic conditions that can determine the dynamics of iron and manganese. In order to study the role played by iron and manganese in the processes that take place in anoxic sediments with shallow gas, four gravity cores were retrieved in anoxic sediments of the Ría de Vigo in November 2012. Methane was present in two of them, below 90cm in the inner zone and below 200cm, in the outer zone. Pore water was collected and analyzed for vertical profiles of pH, sulfide, sulfate, iron and manganese concentrations. Sulfate concentrations decreased with depth but never reached the minimum detection limit. High sulfide concentrations were measured in all cores. The highest sulfide concentrations were found in the inner zone with methane and the lowest were in the outer zone without methane. Concentrations of iron and manganese reached maximum values in the upper layers of the sediment, decreasing with depth, except in the outer zone without gas, where iron and manganese concentration increased strongly toward the bottom of the sediment. In areas with shallow gas iron reduction, sulfate reduction and methane production processes coexist, showing that the traditional redox cascade is highly simplified and suggesting that iron may be involved in a cryptic sulfur cycle and in the oxidation of methane. PMID:26312406

  5. Domestic Violence

    MedlinePLUS

    Domestic violence is a type of abuse. It usually involves a spouse or partner, but it can also ... a child, elderly relative, or other family member. Domestic violence may include Physical violence that can lead to ...

  6. Equilibrium Partitioning Sediment Benchmarks (ESBs) for the Protection of Benthic Organisms: Procedures for the Determination of the Freely Dissolved Interstitial Water Concentrations of Nonionic Organics

    EPA Science Inventory

    This document describes procedures to determine the concentrations of nonionic organic chemicals in sediment interstitial waters. In previous ESB documents, the general equilibrium partitioning (EqP) approach was chosen for the derivation of sediment benchmarks because it account...

  7. An economic and performance design study of solar preheaters for domestic hot water heaters in North Carolina

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, C. B.; Smetana, F. O.

    1977-01-01

    The performance and estimated material costs for several solar preheaters for domestic hot water heaters using isolation levels present in North Carolina are presented. The effects of monthly variations in isolation and the direction of incident radiation are included. Demand is assumed at 13 gallons (49.2 liters) per day per person. The study shows that a closed circulation system with 82 gallons (310 liters) of preheated storage and 53.4 cu ft (4.94 cu m) of collector surface with single cover can be expected to cost about $800 and to repay it capital cost and interest (at 8%) in 5.2 years, assuming present electric rates increase at 5% per year.

  8. Juvenile chemical sediments and the long term persistence of water at the surface of Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tosca, Nicholas J.; Knoll, Andrew H.

    2009-09-01

    Chemical sediments and the aqueous alteration products of volcanic rocks clearly indicate the presence of water, at least episodically, at the Martian surface. Compared to similar materials formed on the early Earth, however, Martian deposits are juvenile, or diagenetically under-developed. Here we examine the role of water in facilitating various diagenetic reactions and evaluate the predicted effects of time and temperature for aqueous diagenesis on Mars. Using kinetic formulations based on terrestrial sedimentary geology, we quantify the integrated effects of time and temperature for a range of possible burial and thermal histories of precipitated minerals on Mars. From this, we estimate thresholds beyond which these precipitates should have been converted to the point of non-detection in the presence of water. Surface water has been shown to be at least episodically present in recent times. Nonetheless, the integrated duration of aqueous activity recorded over geologically long intervals by hydrated amorphous silica, smectite clays and Fe-sulfate minerals suggests that where these minerals occur water did not persist much beyond their initial deposition. This geochemical conclusion converges with geomorphologic studies that suggest water limitation during the late Noachian-Hesperian peak of valley formation and a still more limited footprint of water since that time. In addition to documenting the presence of water and its chemical properties, a complete assessment of potentially habitable environments on Mars should address the timescales on which liquid water has persisted and the timing of aqueous episodes relative to major planetary events.

  9. Installation package for a domestic solar heating and hot water system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The installation of two prototype solar heating and hot water systems is described. The systems consists of the following subsystems: solar collector, storage, control, transport, and auxiliary energy.

  10. Sedimentation and water quality in the West Branch Shade River basin, Ohio, 1983-85

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oblinger Childress, C. J.; Jones, R.L.

