Sample records for water tank project

  1. Project W-519 CDR supplement: Raw water and electrical services for privatization contractor, AP tank farm operations

    SciTech Connect

    Parazin, R.J.

    1998-07-31

    This supplement to the Project W-519 Conceptual Design will identify a means to provide RW and Electrical services to serve the needs of the TWRS Privatization Contractor (PC) at AP Tank Farm as directed by DOE-RL. The RW will serve the fire suppression and untreated process water requirements for the PC. The purpose of this CDR supplement is to identify Raw Water (RW) and Electrical service line routes to the TWRS Privatization Contractor (PC) feed delivery tanks, AP-106 and/or AP-108, and establish associated cost impacts to the Project W-519 baseline.

  2. Organic Tank Safety Project: Effect of water partial pressure on the equilibrium water content of waste samples from Hanford Tank 241-U-105

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. D. Scheele; P. R. Bredt; R. L. Sell

    1997-01-01

    Water content plays a crucial role in the strategy developed by Webb et al. to prevent propagating or sustainable chemical reactions in the organic-bearing wastes stored in the 20 Organic Tank Watch List tanks at the U.S. Department of Energy`s Hanford Site. Because of water`s importance in ensuring that the organic-bearing wastes continue to be stored safely, Duke Engineering and

  3. Organic Tank Safety Project: Effect of water partial pressure on the equilibrium water content of waste samples from Hanford Tank 241-U-105

    SciTech Connect

    Scheele, R.D.; Bredt, P.R.; Sell, R.L.

    1997-09-01

    Water content plays a crucial role in the strategy developed by Webb et al. to prevent propagating or sustainable chemical reactions in the organic-bearing wastes stored in the 20 Organic Tank Watch List tanks at the U.S. Department of Energy`s Hanford Site. Because of water`s importance in ensuring that the organic-bearing wastes continue to be stored safely, Duke Engineering and Services Hanford commissioned the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to investigate the effect of water partial pressure (P{sub H2O}) on the water content of organic-bearing or representative wastes. Of the various interrelated controlling factors affecting the water content in wastes, P{sub H2O} is the most susceptible to being controlled by the and Hanford Site`s environmental conditions and, if necessary, could be managed to maintain the water content at an acceptable level or could be used to adjust the water content back to an acceptable level. Of the various waste types resulting from weapons production and waste-management operations at the Hanford Site, determined that saltcake wastes are the most likely to require active management to maintain the wastes in a Conditionally Safe condition. Webb et al. identified Tank U-105 as a Conditionally Safe saltcake tank. A Conditionally Safe waste is one that is currently safe based on waste classification criteria but could, if dried, be classified as {open_quotes}Unsafe.{close_quotes} To provide information on the behavior of organic-bearing wastes, the Westinghouse Hanford Company provided us with four waste samples taken from Tank 241-U-105 (U-105) to determine the effect of P{sub H2O} on their equilibrium water content.

  4. Organic tank safety project: Effect of water partial pressure on the equilibrium water contents of waste samples from Hanford Tank 241-BY-108

    SciTech Connect

    Scheele, R.D.; Bredt, P.R.; Sell, R.L.

    1997-02-01

    Water content plays a crucial role in the strategy developed by Webb et al. to prevent propagating or sustainable chemical reactions in the organic-bearing wastes stored in the 20 Organic Tank Watch List tanks at the US Department of Energy`s Hanford Site. Because of water`s importance in ensuring that the organic-bearing wastes continue to be stored safely, Duke Engineering and Services Hanford commissioned the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to investigate the effect of water partial pressure (P{sub H2O}) on the water content of organic-bearing or representative wastes. Of the various interrelated controlling factors affecting the water content in wastes, P{sub H2O} is the most susceptible to being controlled by the and Hanford Site`s environmental conditions and, if necessary, could be managed to maintain the water content at an acceptable level or could be used to adjust the water content back to an acceptable level. Of the various waste types resulting from weapons production and waste-management operations at the Hanford Site, Webb et al. determined that saltcake wastes are the most likely to require active management to maintain the wastes in a Conditionally Safe condition. A Conditionally Safe waste is one that satisfies the waste classification criteria based on water content alone or a combination of water content and either total organic carbon (TOC) content or waste energetics. To provide information on the behavior of saltcake wastes, two waste samples taken from Tank 241-BY-108 (BY-108) were selected for study, even though BY-108 is not on the Organic Tanks Watch List because of their ready availability and their similarity to some of the organic-bearing saltcakes.

  5. Organic Tank Safety Project: development of a method to measure the equilibrium water content of Hanford organic tank wastes and demonstration of method on actual waste

    SciTech Connect

    Scheele, R.D.; Bredt, P.R.; Sell, R.L.

    1996-09-01

    Some of Hanford`s underground waste storage tanks contain Organic- bearing high level wastes that are high priority safety issues because of potentially hazardous chemical reactions of organics with inorganic oxidants in these wastes such as nitrates and nitrites. To ensure continued safe storage of these wastes, Westinghouse Hanford Company has placed affected tanks on the Organic Watch List and manages them under special rules. Because water content has been identified as the most efficient agent for preventing a propagating reaction and is an integral part of the criteria developed to ensure continued safe storage of Hanford`s organic-bearing radioactive tank wastes, as part of the Organic Tank Safety Program the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory developed and demonstrated a simple and easily implemented procedure to determine the equilibrium water content of these potentially reactive wastes exposed to the range of water vapor pressures that might be experienced during the wastes` future storage. This work focused on the equilibrium water content and did not investigate the various factors such as @ ventilation, tank surface area, and waste porosity that control the rate that the waste would come into equilibrium, with either the average Hanford water partial pressure 5.5 torr or other possible water partial pressures.

  6. Novel livestock water tank. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Wegman, S.

    1982-01-01

    Novel photovoltaic system provides freeze protection for livestock tanks. Ranchers and farmers living in northern climates traditionally use electric resistance heaters to prevent there stock tanks from freezing in the winter. This traditional method has two distinct drawbacks, it is expensive and it uses large quantities of electrical power each year. This project is to design to keep water tanks ice free without either of those two drawbacks. In this project a small photovoltaic under 100 watts powered an air bubbling system similar to ice prevention systems currently used to keep year round harbors open. This project is designed so that water from the bottom of the stock tank flows to the bottom of heat exchange barrier box 6 feet underground. Heat from the surrounding earth will flow into the heat exchanger and the incoming cool water from the stock tank above. An airbubbler similar to that found in many aquariums will push the warm water up and will discharge the warm water into livestock tanks.

  7. water tank 9/13/2007 1 4.1 Water tank

    E-print Network

    Taylor, Peter

    water tank 9/13/2007 1 4.1 Water tank (a) A cylindrical tank contains 800 ml of water. At t=0 (min- utes) a hole is punched in the bottom, and water begins to flow out. It takes exactly 100 seconds for the tank to empty. Draw the graph of the amount z of water in the tank against time t. Explain the shape

  8. Space Shuttle External Tank Project status

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. M. Davis

    1980-01-01

    The External Tank Project is reviewed with emphasis on the DDT&E and production phases and the lightweight tank development. It is noted that the DDT&E phase is progressing well with the structural and ground vibration test article programs complete, the propulsion test article program progressing well, and the component qualification and verification testing 92% complete. New tools and facilities are

  9. Space Shuttle External Tank Project status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, R. M.

    1980-01-01

    The External Tank Project is reviewed with emphasis on the DDT&E and production phases and the lightweight tank development. It is noted that the DDT&E phase is progressing well with the structural and ground vibration test article programs complete, the propulsion test article program progressing well, and the component qualification and verification testing 92% complete. New tools and facilities are being brought on line to support the increased build rate for the production phase. The lightweight tank, which will provide additional payload in orbit, is progressing to schedule with first delivery in early 1982.

  10. Dryout modeling in support of the organic tank safety project

    SciTech Connect

    Simmons, C.S.

    1998-08-01

    This work was performed for the Organic Tank Safety Project to evaluate the moisture condition of the waste surface organic-nitrate bearing tanks that are classified as being conditionally safe because sufficient water is present. This report describes the predictive modeling procedure used to predict the moisture content of waste in the future, after it has been subjected to dryout caused by water vapor loss through passive ventilation. This report describes a simplified procedure for modeling the drying out of tank waste. Dryout occurs as moisture evaporates from the waste into the headspace and then exits the tank through ventilation. The water vapor concentration within the waste of the headspace is determined by the vapor-liquid equilibrium, which depends on the waste`s moisture content and temperature. This equilibrium has been measured experimentally for a variety of waste samples and is described by a curve called the water vapor partial pressure isotherm. This curve describes the lowering of the partial pressure of water vapor in equilibrium with the waste relative to pure water due to the waste`s chemical composition and hygroscopic nature. Saltcake and sludge are described by two distinct calculations that emphasize the particular physical behavior or each. A simple, steady-state model is devised for each type to obtain the approximate drying behavior. The report shows the application of the model to Tanks AX-102, C-104, and U-105.

  11. 49 CFR 230.115 - Feed water tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Steam Locomotives and Tenders Steam Locomotive Tanks § 230.115 Feed water tanks. (a) General...

  12. HANFORD DOUBLE SHELL TANK (DST) THERMAL & SEISMIC PROJECT BUCKLING EVALUATION METHODS & RESULTS FOR THE PRIMARY TANKS

    SciTech Connect

    MACKEY TC; JOHNSON KI; DEIBLER JE; PILLI SP; RINKER MW; KARRI NK

    2007-02-14

    This report documents a detailed buckling evaluation of the primary tanks in the Hanford double-shell waste tanks (DSTs), which is part of a comprehensive structural review for the Double-Shell Tank Integrity Project. This work also provides information on tank integrity that specifically responds to concerns raised by the Office of Environment, Safety, and Health (ES&H) Oversight (EH-22) during a review of work performed on the double-shell tank farms and the operation of the aging waste facility (AWF) primary tank ventilation system. The current buckling review focuses on the following tasks: (1) Evaluate the potential for progressive I-bolt failure and the appropriateness of the safety factors that were used for evaluating local and global buckling. The analysis will specifically answer the following questions: (a) Can the EH-22 scenario develop if the vacuum is limited to -6.6-inch water gage (w.g.) by a relief valve? (b) What is the appropriate factor of safety required to protect against buckling if the EH-22 scenario can develop? (c) What is the appropriate factor of safety required to protect against buckling if the EH-22 scenario cannot develop? (2) Develop influence functions to estimate the axial stresses in the primary tanks for all reasonable combinations of tank loads, based on detailed finite element analysis. The analysis must account for the variation in design details and operating conditions between the different DSTs. The analysis must also address the imperfection sensitivity of the primary tank to buckling. (3) Perform a detailed buckling analysis to determine the maximum allowable differential pressure for each of the DST primary tanks at the current specified limits on waste temperature, height, and specific gravity. Based on the I-bolt loads analysis and the small deformations that are predicted at the unfactored limits on vacuum and axial loads, it is very unlikely that the EH-22 scenario (i.e., progressive I-bolt failure leading to global buckling of the tank under increased vacuum) could occur.

  13. DETAIL VIEW OF WATER TANKS AND PIPELINE TO WATER SOURCE. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL VIEW OF WATER TANKS AND PIPELINE TO WATER SOURCE. LOOKING NORTHWEST FROM LARGE TAILINGS PILE. THE TANK ON THE LEFT IS A WATER TANK, POSSIBLY ASSOCIATED WITH A WATER SHAFT THAT IS SEEN AS A RAISED SPOT ON THE GROUND JUST TO THE RIGHT OF IT. THE TANK ON THE RIGHT IS IN DIRECT CONNECTION WITH THE PIPELINE CARRYING WATER FROM A NEARBY SPRING IN THE DISTANCE AT CENTER. THE WATER WAS THEN PUMPED UP TO ALL PARTS OF THE MINING OPERATION, INCLUDING THE UPPER MINES ONE MILE NORTH, THE MILL, AND THE CYANIDE PLANT. THE PIPELINE ITSELF IS DISMANTLED, WITH PARTS OF IT MISSING OR SCATTERED ALONG THE GROUND, AS SEEN IN THE CENTER DISTANCE. THE SPRING IS APPROX. A QUARTER MILE DISTANT, AND IS NOT PROMINENT IN THIS PHOTOGRAPH. - Keane Wonder Mine, Park Route 4 (Daylight Pass Cutoff), Death Valley Junction, Inyo County, CA

  14. HANFORD DOUBLE SHELL TANK (DST) THERMAL & SEISMIC PROJECT BUCKLING EVALUATION METHODS & RESULTS FOR THE PRIMARY TANKS

    SciTech Connect

    MACKEY, T.C.

    2006-03-17

    This report documents a detailed buckling evaluation of the primary tanks in the Hanford double shell waste tanks. The analysis is part of a comprehensive structural review for the Double-Shell Tank Integrity Project. This work also provides information on tank integrity that specifically responds to concerns raise by the Office of Environment, Safety, and Health (ES&H) Oversight (EH-22) during a review (in April and May 2001) of work being performed on the double-shell tank farms, and the operation of the aging waste facility (AWF) primary tank ventilation system.

  15. Evaluation of Potential Water Intrusion Sources Tank 241-AY-101

    SciTech Connect

    STAEHR, T.W.

    2001-11-02

    This report documents the results of evaluation of potential sources of external water intrusion into Tank 241-AY-101. Two sources of water intrusion have been identified that have the potential to contribute to leakage into the tank annulus. These sources have include natural storm-induced run-on and run-off, and leakage from water lines located above the tank dome.

  16. Tank Waste Remediation System Projects Document Control Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Slater, G.D.; Halverson, T.G.

    1994-09-30

    The purpose of this Tank Waste Remediation System Projects Document Control Plan is to provide requirements and responsibilities for document control for the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP) Project and the Initial Pretreatment Module (IPM) Project.

  17. Math 315 Exam #3 Solutions in Brief 1. (20 points) Two tanks contain 10 liters of water each. Initially tank

    E-print Network

    Math 315 Exam #3 Solutions in Brief 1. (20 points) Two tanks contain 10 liters of water each. Initially tank 1 contains no salt and tank 2 contains 246 grams of salt. Water con- taining 50 grams of salt per liter is added to tank 1 at the rate 2 liters/minute. Water containing no salt is added to tank 2

  18. The Gunite and Associated Tanks Remediation Project Tank Waste Retrieval Performance and Lessons Learned, vol. 1 [of 2

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, BE

    2003-10-07

    The Gunite and Associated Tanks (GAAT) Remediation Project was the first of its kind performed in the United States. Robotics and remotely operated equipment were used to successfully transfer almost 94,000 gal of remote-handled transuranic sludge containing over 81,000 Ci of radioactive contamination from nine large underground storage tanks at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The sludge was transferred with over 439,000 gal of radioactive waste supernatant and {approx}420,500 gal of fresh water that was used in sluicing operations. The GAATs are located in a high-traffic area of ORNL near a main thoroughfare. A phased and integrated approach to waste retrieval operations was used for the GAAT Remediation Project. The project promoted safety by obtaining experience from low-risk operations in the North Tank Farm before moving to higher-risk operations in the South Tank Farm. This approach allowed project personnel to become familiar with the tanks and waste, as well as the equipment, processes, procedures, and operations required to perform successful waste retrieval. By using an integrated approach to tank waste retrieval and tank waste management, the project was completed years ahead of the original baseline schedule, which resulted in avoiding millions of dollars in associated costs. This report is organized in two volumes. Volume 1 provides information on the various phases of the GAAT Remediation Project. It also describes the different types of equipment and how they were used. The emphasis of Volume 1 is on the description of the tank waste retrieval performance and the lessons learned during the GAAT Remediation Project. Volume 2 provides the appendixes for the report, which include the following information: (A) Background Information for the Gunite and Associated Tanks Operable Unit; (B) Annotated Bibliography; (C) Comprehensive Listing of the Sample Analysis Data from the GAAT Remediation Project; (D) GAAT Equipment Matrix; and (E) Vendor List for the GAAT Remediation Project. The remediation of the GAATs was completed {approx}5.5 years ahead of schedule and {approx}$120,435,000 below the cost estimated in the Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study for the project. These schedule and cost savings were a direct result of the selection and use of state-of-the-art technologies and the dedication and drive of the engineers, technicians, managers, craft workers, and support personnel that made up the GAAT Remediation Project Team.

  19. HIGH LEVEL WASTE TANK CLOSURE PROJECT AT THE IDAHO NATIONAL ENGINEERING AND ENVIRONMENTAL LABORATORY

    SciTech Connect

    Quigley, K.D.; Wessman, D

    2003-02-27

    The Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office (DOE-ID) is in the process of closing two underground high-level waste (HLW) storage tanks at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) to meet Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) regulations and Department of Energy orders. Closure of these two tanks is scheduled for 2004 as the first phase in closure of the eleven 1.14 million liter (300,000 gallon) tanks currently in service at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC). The INTEC Tank Farm Facility (TFF) Closure sequence consists of multiple steps to be accomplished through the existing tank riser access points. Currently, the tank risers contain steam and process waste lines associated with the steam jets, corrosion coupons, and liquid level indicators. As necessary, this equipment will be removed from the risers to allow adequate space for closure equipment and activities. The basic tank closure sequence is as follows: Empty the tank to the residual heel using the existing jets; Video and sample the heel; Replace steam jets with new jet at a lower position in the tank, and remove additional material; Flush tank, piping and secondary containment with demineralized water; Video and sample the heel; Evaluate decontamination effectiveness; Displace the residual heel with multiple placements of grout; and Grout piping, vaults and remaining tank volume. Design, development, and deployment of a remotely operated tank cleaning system were completed in June 2002. The system incorporates many commercially available components, which have been adapted for application in cleaning high-level waste tanks. The system is cost-effective since it also utilizes existing waste transfer technology (steam jets), to remove tank heel solids from the tank bottoms during the cleaning operations. Remotely operated directional spray nozzles, automatic rotating wash balls, video monitoring equipment, decontamination spray-rings, and tank -specific access interface devices have been integrated to provide a system that efficiently cleans tank walls and heel solids in an acidic, radioactive environment. Through the deployment of the tank cleaning system, the INEEL High Level Waste Program has cleaned tanks to meet RCRA clean closure standards and DOE closure performance measures. Design, development, and testing of tank grouting delivery equipment were completed in October 2002. The system incorporates lessons learned from closures at other DOE facilities. The grout will be used to displace the tank residuals remaining after the cleaning is complete. To maximize heel displacement to the discharge pump, grout was placed in a sequence of five positions utilizing two riser locations. The project is evaluating the use of six positions to optimize the residuals removed. After the heel has been removed and the residuals stabilized, the tank, piping, and secondary containment will be grouted.

  20. Aseismic analysis of the emergency water tank

    SciTech Connect

    Tao, H.Y.; Yu, G.F. [NPIC, Chengdu, Sichuan (China)

    1995-11-01

    The emergency water tank is one of the important equipments for safety under the accident condition of the PWR. It was specified that this equipment must be able to resist Safe Shutdown Earthquake (SSE). There was a detailed analysis and calculation for this water container by a specially developed computer code (FSI) for the fluid-structure interaction under the earthquake. This paper describes sloshing period and wave height, dynamic pressure distribution on the tank wall and the comparison with Housner`s theory. The typical shell elements stress responses were given also. In addition, the base shear and the turn-over moment were calculated according to the shell element stress and compared with the equivalent static load method. The conclusion can be reached that the calculation results of FSI is credible.

  1. Vadose zone characterization project at the Hanford Tank Farms: U Tank Farm Report

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1997-05-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy Grand Junction Office (DOE-GJO) was tasked by the DOE Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL) to perform a baseline characterization of the gamma-ray-emitting radionuclides that are distributed in the vadose zone sediments beneath and around the single-shell tanks (SSTs) at the Hanford Site. The intent of this characterization is to determine the nature and extent of the contamination, to identify contamination sources when possible, and to develop a baseline of the contamination distribution that will permit future data comparisons. This characterization work also allows an initial assessment of the impacts of the vadose zone contamination as required by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). This characterization project involves acquiring information regarding vadose zone contamination with borehole geophysical logging methods and documenting that information in a series of reports. This information is presently limited to detection of gamma-emitting radionuclides from both natural and man-made sources. Data from boreholes surrounding each tank are compiled into individual Tank Summary Data Reports. The data from each tank in a tank farm are then compiled and summarized in a Tank Farm Report. This document is the Tank Farm Report for the U Tank Farm. Logging operations used high-purity germanium detection systems to acquire laboratory-quality assays of the gamma-emitting radionuclides in the sediments around and below the tanks. These assays were acquired in 59 boreholes that surround the U Tank Farm tanks. Logging of all boreholes was completed in December 1995, and the last Tank Summary Data Report for the U Tank Farm was issued in September 1996.

  2. Detail of gauge on side of eastiron water tank that ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail of gauge on side of east-iron water tank that indicates water level - Central of Georgia Railway, Savannah Repair Shops & Terminal Facilities, Combination Smokestack, Water Tank & Privies, Bounded by West Broad, Jones, West Boundary & Hull Streets, Savannah, Chatham County, GA

  3. A Water Tank Cerenkov Detector for Very High Energy Astroparticles

    E-print Network

    P. Bauleo; A. Etchegoyen; J. O. Fernandez Niello; A. M. J. Ferrero; A. Filevich; C. K. Guerard; F. Hasenbalg; M. A. Mostafa; D. Ravignani; J. Rodriguez Martino

    1997-07-24

    Extensive airshower detection is an important issue in current astrophysics endeavours. Surface arrays detectors are a common practice since they are easy to handle and have a 100% duty cycle. In this work we present an experimental study of the parameters relevant to the design of a water Cerenkov detector for high energy airshowers. This detector is conceived as part of the surface array of the Pierre Auger Project, which is expected to be sensitive to ultra high energy cosmic rays. In this paper we focus our attention in the geometry of the tank and its inner liner material, discussing pulse shapes and charge collections.

  4. Single-shell tank interim stabilization project plan

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, W.E.

    1998-03-27

    Solid and liquid radioactive waste continues to be stored in 149 single-shell tanks at the Hanford Site. To date, 119 tanks have had most of the pumpable liquid removed by interim stabilization. Thirty tanks remain to be stabilized. One of these tanks (C-106) will be stabilized by retrieval of the tank contents. The remaining 29 tanks will be interim stabilized by saltwell pumping. In the summer of 1997, the US Department of Energy (DOE) placed a moratorium on the startup of additional saltwell pumping systems because of funding constraints and proposed modifications to the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) milestones to the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology). In a letter dated February 10, 1998, Final Determination Pursuant to Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) in the Matter of the Disapproval of the DOE`s Change Control Form M-41-97-01 (Fitzsimmons 1998), Ecology disapproved the DOE Change Control Form M-41-97-01. In response, Fluor Daniel Hanford, Inc. (FDH) directed Lockheed Martin Hanford Corporation (LNMC) to initiate development of a project plan in a letter dated February 25, 1998, Direction for Development of an Aggressive Single-Shell Tank (SST) Interim Stabilization Completion Project Plan in Support of Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement). In a letter dated March 2, 1998, Request for an Aggressive Single-Shell Tank (SST) Interim Stabilization Completion Project Plan, the DOE reaffirmed the need for an aggressive SST interim stabilization completion project plan to support a finalized Tri-Party Agreement Milestone M-41 recovery plan. This project plan establishes the management framework for conduct of the TWRS Single-Shell Tank Interim Stabilization completion program. Specifically, this plan defines the mission needs and requirements; technical objectives and approach; organizational structure, roles, responsibilities, and interfaces; and operational methods. The plan is based on realistic assumptions and addresses three separate funding scenarios.

  5. 13. Water treatment plant interior view of tanks in control ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. Water treatment plant interior view of tanks in control room. View to SW - Fort Benton Water Treatment Plant, Filtration Plant, Lots 9-13 of Block 7, Fort Benton Original Townsite at Missouri River, Fort Benton, Chouteau County, MT

  6. 7. SITE BUILDING 022 WATER SUPPLY TANK VIEW ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. SITE BUILDING 022 - WATER SUPPLY TANK - VIEW IS LOOKING NORTH AT WATER TOWERS AND DIRECTLY AT SITE ENTRY GATE. - Cape Cod Air Station, Massachusetts Military Reservation, Sandwich, Barnstable County, MA

  7. 8. SETTLING TANK, WEST SIDE; WATER PIPE FROM INTAKE STRUCTURE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. SETTLING TANK, WEST SIDE; WATER PIPE FROM INTAKE STRUCTURE IN FOREGROUND. - Hondius Water Line, 1.6 miles Northwest of Park headquarters building & 1 mile Northwest of Beaver Meadows entrance station, Estes Park, Larimer County, CO

  8. Project W-320 Tank 106-C waste retrieval study analysis session report

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, J.W.

    1998-03-25

    This supporting document has been prepared to make the Kaiser Engineers Hanford Company Project W-320 Tank 106-C Waste Retrieval Study Analysis Session Report readily retrievable. This facilitated session was requested by Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) to review the characterization data and select the best alternatives for a double-shell receiver tank and for a sluicing medium for Tank 106-C waste retrieval. The team was composed of WHC and Kaiser Engineers Hanford Company (KEH) personnel knowledgeable about tank farm operations, tank 106-C requirements, tank waste characterization and analysis, and chemical processing. This team was assembled to perform a structured decision analysis evaluation and recommend the best alternative-destination double-shell tank between tanks 101-AY and 102-AY, and the best alternative sluicing medium among dilute complexant (DC), dilute noncomplexant (DNC), and water. The session was facilitated by Richard Harrington and Steve Bork of KEH and was conducted at the Bookwalter Winery in Richland from 7:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. from July 27 through July 29, 1993. Attachment 1 (Scope Statement Sheet) identifies the team members, scope, objectives, and deliverables for the session.

  9. Vadose zone characterization project at the Hanford Tank Farms: BY Tank Farm report

    SciTech Connect

    Kos, S.E.

    1997-02-01

    The US Department of Energy Grand Junction Office (GJO) was tasked by the DOE Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL) to perform a baseline characterization of the contamination distributed in the vadoze zone sediment beneath and around the single-shell tanks (SSTs) at the Hanford Site. The intent of this characterization is to determine the nature and extent of the contamination, to identify contamination sources, and to develop a baseline of the contamination distribution that will permit future data comparisons. This characterization work also allows an initial assessment of the impacts of the vadose zone contamination as required by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). This characterization project involves acquiring information about the vadose zone contamination with borehole geophysical logging methods and documenting that information in a series of reports. Data from boreholes surrounding each tank are compiled into individual Tank Summary Data Reports. The data from each tank farm are then compiled and summarized in a Tank Farm Report. This document is the Tank Farm Report for the BY Tank Farm.

  10. The Gunite and Associated Tanks Remediation Project Tank Waste Retrieval Performance and Lessons Learned, vol. 2 [of 2

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, BE

    2003-10-07

    The Gunite and Associated Tanks (GAAT) Remediation Project was the first of its kind performed in the United States. Robotics and remotely operated equipment were used to successfully transfer almost 94,000 gal of remote-handled transuranic sludge containing over 81,000 Ci of radioactive contamination from nine large underground storage tanks at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The sludge was transferred with over 439,000 gal of radioactive waste supernatant and {approx}420,500 gal of fresh water that was used in sluicing operations. The GAATs are located in a high-traffic area of ORNL near a main thoroughfare. Volume 1 provides information on the various phases of the project and describes the types of equipment used. Volume 1 also discusses the tank waste retrieval performance and the lessons learned during the remediation effort. Volume 2 consists of the following appendixes, which are referenced in Vol. 1: A--Background Information for the Gunite and Associated Tanks Operable Unit; B--Annotated Bibliography; C--GAAT Equipment Matrix; D--Comprehensive Listing of the Sample Analysis Data from the GAAT Remediation Project; and E--Vendor List for the GAAT Remediation Project. The remediation of the GAATs was completed {approx}5.5 years ahead of schedule and {approx}$120,435K below the cost estimated in the Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study for the project. These schedule and cost savings were a direct result of the selection and use of state-of-the-art technologies and the dedication and drive of the engineers, technicians, managers, craft workers, and support personnel that made up the GAAT Remediation Project Team.

  11. Our Environment in Hot Water: Comparing Water Heaters, A Life Cycle Approach Comparing Tank and Tankless Water Heaters in California

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Alison; McMahon, James; Masanet, Eric; Lutz, Jim

    2008-08-13

    Residential water heating is a large source of energy use in California homes. This project took a life cycle approach to comparing tank and tankless water heaters in Northern and Southern California. Information about the life cycle phases was calculated using the European Union?s Methodology study for EcoDesign of Energy-using Products (MEEUP) and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory?s Life Cycle Inventory (NREL LCI) database. In a unit-to-unit comparison, it was found that tankless water heaters would lessen impacts of water heating by reducing annual energy use by 2800 MJ/year (16% compared to tank), and reducing global warming emissions by 175 kg CO2 eqv./year (18% reduction). Overall, the production and combustion of natural gas in the use phase had the largest impact. Total waste, VOCs, PAHs, particulate matter, and heavy-metals-to-air categories were also affected relatively strongly by manufacturing processes. It was estimated that tankless water heater users would have to use 10 more gallons of hot water a day (an increased usage of approximately 20%) to have the same impact as tank water heaters. The project results suggest that if a higher percentage of Californians used tankless water heaters, environmental impacts caused by water heating would be smaller.

  12. Single Shell Tank (SST) Retrieval Project Plan for Tank 241-C-104 Retrieval

    SciTech Connect

    DEFIGH PRICE, C.

    2000-09-20

    In support of the SST Interim Closure Project, Project W-523 ''Tank 241-C-104 Waste Retrieval System'' will provide systems for retrieval and transfer of radioactive waste from tank 241-C-104 (C-104) to the DST staging tank 241-AY-101 (AY-101). At the conclusion of Project W-523, a retrieval system will have been designed and tested to meet the requirements for Acceptance of Beneficial Use and been turned over to operations. Completion of construction and operations of the C-104 retrieval system will meet the recently proposed near-term Tri-Party Agreement milestone, M-45-03F (Proposed Tri-Party Agreement change request M-45-00-01A, August, 30 2000) for demonstrating limits of retrieval technologies on sludge and hard heels in SSTs, reduce near-term storage risks associated with aging SSTs, and provide feed for the tank waste treatment plant. This Project Plan documents the methodology for managing Project W-523; formalizes responsibilities; identifies key interfaces required to complete the retrieval action; establishes the technical, cost, and schedule baselines; and identifies project organizational requirements pertaining to the engineering process such as environmental, safety, quality assurance, change control, design verification, testing, and operational turnover.

  13. Single Shell Tank (SST) Interim Stabilization Project Plan

    SciTech Connect

    VLADIMIROFF, D.T.; BOYLES, V.C.

    2000-05-22

    This project plan establishes the management framework for the conduct of the CHG Single-Shell Tank Interim Stabilization completion program. Specifically, this plan defines the mission needs and requirements; technical objectives and approach; organization structure, roles, responsibilities, and interfaces; and operational methods. This plan serves as the project executional baseline.

  14. Single-shell tank interim stabilization project plan

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, W.E.

    1998-05-11

    This project plan establishes the management framework for conduct of the TWRS Single-Shell Tank Interim Stabilization completion program. Specifically, this plan defines the mission needs and requirements; technical objectives and approach; organizational structure, roles, responsibilities, and interfaces; and operational methods. This plan serves as the project executional baseline.

  15. MODELING DISINFECTANT RESIDUALS IN DRINKING-WATER STORAGE TANKS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The factors leading to the loss of disinfectant residual in well-mixed drinking-water storage tanks are studied. Equations relating disinfectant residual to the disinfectant's reation rate, the tank volume, and the fill and drain rates are presented. An analytical solution for ...

  16. MODELING DISINFECTANT RESIDUALS IN DRINKING-WATER STORAGE TANKS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The factors leading to the loss of disinfectant residual in well-mixed drinking-water storage tanks are studied. quations relating disinfectant residual to the disinfectant's reaction rate, the tank volume, and the fill and drain rates are presented. n analytical solution for the...

  17. SEQUENCE OF TANK-MIXING WATER CONDITIONING ADJUVANTS AND HERBICIDES

    Microsoft Academic Search

    John D. Nalewaja; Zenon Woznica; Edward F. Szeleznak; Brad Ramsdale

    2007-01-01

    SUMMARY Experiments were conducted to determine glyphosate and other weak acid salt herbicide efficacy when applied with ammonium sulfate (AMS) and other water conditioning adjuvants mixed into the spray tank before or after the herbicide. Glyphosate isopropylamine, bentazon sodium, 2,4-D dimethylamine, and dicamba sodium were all equally effective when the AMS was added to the spray tank before or after

  18. HANFORD DOUBLE SHELL TANK THERMAL AND SEISMIC PROJECT BUCKLING EVALUATION METHODS AND RESULTS FOR THE PRIMARY TANKS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    MACKEY TC; JOHNSON KI; DEIBLER JE; PILLI SP; RINKER MW; KARRI NK

    2009-01-01

    This report documents a detailed buckling evaluation of the primary tanks in the Hanford double-shell waste tanks (DSTs), which is part of a comprehensive structural review for the Double-Shell Tank Integrity Project. This work also provides information on tank integrity that specifically responds to concerns raised by the Office of Environment, Safety, and Health (ES&H) Oversight (EH-22) during a review

  19. HANFORD DOUBLE SHELL TANK (DST) THERMAL & SEISMIC PROJECT SEISMIC ANALYSIS OF HANFORD DOUBLE SHELL TANKS

    SciTech Connect

    MACKEY, T.C.

    2006-03-17

    M&D Professional Services, Inc. (M&D) is under subcontract to Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to perform seismic analysis of the Hanford Site double-shell tanks (DSTs) in support of a project entitled ''Double-Shell Tank (DSV Integrity Project--DST Thermal and Seismic Analyses)''. The overall scope of the project is to complete an up-to-date comprehensive analysis of record of the DST system at Hanford in support of Tri-Party Agreement Milestone M-48-14, The work described herein was performed in support of the seismic analysis of the DSTs. The thermal and operating loads analysis of the DSTs is documented in Rinker et al. (2004). The work statement provided to M&D (PNNL 2003) required that the seismic analysis of the DSTs assess the impacts of potentially non-conservative assumptions in previous analyses and account for the additional soil mass due to the as-found soil density increase, the effects of material degradation, additional thermal profiles applied to the full structure including the soil-structure response with the footings, the non-rigid (low frequency) response of the tank roof, the asymmetric seismic-induced soil loading, the structural discontinuity between the concrete tank wall and the support footing and the sloshing of the tank waste. The seismic analysis considers the interaction of the tank with the surrounding soil and the effects of the primary tank contents. The DSTs and the surrounding soil are modeled as a system of finite elements. The depth and width of the soil incorporated into the analysis model are sufficient to obtain appropriately accurate analytical results. The analyses required to support the work statement differ from previous analysis of the DSTs in that the soil-structure interaction (SSI) model includes several (nonlinear) contact surfaces in the tank structure, and the contained waste must be modeled explicitly in order to capture the fluid-structure interaction behavior between the primary tank and contained waste.

  20. 27. View within machine room showing water tank, tool chest ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    27. View within machine room showing water tank, tool chest and oil/grease cans used for maintenance. (Nov. 25, 1988) - University Heights Bridge, Spanning Harlem River at 207th Street & West Harlem Road, New York, New York County, NY

  1. VIEW OF SOUTHERNMOST OF TWO HEAVY WATER STORAGE TANKS, LOCATED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF SOUTHERN-MOST OF TWO HEAVY WATER STORAGE TANKS, LOCATED BEHIND SUPPORT COLUMN, WITH ADJACENT PIPING, LEVEL -27?, LOOKING WEST - Physics Assembly Laboratory, Area A/M, Savannah River Site, Aiken, Aiken County, SC

  2. VIEW OF TWO HEAVY WATER STORAGE TANKS (BEHIND SUPPORT COLUMNS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF TWO HEAVY WATER STORAGE TANKS (BEHIND SUPPORT COLUMNS AND STEEL BEAMS), SUB-BASEMENT LEVEL -27?, LOOKING SOUTHWEST - Physics Assembly Laboratory, Area A/M, Savannah River Site, Aiken, Aiken County, SC

  3. Everett Weinreb, Photographer, April 1989 WATER TANK, LOOKING SOUTHEAST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Everett Weinreb, Photographer, April 1989 WATER TANK, LOOKING SOUTHEAST - Irvine Ranch Agricultural Headquarters, Boyd Tenant House, Southeast of Intersection of San Diego & Santa Ana Freeways, Irvine, Orange County, CA

  4. Contingency plan for the Old Hydrofracture Facility Tanks Sluicing Project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1998-06-01

    This revised contingency plan addresses potential scenarios involving the release of radioactively contaminated waste from the Old Hydrofracture Facility Tanks Contents Removal project to the environment. The tanks are located at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The project involves sluicing the contents of the five underground tanks to mix the sludge and supernatant layers, and pumping the mixture to the Melton Valley Storage Tanks (MVST) for future processing. The sluicing system to be used for the project consists of a spray nozzle designated the {open_quotes}Borehole Miner,{close_quotes} with an associated pump; in-tank submersible pumps to transfer tank contents from the sluice tanks to the recycle tank; high-pressure pumps providing slurry circulation and slurry transport to the MVST; piping; a ventilation system; a process water system; an instrumentation and control system centered around a programmable logic controller; a video monitoring system; and auxiliary equipment. The earlier version of this plan, which was developed during the preliminary design phase of the project, identified eight scenarios in which waste from the tanks might be released to the environment as a result of unanticipated equipment failure or an accident (e.g., vehicular accident). One of those scenarios, nuclear criticality, is no longer addressed by this plan because the tank waste will be isotopically diluted before sluicing begins. The other seven scenarios have been combined into three, and a fourth, Borehole Miner Failure, has been added as follows: (1) underground release from the tanks; (2) aboveground release or spill from the sluicing system, a tank riser, or the transfer pipeline; (3) release of unfiltered air through the ventilation system; and (4) Borehole Miner arm retraction failure. Methods for preventing, detecting, and responding to each release scenario are set out in the plan.

  5. STATUS OF CHEMICAL CLEANING OF WASTE TANKS AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE F TANK FARM CLOSURE PROJECT - 9114

    SciTech Connect

    Thaxton, D; Geoff Clendenen, G; Willie Gordon, W; Samuel Fink, S; Michael Poirier, M

    2008-12-31

    Chemical Cleaning is currently in progress for Tanks 5 and 6 at the Savannah River Site. The Chemical Cleaning process is being utilized to remove the residual waste heel remaining after completion of Mechanical Sludge Removal. This work is required to prepare the tanks for closure. Tanks 5 and 6 are 1950s vintage carbon steel waste tanks that do not meet current containment standards. These tanks are 22.9 meters (75 feet) in diameter, 7.5 meters (24.5 feet) in height, and have a capacity of 2.84E+6 liters (750,000 gallons). Chemical Cleaning adds 8 wt % oxalic acid to the carbon steel tank to dissolve the remaining sludge heel. The resulting acidic waste solution is transferred to Tank 7 where it is pH adjusted to minimize corrosion of the carbon steel tank. The Chemical Cleaning flowsheet includes multiple strikes of acid in each tank. Acid is delivered by tanker truck and is added to the tanks through a hose assembly connected to a pipe penetration through the tank top. The flowsheet also includes spray washing with acid and water. This paper includes an overview of the configuration required for Chemical Cleaning, the planned flowsheet, and an overview of technical concerns associated with the process. In addition, the current status of the Chemical Cleaning process in Tanks 5 and 6, lessons learned from the execution of the process, and the path forward for completion of cleaning in Tanks 5 and 6 will also be discussed.

  6. HANFORD DOUBLE SHELL TANK THERMAL AND SEISMIC PROJECT BUCKLING EVALUATION METHODS AND RESULTS FOR THE PRIMARY TANKS

    SciTech Connect

    MACKEY TC; JOHNSON KI; DEIBLER JE; PILLI SP; RINKER MW; KARRI NK

    2009-01-14

    This report documents a detailed buckling evaluation of the primary tanks in the Hanford double-shell waste tanks (DSTs), which is part of a comprehensive structural review for the Double-Shell Tank Integrity Project. This work also provides information on tank integrity that specifically responds to concerns raised by the Office of Environment, Safety, and Health (ES&H) Oversight (EH-22) during a review of work performed on the double-shell tank farms and the operation of the aging waste facility (AWF) primary tank ventilation system. The current buckling review focuses on the following tasks: (1) Evaluate the potential for progressive anchor bolt failure and the appropriateness of the safety factors that were used for evaluating local and global buckling. The analysis will specifically answer the following questions: (a) Can the EH-22 scenario develop if the vacuum is limited to -6.6-inch water gage (w.g.) by a relief valve? (b) What is the appropriate factor of safety required to protect against buckling if the EH-22 scenario can develop? (c) What is the appropriate factor of safety required to protect against buckling if the EH-22 scenario cannot develop? (2) Develop influence functions to estimate the axial stresses in the primary tanks for all reasonable combinations of tank loads based on detailed finite element analysis. The analysis must account for the variation in design details and operating conditions between the different DSTs. The analysis must also address the imperfection sensitivity of the primary tank to buckling. (3) Perform a detailed buckling analysis to determine the maximum allowable differential pressure for each of the DST primary tanks at the current specified limits on waste temperature, height, and specific gravity. Based on the concrete anchor bolt loads analysis and the small deformations that are predicted at the unfactored limits on vacuum and axial loads, it is very unlikely that the EH-22 scenario (i.e., progressive anchor bolt failure leading to global buckling of the tank under increased vacuum) could occur. After releasing Revision 0 of this report, an independent review of the Double Shell Tanks (DST) Thermal and Operating Loads Analysis (TaLA) combined with the Seismic Analysis was conducted by Dr. Robert P. Kennedy of RPK Structural Mechanics Consulting and Dr. Anestis S. Veletsos of Rice University. Revision I was then issued to address their review comments (included in Appendix D). Additional concerns involving the evaluation of concrete anchor loads and allowables were found during a second review by Drs. Kennedy and Veletsos (see Appendix G). Extensive additional analysis was performed on the anchors, which is detailed by Deibler et al. (2008a, 2008b). The current report (Revision 2) references this recent work, and additional analysis is presented to show that anchor loads do not concentrate significantly in the presence of a local buckle.