    1988-01-01

    Loss of channel conveyance from deposition of sediment from abandoned surface mines in the West Branch Shade River basin has resulted in frequent flooding. In addition, water quality in the West Branch Shade River and some of its tributaries is typical of streams affected by acid mine drainage. About 938 acres were surfaced mined and abandoned in West Branch Shade River basin. By the end of 1984, about 450 acres were reclaimed. The purpose of this study was to measure the effects of abandoned surface mines and their reclamation on suspended-sediment load, channel cross-section profile, and water quality of West Branch Shade River. Sediment data were collected from June 1983 through September 1985. Daily suspended-sediment samples were collected and continuous streamflow data were recorded at two locations in West Branch Shade River basin and one location in the unmined, East Branch Shade River basin. Water-quality samples were collected three times per year, from June 1983 through July 1986, at four locations in the West Branch Shade River basin and at one location in East Branch Shade River basin and at one location in East Branch Shade River basin. Stream-channel cross sections were surveyed at least twice per year at 10 locations. During the period of study, annual mean suspended-sediment concentration was unchanged for the unmined, East Branch Shade River basin; 0.28 ton per acre-foot of runoff in 1984 and 1985 water years. Annual suspended-sediment concentration, in tons per acre foot, in West Branch Shade River near Harrisonville, from 8.6 in 1984 water year to 0.15 in 1985 water year. In West Branch Shade River near Burlingham, where 48 percent of the abandoned mines were reclaimed by the end of 1984, annual mean suspended-sediment concentration was unchanged (0.5 ton per acre-foot of runoff) in 1984 and 1985 water years and was twice that of the unmined basin. Channel profiles, surveyed at each of the 10 cross sections, indicated scouring at two locations and filling at one location. West Branch Shade River near Harrisonville was scouring, whereas West Branch Shade River near Burlingham was filling. Although the source of sediment in the headwaters had been greatly reduced with reclamation, the sediments previously deposited and stored in the channel of West Branch Shade River most likely will continue to provide a suspended-sediment supply and contribute to channel filling farther downstream. In addition, part of West Branch Shade River basin is still largely unreclaimed and continues as a suspended-sediment source. On the basis of successive cross-section profiles, the down-stream-most cross section surveyed in Kingsbury Creek, a tributary to West Branch Shade River, also appeared to be scouring. The cause of the scouring is unknown, as no reclamation activities have occurred in that part of the basin. The quality of West Shade River was characteristic of streams draining abandoned or improperly reclaimed surface mines in southeastern Ohio. Median alkalinity was less than 25 mg/L (milligrams per liter) as CaCO3 at the three mined sites. Median sulfate concentration was 44 mg/L at the unmined site compared to 128 mg/L at the mined sites. Median manganese concentration was 10 times higher at the mined sites than the unmined sites. Both sulfate and manganese are indicators of the presence of acid mine drainage. The greatest change in water quality during the study period was observed in West Branch Shade River near Harrisonville, above which all abandoned mine lands were reclaimed. The pH at that site increased to neutral by the end of the study. In addition, alkalinity concentration increased, and acidity concentration decreased. As has been observed in previous studies of abandoned surface mines that have been reclaimed, manganese and sulfate concentrations did not change following reclamation. No change in water quality was observed at the two downstream sites during the period of study. However, th

  11. Effect of water-column pH on sediment-phosphorus release rates in Upper Klamath Lake, Oregon, 2001

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fisher, Lawrence H.; Wood, Tamara M.

    2004-01-01

    Sediment-phosphorus release rates as a function of pH were determined in laboratory experiments for sediment and water samples collected from Shoalwater Bay in Upper Klamath Lake, Oregon, in 2001. Aerial release rates for a stable sediment/water interface that is representative of the sediment surface area to water column volume ratio (1:3) observed in the lake and volumetric release rates for resuspended sediment events were determined at three different pH values (8.1, 9.2, 10.2). Ambient water column pH (8.1) was maintained by sparging study columns with atmospheric air. Elevation of the water column pH to 9.2 was achieved through the removal of dissolved carbon dioxide by sparging with carbon dioxide-reduced air, partially simulating water chemistry changes that occur during algal photosynthesis. Further elevation of the pH to 10.2 was achieved by the addition of sodium hydroxide, which doubled average alkalinities in the study columns from about 1 to 2 milliequivalents per liter. Upper Klamath Lake sediments collected from the lake bottom and then placed in contact with lake water, either at a stable sediment/water interface or by resuspension, exhibited an initial capacity to take up soluble reactive phosphorus (SRP) from the water column rather than release phosphorus to the water column. At a higher pH this initial uptake of phosphorus is slowed, but not stopped. This initial phase was followed by a reversal in which the sediments began to release SRP back into the water column. The release rate of phosphorus 30 to 40 days after suspension of sediments in the columns was 0.5 mg/L/day (micrograms per liter per day) at pH 8, and 0.9 mg/L/day at pH 10, indicating that the higher pH increased the rate of phosphorus release by a factor of about two. The highest determined rate of release was approximately 10% (percent) of the rate required to explain the annual internal loading to Upper Klamath Lake from the sediments as calculated from a lake-wide mass balance and observed in total phosphorus data collected at individual locations.

  12. Rapid neodymium release to marine waters from lithogenic sediments in the Amazon estuary

    PubMed Central

    Rousseau, Tristan C. C.; Sonke, Jeroen E.; Chmeleff, Jérôme; van Beek, Pieter; Souhaut, Marc; Boaventura, Geraldo; Seyler, Patrick; Jeandel, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    Rare earth element (REE) concentrations and neodymium isotopic composition (?Nd) are tracers for ocean circulation and biogeochemistry. Although models suggest that REE release from lithogenic sediment in river discharge may dominate all other REE inputs to the oceans, the occurrence, mechanisms and magnitude of such a source are still debated. Here we present the first simultaneous observations of dissolved (<0.45??m), colloidal and particulate REE and ?Nd in the Amazon estuary. A sharp drop in dissolved REE in the low-salinity zone is driven by coagulation of colloidal matter. At mid-salinities, total dissolved REE levels slightly increase, while ?Nd values are shifted from the dissolved Nd river endmember (?8.9) to values typical of river suspended matter (?10.6). Combining a Nd isotope mass balance with apparent radium isotope ages of estuarine waters suggests a rapid (3 weeks) and globally significant Nd release by dissolution of lithogenic suspended sediments. PMID:26158849

  13. Rapid neodymium release to marine waters from lithogenic sediments in the Amazon estuary.

    PubMed

    Rousseau, Tristan C C; Sonke, Jeroen E; Chmeleff, Jérôme; van Beek, Pieter; Souhaut, Marc; Boaventura, Geraldo; Seyler, Patrick; Jeandel, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    Rare earth element (REE) concentrations and neodymium isotopic composition (?Nd) are tracers for ocean circulation and biogeochemistry. Although models suggest that REE release from lithogenic sediment in river discharge may dominate all other REE inputs to the oceans, the occurrence, mechanisms and magnitude of such a source are still debated. Here we present the first simultaneous observations of dissolved (<0.45 ?m), colloidal and particulate REE and ?Nd in the Amazon estuary. A sharp drop in dissolved REE in the low-salinity zone is driven by coagulation of colloidal matter. At mid-salinities, total dissolved REE levels slightly increase, while ?Nd values are shifted from the dissolved Nd river endmember (-8.9) to values typical of river suspended matter (-10.6). Combining a Nd isotope mass balance with apparent radium isotope ages of estuarine waters suggests a rapid (3 weeks) and globally significant Nd release by dissolution of lithogenic suspended sediments. PMID:26158849

  14. Sediment Lofting From Melt-Water Generated Turbidity Currents During Heinrich Events as a Tool to Assess Main Sediment Delivery Phases to Small Subpolar Ocean Basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hesse, R.

    2009-05-01

    Small subpolar ocean basins such as the Labrador Sea received a major portion (25%) of their sediment fill during the Pleistocene glaciations (less than 5% of the basin's lifetime), but the detailed timing of sediment supply to the basin remained essentially unknown until recently. The main sediment input into the basin was probably not coupled to major glacial cycles and associated sea-level changes but was related to Heinrich events. Discovery of the depositional facies of fine-grained lofted sediment provides a tool which suggests that the parent-currents from which lofting took place may have been sandy-gravelly turbidity currents that built a huge braided abyssal plain in the Labrador Sea (700 by 120 km underlain by 150 m on average of coarse- grained sediment) which is one of the largest sand accumulations (104 km3) on Earth. The facies of lofted sediment consists of stacked layers of graded muds that contain ice-rafted debris (IRD) which impart a bimodal grain-size distribution to the graded muds. The texturally incompatible grain populations of the muds (median size between 4 and 8 micrometers) and the randomly distributed coarse silt and sand-sized IRD require the combination of two transport processes that delivered the populations independently and allowed mixing at the depositional site: (i) sediment rafting by icebergs (dropstones) and (ii) the rise of turbid freshwater plumes out of fresh-water generated turbidity currents. Sediment lofting from turbidity currents is a process that occurs in density currents generated from sediment-laden fresh-water discharges into the sea that can produce reversed buoyancy, as is well known from experiments. When the flows have traveled long enough, their tops will have lost enough sediment by settling so that they become hypopycnal (their density decreasing below that of the ambient seawater) causing the current tops to lift up. The turbid fresh-water clouds buoyantly rise out of the turbidity current to a level of equal density in the stratified water column, presumably the pycnocline, where they spread out laterally, even up-current, and generate interflows that deposit graded layers. The process is slow enough to allow incorporation into the graded layers of debris melting out of drifting icebergs. The hyperpycnal portion of individual discharge events that generated these currents might have had an estimated volume on the order of 103 km3x(1012 m3) which would have flowed for 10-15 days or less, assuming estimated discharge ranges for subglacial outburst floods of up to 106 m3/s. Turbidites are deposited much too fast to incorporate any substantial fraction of IRD, whereas deposition from lofted interflows may take months. The most likely candidates for the parent currents from which lofting occurred were the sandy flows that formed the sand abyssal plain The observed lofted depositional facies is exclusively found in Heinrich layers at distances of up to 300 km from the presumed terminus of the Hudson Strait ice stream. Through this stratigraphic relationship the lofted facies ties the main pulses of Late Pleistocene sediment supply in the Labrador Basin to Heinrich events. Heinrich events are known as Late Pleistocene ice-rafting episodes of unparalleled intensity in the North Atlantic that were associated with major melt-water discharge pulses and, as it appears now, also were the times of the main sediment delivery. Other potential basin candidates where lofting may have occurred are the Bering Sea and Maury Channel in North Atlantic.