  7. 45. STEEL RESERVOIR TANKS FOR NEW SPRINGFED WATER SYSTEM INSTALLED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    45. STEEL RESERVOIR TANKS FOR NEW SPRING-FED WATER SYSTEM INSTALLED IN 1982. LOCATED IN WAIHANAU VALLEY, THIS REPLACED THE WAIKOLU SYSTEM AND PROVIDES A MORE CONSISTENT AND CLEAN WATER SUPPLY FOR KALAUPAPA. - Kalaupapa Water Supply System, Waikolu Valley to Kalaupapa Settlement, Island of Molokai, Kalaupapa, Kalawao County, HI

  8. Conceptual design report for tank farm restoration and safe operations, project W-314

    SciTech Connect

    Briggs, S.R., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-05-02

    This Conceptual Design Report (CDR) presents the conceptual level design approach that satisfies the established technical requirements for Project W-314, `Tank Farm Restoration and Safe Operations.` The CDR also addresses the initial cost and schedule baselines for performing the proposed Tank Farm infrastructure upgrades. The scope of this project includes capital improvements to Hanford`s existing tank farm facilities(primarily focused on Double- Shell Tank Farms) in the areas of instrumentation/control, tank ventilation, waste transfer, and electrical systems.

  9. Safety evaluation for adding water to tank 101-SY

    SciTech Connect

    Clinton, R.

    1994-12-09

    This document provides a new water limit for Tank 241-SY-101. The original limit was set at 9600 gallons. The new limit is now 20,000 gallons. There are various activities that require the use of additional water to the tank. The main activity is the removal of the temporary mixer pump. This requires a large amount of water which will exceed the original limit. Also, other activities such as flushing, adding a viscometer, and adding a void fraction meter requires additional water. The new limit safely incorporates these activities and allows room for more future activities.

  10. Project management plan for Project W-320, Tank 241-C-106 sluicing. Revision 2

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, D.R.

    1994-07-01

    A major mission of the US Department of Energy (DOE) is the permanent disposal of Hanford Site defense wastes by utilizing safe, environmentally acceptable, and cost-effective disposal methods that meet applicable regulations. The Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Program was established at the Hanford Site to manage and control activities specific to the remediation of safety watch list tanks, including high-heat-producing tanks, and for the ultimate characterization, retrieval, pretreatment, and disposal of the low- and high-level fractions of the tank waste. Project W-320, Tank 241-C-106 Sluicing, provides the methodology, equipment, utilities, and facilities necessary for retrieving the high-heat waste from single-shell tank (SST) 24-C-106. Project W-320 is a fiscal year (FY) 1993 expense-funded major project, and has a design life of 2 years. Retrieval of the waste in tank 241-C-106 will be accomplished through mobilization of the sludge into a pumpable slurry using past-practice sluicing. The waste is then transferred directly to a double-shell tank for interim storage, subsequent pretreatment, and eventual disposal. A detailed description of the management organization and responsibilities of all participants is presented in this document.

  11. Observation of EAS using a large water tank

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, K.; Sakuyama, H.; Suzuki, N.; Suzuki, T.

    1985-08-01

    Using a large water tank (30 m in diameter, 4.5 m in depth) transition of extensive air showers (EAS) was investigated at Taro (200 m above sea level). There are set 150,0.4 sq m proportional counters on the bottom of the water tank. A conventional EAS array of 25 plastic scintillation detectors was arranged within several tens meter from the water tank. A proportional counter (10x10x200 cc x2) is made of a square shaped pipe of iron. Tungsten wire (100 mu m phi) is stretched tight in the center of the counter. A gas mixture of 90% argon and 10% methane is used at 760 mmHg. About 3000 EAS were obtained through 1 m of water since 1984.

  12. Hanford Tank Safety Project: Minutes of the Tank Waste Science Panel meeting, February 7--8, 1991

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Strachan

    1991-01-01

    The Tank Waste Science Panel met February 7--8, 1991, to review the latest data from the analyses of the October 24, 1990, gas release from Tank 241-SY-101 (101-SY) at Hanford; discuss the results of work being performed in support of the Hanford Tank Safety Project; and be briefed on the ferrocyanide issues included in the expanded scope of the Science

  13. ONE MILLION GALLON WATER TANK, PUMP HEADER PIPE (AT LEFT), ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    ONE MILLION GALLON WATER TANK, PUMP HEADER PIPE (AT LEFT), HEADER BYPASS PIPE (AT RIGHT), AND PUMPHOUSE FOUNDATIONS. Looking northeast - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Flame Deflector Water System, Test Area 1-120, north end of Jupiter Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  14. Interface control document for tank waste remediation system privatization phase 1 infrastructure support Project W-519

    SciTech Connect

    Parazin, R.J.

    1998-04-23

    This document describes the functional and physical interfaces between the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Privatization Phase 1 Infrastructure Project W-519 and the various other projects (i.e., Projects W-314, W-464, W-465, and W-520) supporting Phase 1 that will require the allocation of land in and about the Privatization Phase 1 Site and/or interface with the utilities extended by Project W-519. Project W-519 will identify land use allocations and upgrade/extend several utilities in the 200-East Area into the Privatization Phase 1 Site (formerly the Grout Disposal Compound) in preparation for the Privatization Contractors (PC) to construct treatment facilities. The project will upgrade/extend: Roads, Electrical Power, Raw Water (for process and fire suppression), Potable Water, and Liquid Effluent collection. The replacement of an existing Sanitary Sewage treatment system that may be displaced by Phase 1 site preparation activities may also be included.

  15. Single-shell tank interim stabilization project plan

    Microsoft Academic Search

    1998-01-01

    Solid and liquid radioactive waste continues to be stored in 149 single-shell tanks at the Hanford Site. To date, 119 tanks have had most of the pumpable liquid removed by interim stabilization. Thirty tanks remain to be stabilized. One of these tanks (C-106) will be stabilized by retrieval of the tank contents. The remaining 29 tanks will be interim stabilized

  16. OVERVIEW OF ENHANCED HANFORD SINGLE-SHELL TANK (SST) INTEGRITY PROJECT - 12128

    Microsoft Academic Search

    VENETZ TJ; BOOMER KD; WASHENFELDER DJ; JOHNSON JB

    2012-01-01

    To improve the understanding of the single-shell tanks integrity, Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC, the USDOE Hanford Site tank contractor, developed an enhanced Single-Shell Tank (SST) Integrity Project in 2009. An expert panel on SST integrity, consisting of various subject matters experts in industry and academia, was created to provide recommendations supporting the development of the project. This panel developed

  17. EBR-II Primary Tank Wash-Water Alternatives Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Demmer, R. L.; Heintzelman, J. B.; Merservey, R. H.; Squires, L. N.

    2008-05-01

    The EBR-II reactor at Idaho National Laboratory was a liquid sodium metal cooled reactor that operated for 30 years. It was shut down in 1994; the fuel was removed by 1996; and the bulk of sodium metal coolant was removed from the reactor by 2001. Approximately 1100 kg of residual sodium remained in the primary system after draining the bulk sodium. To stabilize the remaining sodium, both the primary and secondary systems were treated with a purge of moist carbon dioxide. Most of the residual sodium reacted with the carbon dioxide and water vapor to form a passivation layer of primarily sodium bicarbonate. The passivation treatment was stopped in 2005 and the primary system is maintained under a blanket of dry carbon dioxide. Approximately 670 kg of sodium metal remains in the primary system in locations that were inaccessible to passivation treatment or in pools of sodium that were too deep for complete penetration of the passivation treatment. The EBR-II reactor was permitted by the Idaho Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) in 2002 under a RCRA permit that requires removal of all remaining sodium in the primary and secondary systems by 2022. The proposed baseline closure method would remove the large components from the primary tank, fill the primary system with water, react the remaining sodium with the water and dissolve the reaction products in the wash water. This method would generate a minimum of 100,000 gallons of caustic, liquid, low level radioactive, hazardous waste water that must be disposed of in a permitted facility. On February 19-20, 2008, a workshop was held in Idaho Falls, Idaho, to look at alternatives that could meet the RCRA permit clean closure requirements and minimize the quantity of hazardous waste generated by the cleanup process. The workshop convened a panel of national and international sodium cleanup specialists, subject matter experts from the INL, and the EBR-II Wash Water Project team that organized the workshop. The workshop was conducted by a trained facilitator using Value Engineering techniques to elicit the most technically sound solutions from the workshop participants. The path forward includes developing the OBA into a well engineered solution for achieving RCRA clean closure of the EBR-II Primary Reactor Tank system. Several high level tasks are also part of the path forward such as reassigning responsibility of the cleanup project to a dedicated project team that is funded by the DOE Office of Environmental Management, and making it a priority so that adequate funding is available to complete the project. Based on the experience of the sodium cleanup specialists, negotiations with the DEQ will be necessary to determine a risk-based de minimus quantity for acceptable amount of sodium that can be left in the reactor systems after cleanup has been completed.

  18. HANFORD DOUBLE SHELL TANK THERMAL AND SEISMIC PROJECT SEISMIC ANALYSIS OF HANFORD DOUBLE SHELL TANKS

    SciTech Connect

    MACKEY TC; RINKER MW; CARPENTER BG; HENDRIX C; ABATT FG

    2009-01-15

    M&D Professional Services, Inc. (M&D) is under subcontract to Pacific Northwest National Laboratories (PNNL) to perform seismic analysis of the Hanford Site Double-Shell Tanks (DSTs) in support of a project entitled Double-Shell Tank (DST) Integrity Project - DST Thermal and Seismic Analyses. The original scope of the project was to complete an up-to-date comprehensive analysis of record of the DST System at Hanford in support of Tri-Party Agreement Milestone M-48-14. The work described herein was performed in support of the seismic analysis of the DSTs. The thermal and operating loads analysis of the DSTs is documented in Rinker et al. (2004). Although Milestone M-48-14 has been met, Revision I is being issued to address external review comments with emphasis on changes in the modeling of anchor bolts connecting the concrete dome and the steel primary tank. The work statement provided to M&D (PNNL 2003) required that a nonlinear soil structure interaction (SSI) analysis be performed on the DSTs. The analysis is required to include the effects of sliding interfaces and fluid sloshing (fluid-structure interaction). SSI analysis has traditionally been treated by frequency domain computer codes such as SHAKE (Schnabel, et al. 1972) and SASSI (Lysmer et al. 1999a). Such frequency domain programs are limited to the analysis of linear systems. Because of the contact surfaces, the response of the DSTs to a seismic event is inherently nonlinear and consequently outside the range of applicability of the linear frequency domain programs. That is, the nonlinear response of the DSTs to seismic excitation requires the use of a time domain code. The capabilities and limitations of the commercial time domain codes ANSYS{reg_sign} and MSC Dytran{reg_sign} for performing seismic SSI analysis of the DSTs and the methodology required to perform the detailed seismic analysis of the DSTs has been addressed in Rinker et al (2006a). On the basis of the results reported in Rinker et al. (2006a), it is concluded that time-domain SSI analysis using ANSYS{reg_sign} is justified for predicting the global response of the DSTs. The most significant difference between the current revision (Revision 1) of this report and the original issue (Revision 0) is the treatment of the anchor bolts that tie the steel dome of the primary tank to the concrete tank dome.

  19. TANK FARM REMEDIATION TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT PROJECT AN EXERCISE IN TECHNICAL & REGULATORY COLLABORATION

    SciTech Connect

    JARAYSI, M.N.

    2007-01-08

    The Tank Farm Remediation Technology Development Project at the Hanford Site focuses on waste storage tanks, pipelines and associated ancillary equipment that are part of the C-200 single-shell tank (SST) farm system located in the C Tank Farm. The purpose of the project is to obtain information on the implementation of a variety of closure activities and to answer questions on technical, operational and regulatory issues associated with closure.

  20. Test and evaluation plan for Project W-314 tank farm restoration and safe operations

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hays

    1998-01-01

    The ``Tank Farm Restoration and Safe Operations`` (TFRSO), Project W-314 will restore and\\/or upgrade existing Hanford Tank Farm facilities and systems to ensure that the Tank Farm infrastructure will be able to support near term TWRS Privatization`s waste feed delivery and disposal system and continue safe management of tank waste. The capital improvements provided by this project will increase the

  1. Water development projects map

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    A new map showing major water development projects across the United States has been published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). The map shows the location, size, and ownership of approximately 2800 of the nation's major multipurpose and flood control dams and virtually all of the reservoir storage and flood control capacity of the country. Other features illustrated on the map include U.S. Bureau of Reclamation surface water irrigation projects; watershed protection projects of the U.S. Soil Conservation Service; hydroelectric power facilities, including both federal plants and nonfederal plants leased by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission; U.S. Army Corps of Engineers navigation and flood damage reduction projects; and the federal systems of wild and scenic rivers. The map also delineates major rivers and the 21 USGS water resources region boundaries so that users of the map can locate development projects with respect to drainage basins.

  2. Headspace vapor characterization of Hanford Waste Tank 241-S-102: Results from samples collected on January 26, 1996. Tank Vapor Characterization Project

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, J.C.; Thomas, B.L.; Pool, K.H. [and others

    1996-07-01

    This report describes the results of vapor samples obtained to compare vapor sampling of the tank headspace using the Vapor Sampling System (VSS) and In Situ Vapor Sampling System (ISVS) with and without particulate prefiltration. Samples were collected from the headspace of waste storage tank 241-S-102 (Tank S-102) at the Hanford Site in Washington State. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) was contracted by Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) to provide sampling devices and analyze samples for water, ammonia, permanent gases, total nonmethane hydrocarbons (TNMHCs, also known as TO-12), and organic analytes in samples collected in SUMMA{trademark} canisters and on triple sorbent traps (TSTs) from the tank headspace. The analytical work was performed by the PNNL Vapor Analytical Laboratory (VAL) by the Tank Vapor Characterization Project. Work performed was based on a sampling and analysis plan (SAP) prepared by WHC. The SAP provided job-specific instructions for samples, analyses, and reporting. The SAP for this sample job was {open_quotes}Sampling and Analysis Plan for Tank Vapor Sampling Comparison Test{close_quote}, and the sample jobs were designated S6007, S6008, and S6009. Samples were collected by WHC on January 26, 1996, using the VSS, a truck-based sampling method using a heated probe; and the ISVS with and without particulate prefiltration.

  3. 19. EMPTY SEDIMENTATION TANKS. TOP LAYER OF WATER FLOWS OVER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. EMPTY SEDIMENTATION TANKS. TOP LAYER OF WATER FLOWS OVER TRIANGULATED CHANNELS AND OUT THE RAISED DUCTS TO FILTRATION PLANT. MOVEABLE BOARDS ON BOTTOM ASSIST IN REMOVING SLUDGE. VIEW LOOKING NORTHEAST. FILTER CONTROL BUILDING AT REAR. - F. E. Weymouth Filtration Plant, 700 North Moreno Avenue, La Verne, Los Angeles County, CA

  4. View of Water Storage Tank off entrance tunnel. Tunnel at ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of Water Storage Tank off entrance tunnel. Tunnel at left of image to Launch Silos - Titan One Missile Complex 2A, .3 miles west of 129 Road and 1.5 miles north of County Line Road, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  5. HANFORD DOUBLE SHELL TANK (DST) THERMAL & SEISMIC PROJECT INCREASED LIQUID LEVEL ANALYSIS FOR 241-AP TANK FARMS

    SciTech Connect

    MACKEY TC; DEIBLER JE; JOHNSON KI; PILLI SP; KARRI NK; RINKER MW; ABATT FG; CARPENTER BG

    2007-02-16

    The overall scope of the project is to complete an up-to-date comprehensive analysis of record of the SDT System at Hanford. The "Double-Shell Tank (DST) Integrity Project - DST Thermal and Seismic Project" is in support of Tri-Party Agreement Milestone M-48-14.

  6. Dynamics and solutions to some control problems for water-tank systems

    E-print Network

    dynamics . We concentrate on finding open-loop tank trajectories such that if the liquid is initially1 Dynamics and solutions to some control problems for water-tank systems Nicolas Petit , Pierre Rouchon Abstract We consider a tank containing a fluid. The tank is subjected to directly controlled

  7. HANFORD SITE RIVER PROTECTION PROJECT (RPP) TANK FARM CLOSURE

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. N. JARAYSI; Z. SMITH; R. QUINTERO; M. B. BURANDT; W. HEWITT

    2006-01-01

    The U. S. Department of Energy, Office of River Protection and the CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. are responsible for the operations, cleanup, and closure activities at the Hanford Tank Farms. There are 177 tanks overall in the tank farms, 149 single-shell tanks (see Figure 1), and 28 double-shell tanks (see Figure 2). The single-shell tanks were constructed 40 to

  8. HIGH LEVEL WASTE MECHANCIAL SLUDGE REMOVAL AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE F TANK FARM CLOSURE PROJECT

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rudy C. Jolly; B Bruce Martin

    2008-01-01

    The Savannah River Site F-Tank Farm Closure project has successfully performed Mechanical Sludge Removal (MSR) using the Waste on Wheels (WOW) system for the first time within one of its storage tanks. The WOW system is designed to be relatively mobile with the ability for many components to be redeployed to multiple waste tanks. It is primarily comprised of Submersible

  9. ICS solar systems with two water tanks

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Y. Tripanagnostopoulos; M. Souliotis

    2006-01-01

    Integrated collector storage (ICS) systems are compact solar water heaters, simple in construction, installation and operation. They are cheaper than flat plate thermosiphonic units, but their higher thermal losses make them suitable mainly for application in locations with favourable weather conditions. Aiming to the achievement of low system height and satisfactory water temperature stratification, new types of ICS systems with

  10. 33 CFR 165.1313 - Security zone regulations, tank ship protection, Puget Sound and adjacent waters, Washington

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...false Security zone regulations, tank ship protection, Puget Sound and adjacent waters...1313 Security zone regulations, tank ship protection, Puget Sound and adjacent waters...suspension of enforcement. The tank ship security zone established by this...

  11. 33 CFR 165.1313 - Security zone regulations, tank ship protection, Puget Sound and adjacent waters, Washington

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...false Security zone regulations, tank ship protection, Puget Sound and adjacent waters...1313 Security zone regulations, tank ship protection, Puget Sound and adjacent waters...suspension of enforcement. The tank ship security zone established by this...

  12. 33 CFR 165.1313 - Security zone regulations, tank ship protection, Puget Sound and adjacent waters, Washington

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...false Security zone regulations, tank ship protection, Puget Sound and adjacent waters...1313 Security zone regulations, tank ship protection, Puget Sound and adjacent waters...suspension of enforcement. The tank ship security zone established by this...

  13. 33 CFR 165.1313 - Security zone regulations, tank ship protection, Puget Sound and adjacent waters, Washington

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...false Security zone regulations, tank ship protection, Puget Sound and adjacent waters...1313 Security zone regulations, tank ship protection, Puget Sound and adjacent waters...suspension of enforcement. The tank ship security zone established by this...

  14. 33 CFR 165.1313 - Security zone regulations, tank ship protection, Puget Sound and adjacent waters, Washington

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...false Security zone regulations, tank ship protection, Puget Sound and adjacent waters...1313 Security zone regulations, tank ship protection, Puget Sound and adjacent waters...suspension of enforcement. The tank ship security zone established by this...

  15. Lesotho Highlands Water Project

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Kingdom of Lesotho is a tiny landlocked country, about the size of the state of Maryland, and it is completely surrounded by South Africa. Its most significant natural resource is water, and thus the majority of its economy is based on providing water and electricity to South Africa. The Lesotho Highlands Water Project website is a window into the effects such a large water project can have on a community, arguably some of them negative. For instance, visitors should check out the "FAQs" section to read some of the issues that have come up with the project, including loss of property and livelihood. The "Documents & Reports" link has dozens of documents, including ones about "IFR" (which stands for Instream Flow Requirement), "Hydrology" and "Studies & Special Reports". Visitors shouldn't miss the "Villages of the Dammed Response", under "Studies & Special Reports", which is an excellent letter to the editor at the Globe and Mail that highlights the debate surrounding the Water Project and what it promises.

  16. Drought Proofing Cities: Desalination vs Rainwater Tanks - A challenge to water supply managers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D Knights; T Wong

    Drought is affecting water supply in many cities across Australia. However, rainwater tanks do not appear to be considered a serious water supply option by many government agencies. The major concern about rainwater tanks for drought response is the yield they would provide during drought conditions. The results presented in this paper challenge the widely held assumption that rainwater tanks

  17. Numerical Analysis of Water Temperature Distribution in the Tank of ASHPWH it ha Cylindrical Condenser

    E-print Network

    Wang, D.; Shan, S.; Wang, R.

    2006-01-01

    . In addition, the effects of tank dimension and the type of condenser coil on water temperature distribution were discussed. The work of this paper could be used for the optimization of tank and condenser coil designs....

  18. Hanford tank waste operation simulator operational waste volume projection verification and validation procedure

    SciTech Connect

    HARMSEN, R.W.

    1999-10-28

    The Hanford Tank Waste Operation Simulator is tested to determine if it can replace the FORTRAN-based Operational Waste Volume Projection computer simulation that has traditionally served to project double-shell tank utilization. Three Test Cases are used to compare the results of the two simulators; one incorporates the cleanup schedule of the Tri Party Agreement.

  19. System Safety Program Plan for Project W-314, tank farm restoration and safe operations

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Boos

    1996-01-01

    This System Safety Program Plan (SSPP) outlines the safety analysis strategy for project W-314, ``Tank Farm Restoration and Safe Operations.`` Project W-314 will provide capital improvements to Hanford`s existing Tank Farm facilities, with particular emphasis on infrastructure systems supporting safe operation of the double-shell activities related to the project`s conceptual Design Phase, but is planned to be updated and maintained

  20. 49 CFR 230.115 - Feed water tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    Tanks shall be maintained free from leaks, and in safe and suitable condition for service. Suitable screens must be provided for tank wells or tank hose and shall be maintained in a manner that allows the unobstructed flow of...

  1. 49 CFR 230.115 - Feed water tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    Tanks shall be maintained free from leaks, and in safe and suitable condition for service. Suitable screens must be provided for tank wells or tank hose and shall be maintained in a manner that allows the unobstructed flow of...

  2. HANFORD DOUBLE SHELL TANK THERMAL AND SEISMIC PROJECT SUMMARY OF COMBINED THERMAL AND OPERATING LOADS WITH SEISMIC ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect

    MACKEY TC; DEIBLER JE; RINKER MW; JOHNSON KI; ABATT FG; KARRI NK; PILLI SP; STOOPS KL

    2009-01-15

    This report summarizes the results of the Double-Shell Tank Thermal and Operating Loads Analysis (TaLA) combined with the Seismic Analysis. This combined analysis provides a thorough, defensible, and documented analysis that will become a part of the overall analysis of record for the Hanford double-shell tanks (DSTs). The bases of the analytical work presented herein are two ANSYS{reg_sign} finite element models that were developed to represent a bounding-case tank. The TaLA model includes the effects of temperature on material properties, creep, concrete cracking, and various waste and annulus pressure-loading conditions. The seismic model considers the interaction of the tanks with the surrounding soil including a range of soil properties, and the effects of the waste contents during a seismic event. The structural evaluations completed with the representative tank models do not reveal any structural deficiencies with the integrity of the DSTs. The analyses represent 60 years of use, which extends well beyond the current date. In addition, the temperature loads imposed on the model are significantly more severe than any service to date or proposed for the future. Bounding material properties were also selected to provide the most severe combinations. While the focus of the analyses was a bounding-case tank, it was necessary during various evaluations to conduct tank-specific analyses. The primary tank buckling evaluation was carried out on a tank-specific basis because of the sensitivity to waste height, specific gravity, tank wall thickness, and primary tank vapor space vacuum limit. For this analysis, the occurrence of maximum tank vacuum was classified as a service level C, emergency load condition. The only area of potential concern in the analysis was with the buckling evaluation of the AP tank, which showed the current limit on demand of l2-inch water gauge vacuum to exceed the allowable of 10.4 inches. This determination was based on analysis at the design waste temperature of 350 F and the full 60-year corrosion allowance on the tank wall of 0.060 inch. However, analysis at a more realistic temperature of 250 F or corrosion allowance of 0.025 inch results in an acceptable demand/capacity ratio according to the ASME code criteria. Thus, buckling of the primary tank is judged to be unlikely for the current lack of corrosion in the tanks, and the expectation that the maximum waste temperature will not exceed 210 F. The reinforced concrete structure was evaluated as specified by the American Concrete Institute (ACI) code requirements for nuclear safety-related structures (ACI-349). The demand was demonstrated to be lower than the capacity at all locations. Revision 1 is being issued to document changes to the anchor bolt evaluation. RPP-RPT-32237 Rev. 1, Hanford Double-Shell Tank Thermal and Seismic Project-Increased Liquid Level Analysis for 241AP Tank Farms, described changes to the anchor bolt modeling and evaluation which were implemented in response to the independent reviewer's comments. Similar changes have been made in the bounding tank analysis and are documented in RPP-RPT-28968 Rev. 1. The conclusions of the previous releases of this report remain unchanged.

  3. Rogue wave observation in a water wave tank.

    PubMed

    Chabchoub, A; Hoffmann, N P; Akhmediev, N

    2011-05-20

    The conventional definition of rogue waves in the ocean is that their heights, from crest to trough, are more than about twice the significant wave height, which is the average wave height of the largest one-third of nearby waves. When modeling deep water waves using the nonlinear Schrödinger equation, the most likely candidate satisfying this criterion is the so-called Peregrine solution. It is localized in both space and time, thus describing a unique wave event. Until now, experiments specifically designed for observation of breather states in the evolution of deep water waves have never been made in this double limit. In the present work, we present the first experimental results with observations of the Peregrine soliton in a water wave tank. PMID:21668234

  4. Project W-151 Tank 101-AZ Waste Retrieval System Year 2000 Compliance Assessment Project Plan

    SciTech Connect

    BUSSELL, J.H.

    1999-08-02

    This assessment describes the potential Year 2000 (Y2K) problems and describes the methods for achieving Y2K compliance for Project W-151, Tank 101-AZ Waste Retrieval System. The purpose of this assessment is to give an overview of the project. This document will not be updated and any dates contained in this document are estimates and may change. Two mixer pumps and instrumentation have been or are planned to be installed in waste tank 101-AZ to demonstrate solids mobilization. The information and experience gained during this process test will provide data for comparison with sludge mobilization prediction models and provide indication of the effects of mixer pump operation on an Aging Waste Facility tank. A limited description of system dates, functions, interfaces, potential Y2K problems, and date resolutions is presented. The project is presently on hold, and definitive design and procurement have been completed. This assessment will describe the methods, protocols, and practices to ensure that equipment and systems do not have Y2K problems.

  5. Hanford Site organic waste tanks: History, waste properties, and scientific issues. Hanford Tank Safety Project

    SciTech Connect

    Strachan, D.M.; Schulz, W.W.; Reynolds, D.A.

    1993-01-01

    Eight Hanford single-shell waste tanks are included on a safety watch list because they are thought to contain significant concentrations of various organic chemical. Potential dangers associated with the waste in these tanks include exothermic reaction, combustion, and release of hazardous vapors. In all eight tanks the measured waste temperatures are in the range 16 to 46{degree}C, far below the 250 to 380{degree}C temperatures necessary for onset of rapid exothermic reactions and initiation of deflagration. Investigation of the possibility of vapor release from Tank C-103 has been elevated to a top safety priority. There is a need to obtain an adequate number of truly representative vapor samples and for highly sensitive and capable methods and instruments to analyze these samples. Remaining scientific issues include: an understanding of the behavior and reaction of organic compounds in existing underground tank environments knowledge of the types and amounts of organic compounds in the tanks knowledge of selected physical and chemical properties of organic compounds source, composition, quality, and properties of the presently unidentified volatile organic compound(s) apparently evolving from Tank C-103.

  6. Project plan for resolution of the organic waste tank safety issues at the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect

    Meacham, J.E.

    1996-10-03

    A multi-year project plan for the Organic Safety Project has been developed with the objective of resolving the organic safety issues associated with the High Level Waste (HLW) in Hanford`s single-shell tanks (SSTS) and double-shell tanks (DSTs). The objective of the Organic Safety Project is to ensure safe interim storage until retrieval for pretreatment and disposal operations begins, and to resolve the organic safety issues by September 2001. Since the initial identification of organics as a tank waste safety issue, progress has been made in understanding the specific aspects of organic waste combustibility, and in developing and implementing activities to resolve the organic safety issues.

  7. HANFORD SITE RIVER PROTECTION PROJECT (RPP) TANK FARM CLOSURE

    SciTech Connect

    JARAYSI, M.N.; SMITH, Z.; QUINTERO, R.; BURANDT, M.B.; HEWITT, W.

    2006-01-30

    The U. S. Department of Energy, Office of River Protection and the CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. are responsible for the operations, cleanup, and closure activities at the Hanford Tank Farms. There are 177 tanks overall in the tank farms, 149 single-shell tanks (see Figure 1), and 28 double-shell tanks (see Figure 2). The single-shell tanks were constructed 40 to 60 years ago and all have exceeded their design life. The single-shell tanks do not meet Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 [1] requirements. Accordingly, radioactive waste is being retrieved from the single-shell tanks and transferred to double-shell tanks for storage prior to treatment through vitrification and disposal. Following retrieval of as much waste as is technically possible from the single-shell tanks, the Office of River Protection plans to close the single-shell tanks in accordance with the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order [2] and the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 [3] requirements. The double-shell tanks will remain in operation through much of the cleanup mission until sufficient waste has been treated such that the Office of River Protection can commence closing the double-shell tanks. At the current time, however, the focus is on retrieving waste and closing the single-shell tanks. The single-shell tanks are being managed and will be closed in accordance with the pertinent requirements in: Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 and its Washington State-authorized Dangerous Waste Regulations [4], US DOE Order 435.1 Radioactive Waste Management [5], the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 [6], and the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 [7]. The Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, which is commonly referred to as the Tri-Party Agreement or TPA, was originally signed by Department of Energy, the State of Washington, and the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency in 1989. Meanwhile, the retrieval of the waste is under way and is being conducted to achieve the completion criteria established in the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order.

  8. HIGH LEVEL WASTE MECHANCIAL SLUDGE REMOVAL AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE F TANK FARM CLOSURE PROJECT

    SciTech Connect

    Jolly, R; Bruce Martin, B

    2008-01-15

    The Savannah River Site F-Tank Farm Closure project has successfully performed Mechanical Sludge Removal (MSR) using the Waste on Wheels (WOW) system for the first time within one of its storage tanks. The WOW system is designed to be relatively mobile with the ability for many components to be redeployed to multiple waste tanks. It is primarily comprised of Submersible Mixer Pumps (SMPs), Submersible Transfer Pumps (STPs), and a mobile control room with a control panel and variable speed drives. In addition, the project is currently preparing another waste tank for MSR utilizing lessons learned from this previous operational activity. These tanks, designated as Tank 6 and Tank 5 respectively, are Type I waste tanks located in F-Tank Farm (FTF) with a capacity of 2,840 cubic meters (750,000 gallons) each. The construction of these tanks was completed in 1953, and they were placed into waste storage service in 1959. The tank's primary shell is 23 meters (75 feet) in diameter, and 7.5 meters (24.5 feet) in height. Type I tanks have 34 vertically oriented cooling coils and two horizontal cooling coil circuits along the tank floor. Both Tank 5 and Tank 6 received and stored F-PUREX waste during their operating service time before sludge removal was performed. DOE intends to remove from service and operationally close (fill with grout) Tank 5 and Tank 6 and other HLW tanks that do not meet current containment standards. Mechanical Sludge Removal, the first step in the tank closure process, will be followed by chemical cleaning. After obtaining regulatory approval, the tanks will be isolated and filled with grout for long-term stabilization. Mechanical Sludge Removal operations within Tank 6 removed approximately 75% of the original 95,000 liters (25,000 gallons). This sludge material was transferred in batches to an interim storage tank to prepare for vitrification. This operation consisted of eleven (11) Submersible Mixer Pump(s) mixing campaigns and multiple intraarea transfers utilizing STPs from July 2006 to August 2007. This operation and successful removal of sludge material meets requirement of approximately 19,000 to 28,000 liters (5,000 to 7,500 gallons) remaining prior to the Chemical Cleaning process. Removal of the last 35% of sludge was exponentially more difficult, as less and less sludge was available to mobilize and the lighter sludge particles were likely removed during the early mixing campaigns. The removal of the 72,000 liters (19,000 gallons) of sludge was challenging due to a number factors. One primary factor was the complex internal cooling coil array within Tank 6 that obstructed mixer discharge jets and impacted the Effective Cleaning Radius (ECR) of the Submersible Mixer Pumps. Minimal access locations into the tank through tank openings (risers) presented a challenge because the available options for equipment locations were very limited. Mechanical Sludge Removal activities using SMPs caused the sludge to migrate to areas of the tank that were outside of the SMP ECR. Various SMP operational strategies were used to address the challenge of moving sludge from remote areas of the tank to the transfer pump. This paper describes in detail the Mechanical Sludge Removal activities and mitigative solutions to cooling coil obstructions and other challenges. The performance of the WOW system and SMP operational strategies were evaluated and the resulting lessons learned are described for application to future Mechanical Sludge Removal operations.

  9. Effect of temperature on anaerobic treatment of black water in UASB-septic tank systems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sari Luostarinen; Wendy Sanders; Katarzyna Kujawa-Roeleveld; Grietje Zeeman

    2007-01-01

    The effect of northern European seasonal temperature changes and low temperature on the performance of upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB)-septic tanks treating black water was studied. Three UASB-septic tanks were monitored with different operational parameters and at different temperatures. The results indicated the feasibility of the UASB-septic tank for (pre)treatment of black water at low temperatures with respect to removal

  10. Hanford Tank Safety Project: Minutes of the Tank Waste Science Panel meeting, February 7--8, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Strachan, D.M. [comp.

    1991-06-01

    The Tank Waste Science Panel met February 7--8, 1991, to review the latest data from the analyses of the October 24, 1990, gas release from Tank 241-SY-101 (101-SY) at Hanford; discuss the results of work being performed in support of the Hanford Tank Safety Project; and be briefed on the ferrocyanide issues included in the expanded scope of the Science Panel. The shapes of the gas release curves from the past three events are similar and correlate well with changes in waste level, but the correlation between the released volume of gas and the waste height is not as good. An analysis of the kinetics of gas generation from waste height measurements in Tank 101-SY suggests that the reaction giving rise to the gases in the tank is independent of the gas pressure and independent of the physical processes that give rise to the episodic release of the gases. Tank waste height data were also used to suggest that a floating crust formed early in the history of the tank and that the current crust is being made thicker in the eastern sector of the tank by repeated upheaval of waste slurry onto the surface. The correlation between the N{sub 2}O and N{sub 2} generated in the October release appears to be 1:1, suggesting a single mechanistic pathway. Analysis of other gas generation ratios, however, suggests that H{sub 2} and N{sub 2}O are evolved together, whereas N{sub 2} is from the air. If similar ratios are observed in planned radiolysis experiments are Argonne National Laboratory, radiolysis would appear to be generating most of the gases in Tank 101-SY. Data from analysis of synthetic waste crust using a dynamic x-ray diffractometer suggest that, in air, organics are being oxidized and liberating CO{sub 2} and NO{sub x}. Experiments at Savannah River Laboratory indicate that irradiation of solutions containing NO{sub 3} and organics can produce N{sub 2}O.

  11. Systems Engineering Implementation Plan for Single Shell Tanks (SST) Retrieval Projects

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. W. LEONARD; G. A. HOFFERBER

    2000-01-01

    This document communicates the planned implementation of the Systems Engineering processes and products for the SST retrieval projects as defined in the Systems Engineering Management Plan for the Tank Farm Contractor.

  12. Phase 2 Rebaseline Report for Tank Farm Restoration and Safe Operations Project W-314

    Microsoft Academic Search

    2000-01-01

    Project W-314, (97-D-402) Tank Farm Restoration and Safe Operations is a multi-year, multiphase project established to upgrade selected 200 East and West Area Tank Farms to support the long-term mission of waste storage, retrieval, and transfer for vitrification. Key drivers for these upgrades include the planned timetable for transfer of waste to the privatized vitrification facility, regulatory compliance requirements (i.e.,

  13. NON-LINEAR VIBRATIONS OF A STRUCTURE CAUSED BY WATER SLOSHING IN A RECTANGULAR TANK

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. Ikeda; N. Nakagawa

    1997-01-01

    The non-linear vibrations of a structure coupled with water sloshing in a rectangular tank are theoretically and experimentally studied. The water tank is attached to a structure to suppress the horizontal vibrations of the structure caused by a sinusoidal excitation. In the theoretical analysis, considering the only source of non-linearity of the liquid inertia to be due to a large

  14. Numerical Analysis of Water Temperature Distribution in the Tank of ASHPWH it ha Cylindrical Condenser 

    E-print Network

    Wang, D.; Shan, S.; Wang, R.

    2006-01-01

    Air source heat pump water heaters (ASHPWH) are becoming increasingly popular for saving energy, protecting the environment and security purposes. The water temperature distribution in the tank is an important parameter for an ASHPWH. This paper...

  15. Waste Tank Organic Safety Project organic concentration mechanisms task. FY 1994 progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Gerber, M.A.

    1994-09-01

    The Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), Waste Tank Organic Safety Project is conducting research to support Westinghouse Hanford Company`s (WHC) Waste Tank Safety Program, sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy`s Tank Farm Project Office. The goal of PNL`s program is to provide a scientific basis for analyzing organics in Hanford`s underground storage tanks (USTs) and for determining whether they are at concentrations that pose a potentially unsafe condition. Part of this research is directed toward determining what organic concentrations are safe by conducting research on organic aging mechanisms and waste energetics to assess the conditions necessary to produce an uncontrolled energy release in tanks due to reactions between the organics and the nitrate and nitrate salts in the tank wastes. The objective of the Organic Concentration Mechanisms Task is to assess the degree of localized enrichment of organics to be expected in the USTs due to concentration mechanisms. This report describes the progress of research conducted in FY 1994 on two concentration mechanisms of interest to the tank safety project: (1) permeation of a separate organic liquid phase into the interstitial spaces of the tank solids during the draining of free liquid from the tanks; and (2) concentration of organics on the surfaces of the solids due to adsorption. Three experiments were conducted to investigate permeation of air and solvent into a sludge simulant that is representative of single-shell tank sludge. The permeation behavior of air and solvent into the sludge simulant can be explained by the properties of the fluid pairs (air/supernate and solvent supernate) and the sludge. One important fluid property is the interfacial tension between the supernate and either the solvent or air. In general, the greater the interfacial tension between two fluids, the more difficult it will be for the air or solvent to displace the supernate during dewatering of the sludge.

  16. 546 Solutions Manual x Fluid Mechanics, Fifth Edition 6.153 Two water tanks, each with base

    E-print Network

    Bahrami, Majid

    546 Solutions Manual x Fluid Mechanics, Fifth Edition 6.153 Two water tanks, each with base area for the fact that, as the left tank falls by dh, the right tank rises by the same amount, hence dhdt changes twice as fast as for one tank alone. We can separate and integrate and find the time for h to drop from

  17. Tank Vapor Characterization Project: Annual status report for FY 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Silvers, K.L.; Fruchter, J.S.; Huckaby, J.L.; Almeida, T.L.; Evans, J.C. Jr.; Pool, K.H.; Simonen, C.A.; Thornton, B.M.

    1997-01-01

    In Fiscal Year 1996, staff at the Vapor Analytical Laboratory at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory performed work in support of characterizing the vapor composition of the headspaces of radioactive waste tanks at the Hanford Site. Work performed included support for technical issues and sampling methodologies, upgrades for analytical equipment, analytical method development, preparation of unexposed samples, analyses of tank headspaces samples, preparation of data reports, and operation of the tank vapor database. Progress made in FY 1996 included completion and issuance of 50 analytical data reports. A sampling system comparison study was initiated and completed during the fiscal year. The comparison study involved the vapor sampling system (VSS), a truck-based system, and the in situ vapor sampling system (ISVS), a cart-based system. Samples collected during the study were characterized for inorganic, permanent gases, total non-methane organic compounds and organic speciation by SUMMA{trademark} and TST methods. The study showed comparable sampling results between the systems resulting in the program switching from the VSS to the less expensive ISVS methodology in late May 1996. A temporal study was initiated in January 1996 in order to understand the influences seasonal temperatures changes have on the vapors in the headspace of Hanford waste tanks. A holding time study was initiated in the fourth quarter of FY 1996. Samples were collected from tank S-102 and rushed to the laboratory for time zero analysis. Additional samples will be analyzed at 1, 2, 4, 8, 16, and 32 weeks.

  18. Upgrade of 400,000 gallon water storage tank at Argonne National Laboratory-West to UCRL-15910 high hazard seismic requirements

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. J. Griffin; B. G. Harris

    1993-01-01

    As part of the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) Project at Argonne National Laboratory West (ANL-W), it was necessary to strengthen an existing 400,000 gallon flat-bottom water storage tank to meet UCRL-15910 (currently formulated as DOE Standard DOE-STD-1020-92, Draft) high hazard natural phenomena requirements. The tank was constructed in 1988 and preliminary calculations indicated that the existing base anchorage was insufficient

  19. Pore Water Extraction Test Near 241-SX Tank Farm at the Hanford Site, Washington, USA

    SciTech Connect

    Eberlein, Susan J. [Washington River Protection Systems, Richland, WA (United States); Parker, Danny L. [Washington River Protection Systems, Richland, WA (United States); Tabor, Cynthia L. [Washington River Protection Systems, Richland, WA (United States); Holm, Melissa J. [Washington River Protection Systems, Richland, WA (United States)

    2013-11-11

    A proof-of-principle test is underway near the Hanford Site 241-SX Tank Farm. The test will evaluate a potential remediation technology that will use tank farm-deployable equipment to remove contaminated pore water from vadose zone soils. The test system was designed and built to address the constraints of working within a tank farm. Due to radioactive soil contamination and limitations in drilling near tanks, small-diameter direct push drilling techniques applicable to tank farms are being utilized for well placement. To address space and weight limitations in working around tanks and obstacles within tank farms, the above ground portions of the test system have been constructed to allow deployment flexibility. The test system utilizes low vacuum over a sealed well screen to establish flow into an extraction well. Extracted pore water is collected in a well sump,and then pumped to the surface using a small-diameter bladder pump.If pore water extraction using this system can be successfully demonstrated, it may be possible to target local contamination in the vadose zone around underground storage tanks. It is anticipated that the results of this proof-of-principle test will support future decision making regarding interim and final actions for soil contamination within the tank farms.

  20. Project W-211 Initial Tank Retrieval Systems (ITRS) Description of Operations for 241-AZ-102

    SciTech Connect

    BRIGGS, S.R.

    2000-02-25

    The primary purpose of the Initial Tank Retrieval Systems (ITRS) is to provide systems for retrieval of radioactive wastes stored in underground double-shell tanks (DSTs) for transfer to alternate storage, evaporation, pretreatment or treatment, while concurrently reducing risks associated with safety watch list and other DSTs. This Description of Operation (DOO) defines the control philosophy for the waste retrieval system for Tank 241-AZ-102 (AZ-102). This DOO provides a basis for the detailed design of the Project W-211 Retrieval Control System (RCS) for AZ-102 and also establishes test criteria for the RCS.