  15. Seasonal and spatial patterns in mass and organic matter sedimentation in the North Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hargrave, B. T.; Walsh, I. D.; Murray, D. W.

    Sedimentation rates in the North Water between September 1997 and July 1999 were calculated from integrated monthly values for dry and organic matter, organic carbon, nitrogen, and sum-chloropigments, using pairs of multi-cup sediment traps moored at two depths >200 m at five stations. Highest fluxes in upper traps (144 and 297 g m -2 yr -1, 8 and 12 g C m -2 yr -1) occurred near Ellesmere Island at the western end of a cross-polynya transect (76°N). Rates to the east under the West Greenland Current (35 and 124 g m -2 yr -1, 4 and 7 g C m -2 yr -1) were higher than those in the central area of the polynya (13 and 39 g m -2 yr -1, 1.4 and 2.6 g C m -2 yr -1) and to the north at the entrance to Kane Basin (78°N), where levels of inorganic matter in settled material were relatively high (50 g m -2 yr -1, 1.8 g C m -2 yr -1). Minimum fluxes in upper traps (4.2 g m -2 yr -1, 0.7 g C m -2 yr -1) were measured at the southern limit of the polynya in northern Baffin Bay (75°N). Annual fluxes of particulate matter in the polynya between 1997 and 1999 (4-308 g m -2 yr -1, 1-14 g C m -2 yr -1) are higher than previously reported for ice-covered arctic regions. There was a similar seasonal progression at all locations with sedimentation rates increasing from winter minima during March followed by a larger secondary peak of maximum particle flux between June and September. Maximum sedimentation occurred earlier (April-June) on the eastern side of the polynya than off the coast of Ellesmere Island (July-September). High fluxes were sustained through late fall and early winter months at sites close to the coasts of both Greenland and Ellesmere Island. At most stations 40-50% of the annual organic matter sedimentation occurred during a prolonged period of high sedimentation between June and October. Sedimentation rates at 50 m above bottom were 30-50% higher than at shallower depths and settled material contained higher amounts of inorganic matter. Annual fluxes for all variables at four stations where between-year comparisons could be made showed that rates were two to five times higher in the second year of the study.

  16. Phosphorus sorption by sediments from a soft-water seepage lake. 2. Effects of pH and sediment composition

    SciTech Connect

    Detenbeck, N.E.; Brezonik, P.L. )

    1991-03-01

    The effects of pH and sediment composition on phosphorus sorption by sandy littoral and organic-rich pelagic sediments from Little Rock Lake (Vilas County, WI) were evaluated in laboratory experiments. About two-thirds of total sedimentary P is in organic forms. Concentrations of inorganic P (P{sub i}) are low in littoral sediments (0.66-1.71 {mu}mol/g). In pelagic sediments P{sub i} concentrations are approximately 10 times higher (16.1-19.4 {mu}mol/g). Most of the P{sub i} ({approximately}70%) is readily exchangeable. Variability in P{sub i} is related to surface area and aluminum oxyhydroxide content but not to iron oxyhydroxides. Potential effects of pH on sorption are large; predicted equilibrium phosphate concentrations (EPC) decrease by 88-91% between pH 6.0 and 4.5, as P binding by the sediments increases. Diffusive fluxes of P{sub i} out of the sediments could decrease by as much as 90% if surficial sediments in Little Rock Lake become acidified.

  17. Identifying water-quality trends in the Trinity River, Texas, USA, 1969-1992, using sediment cores from Lake Livingston

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Van Metre, P.C.; Callender, E.

    1996-01-01

    Chemical analyses were done on cores of bottom sediment from three locations in Lake Livingston, a reservoir on the Trinity River in east Texas to identify trends in water quality in the Trinity River using the chemical record preserved in bottom sediments trapped by the reservoir. Sediment cores spanned the period from 1969, when the reservoir was impounded, to 1992, when the cores were collected. Chemical concentrations in reservoir sediment samples were compared to concentrations for 14 streambed sediment samples from the Trinity River Basin and to reported concentrations for soils in the eastern United States and shale. These comparisons indicate that sediments deposited in Lake Livingston are representative of the environmental setting of Lake Livingston within the Trinity River Basin. Vertical changes in concentrations within sediment cores indicate temporal trends of decreasing concentrations of lead, sodium, barium, and total DDT (DDT plus its metabolites DDD and DDE) in the Trinity River. Possible increasing temporal trends are indicated for chlordane and dieldrin. Each sediment-derived trend is related to trends in water quality in the Trinity River or known changes in environmental factors in its drainage basin or both.

  18. From the tap to the mouth, drinking water quality in the domestic context in Khartoum, Sudan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavie, Emilie; Hassan El-Tayib, Noha

    2013-04-01

    The city of Khartoum experienced a rapid growth and an urban spread towards its periphery that has become denser than the centre. Urban planning was unable to follow the pace of demographic growth (5.5 million inhabitants in 2008), and the establishment of a decent drinking water network is slow. The population is incited to be independent from quantitative variations by storing drinking water, because of water turbidity, many cuts, and pressure decreases. These bad habits of storage, the lack of efficiency of treatment, and the absence of collective supply network maintenance, are responsible for a significant decrease in the physical and biological water quality. The result is a development of water-borne diseases (generally diarrheal symptoms and kidney diseases). Our study aimed at measuring the changes of water quality in these storage recipients, so as to evaluate the possible risks on people health. It demonstrated that the distinction made between quantity and quality in the institutional management of drinking water in Khartoum is a dead-end. It also suggested that treatment would be more efficient and water would have better quality if smaller quantity of drinking water was produced and the amount of wasted water was reduced. Storage is a worsening factor of bacteriological pollution. Then, contrary to what numerous researchers observed in other fieldworks, here the temperature does not limit the bacteriological development and bacteriology does not seem to be in connection with turbidity. Then water storage is an important problem for people's health, responsible for many diarrheal (bacteria) and kidney diseases (salinization). Nevertheless, conscientious of the quantitative deficiency, the Khartoum State Water Cooperation (in charge of water supply) tries to produce more water so as to avoid cuts. On the contrary, we think that the solution is in the maintenance of the infrastructure. Best network (30% of losses occur in the network) and better waterworks could provide better water without cuts, limiting the storage needs. This poster would present a part of our results financed by the French National Agency of Research (ANR) and published in: Lavie, E. and Hassan El Tayib N. (under press, 2013). Du robinet au consommateur : qualité de l'eau potable dans le contexte domestique de l'agglomération de Khartoum, Soudan. In Cybergeo, European journal of geography.

  19. Uranium release from sediment to groundwater: Influence of water chemistry and insights into release mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alam, Md. Samrat; Cheng, Tao

    2014-08-01

    Uranium (U) contamination in groundwater often results from natural geochemical processes such as mineral dissolution and desorption of adsorbed U from mineral surface. Although U adsorption and U mineral dissolution have been extensively studied, current knowledge of minerals and water chemistry conditions that control U release in uncontaminated soil and aquifers is still limited. Identification of these minerals and the knowledge of how water chemistry conditions influence U release is critical to better understand, predict, and manage geogenic U contamination in soil and groundwater. The objective of this study is to determine the extent and mechanisms of U release from a heterogeneous natural sediment under water chemistry conditions relevant to natural soil water and groundwater. A sediment sample was collected and characterized by XRD, SEM-EDX and extraction methods, and examined using laboratory leaching experiments. Our results show that Fe-Mn (oxy)hydroxides and silicate minerals are the major U hosting minerals, and a substantial fraction of U exists as adsorbed ions on minerals. We also found that U release is controlled by a number of interactive processes including dissolution of U-bearing minerals, U desorption from mineral surface, formation of aqueous U complexes, and reductive precipitation of U. Results from this study shed light on the important geochemical reactions that need be considered for developing a conceptual model that predicts U contamination in subsurface environment.

  20. Development and application of a marine sediment pore-water toxicity test using Ulva fasciata zoospores

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hooten, R.L.; Carr, R.S.