  1. STATUS OF MECHANICAL SLUDGE REMOVAL AND COOLING COILS CLOSURE AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE - F TANK FARM CLOSURE PROJECT - 9225

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jolly

    2009-01-01

    The Savannah River Site F-Tank Farm Closure project has successfully performed Mechanical Sludge Removal using the Waste on Wheels (WOW) system within two of its storage tanks. The Waste on Wheels (WOW) system is designed to be relatively mobile with the ability for many components to be redeployed to multiple tanks. It is primarily comprised of Submersible Mixer Pumps (SMPs),

  2. Characterization, Dilution, and Aging Study of a River Protection Project Sample from Tank 241AW101

    Microsoft Academic Search

    2004-01-01

    As part of the program to provide pretreatment development and testing services to support the River Protection Project-Waste Treatment Plant (RPP-WTP) mission to treat Hanford tank waste, a approximate 15 L sample of waste from Tank 241-AW-101 was received at the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC). The waste sample was characterized and diluted to provide feed for pretreatment testing. The

  3. Nonlinear sloshing and passage through resonance in a shallow water tank

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E. A. Cox; J. P. Gleeson; M. P. Mortell

    2005-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the effect of slowly changing the length of a tank on the nonlinear standing waves (free vibrations) and resonant forced oscillations of shallow water in the tank. The analysis begins with the Boussinesq equations. These are reduced to a nonlinear differential-difference equation for the slow variation of a Riemann invariant on one end. Then a

  4. Headspace vapor characterization of Hanford Waste Tank 241-A-103: Results from samples collected on November 9, 1995. Tank Vapor Characterization Project

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, J.C.; Thomas, B.L.; Pool, K.H.; Olsen, K.B. [and others

    1996-06-01

    This report describes the results of vapor samples taken from the headspace of waste storage tank 241-A-103 (Tank A-103) at the Hanford Site in Washington State. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) contracted with Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) to provide sampling devices and analyze samples for inorganic and organic analytes collected from the tank headspace and ambient air near the tank. The analytical work was performed by the PNNL Vapor Analytical Laboratory (VAL) by the Tank Vapor Characterization Project. Work performed was based on a sample and analysis plan (SAP) prepared by WHC. The SAP provided job-specific instructions for samples, analyses, and reporting. The SAP for this sample job was {open_quotes}Vapor Sampling and Analysis Plan{close_quotes}, and the sample job was designated S5073. Samples were collected by WHC on November 9, 1995, using the Vapor Sampling System (VSS), a truck-based sampling method using a heated probe inserted into the tank headspace.

  5. Headspace vapor characterization of Hanford Waste Tank 241-BX-107: Results from samples collected on November 17, 1995. Tank Vapor Characterization Project

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, J.C.; Thomas, B.L.; Pool, K.H. [and others

    1996-06-01

    This report describes the results of vapor samples taken from the headspace of waste storage tank 241-BX-107 (Tank BX-107) at the Hanford Site in Washington State. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) contracted with Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) to provide sampling devices and analyze samples for inorganic and organic analytes collected from the tank headspace and ambient air near the tank. The analytical work was performed by the PNNL Vapor Analytical Laboratory (VAL) by the Tank Vapor Characterization Project. Work performed was based on a sample and analysis plan (SAP) prepared by WHC. The SAP provided job-specific instructions for samples, analyses, and reporting. The SAP for this sample job was {open_quotes}Vapor Sampling and Analysis Plan{close_quotes}, and the sample job was designated S5080. Samples were collected by WHC on November 17, 1995, using the Vapor Sampling System (VSS), a truck-based sampling method using a heated probe inserted into the tank headspace.

  6. Headspace vapor characterization of Hanford Waste Tank 241-S-108: Results from samples collected on December 6, 1995. Tank Vapor Characterization Project

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, B.L.; Evans, J.C.; McVeety, B.D. [and others

    1996-06-01

    This report describes the results of vapor samples taken from the headspace of waste storage tank 241-S-108 (Tank S-108) at the Hanford Site in Washington State. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) contracted with Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) to provide sampling devices and analyze samples for inorganic and organic analytes collected from the tank headspace and ambient air near the tank. The analytical work was performed by the PNNL Vapor Analytical Laboratory (VAL) by the Tank Vapor Characterization Project. Work performed was based on a sample and analysis plan (SAP) prepared by WHC. The SAP provided job-specific instructions for samples, analyses, and reporting. The SAP for this sample job was {open_quotes}Vapor Sampling and Analysis Plan{close_quotes}, and the sample job was designated S5086. Samples were collected by WHC on December 6, 1995, using the Vapor Sampling System (VSS), a truck-based sampling method using a heated probe inserted into the tank headspace.

  7. Headspace vapor characterization of Hanford Waste Tank 241-TX-111: Results from samples collected on October 12, 1995. Tank Vapor Characterization Project

    SciTech Connect

    Pool, K.H.; Clauss, T.W.; Evans, J.C. [and others

    1996-06-01

    This report describes the results of vapor samples taken from the headspace of waste storage tank 241-TX-111 (Tank TX-111) at the Hanford Site in Washington State. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) contracted with Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) to provide sampling devices and analyze samples for inorganic and organic analytes collected from the tank headspace and ambient air near the tank. The analytical work was performed by the PNNL Vapor Analytical Laboratory (VAL) by the Tank Vapor Characterization Project. Work performed was based on a sample and analysis plan (SAP) prepared by WHC. The SAP provided job-specific instructions for samples, analyses, and reporting. The SAP for this sample job was {open_quotes}Vapor Sampling and Analysis Plan{close_quotes}, and the sample job was designated S5069. Samples were collected by WHC on October 12, 1995, using the Vapor Sampling System (VSS), a truck-based sampling method using a heated probe inserted into the tank headspace.

  8. Headspace vapor charterization of Hanford Waste Tank 241-S-110: Results from samples collected on December 5, 1995. Tank Vapor Characterization Project

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, B.L.; Evans, J.C.; McVeety, B.D. [and others

    1996-06-01

    This report describes the results of vapor samples taken from the headspace of waste storage tank 241-S-110 (Tank S-110) at the Hanford Site in Washington State. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) contracted with Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) to provide sampling devices and analyze samples for inorganic and organic analytes collected from the tank headspace and ambient air near the tank. The analytical work was performed by the PNNL Vapor Analytical Laboratory (VAL) by the Tank Vapor Characterization Project. Work performed was based on a sample and analysis plan (SAP) prepared by WHC. The SAP provided job-specific instructions for samples, analyses, and reporting. The SAP for this sample job was {open_quotes}Vapor Sampling and Analysis Plan{close_quotes}, and the sample job was designated S5085. Samples were collected by WHC on December 5, 1995, using the Vapor Sampling System (VSS), a truck-based sampling method using a heated probe inserted into the tank headspace.

  9. Headspace vapor characterization of Hanford Waste Tank 241-BY-102: Results from samples collected on November 21, 1995. Tank Vapor Characterization Project

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, B.L.; Evans, J.C.; Pool, K.H. [and others

    1996-06-01

    This report describes the results of vapor samples taken from the headspace of waste storage tank 241-BY-102 (Tank BY-102) at the Hanford Site in Washington State. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) contracted with Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) to provide sampling devices and analyze samples for inorganic and organic analytes collected from the tank headspace and ambient air near the tank. The analytical work was performed by the PNNL Vapor Analytical Laboratory (VAL) by the Tank Vapor Characterization Project. Work performed was based on a sample and analysis plan (SAP) prepared by WHC. The SAP provided job-specific instructions for samples, analyses, and reporting. The SAP for this sample job was {open_quotes}Vapor Sampling and Analysis Plan{close_quotes}, and the sample job was designated S5081. Samples were collected by YMC on November 21, 1995, using the Vapor Sampling System (VSS), a truck-based sampling method using a heated probe inserted into the tank headspace.

  10. Headspace vapor characterization of Hanford Waste Tank 241-S-112: Results from samples collected on July 11, 1995. Tank Vapor Characterization Project

    SciTech Connect

    Clauss, T.W.; Pool, K.H.; Evans, J.C. [and others

    1996-05-01

    This report describes the results of vapor samples taken from the headspace of waste storage Tank 241-S-112 (Tank S-112) at the Hanford. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is contracted with Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) to provide sampling devices and analyze samples for inorganic and organic analytes collected from the tank headspace and ambient air near the tank. The analytical work was performed by the PNNL Vapor Analytical Laboratory (VAL) by the Tank Vapor Characterization Project. Work performed was based on a sample and analysis plan (SAP) prepared by WHC. The SAP provided job-specific instructions for samples, analyses, and reporting. The SAP for this sample job was {open_quotes}Vapor Sampling and Analysis Plan{close_quotes}, and the sample job was designated S5044. Samples were collected by WHC on July 11, 1995, using the Vapor Sampling System (VSS), a truck-based sampling method using a heated probe inserted into the tank headspace.

  11. Headspace vapor characterization of Hanford Waste Tank 241-SX-109: Results from samples collected on August 1, 1995. Tank Vapor Characterization Project

    SciTech Connect

    Pool, K.H.; Clauss, T.W.; Evans, J.C. [and others

    1996-05-01

    This report describes the results of vapor samples taken from the headspace of waste storage tank 241-SX-109 (Tank SX-109) at the Hanford Site in Washington State. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) contracted with Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) to provide sampling devices and analyze samples for inorganic and organic analytes collected from the tank headspace and ambient air near the tank. The analytical work was performed by the PNNL Vapor Analytical Laboratory (VAL) by the Tank Vapor Characterization Project. Work performed was based on a sample and analysis plan (SAP) prepared by WHC. The SAP provided job-specific instructions for samples, analyses, and reporting. The SAP for this sample job was {open_quotes}Vapor Sampling and Analysis Plan{close_quotes}, and the sample job was designated S5048. Samples were collected by WHC on August 1, 1995, using the Vapor Sampling System (VSS), a truck-based sampling method using a heated probe inserted into the tank headspace.

  12. Headspace vapor characterization of Hanford Waste Tank 241-SX-105: Results from samples collected on July 26, 1995. Tank Vapor Characterization Project

    SciTech Connect

    Pool, K.H.; Clauss, T.W.; Evans, J.C. [and others

    1996-05-01

    This report describes the results of vapor samples taken from the headspace of waste storage tank 241-SX-105 (Tank SX-105) at the Hanford Site in Washington State. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) contracted with Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) to provide sampling devices and analyze samples for inorganic and organic analytes collected from the tank headspace and ambient air near the tank. The analytical work was performed by the PNNL Vapor Analytical Laboratory (VAL) by the Tank Vapor Characterization Project. Work performed was based on a sample and analysis plan (SAP) prepared by WHC. The SAP provided job-specific instructions for samples, analyses, and reporting. The SAP for this sample job was {open_quotes}Vapor Sampling and Analysis Plan{close_quotes}, and the sample job was designated S5047. Samples were collected by WHC on July 26, 1995, using the Vapor Sampling System (VSS), a truck-based sampling method using a heated probe inserted into the tank headspace.

  13. Headspace vapor characterization of Hanford Waste Tank 241-SX-104: Results from samples collected on July 25, 1995. Tank Vapor Characterization Project

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, B.L.; Clauss, T.W.; Evans, J.C. [and others

    1996-05-01

    This report describes the results of vapor samples taken from the headspace of waste storage tank 241-SX-104 (Tank SX-104) at the Hanford Site in Washington State. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) contracted with Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) to provide sampling devices and analyze samples for inorganic and organic analytes collected from the tank headspace and ambient air near the tank. The analytical work was performed by the PNNL Vapor Analytical Laboratory (VAL) by the Tank Vapor Characterization Project. Work performed was based on a sample and analysis plan (SAP) prepared by WHC. The SAP provided job-specific instructions for samples, analyses, and reporting. The SAP for this sample job was {open_quotes}Vapor Sampling and Analysis Plan{close_quotes}, and the sample job was designated S5049. Samples were collected by WHC on July 25, 1995, using the Vapor Sampling System (VSS), a truck-based sampling method using a heated probe inserted into the tank headspace.

  14. Headspace vapor characterization of Hanford Waste Tank AX-103: Results from samples collected on June 21, 1995. Tank Vapor Characterization Project

    SciTech Connect

    Ligotke, M.W.; Pool, K.H.; Clauss, T.W. [and others

    1996-05-01

    This report describes the results of vapor samples taken from the headspace of waste storage tank 241-AX-103 (Tank AX-103) at the Hanford Site in Washington State. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) contracted with Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) to provide sampling devices and analyze samples for inorganic and organic analytes collected from the tank headspace and ambient air near the tank. The analytical work was performed by the PNNL Vapor Analytical Laboratory (VAL) by the Tank Vapor Characterization Project. Work performed was based on a sample and analysis plan (SAP) prepared by WHC. The SAP provided job-specific instructions for samples, analyses, and reporting. The SAP for this sample job was {open_quotes}Vapor Sampling and Analysis Plan{close_quotes}, and the sample job was designated S5029. Samples were collected by WHC on June 21, 1995, using the Vapor Sampling System (VSS), a truck-based sampling method using a heated probe inserted into the tank headspace.

  15. Headspace vapor characterization of Hanford Waste Tank AX-101: Results from samples collected on June 15, 1995. Tank Vapor Characterization Project

    SciTech Connect

    Pool, K.H.; Clauss, T.W.; Evans, J.C.; McVeety, B.D. [and others

    1996-05-01

    This report describes the results of vapor samples taken from the headspace of waste storage tank 241-AX-101 (Tank AX-101) at the Hanford Site in Washington State. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) contracted with Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) to provide sampling devices and analyze samples for inorganic and organic analytes collected from the tank headspace and ambient air near the tank. The analytical work was performed by the PNNL Vapor Analytical Laboratory (VAL) under the Tank Vapor Characterization Project. Work performed was based on a sample and analysis plan (SAP) prepared by WHC. The SAP provided job-specific instructions for samples, analyses, and reporting. The SAP for this sample job was {open_quotes}Vapor Sampling and Analysis Plan{close_quotes}, and the sample job was designated S5028. Samples were collected by WHC on June 15, 1995, using the Vapor Sampling System (VSS), a truck-based sampling method using a heated probe inserted into the tank headspace.

  16. Headspace vapor characterization of Hanford Waste Tank SX-102: Results from samples collected on July 19, 1995. Tank Vapor Characterization Project

    SciTech Connect

    McVeety, B.D.; Evans, J.C.; Clauss, T.W.; Pool, K.H. [and others

    1996-05-01

    This report describes the results of vapor samples taken from the headspace of waste storage tank 241-SX-102 (Tank SX-102) at the Hanford Site in Washington State. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) contracted with Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) to provide sampling devices and analyze samples for inorganic and organic analytes collected from the tank headspace and ambient air near the tank. The analytical work was performed under the PNNL Vapor Analytical Laboratory (VAL) by the Tank Vapor Characterization Project. Work performed was based on a sample and analysis plan (SAP) prepared by WHC. The SAP provided job-specific instructions for samples, analyses, and reporting. The SAP for this sample job was {open_quotes}Vapor Sampling and Analysis Plan{close_quotes}, and the sample job was designated S5046. Samples were collected by WHC on July 19, 1995, using the vapor sampling system (VSS), a truck-based sampling method using a heated probe inserted into the tank headspace.

  17. 4-62 The water in a rigid tank is cooled until the vapor starts condensing. The initial pressure in the tank is to be determined.

    E-print Network

    Bahrami, Majid

    pressure in the tank is to be determined. Analysis This is a constant volume process (v = V /m = constant that contains water at a specified state. The volume of the tank, the final temperature and pressure contains saturated liquid water. The volume of the cylinder at the initial state is 33 11 m001619.0/kg

  18. Elemental Water Impact Test: Phase 2 36-Inch Aluminum Tank Head

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vassilakos, Gregory J.

    2014-01-01

    Spacecraft are being designed based on LS-DYNA simulations of water landing impacts. The Elemental Water Impact Test (EWIT) series was undertaken to assess the accuracy of LS-DYNA water impact simulations. EWIT Phase 2 featured a 36-inch aluminum tank head. The tank head was outfitted with one accelerometer, twelve pressure transducers, three string potentiometers, and four strain gages. The tank head was dropped from heights of 1 foot and 2 feet. The focus of this report is the correlation of analytical models against test data. As a measure of prediction accuracy, peak responses from the baseline LS-DYNA model were compared to peak responses from the tests.

  19. Permitting plan for the tank farm restoration and safe operations project

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Swan; Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-01-01

    This permitting plan evaluates environmental regulations for Project W-314, the Tank Farm Restoration and Safe Operations project. Described within this document are the environmental reviews, permits, and approvals required for the project, as well as the regulatory authority(s) potentially applicable. Finally,this document provides the project with a recommended regulatory strategy that includes the possible alternatives to successfully secure environmental reviews,

  20. Melton Valley Storage Tanks Capacity Increase Project, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1995-04-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to construct and maintain additional storage capacity at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, Tennessee, for liquid low-level radioactive waste (LLLW). New capacity would be provided by a facility partitioned into six individual tank vaults containing one 100,000 gallon LLLW storage tank each. The storage tanks would be located within the existing Melton Valley Storage Tank (MVST) facility. This action would require the extension of a potable water line approximately one mile from the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) area to the proposed site to provide the necessary potable water for the facility including fire protection. Alternatives considered include no-action, cease generation, storage at other ORR storage facilities, source treatment, pretreatment, and storage at other DOE facilities.

  1. System Engineering Management and Implementation Plan for Project W-211 Initial Tank Retrieval Systems (ITRS)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    VAN BEEK

    2000-01-01

    This systems Engineering Management and Implementation Plan (SEMIP) describes the Project W-211 implementation of the Tank Farm Contractor Systems Engineering Management Plan (TFC SEMP). The SEMIP defines the systems engineering products and processes used by the project to comply with the TFC SEMP, and provides the basis for tailoring systems engineering processes by applying a graded approach to identify appropriate

  2. SPRINGS AND WATER TANKS ON THE COLORADO RIVER INDIAN RESERVATION IN ARIZONA

    EPA Science Inventory

    This point coverage shows springs and water tanks on Colorado River Indian Reservation in Arizona. This coverage was digitized off of USGS 7.5 minute quad maps by the Phoenix office of the Bureau of Indian Affairs. ...

  3. SPRINGS AND WATER TANKS ON GILA RIVER INDIAN RESERVATION IN ARIZONA

    EPA Science Inventory

    This point coverage shows springs and water tanks on Gila River Indian Reservation in Arizona. This coverage was digitized off of USGS 7.5 minute quad maps by the Phoenix office of the Bureau of Indian Affairs. ...

  4. SAMPLING OIL-WATER MIXTURES AT OHMSETT (OIL AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SIMULATED ENVIRONMENTAL TEST TANK)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report describes procedures developed at the Oil and Hazardous Material Simulated Environmental Test Tank (OHMSETT) for sampling oil and water mixtures. Two procedures for sampling in containers are discussed: grab and stratified sampling. Both of these techniques require str...

  5. Temperature distribution of a hot water storage tank in a simulated solar heating and cooling system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Namkoong, D.

    1976-01-01

    A 2,300-liter hot water storage tank was studied under conditions simulating a solar heating and cooling system. The initial condition of the tank, ranging from 37 C at the bottom to 94 C at the top, represented a condition midway through the start-up period of the system. During the five-day test period, the water in the tank gradually rose in temperature but in a manner that diminished its temperature stratification. Stratification was found not to be an important factor in the operation of the particular solar system studied.

  6. HANFORD DOUBLE SHELL TANK (DST) THERMAL & SEISMIC PROJECT SEISMIC ANALYSIS IN SUPPORT OF INCREASED LIQUID LEVEL IN 241-AP TANK FARMS

    SciTech Connect

    MACKEY TC; ABBOTT FG; CARPENTER BG; RINKER MW

    2007-02-16

    The overall scope of the project is to complete an up-to-date comprehensive analysis of record of the DST System at Hanford. The "Double-Shell Tank (DST) Integrity Project - DST Thermal and Seismic Project" is in support of Tri-Party Agreement Milestone M-48-14.

  7. A survey of available information on gas generation in tank 241SY101: Hanford Tank Safety Project

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. M. Strachan; D. A. Reynolds; D. D. Siemer; R. W. Wallace

    1991-01-01

    As a result of a concerted effort to determine the chemical and physical mechanisms underlying the generation and episodic release of gases from tank 241-SY-101, more commonly known as tank 101-SY, the Tank Waste Science Panel has been established at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory. Four of the members of this panel met to screen the available information on tank 101-SY

  8. STATUS OF CHEMICAL CLEANING OF WASTE TANKS AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE F TANK FARM CLOSURE PROJECT - 9114

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D Thaxton; G Geoff Clendenen; W Willie Gordon; S Samuel Fink; M Michael Poirier

    2008-01-01

    Chemical Cleaning is currently in progress for Tanks 5 and 6 at the Savannah River Site. The Chemical Cleaning process is being utilized to remove the residual waste heel remaining after completion of Mechanical Sludge Removal. This work is required to prepare the tanks for closure. Tanks 5 and 6 are 1950s vintage carbon steel waste tanks that do not

  9. Organic Tank Safety Project: Equilibrium moisture determination task fiscal year 1997. Annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Scheele, R.D.; Bredt, P.R.; Sell, R.L.

    1997-09-01

    Twenty waste storage tanks at the U.S. Department of Energy`s Hanford Site are included in the Organic Tank Watch List. The water content in the wastes plays a significant role in preventing propagating or sustainable chemical reactions, and the fuel and energetics independent safety criterion has been determined to be 20 wt % water. To ensure that the organic-bearing wastes continue to be stored safely, Duke Engineering and Services Hanford commissioned the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to investigate the effect of water partial pressure (P{sub H2O}) on the water content of organic-bearing or representative wastes. If necessary, the P{sub H2O} could be managed to maintain the water content at an acceptable level or adjust the water content back to an acceptable level. During fiscal year 1997, the effect of P{sub H2O} was tested to determine how organic-bearing wastes will respond if exposed to environmental Hanford water partial pressures or other potential water partial pressures. The samples tested were obtained from Organic Watch List Tanks, tanks that D.A. Reynolds of Lockheed Martin Hanford suspects may contain wastes having significant organic content, or wastes characteristic of organic-bearing wastes. Temperatures at or near maximum tank waste surface temperatures were used in the tests. At 26{degrees}C, the lowest temperature used, the water partial pressures used in the tests ranged from 2 to 22 torr. At 41{degrees}C, the highest temperature used, the water partial pressures used ran ed from 3.5 to 48 torr.

  10. Mahaweli Water Resources Project

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. C. De S. Hewavisenthi

    1992-01-01

    The Mahaweli Ganga is the most important river in Sri Lanka with a basin area equivalent to fifteen per cent of the country's land and carries the largest volume of discharge. A Master Plan for a comprehensive water resources development of the Mahaweli Basin was drawn up in 1968, and the work on a compressed but accelerated version of this

  11. Ground-water quality in selected areas serviced by septic tanks, Dade County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pitt, William A.; Mattraw, H.C.; Klein, Howard

    1975-01-01

    During 1971-74, the U.S. Geological Survey investigated the chemical, physical, bacteriological, and virological characteristics of the ground water in five selected areas serviced by septic tanks in Dade County, Florida. Periodic water samples were collected from multiple-depth groups of monitor wells ranging in depth from 10 to 60 ft at each of the five areas. Analyses of ground water from base-line water-quality wells in inland areas remote from urban development indicated that the ground water is naturally high in organic nitrogen, ammonia, organic carbon and chemical oxygen demand. Some enrichment of ground water with sodium provided a possible key to differentiating septic-tank effluent from other urban ground-water contaminant sources. High ammonia nitrogen, phosphorus, and the repetitive detection of fecal coliform bacteria were characteristic of two 10-foot monitor wells that consistently indicated the presence of septic-tank effluent in ground water. Dispersion, dilution, and various chemical processes have presumably prevented accumulation of septic-tank effluent at depths greater than 20 ft, as indicated by the 65 types of water analyses used in the investigation. Fecal coliform bacteria were present on one or two occasions in many monitor wells but the highest concentration, 1,600 colonies/100 ml, was related to storm-water infiltration rather than septic-tank discharge. Areal variations in the composition and the hydraulic conductivity of the sand and limestone aquifer had the most noticeable influence on the overall ground-water quality. The ground water in the more permeable limestone in south Dade County near Homestead contained low concentrations of septic-tank related constituents, but higher concentrations of dissolved sulfate and nitrate. The ground water in north Dade County, where the aquifer is less permeable, contained the highest dissolved iron, manganese, COD, and organic carbon.

  12. Tank bromeliad water: similar or distinct environments for research of bacterial bioactives?

    PubMed

    Carmo, F L; Santos, H F; Peixoto, R S; Rosado, A S; Araujo, F V

    2014-01-01

    The Atlantic Rainforest does not have a uniform physiognomy, its relief determines different environmental conditions that define the composition of its flora and fauna. Within this ecosystem, bromeliads that form tanks with their leaves hold water reservoirs throughout the year, maintaining complex food chains, based mainly on autotrophic and heterotrophic bacteria. Some works concluded that the water held by tank bromeliads concentrate the microbial diversity of their ecosystem. To investigate the bacterial diversity and the potential biotechnology of these ecosystems, tank bromeliads of the Neoregelia cruenta species from the Atlantic Rainforest in Brazil were used as models for this research. Bacteria isolated from these models were tested for production of bioactive compounds. DGGE of the water held by tank bromeliads was performed in different seasons, locations and sun exposure to verify whether these environmental factors affect bacterial communities. The DGGE bands profile showed no grouping of bacterial community by the environmental factors tested. Most of the isolates demonstrated promising activities in the tests performed. Collectively, these results suggest that tank bromeliads of the N. cruenta species provide important habitats for a diverse microbial community, suggesting that each tank forms a distinct micro-habitat. These tanks can be considered excellent sources for the search for new enzymes and/or new bioactive composites of microbial origin. PMID:24948929

  13. Tank bromeliad water: Similar or distinct environments for research of bacterial bioactives?

    PubMed Central

    Carmo, F.L.; Santos, H.F.; Peixoto, R.S.; Rosado, A.S.; Araujo, F.V.

    2014-01-01

    The Atlantic Rainforest does not have a uniform physiognomy, its relief determines different environmental conditions that define the composition of its flora and fauna. Within this ecosystem, bromeliads that form tanks with their leaves hold water reservoirs throughout the year, maintaining complex food chains, based mainly on autotrophic and heterotrophic bacteria. Some works concluded that the water held by tank bromeliads concentrate the microbial diversity of their ecosystem. To investigate the bacterial diversity and the potential biotechnology of these ecosystems, tank bromeliads of the Neoregelia cruenta species from the Atlantic Rainforest in Brazil were used as models for this research. Bacteria isolated from these models were tested for production of bioactive compounds. DGGE of the water held by tank bromeliads was performed in different seasons, locations and sun exposure to verify whether these environmental factors affect bacterial communities. The DGGE bands profile showed no grouping of bacterial community by the environmental factors tested. Most of the isolates demonstrated promising activities in the tests performed. Collectively, these results suggest that tank bromeliads of the N. cruenta species provide important habitats for a diverse microbial community, suggesting that each tank forms a distinct micro-habitat. These tanks can be considered excellent sources for the search for new enzymes and/or new bioactive composites of microbial origin. PMID:24948929

  14. Sludge accumulation and conversion to methane in a septic tank treating domestic wastewater or black water.

    PubMed

    Elmitwalli, Tarek

    2013-01-01

    Although the septic tank is the most applied on-site system for wastewater pre-treatment, limited research has been performed to determine sludge accumulation and biogas production in the tank. Therefore a dynamic mathematical model based on the Anaerobic Digestion Model No. 1 (ADM1) was developed for anaerobic digestion of the accumulated sludge in a septic tank treating domestic wastewater or black water. The results showed that influent chemical oxygen demand (COD) concentration and hydraulic retention time (HRT) of the tank mainly control the filling time with sludge, while operational temperature governs characteristics of the accumulated sludge and conversion to methane. For obtaining stable sludge and high conversion, the tank needs to be operated for a period more than a year without sludge wasting. Maximum conversion to methane in the tank is about 50 and 60% for domestic wastewater and black water, respectively. The required period for sludge wasting depends on the influent COD concentration and the HRT, while characteristics of the wasted sludge are affected by operational temperature followed by the influent COD concentration and the HRT. Sludge production from the tank ranges between 0.19 to 0.22 and 0.13 to 0.15 L/(person.d), for the domestic wastewater and black water, respectively. PMID:23985530

  15. Recreational Vehicle Water Tanks as a Possible Source for Legionella Infections

    PubMed Central

    Litwin, Christine M.; Asebiomo, Bankole; Wilson, Katherine; Hafez, Michael; Stevens, Valerie; Fliermans, Carl B.; Fields, Barry S.; Fisher, John F.

    2013-01-01

    We investigated recreational vehicle (RV) water reservoirs in response to a case of pneumonia in which Legionella pneumophila was cultured both from the patient and a RV reservoir in which he travelled. Water samples processed and cultured at the CDC according to standard protocol were positive for Legionella spp. in 4/17 (24%) faucets, 1/11 (9%) water tanks from 4/20 (20%) RVs from three different campsites. Legionella spp. that were isolated included L. pneumophila (serogroups 1 and 6), L. anisa, L. feeleii, and L. quateriensis. Environmental controls from the potable water of the three campsites were culture-negative. A survey of maintenance practices by the RV users at the campsites revealed that chlorine disinfection of the water tanks was rarely performed. To prevent the possibility of Legionella infections, RV owners should implement regular chlorine disinfection of their water tanks and follow the recommended maintenance guidelines according to their owner's manuals. PMID:24371531

  16. Nuclear criticality project plan for the Hanford Site tank farms

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bratzel; Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-01-01

    The mission of this project is to provide a defensible technical basis report in support of the Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR). This technical basis report will also be used to resolve technical issues associated with the nuclear criticality safety issue. The strategy presented in this project plan includes an integrated programmatic and organizational approach. The scope of this project

  17. Langerhans Lab Protocols Fish tank water changing protocol.docx written 11/26/12 by JW Page 1 of 1

    E-print Network

    Langerhans, Brian

    Langerhans Lab Protocols Fish tank water changing protocol.docx written 11/26/12 by JW Page 1 of 1 Fish Tank Water Changing Fry and tanks: 1. Remove air stone & lid, then take tank from shelf and place on stable surface. 2. Remove plants/ structure. Let debris settle out of water for a few minutes. 3. Count

  18. Double Shell Tanks (DST) and Waste Feed Delivery Project Management Quality Affecting Procedures Management Plan

    SciTech Connect

    LUND, D.P.

    2000-09-25

    The purpose of the Double Shell Tanks (DST) and Waste Feed Delivery (WFD) Management Assessment Plan is to define how management assessments within DST h WFD will be conducted. The plan as written currently includes only WFD Project assessment topics. Other DST and WFD group assessment topics will be added in future revisions.

  19. Initial single shell tank retrieval system project system engineering management plan

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Krieg; Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-01-01

    This System Engineering Management Plan (SEMP) describes the Systems Engineering approach that will be used to manage the retrieval of waste from the first single shell tank farm using past practice sluicing techniques. This Project SEMP is used to supplement the requirements of the TWRS SEMP, WHC-SD-WM-SEMP-002.

  20. Implementation Plan for Tank Farm Transition Projects Suspect and Counterfeit Items

    Microsoft Academic Search

    2000-01-01

    This plan is designed to provide an appropriate level of confidence that Tank Farm Transition Projects (TFTP) facilities will be evaluated to assess the presence of suspect\\/counterfeit items. It is intended to identify suspect\\/counterfeit items that are presently in inventory and provide for the reporting and disposition of those items. Items which have been installed will also receive appropriate evaluation

  1. Chemical research projects office fuel tank sealants review. [flight testing of fluorosilicone sealants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosser, R. W.; Parker, J. A.

    1974-01-01

    The status of high-temperature fuel tank sealants for military and potentially commercial supersonic aircraft is examined. The interrelationships of NASA's sealants program comprise synthesis and development of new fluoroether elastomers, sealant prediction studies, flight simulation and actual flight testing of best state-of-the-art fluorosilicone sealants. The technical accomplishments of these projects are reviewed.

  2. A laboratory study of longitudinal waves in surfactant films in a water wave tank

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Xinan Liu; James H. Duncan; Gerald M. Korenowski; Joseph S. Kelly

    2007-01-01

    The dynamics of longitudinal surface waves in surfactant films in a large wave tank (14.8 m long, 1.2 m wide, and 1.0 m deep) were studied experimentally. Three soluble surfactants (Triton X-100, sodium dodecyl sulfate, and hemicyanine) were added to the tank water in separated experiments; however, other naturally occurring surfactants were present as well. Since it is exceedingly difficult

  3. Experimental studies on a solar powered air conditioning system with partitioned hot water storage tank

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Z. F Li; K Sumathy

    2001-01-01

    This paper reports on the performance of a solar powered absorption air conditioning system with a partitioned hot water storage tank. The system employs a flat-plate collector array with a surface area of 38 m2 to drive a LiBr–H2O absorption chiller of 4.7 kW cooling capacity. The system is provided with a storage tank (2.75 m3) which is partitioned into

  4. Systematic procedures for sizing photovoltaic pumping system, using water tank storage

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Hamidat; B. Benyoucef

    2009-01-01

    In this work, the performances of the photovoltaic pumping destined to supply drinking water in remote and scattered small villages have been studied. The methodology adopted proposes various procedures based on the water consumption profiles, total head, tank capacity and photovoltaic array peak power. A method of the load losses probability (LLP) has been used to optimize sizing of the

  5. Condenser-Tank Interaction in a Heat Pump Water Heater with a Wrap around Condenser

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. N. Anderson; G. L. Morrison

    An experimental study was conducted to determine the overall heat transfer coefficient of a wrap around coil condenser soldered to the exterior surface of a water tank in a heat pump water heater (HPWH). The experimental data showed that the heat transfer coefficient did not significantly vary during the heat pump's operation. Numerical and computational fluid dynamics models were developed

  6. The characteristics of the thermal energy storage in a two-compartment water tank

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sui Lin; C. C. K. Kwok; J. C. Y. Wang

    1984-01-01

    A water storage tank consisting of two equal compartments of 35.56 cm i.d. and 50.8 cm height, used in a solar water-heating system, was designed and manufactured. The lower compartment, which contained the cold water inlet, was in a loop with a solar energy collector. The upper compartment, from which hot water could be drawn, was connected to the top

  7. Design review report: 200 East upgrades for Project W-314, tank farm restoration and safe operations

    SciTech Connect

    Boes, K.A.

    1998-04-15

    This Design Review Report (DRR) documents the contractor design verification methodology and records associated with project W-314`s 200 East (200E) Upgrades design package. The DRR includes the documented comments and their respective dispositions for this design. Acceptance of the comment dispositions and closure of the review comments is indicated by the signatures of the participating reviewers. Project W-314 is a project within the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Tank Waste Retrieval Program. This project provides capital upgrades for the existing Hanford tank farm waste transfer, instrumentation, ventilation, and electrical infrastructure systems. To support established TWRS programmatic objectives, the project is organized into two distinct phases. The initial focus of the project (i.e., Phase 1) is on waste transfer system upgrades needed to support the TWRS Privatization waste feed delivery system. Phase 2 of the project will provide upgrades to support resolution of regulatory compliance issues, improve tank infrastructure reliability, and reduce overall plant operating/maintenance costs. Within Phase 1 of the W-314 project, the waste transfer system upgrades are further broken down into six major packages which align with the project`s work breakdown structure. Each of these six sub-elements includes the design, procurement, and construction activities necessary to accomplish the specific tank farm upgrades contained within the package. The first design package (AN Valve Pit Upgrades) was completed in November 1997, and the associated design verification activities are documented in HNF-1893. The second design package, 200 East (200E) Upgrades, was completed in March 1998. This design package identifies modifications to existing valve pits 241-AX-B and 241-A-B, as well as several new waste transfer pipelines to be constructed within the A Farm Complex of the 200E Area. The scope of the valve pit modifications includes new pit cover blocks, valve manifolds, leak detectors, and special protective coatings similar to those previously approved for the AN Valve Pit Upgrades design package. The new transfer lines included in this package (with official line number designations) are described within.

  8. Water washes and caustic leaches of sludge from Hanford Tank S-101 and water washes of sludge from Hanford Tank C-103

    SciTech Connect

    Hunt, R.D.; Collins, J.L.; Chase, C.W.

    1998-07-01

    In 1993, the Department of Energy (DOE) selected the enhanced sludge washing (ESW) process as the baseline for pretreatment of Hanford tank sludges. The ESW process uses a series of water washes and caustic leaches to separate nonradioactive components such as aluminum, chromium, and phosphate from the high-level waste sludges. If the ESW process is successful, the volume of immobilized high-level waste will be significantly reduced. The tests on the sludge from Hanford Tank S-101 focused on the effects of process variables such as sodium hydroxide concentration (1 and 3 M), temperature (70 and 95 C), and leaching time (5, 24, 72, and 168 h) on the efficacy of the ESW process with realistic liquid-to-solid ratios. Another goal of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of water washes on a sludge sample from hanford Tank C-103. The final objective of this study was to test potential process control monitors during the water washes and caustic leaches with actual sludge. Both {sup 137}Cs activity and conductance were measured for each of the water washes and caustic leaches. Experimental procedures, a discussion of results, conclusions and recommendations are included in this report.

  9. High-Level Waste Mechanical Sludge Removal at the Savannah River Site - F Tank Farm Closure Project

    SciTech Connect

    Jolly, R.C.Jr. [Washington Savannah River Company (United States); Martin, B. [Washington Savannah River Company, A Washington Group International Company (United States)

    2008-07-01

    The Savannah River Site F-Tank Farm Closure project has successfully performed Mechanical Sludge Removal (MSR) using the Waste on Wheels (WOW) system for the first time within one of its storage tanks. The WOW system is designed to be relatively mobile with the ability for many components to be redeployed to multiple waste tanks. It is primarily comprised of Submersible Mixer Pumps (SMPs), Submersible Transfer Pumps (STPs), and a mobile control room with a control panel and variable speed drives. In addition, the project is currently preparing another waste tank for MSR utilizing lessons learned from this previous operational activity. These tanks, designated as Tank 6 and Tank 5 respectively, are Type I waste tanks located in F-Tank Farm (FTF) with a capacity of 2,840 cubic meters (750,000 gallons) each. The construction of these tanks was completed in 1953, and they were placed into waste storage service in 1959. The tank's primary shell is 23 meters (75 feet) in diameter, and 7.5 meters (24.5 feet) in height. Type I tanks have 34 vertically oriented cooling coils and two horizontal cooling coil circuits along the tank floor. Both Tank 5 and Tank 6 received and stored F-PUREX waste during their operating service time before sludge removal was performed. DOE intends to remove from service and operationally close (fill with grout) Tank 5 and Tank 6 and other HLW tanks that do not meet current containment standards. Mechanical Sludge Removal, the first step in the tank closure process, will be followed by chemical cleaning. After obtaining regulatory approval, the tanks will be isolated and filled with grout for long-term stabilization. Mechanical Sludge Removal operations within Tank 6 removed approximately 75% of the original 95,000 liters (25,000 gallons). This sludge material was transferred in batches to an interim storage tank to prepare for vitrification. This operation consisted of eleven (11) Submersible Mixer Pump(s) mixing campaigns and multiple intra-area transfers utilizing STPs from July 2006 to August 2007. This operation and successful removal of sludge material meets requirement of approximately 19,000 to 28,000 liters (5,000 to 7,500 gallons) remaining prior to the Chemical Cleaning process. Removal of the last 35% of sludge was exponentially more difficult, as less and less sludge was available to mobilize and the lighter sludge particles were likely removed during the early mixing campaigns. The removal of the 72,000 liters (19,000 gallons) of sludge was challenging due to a number factors. One primary factor was the complex internal cooling coil array within Tank 6 that obstructed mixer discharge jets and impacted the Effective Cleaning Radius (ECR) of the Submersible Mixer Pumps. Minimal access locations into the tank through tank openings (risers) presented a challenge because the available options for equipment locations were very limited. Mechanical Sludge Removal activities using SMPs caused the sludge to migrate to areas of the tank that were outside of the SMP ECR. Various SMP operational strategies were used to address the challenge of moving sludge from remote areas of the tank to the transfer pump. This paper describes in detail the Mechanical Sludge Removal activities and mitigative solutions to cooling coil obstructions and other challenges. The performance of the WOW system and SMP operational strategies were evaluated and the resulting lessons learned are described for application to future Mechanical Sludge Removal operations. (authors)

  10. Evaluation of Water Quality for Two St. Johns River Tributaries Receiving Septic Tank Effluent, Duval County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wicklein, Shaun M.

    2004-01-01

    Tributary streamflow to the St. Johns River in Duval County is thought to be affected by septic tank leachate from residential areas adjacent to these tributaries. Water managers and the city of Jacksonville have committed to infrastructure improvements as part of a management plan to address the impairment of tributary water quality. In order to provide data to evaluate the effects of future remedial activities in selected tributaries, major ion and nutrient concentrations, fecal coliform concentrations, detection of wastewater compounds, and tracking of bacterial sources were used to document septic tank influences on the water quality of selected tributaries. The tributaries Fishing Creek and South Big Fishweir Creek were selected because they drain subdivisions identified as high priority locations for septic tank phase-out projects: the Pernecia and Murray Hill B subdivisions, respectively. Population, housing (number of residences), and septic tank densities for the Murray Hill B subdivision are greater than those for the Pernecia subdivision. Water-quality samples collected in the study basins indicate influences from ground water and septic tanks. Estimated concentrations of total nitrogen ranged from 0.33 to 2.86 milligrams per liter (mg/L), and ranged from less than laboratory reporting limit (0.02 mg/L) to 0.64 mg/L for total phosphorus. Major ion concentrations met the State of Florida Class III surface-water standards; total nitrogen and total phosphorus concentrations exceeded the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Ecoregion XII nutrient criteria for rivers and streams 49 and 96 percent of the time, respectively. Organic wastewater compounds detected at study sites were categorized as detergents, antioxidants and flame retardants, manufactured polycarbonate resins, industrial solvents, and mosquito repellent. The most commonly detected compound was para-nonylphenol, a breakdown product of detergent. Results of wastewater sampling give evidence that stream water in the study basins is affected by septic tank effluent. Fecal coliform bacteria concentrations were measured on a monthly basis; of 115 samples, 63 percent exceeded the State of Florida fecal coliform bacteria standard for Class III surface waters of 800 colonies per 100 milliliters of water on any 1 day. Fecal coliform bacteria concentrations ranged from less than 20 colonies per 100 milliliters of sample to greater than or equal to 160,000 colonies per 100 milliliters of sample. Antibiotic resistance patterns of fecal coliform bacteria were used to identify the sources of fecal coliform bacteria. Significant sources of fecal coliform bacteria included wild animals, dogs, and humans. A majority of the fecal coliform bacteria were classified to be from human sources. Because the primary source of fecal coliform bacteria is from human sources, and most likely septic tank effluent, management of human sources may substantially improve microbiological water quality in both the Fishing Creek and South Branch Big Fishweir Creek basins.

  11. Temperature stratification from thermal diodes in solar hot water storage tank

    SciTech Connect

    Rhee, Jinny; Campbell, Andrew; Mariadass, Adele; Morhous, Branden [San Jose State University, One Washington Square, San Jose, CA 95192-0087 (United States); 581 North 2nd Street, San Jose, CA 95112 (United States); 460 North Winchester Blvd., Apt. 15, Santa Clara, CA 95050 (United States); 2442 East Nathan Way, Chandler, AZ 85225 (United States)

    2010-03-15

    In this brief note, we have experimentally measured the temperature stratification in a solar hot water storage tank resulting from a simulated solar heating load. Various modifications using a double chimney device that acts as a thermal diode were examined with the intent of maximizing temperature stratification. The greatest stratification was seen with a unique thermal diode arrangement named the express-elevator design, so-called for the direct hot water path from the bottom third of the tank to the top third. (author)

  12. HANFORD DOUBLE SHELL TANK THERMAL AND SEISMIC PROJECT INCREASED LIQUID LEVEL ANALYSIS FOR 241-AP TANK FARMS

    SciTech Connect

    TC MACKEY; JE DEIBLER; MW RINKER; KI JOHNSON; SP PILLI; NK KARRI; FG ABATT; KL STOOPS

    2009-01-14

    The essential difference between Revision 1 and the original issue of this report is the analysis of the anchor bolts that tie the steel dome of the primary tank to the concrete tank dome. The reevaluation of the AP anchor bolts showed that (for a given temperature increase) the anchor shear load distribution did not change significantly from the initially higher stiffness to the new secant shear stiffness. Therefore, the forces and displacements of the other tank components such as the primary tanks stresses, secondary liner strains, and concrete tank forces and moments also did not change significantly. Consequently, the revised work in Revision 1 focused on the changes in the anchor bolt responses and a full reevaluation of all tank components was judged to be unnecessary.

  13. Design review plan for Multi-Function Waste Tank Facility (Project W-236A)

    SciTech Connect

    Renfro, G.G.

    1994-12-20

    This plan describes how the Multi-Function Waste Tank Facility (MWTF) Project conducts reviews of design media; describes actions required by Project participants; and provides the methodology to ensure that the design is complete, meets the technical baseline of the Project, is operable and maintainable, and is constructable. Project W-236A is an integrated project wherein the relationship between the operating contractor and architect-engineer is somewhat different than that of a conventional project. Working together, Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) and ICF Karser Hanford (ICF KH) have developed a relationship whereby ICF KH performs extensive design reviews and design verification. WHC actively participates in over-the-shoulder reviews during design development, performs a final review of the completed design, and conducts a formal design review of the Safety Class I, ASME boiler and Pressure Vessel Code items in accordance with WHC-CM-6-1, Standard Engineering Practices.

  14. Implementation Plan for Tank Farm Transition Projects Suspect and Counterfeit Items

    SciTech Connect

    TRUE, R.R.

    2000-03-16

    This plan is designed to provide an appropriate level of confidence that Tank Farm Transition Projects (TFTP) facilities will be evaluated to assess the presence of suspect/counterfeit items. It is intended to identify suspect/counterfeit items that are presently in inventory and provide for the reporting and disposition of those items. Items which have been installed will also receive appropriate evaluation using a graded approach to achieve optimum results balanced against safety considerations and cost effectiveness.

  15. HANFORD DOUBLE SHELL TANK (DST) THERMAL & SEISMIC PROJECT DYTRAN ANALYSIS OF SEISMICALLY INDUCED FLUID STRUCTURE INTERACTION IN A HANFORD DOUBLE SHELL PRIMARY TANK

    SciTech Connect

    MACKEY, T.C.

    2006-03-14

    M&D Professional Services, Inc. (M&D) is under subcontract to Pacific Northwest National Laboratories (PNNL) to perform seismic analysis of the Hanford Site Double-Shell Tanks (DSTs) in support of a project entitled ''Double-Shell Tank (DSV Integrity Project-DST Thermal and Seismic Analyses)''. The overall scope of the project is to complete an up-to-date comprehensive analysis of record of the DST System at Hanford in support of Tri-Party Agreement Milestone M-48-14. The work described herein was performed in support of the seismic analysis of the DSTs. The thermal and operating loads analysis of the DSTs is documented in Rinker et al. (2004). The overall seismic analysis of the DSTs is being performed with the general-purpose finite element code ANSYS'. The global model used for the seismic analysis of the DSTs includes the DST structure, the contained waste, and the surrounding soil. The seismic analysis of the DSTs must address the fluid-structure interaction behavior and sloshing response of the primary tank and contained liquid. ANSYS has demonstrated capabilities for structural analysis, but has more limited capabilities for fluid-structure interaction analysis. The purpose of this study is to demonstrate the capabilities and investigate the limitations of the finite element code MSC.Dytranz for performing a dynamic fluid-structure interaction analysis of the primary tank and contained waste. To this end, the Dytran solutions are benchmarked against theoretical solutions appearing in BNL 1995, when such theoretical solutions exist. When theoretical solutions were not available, comparisons were made to theoretical solutions to similar problems, and to the results from ANSYS simulations. Both rigid tank and flexible tank configurations were analyzed with Dytran. The response parameters of interest that are evaluated in this study are the total hydrodynamic reaction forces, the impulsive and convective mode frequencies, the waste pressures, and slosh heights. To a limited extent, primary tank stresses are also reported. The capabilities and limitations of ANSYS for performing a fluid-structure interaction analysis of the primary tank and contained waste were explored in a parallel investigation and documented in a companion report (Carpenter and Abatt [2006]). The results of this study were used in conjunction with the results of the global ANSYS analysis reported in Carpenter et al. (2006) and the parallel ANSYS fluid-structure interaction analysis to help determine if a more refined sub-model of the primary tank is necessary to capture the important fluid-structure interaction effects in the tank and if so, how to best utilize a refined sub-model of the primary tank. The results of this study demonstrate that Dytran has the capability to perform fluid-structure interaction analysis of a primary tank subjected to seismic loading. With the exception of some isolated peak pressures and to a lesser extent peak stresses, the results agreed very well with theoretical solutions. The benchmarking study documented in Carpenter and Abatt (2006) showed that the ANSYS model used in that study captured much of the fluid-structure interaction (FSI) behavior, but did have limitations for predicting the convective response of the waste. While Dytran appears to have stronger capabilities for the analysis of the FSI behavior in the primary tank, it is more practical to use ANSYS for the global evaluation of the tank. Thus, Dytran served the purpose of helping to identify limitations in the ANSYS FSI analysis so that those limitations can be addressed in the structural evaluation of the primary tank.

  16. Effects of plumbing attachments on heat losses from solar domestic hot water storage tanks. Final report, Part 2

    SciTech Connect

    Song, J.; Wood, B.D. [Univ. of Nevada, Reno, NV (United States); Ji, L.J. [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States)

    1998-03-01

    The Solar Rating and Certification Corporation (SRCC) has established a standardized methodology for determining the performance rating of the Solar Domestic Hot Water (SDHW) systems it certifies under OG-300. Measured performance data for the solar collector component(s) of the system are used along with numerical models for the balance of the system to calculate the system`s thermal performance under a standard set of rating conditions. SRCC uses TRNSYS to model each of the components that comprise the system. The majority of the SRCC certified systems include a thermal storage tank with an auxiliary electrical heater. The most common being a conventional fifty gallon electric tank water heater. Presently, the thermal losses from these tanks are calculated using Q = U {center_dot} A {center_dot} {Delta}T. Unfortunately, this generalized formula does not adequately address temperature stratification both within the tank as well as in the ambient air surrounding the tank, non-uniform insulation jacket, thermal siphoning in the fluid lines attached to the tank, and plumbing fittings attached to the tank. This study is intended to address only that part of the problem that deals with the plumbing fittings attached to the tank. Heat losses from a storage tank and its plumbing fittings involve three different operating modes: charging, discharging and standby. In the charging mode, the tank receives energy from the solar collector. In the discharge mode, water flows from the storage tank through the distribution pipes to the faucets and cold city water enters the tank. In the standby mode, there is no forced water flow into or out of the tank. In this experimental study, only the standby mode was considered.

  17. Headspace vapor characterization at Hanford Waste Tank 241-A-102: Results from samples collected on November 10, 1995. Tank Vapor Characterization Project

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, J.C.; Pool, K.H.; Thomas, B.L.; Olsen, K.B.; Fruchter, J.S.; Silvers, K.L.

    1996-06-01

    This report describes the results of vapor samples taken from the headspace of waste storage tank 241-A-102 (Tank A-102) at the Hanford Site in Washington State. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) (a) contracted with Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) to provide sampling devices and analyze samples for inorganic and organic analytes collected from the tank headspace and ambient air near the tank. The analytical work was performed by the PNNL Vapor Analytical Laboratory (VAL) by the Tank Vapor Characterization Project. Work performed was based on a sample and analysis plan (SAP) prepared by WHC. The SAP provided job-specific instructions for samples, analyses, and reporting. The SAP for this sample job was {open_quotes}Vapor Sampling and Analysis Plan{close_quotes}, and the sample job was designated S5074. Samples were collected by WHC on November 10, 1995, using the Vapor Sampling System (VSS), a truck-based sampling method using a heated probe inserted into the tank headspace.

  18. Specific leaf areas of the tank bromeliad Guzmania monostachia perform distinct functions in response to water shortage

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Luciano Freschi; Cassia Ayumi Takahashi; Camila Aguetoni Cambui; Thais Ribeiro Semprebom; Aline Bertinatto Cruz; Paulo Tamoso Mioto; Leonardo de Melo Versieux; Alice Calvente; Sabrina Ribeiro Latansio-Aidar; Marcos Pereira Marinho Aidar; Helenice Mercier

    2010-01-01

    Leaves comprise most of the vegetative body of tank bromeliads and are usually subjected to strong longitudinal gradients. For instance, while the leaf base is in contact with the water accumulated in the tank, the more light-exposed middle and upper leaf sections have no direct access to this water reservoir. Therefore, the present study attempted to investigate whether different leaf

  19. Diversion tanks will prevent field shutdown: design-build project is 80% alaskan

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, M.

    1985-12-01

    The nation's second largest oil field is nearing peak production of 250,000 bbl per day. The Kuparuk River field on Alaska's North Slope put a second central processing facility (CPF-2) on line this year and a third will arrive on the 1986 sea lift. By 1990, the field will hold 400 producing wells and 400 water injection wells. Considering this investment, field operator Arco Alaska Inc., wanted to find a way to avoid costly field shutdowns that could be caused by oil-gas-water separation system problems or a temporary shutdown of the trans-Alaska pipeline or Alyeska terminal. The answer was a system of diversion tanks through which 220,000 bbl of crude could be kept circulating until problems could be corrected. The design and construction of these tanks are described.

  20. Waste Characterization Plan for the Hanford Site single-shell tanks. Appendix D, Quality Assurance Project Plan for characterization of single-shell tanks: Revision 3

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, J.G.; Winters, W.I.; Simpson, B.C. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Buck, J.W.; Chamberlain, P.J.; Hunter, V.L. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1991-09-01

    This section of the single-shell tank (SST) Waste Characterization Plan describes the quality control (QC) and quality assurance (QA) procedures and information used to support data that is collected in the characterization of SST wastes. The section addresses many of the same topics discussed in laboratory QA project plans (QAPjP) (WHC 1989, PNL 1989) and is responsive to the requirements of QA program plans (QAPP) (WHC 1990) associated with the characterization of the waste in the SSTs. The level of QC for the project depends on how the data is used. Data quality objectives (DQOs) are being developed to support decisions made using this data. It must be recognized that the decisions and information related to this part of the SST program deal with the materials contained within the tank only and not what may be in the environment/area surrounding the tanks. The information derived from this activity will be used to determine what risks may be incurred by the environment but are not used to define what actual constituents are contained within the soil surrounding the tanks. The phases defined within the DQOs on this Waste Characterization Plan follow the general guidance of the Comprehensive Environmental Response Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) yet are pertinent to analysis of the contents of the tanks and not the environment.

  1. Multi-Function Waste Tank Facility Quality Assurance Program Plan, Project W-236A. Revision 2

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, L.R.

    1995-05-30

    This document describes the Quality Assurance (QA) program for the Multi-Function Waste Tank Facility (MWTF) Project. The purpose of this QA program is to control project activities in such a manner as to achieve the mission of the MWTF Project in a safe and reliable manner. The QA program for the MWTF Project is founded on DOE Order 5700.6C, Quality Assurance, and implemented through the use of ASME NQA-1, Quality Assurance Program Requirements for Nuclear Facilities (ASME 1989 with addenda la-1989, lb-1991 and lc-1992). This document describes the program and planned actions which the Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) will implement to demonstrate and ensure that the project meets the requirements of DOE Order 5700.6C through the interpretive guidance of ASME NQA-1.

  2. Fire hazard analysis for Project W-320 Tank 241-C-106 waste retrieval

    SciTech Connect

    Conner, J.C.

    1995-09-12

    This Fire Hazards Analysis (FHA) for Project W-320, `Tank 241-C-106 Waste Retrieval` addresses fire hazards or fire related concerns in accordance with DOE 5480.7A (DOE 1998), resulting from or related to the processes and equipment to be installed or modified under Project W-320 to ensure that there are no undue fire hazards to site personnel and the public; the potential for the occurrence of a fire is minimized, process control and safety systems are not damaged by fire or related perils; and property damage from fire and related perils does not exceed an acceptable level.

  3. Stabilization of In-Tank Residual Wastes and External-Tank Soil Contamination for the Hanford Tank Closure Program: Applications to the AX Tank Farm

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, H.L.; Dwyer, B.P.; Ho, C.; Krumhansl, J.L.; McKeen, G.; Molecke, M.A.; Westrich, H.R.; Zhang, P.

    1998-11-01

    Technical support for the Hanford Tank Closure Program focused on evaluation of concepts for immobilization of residual contaminants in the Hanford AX tanks and underlying soils, and identification of cost-effective approaches to improve long-term performance of AX tank farm cIosure systems. Project objectives are to develop materials or engineered systems that would significantly reduce the radionuclide transport to the groundwater from AX tanks containing residual waste. We pursued several studies that, if implemented, would help achieve these goals. They include: (1) tank fill design to reduce water inilltration and potential interaction with residual waste; (2) development of in-tank getter materials that would specifically sorb or sequester radionuclides; (3) evaluation of grout emplacement under and around the tanks to prevent waste leakage during waste retrieval or to minimize water infiltration beneath the tanks; (4) development of getters that will chemically fix specific radionuclides in soils under tanks; and (5) geochemical and hydrologic modeling of waste-water-soil-grout interactions. These studies differ in scope from the reducing grout tank fill employed at the Savannah River Site in that our strategy improves upon tank fill design by providing redundancy in the barriers to radionuclide migration and by modification the hydrogeochemistry external to the tanks.

  4. How Much Water is in the Tank? Model Calculations for Two Epiphytic Bromeliads

    Microsoft Academic Search

    GERHARD Z OTZ; V ERA T HOMAS

    1999-01-01

    Water-impounding foliage (fl tank) characterizes many bromeliad species but, to date, a quantitative evaluation of the eectiveness of these structures to bridge rainless periods is not available. We present a model that analyses the capacity of these phytotelmata to supply moisture to the bromeliad as a function of plant size, and parameterize it for two epiphyte species, Tillandsia fasciculata and

  5. A review of low-flow, stratified-tank solar water heating systems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. G. T. Hollands; M. F. Lightstone

    1989-01-01

    Researchers have discovered that by using low collector flow rates (roughly one-seventh of those that have been generally used) and by taking measures to ensure the water in the storage tank remains stratified, the energy delivered by a forced-flow solar system can be increased substantially. In addition, the lower collector flow rates permit substantial savings in system cost, mainly through

  6. Evaluation of current industry practices for maintaining tomato dump tank water quality during packinghouse operations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In the United States, chlorine is the mainstay disinfectant for produce wash water. In packinghouses, large amounts of accumulating organic matter in dump tanks can cause a dramatic decline in chlorine levels, leaving wash solutions vulnerable to becoming a reservoir for both plant and human pathog...

  7. Parametric Study of Single-Pipe Diffusers in Stratified Chilled Water Storage Tanks (RP1185)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jing Song; William P. Bahnfleth; John M. Cimbala

    2004-01-01

    A parametric study was performed of the charging thermal performance of a full-scale pipe diffuser in a single cylindrical stratified chilled water storage tank by applying factorial experimental theory to the results of simulations performed with a validated computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model. Dimensional parameters having the potential to influence charging inlet performance were identified and formed into dimensionless groups

  8. OG 4.4.06 1 Use of Instrumented Water Tanks for the Improvement of Air

    E-print Network

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    OG 4.4.06 1 Use of Instrumented Water Tanks for the Improvement of Air Shower Detector Sensitivity sensitivity to those of scintillation counters as applied to detecting extensive air showers (EAS. Considerable efforts have also been made to develop telescopes which detect VHE extensive air showers (EAS

  9. Corrosion and electrochemical properties of the steel of exploited oil tanks in bottom water

    Microsoft Academic Search

    O. Zvirko; A. Zagórski

    2008-01-01

    We have detected a distinction in the corrosion and electrochemical behavior of St3sp steel of different parts of an oil storage\\u000a tank in under-product water of different oil refineries depending on preliminary contact between the metal and working media\\u000a of different corrosiveness. Due to long-term contact of the steel with a corrosive working medium (under-product or condensed\\u000a water), its corrosion

  10. Impact of Storage Tanks on Drinking Water Quality in Al-Karak Province-Jordan

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Anf H. Ziadat

    2005-01-01

    One hundred water samples were collected from the residential galvanized steel water storage tanks from three different regions of Al-Karak Province in the southern part of the country Jordan. Samples were analyzed for major anions (HCO3, F-, Cl-, NO3- and SO4-2), major cations (Na+, K+, Ca2+ and Mg2+) and heavy metals (Pb, Fe, Cu, Zn, Mn and Ni), in order

  11. Upgrade of 400,000 gallon water storage tank at Argonne National Laboratory-West to UCRL-15910 high hazard seismic requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Griffin, M.J. [EQE International, Inc., Irvine, CA (United States); Harris, B.G. [Argonne National Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1993-10-01

    As part of the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) Project at Argonne National Laboratory West (ANL-W), it was necessary to strengthen an existing 400,000 gallon flat-bottom water storage tank to meet UCRL-15910 (currently formulated as DOE Standard DOE-STD-1020-92, Draft) high hazard natural phenomena requirements. The tank was constructed in 1988 and preliminary calculations indicated that the existing base anchorage was insufficient to prevent buckling and potential failure during a high hazard seismic event. General design criteria, including ground motion input, load combinations, etc., were based upon the requirements of UCRL-15910 for high hazard facilities. The analysis and capacity assessment criteria were based on the Generic Implementation Procedure developed by the Seismic Qualification Utilities Group (SQUG). Upgrade modifications, consisting of increasing the size of the Generic Implementation Procedure developed by the Seismic Qualification Utilities Group (SQUG). Upgrade modifications, consisting of increasing the size of the foundation and installing additional anchor bolts and chairs, were necessary to increase the capacity of the tank anchorage/support system. The construction of the upgrades took place in 1992 while the tank remained in service to allow continued operation of the EBR-II reactor. The major phases of construction included the installation and testing of 144 1/14in. {times} 15in., and 366 1in. {times} 16in. epoxied concrete anchors, placement of 220 cubic yards of concrete heavily reinforced, and installation of 24 1-1/2in. {times} 60in. tank anchor bolts and chairs. A follow-up inspection of the tank interior by a diver was conducted to determine if the interior tank coating had been damaged by the chair welding. The project was completed on schedule and within budget.

  12. HANFORD DOUBLE SHELL TANK (DST) THERMAL & SEISMIC PROJECT DYTRAN BENCHMARK ANALYSIS OF SEISMICALLY INDUCED FLUID STRUCTURE INTERACTION IN FLAT TOP TANKS

    SciTech Connect

    MACKEY, T.C.

    2007-02-16

    The work reported in this document was performed in support of a project entitled ''Double-Shell Tank (DST) Integrity Project - DST Thermal and Seismic Analyses''. The overall scope of the project is to complete an up-to-date comprehensive analysis of record of the DST System at Hanford. The work described herein was performed in support of the seismic analysis of the DSTs. The thermal and operating loads analysis of the DSTs is documented in Rinker et al. (2004). The work herein was motivated by review comments from a Project Review Meeting held on March 20-21, 2006. One of the recommendations from that meeting was that the effects of the interaction between the tank liquid and the roof be further studied (Rinker, Deibler, Johnson, Karri, Pilli, Abatt, Carpenter, and Hendrix - Appendix E of RPP-RPT-28968, Rev. 1). The reviewers recommended that solutions be obtained for seismic excitation of flat roof tanks containing liquid with varying headspace between the top of the liquid and the tank roof. It was recommended that the solutions be compared with simple, approximate procedures described in BNL (1995) and Malhotra (2005). This report documents the results of the requested studies and compares the predictions of Dytran simulations to the approximate procedures in BNL (1995) and Malhotra (2005) for flat roof tanks. The four cases analyzed all employed a rigid circular cylindrical flat top tank with a radius of 450 in. and a height of 500 in. The initial liquid levels in the tank were 460,480,490, and 500 in. For the given tank geometry and the selected seismic input, the maximum unconstrained slosh height of the liquid is slightly greater than 25 in. Thus, the initial liquid level of 460 in. represents an effectively roofless tank, the two intermediate liquid levels lead to intermittent interaction between the liquid and tank roof, and the 500 in. liquid level represents a completely full tank with no sloshing. Although this work was performed in support of the seismic analysis of the Hanford DSTs, the tank models in this study are for an idealized flat top configuration. Moreover, the liquid levels used in the present models are for study purposes only and are independent of the actual operating levels of the DSTs. The response parameters that are evaluated in this study are the total hydrodynamic reaction forces, the peak convective hydrodynamic forces, the fundamental convective frequencies, the liquid pressures, and peak slosh heights. The results show that the Dytran solutions agree well with the known solutions for the roofless tank and completely full tank. At the two intermediate liquid levels, there are some significant differences between the Dytran results and the approximate estimates. The results show that the estimates of peak hydrodynamic reaction forces appearing in BNL (1995) and Malhotra (2005) are reasonable and generally conservative relative to the Dytran solutions. At the 460 and 480 in. liquid levels, Dytran underestimates the convective component of the reaction force compared to the estimated in BNL (1995) and Malhotra (2005), but the convective component of the reaction force is small relative to the total reaction force. At the 490 in. liquid levels, the peak convective reaction force is more than twice as large as predicted by the approximate methods in BNL (1995) and Malhotra (2005). All three methods give similar answers for the fundamental convective frequency at the 460 and 480 in. liquid levels, but the Dytran solution indicates a significant increase in the apparent convective frequency at the 490 in. liquid level that is caused by the interaction with the roof. The peak wall pressures in the tank at the two intermediate liquid levels are essentially the same as for a roofless tank in the lower two-thirds of the tank wall, but diverge from that solution in the upper third of the tank wall. The estimates of peak wall pressures appearing in BNL (1995) are quite conservative lower in the tank, but may underestimate the peak wall pressures closer to the tank roof. Finally, the peak roof pre

  13. Tank Vapor Characterization Project: Vapor space characterization of waste Tank A-101, Results from samples collected on June 8, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Pool, K.H.; Clauss, T.W.; McVeety, B.D.; Evans, J.C.; Thomas, B.L.; Olsen, K.B.; Fruchter, J.S.; Ligotke, M.W.

    1995-11-01

    This report describes the analytical results of vapor samples taken from the headspace of the waste storage tank 241-A-101 (Tank A-101) at the Hanford Site in Washington State. The results described in this report were obtained to characterize the vapors present in the tank headspace and to support safety evaluations and tank-farm operations. The results include air concentrations of selected inorganic and organic analytes and grouped compounds from samples obtained by Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) and provided for analysis to Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNL). Analyses were performed by the Vapor Analytical Laboratory (VAL) at PNL. Analyte concentrations were based on analytical results and, where appropriate, sample volumes provided by WHC. A summary of the results is listed in Table 1. Detailed descriptions of the analytical results appear in the text.

  14. One System Integrated Project Team Progress in Coordinating Hanford Tank Farms and the Waste Treatment Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Skwarek, Raymond J. [Washington River Protection Systems, Richland, WA (United States); Harp, Ben J. [USDOE Office of River Protection, Richland, WA (United States); Duncan, Garth M. [Bechtel National, Inc. (United States)

    2013-12-18

    The One System Integrated Project Team (IPT) was formed at the Hanford Site in late 2011 as a way to improve coordination and itegration between the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) and the Tank Operations Contractor (TOC) on interfaces between the two projects, and to eliminate duplication and exploit opportunities for synergy. The IPT is composed of jointly staffed groups that work on technical issues of mutal interest, front-end design and project definition, nuclear safety, plant engineering system integration, commissioning, planning and scheduling, and environmental, safety, health and quality (ESH&Q) areas. In the past year important progress has been made in a number of areas as the organization has matured and additional opportunities have been identified. Areas covered in this paper include: Support for development of the Office of Envirnmental Management (EM) framework document to progress the Office of River Protection's (ORP) River Protection Project (RPP) mission; Stewardship of the RPP flowsheet; Collaboration with Savannah River Site (SRS), Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Operations programs integration; and, Further development of the waste acceptance criteria.

  15. Tank vapor characterization project: Headspace vapor characterization of Hanford Waste Tank 241-S-102: Second comparison study results from samples collected on 04/04/96

    SciTech Connect

    Pool, K.H.; Evans, J.C.; Thomas, B.J. [and others

    1997-01-01

    This report describes the analytical results of vapor samples taken from the headspace of waste storage tank 241-S-102 (Tank S-102) at the Hanford Site in Washington State. The results described in this report is the second in a series comparing vapor sampling of the tank headspace using the Vapor Sampling System (VSS) and In Situ Vapor Sampling (ISVS) system without high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) prefiltration. The results include air concentrations of water (H{sub 2}O) and ammonia (NH{sub 3}), permanent gases, total non-methane organic compounds (TO-12), and individual organic analytes collected in SUMMA{trademark} canisters and on triple sorbent traps (TSTs). Samples were collected by Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) and analyzed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). Analyses were performed by the Vapor Analytical Laboratory (VAL) at PNNL. Analyte concentrations were based on analytical results and, where appropriate, sample volume measurements provided by WHC.

  16. Tank Vapor Characterization Project -- Headspace vapor characterization of Hanford waste Tank 241-C-107: Results from samples collected on 01/17/96

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, B.L.; Evans, J.C.; Pool, K.H.; Olsen, K.B.; Fruchter, J.S.; Silvers, K.L.

    1996-07-01

    This report describes the analytical results of vapor samples taken from the headspace of waste storage tank 241-C-107 (Tank C-107) at the Hanford Site in Washington State. The results described in this report were obtained to compare vapor sampling of the tank headspace using the Vapor Sampling System (VSS) and In Situ Vapor Sampling (ISVS) system with and without high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) prefiltration. The results include air concentrations of water (H{sub 2}O) and ammonia (NH{sub 3}), permanent gases, total non-methane hydrocarbons (TO-12), and individual organic analytes collected in SUMMA{trademark} canisters and on triple sorbent traps (TSTs). Samples were collected by Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) and analyzed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). Analyses were performed by the Vapor Analytical Laboratory (VAL) at PNNL. Analyte concentrations were based on analytical results and, where appropriate, sample volume measurements provided by WHC.

  17. Tank vapor characterization project - headspace vapor characterization of Hanford Waste Tank 241-C-107: Second comparison study results from samples collected on 3/26/96

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, J.C.; Pool, K.H.; Thomas, B.L. [and others

    1997-01-01

    This report describes the analytical results of vapor samples taken from the headspace of waste storage tank 241-C-107 (Tank C-107) at the Hanford Site in Washington State. The results described in this report is the second in a series comparing vapor sampling of the tank headspace using the Vapor Sampling System (VSS) and In Situ Vapor Sampling (ISVS) system without high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) prefiltration. The results include air concentrations of water (H{sub 2}O) and ammonia (NH{sub 3}), permanent gases, total non-methane organic compounds (TO-12), and individual organic analytes collected in SUMMA{trademark} canisters and on triple sorbent traps (TSTs). Samples were collected by Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) and analyzed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). Analyses were performed by the Vapor Analytical Laboratory (VAL) at PNNL. Analyte concentrations were based on analytical results and, where appropriate, sample volume measurements provided by WHC.

  18. Tank vapor characterization project. Headspace vapor characterization of Hanford waste tank 241-BY-108: Second comparison study results from samples collected on 3/28/96

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, B.L.; Pool, K.H.; Evans, J.C. [and others

    1997-01-01

    This report describes the analytical results of vapor samples taken from the headspace of waste storage tank 241-BY-108 (Tank BY-108) at the Hanford Site in Washington State. The results described in this report is the second in a series comparing vapor sampling of the tank headspace using the Vapor Sampling System (VSS) and In Situ Vapor Sampling (ISVS) system without high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) prefiltration. The results include air concentrations of water (H{sub 2}O) and ammonia (NH{sub 3}), permanent gases, total non-methane organic compounds (TO-12), and individual organic analytes collected in SUMMA{trademark} canisters and on triple sorbent traps (TSTs). Samples were collected by Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) and analyzed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). Analyses were performed by the Vapor Analytical Laboratory (VAL) at PNNL. Analyte concentrations were based on analytical results and, where appropriate, sample volume measurements provided by WHC.

  19. Engineer/constructor description of work for Tank 241-SY-102 retrieval system, project W-211, initial tank retrieval systems

    SciTech Connect

    Rieck, C.A. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

    1996-02-01

    This document provides a description of work for the design and construction of a waste retrieval system for Tank 241-SY-102. The description of work includes a working estimate and schedule, as well as a narrative description and sketches of the waste retrieval system. The working estimate and schedule are within the established baselines for the Tank 241-SY-102 retrieval system. The technical baseline is provided in Functional Design Criteria, WHC-SD-W211-FDC-001, Revision 2.

  20. Effect of surface waves on radiotherapy dosimetric measurements in water tanks

    PubMed Central

    Bakhtiari, Mohammad

    2011-01-01

    The effect of surface waves, generated by moving the scanning arms in water phantoms, on radiation dosimetry is studied. It is shown that in large water tanks, high arm speeds can result in dosimetric errors of up to 5%. The measurements that are started after damping the water waves can result in about a 50% improvement in accuracy of measurements. It is shown that the water surfaces at the start of the measurements have high fluctuations that transform to a steady phase by elapsing time. PMID:22228932

  1. Combined Opportunities in Energy & Water Conservation Projects

    E-print Network

    Keller, Arturo A.

    Combined Opportunities in Energy & Water Conservation Projects A.Keller, S. Hughes, S. Bennett, M, the Metropolitan Water District, the California Urban Water Conservation Council, Santa Clara Valley Water District) as a result of energy and water conservation; ~ Determined total cost of implementing the conservation

  2. Southern Region Water Quality Coordination Project

    E-print Network

    Southern Region Water Quality Coordination Project September 14, 2004 to June 1, 2005 Progress responding to water quality and conservation issues with educational assistance, technology development and technology transfer programs. #12;2 Southern Region Water Quality Coordination Project Annual Report Sept. 15

  3. Minutes of the Tank Waste Science Panel Meeting March 25--27, 1992. Hanford Tank Safety Project

    SciTech Connect

    Schutz, W W [comp.; Consultant, Wellington, Delaware (United States); Strachan, D M [comp.; Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1992-08-01

    Discussions from the seventh meeting of the Tank Waste Science are presented in Colorado. The subject areas included the generation of gases in Tank 241-SY-101, the possible use of sonication as a mitigation method, and analysis for organic constituents in core samples. Results presented and discussed include: Ferrocyanides appear to be rapidly dissolved in 1M NaOH; upon standing in the laboratory at ambient conditions oxalate precipitates from simulated wastes containing HEDTA. This suggests that one of the main components in the solids in Tank 241-SY-101 is oxalate; hydrogen evolved from waste samples from Tank 241-SY-101 is five times that observed in the off gas from the tank; data suggest that mitigation of Tank 241-SY-101 will not cause a high release of dissolved N{sub 2}O; when using a slurry for radiation studies, a portion of the generated gases is very difficult to remove. To totally recover the generated gases, the solids must first be dissolved. This result may have an impact on mitigation by mixing if the gases are not released. Using {sup 13}C-labeled organics in thermal degradation studies has allowed researchers to illucidate much of the kinetic mechanism for the degradation of HEDTA and glycolate. In addition to some of the intermediate, more complex organic species, oxalate, formate, and CO{sub 2} were identified; and analytic methods for organics in radioactive complex solutions such as that found in Tank 241-SY-101 have been developed and others continue to be developed.

  4. Permitting plan for Project W-340, Tank 241-C-106 manipulator retrieval arm

    SciTech Connect

    Tollefson, K.S.

    1995-01-01

    This document describes the regulatory requirements and describes alternative strategies for obtaining permits and approvals for Project W-340, Tank 241-C-106 Manipulator Retrieval Arm. A comprehensive review of environmental regulations has indicated that several environmental reviews, permits, and approvals are required before design, construction, and operation of the facility. The environmental reviews, permits, and approvals, as well the regulatory authority potentially applicable to the Project W-340 Long Reach Manipulator Arm include the following: National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 -- US Department of Energy, Headquarters; State Environmental Policy Act of 1971 -- State of Washington Department of Ecology; Air Permitting; Dangerous Waste Permitting; Miscellaneous Reviews/Permits/Approvals. This document describes the environmental reviews, permits, and approval requirements for the project. It provides a summary of permit application data requirements, alternative strategies for permit completion and approval, as well as the estimated probability of success for each alternative strategy.

  5. Project W-211, initial tank retrieval systems, retrieval control system software configuration management plan

    SciTech Connect

    RIECK, C.A.

    1999-02-23

    This Software Configuration Management Plan (SCMP) provides the instructions for change control of the W-211 Project, Retrieval Control System (RCS) software after initial approval/release but prior to the transfer of custody to the waste tank operations contractor. This plan applies to the W-211 system software developed by the project, consisting of the computer human-machine interface (HMI) and programmable logic controller (PLC) software source and executable code, for production use by the waste tank operations contractor. The plan encompasses that portion of the W-211 RCS software represented on project-specific AUTOCAD drawings that are released as part of the C1 definitive design package (these drawings are identified on the drawing list associated with each C-1 package), and the associated software code. Implementation of the plan is required for formal acceptance testing and production release. The software configuration management plan does not apply to reports and data generated by the software except where specifically identified. Control of information produced by the software once it has been transferred for operation is the responsibility of the receiving organization.

  6. Effect of the storage tank thermal insulation on the thermal performance of an integrated collector storage solar water heater (ICSSWH)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaabane, Monia; Mhiri, Hatem; Bournot, Philippe

    2014-10-01

    The thermal behavior of an integrated collector storage solar water heater (ICSSWH) is numerically studied using CFD simulations. Based on the good agreement between the numerical results and the experimental data from literature, we propose a geometrical change allowing limiting the main disadvantage of this solar system which is its high night losses due to the non-insulated storage tank surface. A second 3D CFD model of an ICSSWH in which the storage tank is partially insulated is developed and three values of this tank thermal insulated fraction are studied. Numerical results show that the partially insulated tank based ICSSWH presents lower thermal losses during the night and this night thermal losses coefficient is reduced from 14.6 to 11.64 W K-1 for the tank thermal insulation fraction ? = 1/4. Similarly, the modified system presents the advantage of its lower thermal losses even during the day. Regarding the thermal production, it is seen that the modified system presents higher water temperature at night and that for all the tank thermal insulation fractions. Concerning the operation of this modified system during the day, the water temperature is lower during the day and that up to 16 h but the water temperature which achieves 324 K for the storage tank thermal insulation fraction ? = 1/8 still sufficiently high to satisfy a family hot water needs.

  7. River Protection Project (RPP) Tank Waste Retrieval and Disposal Mission Technical Baseline Summary Description

    SciTech Connect

    DOVALLE, O.R.

    1999-12-29

    This document is one of the several documents prepared by Lockheed Martin Hanford Corp. to support the U. S. Department of Energy's Tank Waste Retrieval and Disposal mission at Hanford. The Tank Waste Retrieval and Disposal mission includes the programs necessary to support tank waste retrieval; waste feed, delivery, storage, and disposal of immobilized waste; and closure of the tank farms.

  8. Robotic systems for the high level waste tank farm replacement project at INEL

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Berger; D. White; B. Thompson; M. Christensen

    1993-01-01

    Westinghouse Idaho Nuclear Company (WINCO) is specifying and designing a new high level waste tank farm at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The farm consists of four underground storage tanks, which replace the existing tanks. The new facility includes provisions for remote operations. One of the planned remote operations is robotic inspection of the tank from the interior and

  9. STS-55 crewmembers repair waste water tank on OV-102's middeck

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Three STS-55 crewmembers participate in an inflight maintenance (IFM) exercise to counter problems experienced with a waste water tank below Columbia's, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 102's, middeck. Mission Specialist 3 (MS3) Bernard A. Harris, Jr, inside the airlock, holds middeck floor access panel MD54G and looks below at Pilot Terence T. Henricks who is in the bilge area. Commander Steven R. Nagel is lying on middeck floor at the left.

  10. Instrumented Water Tanks can Improve Air Shower Detector Sensitivity

    E-print Network

    R. Atkins; W. Benbow; D. Berley; M. -L. Chen; D. G. Coyne; R. S. Delay; B. L. Dingus; D. E. Dorfan; R. W. Ellsworth; D. Evans; A. Falcone; L. Fleysher; R. Fleysher; G. Gisler; J. A. Goodman; T. J. Haines; C. M. Hoffman; S. Hugenberger; L. A. Kelley; I. Leonor; J. Macri; M. McConnell; J. F. McCullough; J. E. McEnery; R. S. Miller; A. I. Mincer; M. F. Morales; P. Nemethy; J. M. Ryan; M. Schneider; B. Shen; A. Shoup; G. Sinnis; A. J. Smith; G. W. Sullivan; T. N. Thompson; O. T. Tumer; K. Wang; M. O. Wascko; S. Westerhoff; D. A. Williams; T. Yang; G. B. Yodh

    1999-07-15

    Previous works have shown that water Cherenkov detectors have superior sensitivity to those of scintillation counters as applied to detecting extensive air showers (EAS). This is in large part due to their much higher sensitivity to EAS photons which are more than five times more numerous than EAS electrons. Large area water Cherenkov detectors can be constructed relatively cheaply and operated reliably. A sparse detector array has been designed which uses these types of detectors to substantially increase the area over which the Milagro Gamma Ray Observatory collects EAS information. Improvements to the Milagro detector's performance characteristics and sensitivity derived from this array and preliminary results from a prototype array currently installed near the Milagro detector will be presented.

  11. Attenuation of standing waves in a large water tank using arrays of large tethered encapsulated bubbles.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kevin M; Wilson, Preston S; Wochner, Mark S

    2014-04-01

    The use of bubble resonance effects to attenuate low-frequency underwater sound was investigated experimentally in a large water tank. A compact electromechanical sound source was used to excite standing wave fields at frequencies ranging between 50 and 200 Hz in the tank. The source was then surrounded by a stationary array of tethered encapsulated air bubbles, and reduction in standing wave amplitude by as much as 26?dB was observed. The bubbles consisted of either thin-shelled latex balloons with approximately 5?cm radii or thicker-shelled vinyl boat fenders with 6.9?cm radii. The effects of changing the material and thickness of the bubble shells were found to be in qualitative agreement with predictions from Church's model for sound propagation in a liquid containing encapsulated bubbles [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 97, 1510-1521 (1995)]. Although demonstrated here for low frequency noise abatement within a tank, which is useful for quieting acoustic test facilities and large tanks used for marine life husbandry, the eventual aim of this work is to use stationary arrays of large tethered encapsulated bubbles to abate low frequency underwater noise from anthropogenic sources in the marine environment. PMID:25234970

  12. Tank waste remediation system privatization phase 1 infrastructure project W-519, project execution plan

    SciTech Connect

    Parazin, R.J.

    1998-08-28

    This Project Execution Plan (PEP) defines the overall strategy, objectives, and contractor management requirements for the execution phase of Project W-519 (98-D403), Privatization Phase 1 Infrastructure Support, whose mission is to effect the required Hanford site infrastructure physical changes to accommodate the Privatization Contractor facilities. This plan provides the project scope, project objectives and method of performing the work scope and achieving objectives. The plan establishes the work definitions, the cost goals, schedule constraints and roles and responsibilities for project execution. The plan also defines how the project will be controlled and documented.

  13. Elemental Water Impact Test: Phase 3 Plunge Depth of a 36-Inch Aluminum Tank Head

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vassilakos, Gregory J.

    2014-01-01

    Spacecraft are being designed based on LS-DYNA water landing simulations. The Elemental Water Impact Test (EWIT) series was undertaken to assess the accuracy of LS-DYNA water impact simulations. Phase 3 featured a composite tank head that was tested at a range of heights to verify the ability to predict structural failure of composites. To support planning for Phase 3, a test series was conducted with an aluminum tank head dropped from heights of 2, 6, 10, and 12 feet to verify that the test article would not impact the bottom of the test pool. This report focuses on the comparisons of the measured plunge depths to LS-DYNA predictions. The results for the tank head model demonstrated the following. 1. LS-DYNA provides accurate predictions for peak accelerations. 2. LS-DYNA consistently under-predicts plunge depth. An allowance of at least 20% should be added to the LS-DYNA predictions. 3. The LS-DYNA predictions for plunge depth are relatively insensitive to the fluid-structure coupling stiffness.