    1998-01-01

    An acute (96 h) pore-water toxicity test protocol using germination and growth of Ulva fasciata zoospores as endpoints was developed to test the toxicity of marine and estuarine sediment pore-water samples. Tests with an organic toxicant (sodium dodecyl sulfate; SDS), three metals (Cd, Cu, and Zn), and ammonia (NH3) were conducted to determine zoospore sensitivity. Zoospore germination and gametophyte growth were as sensitive to SDS as sea urchin (Arbacia punctulata) fertilization and embryological development. Zoospore sensitivity to metals was greater than or comparable to that of adult macroalgae. Zoospores were less sensitive to NH3 than were other commonly used toxicity test organisms. Test results using this algal assay with sediment pore-water samples with high NH3 concentrations were compared with results from sea urchin fertilization and embryological development tests for the same samples. Ulva fasciata zoospore germination was not affected by samples with high NH3 concentrations that were toxic in both sea urchin tests. Zoospore tolerance of NH3 and sensitivity to other contaminants indicate that their response may be useful in toxicity identification evaluation studies with pore-water samples that contain high concentrations of unionized NH3.

  1. Development and application of a marine sediment pore-water toxicity test using Ulva fasciata zoospores

    SciTech Connect

    Hooten, R.L.; Carr, R.S.

    1998-01-01

    An acute (96 h) pore-water toxicity test protocol using germination and growth of Ulva fasciata zoospores as endpoints was developed to test the toxicity of marine and estuarine sediment pore-water samples. Tests with an organic toxicant (sodium dodecyl sulfate; SDS), three metals (Cd, Cu, and Zn), and ammonia (NH{sub 3}) were conducted to determine zoospore sensitivity. Zoospore germination and gametophyte growth were as sensitive to SDS as sea urchin (Arbacia punctulata) fertilization and embryological development. Zoospore sensitivity to metals was greater than or comparable to that of adult macroalgae. Zoospores were less sensitive to NH{sub 3} than were other commonly used toxicity test organisms. Test results using this algal assay with sediment pore-water samples with high NH{sub 3} concentrations were compared with results from sea urchin fertilization and embryological development tests for the same samples. Ulva fasciata zoospore germination was not affected by samples with high NH{sub 3} concentrations that were toxic in both sea urchin tests. Zoospore tolerance of NH{sub 3} and sensitivity to other contaminants indicate that their response may be useful in toxicity identification evaluation studies with pore-water samples that contain high concentrations of unionized NH{sub 3}.

  2. Screening for over 1000 organic micropollutants in surface water and sediments in the Liaohe River watershed.

    PubMed

    Bu, Qingwei; Luo, Qian; Wang, Donghong; Rao, Kaifeng; Wang, Zijian; Yu, Gang

    2015-11-01

    High throughout screening method has gained attractive prospects because it offers a fast and effective approach to obtain a holistic picture of organic micropollutant (OM) pollution in a site specific environment. However, reliability and usefulness of the generated data sets for OM pollution profiles and occurrence levels have not been fully evaluated. In this paper, we screened 1030 OMs in surface water and sediments from the selected rivers of the Liaohe River watershed to (1) examine the usefulness of using qualitative data to gain insights into source identification and (2) further evaluate the reliability of the semi-quantification results in a filed study. The results showed that 81 and 89 OMs at concentrations up to 5670 ng/L and 6714 ng/g were identified in surface water and sediments, respectively. Qualitative data could be used to identify the similarity (or dissimilarity) of pollution sources at different locations for surface water, which could provide insights for source back tracking of water contamination. Accuracy tests showed that our semi-quantification results agree well with those from previously reported values and our target analysis. Though our results for the majority of newly quantified OMs need to be further confirmed, we have demonstrated that this method is suitable for understanding the pollution characteristics and occurrence levels of OMs in the environment for environmental scientists and managers. PMID:26203867