  14. SINGLE-SHELL TANK INTEGRITY PROJECT ANALYSIS OF RECORD-PRELIMINARY MODELING PLAN FOR THERMAL AND OPERATING LOADS

    SciTech Connect

    RAST RS; RINKER MW; BAPANAALLI SK; DEIBLER JE; GUZMAN-LEONG CE; JOHNSON KI; KARRI NK; PILLI SP; SANBORN SE

    2010-10-22

    This document is a Phase I deliverable for the Single-Shell Tank Analysis of Record effort. This document is not the Analysis of Record. The intent of this document is to guide the Phase II detailed modeling effort. Preliminary finite element models for each of the tank types were developed and different case studies were performed on one or more of these tank types. Case studies evaluated include thermal loading, waste level variation, the sensitivity of boundary effects (soil radial extent), excavation slope or run to rise ratio, soil stratigraphic (property and layer thickness) variation at different farm locations, and concrete material property variation and their degradation under thermal loads. The preliminary analysis document reviews and preliminary modeling analysis results are reported herein. In addition, this report provides recommendations for the next phase of the SST AOR project, SST detailed modeling. Efforts and results discussed in this report do not include seismic modeling as seismic modeling is covered by a separate report. The combined results of both static and seismic models are required to complete this effort. The SST AOR project supports the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of River Protection (ORP) mission for obtaining a better understanding of the structural integrity of Hanford's SSTs. The 149 SSTs, with six different geometries, have experienced a range of operating histories which would require a large number of unique analyses to fully characterize their individual structural integrity. Preliminary modeling evaluations were conducted to determine the number of analyses required for adequate bounding of each of the SST tank types in the Detailed Modeling Phase of the SST AOR Project. The preliminary modeling was conducted in conjunction with the Evaluation Criteria report, Johnson et al. (2010). Reviews of existing documents were conducted at the initial stage of preliminary modeling. These reviews guided the topics that were explored in the SST preliminary modeling. The reviews determined the level of detail necessary to perform the analyses of the SSTs. To guide the Phase II detailed modeling effort, preliminary finite element models for each of the tank types were developed and different case studies were performed on one or more of these tank types. Case studies evaluated include thermal loading, waste level variation, the sensitivity of boundary effects (soil radial extent), excavation slope or run to rise ratio, soil stratigraphic (property and layer thickness) variation at different farm locations, and concrete material property variation and their degradation under thermal loads. Conclusions were derived from case studies on one of the tank types when no additional runs of similar cases on other types of tanks were found necessary to derive those conclusions. The document reviews provided relatively complete temperature histories for Type IV tanks. The temperature history data for Type I, II, and III tanks was almost nonexistent for years prior to 1975. Document reviews indicate that there might be additional useful data in the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL) records in Seattle, WA, and these records need to be reviewed to extract data that might have been disregarded during previous reviews. Thermal stress analyses were conducted using different temperature distribution scenarios on Type IV tanks. Such studies could not be carried out for other tank types due to lack of temperature history data. The results from Type IV tank analyses indicate that factors such as temperature distribution in the tank waste and rate of rise in waste temperature have a significant impact on the thermal stresses in the tank structures. Overall, the conclusion that can drawn from the thermal stress analyses is that these studies should be carried out for all tank types during the detailed analysis phase with temperature values that are reasonably close to the typical temperature histories of the respective tank types. If and/or when additional waste temperature data

  15. Experimental Study on Hydrothermal Plume Dynamics in a Stratified Salt Water Tank

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, W.; He, Z.; Jiang, H.

    2014-12-01

    Hydrothermal plumes are generated by high temperature hydrothermal venting systems occurred at many places along the mid-ocean ridges. The understanding of interaction between plumes and surrounding seawater are important since plumes transport significant heat and chemicals from the lithosphere to the ocean. This paper presents an experimental study on plume generation, mixing, entrainment and rising in a stratified salt water tank. The two-tank method is first improved to produce a stable linear stratification in the tank. A series of plume experiments using different orifice diameters and fluxes are then carried out to evaluate the characteristics of plumes. The stratification of salt water is measured and buoyancy frequency is calculated to provide the background information. The plume shape, flow field, rise height, and buoyancy flux are analyzed using image processing methods. The results show that the established experimental system is capable of providing stable linear stratifications for laboratory studies of hydrothermal plumes. The measured plume shapes and rise heights are in good agreement with available empirical formulae in the literature.

  16. A new demulsifier device for oil-water separation in oil tanks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meribout, Mahmoud

    2011-06-01

    In this paper, a new innovative closed-loop and autonomous electronic device for oil-water separation in the emulsion layer is presented. The device is designed for crude oil separation tanks and is sought to replace other traditional methods such as the ones using chemicals. It is modular and comprises three subsystems: sensing subsystem, actuating subsystem, and data communication/interfacing subsystem. The sensing subsystem is intrinsically safe and consists of a one dimensional level array of non intrusive ultrasonic transducers that monitor in real-time the low and high levels of the emulsion layer in a tank with a vertical resolution of 15 cm. The actuating system includes a microwave generator which stimulates the emulsion at a predefined position to breaks it out. A built-in feedback PID-based controller determines the optimal position of this generator based on the oil-water content which is provided by the sensor array and moves the generator accordingly. The data communication/interfacing system is responsible to transfer to the control room real-time data (e.g. the actual position of the emulsion layer and the actual temperature inside the tank) using field bus network protocol (RS485 protocol). This would help a continuous and effective monitoring by the operator using a dedicated GUI. In addition of being safe and environmentally friendly, the device provides faster and more efficient separation than the traditional techniques.

  17. One System Integrated Project Team: Retrieval and Delivery of Hanford Tank Wastes for Vitrification in the Waste Treatment Plant - 13234

    SciTech Connect

    Harp, Benton J. [U.S. Department of Energy, Office of River Protection, Post Office Box 550, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States)] [U.S. Department of Energy, Office of River Protection, Post Office Box 550, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States); Kacich, Richard M. [Bechtel National, Inc., 2435 Stevens Center Place, Richland, Washington 99354 (United States)] [Bechtel National, Inc., 2435 Stevens Center Place, Richland, Washington 99354 (United States); Skwarek, Raymond J. [Washington River Protection Solutions LLC, Post Office Box 850, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States)] [Washington River Protection Solutions LLC, Post Office Box 850, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    The One System Integrated Project Team (IPT) was formed in late 2011 as a way for improving the efficiency of delivery and treatment of highly radioactive waste stored in underground tanks at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) 586-square-mile Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State. The purpose of the One System IPT is to improve coordination and integration between the Hanford's Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) contractor and the Tank Operations Contractor (TOC). The vision statement is: One System is a WTP and TOC safety-conscious team that, through integrated management and implementation of risk-informed decision and mission-based solutions, will enable the earliest start of safe and efficient treatment of Hanford's tank waste, to protect the Columbia River, environment and public. The IPT is a formal collaboration between Bechtel National, Inc. (BNI), which manages design and construction of the WTP for the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of River Protection (DOEORP), and Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS), which manages the TOC for ORP. More than fifty-six (56) million gallons of highly radioactive liquid waste are stored in one hundred seventy-seven (177) aging, underground tanks. Most of Hanford's waste tanks - one hundred forty-nine (149) of them - are of an old single-shell tank (SST) design built between 1944 and 1964. More than sixty (60) of these tanks have leaked in the past, releasing an estimated one million gallons of waste into the soil and threatening the nearby Columbia River. There are another twenty-eight (28) new double-shelled tanks (DSTs), built from 1968 to 1986, that provide greater protection to the environment. In 1989, DOE, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology) signed a landmark agreement that required Hanford to comply with federal and state environmental standards. It also paved the way for agreements that set deadlines for retrieving the tank wastes and for building and operating the WTP. The tank wastes are the result of Hanford's nearly fifty (50) years of plutonium production. In the intervening years, waste characteristics have been increasingly better understood. However, waste characteristics that are uncertain and will remain as such represent a significant technical challenge in terms of retrieval, transport, and treatment, as well as for design and construction of WTP. What also is clear is that the longer the waste remains in the tanks, the greater the risk to the environment and the people of the Pacific Northwest. The goal of both projects - tank operations and waste treatment - is to diminish the risks posed by the waste in the tanks at the earliest possible date. About two hundred (200) WTP and TOC employees comprise the IPT. Individual work groups within One System include Technical, Project Integration and Controls, Front-End Design and Project Definition, Commissioning, Nuclear Safety and Engineering Systems Integration, and Environmental Safety and Health and Quality Assurance (ESH and QA). Additional functions and team members will be added as the WTP approaches the operational phase. The team has undertaken several initiatives since its formation to collaborate on issues: (1) alternate scenarios for delivery of wastes from the tank farms to WTP; (2) improvements in managing Interface Control Documents; (3) coordination on various technical issues, including the Defense Nuclear Facilities Nuclear Safety Board's Recommendation 2010-2; (4) deployment of the SmartPlant{sup R} Foundation-Configuration Management System; and (5) preparation of the joint contract deliverable of the Operational Readiness Support Plan. (authors)

  18. One System Integrated Project Team: Retrieval And Delivery Of The Hanford Tank Wastes For Vitrification In The Waste Treatment Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Harp, Benton J. [Department of Energy, Office of River Protection, Richland, Washington (United States); Kacich, Richard M. [Bechtel National, Inc., Richland, WA (United States); Skwarek, Raymond J. [Washington River Protection Solutions LLC, Richland, WA (United States)

    2012-12-20

    The One System Integrated Project Team (IPT) was formed in late 2011 as a way for improving the efficiency of delivery and treatment of highly radioactive waste stored in underground tanks at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) 586-square-mile Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State. The purpose of the One System IPT is to improve coordination and integration between the Hanford's Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) contractor and the Tank Operations Contractor (TOC). The vision statement is: One System is a WTP and TOC safety conscious team that, through integrated management and implementation of risk-informed decision and mission-based solutions, will enable the earliest start of safe and efficient treatment of Hanford's tank waste, to protect the Columbia River, environment and public. The IPT is a formal collaboration between Bechtel National, Inc. (BNI), which manages design and construction of the WTP for the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of River Protection (DOEORP), and Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS), which manages the TOC for ORP. More than fifty-six (56) million gallons of highly radioactive liquid waste are stored in one hundred seventy-seven (177) aging, underground tanks. Most of Hanford's waste tanks - one hundred forty-nine (149) of them - are of an old single-shell tank (SST) design built between 1944 and 1964. More than sixty (60) of these tanks have leaked in the past, releasing an estimated one million gallons of waste into the soil and threatening the nearby Columbia River. There are another twenty-eight (28) new double-shelled tanks (DSTs), built from 1968 to 1986, that provide greater protection to the environment. In 1989, DOE, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology) signed a landmark agreement that required Hanford to comply with federal and state environmental standards. It also paved the way for agreements that set deadlines for retrieving the tank wastes and for building and operating the WTP. The tank wastes are the result of Hanford's nearly fifty (50) years of plutonium production. In the intervening years, waste characteristics have been increasingly better understood. However, waste characteristics that are uncertain and will remain as such represent a significant technical challenge in terms of retrieval, transport, and treatment, as well as for design and construction ofWTP. What also is clear is that the longer the waste remains in the tanks, the greater the risk to the environment and the people of the Pacific Northwest. The goal of both projects - tank operations and waste treatment - is to diminish the risks posed by the waste in the tanks at the earliest possible date. About two hundred (200) WTP and TOC employees comprise the IPT. Individual work groups within One System include Technical, Project Integration & Controls, Front-End Design & Project Definition, Commissioning, Nuclear Safety & Engineering Systems Integration, and Environmental Safety and Health and Quality Assurance (ESH&QA). Additional functions and team members will be added as the WTP approaches the operational phase. The team has undertaken several initiatives since its formation to collaborate on issues: (1) alternate scenarios for delivery of wastes from the tank farms to WTP; (2) improvements in managing Interface Control Documents; (3) coordination on various technical issues, including the Defense Nuclear Facilities Nuclear Safety Board's Recommendation 2010-2; (4) deployment of the SmartPlant? Foundation-configuration Management System; and (5) preparation of the joint contract deliverable of the Operational Readiness Support Plan.

  19. Leaf hydraulic conductance for a tank bromeliad: axial and radial pathways for moving and conserving water.

    PubMed

    North, Gretchen B; Lynch, Frank H; Maharaj, Franklin D R; Phillips, Carly A; Woodside, Walter T

    2013-01-01

    Epiphytic plants in the Bromeliaceae known as tank bromeliads essentially lack stems and absorptive roots and instead take up water from reservoirs formed by their overlapping leaf bases. For such plants, leaf hydraulic conductance is plant hydraulic conductance. Their simple strap-shaped leaves and parallel venation make them suitable for modeling leaf hydraulic conductance based on vasculature and other anatomical and morphological traits. Plants of the tank bromeliad Guzmania lingulata were investigated in a lowland tropical forest in Costa Rica and a shaded glasshouse in Los Angeles, CA, USA. Stomatal conductance to water vapor and leaf anatomical variables related to hydraulic conductance were measured for both groups. Tracheid diameters and numbers of vascular bundles (veins) were used with the Hagen-Poiseuille equation to calculate axial hydraulic conductance. Measurements of leaf hydraulic conductance using the evaporative flux method were also made for glasshouse plants. Values for axial conductance and leaf hydraulic conductance were used in a model based on leaky cable theory to estimate the conductance of the radial pathway from the vein to the leaf surface and to assess the relative contributions of both axial and radial pathways. In keeping with low stomatal conductance, low stomatal density, low vein density, and narrow tracheid diameters, leaf hydraulic conductance for G. lingulata was quite low in comparison with most other angiosperms. Using the predicted axial conductance in the leaky cable model, the radial resistance across the leaf mesophyll was predicted to predominate; lower, more realistic values of axial conductance resulted in predicted radial resistances that were closer to axial resistance in their impact on total leaf resistance. Tracer dyes suggested that water uptake through the tank region of the leaf was not limiting. Both dye movement and the leaky cable model indicated that the leaf blade of G. lingulata was structurally and hydraulically well-suited to conserve water. PMID:23596446

  20. Leaf Hydraulic Conductance for a Tank Bromeliad: Axial and Radial Pathways for Moving and Conserving Water

    PubMed Central

    North, Gretchen B.; Lynch, Frank H.; Maharaj, Franklin D. R.; Phillips, Carly A.; Woodside, Walter T.

    2013-01-01

    Epiphytic plants in the Bromeliaceae known as tank bromeliads essentially lack stems and absorptive roots and instead take up water from reservoirs formed by their overlapping leaf bases. For such plants, leaf hydraulic conductance is plant hydraulic conductance. Their simple strap-shaped leaves and parallel venation make them suitable for modeling leaf hydraulic conductance based on vasculature and other anatomical and morphological traits. Plants of the tank bromeliad Guzmania lingulata were investigated in a lowland tropical forest in Costa Rica and a shaded glasshouse in Los Angeles, CA, USA. Stomatal conductance to water vapor and leaf anatomical variables related to hydraulic conductance were measured for both groups. Tracheid diameters and numbers of vascular bundles (veins) were used with the Hagen–Poiseuille equation to calculate axial hydraulic conductance. Measurements of leaf hydraulic conductance using the evaporative flux method were also made for glasshouse plants. Values for axial conductance and leaf hydraulic conductance were used in a model based on leaky cable theory to estimate the conductance of the radial pathway from the vein to the leaf surface and to assess the relative contributions of both axial and radial pathways. In keeping with low stomatal conductance, low stomatal density, low vein density, and narrow tracheid diameters, leaf hydraulic conductance for G. lingulata was quite low in comparison with most other angiosperms. Using the predicted axial conductance in the leaky cable model, the radial resistance across the leaf mesophyll was predicted to predominate; lower, more realistic values of axial conductance resulted in predicted radial resistances that were closer to axial resistance in their impact on total leaf resistance. Tracer dyes suggested that water uptake through the tank region of the leaf was not limiting. Both dye movement and the leaky cable model indicated that the leaf blade of G. lingulata was structurally and hydraulically well-suited to conserve water. PMID:23596446

  1. Supplemental design requirements document, Multifunction Waste Tank Facility, Project W-236A. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Groth, B.D.

    1995-01-11

    The Multi-Function Waste Tank Facility (MWTF) consists of four, nominal 1 million gallon, underground double-shell tanks, located in the 200-East area, and two tanks of the same capacity in the 200-West area. MWTF will provide environmentally safe storage capacity for wastes generated during remediation/retrieval activities of existing waste storage tanks. This document delineates in detail the information to be used for effective implementation of the Functional Design Criteria requirements.

  2. Implementation of an Integrated Information Management System for the US DOE Hanford Tank Farms Project

    SciTech Connect

    Joyner, William Scott [Washington River Protection Systems, Richland, WA (United States); Knight, Mark A. [Washington River Protection Systems, Richland, WA (United States)

    2013-11-14

    In its role as the Tank Operations Contractor at the U.S. Department of Energy's site in Hanford, WA, Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC is implementing an integrated document control and configuration management system. This system will combine equipment data with technical document data that currently resides in separate disconnected databases. The new system will provide integrated information, enabling users to more readily identify the documents that relate to a structure, system, or component and vice-versa. Additionally, the new system will automate engineering work processes through electronic workflows, and where practical and feasible provide integration with design authoring tools. Implementation of this system will improve configuration management of the technical baseline, increase work process efficiencies, support the efficient design of future large projects, and provide a platform for the efficient future turnover of technical baseline data and information.

  3. Project 17 month payback for glass fiber insulation on 30 oil storage tanks

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gaines

    1985-01-01

    A major west coast oil producer decided to insulate 30 bare wall tanks in the lube storage section of the tank farm as part of a companywide program to conserve energy and reduce fuel consumption. Petroleum products stored in the 30 to 40 year old tanks have a viscosity index of 128 to 155, and must be held at about

  4. Chemical Sludge Heel Removal At The Savannah River Site F-Tank Farm Closure Project

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. D. Thaxton IV; T. C. Baughman

    2008-01-01

    Chemical Sludge Removal (CSR) is the final waste removal activity planned for some of the oldest nuclear waste tanks located at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in Aiken, SC. In 2008, CSR will be used to empty two of these waste tanks in preparation for final closure. The two waste tanks chosen to undergo this process have previously leaked small

  5. CHEMICAL SLUDGE HEEL REMOVAL AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE F TANK FARM CLOSURE PROJECT 8183

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D Thaxton; T Timothy Baughman

    2008-01-01

    Chemical Sludge Removal (CSR) is the final waste removal activity planned for some of the oldest nuclear waste tanks located at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in Aiken, SC. In 2008, CSR will be used to empty two of these waste tanks in preparation for final closure. The two waste tanks chosen to undergo this process have previously leaked small

  6. Statements of work for FY 1996 to 2001 for the Hanford Low-Level Tank Waste Performance Assessment Project

    SciTech Connect

    Mann, F.M.

    1995-06-07

    The statements of work for each activity and task of the Hanford Low-Level Tank Waste Performance Assessment project are given for the fiscal years 1996 through 2001. The end product of this program is approval of a final performance assessment by the Department of Energy in the year 2000.

  7. Scaling Characteristics of Developing Sea Breezes Simulated in a Water Tank

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Renmin; Sun, Jianning; Luo, Tao; Wu, Xuping

    2013-09-01

    Sea-breeze circulations in a stably stratified environment have been simulated in a water tank. The floor of the tank was divided into two halves representing land and sea; the land side was heated from the bottom of the tank, and the sea side was insulated by an underlying sponge slab. The temperature profiles over both land and sea sides, the land-sea temperature difference, and the horizontal temperature distributions were measured. Particle tracking velocimetry was applied to obtain the two-dimensional velocity field orthogonal to the coastline. It was shown that the overall flow consists of a closed circulation caused by the horizontal temperature difference between land and sea, and a strong updraft occurring at the sea-breeze front. The dimensionless governing parameters are calculated from the measurements and used to characterize the developing sea breezes. The analysis confirms the scaling laws for sea-breeze velocity and depth. The results indicate that the scaling characteristics of the sea-breeze translation speed during the developing period are different to those during the following maintaining period. A criterion for the onset of the sea breeze is proposed based on these results.

  8. SELECTED WATER DECONTAMINATION RESEARCH PROJECT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Water Environment Federation (WEF), through funding from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Agency's Office of Research and Development (ORD), will host the first of three regional water sector stakeholder workshops March 15-17, 2005 at the Phoenix Marriot...

  9. Instability of convection of an ethanol water solution in a vertical tank

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Cho Lik; Yu, Youmin; Chen, C. F.

    2004-07-01

    An experimental and numerical investigation has been carried out into the instability characteristics of natural convection of an ethanol water solution in a vertical tank with aspect ratio (height/width) of 15. The solution contains 39 wt% ethanol with Prandtl number Pr {=} 26. The density anomaly due to the Soret effect may be safely ignored in the present test configuration. Onset of instability, in the form of multicellular convection located in the mid-height of the tank, occurs at Grashof number Gr {?} 13 500. These convection cells are unsteady even at low supercritical states, similar to earlier observations for higher Pr fluids. The cause of such unsteadiness of the flow has been determined by studying the streak images constructed by superposing individual frames of a digital movie sequence. New cells are generated in the upper and lower portions of the tank and then migrate toward the centre, causing the convection cells in the mid-section to merge. At higher Gr, even the tertiary cells, which rotate in the opposite direction of the secondary cells, participate in the merging process. Numerical simulations of the two-dimensional natural convection of a Boussinesq fluid with constant thermophysical properties, carried out at low supercritical Gr equivalent to the experimental value, show the same process of cell generation and merging as that observed in the experiments. By analysing the substantial time rate of change of the kinetic energy of the fluid using the mechanical energy equation, it is determined that the energy needed for the cell generation process is supplied by the work of the dynamic pressure. The subsequent migration of the cells toward the middle is caused by the pressure gradient in the tank. The total kinetic energy of the fluid attains a relative maximum right after a merging process due to the reduction of dissipation associated with the region of strong shear between the cells.

  10. Bacterioneuston control of air-water methane exchange determined with a laboratory gas exchange tank

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Upstill-Goddard, Robert C.; Frost, Thomas; Henry, Gordon R.; Franklin, Mark; Murrell, J. Colin; Owens, Nicholas J. P.

    2003-12-01

    The apparent transfer velocities (kw) of CH4, N2O, and SF6 were determined for gas invasion and evasion in a closed laboratory exchange tank. Tank water (pure Milli-RO® water or artificial seawater prepared in Milli-RO®) and/or tank air gas compositions were adjusted, with monitoring of subsequent gas transfer by gas chromatography. Derived kw was converted to "apparent k600," the value for CO2 in freshwater at 20°C. For CH4, analytical constraints precluded estimating apparent k600 based on tank air measurements. In some experiments we added strains of live methanotrophs. In others we added chemically deactivated methanotrophs, non-CH4 oxidizers (Vibrio), or bacterially associated surfactants, as controls. For all individual controls, apparent k600 estimated from CH4, N2O, or SF6 was indistinguishable. However, invasive estimates always exceeded evasive estimates, implying some control of gas invasion by bubbles. Estimates of apparent k600 differed significantly between methanotroph strains, possibly reflecting species-specific surfactant release. For individual strains during gas invasion, apparent k600 estimated from CH4, N2O, or SF6 was indistinguishable, whereas during gas evasion, k600-CH4 was significantly higher than either k600-N2O or k600-SF6, which were identical. Hence evasive k600-CH4/k600-SF6 was always significantly above unity, whereas invasive k600-CH4/k600-SF6 was not significantly different from unity. Similarly, k600-CH4/k600-SF6 for the controls and k600-N2O/k600-SF6 for all experiments did not differ significantly from unity. Our results are consistent with active metabolic control of CH4 exchange by added methanotrophs in the tank microlayer, giving enhancements of ˜12 ± 10% for k600-CH4. Hence reactive trace gas fluxes determined by conventional tracer methods at sea may be in error, prompting a need for detailed study of the role of the sea surface microlayer in gas exchange.

  11. Water Integration Project Science Strategies White Paper

    SciTech Connect

    Alan K. Yonk

    2003-09-01

    This white paper has been prepared to document the approach to develop strategies to address Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) science and technology needs/uncertainties to support completion of INEEL Idaho Completion Project (Environmental Management [EM]) projects against the 2012 plan. Important Idaho Completion Project remediation and clean-up projects include the 2008 OU 10-08 Record of Decision, completion of EM by 2012, Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center Tanks, INEEL CERCLA Disposal Facility, and the Radioactive Waste Management Complex. The objective of this effort was to develop prioritized operational needs and uncertainties that would assist Operations in remediation and clean-up efforts at the INEEL and develop a proposed path forward for the development of science strategies to address these prioritized needs. Fifteen needs/uncertainties were selected to develop an initial approach to science strategies. For each of the 15 needs/uncertainties, a detailed definition was developed. This included extracting information from the past interviews with Operations personnel to provide a detailed description of the need/uncertainty. For each of the 15 prioritized research and development needs, a search was performed to identify the state of the associated knowledge. The knowledge search was performed primarily evaluating ongoing research. The ongoing research reviewed included Environmental Systems Research Analysis, Environmental Management Science Program, Laboratory Directed Research and Development, Inland Northwest Research Alliance, United States Geological Survey, and ongoing Operations supported projects. Results of the knowledge search are documented as part of this document.

  12. 75 FR 49518 - Northwest Area Water Supply Project, North Dakota

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-13

    ...INTERIOR Bureau of Reclamation Northwest Area Water Supply Project, North Dakota AGENCY...Statement (EIS) for the Northwest Area Water Supply Project (NAWS Project), a Federal...Dakotas Area Office, Attention: Alicia Waters, P.O. Box 1017, Bismarck, ND...

  13. 75 FR 48986 - Northwest Area Water Supply Project, North Dakota

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-12

    ...INTERIOR Bureau of Reclamation Northwest Area Water Supply Project, North Dakota AGENCY...Statement (EIS) for the Northwest Area Water Supply Project (NAWS Project), a Federal...Dakotas Area Office, Attention: Alicia Waters, P.O. Box 1017, Bismarck, ND...

  14. 59 FR- Procedure for Evaluating Water Resource Projects

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    1994-08-16

    ...DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Procedure for Evaluating Water Resource Projects AGENCY...on procedures for evaluating water resource projects to meet the...determine whether or not proposed water resource projects are...

  15. Kazachstania rupicola sp. nov., a yeast species isolated from water tanks of a bromeliad in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Safar, Silvana Vilas Boas; Gomes, Fátima C O; Marques, Andréa R; Lachance, Marc-André; Rosa, Carlos A

    2013-03-01

    Two isolates of a novel yeast species were obtained from water tanks (phytotelmata) of the bromeliad Vriesea minarum collected in a tableland ('campo rupestre') ecosystem in Brazil. The sequences of the D1/D2 domains of the large-subunit rRNA gene showed that this species is related to Kazachstania exigua and others, from which it differs by 8-10 nucleotide substitutions. The novel species Kazachstania rupicola sp. nov. is proposed to accommodate these isolates. The type strain is UFMG-BRO-80(T) (?=?CBS 12684(T) ?=?CBMAI 1466(T)). PMID:23159754

  16. Cold test plan for the Old Hydrofracture Facility tank contents removal project, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1997-11-01

    This Old Hydrofracture Facility (OHF) Tanks Contents Removal Project Cold Test Plan describes the activities to be conducted during the cold test of the OHF sluicing and pumping system at the Tank Technology Cold Test Facility (TTCTF). The TTCTF is located at the Robotics and Process Systems Complex at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The cold test will demonstrate performance of the pumping and sluicing system, fine-tune operating instructions, and train the personnel in the actual work to be performed. After completion of the cold test a Technical Memorandum will be prepared documenting completion of the cold test, and the equipment will be relocated to the OHF site.

  17. Observation of a hierarchy of up to fifth-order rogue waves in a water tank.

    PubMed

    Chabchoub, A; Hoffmann, N; Onorato, M; Slunyaev, A; Sergeeva, A; Pelinovsky, E; Akhmediev, N

    2012-11-01

    We present experimental observations of the hierarchy of rational breather solutions of the nonlinear Schrödinger equation (NLS) generated in a water wave tank. First, five breathers of the infinite hierarchy have been successfully generated, thus confirming the theoretical predictions of their existence. Breathers of orders higher than five appeared to be unstable relative to the wave-breaking effect of water waves. Due to the strong influence of the wave breaking and relatively small carrier steepness values of the experiment these results for the higher-order solutions do not directly explain the formation of giant oceanic rogue waves. However, our results are important in understanding the dynamics of rogue water waves and may initiate similar experiments in other nonlinear dispersive media such as fiber optics and plasma physics, where the wave propagation is governed by the NLS. PMID:23214897

  18. Combined cooling and purification system for nuclear reactor spent fuel pit, refueling cavity, and refueling water storage tank

    DOEpatents

    Corletti, M.M.; Lau, L.K.; Schulz, T.L.

    1993-12-14

    The spent fuel pit of a pressured water reactor (PWR) nuclear power plant has sufficient coolant capacity that a safety rated cooling system is not required. A non-safety rated combined cooling and purification system with redundant branches selectively provides simultaneously cooling and purification for the spent fuel pit, the refueling cavity, and the refueling water storage tank, and transfers coolant from the refueling water storage tank to the refueling cavity without it passing through the reactor core. Skimmers on the suction piping of the combined cooling and purification system eliminate the need for separate skimmer circuits with dedicated pumps. 1 figures.

  19. Combined cooling and purification system for nuclear reactor spent fuel pit, refueling cavity, and refueling water storage tank

    DOEpatents

    Corletti, Michael M. (New Kensington, PA); Lau, Louis K. (Monroeville, PA); Schulz, Terry L. (Murrysville Boro, PA)

    1993-01-01

    The spent fuel pit of a pressured water reactor (PWR) nuclear power plant has sufficient coolant capacity that a safety rated cooling system is not required. A non-safety rated combined cooling and purification system with redundant branches selectively provides simultaneously cooling and purification for the spent fuel pit, the refueling cavity, and the refueling water storage tank, and transfers coolant from the refueling water storage tank to the refueling cavity without it passing through the reactor core. Skimmers on the suction piping of the combined cooling and purification system eliminate the need for separate skimmer circuits with dedicated pumps.

  20. ICPP tank farm closure study. Volume 2: Engineering design files

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1998-02-01

    Volume 2 contains the following topical sections: Tank farm heel flushing/pH adjustment; Grouting experiments for immobilization of tank farm heel; Savannah River high level waste tank 20 closure; Tank farm closure information; Clean closure of tank farm; Remediation issues; Remote demolition techniques; Decision concerning EIS for debris treatment facility; CERCLA/RCRA issues; Area of contamination determination; Containment building of debris treatment facility; Double containment issues; Characterization costs; Packaging and disposal options for the waste resulting from the total removal of the tank farm; Take-off calculations for the total removal of soils and structures at the tank farm; Vessel off-gas systems; Jet-grouted polymer and subsurface walls; Exposure calculations for total removal of tank farm; Recommended instrumentation during retrieval operations; High level waste tank concrete encasement evaluation; Recommended heavy equipment and sizing equipment for total removal activities; Tank buoyancy constraints; Grout and concrete formulas for tank heel solidification; Tank heel pH requirements; Tank cooling water; Evaluation of conservatism of vehicle loading on vaults; Typical vault dimensions and approximately tank and vault void volumes; Radiological concerns for temporary vessel off-gas system; Flushing calculations for tank heels; Grout lift depth analysis; Decontamination solution for waste transfer piping; Grout lift determination for filling tank and vault voids; sprung structure vendor data; Grout flow properties through a 2--4 inch pipe; Tank farm load limitations; NRC low level waste grout; Project data sheet calculations; Dose rates for tank farm closure tasks; Exposure and shielding calculations for grout lines; TFF radionuclide release rates; Documentation of the clean closure of a system with listed waste discharge; and Documentation of the ORNL method of radionuclide concentrations in tanks.

  1. Sampling oil-water mixtures at OHMSETT (Oil and Hazardous Materials Simulated Environmental Test Tank). Final report

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Borst

    1987-01-01

    This report describes procedures developed at the Oil and Hazardous Material Simulated Environmental Test Tank (OHMSETT) for sampling oil and water mixtures. Two procedures for sampling in containers are discussed: grab and stratified sampling. Both of these techniques require stripping free-standing water from the container bottom. The grab-sample technique requires that the remaining fluids be thoroughly mixed before immersing a

  2. Position paper, need for additional waste storage capacity and recommended path forward for project W-236a, Multi-function Waste Tank Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Awadalla, N.G.

    1994-09-27

    Project W-236a, Multi-function waste Tank Facility (MWTF), was initiated to increase the safe waste storage capacity for the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) by building two new one million gallon underground storage tanks in the 200 West Area and four tanks in the 200 East Area. Construction of the tanks was scheduled to begin in September 1994 with operations beginning in calendar year (CY) 1998. However, recent reviews have raised several issues regarding the mission, scope, and schedule of the MWTF. The decision to build new tanks must consider several elements, such as: Operational risk and needs -- Operational risk and flexibility must be managed such that any identified risk is reduced as soon as practicable; The amount of waste that will be generated in the future -- Additional needed tank capacity must be made available to support operations and maintain currently planned safety improvement activities; Safety issues -- The retrieval of waste from single-shell tanks (SSTs) and watch list tanks will add to the total amount of waste that must be stored in a double-shell tank (DST); Availability of existing DSTs -- The integrity of the 28 existing DSTs must be continuously managed; and Affect on other projects and programs -- Because MWTF systems have been integrated with other projects, a decision on one project will affect another. In addition the W-236a schedule is logically tied to support retrieval and safety program plans. Based on the above, two new tanks are needed for safe waste storage in the 200 West Area, and they need to be built as soon as practicable. Design should continue for the tanks in the 200 East Area with a decision made by September, on whether to construct them. Construction of the cross-site transfer line should proceed as scheduled. To implement this recommendation several actions need to be implemented.

  3. Efficiency Projects and Water Reuse 

    E-print Network

    Pannell, B.

    2011-01-01

    ? are extremely important to a successful audit - Be very careful with estimates! ? Reduction in Real Loss of 201,550,239 gallons ? Savings to the Utility of Approx. $765,890.91 ?Reduce Water ?Loss? Thru Better Auditing And Metering Improvements ? A...-Pronged Approach; Better Audits and Better Meters ? Water Saved is Energy Saved ESL-KT-11-11-36 ? Replacement of Coarse Air Diffusers and Blower Improvements at WWTP ?Efficient Aeration At Wastewater Plant Look For The Low Hanging Fruit! ESL-KT-11...

  4. High Level Waste Tank Closure Project at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Wessman, D. L.; Quigley, K. D.

    2002-02-27

    The Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office (DOE-ID) is making preparations to close two underground high-level waste (HLW) storage tanks at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) to meet Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) regulations and Department of Energy orders. Closure of these two tanks is scheduled for 2004 as the first phase in closure of the eleven 300,000 gallon tanks currently in service at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC). The INTEC Tank Farm Facility (TFF) Closure sequence consists of multiple steps to be accomplished through the existing tank riser access points. Currently, the tank risers contain steam and process waste lines associated with the steam jets, corrosion coupons, and liquid level indicators. As necessary, this equipment will be removed from the risers to allow adequate space for closure equipment and activities.

  5. Kazachstania bromeliacearum sp. nov., a yeast species from water tanks of bromeliads.

    PubMed

    Araújo, Fabio V; Rosa, Carlos A; Freitas, Larissa F D; Lachance, Marc-André; Vaughan-Martini, Ann; Mendonça-Hagler, Leda C; Hagler, Allen N

    2012-04-01

    Cultures of a novel nutritionally specialized, fermentative yeast species were isolated from 34 water tanks of five bromeliad species, two mangrove sediment samples and one swamp water sample in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Sequence analysis of the D1/D2 domains of the large subunit of the rRNA gene showed that the novel species belongs to the genus Kazachstania. The novel species differs from Kazachstania martiniae by 11 substitutions and 2 gaps in the sequence of the domains D1/D2 of the LSU rRNA gene. The name Kazachstania bromeliacearum sp. nov. is proposed for the novel species. The type strain is IMUFRJ 51496T (=CBS 7996T=DBVPG 6864T=UFMG BR-174T). PMID:21602361

  6. Gasoline leaking from underground storage tanks: impact on drinking water quality

    SciTech Connect

    Page, N.P.

    1988-01-01

    Of the 1.4 million underground storage tanks (USTs) now in use for storing gasoline, it is estimated that 10-35% are leaking or fail to pass a tightness test. In order to assess the potential for pollution of drinking water due to gasoline leaking from USTs, it is necessary to understand the complex composition of gasoline, the movement of individual gasoline components through the soil matrix to the water table and their transport via groundwater movement to receptor wells. The primary factors that contribute to the environmental movement of gasoline components are water solubility, soil-sorption, biodegradation, and rainfall. Gasoline is a complex mixture of at least 150 hydrocarbons with about 60-70% paraffins and 25-30% aromatics. Of these, the aromatics are of greatest concern due to their water solubility and resistance to biodegradation. Benzene, toluene, and xylenes are of particular concern. Another chemical of concern is methyl tertbutyl ether (MTBE), a hydrocarbon now being added in large quantities in many brands as an octane-enhancer. MTBE has been found in many wells as the first chemical arriving at receptor wells following a gasoline leak or spill. Models are available for predicting concentrations at receptor wells; however, site specific input, e.g., soil type, biodegradation, and rainfall, are necessary for the meaningful and reliable application of the models. Movement of chemicals through the environment is a slow process; often it may take several years for a chemical to move from a leaking tank to the nearest receptor well.

  7. Exergetic modeling and assessment of solar assisted domestic hot water tank integrated ground-source heat pump systems for residences

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Arif Hepbasli

    2007-01-01

    The present study deals with the exergetic modeling and performance evaluation of solar assisted domestic hot water tank integrated ground-source heat pump (GSHP) systems for residences for the first time to the best of the author's knowledge. The model is applied to a system, which mainly consists of (i) a water-to-water heat pump unit (ii) a ground heat exchanger system

  8. HANFORD DOUBLE SHELL TANK (DST) THERMAL & SEISMIC PROJECT SUMMARY OF COMBINED THERMAL & OPERATING LOADS

    SciTech Connect

    MACKEY, T.C.

    2006-03-17

    This report summarizes the results of the Double-Shell Tank Thermal and Operating Loads Analysis (TOLA) combined with the Seismic Analysis. This combined analysis provides a thorough, defensible, and documented analysis that will become a part of the overall analysis of record for the Hanford double-shell tanks (DSTs).

  9. HIGH LEVEL WASTE TANK CLOSURE PROJECT AT THE IDAHO NATIONAL ENGINEERING AND ENVIRONMENTAL LABORATORY

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. D. Quigley

    2003-01-01

    The Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office (DOE-ID) is in the process of closing two underground high-level waste (HLW) storage tanks at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) to meet Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) regulations and Department of Energy orders. Closure of these two tanks is scheduled for 2004 as the first phase in closure of

  10. Project Delivery Acquisition and Contracting Plan for the Tank Farm Contractor

    Microsoft Academic Search

    2000-01-01

    This document is a plan presenting the process, strategies and approaches for vendor contracting by the Tank Farm Contractor. The plan focuses on contracting structures, practices, methods, and desired approaches in contracting. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of River Protection (ORP) has contracted with the CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. (CHG), as the Tank Farm Contractor (TFC), to

  11. 33 CFR 155.370 - Oily mixture (bilge slops)/fuel oil tank ballast water discharges on oceangoing ships of 10,000...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    Oily mixture (bilge slops)/fuel oil tank ballast water discharges on oceangoing ships of 10,000 gross tons and above and oceangoing ships of 400 gross tons and above that carry ballast water in their fuel oil tanks. 155.370 Section 155.370 Navigation and Navigable...

  12. Solar collector heat exchanger or hot water storage tank and method of forming same

    SciTech Connect

    Buckley, B. S.

    1985-06-25

    A solar collector, or absorber, panels or a heat storage tank, suitable for heating water using solar energy is formed from two sheets of uncured elastic material, such as EPDM rubber, by simultaneously bonding and curing the peripheral edges of the two sheets and at spaced apart, discrete areas over most of the interior areas of the sheets. In one form one of the sheets is coated with a layer of release agent, over all areas except the discrete areas and the peripheral areas so that only such uncoated areas will bond during cure. In another form, a sheet of non-adherent plastic, slightly smaller than the two sheets and having holes or holidays to form the discrete areas, is bonded between the two sheets. In a third form, the peripheral edges are first sealed to form a chamber, then the chamber is inflated and a forming die presses together the discrete areas only. Reinforcing fibers are employed or molded, into at least one of the uncured sheets. Woven fabric sheets may be stitched or fastened together, coated with a thermosetting plastic and then formed into a panel or tank chamber as above. In the solar collector panel embodiment, at least one of the reinforcing fibers is metal, most preferably, in a metal screen to equalize temperatures between the bonded discrete areas and areas overlying liquid carrying volumes of the panel.

  13. AX Tank Farm tank removal study

    SciTech Connect

    SKELLY, W.A.

    1999-02-24

    This report examines the feasibility of remediating ancillary equipment associated with the 241-AX Tank Farm at the Hanford Site. Ancillary equipment includes surface structures and equipment, process waste piping, ventilation components, wells, and pits, boxes, sumps, and tanks used to make waste transfers to/from the AX tanks and adjoining tank farms. Two remedial alternatives are considered: (1) excavation and removal of all ancillary equipment items, and (2) in-situ stabilization by grout filling, the 241-AX Tank Farm is being employed as a strawman in engineering studies evaluating clean and landfill closure options for Hanford single-shell tanks. This is one of several reports being prepared for use by the Hanford Tanks Initiative Project to explore potential closure options and to develop retrieval performance evaluation criteria for tank farms.

  14. COSTING MODELS FOR WATER SUPPLY DISTRIBUTION: PART III- PUMPS, TANKS, AND RESERVOIRS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Distribution systems are generally designed to ensure hydraulic reliability. Storage tanks, reservoirs and pumps are critical in maintaining this reliability. Although storage tanks, reservoirs and pumps are necessary for maintaining adequate pressure, they may also have a negati...

  15. ADM. Tanks: from left to right: fuel oil tank, fuel ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    ADM. Tanks: from left to right: fuel oil tank, fuel pump house (TAN-611), engine fuel tank, water pump house, water storage tank. Camera facing northwest. Not edge of shielding berm at left of view. Date: November 25, 1953. INEEL negative no. 9217 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Area North, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  16. Little Big Horn River Water Quality Project

    SciTech Connect

    Bad Bear, D.J.; Hooker, D. [Little Big Horn Coll., Crow Agency, MT (United States)

    1995-10-01

    This report summarizes the accomplishments of the Water Quality Project on the Little Big horn River during the summer of 1995. The majority of the summer was spent collecting data on the Little Big Horn River, then testing the water samples for a number of different tests which was done at the Little Big Horn College in Crow Agency, Montana. The intention of this study is to preform stream quality analysis to gain an understanding of the quality of selected portion of the river, to assess any impact that the existing developments may be causing to the environment and to gather base-line data which will serve to provide information concerning the proposed development. Citizens of the reservation have expressed a concern of the quality of the water on the reservation; surface waters, ground water, and well waters.

  17. Evaluation of Hanford Single-Shell Waste Tanks Suspected of Water Intrusion

    SciTech Connect

    Feero, Amie J. [Washington River Protection Systems, Richland, WA (United States); Washenfelder, Dennis J. [Washington River Protection Systems, Richland, WA (United States); Johnson, Jeremy M. [USDOE Office of River Protection, Richland, WA (United States); Schofield, John S. [Washington River Protection Systems, Richland, WA (United States)

    2013-11-14

    Intrusions evaluations for twelve single-shell tanks were completed in 2013. The evaluations consisted of remote visual inspections, data analysis, and calculations of estimated intrusion rates. The observation of an intrusion or the preponderance of evidence confirmed that six of the twelve tanks evaluated had intrusions. These tanks were tanks 241-A-103, BX-101, BX-103, BX-110, BY-102, and SX-106.

  18. Quality Assurance Project Plan for the HWMA/RCRA Closure Certification of the TRA-731 Caustic and Acid Storage Tank System - 1997 Notice of Violation Consent Order

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, S.K.

    2002-01-31

    This Quality Assurance Project Plan for the HWMA/RCRA Closure Certification of the TRA- 731 Caustic and Acid Storage Tank System is one of two documents that comprise the Sampling and Analysis Plan for the HWMA/RCRA closure certification of the TRA-731 caustic and acid storage tank system at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. This plan, which provides information about the project description, project organization, and quality assurance and quality control procedures, is to be used in conjunction with the Field Sampling Plan for the HWMA/RCRA Closure Certification of the TRA-731 Caustic and Acid Storage Tank System. This Quality Assurance Project Plan specifies the procedures for obtaining the data of known quality required by the closure activities for the TRA-731 caustic and acid storage tank system.

  19. Quality Assurance Project Plan for the HWMA/RCRA Closure Certification of the TRA-731 Caustic and Acid Storage Tank System - 1997 Notice of Violation Consent Order

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, Susan Kay; Orchard, B. J.

    2002-01-01

    This Quality Assurance Project Plan for the HWMA/RCRA Closure Certification of the TRA-731 Caustic and Acid Storage Tank System is one of two documents that comprise the Sampling and Analysis Plan for the HWMA/RCRA closure certification of the TRA-731 caustic and acid storage tank system at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. This plan, which provides information about the project description, project organization, and quality assurance and quality control procedures, is to be used in conjunction with the Field Sampling Plan for the HWMA/RCRA Closure Certification of the TRA-731 Caustic and Acid Storage Tank System. This Quality Assurance Project Plan specifies the procedures for obtaining the data of known quality required by the closure activities for the TRA-731 caustic and acid storage tank system.

  20. Chiller Start/Stop Optimization for a Campus-wide Chilled Water System with a Thermal Storage Tank Under a Four-Period Electricity Rate Schedule

    E-print Network

    Zhou, J.; Wei, G.; Turner, W. D.; Deng, S.; Claridge, D.; Contreras, O.

    2002-01-01

    The existence of a 1.4-million-gallon chilled water thermal storage tank greatly increases the operational flexibility of a campuswide chilled water system under a four-part electricity rate structure. While significant operational savings can...

  1. EMSP Project 70070: Reactivity of Primary Soil Minerals and Secondary Precipitates Beneath Leaking Hanford Waste Tanks - Final Report

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kathryn L. Nagy

    2004-01-01

    Since the late 1950s, leaks from 67 single-shell tanks at the Hanford Site have released about 1 million curies to the underlying sediments. The radioactive material was contained in water-based solutions generally characterized as having high pH values (basic solutions), high nitrate and nitrite concentrations, and high aluminum concentrations. The solutions were also hot, in some cases at or near

  2. Effect of nitrate injection on the bacterial community in a water-oil tank system analyzed by PCR-DGGE.

    PubMed

    Jurelevicius, Diogo; von der Weid, Irene; Korenblum, Elisa; Valoni, Erika; Penna, Mônica; Seldin, Lucy

    2008-04-01

    Sulfide production by sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) is a major concern for the petroleum industry since it is toxic and corrosive, and causes plugging due to the formation of insoluble iron sulfides (reservoir souring). In this study, PCR followed by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) using two sets of primers based on the 16S rRNA gene and on the aps gene (adenosine-5-phosphosulfate reductase) was used to track changes in the total bacterial and SRB communities, respectively, present in the water-oil tank system on an offshore platform in Brazil in which nitrate treatment was applied for 2 months (15 nitrate injections). PCR-DGGE analysis of the total bacterial community showed the existence of a dominant population in the water-oil tank, and that the appearance and/or the increase of intensity of some bands in the gels were not permanently affected by the introduction of nitrate. On the other hand, the SRB community was stimulated following nitrate treatment. Moreover, sulfide production did not exceed the permissible exposure limit in the water-oil separation tank studied treated with nitrate. Therefore, controlling sulfide production by treating the produced water tank with nitrate could reduce the quantity of chemical biocides required to control microbial activities. PMID:18180965

  3. Recent developments in membrane water reuse projects

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Scott D. N. Freeman; O. J. Morin

    1995-01-01

    There is increasing interest in the use of membrane processing of wastewater for reuse as industrial process water, groundwater recharge, and irrigation. Status reports are presented on six current projects. The 1 mgd San Pasqual, California facility processes municipal effluent for irrigation. The 0.2 mgd Vero Beach, Florida facility processes secondary municipal effluent for reuse as boiler makeup for a

  4. Potable Water Source Implementation Project Location

    E-print Network

    Pringle, James "Jamie"

    is to install two new well pumps to provide the resi- dents with potable drinking water. We are planning to work the well project is complete, we are hoping to install a drip-irrigation system for agricultural use, build. In May 2012, a larger group is planning to return to Lukodi and the surrounding cities to introduce other

  5. 14 CFR 26.37 - Pending type certification projects: Fuel tank flammability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...26.37 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT CONTINUED AIRWORTHINESS AND SAFETY IMPROVEMENTS FOR TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Fuel Tank Flammability § 26.37 Pending...

  6. 14 CFR 26.37 - Pending type certification projects: Fuel tank flammability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...26.37 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT CONTINUED AIRWORTHINESS AND SAFETY IMPROVEMENTS FOR TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Fuel Tank Flammability § 26.37 Pending...

  7. 14 CFR 26.37 - Pending type certification projects: Fuel tank flammability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...26.37 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT CONTINUED AIRWORTHINESS AND SAFETY IMPROVEMENTS FOR TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Fuel Tank Flammability § 26.37 Pending...

  8. 14 CFR 26.37 - Pending type certification projects: Fuel tank flammability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...26.37 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT CONTINUED AIRWORTHINESS AND SAFETY IMPROVEMENTS FOR TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Fuel Tank Flammability § 26.37 Pending...

  9. 14 CFR 26.37 - Pending type certification projects: Fuel tank flammability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...26.37 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT CONTINUED AIRWORTHINESS AND SAFETY IMPROVEMENTS FOR TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Fuel Tank Flammability § 26.37 Pending...

  10. Solar domestic hot water system, a comparative study and storage tank investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, M. F.

    1980-03-01

    A computer program was developed to simulate five typical solar domestic hot water systems which included both thermosyphon and pumped designs that were assembled and tested. Numerical simulations of these systems were verified by comparison to experimental results. Predicted thermal performance, i.e., collector inlet and outlet temperatures, and auxiliary energy requirements were found to be in excellent agreement with experiments. The computer program was then used to predict the long term annual performance of the various systems at 14 different locations throughout California. Load size and load distribution were also varied. Economic analyses were performed on each system with the goal of identifying the most economical system at each location under a prescribed load (gallons/day) size and distribution pattern (time of day for hot water use). It was found that in almost all cases the two tank thermosyphon system was the most cost effective system for all locations, load sizes and distributions and shows promise of being the most widely used solar domestic hot water system.

  11. Safety analysis report for the gunite and associated tanks project remediation of the South Tank Farm, facility 3507, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Platfoot, J.H.

    1998-02-01

    The South Tank Farm (STF) is a series of six, 170,000-gal underground, domed storage tanks, which were placed into service in 1943. The tanks were constructed of a concrete mixture known as gunite. They were used as a portion of the Liquid Low-Level Waste System for the collection, neutralization, storage, and transfer of the aqueous portion of the radioactive and/or hazardous chemical wastes produced as part of normal facility operations at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The last of the tanks was taken out of service in 1986, but the tanks have been shown by structural analysis to continue to be structurally sound. An attempt was made in 1983 to empty the tanks; however, removal of all the sludge from the tanks was not possible with the equipment and schedule available. Since removal of the liquid waste in 1983, liquid continues to accumulate within the tanks. The in-leakage is believed to be the result of groundwater dripping into the tanks around penetrations in the domes. The tanks are currently being maintained under a Surveillance and Maintenance Program that includes activities such as level monitoring, vegetation control, High Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) filter leakage requirement testing/replacement, sign erection/repair, pump-out of excessive liquids, and instrument calibration/maintenance. These activities are addressed in ORNL/ER-275.

  12. Specific leaf areas of the tank bromeliad Guzmania monostachia perform distinct functions in response to water shortage.

    PubMed

    Freschi, Luciano; Takahashi, Cassia Ayumi; Cambui, Camila Aguetoni; Semprebom, Thais Ribeiro; Cruz, Aline Bertinatto; Mioto, Paulo Tamoso; de Melo Versieux, Leonardo; Calvente, Alice; Latansio-Aidar, Sabrina Ribeiro; Aidar, Marcos Pereira Marinho; Mercier, Helenice

    2010-05-01

    Leaves comprise most of the vegetative body of tank bromeliads and are usually subjected to strong longitudinal gradients. For instance, while the leaf base is in contact with the water accumulated in the tank, the more light-exposed middle and upper leaf sections have no direct access to this water reservoir. Therefore, the present study attempted to investigate whether different leaf portions of Guzmania monostachia, a tank-forming C(3)-CAM bromeliad, play distinct physiological roles in response to water shortage, which is a major abiotic constraint in the epiphytic habitat. Internal and external morphological features, relative water content, pigment composition and the degree of CAM expression were evaluated in basal, middle and apical leaf portions in order to allow the establishment of correlations between the structure and the functional importance of each leaf region. Results indicated that besides marked structural differences, a high level of functional specialization is also present along the leaves of this bromeliad. When the tank water was depleted, the abundant hydrenchyma of basal leaf portions was the main reservoir for maintaining a stable water status in the photosynthetic tissues of the apical region. In contrast, the CAM pathway was intensified specifically in the upper leaf section, which is in agreement with the presence of features more suitable for the occurrence of photosynthesis at this portion. Gas exchange data indicated that internal recycling of respiratory CO(2) accounted for virtually all nighttime acid accumulation, characterizing a typical CAM-idling pathway in the drought-exposed plants. Altogether, these data reveal a remarkable physiological complexity along the leaves of G. monostachia, which might be a key adaptation to the intermittent water supply of the epiphytic niche. PMID:19954859

  13. AX Tank Farm tank removal study

    SciTech Connect

    SKELLY, W.A.

    1998-10-14

    This report considers the feasibility of exposing, demolishing, and removing underground storage tanks from the 241-AX Tank Farm at the Hanford Site. For the study, it was assumed that the tanks would each contain 360 ft{sup 3} of residual waste (corresponding to the one percent residual Inventory target cited in the Tri-Party Agreement) at the time of demolition. The 241-AX Tank Farm is being employed as a ''strawman'' in engineering studies evaluating clean and landfill closure options for Hanford single-shell tank farms. The report is one of several reports being prepared for use by the Hanford Tanks Initiative Project to explore potential closure options and to develop retrieval performance evaluation criteria for tank farms.

  14. Various phenomena on a water vortex in a cylindrical tank over a rotating bottom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iga, Keita; Yokota, Sho; Watanabe, Shunichi; Ikeda, Takashi; Niino, Hiroshi; Misawa, Nobuhiko

    2014-06-01

    Flows in a cylindrical tank over a rotating bottom are investigated by laboratory experiments. Despite the axisymmetry of the experimental setup, various anisotropic phenomena are observed. The slow rotation of the bottom disk induces a circular flow according to the axisymmetric environment, but polygonal vortices form under faster rotation. Between these two vortex flow states, the flow undergoes a transition with clear hysteresis during which the elliptical shape assumed under faster rotation is retained when the rotation is subsequently slowed to rates that previously supported axisymmetric flow. Sloshing is also observed; here, a calm circular flow state alternates with an oscillation of the water surface along the sidewall of the container. A phase diagram showing the phenomena observed under different combinations of the initial water depth at rest and the rotation rate of the bottom disk is developed following thorough experimental testing over a wide range of parameter values. The features of the dependences of the range for each phenomenon to occur on these parameters are also elucidated.

  15. Performance of a hypersonic hot fuselage structure with a carbon dioxide frost projected, nonintegral cryogenic tank

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharpe, E. L.; Jackson, L. R.

    1975-01-01

    A model which consisted of a hot structure and a nonintegral tank protected by a carbon dioxide frost thermal protection system was tested under the following conditions: (1) room temperature loading and (2) heating and loading corresponding to the Mach 8 flight of an air-breathing launch vehicle. In the simulated flight tests, liquid nitrogen inside the tank was withdrawn at the rate fuel would be consumed. Prior to each simulated flight test, carbon dioxide was cryodeposited in the insulation surrounding the tank; during the tests, subliming CO2 frost absorbed heat and provided a purge gas for the space between the tank and the structure. A method of flame spraying the joints between panels with a nickel-aluminum material was developed to prevent excessive leakage of the purge gas through the outer structure. The tests indicated that the hot structure (with a joint repaired by riveting), the nonintegral tank and suspension system, and the carbon dioxide frost thermal protection system provide a workable concept with predictable performance.

  16. Hanford Technology Development (Tank Farms) - 12509

    SciTech Connect

    Fletcher, Thomas; Charboneau, Stacy; Olds, Erik [US DOE (United States)

    2012-07-01

    The mission of the Department of Energy's Office of River Protection (ORP) is to safely retrieve and treat the 56 million gallons of Hanford's tank waste and close the Tank Farms to protect the Columbia River. The millions of gallons of tank waste are a byproduct of decades of plutonium production. After irradiated fuel rods were taken from the nuclear reactors to the processing facilities at Hanford they were exposed to a series of chemicals designed to dissolve away the rod, which enabled workers to retrieve the plutonium. Once those chemicals were exposed to the fuel rods they became radioactive and extremely hot. They also couldn't be used in this process more than once. Because the chemicals are caustic and extremely hazardous to humans and the environment, underground storage tanks were built to hold these chemicals until a more permanent solution could be found. One key part of the ongoing work at Hanford is retrieving waste from the single-shell tanks, some of which have leaked in the past, and transferring that waste to the double-shell tanks - none of which have ever leaked. The 56 million gallons of radioactive tank waste is stored in 177 underground tanks, 149 of which are single-shell tanks built between 1943 and 1964. The tanks sit approximately 250 feet above the water table. Hanford's single-shell tanks are decades past their 20-year design life. In the past, up to 67 of the single-shell tanks are known or suspected to have leaked as much as one million gallons of waste to the surrounding soil. Starting in the late 1950's, waste leaks from dozens of the single-shell tanks were detected or suspected. Most of the waste is in the soil around the tanks, but some of this waste is thought to have reached groundwater. The Vadose Zone Project was established to understand the radioactive and chemical contamination in the soil beneath the tanks as the result of leaks and discharges from past plutonium-production operations. The vadose zone is the area of soil between the ground surface and the water table 200-to-300 feet below. The project tracks and monitors contamination in the soil. Technologies are being developed and deployed to detect and monitor contaminants. Interim surface barriers, which are barriers put over the single-shell tanks, prevent rain and snow from soaking into the ground and spreading contamination. The impermeable barrier placed over T Farm, which was the site of the largest tank waste leak in Hanford's history, is 60,000 square feet and sloped to drain moisture outside the tank farm. The barrier over TY Farm is constructed of asphalt and drains moisture to a nearby evaporation basin. Our discussion of technology will address the incredible challenge of removing waste from Hanford's single-shell tanks. Under the terms of the Tri-Party Agreement, ORP is required to remove 99 percent of the tank waste, or until the limits of technology have been reached. All pumpable liquids have been removed from the single-shell tanks, and work now focuses on removing the non-pumpable liquids. Waste retrieval was completed from the first single-shell tank in late 2003. Since then, another six single-shell tanks have been retrieved to regulatory standards. (authors)

  17. HANFORD DOUBLE SHELL TANK THERMAL AND SEISMIC PROJECT SEISMIC ANALYSIS IN SUPPORT OF INCREASED LIQUID LEVEL IN 241-AP TANK FARMS

    SciTech Connect

    TC MACKEY; FG ABATT; MW RINKER

    2009-01-14

    The essential difference between Revision 1 and the original issue of this report is in the spring constants used to model the anchor bolt response for the anchor bolts that tie the steel dome of the primary tank to the concrete tank dome. Consequently, focus was placed on the changes in the anchor bolt responses, and a full reevaluation of all tank components was judged to be unnecessary. To confirm this judgement, primary tank stresses from the revised analysis of the BES-BEC case are compared to the original analysis and it was verified that the changes are small, as expected.

  18. Tank 241-B-103 headspace gas and vapor characterization: Results for homogeneity samples collected on October 16, 1996. Tank vapor characterization project

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, K.B.; Pool, K.H.; Evans, J.C. [and others

    1997-06-01

    This report presents the results of analyses of samples taken from the headspace of waste storage tank 241-B-103 (Tank B-103) at the Hanford Site in Washington State. Samples were collected to determine the homogeneity of selected inorganic and organic headspace constituents. Two risers (Riser 2 and Riser 7) were sampled at three different elevations (Bottom, Middle, and Top) within the tank. Tank headspace samples were collected by SGN Eurisys Service Corporation (SESC) and were analyzed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to determine headspace concentrations of selected non-radioactive analytes. Analyses were performed by the Vapor Analytical Laboratory (VAL) at PNNL.

  19. Project management plan for Waste Area Grouping 5 Old Hydrofracture Facility tanks contents removal at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1998-02-01

    This revision (Rev. 1) updates the schedule and designation of responsibilities for the Old Hydrofracture Facility (OHF) tanks contents removal project. Ongoing and planned future activities include: cold testing of the sluicing and pumping system; readiness assessment; equipment relocation and assembly; isotopic dilution of fissile radionuclides; sluicing and transfer of the tanks contents; and preparation of the Removal Action Completion Report. The most significant change is that the sluicing and pumping system has been configured by and will be operated by CDM Federal Programs Corporation. In addition, a new technical lead and a new project analyst have been designated within Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc. and Lockheed Martin Energy Research Corp. The schedule for tanks contents removal has been accelerated, with transfer of the final batch of tank slurry now scheduled for March 31, 1998 (instead of November 10, 1998). The OHF sluicing and pumping project is proceeding as a non-time-critical removal action under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act. The purpose of the project is to remove the contents from five inactive underground storage tanks, designated T-1, T-2, T-3, T-4, and T-9. The tanks contain an estimated 52,700 gal of liquid and sludge, together comprising a radioactive inventory of approximately 30,000 Ci.

  20. Consequences of a postulated tank bump related to Project W-320

    SciTech Connect

    Himes, D.A.

    1997-05-14

    An analysis was performed of radiological and toxicological consequences of a conservative tank bump scenario which could occur if preventative measures fail and the local sludge temperature exceed the saturation temperature for a long enough period of time to produce a release of this type. Because of the nature of the release, there are no effective mitigative actions which can be taken other than prevention of the tank bump. The unmitigated scenario analyzed here exceeded both onsite and offsite risk guidelines for an anticipated accident.

  1. 67 FR 49287 - Buckman Water Diversion Project; Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2002-07-30

    ...DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Forest Service Buckman Water Diversion Project; Meetings AGENCY: Forest Service...public scoping meetings to discuss the Buckman Water Diversion Project. The Notice of Intent to...

  2. Multidimensional modal analysis of nonlinear sloshing in a rectangular tank with finite water depth

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Odd M. Faltinsen; Olav F. Rognebakke; Ivan A. Lukovsky; Alexander N. Timokha

    2000-01-01

    The discrete infinite-dimensional modal system describing nonlinear sloshing of an incompressible fluid with irrotational flow partially occupying a tank performing an arbitrary three-dimensional motion is derived in general form. The tank has vertical walls near the free surface and overturning waves are excluded. The derivation is based on the Bateman Luke variational principle. The free surface motion and velocity potential

  3. Solar hot water demonstration project at Red Star Industrial Laundry, Fresno, California

    SciTech Connect

    None

    1980-07-01

    The Final Report of the Solar Hot Water System located at the Red Star Industrial Laundry, 3333 Sabre Avenue, Fresno, California, is presented. The system was designed as an integrated wastewater heat recovery and solar preheating system to supply a part of the hot water requirements. It was estimated that the natural gas demand for hot water heating could be reduced by 56 percent (44 percent heat reclamation and 12 percent solar). The system consists of a 16,500 gallon tube-and-shell wastewater heat recovery subsystem combined with a pass-through 6,528 square foot flat plate Ying Manufacturing Company Model SP4120 solar collector subsystem, a 12,500 gallon fiber glass water storage tank subsystem, pumps, heat exchangers, controls, and associated plumbing. The design output of the solar subsystem is approximately 2.6 x 10/sup 9/ Btu/year. Auxiliary energy is provided by a gas fired low pressure boiler servicing a 4,000 gallon service tank. This project is part of the US Department of Energy's Solar Demonstration Program with DOE sharing $184,841 of the $260,693 construction cost. The system was turned on in July 1977, and acceptance tests completed in September 1977. The demonstration period for this project ends September 2, 1982.

  4. Support Provided to the External Tank (ET) Project on the Use of Statistical Analysis for ET Certification Consultation Position Paper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Null, Cynthia H.

    2009-01-01

    In June 2004, the June Space Flight Leadership Council (SFLC) assigned an action to the NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) and External Tank (ET) project jointly to characterize the available dataset [of defect sizes from dissections of foam], identify resultant limitations to statistical treatment of ET as-built foam as part of the overall thermal protection system (TPS) certification, and report to the Program Requirements Change Board (PRCB) and SFLC in September 2004. The NESC statistics team was formed to assist the ET statistics group in August 2004. The NESC's conclusions are presented in this report.

  5. Pump and control unit for a solar heating installation for a water tank and particularly for a swimming pool

    SciTech Connect

    Cannaux, G.; Calvet, G.

    1985-09-17

    The invention relates to a pump and control unit for a solar heating installation system for a water tank, particularly for a swimming pool. The system contains a solar collector, a hydraulic circuit which includes an outward-flow pipe, a return-flow pipe, a pump, a derivative-action control unit and two sensors mounted on the outward-flow pipe and on the return-flow pipe, respectively. The pump, the control unit and the two sensors are integrated into a single case. The case is provided in its top wall with a transparent opening which faces the return-flow sensor and through which said sensor can be exposed to solar radiation, such that the pump may be automatically activated during periods of sunshine, i.e., when the solar collector is heating the water returning to the tank, and stopped due to lack of sunshine.

  6. Development of a CFD Model for Secondary Final Settling Tanks in Water Pollution Control Plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Minwei; Xanthos, Savvas; Ramalingam, Krish; Fillos, John

    2007-11-01

    To assess performance and evaluate alternatives to improve efficiency of the New York City the Wards Island Water Pollution Control Plant (WPCP) FSTs at peak loads, a 3D CFD model has been developed. Fluent was utilized as the base platform, where sub-models of the Suspended Solids (SS), settling characteristics, density currents and SS flocculation were incorporated. This was supplemented by field and bench scale experiments to quantify the coefficients integral to the sub-models. Model calibration and validation have been carried out by using the extensive set of data collected. The model can be used to evaluate different modes of operation, alternate hydraulic and solids loading rates, as well as addition of auxiliary components such as baffles to improve process performance. The model is being used to compare potential benefits for different alternatives of design and operation of the existing FSTs. After comparing series of inlet baffles, a baffle with 4 horizontal and 7 vertical slots has been recommended for installation in the FSTs. Additional baffle type, configurations and locations within the tank are also being evaluated to improve the performance of the FSTs especially during periods of poor settling and peak flow conditions.

  7. 33 CFR 157.208 - Dedicated Clean Ballast Tanks Operations Manual for foreign tank vessels: Submission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Dedicated Clean Ballast Tanks Operations Manual...208 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT...CARRYING OIL IN BULK Dedicated Clean Ballast Tanks on Tank...

  8. 33 CFR 157.208 - Dedicated Clean Ballast Tanks Operations Manual for foreign tank vessels: Submission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Dedicated Clean Ballast Tanks Operations Manual...208 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT...CARRYING OIL IN BULK Dedicated Clean Ballast Tanks on Tank...

  9. 33 CFR 157.208 - Dedicated Clean Ballast Tanks Operations Manual for foreign tank vessels: Submission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Dedicated Clean Ballast Tanks Operations Manual...208 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT...CARRYING OIL IN BULK Dedicated Clean Ballast Tanks on Tank...

  10. Anaerobic on-site treatment of black water and dairy parlour wastewater in UASB-septic tanks at low temperatures

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sari A. Luostarinen; Jukka A. Rintala

    2005-01-01

    Anaerobic on-site treatment of synthetic black water (BW) and dairy parlour wastewater (DPWW) was studied in two-phased upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB)-septic tanks at low temperatures (10–20°C). At all temperatures, total chemical oxygen demand (CODt) removal was above 90% with BW and above 80% with DPWW and removal of total suspended solids (TSS) above 90% with both wastewaters. Moreover, dissolved

  11. Tank evaluation system shielded annular tank application

    SciTech Connect

    Freier, D.A.

    1988-10-04

    TEST (Tank Evaluation SysTem) is a research project utilizing neutron interrogation techniques to analyze the content of nuclear poisons and moderators in tank shielding. TEST experiments were performed on an experimental SAT (Shielded Annular Tank) at the Rocky Flats Plant. The purpose of these experiments was threefold: (1) to assess TEST application to SATs, (2) to determine if Nuclear Safety inspection criteria could be met, and (3) to perform a preliminary calibration of TEST for SATs. Several experiments were performed, including measurements of 11 tank shielding configurations, source-simulated holdup experiments, analysis of three detector modes, resolution studies, and TEST scanner geometry experiments. 1 ref., 21 figs., 4 tabs.

  12. Quantification of the contribution of nitrogen from septic tanks to ground water in Spanish Springs Valley, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rosen, Michael R.; Kropf, Christian; Thomas, Karen A.

    2006-01-01

    Analysis of total dissolved nitrogen concentrations from soil water samples collected within the soil zone under septic tank leach fields in Spanish Springs Valley, Nevada, shows a median concentration of approximately 44 milligrams per liter (mg/L) from more than 300 measurements taken from four septic tank systems. Using two simple mass balance calculations, the concentration of total dissolved nitrogen potentially reaching the ground-water table ranges from 25 to 29 mg/L. This indicates that approximately 29 to 32 metric tons of nitrogen enters the aquifer every year from natural recharge and from the 2,070 houses that use septic tanks in the densely populated portion of Spanish Springs Valley. Natural recharge contributes only 0.25 metric tons because the total dissolved nitrogen concentration of natural recharge was estimated to be low (0.8 mg/L). Although there are many uncertainties in this estimate, the sensitivity of these uncertainties to the calculated load is relatively small, indicating that these values likely are accurate to within an order of magnitude. The nitrogen load calculation will be used as an input function for a ground-water flow and transport model that will be used to test management options for controlling nitrogen contamination in the basin.

  13. Anaerobic on-site treatment of kitchen waste in combination with black water in UASB-septic tanks at low temperatures

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. Luostarinen; J. Rintala

    2007-01-01

    Anaerobic on-site treatment of a mixture of black water and kitchen waste (BWKW) was studied using two-phased upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) septic tanks at the low temperatures of 20 and 10°C. Black water (BW) was also treated alone as reference. The two-phased UASB-septic tanks removed over 95% of total suspended solids (TSS) and 90% of total chemical oxygen demand

  14. Tank Vapor Characterization Project: Headspace vapor characterization of Hanford waste tank 241-S-101: Results from samples collected on 06/06/96

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, B.L.; Evans, J.C.; Pool, K.H.; Olsen, K.B.; Fruchter, J.S.; Silvers, K.L.

    1997-01-01

    This report describes the analytical results of vapor samples taken from the headspace of the waste storage tank 241-S-101. The results described in this report were obtained to characterize the vapors present in the tank headspace and to support safety evaluations and tank farm operations. The results include air concentrations of selected inorganic and organic analytes and grouped compounds from samples obtained. Analyte concentrations were based on analytical results and sample volumes provided by WHC. A summary of the inorganic analytes, permanent gases, and total non-methane organic compounds is listed.

  15. Cracking of AFNOR 7020 Aluminum Alloy Weld Joint of Water Tank for Satellite Launch Vehicle: A Metallurgical Investigation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Abhay K. Jha; K. Sreekumar; P. P. Sinha

    Aluminum alloys are frequently used as the preferred material for aerospace applications owing to their high-specific strength\\u000a and ease of fabrication. In one such application, a torroidal-shaped water tank made of AFNOR 7020 (Al–4.5Zn–1.5Mg) alloy\\u000a sheet and rings, stores water to provide for the initial run of a turbo pump and for the cooling of engine components. During\\u000a the stage

  16. Tank Vapor Characterization Project. Headspace vapor characterization of Hanford Waste Tank AX-102: Results from samples collected on June 27, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Clauss, T.W.; Pool, K.H.; Evans, J.C.; McVeety, B.D.; Thomas, B.L.; Olsen, K.B.; Fruchter, J.S.; Ligotke, M.W.

    1995-11-01

    This report describes the analytical results of vapor samples taken from the headspace of the waste storage tank 241-AX-102 (Tank AX-102) at the Hanford Site in Washington State. The results described in this report were obtained to characterize the vapors present in the tank headspace and to support safety evaluations and tank-farm operations. The results include air concentrations of selected inorganic and organic analytes and grouped compounds from samples obtained by Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) and provided for analysis to Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). Analyses were performed by the Vapor Analytical Laboratory (VAL) at PNL. Analyte concentrations were based on analytical results and, where appropriate, sample volumes provided by WHC. Detailed descriptions of the analytical results appear in the text.

  17. Tank Vapor Characterization Project: Headspace vapor characterization of Hanford Waste Tank U-203, Results from samples collected on August 8, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Pool, K.H.; Clauss, T.W.; Evans, J.C.; McVeety, B.D.; Thomas, B.L.; Olsen, K.B.; Fruchter, J.S.; Ligotke, M.W.

    1995-11-01

    This report describes the analytical results of vapor samples taken from the headspace of the waste storage tank 241-U-203 (Tank U-203) at the Hanford Site in Washington State. The results described in this report were obtained to characterize the vapors present in the tank headspace and to support safety evaluations and tank-farm operations. The results include air concentrations of selected inorganic and organic analytes and grouped compounds from samples obtained by Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) and provided for analysis to Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). Analyses were performed by the Vapor Analytical Laboratory (VAL) at PNL. Analyte concentrations were based on analytical results and, where appropriate, sample volumes provided by WHC. A summary of the results is listed. Detailed descriptions of the analytical results appear in the text.

  18. Tank vapor characterization project - Tank 241-TY-103 headspace gas and vapor characterization: Results for homogeneity samples collected on November 22, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, K.B.; Pool, K.H.; Evans, J.C.; Hayes, J.C. [and others] [and others

    1997-07-01

    This report presents the results of analyses of samples taken from the headspace of waste storage tank 241-TY-103 (Tank TY-103) at the Hanford Site in Washington State. Samples were collected to determine the homogeneity of selected inorganic and organic headspace constituents. Two risers (Riser 8 and Riser 18) were sampled at three different elevations (Top, Middle, and Bottom) within the tank. Tank headspace samples were collected by SGN Eurisys Service Corporation (SESC) and were analyzed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to determine headspace concentrations of selected non-radioactive analytes. Analyses were performed by the Vapor Analytical Laboratory (VAL) at PNNL. No analytes were determined to be above immediate notification limits specified by the sampling and analysis plan (SAP).

  19. How Tank Bromeliads Respond to Changing Tank Conditions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rebecca Tribelhorn

    2010-01-01

    Bromeliads, particularly those with a water-holding tank formed by leaves, act as amplifiers of biodiversity in their tropical forest ecosystem. The tanks play host to a wide diversity of life forms, and provide the bromeliad with almost all of its water and mineral nutrients. Bacteria, insects, amphibians, and other plants thrive in the conditions created by the tank. To investigate

  20. Double Shell Tank (DST) Utilities Specification

    SciTech Connect

    SUSIENE, W.T.

    2000-04-27

    This specification establishes the performance requirements and provides the references to the requisite codes and standards to he applied during the design of the Double-Shell Tank (DST) Utilities Subsystems that support the first phase of waste feed delivery (WFD). The DST Utilities Subsystems provide electrical power, raw/potable water, and service/instrument air to the equipment and structures used to transfer low-activity waste (LAW) and high-level waste (HLW) to designated DST staging tanks. The DST Utilities Subsystems also support the equipment and structures used to deliver blended LAW and HLW feed from these staging tanks to the River Protection Project (RPP) Privatization Contractor facility where the waste will be immobilized. This specification is intended to be the basis for new projects/installations. This specification is not intended to retroactively affect previously established project design criteria without specific direction by the program.

  1. ALARA plan for the Old Hydrofracture Facility tanks contents removal project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Amendment 1 for Appendix B: Install flex-pipe on tank riser spools

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1998-05-13

    This amendment to Appendix B contains the specific ALARA evaluations for installing flex-pipe on riser spools to accommodate ventilation duct connections to the north risers of each tank. The work will be a routine task that is part of the Equipment Installation and Mobilization phase of the project. The dose rates were estimated using the recent Radiological Surveillance Section radiological survey: SAAS-97-063S. Task B-6 has been added to the OHF Project ALARA review process to address a field decision to modify an approach to installing the tank ventilation system. The revised approach will incorporate 12-in. diameter, 36-in. long, stainless steel flex-pipe connected to each north riser spool to address the problem of pipe fitting multiple bends and turns expected with the 12-in. PVC duct. This improved approach will reduce the time necessary to install the duct system between the tanks and the ventilation skid. However, the task includes opening the 12-in. riser spool connections to replace the currently installed blind gaskets. Since a riser spool for each tank will be opened, there is a potential for significant personnel exposure and spread of contamination that will addressed through this ALARA review process.

  2. Tank monitor and control system (TMACS) year 2000 compliance project plan

    SciTech Connect

    HOLM, M.J.

    1999-06-24

    The purpose of this document is to describe tests performed to validate Revision 11 of the Tank Monitor and Control System (TMACS) and verify that the software functions as intended by design. This document is intended to test the software portion of TMACS. The tests will be performed on the development system. The software to be tested is the TMACS knowledge bases (KB) and the I/O driver/services. The development system will not be talking to field equipment; instead, the field equipment is simulated using emulators or multiplexers in the lab.

  3. Comparing strategies: State funding of capital projects versus water conservation 

    E-print Network

    Finch, Dr. Calvin

    2013-01-01

    for conversion to low water-use landscapes. It is not a simple choice. Capital project advocates say conservation projects do not really create new water as a reservoir does. However, that argument does not seem to ?hold water? to me. In the simplest de#30...

  4. The TAMU Water Project: Critical Environmental Justice as Pedagogy 

    E-print Network

    Munoz, Marissa Isela

    2010-10-12

    The TAMU Water Project is a trans-disciplinary collaborative that works to address the water needs of rural communities along the Texas/Mexico border called colonias. Modeled initially after the work of Potters for Peace, the TAMU Water Project...

  5. Project management plan for Waste Area Grouping 5 Old Hydrofracture Facility tanks contents removal at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1998-06-01

    On January 1, 1992, the US Department of Energy (DOE), the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Region IV, and the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) signed a Federal Facility Agreement (FFA) concerning the Oak Ridge Reservation. The FFA requires that inactive liquid low-level (radioactive) waste (LLLW) tanks at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) be remediated in accordance with requirements of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA). This revision is to update the schedule and designation of responsibilities for the Old Hydrofracture Facility (OHF) tanks contents removal project. The scope of this project is to transfer inventory from the five inactive LLLW tanks at the OHF into the active LLLW system.

  6. Water Research Foundation Project 4090 Decision Support System

    E-print Network

    Keller, Arturo A.

    Water Research Foundation Project 4090 Decision Support System for Sustainable Energy Management Steve Conrad, Principal Investigator Director, Sustainable Systems - Junxion Strategy Inc. PhD Candidate;Presentation Outline > Provide Project Background > Discuss Decision Support > Present Scope of Decision

  7. Biannual recalibration of two spectral gamma-ray logging systems used for baseline characterization measurements in the Hanford Tank Farms. Vadose Zone Characterization Project at the Hanford Tank Farms

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Koizumi

    1996-01-01

    The US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Grand Junction Projects Office (GJPO) is engaged in establishing an initial, or baseline, characterization of the gamma-ray-emitting contaminants in the subsurface of the Tank Farms at the DOE Hanford site in the State of Washington. These baseline data are gathered by logging existing monitoring boreholes with two high-resolution passive gamma-ray logging systems informally known

  8. Shor Lab "Soil Water" Project Undergraduate Research Opportunity

    E-print Network

    Shor, Leslie McCabe

    Shor Lab ­ "Soil Water" Project Undergraduate Research Opportunity Primary Graduate Student: Jinzi altering soil hydraulic conductivity. The Shor and Gage labs have received a USDA grant to investigate

  9. Conservation Project Shows Substantial Reduction in Home Water Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharpe, William E.; Smith, Donald

    1978-01-01

    Describes a water use study-conservation project conducted by the Washington Suburban Sanitary Commission in Maryland. Results show a significant decrease in the amount of water used by home customers over a ten-year period. (Author/MA)

  10. Managed aquifer recharge in weathered crystalline basement aquifers in India: Monitoring of the effect of tank infiltration on water quality over several monsoon events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alazard, Marina; Boisson, Alexandre; Maréchal, Jean-Christophe; Dewandel, Benoît; Perrin, Jérôme; Pettenati, Marie; Picot-Colbeaux, Géraldine; Ahmed, Shakeel; Thiéry, Dominique; Kloppmann, Wolfram

    2015-04-01

    Managed aquifer recharge (MAR) structures like percolation tanks are considered by the Indian national and regional governments as major option for tackling declining groundwater levels due to overexploitation for irrigation purposes (Boisson et al., 2014). Their main purpose is to restore groundwater availability under strong climatic and anthropogenic pressure. Furthermore, MAR-induced dilution with fresh surface water is generally expected to improve groundwater quality with respect to both anthropogenic and geogenic contaminants (total mineralisation, nitrates, chlorides, sulphates and fluoride contents). The impact of a percolation tank on groundwater quality was investigated in a context that is typical for hydro-climatic and geological settings in southern and eastern India: fractured crystalline basement aquifers overlain by a weathering zone under semi-arid climate. Water level data and geochemical indicators (stable isotopes and major ions) were monitored for both groundwater and surface water, over several successive monsoon events. In case of high to very high water levels, the groundwater quality is globally improved. However, in a few cases, the quality of the groundwater can be negatively impacted due to leaching of salts under the tank, particularly during the first rain events of the monsoon. Geogenic fluoride contents in groundwater, induced by water-rock interaction and enhanced by recycling of agricultural return flow under paddy fields, is found to be relatively stable over the year. This finding points out that the underlying processes, mainly dissolution of F-bearing phases like fluorapatites combined with Ca/Na cation exchange and calcite precipitation, both limiting the possibility of F-removal via fluorite precipitation (Pettenati et al., 2013, 2014), are not impacted by the hydrological conditions. This work highlights the complexity of the recharge processes in crystalline aquifers, enhanced by the variability of hydrological conditions. It also provides insights into the possible risk for groundwater quality deterioration in cases of light and short monsoons periods. This research was conducted within the framework of the Saph Pani project and co-financed by the European Commission within the Seventh Framework Programme, grant agreement No. 282911 and the Research Division of BRGM. Boisson A., Villesseche D., Baisset M., Perrin J., Viossanges M., Kloppmann W., Chandra S., Dewandel B., Picot-Colbeaux G., Rangarajan R., Maréchal J. C., and Ahmed S. (2014) Questioning the impact and sustainability of percolation tanks as aquifer recharge structures in semi-arid crystalline context. Environ Earth Sci., DOI 10.1007/s12665-014-3229-2. Pettenati M., Perrin J., Pauwels H., and Ahmed S. (2013) Simulating fluoride evolution in groundwater using a reactive multicomponent transient transport model: Application to a crystalline aquifer of Southern India. Appl. Geochem. 29, 102-116. Pettenati M., Picot-Colbeaux G., Thiéry D., Boisson A., Alazard M., Perrin J., Dewandel B., Maréchal J.-C., Ahmed S., and Kloppmann W. (2014) Water Quality Evolution During Managed Aquifer Recharge (MAR) in Indian Crystalline Basement Aquifers: Reactive Transport Modeling in the Critical Zone. Procedia Earth and Planetary Science 10, 82-87.

  11. Multiple lines of evidence shed light on the occurrence of paramecium (ciliophora, oligohymenophorea) in bromeliad tank water.