  3. Correlation of Dynamic Surface Tension with Sedimentation of PTFE Particles and Water Penetration in Powders.

    PubMed

    Shah, Vidhi; Bharatiya, Bhavesh; Shah, Dinesh O; Mukherjee, Tulsi

    2015-12-29

    The dynamic surface tension of aqueous poly(ethylene oxide)-poly(propylene oxide)-poly(ethylene oxide) [(PEO-PPO-PEO)]-type polymeric surfactant (P103, P105, F108, P123, and F127) solutions were correlated with water penetration in packed Teflon powders, the sedimentation of Teflon suspensions in these solutions, foamability, and contact angle measurements on a Teflon surface. The DST trend with bubble lifetime indicated that the overall slowdown in the diffusion process in aqueous solutions is a function of a higher poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) molecular weight for a given series of block copolymers containing equal PPO molecular weights, favoring slower diffusion kinetics to the air-water interface caused by preferential partitioning in bulk water. The wettability of poly(tetrafluoroethylene) (PTFE) powder illustrates better water penetration for polymers with low molecular weight and lower HLB values. The wettability of F127 solutions decreases with corresponding increases in concentration resulting from higher viscosity, which restrains the diffusion kinetics at the PTFE-water interface. The foamability decreases drastically with higher PEO molecular weight as attributed by slower diffusion kinetics, leading to a decrease in the effective concentration of molecules at the foam interface. The contact angle on glass and the PTFE surface are in good agreement with assumptions made by other analytical techniques showing a lower value of the contact angle with a lower HLB of the Pluronic, which relates to the higher adsorption of molecules at the interface. It is concluded that the adsorption of molecules at the PTFE-water interface decreases in aqueous Pluronic solutions with corresponding increases in the hydrophilic lipophilic balance (HLB), which is consistent with foaming, water penetration in a packed powder of PTFE, the rate of sedimentation, and DST data. A PTFE dispersion containing P123 showed the maximum wettability and lowest sedimentation among the series of block copolymers introduced, which is attributed to faster diffusion kinetics and a higher PPO contribution fostering faster adsorption at the PTFE surface. The dynamic surface tension of aqueous Pluronic solutions seems to correlate well with the adsorption characteristics at the air-water and PTFE-water interfaces. PMID:26625137

  4. Effects of acid mine drainage on water, sediment and associated benthic macroinvertebrate communities

    SciTech Connect

    Rutherford, L.G.; Cherry, D.S.; Dobbs, M.G.; Cairns, J. Jr.; Zipper, C.E.

    1995-12-31

    The toxic constituents of abandoned mined land (AML) discharges (acidic pH, heavy metals, total suspended solids) are extremely toxic to aquatic life . Studies were undertaken to ascertain environmental impacts to the upper Powell River, Lee and Wise Counties, Va. These impacts included disruptions in physical water quality, sediment quality, altered benthic macroinvertebrate assemblages, and toxicity of the water column and sediments from short-term impairment bioassays, and the potential to bioaccumulate selected metals (Al, Fe, Mn, P, Zn, Cu, Mg, S, Ni, Cd) by periphyton and resident bivalves. Water chemistry and macroinvertebrate assemblages were collected at upstream control, just below acid mine drainage and other downstream sites. Selected trace metal concentrations (Al, Fe, Mn, P, Zn, Cu, Mg, S, Ni, Cd) were determined for water, sediment and resident bivalves using ICP-AES. Acidic pH ranged from 2.15--3.3 at three AML-influenced seeps and varied from 6.4--8.0 at reference stations. At one AML-influenced creek, acidic pH conditions worsened from summer to fall and eradicated aquatic life throughout a 1.5 km stretch of that creek as it flowed into another creek. An additional dilution of 3.4 km in the second creek was needed to nearly neutralize the acidic pH problem. Conductivity (umhos/cm) ranged from 32--278 at reference sites and from 245--4,180 at AML-impact sites. Benthic macroinvertebrate abundance and taxon richness were essentially eliminated in the seeps or reached numbers of 1 -3 taxa totaling < 10 organisms relative to reference areas where richness values were 12--17 and comprised 300--977 organisms. Concentrations of Fe, Al, Mg and Cu and Zn were highest in the environmentally stressed stations of low pH and high conductivity relative to the reference stations. Iron was, by far, the element in highest concentration followed by Al and Mg.

  5. Assessment on the distribution and partitioning of perfluorinated compounds in the water and sediment of Nansi Lake, China.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yuanxin; Cao, Xuezhi; Wang, Hui; Wan, Yi; Wang, Shiliang

    2015-10-01

    In this study, the distribution and partitioning of nine perfluorinated compounds (PFCs) in the water and sediment of Nansi Lake were systematically investigated. The total concentration of PFCs was in the range of 38.4-91.4 ng/L in the water and 0.47-1.81 ng/g in the sediment. The concentration of perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) was the highest in all the homologues in the water and was in the range of 34.9-84.6 ng/L. However, perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS), PFOA, and perfluoroundecanoic acid (PFUnDA) were the predominant PFCs in the sediment, and their levels were similar. The levels of PFOA, PFHpA, PFOS, PFNA, and the total PFCs in the water were relatively higher in the upper region than those in the lower region of Nansi Lake. In the sediment, the levels of PFOA, PFOS, and PFUnDA showed the similar distribution tendency. Industrial wastewater discharged from the cities around Nansi Lake was the main sources of PFCs. The partitioning coefficients (K d ) of PFOA, PFNA, PFDA, and PFOS were in the range of 0.29-0.87, 1.43-2.18, 2.08-3.15, and 2.20-2.80, respectively. Therefore, the log K d of PFDA and PFOS was apparently high as compared to two other compounds. The organic matter content of the sediment had no effect on the partitioning of PFCs between sediment and water in Nansi Lake. PMID:26341502