    PubMed

    Buosi, Paulo R B; Cabral, Adalgisa F; Simão, Taiz L L; Utz, Laura R P; Velho, Luiz F M

    2014-01-01

    Phytotelmata are vegetal structures that hold water from the rain, and organic matter from the forest and the soil, resulting in small, compartmentalized bodies of water, which provide an essential environment for the establishment and development of many organisms. These microenvironments generally harbor endemic species, but many organisms that are found in lakes and rivers, are also present. Here, we report, for the first time, the occurrence of the ciliate genus Paramecium in the tank of the bromeliad species Aechmaea distichantha. The identification of the Paramecium species was performed based on live observations, protargol impregnation, scanning electronic microscopy, and sequencing of the 18s rRNA. The absence of Paramecium from bromeliad tank water was highlighted in several earlier investigations, and may be due to the fact that this species is unable to make cysts. The occurrence of Paramecium multimicronucleatum in our samples may be explained by the proximity between the bromeliads and the river, a potential source of the species. Further, we also believe that the counting methodology used in our study provides a more accurate analysis of the species diversity, since we investigated all samples within a maximum period of 6 h after sampling, allowing minimum loss of specimens. PMID:24011017

  12. Waste tank structural evaluation program. Waste Tank Safety Programs

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. DeFigh-Price; I. E. Reep

    1991-01-01

    This program is part of the overall Waste Tank Safety Programs for the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington. It is managed by Westinghouse Hanford Company (Westinghouse Hanford) for the Tank Farm Project Office (TFPO) of the US Department of Energy Field Office, Richland (RL). Waste Tank Safety Programs (Gasper 1991) is responsible for identifying, addressing, and closing all major safety issues

  13. Caribbean Water Initiative (CARIWIN) Project number S61268-583

    E-print Network

    Barthelat, Francois

    Caribbean Water Initiative (CARIWIN) Project number S61268-583 McGill University Caribbean CARICOM ­ Caribbean Commonwealth CARIWAND ­ Caribbean Water and Gender Network CARIWIN ­ Caribbean Water of Meteorology and Hydrology CWS ­ Community Water Strategies DCETO ­ Developing Country Educational and Training

  14. Tank Vapor Characterization Project: Headspace vapor characterization of Hanford Waste Tank 241-C-204: Results from samples collected on 07/02/96

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, B.L.; Evans, J.C.; Pool, K.H. [and others

    1997-01-01

    This report describes the analytical results of vapor samples taken from the headspace of the waste storage tank 241-C-204 (Tank C-204) at the Hanford Site in Washington State. The results described in this report were obtained to characterize the vapors present in the tank headspace and to support safety evaluations and tank farm operations. The results include air concentrations of selected inorganic and organic analytes and grouped compounds from samples obtained by Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) and provided for analysis to Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). Analyses were performed by the Vapor Analytical Laboratory (VAL) at PNNL. Analyte concentrations were based on analytical results and, where appropriate, sample volumes provided by WHC. A summary of the inorganic analytes, permanent gases, and total non-methane organic compounds is listed in Table S.1. The three highest concentration analytes detected in SUMMA{trademark} canister and triple sorbent trap samples are also listed in Table S.1. Detailed descriptions of the analytical results appear in the appendices.

  15. Tank vapor characterization project: Tank 241-S-102 temporal study headspace gas and vapor characterization results from samples collected on September 19, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, J.C.; Pool, K.H.; Thomas, B.L.; Sklarew, D.S. [and others

    1997-08-01

    This report presents the results from analysis of samples taken from the headspace of waste storage tank 241-S-102 (Tank S-102) at the Hanford Site in Washington State. Tank headspace samples collected by Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) were analyzed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to determine headspace concentrations of selected non-radioactive analytes. Analyses were performed by the Vapor Analytical Laboratory (VAL) at PNNL. Vapor concentrations from sorbent trap samples are based on measured sample volumes provided by WHC. Ammonia was determined to be above the immediate notification limit of 150 ppm as specified by the sampling and analysis plan (SAP). Hydrogen was the principal flammable constituent of the Tank S-102 headspace, determined to be present at approximately 2.948% of its lower flammability limit (LFL). Total headspace flammability was estimated to be <3.659% of the LFL. Average measured concentrations of targeted gases, inorganic vapors, and selected organic vapors are provided in Tables S.1. A summary of experimental methods, including sampling methodology, analytical procedures, and quality assurance and control methods are presented in Section 2.0. Detailed descriptions of the analytical results are provided in Section 3.0.

  16. Tank Vapor Characterization Project: Headspace vapor characterization of Hanford Tank 241-TY-102: Results from samples collected on 04/12/96

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, J.C.; Pool, K.H.; Thomas, B.L. [and others

    1997-01-01

    This report describes the analytical results of vapor samples taken from the headspace of the waste storage tank 241-TY-102 (Tank TY-102) at the Hanford Site in Washington State. The results described in this report were obtained to`characterize the vapors present in the tank headspace and to support safety evaluations and tank farm operations. The results include air concentrations of selected inorganic and organic analytes, and grouped compounds from samples obtained by Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) and provided for analysis to Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). Analyses were performed by the Vapor Analytical Laboratory (VAL) at PNNL. Analyte concentrations were based on analytical results and, where appropriate, sample volumes provided by WHC. A summary of the inorganic analytes, permanent gases, and total non-methane organic compounds is listed in Table S.1. The three highest concentration analytes detected in SUMMA{trademark} canister and triple sorbent trap samples are also listed in Table S.1. Detailed descriptions of the analytical results appear in the appendices.

  17. Tank 241-BX-104 third temporal study: Headspace gas and vapor characterization results from samples collected on February 6, 1997. Tank vapor characterization project

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, J.C.; Pool, K.H.; Hayes, J.C. [and others

    1997-09-01

    This report presents the results from analyses of samples taken from the headspace of waste storage tank 241-BX-104 (Tank BX-104) at the Hanford Site in Washington State. Tank headspace samples collected by SGN Eurisys Service Corporation (SESC) were analyzed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to determine headspace concentrations of selected non-radioactive analytes. Analyses were performed by the Vapor Analytical Laboratory (VAL) at PNNL. Vapor concentrations from sorbent trap samples are based on measured sample volumes provided by SESC. Ammonia was determined to be above the immediate notification limit specified by the sampling and analysis plan (SAP). Hydrogen was the principal flammable constituent of the Tank BX-104 headspace, determined to be present at approximately 0.178 % of its lower flammability limit (LFL). Total headspace flammability was estimated to be <0.458% of the LFL. Average measured concentrations of targeted gases, inorganic vapors, and selected organic vapors are provided in Table S.1. A summary of experimental methods, including sampling methodology, analytical procedures, and quality assurance and control methods are presented in Section 2.0. Detailed descriptions of the analytical results are provided in Section 3.0.

  18. Tank Vapor Characterization Project: Tank 241-BX-104 headspace gas and vapor characterization results from samples collected on August 22, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, J.C.; Pool, K.H.; Thomas, B.L.; Olsen, K.B.; Julya, J.L. [and others

    1997-08-01

    This report presents the results from analyses of samples taken from the headspace of waste storage tank 241-BX-104 (Tank BX-104) at the Hanford Site in Washington State. Tank headspace samples collected by Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) were analyzed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to determine headspace concentrations of selected non-radioactive analytes. Analyses were performed by the Vapor Analytical Laboratory (VAL) at PNNL. Vapor concentrations from sorbent trap samples are based on measured sample volumes provided by WHC. Ammonia was determined to be above the immediate notification limit specified by the sampling and analyses plan (SAP). Total non-methane organic compounds was the principal flammable constituent of the Tank BX-104 headspace, determined to be present at approximately 0.310% of its lower flammability limit (LFL). Total headspace flammability was estimated to be <0.784% of the LFL. Average measured concentrations of targeted gases, inorganic vapors, and selected organic vapors are provided in Table S.1. A summary of experimental methods, including sampling methodology, analytical procedures, and quality assurance and control methods are presented in Section 2.0. Detailed descriptions of the analytical results are provided in Section 3.0.

  19. Tank Vapor Characterization Project: Tank 241-BX-103 headspace gas and vapor characterization results from samples collected on August 1, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, J.C.; Pool, K.H.; Thomas, B.L.; Sklarew, D.S.; Edwards, J.A. [and others] [and others

    1997-08-01

    This report presents the results from analyses of samples taken from headspace of waste storage tank 241-BX-103 (Tank BX-103) at the Hanford Site in Washington State. Tank headspace samples collected by Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) were analyzed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to determine headspace concentrations of selected non-radioactive analytes. Analyses were performed by the Vapor Analytical Laboratory (VAL) at PNNL. Vapor concentrations from sorbent trap samples are based on measured sample volumes provided by WHC. No analytes were determined to be above the immediate notification limits specified by the sampling and analysis plan (SAP). Hydrogen was the principal flammable constituent of the Tank BX-103 headspace, determined to be present at approximately 0.385% of its lower flammability limit (LFL). Total headspace flammability was estimated to be <0.633% if the LFL. Average measured concentrations of targeted gases, inorganic vapors, and selected organic vapors are provided in Table S.1. A summary of experimental methods, including sampling methodology, analytical procedures, and quality assurance and control methods are presented in Section 2.0. Detailed descriptions of the analytical results are provided in Section 3.0.

  20. Tank Vapor Characterization Project: Tank 241-BX-111 headspace gas and vapor characterization results from samples collected on August 27, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Pool, K.H.; Evans, J.C.; Thomas, B.L.; Sklarew, D.S. Edwards, J.A. [and others

    1997-08-01

    This report presents the results from analyses of samples taken from the headspace of waste storage tank 241-BX-111 (Tank BX-111) at the Hanford Site in Washington State. Tank headspace samples collected by Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) were analyzed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to determine headspace concentrations of selected non-radioactive analytes. Analyses were performed by the Vapor Analytical Laboratory (VAL) at PNNL. Vapor concentrations from sorbent trap samples are based on measured sample volumes provided by WHC. No analytes were determined to be above the immediate notification limits specified by the sampling and analysis plan (SAP). Ammonia was the principal flammable constituent of the Tank BX-111 headspace, determined to be present at approximately 0.042 of its lower flammability limit (LFL). Total headspace flammability was estimated to be <0.157% of the LFL. Average measured concentrations of targeted gases, inorganic vapors, and selected organic vapors are provided in Table S.1. A summary of experimental methods, including sampling methodology, analytical procedures, and quality assurance and control methods are presented in Section 2.0. Detailed descriptions of the analytical results are provided in Section 3.0.

  1. Tank vapor characterization project: Tank 241-BY-101 headspace gas and vapor characterization results from samples collected on August 29, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, J.C.; Pool, K.H.; Thomas, B.L.; Olsen, K.B. [and others

    1997-08-01

    This report presents the results from analyses of samples taken from the headspace of waste storage tank 241-BY-101 (Tank BY-101) at the Hanford Site in Washington State. Tank headspace samples collected by Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) were analyzed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to determine headspace concentrations of selected non-radioactive analytes. Analyses were performed by the Vapor Analytical Laboratory (VAL) at PNNL. Vapor concentrations from sorbent trap samples are based on measured sample volumes provided by WHC. No analytes were determined to be above the immediate notification limits specified by the sampling and analysis plan (SAP). Total non-methane organic compounds (TNMOCs) were the principal flammable constituent of the Tank By-101 headspace, determined to be present at approximately 0.136% of the LFL. Averaged measured concentrations of targeted gases, inorganic vapors, and selected organic vapors are provided in Table S.1. A summary of experimental methods, including sampling methodology, analytical procedures, and quality assurance and control methods are presented in Section 2.0. Detailed descriptions of the analytical results are provided in Section 3.0.

  2. Tank Vapor Characterization Project: Tank 241-BX-102 headspace gas and vapor characterization results from samples collected on July 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Pool, K.H.; Evans, J.C.; Thomas, B.L.; Olsen, K.B. Edwards, J.A. [and others

    1997-08-01

    This report presents the results from analyses of samples taken from the headspace of waste storage tank 241-BX-102 (Tank BX-102) at the Hanford Site in Washington State. Tank headspace samples collected by Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) were analyzed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to determine headspace concentrations of selected non-radioactive analytes. Analyses were performed by the Vapor Analytical Laboratory (VAL) at PNNL. Vapor concentrations from sorbent trap samples are based on measured volumes provided by WHC. No analytes were determined to be above the immediate notification limits specified by the sampling and and analysis plan. Ammonia and TNMOCs were the principal flammable constituents of the Tank BX-102 headspace, each determined to be present at approximately 0.002% of its lower flammability limit (LFL). Total headspace flammability was estimated to be <0.107% of the LFL. Average measured concentrations of targeted gases, inorganic vapors, and selected organic vapors are provided in Table S.1. A summary of experimental methods, including sampling methodology, analytical procedures, and quality assurance and control methods are presented in Section 2.0. Detailed descriptions of the analytical results are provided in Section 3.0.

  3. Tank Vapor Characterization Project: Headspace vapor characterization of Hanford Waste Tank 241-S-103: Results from samples collected on 06/12/96

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, J.C.; Pool, K.H.; Thomas, B.L. [and others

    1997-01-01

    This report describes the analytical results of vapor samples taken from the headspace of the waste storage tank 241-S-103 (Tank S-103) at the Hanford Site in Washington State. The results described in this report were obtained to characterize the vapors present in the tank headspace and to support safety evaluations and tank farm operations. The results include air concentrations of selected inorganic and organic analytes and grouped compounds from samples obtained by Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) and provided for analysis to Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). Analyses were performed by the Vapor Analytical Laboratory (VAL) at PNNL. Analyte concentrations were based on analytical results and, where appropriate, sample volumes provided by WHC. A summary of the inorganic analytes, permanent gases, and total non-methane organic compounds is listed in Table S.1. The three highest concentration analytes detected in SUMMA{trademark} canister and triple sorbent trap samples are also listed in Table S.1. Detailed descriptions of the analytical results appear in the appendices.

  4. Tank Vapor Characterization Project: Headspace vapor characterization of Hanford Tank 241-B-105: Results from samples collected on 07/30/96

    SciTech Connect

    Pool, K.H.; Evans, J.C.; Thomas, B.L. [and others

    1997-01-01

    This report describes the analytical results of vapor samples taken from the headspace of the waste storage tank 241-B-105 (Tank B-105) at the Hanford Site in Washington State. The results described in this report were obtained to characterize the vapors present in the tank headspace and to support safety evaluations and tank farm operations. The results include air concentrations of selected inorganic and organic analytes and grouped compounds from samples obtained by Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) and provided for analysis to Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). Analyses were performed by the Vapor Analytical Laboratory (VAL) at PNNL. Analyte concentrations were based on analytical results and, where appropriate, sample volumes provided by WHC. A summary of the inorganic analytes, permanent gases, and total non-methane organic compounds is listed in Table S.1. The three highest concentration analytes detected in SUMMA{trademark} canister and triple sorbent trap samples are also listed in Table S.1. Detailed descriptions of the analytical results appear in the appendices.

  5. Interior view, looking up toward project west at the heavy ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Interior view, looking up toward project west at the heavy timber joists and center beam supporting the wood water tank. Note the iron compression bands around the perimeter of the tank. Note also the iron (steel?) water fill pipe for the tank, bent to fit between the joists and the tank wall. - East Broad Top Railroad & Company, Water Tank at Coles Station, East Broad Top Railroad & Company (at Milepost 24.3), 0.5 miles east of Coles Valley Road, Saltillo, Huntingdon County, PA

  6. A Method to Determine the Optimal Tank Size for a Chilled Water Storage System Under a Time-of-Use Electricity Rate Structure

    E-print Network

    Zhang, Z.; Turner, W. D.; Chen, Q.; Xu, C.; Deng, S.

    2010-01-01

    In the downtown area of Austin, it is planned to build a new naturally stratified chilled water storage tank and share it among four separated chilled water plants. An underground piping system is to be established to connect these four plants...

  7. A study on the dynamic response of a semi-submersible floating offshore wind turbine system Part 1: A water tank test

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Takeshi Ishihara; Pham Van Phu; Hiroyuki Sukegawa; Kenji Shimada

    A new semi-submersible floating structure was proposed on which three wind turbine towers would be installed. This paper presented the dynamic behaviors of the 1\\/150 scaled rigid model experiments in a water tank. A free vibration test was conducted in still water to obtain the natural pe- riods for verifying the numerical model and modeling the damping ratio of the

  8. Design review report: project development specifications for project W-314, tank farm resoration and safe operation, phase I

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Boes; Fluor Daniel Hanford

    1997-01-01

    This Design Review Report (DRR) documents the closure of all Review Cormnent Record sheets associated with the design reviews conducted for the Project W-314 Phase 1 Project Development Specification (PDS) Requirements Analysis. The DRR includes the documented comments and their respective dispositions for the W-314 PDS Requirements Analysis documents associated with Transfer Piping, Valve Pit Manifolds, Pit Leak Detection, Master

  9. Phase II Final Project Report Paso del Norte Watershed Council Coordinated Water Resources Database and GIS Project

    E-print Network

    Brown, Christopher; Sheng, Zhuping; Bourdon, Marc

    The Coordinated Water Resources Database and GIS Project (Project) was developed to provide improved access to regional water resources data in the Paso del Norte region for regional water stakeholders to make timely decisions in water operations...

  10. Waste tank structural evaluation program

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. DeFigh-Price; I. E. Reep

    1991-01-01

    This program is part of the overall Waste Tank Safety Programs for the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington. It is managed by Westinghouse Hanford Company (Westinghouse Hanford) for the Tank Farm Project Office (TFPO) of the US Department of Energy Field Office, Richland (RL). Waste Tank Safety Programs (Gasper 1991) is responsible for identifying, addressing, and closing all major safety issues

  11. Tank farm restoration and safe operation, project W-314, upgrade scope summary report

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobson, R.W.

    1997-01-08

    This revision of the Project W-314 Upgrade Scope Summary Report (USSR) represents a refinement of the project scope and supporting justification from which the Conceptual Design Report (CDR) was developed. It defines the actual upgrades and provides traceability to the requirement or driver for the activity.

  12. Tank farm restoration and safe operation, project W-314, upgrade scope summary report (USSR)

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobson, R.W.

    1997-04-01

    This revision to the Project W-314 Upgrade Scope Summary Report (USSR), incorporates changes to the project scope from Alternative Generation Analysis (AGA), customer guidance, and changing requirements. It defines the actual upgrades currently in scope, and provides traceability to the requirements and/or drivers.

  13. Configuration Management Plan for Tank Farm Restoration and Safe Operations Project W-314

    Microsoft Academic Search

    2000-01-01

    The Configuration Management Plan for Project W-314 describes the systems, processes and procedures for implementation of applicable configuration management practices described in HNF-0842, Volume 111, Section 3.1, ''Configuration Management Implementation''. This plan is tailored specifically for use by Project W-314.

  14. Systems Engineering Management Plan for Tank Farm Restoration and Safety Operations Project W-314

    Microsoft Academic Search

    2000-01-01

    The Systems Engineering Management Plan for Project W-314 has been prepared within the guidelines of HNF-SD-WM-SEMP-002, TWRS Systems Engineering Management Plan. The activities within this SEMP have been tailored, in accordance with the TWRS SEMP and DOE Order 430.1, Life Cycle Asset Management, to meet the needs of the project.

  15. Risk Management Plan for Tank Farm Restoration and Safe Operations Project W-314

    Microsoft Academic Search

    2000-01-01

    The Risk Management Plan for Project W-314 describes the systems, processes and procedures for implementation of applicable risk management practices described in HNF-0842, Volume IV, Section 2.6, ''Risk Management''. This plan is tailored specifically for use by Project W-314.

  16. A pilot study on water pollution and characterization of multidrug-resistant superbugs from Byramangala tank, Ramanagara district, Karnataka, India.

    PubMed

    Skariyachan, Sinosh; Lokesh, Priyanka; Rao, Reshma; Kumar, Arushi Umesh; Vasist, Kiran S; Narayanappa, Rajeswari

    2013-07-01

    Urbanization and industrialization has increased the strength and qualities of municipal sewage in Bangalore, India. The disposal of sewage into natural water bodies became a serious issue. Byramangala reservoir is one such habitat enormously polluted in South India. The water samples were collected from four hotspots of Byramangala tank in 3 months. The biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) and bacterial counts were determined. The fecal coliforms were identified by morphological, physiological, and biochemical studies. The antibiotics sensitivity profiling of isolated bacteria were further carried out. We have noticed that a high content of BOD in the tank in all the 3 months. The total and fecal counts were found to be varied from 1.6?×?10(6) to 8.2?×?10(6)?colony forming unit/ml and >5,500/100 ml, respectively. The variations in BOD and total count were found to be statistically significant at p?>?0.05. Many pathogenic bacteria were characterized and most of them were found to be multidrug resistant. Salmonella showed resistance to cefoperazone, cefotaxime, cefixime, moxifloxacin, piperacillin/tazobactam, co-trimoxazole, levofloxacin, trimethoprim, and ceftazidime. Escherichia coli showed resistance to chloramphenicol, trimethoprim, co-trimoxazole, rifampicin, and nitrofurantoin while Enterobacter showed resistant to ampicillin, cefepime, ceftazidime, cefoperazone, and cefotaxime. Klebsiella and Shigella exhibited multiple drug resistance to conventional antibiotics. Staphylococcus showed resistance to vancomycin, methicillin, oxacillin, and tetracycline. Furthermore, Salmonella and Klebsiella are on the verge of acquiring resistance to even the strongest carbapenems-imipenem and entrapenem. Present study revealed that Byramanagala tank has become a cesspool of multidrug-resistant "superbugs" and will be major health concern in South Bangalore, India. PMID:23114918

  17. The Model of Lake Operation in Water Transfer Projects Based on the Theory of Water- right

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bi-peng, Yan; Chao, Liu; Fang-ping, Tang

    the lake operation is a very important content in Water Transfer Projects. The previous studies have not any related to water-right and water- price previous. In this paper, water right is divided into three parts, one is initialization waterright, another is by investment, and the third is government's water- right re-distribution. The water-right distribution model is also build. After analyzing the cost in water transfer project, a model and computation method for the capacity price as well as quantity price is proposed. The model of lake operation in water transfer projects base on the theory of water- right is also build. The simulation regulation for the lake was carried out by using historical data and Genetic Algorithms. Water supply and impoundment control line of the lake was proposed. The result can be used by south to north water transfer projects.

  18. Development Project of Supercritical-water Cooled Power Reactor

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. Kataoka; S. Shiga; K. Moriya; Y. Oka; S. Yoshida; H. Takahashi

    2002-01-01

    A Supercritical-water Cooled Power Reactor (SCPR) development project (Feb. 2001- Mar. 2005) is being performed by a joint team consisting of Japanese universities and nuclear venders with a national fund. The main objective of this project is to provide technical information essential to demonstration of SCPR technologies through concentrating three sub-themes: 'plant conceptual design', 'thermohydraulics', and 'material and water chemistry'.

  19. Predicting the indicators characterizing the water decarbonization efficiency when using atmospheric-pressure thermal deaerators without subjecting water to steam bubbling in the deaerator tank

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leduhovsky, G. V.; Gorshenin, S. D.; Vinogradov, V. N.; Barochkin, E. V.; Korotkov, A. A.

    2015-07-01

    The results obtained from combined numerical and experimental investigations of the water decarbonization process carried out in atmospheric-pressure deaerators without subjecting water to steam bubbling in the deaerator tank are presented. More exact values of the hydrocarbonate thermal decomposition rate have been obtained, and the hypothesis about a change of the process governing mechanism in shifting to low total alkalinity values of deaerated water has been proven in the course of these investigations. A procedure for predicting the indicators characterizing the water decarbonization efficiency in using deaerators is proposed based on the obtained study results. The developed procedure features the maximally possible accuracy that can be achieved at the metrological characteristics of the standard alkalinity measurement methods.

  20. Radioactive air emissions notice of construction for installation and operation of a waste retrieval system and tanks 241-AP-102 and 241-AP-104 project

    SciTech Connect

    DEXTER, M.L.

    1999-11-15

    This document serves as a notice of construction (NOC) pursuant to the requirements of Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 246 247-060, and as a request for approval to modify pursuant to 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 61 07 for the installation and operation of one waste retrieval system in the 24 1 AP-102 Tank and one waste retrieval system in the 241 AP 104 Tank Pursuant to 40 CFR 61 09 (a)( 1) this application is also intended to provide anticipated initial start up notification Its is requested that EPA approval of this application will also constitute EPA acceptance of the initial start up notification Project W 211 Initial Tank Retrieval Systems (ITRS) is scoped to install a waste retrieval system in the following double-shell tanks 241-AP 102-AP 104 AN 102, AN 103, AN-104, AN 105, AY 102 AZ 102 and SY-102 between now and the year 2011. Because of the extended installation schedules and unknowns about specific activities/designs at each tank, it was decided to submit NOCs as that information became available This NOC covers the installation and operation of a waste retrieval system in tanks 241 AP-102 and 241 AP 104 Generally this includes removal of existing equipment installation of new equipment and construction of new ancillary equipment and buildings Tanks 241 AP 102 and 241 AP 104 will provide waste feed for immobilization into a low activity waste (LAW) product (i.e. glass logs) The total effective dose equivalent (TEDE) to the offsite maximally exposed individual (MEI) from the construction activities is 0 045 millirem per year The unabated TEDE to the offsite ME1 from operation of the mixer pumps is 0 042 millirem per year.

  1. 8. VIEW FROM NORTHWEST OF CONDENSATE STORAGE TANK (LEFT), PRIMARY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. VIEW FROM NORTHWEST OF CONDENSATE STORAGE TANK (LEFT), PRIMARY WATER STORAGE TANK (CENTER), CANAL WATER STORAGE TANK (RIGHT) (LOCATIONS E,F,D) - Shippingport Atomic Power Station, On Ohio River, 25 miles Northwest of Pittsburgh, Shippingport, Beaver County, PA

  2. 33 CFR 157.220 - Dedicated clean ballast tanks: Standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Dedicated clean ballast tanks: Standards...220 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT...CARRYING OIL IN BULK Dedicated Clean Ballast Tanks on Tank...

  3. 33 CFR 157.220 - Dedicated clean ballast tanks: Standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Dedicated clean ballast tanks: Standards...220 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT...CARRYING OIL IN BULK Dedicated Clean Ballast Tanks on Tank...

  4. 33 CFR 157.218 - Dedicated clean ballast tanks: Alterations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Dedicated clean ballast tanks: Alterations...218 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT...CARRYING OIL IN BULK Dedicated Clean Ballast Tanks on Tank...

  5. 33 CFR 157.218 - Dedicated clean ballast tanks: Alterations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Dedicated clean ballast tanks: Alterations...218 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT...CARRYING OIL IN BULK Dedicated Clean Ballast Tanks on Tank...

  6. 33 CFR 157.218 - Dedicated clean ballast tanks: Alterations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Dedicated clean ballast tanks: Alterations...218 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT...CARRYING OIL IN BULK Dedicated Clean Ballast Tanks on Tank...

  7. 33 CFR 157.220 - Dedicated clean ballast tanks: Standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Dedicated clean ballast tanks: Standards...220 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT...CARRYING OIL IN BULK Dedicated Clean Ballast Tanks on Tank...

  8. Environmental projects. Volume 13: Underground storage tanks, removal and replacement. Goldstone Deep Space Communications Complex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bengelsdorf, Irv

    1991-01-01

    The Goldstone Deep Space Communications Complex (GDSCC), located in the Mojave Desert about 40 miles north of Barstow, California, and about 160 miles northeast of Pasadena, is part of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA's) Deep Space Network, one of the world's largest and most sensitive scientific telecommunications and radio navigation networks. Activities at the GDSCC are carried out in support of six large parabolic dish antennas. As a large-scale facility located in a remote, isolated desert region, the GDSCC operations require numerous on-site storage facilities for gasoline, diesel oil, hydraulic oil, and waste oil. These fluids are stored in underground storage tanks (USTs). This present volume describes what happened to the 26 USTs that remained at the GDSCC. Twenty-four of these USTs were constructed of carbon steel without any coating for corrosion protection, and without secondary containment or leak detection. Two remaining USTs were constructed of fiberglass-coated carbon steel but without secondary containment or leak protection. Of the 26 USTs that remained at the GDSCC, 23 were cleaned, removed from the ground, cut up, and hauled away from the GDSCC for environmentally acceptable disposal. Three USTs were permanently closed (abandoned in place).

  9. Tank waste remediation system privatization phase I infrastructure and project W-519 and QA implementation plan

    SciTech Connect

    HUSTON, J.J.

    1999-08-19

    This document has been prepared to identify the quality requirements for all products/activities developed by or for Project W-519. This plan is responsive to the Numatec Hanford Corporation, Quality Assurance Program Plan, NHC-MP-001.

  10. Tank vapor characterization project. Headspace vapor characterization of Hanford waste Tank SX-101: Results from samples collected on 07/21/95

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, J.C.; Clauss, T.W.; McVeety, B.D.; Pool, K.H.; Olsen, K.B.; Fruchter, J.S.; Silvers, K.L.

    1996-05-01

    Results described in this report were obtained to characterize the vapors present in the tank headspace and to support safety evaluations and tank-farm operations. They include air concentrations of inorganic and organic analytes and grouped compounds from samples. The vapor concentrations are based either on whole-volume samples or on sorbent traps exposed to sample flow. No immediate notifications were needed because analytical results indicated no specific analytes exceeded notification levels. Summary of results: NH3, 3.8 ppmv; NO2, 0.10 ppmv; NO, 0.13 ppm; H2O, 11.8 mg/L; CO2, 338 ppmv; CO, <25 ppmv; CH4, <25 ppmv; H2, <25 ppmv; N20, <25 ppmv; hydrocarbons, 0.98 mg/m{sup 3}; methanol, 0.060 ppmv; acetone, 0.033 ppmv; trichlorofluoromethane, 0.023 ppmv; and acetone, 0.034 ppmv.

  11. 46 CFR 38.15-1 - Filling of tanks-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... (c) The “filling density” is defined as the...tank to the weight of water the tank will hold at...Permissible Filling Densities for Tanks Operating...Maximum permitted filling density Unlagged tanks—water capacity 1,200...

  12. Recent history provides sustainable African water quality project insight.

    PubMed

    Holm, Rochelle H

    2012-01-01

    Small-scale projects to provide clean drinking water undertaken in the developing world can contribute to significantly improving the livelihood of rural communities. There has been a historical tendency to poorly plan such projects leading to an unsustainable future. Recent history indicates three simple steps to ensuring successful and enduring clean water projects. First, identification of need by the indigenous community provides ownership in the project. Second, a partnership between key individuals in the indigenous community with the donor provides for ambassadors on both sides of the project. Finally, an exit strategy by the donors for the indigenous communities ensures local sustainability for the future. The study site is the village of Geisha in northern Malawi, Africa. Sustainable implementation approaches are discussed in this case study as well as the various lessons learned. Improved project processes ensure sustainable small-scale water quality projects by donor organizations in developing countries. PMID:22070428

  13. 33 CFR 157.206 - Dedicated Clean Ballast Tanks Operations Manual for U.S. tank vessels: Submission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Dedicated Clean Ballast Tanks Operations Manual...206 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT...CARRYING OIL IN BULK Dedicated Clean Ballast Tanks on Tank...

  14. 33 CFR 157.206 - Dedicated Clean Ballast Tanks Operations Manual for U.S. tank vessels: Submission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Dedicated Clean Ballast Tanks Operations Manual...206 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT...CARRYING OIL IN BULK Dedicated Clean Ballast Tanks on Tank...

  15. 33 CFR 157.206 - Dedicated Clean Ballast Tanks Operations Manual for U.S. tank vessels: Submission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Dedicated Clean Ballast Tanks Operations Manual...206 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT...CARRYING OIL IN BULK Dedicated Clean Ballast Tanks on Tank...

  16. Tank Vapor Characterization Project: Tank 241-C-107 temporal study headspace gas and vapor characterization results from samples collected on September 5, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Pool, K.H.; Evans, J.C.; Thomas, B.L.; Edwards, J.A.; Silvers, K.L. [and others

    1997-08-01

    This report presents the results from analyses of samples taken from the headspace of waste storage tank 241-C-107 at the Hanford Site in Washington State. Tank headspace samples collected by Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) were analyzed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to determine headspace concentrations of selected non-radioactive analytes. Analyses were performed by the Vapor Analytical Laboratory (VAL) at PNNL. Vapor concentrations from sorbent trap samples are based on measured sample volumes provided by WHC. No analytes were determined to be above the immediate notification limits specified by the sampling and analysis plan (SAP). Hydrogen was the principal flammable constituent of the Tank C-107 headspace, determined to be present at approximately 1.405% of its lower flammability limit (LFL). Total headspace flammability was estimated to be <1.519% of the LFL. Average measured concentrations of targeted gases, inorganic vapors, and selected organic vapors are provided in Table S.1. A summary of experimental methods, including sampling methodology, analytical procedures, and quality assurance and control methods are presented in Section 2.0. Detailed descriptions of the analytical results are provided in Section 3.0.

  17. Computational analysis of coupled fluid, heat, and mass transport in ferrocyanide single-shell tanks: FY 1994 interim report. Ferrocyanide Tank Safety Project

    SciTech Connect

    McGrail, B.P.

    1994-11-01

    A computer modeling study was conducted to determine whether natural convection processes in single-shell tanks containing ferrocyanide wastes could generate localized precipitation zones that significantly concentrate the major heat-generating radionuclide, {sup 137}Cs. A computer code was developed that simulates coupled fluid, heat, and single-species mass transport on a regular, orthogonal finite-difference grid. The analysis showed that development of a ``hot spot`` is critically dependent on the temperature dependence for the solubility of Cs{sub 2}NiFe(CN){sub 6} or CsNaNiFe(CN){sub 6}. For the normal case, where solubility increases with increasing temperature, the net effect of fluid flow, heat, and mass transport is to disperse any local zones of high heat generation rate. As a result, hot spots cannot physically develop for this case. However, assuming a retrograde solubility dependence, the simulations indicate the formation of localized deposition zones that concentrate the {sup 137}Cs near the bottom center of the tank where the temperatures are highest. Recent experimental studies suggest that Cs{sub 2}NiFe(CN){sub 6}(c) does not exhibit retrograde solubility over the temperature range 25{degree}C to 90{degree}C and NaOH concentrations to 5 M. Assuming these preliminary results are confirmed, no natural mass transport process exists for generating a hot spot in the ferrocyanide single-shell tanks.

  18. Technical safety requirements for the South Tank Farm remediation project, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Platfoot

    1999-01-01

    The South Tank Farm (STF) is a series of six, 170,000-gal underground, domed storage tanks that were placed into service in 1943. The tanks were constructed of a concrete mixture known as gunite. They were used as a portion of the Liquid LOW-LEVEL WASTE (LLW) System for the collection, neutralization, storage, and transfer of the aqueous portion of the radioactive

  19. Design review report: project development specifications for project W-314, tank farm resoration and safe operation, phase I

    SciTech Connect

    Boes, K.A., Fluor Daniel Hanford

    1997-02-27

    This Design Review Report (DRR) documents the closure of all Review Cormnent Record sheets associated with the design reviews conducted for the Project W-314 Phase 1 Project Development Specification (PDS) Requirements Analysis. The DRR includes the documented comments and their respective dispositions for the W-314 PDS Requirements Analysis documents associated with Transfer Piping, Valve Pit Manifolds, Pit Leak Detection, Master Pump Shutdown, and Special Protective Coating. Acceptance of the comment dispositions and closure of the review comments is indicated by the Signatures of the participating reviewers.

  20. Experimental Wave Tank Test for Reference Model 3 Floating-Point Absorber Wave Energy Converter Project

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Y. H.; Lawson, M.; Li, Y.; Previsic, M.; Epler, J.; Lou, J.

    2015-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy established a reference model project to benchmark a set of marine and hydrokinetic technologies including current (tidal, open-ocean, and river) turbines and wave energy converters. The objectives of the project were to first evaluate the status of these technologies and their readiness for commercial applications. Second, to evaluate the potential cost of energy and identify cost-reduction pathways and areas where additional research could be best applied to accelerate technology development to market readiness.

  1. Tank characterization technical sampling basis

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, T.M.

    1998-04-28

    Tank Characterization Technical Sampling Basis (this document) is the first step of an in place working process to plan characterization activities in an optimal manner. This document will be used to develop the revision of the Waste Information Requirements Document (WIRD) (Winkelman et al. 1997) and ultimately, to create sampling schedules. The revised WIRD will define all Characterization Project activities over the course of subsequent fiscal years 1999 through 2002. This document establishes priorities for sampling and characterization activities conducted under the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Tank Waste Characterization Project. The Tank Waste Characterization Project is designed to provide all TWRS programs with information describing the physical, chemical, and radiological properties of the contents of waste storage tanks at the Hanford Site. These tanks contain radioactive waste generated from the production of nuclear weapons materials at the Hanford Site. The waste composition varies from tank to tank because of the large number of chemical processes that were used when producing nuclear weapons materials over the years and because the wastes were mixed during efforts to better use tank storage space. The Tank Waste Characterization Project mission is to provide information and waste sample material necessary for TWRS to define and maintain safe interim storage and to process waste fractions into stable forms for ultimate disposal. This document integrates the information needed to address safety issues, regulatory requirements, and retrieval, treatment, and immobilization requirements. Characterization sampling to support tank farm operational needs is also discussed.

  2. 14. PROJECT PLAN, INTAKE PIER, RAW WATER CONDUITS, PUMPING STATION ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. PROJECT PLAN, INTAKE PIER, RAW WATER CONDUITS, PUMPING STATION FORCE MAINS, TREATED WATER PIPELINES, AND FILTRATION PLANT, SHEET 1 OF 117, 1920. - Sacramento River Water Treatment Plant Intake Pier & Access Bridge, Spanning Sacramento River approximately 175 feet west of eastern levee on river; roughly .5 mile downstream from confluence of Sacramento & American Rivers, Sacramento, Sacramento County, CA

  3. Hamerschlag Hall Green Roof Project Water Monitoring System

    E-print Network

    Andrews, Peter B.

    1 Hamerschlag Hall Green Roof Project Water Monitoring System Plans and Specifications Created By Carothers Water Monitoring, Flume, and Curbing Specifications · The connection between the curbing of the green roof. #12;3 #12;4 #12;5 #12;6 #12;7 #12;8 Appendix A Water Flow Monitoring Equipment Specification

  4. POTENTIAL EFFECTS OF PROJECT CHARIOT ON LOCAL WATER SUPPLIES

    Microsoft Academic Search

    1961-01-01

    An order-of-magnitude appraisal of the concentrations of radioactive ; nuclides that might be introduced into local water supplies by execution of ; Project Chariot near Cape Thompson, Alaska is presented. Summaires are given of ; the following environmental characteristics of the area: wind movement, air ; temperature and permafrost, precipitation, stream flow, evapo-transpiration and ; soil water, ground-water movement, sediment

  5. SPRING_TANK

    EPA Science Inventory

    This point coverage shows springs and water tanks on Salt River Indian Reservation in Arizona. This coverage was digitized off of USGS 7.5 minute quad maps by the Phoenix office of the Bureau of Indian Affairs. ...

  6. Tank 241-C-106 sluicing project W-320 integrity assessment report

    SciTech Connect

    Symons, G.A., Fluor Daniel Hanford

    1997-02-11

    This Integrity Assessment Report is prepared by ICF Kaiser Hanford Co. (ICFKH) for Westinqhouse Hanford Company (WHC), operations contractor and the Department of Energy (DOE), the system owner. It is a revision of the original report dated 10/26/94 (ICFKH Transmittal TR-W-320-295). The original project scope has been modified, necessitating with WAC-173-303-640.

  7. Tank 241-C-106 sluicing project W-320 integrity assessment report

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Symons; Fluor Daniel Hanford

    1997-01-01

    This Integrity Assessment Report is prepared by ICF Kaiser Hanford Co. (ICFKH) for Westinqhouse Hanford Company (WHC), operations contractor and the Department of Energy (DOE), the system owner. It is a revision of the original report dated 10\\/26\\/94 (ICFKH Transmittal TR-W-320-295). The original project scope has been modified, necessitating with WAC-173-303-640.

  8. Perched-Water Evaluation for the Deep Vadose Zone Beneath the B, BX, and BY Tank Farms Area of the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect

    Truex, Michael J.; Oostrom, Martinus; Carroll, KC; Chronister, Glen B.

    2013-06-28

    Perched-water conditions have been observed in the vadose zone above a fine-grained zone that is located a few meters above the water table within the B, BX, and BY Tank Farms area. The perched water contains elevated concentrations of uranium and technetium-99. This perched-water zone is important to consider in evaluating the future flux of contaminated water into the groundwater. The study described in this report was conducted to examine the perched-water conditions and quantitatively evaluate 1) factors that control perching behavior, 2) contaminant flux toward groundwater, and 3) associated groundwater impact.

  9. Diversion tanks will prevent field shutdown: design-build project is 80% alaskan

    Microsoft Academic Search

    1985-01-01

    The nation's second largest oil field is nearing peak production of 250,000 bbl per day. The Kuparuk River field on Alaska's North Slope put a second central processing facility (CPF-2) on line this year and a third will arrive on the 1986 sea lift. By 1990, the field will hold 400 producing wells and 400 water injection wells. Considering this

  10. Measured performance of a solar augmented heat pump/chiller system with thermal storage in tanks of stratified water

    SciTech Connect

    Wildin, M.W.

    1983-01-01

    The performance of the heating and cooling system in a building designed to illustrate energy conservation, solar energy use and thermal storage for electric load management and energy conservation was monitored for a period of 20 months, beginning in January 1981. Solar energy was employed to augment the heating energy obtained by heat recovery using electric-driven reciprocating heat pump/chillers and an air-to-air heat exchanger. Solar energy was gathered by 289 m/sup 2/ (3110 ft/sup 2/) of evacuated tube collectors on the roof of the building, which has a gross floor area of 5330 m/sup 2/ (57,350 ft/sup 2/). The fractions of the total active heating load, including air-to-air heat recovery, supplied by solar energy for the one partial and one completed heating season for which results were obtained, were 50 and 42 percent, respectively. Stratified water tanks were used in the heating season to store excess solar energy and both heating and cooling capacity generated by the heat pump/chillers. During the cooling season, the tanks were used to store cooling capacity generated by the chillers. An economic analysis using the results for energy consumption obtained from this building indicated that the solar system was not economically attractive, despite its encouraging technical performance. Thermal storage for electric load management was attractive for moderate costs of capital.

  11. Project W-314 specific test and evaluation plan for AZ tank farm upgrades

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hays

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this Specific Test and Evaluation Plan (STEP) is to provide a detailed written plan for the systematic testing of modifications made by the addition of the SN-631 transfer line from the AZ-O1A pit to the AZ-02A pit by the W-314 Project. The STEP develops the outline for test procedures that verify the system`s performance to the established

  12. SINGLE-SHELL TANK INTEGRITY PROJECT ANALYSIS OF RECORD-PRELIMINARY MODELING PLAN FOR THERMAL AND OPERATING LOADS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    RAST RS; RINKER MW; BAPANAALLI SK; DEIBLER JE; GUZMAN-LEONG CE; JOHNSON KI; KARRI NK; PILLI SP; SANBORN SE

    2010-01-01

    This document is a Phase I deliverable for the Single-Shell Tank Analysis of Record effort. This document is not the Analysis of Record. The intent of this document is to guide the Phase II detailed modeling effort. Preliminary finite element models for each of the tank types were developed and different case studies were performed on one or more of

  13. Project health and safety plan for the Gunite and Associated Tanks at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Abston

    1997-01-01

    The Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc. (Energy Systems) policy is to provide a safe and healthful workplace for all employees and subcontractors. The accomplishment of this policy requires that operations at the Gunite and Associated Tanks (GAAT) in the North and South Tank Farms (NTF and STF) at the Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge National Laboratory are guided by

  14. Oak Ridge National Laboratory Gunite and Associated Tanks Stabilization Project-Low-Tech Approach with High-Tech Results

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Brill; T. Alsup; D. Bolling

    2002-01-01

    Environmental restoration of the Gunite and Associated Tanks (GAAT) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) was a priority to the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) because of their age and deteriorating structure. These eight tanks ranging up to 170,000 gallons in capacity were constructed in 1943 of a Gunite or ''sprayed concrete material'' as part of the Manhattan

  15. A Sustainable Waste Water Management Project: MEDAWARE

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Filiz Dilek; Celal F Gökçay

    The MEDAWARE Project was initiated by the collaboration of 7 Med countries in 2003. The main aim of the project was to develop tools and guidelines for the promotion of the urban wastewater treatment and reuse in the agricultural production in the Mediterranean countries for a sustainable environment and resources. Within this scope METU team undertook an inventory of the

  16. INL Bettis Water Treatment Project Report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2009-06-01

    Bechtel Bettis Atomic Power Laboratory (Bettis), West Mifflin, PA, requested that the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) (Battelle Energy Alliance) perform tests using water simulants and three specified media to determine if those ion-exchange (IX) resins will be effective at removing the plutonium contamination from water. This report details the testing and results of the tests to determine the suitability of the media to treat plutonium contaminated water at near nuetral pH.