  6. Water flow patterns in subsurface flow constructed wetlands designed for on-site domestic wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Weaver, R W; Stecher, M C; McInnes, K J

    2003-01-01

    Bypass flow in subsurface flow constructed wetlands, which may be related to several wetland characteristics, reduces detention time and may result in inadequately treated wastewater. Subsurface flow constructed wetlands, 2.3 m wide by 4.8 m long and containing a gravel matrix, were used to investigate the impact of wetland depth, inlet pipe location, loading volume, and plants on water flow. Flow patterns were determined using blue dye or bromide as tracers. The blue dye adsorbed to the gravel and was not an effective tracer for following water movement. Water dispersed as it flowed through the wetland, and approximately two pore volumes of added water were required to displace approximately 99% of the bromide tracer added as a pulse. In 17 and 25 cm deep wetlands, water flow was uniform with depth, and inlet depth had little influence on water flow patterns. Water flow in a 40 cm deep wetland was not uniform with depth for either inlet pipe placement. The presence of plants caused preferential water flow around root masses, thereby, limiting their potential to interface with wastewater. Water mixing by dispersion from the surface to deeper depths may enhance aeration. Bromide was first detected in effluent after only 0.5 pore volumes of tap water had been added. This indicates that detention time for some wastewater would be less than expected, since plug flow is usually assumed in subsurface flow constructed wetlands. This occurrence should be considered for time-dependent treatments, such as fecal coliform and biological oxygen demand reduction. PMID:12641255

  7. Effects of sediment depositional environment and ground-water flow on the quality and geochemistry of water in aquifers in sediments of Cretaceous age in the coastal plain of South Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Speiran, Gary K.; Aucott, Walter R.

    1994-01-01

    The quality and geochemistry of ground water are significantly affected by the depositional environment of aquifer sediments. Cretaceous sediments in the Coastal Plain of South Carolina have been deposited in fluvial, delta-plain, marginal-marine, and marine environments. Depositional environments of sediments within a single aquifer may grade from nonmarine, fluvial, or upper delta plain near the updip limit of the aquifer to transitional, lower delta plain and to marine toward the coast. In nonmarine sediments the major source of inorganic carbon in the water is the decomposition of organic material. The major aqueous geochemical processes are the dissolution and alteration of silicate minerals. Silica makes up a major part of the dissolved constituents in water from these sediments. In transitional and marine sediments the major aqueous geochemical processes are (1) the dissolution of calcium carbonate by hydrolysis and by carbonic acid derived from the decomposition of organic material and (2) the exchange of calcium in solution for sodium on the marine-clay minerals. The clay minerals may also serve as buffers by neutralizing the hydroxyl ion produced by hydrolysis. The effects of incompletely flushed dilute saltwater on water quality increase toward the coast and toward the northeast.

  8. Bioavailability of metals and toxicity identification of the sediment pore waters from Plow Shop Pond, Fort Devens, Massachusetts

    SciTech Connect

    Jop, K.; Putt, A.; Shepherd, S.; Askew, A.; Bleiler, J.; Reed, S.; George, C.

    1995-12-31

    Plow Shop Pond is a shallow, 30-acre pond located at Fort Devens, Massachusetts. An ecological risk assessment was conducted at Plow Shop Pond as part of a remedial investigation. Preliminary analysis revealed high concentrations of arsenic, copper, chromium, lead, and mercury in the sediment. Therefore, a laboratory testing program was incorporated into this investigation to assess the toxicity of sediments to aquatic organisms. The screening testing program included short-term chronic exposure of Ceriodaphnia dubia to pore waters, 10-day exposures of Chironomus tentans and Hyalella azteca to bulk sediments and a bioaccumulation study with Lumbriculus variegatus. Survival and reproduction of C. dubia, growth of amphipods and reproduction of oligochaetes appeared to indicate sediment toxicity at some sites within the pond. Although high concentrations of arsenic, copper, mercury and lead were detected in the whole sediments and pore waters, the response could not be correlated to a particular element. Also, relatively low bioaccumulation of methyl mercury and high uptake of inorganic mercury was established for three sediment samples. To characterize and identify the source of toxicity, a toxicity identification evaluation program using sediments collected at several locations was performed. The pore water from these samples was used for fractionation coupled with a 10-day test using H. azteca. Survival and growth were evaluated as endpoints during the exposures. Partitioning of metals and their bioavailability was influenced primarily by organic carbon and AVS concentration. At least two constituents were responsible for the toxicity.