  17. Impact of rural water projects on hygienic behaviour in Swaziland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peter, Graciana

    In Swaziland, access to safe water supply and sanitation has improved significantly and was expected to result in improved health and, in particular, reduced infant mortality rates. On the contrary, mortality rates in the under 5 years age group are high and have doubled from 60 in 1996, to 120 deaths per 1000 in 2006. The main objective of the study was to assess whether the water projects permit, and are accompanied by, changes in hygienic behaviour to prevent transmission of diseases. The study area was Phonjwane, located in the dry Lowveld of Swaziland, where water projects play a significant role in meeting domestic water demands. Hygienic behaviour and sanitation facilities were analysed and compared before and after project. The results of the study show that domestic water supply projects have significantly reduced distances travelled and time taken to collect water, and that increased quantities of water are collected and used. While the majority of respondents (95.6%) used the domestic water project source, the quantities allowed per household (125 l which translates to an average of 20.8 l per person) were insufficient and therefore were supplemented with harvested rainwater (57.8%), water from a polluted river (17.8%), and water from a dam (2.2%). Increased water quantities have permitted more baths and washing of clothes and hands, but significant proportions of the population still skip hygienic practices such as keeping water for washing hands inside or near toilet facilities (40%) and washing hands (20%). The study concludes that the water supply project has permitted and improved hygienic practices but not sufficiently. The health benefits of safe domestic water supplies are hampered by insufficient quantities of water availed through the projects, possible contamination of the water in the house, poor hygienic behaviours and lack of appropriate sanitation measures by some households. There is a need to provide sufficient quantities of safe water to meet all domestic demands. Domestic water supply must be accompanied by appropriate sanitation and hygienic education.

  18. Single Shell Tank (SST) Retrieval Sequence & Double Shell Tank (DST) Space Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    HOHL, T.M.

    2001-09-20

    This document describes the baseline single-shell tank (SST) waste retrieval sequence for the River Protection Project updated for Fiscal Year 2002. The double-shell tank (DST) space evaluation presents projected DST needs for Hanford for additional DSTs.

  19. Single Shell Tank (SST) Retrieval Sequence & Double Shell Tank (DST) Space Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    STRODE, J.N.

    2002-09-23

    This document describes the baseline single-shell tank (SST) waste retrieval sequence for the River Protection Project updated for Fiscal Year 2002. The double-shell tank (DST) space evaluation presents projected DST needs for Hanford for additional DSTs.

  20. Single Shell Tank (SST) Retrieval Sequence and Double Shell Tank (DST) Space Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    KIRCH, N.W.

    2003-09-23

    This document describes the baseline single-shell tank (SST) waste retrieval sequence for the River Protection Project updated for Fiscal Year 2002. The double-shell tank (DST) space evaluation presents projected DST needs for Hanford for additional DSTs.

  1. Efficacy of oligodynamic metals in the control of bacteria growth in humidifier water tanks and mist droplets.

    PubMed

    Collart, David; Mehrabi, Sharifeh; Robinson, Liah; Kepner, Bryan; Mintz, Eric A

    2006-06-01

    Antimicrobial capsules were evaluated for their effectiveness to control bacterial contamination of cool mist humidifiers. These capsules contain a mixture of silver and copper promoted alumina beads designed to release low concentrations of these oligodynamic metals into the reservoir water for bacteria control. The reservoir water and mist droplets from the humidifier units were tested for the presence of bacteria over a three-week period. A control unit (without capsule) showed significant bacterial contamination by day three, which increased throughout the three-week test period, in both the reservoir and mist droplets, whereas the antimicrobial capsules reduced contamination during the first week, and minimized the presence of bacteria, in both the reservoir water and mist droplets, to less than 2% of the control unit throughout the three-week test period. It was also observed that, after each inactive weekend, the initial discharge of bacteria via the mist droplets in the control unit was significantly higher than during daily use. However, initial bacterial discharge from the test unit following weekend inactivity never exceeded 0.5% of the control unit. In conclusion, these capsules containing oligodynamic metals are effective in controlling bacteria growth in humidifier water tanks and mist droplets. PMID:16813008

  2. Handbook on the Economic Analysis of Water Supply Projects

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    1999-01-01

    Handbook on the Economic Analysis of Water Supply Projects was written for non-economists working in the planning, implementation, and management of water supplies. Created by the Asian Development Bank, the handbook is a resource guide to help staff of government agencies, financing institutions, and water utilities understand the principles of economic analysis of water supply projects. Written in easy-to-understand language, the handbook consists of nine chapters, each with separate tables of contents, with titles such as "Least Cost Analysis," "Demand Analysis and Forecasting," and "Sensitivity and Risk Analysis." Each chapter is available only in .pdf format and must be downloaded separately. Also included are an appendix and glossary.

  3. Comparing strategies: State funding of capital projects versus water conservation

    E-print Network

    Finch, Dr. Calvin

    2013-01-01

    10 tx H2O Winter 2013 Column by Dr. Calvin Finch, Water Conservation and Technology Center director COMPARING STRATEGIES State funding of capital projects versus water conservation The Texas Legislature seems intent on helping local water... ?new water? is also just as permanent as a reservoir because the old, ine#16;cient plumbing is no longer available. Unless familiar with the billions of gallons of water produced by San Antonio?s or El Paso?s water conservation e orts, one might...

  4. Sidewall-box airlift pump provides large flows for aeration, CO2 stripping, and water rotation in large dual-drain circular tanks

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Conventional gas transfer technologies for aquaculture systems occupy a large amount of space, require a considerable capital investment, and can contribute to high electricity demand. In addition, diffused aeration in a circular culture tank can interfere with the hydrodynamics of water rotation a...

  5. Parametric Study of Charging Inlet Diffuser Performance in Stratified Chilled Water Storage Tanks with Radial Diffusers: Part 2–Dimensional Analysis, Parametric Simulations and Simplified Model Development

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Musser; W. P. Bahnfleth

    2001-01-01

    A parametric study of the thermal performance during charging of a full-scale radial inlet diffuser in a cylindrical stratified chilled water storage tank was performed by applying factorial experimental theory to the results of simulations performed with a validated computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model. Part 1 describes the development and validation of the CFD model. Part 2 summarizes the results

  6. UMTRA project water sampling and analysis plan -- Shiprock, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-02-01

    Water sampling and analysis plan (WSAP) is required for each U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site to provide a basis for ground water and surface water sampling at disposal and former processing sites. This WSAP identifies and justifies the sampling locations, analytical parameters, detection limits, and sampling frequency for the monitoring stations at the Navaho Reservation in Shiprock, New Mexico, UMTRA Project site. The purposes of the water sampling at Shiprock for fiscal year (FY) 1994 are to (1) collect water quality data at new monitoring locations in order to build a defensible statistical data base, (2) monitor plume movement on the terrace and floodplain, and (3) monitor the impact of alluvial ground water discharge into the San Juan River. The third activity is important because the community of Shiprock withdraws water from the San Juan River directly across from the contaminated alluvial floodplain below the abandoned uranium mill tailings processing site.

  7. Water Resources Research Grant Program project descriptions, fiscal year 1986

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Branch of Research Grants and Contracts

    1986-01-01

    Information is presented on the 43 projects funded by the United States Geological Survey 's Water Resources Grant Program in fiscal year 1986. The report gives the grant number; project title; performing organization; principal investigator(s); dates; and a project description which includes (1) identification of the water related problems and problem-solution approach, (2) contribution to problem solution, (3) objectives, (4) approach, and (5) result users. The 43 projects include 14 in the area of groundwater management, 6 in surface-water management, 2 in systems-operating/planning, 3 in irrigation management, 8 in desalination/reuse, 6 in economic/institutional studies, and 4 in climate variability. The reports contain tables showing (1) funding according to research topic, (2) projects funded to type of submitting organization, (3) proposals received, research topic, and funding levels, and (4) submitting organization. A comparison is given to fiscal year 1985 in each case. (USGS)

  8. 43 CFR 418.2 - How Project water may be used.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...NEWLANDS RECLAMATION PROJECT, NEVADA General Provisions § 418.2 How Project water may be used. Project water may be delivered only to serve valid water rights used for: (a) Maintenance of wetlands and fish and wildlife including...

  9. 43 CFR 418.2 - How Project water may be used.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...NEWLANDS RECLAMATION PROJECT, NEVADA General Provisions § 418.2 How Project water may be used. Project water may be delivered only to serve valid water rights used for: (a) Maintenance of wetlands and fish and wildlife including...

  10. 43 CFR 418.2 - How Project water may be used.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...NEWLANDS RECLAMATION PROJECT, NEVADA General Provisions § 418.2 How Project water may be used. Project water may be delivered only to serve valid water rights used for: (a) Maintenance of wetlands and fish and wildlife including...

  11. 43 CFR 418.2 - How Project water may be used.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...NEWLANDS RECLAMATION PROJECT, NEVADA General Provisions § 418.2 How Project water may be used. Project water may be delivered only to serve valid water rights used for: (a) Maintenance of wetlands and fish and wildlife including...

  12. 43 CFR 418.2 - How Project water may be used.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...NEWLANDS RECLAMATION PROJECT, NEVADA General Provisions § 418.2 How Project water may be used. Project water may be delivered only to serve valid water rights used for: (a) Maintenance of wetlands and fish and wildlife including...

  13. 68 FR 16258 - Lingle-Ft. Laramie Water Quality Project, Goshen County, WY

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2003-04-03

    ...DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Natural Resources...Lingle-Ft. Laramie Water Quality Project...Department of Agriculture, gives notice that...Lingle-Ft. Laramie Water Quality Project...Lingle-Ft. Laramie Water Quality Project...Wyoming Board of Agriculture for ranking...

  14. 68 FR 7763 - Lingle-Ft. Laramie Water Quality Project, Goshen County, WY

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2003-02-18

    ...DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Natural Resources...Lingle-Ft. Laramie Water Quality Project...Department of Agriculture, gives notice that...Lingle-Ft. Laramie Water Quality Project...Lingle-Ft. Laramie Water Quality Project...Wyoming Board of Agriculture for ranking...

  15. Lessons Learned from a Third World Water and Sanitation Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jenkins-McLean, Terri

    1991-01-01

    The seven-step project cycle used in a water sanitation project in Belize from 1986-89 is described. The direct involvement of community organizations, village councils, family gatherings, parent-teacher organizations, political groups, Village Health Committees, and volunteer organizations is emphasized. (CW)

  16. Green River Formation water flood demonstration project. Final report

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. I. Pennington; J. E. Dyer; J. D. Lomax; M. D. Deo

    1996-01-01

    The objectives of the project were to understand the oil production mechanisms in the Monument Butte unit via reservoir characterization and reservoir simulations and to transfer the water flooding technology to similar units in the vicinity, particularly the Travis and the Boundary units. The reservoir characterization activity in the project basically consisted of extraction and analysis of a full diameter

  17. Environmentally Sound Small-Scale Water Projects. Guidelines for Planning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tillman, Gus

    This manual is the second volume in a series of publications on community development programs. Guidelines are suggested for small-scale water projects that would benefit segments of the world's urban or rural poor. Strategies in project planning, implementation and evaluation are presented that emphasize environmental conservation and promote…

  18. BELTWAY 8 WETLAND WATER QUALITY PROJECT: CONSTRUCTED WETLANDS FOR STORM WATER POLISHING AND WETLAND MITIGATION BANKING

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robert Knight; Robert Adams; C OBRIEN; Eduardo Davis

    1998-01-01

    The Harris County Flood Control District is implementing a wetland mitigation bank project that includes highway runoff as a significant water source. Part of this project is being implemented in cooperation with the Texas Department of Transportation through funding from the Intermodal Surface Transportation Efficiency Act for water quality improvement. This collaborative effort includes treatment and final polishing of storm

  19. N 2 O emissions from different cropping systems and from aerated, nitrifying and denitrifying tanks of a municipal waste water treatment plant

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. Benckiser; R. Eilts; A. Linn; H.-J. Lorch; E. Sümer; A. Weiske; F. Wenzhöfer

    1996-01-01

    Nitrous oxide emissions, nitrate, water-soluble carbon and biological O2 demand (BOD5) were quantified in different cropping systems fertilized with varying amounts of nitrogen (clayey loam, October 1991 to May 1992), in an aerated tank (March 1993 to March 1994), and in the nitrification-denitrification unit (March to July 1994) of a municipal waste water treatment plant. In addition, the N2O present

  20. Geospatial application of the Water Erosion Prediction Project (WEPP) model

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Water Erosion Prediction Project (WEPP) model is a process-based technology for prediction of soil erosion by water at hillslope profile, field, and small watershed scales. In particular, WEPP utilizes observed or generated daily climate inputs to drive the surface hydrology processes (infiltrat...

  1. WATER SYSTEM OPERATOR TRAINING FOR THE CENTRAL ARIZONA PROJECT

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Central Arizona Project (CAP) is designed to bring about 1.5 million acre-feet of Colorado River water per year to Maricopa, Pima, and Pinal counties in Arizona. CAP carries water from Lake Havasu down to Tucson. The CAP canal system is a 336-mile long system of aqueducts, tunnels, pumping pla...

  2. Paso del Norte Watershed Council Coordinated Water Resources Database Project

    E-print Network

    Brown, Christopher; Sheng, Zhuping; Rich, Matt

    cooperative database project that would provide streamlined access to a range of water resource data in the Paso del Norte region. In August of 2002, the El Paso Water Utilities provided initial funding to the Paso del Norte Watershed Council to develop a...

  3. UMTRA Project water sampling and analysis plan, Slick Rock, Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-08-01

    This water sampling and analysis plan (WSAP) provides the regulatory and technical basis for ground water and surface water sampling at the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project Union Carbide (UC) and North Continent (NC) processing sites and the proposed Burro Canyon disposal site near Slick Rock, Colorado for the upcoming year. It identifies and justifies the sampling locations, analytical parameters, and sampling frequencies. The WSAP bridges water quality characterization and data collection objectives for the surface remediation program (Subpart A) and the ground water compliance program (Subpart B) identified in 40 CFR Part 192 (1994).

  4. Key Experiences in Developing a Sustainable Water Distribution and Filtration Project in Rural Honduras: A New Paradigm in "Service Learning"

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    John, Alex

    The University of Southern California chapter of Engineers Without Borders (EWBUSC) was formed in the fall of 2006. Within six months of its charter approval, the chapter obtained, assessed, and began raising funds for a water project in the village of La Estanzuela, Honduras. Since the village has no electricity, the design process began with a ram-pump to transport water from a nearby waterfall to a tank at the center of the village. A number of tasks were defined for the assessment trip, which was taken in March 2007. Technical measurements included terrain GPS samples, river flow rates and multiple water samplings and testing. A preliminary system design was formulated, and a community health survey was administered. The data are being analyzed to finalize system design and establish baseline health and water quality measurements. Planning for a final assessment trip in March of 2008 has also been finalized. EWB-USC is partnering this effort with a number of humanitarian organizations, and the International Rotary Organizations Decade of Water Improvement to provide some of the supplies and equipments for this project. This paper highlights the key experiences in organizational development, project funding, trip planning, assessment trip and lays out a five-year project plan for our future efforts. The hope is that through exposure to these experiences, other newly formed EWB student organizations will plan for their activities in a more efficient and responsive way.

  5. Native Waters: An American Indian Water Resource Education Project

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2004-01-01

    This community education initiative supports the efforts of Native American tribal leaders, educators, and students to develop contemporary, scientifically accurate, and culturally sensitive water education resources, programs, and networking opportunities. A traveling exhibit provides a Native American point of view on protection and conservation of water resources. A teachers' guide is provided to accompany the exhibit. Other materials include learning opportunities for students and educators, news articles, publications, scholarship information, and links to related information.

  6. HANFORD DOUBLE SHELL TANK THERMAL AND SEISMIC PROJECT SUMMARY OF COMBINED THERMAL AND OPERATING LOADS WITH SEISMIC ANALYSIS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    MACKEY TC; DEIBLER JE; RINKER MW; JOHNSON KI; ABATT FG; KARRI NK; PILLI SP; STOOPS KL

    2009-01-01

    This report summarizes the results of the Double-Shell Tank Thermal and Operating Loads Analysis (TaLA) combined with the Seismic Analysis. This combined analysis provides a thorough, defensible, and documented analysis that will become a part of the overall analysis of record for the Hanford double-shell tanks (DSTs). The bases of the analytical work presented herein are two ANSYS{reg_sign} finite element

  7. TA-2 Water Boiler Reactor Decommissioning Project

    SciTech Connect

    Durbin, M.E. (ed.); Montoya, G.M.

    1991-06-01

    This final report addresses the Phase 2 decommissioning of the Water Boiler Reactor, biological shield, other components within the biological shield, and piping pits in the floor of the reactor building. External structures and underground piping associated with the gaseous effluent (stack) line from Technical Area 2 (TA-2) Water Boiler Reactor were removed in 1985--1986 as Phase 1 of reactor decommissioning. The cost of Phase 2 was approximately $623K. The decommissioning operation produced 173 m{sup 3} of low-level solid radioactive waste and 35 m{sup 3} of mixed waste. 15 refs., 25 figs., 3 tabs.

  8. Evaluations of a Ballast Water Treatment to Stop Invasive Species and Tank Corrosion

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mario N. Tamburri; Gregory M. Ruiz

    2005-01-01

    Invasive species are one of the most destructive environmental problems facing the world today. They can alter habitats, cause local extinction of native species, and have enormous economic impacts. Because ballast water is the primary source of aquatic invasions, the International Maritime Organization has recently passed regulations that will require ocean-going vessels to treat water prior to discharge. It has

  9. Response of delta distributaries to differential water depths in the transverse direction: Tank experiments with bimodal grain-size sediment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muto, T.; Nishikawa, N.; Parker, G.

    2013-12-01

    A series of 2D tank experiments was conducted to explore how a river delta being fed bimodal grain-size sediment responds to non-uniform, basin water depths varying in the transverse direction. During each run, upstream water discharge, rate of sediment supply and base level were all kept constant. Sediment used was a 50:50 mixture of 0.1 mm and 0.9 mm quartz grains. Our experimental observations imply the presence of a particular feedback mechanism of delta distributary channels in response to differential bathymetry. When an active distributary channel empties into shallow water, a delta lobe rapidly extends in the offshore direction, but then in a relatively short period becomes inactive as the feeder channel migrates or avulses to another location. When an otherwise similar distributary channel empties into deep water, on the other hand, delta lobe progradation takes place only slowly, and it takes longer for the feeder channel to migrate to another location, whereby the delta can develop an isotropic shoreline configuration as a whole. Differential basement bathymetry can thus affect local residence time and avulsion frequency of active feeder channels. However, differential bathymetry does not function by itself, but always in combination with the effect of alluvial aggradation. These observations are substantially consistent with the existing notion, which was obtained from our previous experiment that was conducted with single-grain size sediment (0.1 mm), suggesting that the compensational behavior of active distributary channels holds regardless of grain-size distribution of supplied sediment.

  10. Engineering study of 50 miscellaneous inactive underground radioactive waste tanks located at the Hanford Site, Washington

    SciTech Connect

    Freeman-Pollard, J.R.

    1994-03-02

    This engineering study addresses 50 inactive underground radioactive waste tanks. The tanks were formerly used for the following functions associated with plutonium and uranium separations and waste management activities in the 200 East and 200 West Areas of the Hanford Site: settling solids prior to disposal of supernatant in cribs and a reverse well; neutralizing acidic process wastes prior to crib disposal; receipt and processing of single-shell tank (SST) waste for uranium recovery operations; catch tanks to collect water that intruded into diversion boxes and transfer pipeline encasements and any leakage that occurred during waste transfer operations; and waste handling and process experimentation. Most of these tanks have not been in use for many years. Several projects have, been planned and implemented since the 1970`s and through 1985 to remove waste and interim isolate or interim stabilize many of the tanks. Some tanks have been filled with grout within the past several years. Responsibility for final closure and/or remediation of these tanks is currently assigned to several programs including Tank Waste Remediation Systems (TWRS), Environmental Restoration and Remedial Action (ERRA), and Decommissioning and Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Closure (D&RCP). Some are under facility landlord responsibility for maintenance and surveillance (i.e. Plutonium Uranium Extraction [PUREX]). However, most of the tanks are not currently included in any active monitoring or surveillance program.

  11. Blue water transfer versus virtual water transfer in China, with a focus on the South-North Water Transfer Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hong; Zhou, Yuan; Liu, Junguo

    2015-04-01

    Alongside its astonishing economic growth during the past decades, there has been increasing water stress in many areas in China. Water diversion has been one of the measures in dealing with the problem. The South-North Water Transfer Project is the largest project as such in the world, which aims to transfer water from the Yangtze River to primarily the North China Plain to alleviate the water stress in the region. Water diversion projects play an important role in supporting the continuous economic growth and safeguarding food production in the country. However, they also bring about many negative impacts concerning the environmental and ecosystem sustainability, as well as socio-economic development, both in the source and destination regions of diversions. One question arising is whether a virtual water transfer, primarily in the form of agricultural products, would be one of the tools economically and environmentally advantageous over transferring massive amounts of water to water deficit regions. This study presents an overview of China's water and land endowments and uses across regions, and the spatial distribution of food production. Based on this, the extent to which the virtual water strategy may be useful in dealing with the water stress in northern China as well as its limitations will be discussed. The focus will be on the South-North Water Transfer Project.

  12. Pressurizer tank upper support

    DOEpatents

    Baker, T.H.; Ott, H.L.

    1994-01-11

    A pressurizer tank in a pressurized water nuclear reactor is mounted between structural walls of the reactor on a substructure of the reactor, the tank extending upwardly from the substructure. For bearing lateral loads such as seismic shocks, a girder substantially encircles the pressurizer tank at a space above the substructure and is coupled to the structural walls via opposed sway struts. Each sway strut is attached at one end to the girder and at an opposite end to one of the structural walls, and the sway struts are oriented substantially horizontally in pairs aligned substantially along tangents to the wall of the circular tank. Preferably, eight sway struts attach to the girder at 90[degree] intervals. A compartment encloses the pressurizer tank and forms the structural wall. The sway struts attach to corners of the compartment for maximum stiffness and load bearing capacity. A valve support frame carrying the relief/discharge piping and valves of an automatic depressurization arrangement is fixed to the girder, whereby lateral loads on the relief/discharge piping are coupled directly to the compartment rather than through any portion of the pressurizer tank. Thermal insulation for the valve support frame prevents thermal loading of the piping and valves. The girder is shimmed to define a gap for reducing thermal transfer, and the girder is free to move vertically relative to the compartment walls, for accommodating dimensional variation of the pressurizer tank with changes in temperature and pressure. 10 figures.

  13. Pressurizer tank upper support

    DOEpatents

    Baker, Tod H. (O'Hara Township, Allegheny County, PA); Ott, Howard L. (Kiski Township, Armstrong County, PA)

    1994-01-01

    A pressurizer tank in a pressurized water nuclear reactor is mounted between structural walls of the reactor on a substructure of the reactor, the tank extending upwardly from the substructure. For bearing lateral loads such as seismic shocks, a girder substantially encircles the pressurizer tank at a space above the substructure and is coupled to the structural walls via opposed sway struts. Each sway strut is attached at one end to the girder and at an opposite end to one of the structural walls, and the sway struts are oriented substantially horizontally in pairs aligned substantially along tangents to the wall of the circular tank. Preferably, eight sway struts attach to the girder at 90.degree. intervals. A compartment encloses the pressurizer tank and forms the structural wall. The sway struts attach to corners of the compartment for maximum stiffness and load bearing capacity. A valve support frame carrying the relief/discharge piping and valves of an automatic depressurization arrangement is fixed to the girder, whereby lateral loads on the relief/discharge piping are coupled directly to the compartment rather than through any portion of the pressurizer tank. Thermal insulation for the valve support frame prevents thermal loading of the piping and valves. The girder is shimmed to define a gap for reducing thermal transfer, and the girder is free to move vertically relative to the compartment walls, for accommodating dimensional variation of the pressurizer tank with changes in temperature and pressure.

  14. UMTRA project water sampling and analysis plan, Monument Valley, Arizona

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-04-01

    The Monument Valley Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site in Cane Valley is a former uranium mill that has undergone surface remediation in the form of tailings and contaminated materials removal. Contaminated materials from the Monument Valley (Arizona) UMTRA Project site have been transported to the Mexican Hat (Utah) UMTRA Project site for consolidation with the Mexican Hat tailings. Tailings removal was completed in February 1994. Three geologic units at the site contain water: the unconsolidated eolian and alluvial deposits (alluvial aquifer), the Shinarump Conglomerate (Shinarump Member), and the De Chelly Sandstone. Water quality analyses indicate the contaminant plume has migrated north of the site and is mainly in the alluvial aquifer. An upward hydraulic gradient in the De Chelly Sandstone provides some protection to that aquifer. This water sampling and analysis plan recommends sampling domestic wells, monitor wells, and surface water in April and September 1994. The purpose of sampling is to continue periodic monitoring for the surface program, evaluate changes to water quality for site characterization, and provide data for the baseline risk assessment. Samples taken in April will be representative of high ground water levels and samples taken in September will be representative of low ground water levels. Filtered and nonfiltered samples will be analyzed for plume indicator parameters and baseline risk assessment parameters.

  15. The characterization of Salmonella enterica serotypes isolated from the scalder tank water of a commercial poultry processing plant: Recovery of a multidrug-resistant Heidelberg strain.

    PubMed

    Rothrock, Michael J; Ingram, Kimberly D; Gamble, John; Guard, Jean; Cicconi-Hogan, Kellie M; Hinton, Arthur; Hiett, Kelli L

    2015-03-01

    The recent multistate outbreak of a multidrug-resistant (MDR) Salmonella Heidelberg strain from commercial poultry production highlights the need to better understand the reservoirs of these zoonotic pathogens within the commercial poultry production and processing environment. As part of a larger study looking at temporal changes in microbial communities within the major water tanks within a commercial processing facility, this paper identifies and characterizes Salmonella enterica isolated from the water in a final scalder tank at 3 times during a typical processing day: prior to the birds entering the tank (start), halfway through the processing day (mid), and after the final birds were scalded (end). Over 3 consecutive processing days, no Salmonella were recovered from start-of-day water samples, while a total of 56 Salmonella isolates were recovered from the mid-day and end-of-day scalder water samples. Traditional and newer PCR-based serotyping methods eventually identified these isolates as either group C3 S. Kentucky (n = 45) and group B S. Heidelberg (n = 11). While none of the S. Kentucky isolates possessed any resistances to the antimicrobials tested, all S. Heidelberg isolates were found to be multidrug resistant to 5 specific antimicrobials representing 3 antimicrobial classes. Due to the potential public health impact of S. Heidelberg and the recent nationwide poultry-associated outbreak of multidrug-resistant S. Heidelberg, future studies should focus on understanding the transmission and environmental growth dynamics of this serotype within the commercial poultry processing plant environment. PMID:25681479

  16. Project W-211, initial tank retrieval systems, description of operations for 241-AP-102 and 241-AP-104

    SciTech Connect

    RIECK, C.A.

    1999-02-25

    The primary purpose of the Initial Tank Retrieval Systems (ITRS) is to provide systems for retrieval of radioactive wastes stored in underground double-shell tanks (DSTS) for transfer to alternate storage, evaporation, pretreatment or treatment, while concurrently reducing risks associated with safety watch list and other DSTs. This Description of Operations (DOO) defines the control philosophy for the waste retrieval system for tanks 241-AP-102 (AP-102) and 241-AP-104 (AP-104). This DOO will provide a basis for the detailed design of the Retrieval Control System (RCS) for AP-102 and AP-104 and establishes test criteria for the RCS. The test criteria will be used during qualification testing and acceptance testing to verify operability.

  17. Development of a CFD Model for Secondary Final Settling Tanks in Water Pollution Control Plants

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Minwei Gong; Savvas Xanthos; Krish Ramalingam; John Fillos

    2007-01-01

    To assess performance and evaluate alternatives to improve efficiency of the New York City the Wards Island Water Pollution Control Plant (WPCP) FSTs at peak loads, a 3D CFD model has been developed. Fluent was utilized as the base platform, where sub-models of the Suspended Solids (SS), settling characteristics, density currents and SS flocculation were incorporated. This was supplemented by

  18. TANK 21 AND TANK 24 BLEND AND FEED STUDY: BLENDING TIMES, SETTLING TIMES, AND TRANSFERS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. Lee; R. Leishear; M. Poirier

    2012-01-01

    The Salt Disposition Integration (SDI) portfolio of projects provides the infrastructure within existing Liquid Waste facilities to support the startup and long term operation of the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF). Within SDI, the Blend and Feed Project will equip existing waste tanks in the Tank Farms to serve as Blend Tanks where salt solutions of up to 1.2 million

  19. Tank characterization report for Single-Shell Tank T-102

    SciTech Connect

    Remund, K.M.; Hartley, S.A.; Toth, J.J.; Tingey, J.M.; Heasler, P.G.; Ryan, F.M.; Simpson, B.C.

    1994-09-01

    Tank 241-T-102 (hereafter referred to as T-102) is a 530,000 gallon single-shell waste tank located in the 200 West T Tank farm at the Hanford Site. In 1993, two cores were taken from this tank and analysis of the cores was conducted by Battelle`s 325-A Laboratory. Characterization of the waste in this tank was conducted to support Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) Milestone M-44-05. Tank T-102 was constructed in 1943 and put into service in 1945; it is the second tank in a cascade system with Tanks T-101 and T-103. During its process history, Tank T-102 received mostly Metal Waste (MW) from the Bismuth Phosphate Process and Coating Waste (CW) from the REDOX Process via the cascade from Tank T-101 and in transfers from Tank C-102. In 1956, the MW was removed from T-102 by pumping and sluicing`. This tank was declared inactive and retired from service in 1976. In 1981, intrusion prevention and stabilization measures were taken to isolate the waste in T-102. The tank presently contains approximately 121,100 liters (32,000 gallons) of liquid and sludge-like waste. Historically, there are no unreviewed safety issues associated with this tank and none were revealed after reviewing the data from the latest core sampling event in 1993. An extensive set of analytical measurements was performed on the core composites. The major constituents (>0.5 wt%) of the waste are water, aluminum, sodium, iron, and nitrate, ordered from the largest concentration to the smallest. The concentrations and inventories of these and other constituents are given. The results of the chemical analyses have been compared to the dangerous waste codes in the Washington Dangerous Waste Regulations (WAC 173-303).

  20. Tank Tests of the Effect of Rivet Heads, etc., on the Water Performance of a Seaplane Float, Special Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parkinson, J. B.; Robertson, J. B., Jr.

    1936-01-01

    A 1/3.5 full-size model of the Mark V float of the Bureau of Aeronautics, Navy Department, was tested in the NACA tank both with smooth painted bottom surfaces and with roundhead rivets, plate laps, and keel plates fitted to simulate the actual bottom of a metal float. The augmentation in water resistance due to the added roughness was found to be from 10-12% at the hum speed and from 12-14% at high speeds. The effect of the roughness of the afterbody was found to be negligible except at high trims. The model data were extrapolated to full size by the usual method which assumes the forces to vary according to Froude's law, and in the case of the smooth model by a method of separation that takes into account the effect of scale on the frictional resistance. It was concluded that the effect of rivet heads on the takeoff performance of a relatively high-powered float seaplane is of little consequence but that it may be of greater importance in the case of more moderately powered flying boats.

  1. Reuse of drinking water treatment residuals in a continuous stirred tank reactor for phosphate removal from urban wastewater.

    PubMed

    Bai, Leilei; Wang, Changhui; Pei, Yuansheng; Zhao, Jinbo

    2014-01-01

    This work proposed a new approach of reusing drinking water treatment residuals (WTR) in a continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR) to remove phosphate (P) from urban wastewater. The results revealed that the P removal efficiency of the WTR was more than 94% for urban wastewater, in the condition of initial P concentration (P0) of 10 mg L?¹, hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 2 h and WTR dosage (M0) of 10 g L?¹. The P mass transfer from the bulk to the solid-liquid interface in the CSTR system increased at lower P0, higher M0 and longer HRT. The P adsorption capacity of WTR from urban wastewater was comparable to that of the 201 × 4 resin and unaffected by ions competition. Moreover, WTR had a limited effect on the metals' (Fe, Al, Zn, Cu, Mn and Ni) concentrations of the urban wastewater. Based on the principle of waste recycling, the reuse of WTR in CSTR is a promising alternative technology for P removal from urban wastewater. PMID:25176310

  2. Kinetic study of defluoridation of drinking water by electrocoagulation\\/electroflotation in a stirred tank reactor and in an external-loop airlift reactor

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. H. Essadki; B. Gourich; M. Azzi; Ch. Vial; H. Delmas

    2010-01-01

    A kinetic study of defluoridation of drinking water was carried out using the electrocoagulation\\/electroflotation process in two batch reactors of identical volume (20L): a stirred tank reactor (STR) and an external-loop airlift reactor (ELALR). When the evolution of fluoride content was independent of stirring speed, experimental results showed that the kinetics of fluoride removal could be modelled using a variable-order-kinetic

  3. Ka-band backscattering from water surface at small incidence: A wind-wave tank study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boisot, Olivier; Pioch, Sébastien; Fatras, Christophe; Caulliez, Guillemette; Bringer, Alexandra; Borderies, Pierre; Lalaurie, Jean-Claude; Guérin, Charles-Antoine

    2015-05-01

    We report on an experiment conducted at the large Pytheas wind-wave facility in Marseille to characterize the Ka-band radar return from water surfaces when observed at small incidence. Simultaneous measurements of capillary-gravity to gravity wave height and slopes and Normalized Radar Cross Section (NRCS) were carried out for various wind speeds and scattering angles. From this data set we construct an empirical two-dimensional wave number spectrum accounting for the surface current to describe water surface motions from decimeter to millimeter scales. Some consistency tests are proposed to validate the surface wave spectrum, which is then incorporated into simple analytical scattering models. The resulting directional NRCS is found in overall good agreement with the experimental values. Comparisons are performed with oceanic models as well as in situ measurements over different types of natural surfaces. The applicability of the present findings to oceanic as well as continental surfaces is discussed.

  4. UMTRA project water sampling and analysis plan, Mexican Hat, Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-04-01

    The Mexican Hat, Utah, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site is a former uranium mill that is undergoing surface remediation in the form of on-site tailings stabilization. Contaminated surface materials from the Monument Valley, Arizona, UMTRA Project site have been transported to the Mexican Hat site and are being consolidated with the Mexican Hat tailings. The scheduled completion of the tailings disposal cell is August 1995. Water is found in two geologic units at the site: the Halgaito Shale Formation and the Honaker Trail Formation. The tailings rest on the Halgaito Shale, and water contained in that unit is a result of milling activities and, to a lesser extent, water released from the tailings from compaction during remedial action construction of the disposal cell. Water in the Halgaito Shale flows through fractures and discharges at seeps along nearby arroyos. Flow from the seeps will diminish as water drains from the unit. Ground water in the lower unit, the Honaker Trail Formation, is protected from contamination by an upward hydraulic gradient. There are no nearby water supply wells because of widespread poor background ground water quality and quantity, and the San Juan River shows no impacts from the site. This water sampling and analysis plan (WSAP) recommends sampling six seeps and one upgradient monitor well compared in the Honaker Trail Formation. Samples will be taken in April 1994 (representative of high group water levels) and September 1994 (representative of low ground water levels). Analyses will be performed on filtered samples for plume indicator parameters.

  5. The effect of a commercial bacterial supplement on the high-density culturing of Litopenaeus vannamei with a low-protein diet in an outdoor tank system and no water exchange

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Dennis McIntosh; T. M Samocha; E. R Jones; A. L Lawrence; D. A McKee; S Horowitz; A Horowitz

    2000-01-01

    The effect of adding a commercial bacterial supplement to shrimp growout facilities was studied with respect to shrimp yield and water quality parameters. Shrimp (Litopenaeusvannamei) were grown in 12 10.5-m2 outdoor tanks with no water exchange. Each tank was stocked with juvenile L. vannamei (average weight, 1.69 g) at a density of 40\\/m2. The shrimp were fed with a 21%

  6. Caribbean Water Initiative (CARIWIN) Project number S61268-583

    E-print Network

    Barthelat, Francois

    Caribbean Water Initiative (CARIWIN) Project number S61268-583 McGill University Caribbean, 2011 #12;List of acronyms AUCC ­ Association of Universities and Colleges of Canada CAFRA ­ Caribbean Institute for Feminist Research and Action CARDI ­ Caribbean Agricultural Research and Development Institute

  7. Water Resources Research Grant Program project descriptions, fiscal year 1985

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    U.S. Geological Survey Branch of Research Grants and Contracts

    1985-01-01

    Information on each of the 24 projects funded by the U.S. Geological Survey in FY 1985 under section 105 of Public Law 93-242 (the Water Resources Research Act of 1984) is presented, including the grant number, organization, the period of performance, and a brief description of the work to be carried out. (Lantz-PTT)

  8. Geospatial application of the Water Erosion Prediction Project (WEPP) model

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    At the hillslope profile and/or field scale, a simple Windows graphical user interface (GUI) is available to easily specify the slope, soil, and management inputs for application of the USDA Water Erosion Prediction Project (WEPP) model. Likewise, basic small watershed configurations of a few hillsl...

  9. WATER TREATMENT PROJECT: OBSERVATIONS ON USE OF GAC IN PRACTICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objectives of this project were: (1) to determine if granular activated carbon (GAC) adsorption beds applied in water treatment practice slough-off organic materials during the spring warm-up and (2) to evaluate the feasibility of the dilute or low-level COD procedure for the...

  10. Front Range Infrastructure Resources Project: water-resources activities

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robson, Stanley G.; Heiny, Janet S.

    1998-01-01

    Infrastructure, such as roads, buildings, airports, and dams, is built and maintained by use of large quantities of natural resources such as aggregate (sand and gravel), energy, and water. As urban area expand, local sources of these resource are becoming inaccessible (gravel cannot be mined from under a subdivision, for example), or the cost of recovery of the resource becomes prohibitive (oil and gas drilling in urban areas is costly), or the resources may become unfit for some use (pollution of ground water may preclude its use as a water supply). Governmental land-use decision and environmental mandates can further preclude development of natural resources. If infrastructure resources are to remain economically available. current resource information must be available for use in well-reasoned decisions bout future land use. Ground water is an infrastructure resource that is present in shallow aquifers and deeper bedrock aquifers that underlie much of the 2,450-square-mile demonstration area of the Colorado Front Range Infrastructure Resources Project. In 1996, mapping of the area's ground-water resources was undertaken as a U.S. Geological Survey project in cooperation with the Colorado Department of Natural Resources, Division of Water Resources, and the Colorado Water Conservation Board.

  11. Development of concept for concurrent biocide generation and water system purification. [with application to Skylab water tanks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    An attempt was made to construct an electrochemical system, using iodine, for water purification in Skylab. Data cover measurements of iodine production rates, effect of electrode size and geometry on iodine production rates, and feasibility of using stainless steels as reference electrodes.

  12. Ballast Tank of Ocean-Going Ship

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    The empty interior of an ocean-going ship's ballast tank. Such tanks are filled with water to balance a ship's loads. Unless the water is treated before it is emptied into foreign waters, it can introduce foreign organisms into the water that may become established and compe...

  13. Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems: Septic Tank/Soil Absorption Field 

    E-print Network

    Lesikar, Bruce J.

    2008-10-23

    Onsite wastewater treatment systems Septic tank/soil absorption field Figure 1: A septic tank and soil absorption field system. T he septic tank and soil absorption system is the most cost-efficient method available to treat residential wastewater.... Septic tank A septic tank is an enclosed watertight container that collects and provides primary treatment of waste- water by separating solids from the wastewater. It removes the solids by holding wastewater in the tank and allowing the settleable...

  14. Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems: Septic Tank/Soil Absorption Field

    E-print Network

    Lesikar, Bruce J.

    2008-10-23

    Onsite wastewater treatment systems Septic tank/soil absorption field Figure 1: A septic tank and soil absorption field system. T he septic tank and soil absorption system is the most cost-efficient method available to treat residential wastewater.... Septic tank A septic tank is an enclosed watertight container that collects and provides primary treatment of waste- water by separating solids from the wastewater. It removes the solids by holding wastewater in the tank and allowing the settleable...

  15. U.S. Department of Energy Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Ground Water Project: Project plan

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-09-01

    The scope of the Project is to develop and implement a ground water compliance strategy for all 24 UMTRA Project processing sites. The compliance strategy for the processing sites must satisfy the proposed EPA ground water cleanup standards in 40 CFR Part 192, Subparts B and C (1987). This scope of work will entail the following activities on a site-specific basis: Develop a compliance strategy based on modification of the UMTRA Surface Project RAPs or develop Ground Water Project RAPs with NRC concurrence on the RAP and full participation of the affected states and tribes. Implement the RAP to include institutional controls, where appropriate, as an interim measure until compliance with the standards is achieved. Institute long-term verification monitoring for transfer to a separate long-term surveillance program on or before the Project end date. Prepare certification or confirmation reports and modify the long-term surveillance plan (LTSP), where needed, on those sites completed prior to the Project end date.

  16. 33 CFR 157.212 - Dedicated Clean Ballast Tanks Operations Manual: Not approved.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Dedicated Clean Ballast Tanks Operations Manual...212 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT...CARRYING OIL IN BULK Dedicated Clean Ballast Tanks on Tank...

  17. 33 CFR 157.212 - Dedicated Clean Ballast Tanks Operations Manual: Not approved.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Dedicated Clean Ballast Tanks Operations Manual...212 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT...CARRYING OIL IN BULK Dedicated Clean Ballast Tanks on Tank...

  18. 33 CFR 157.224 - Dedicated Clean Ballast Tanks Operations Manual.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Dedicated Clean Ballast Tanks Operations Manual...224 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT...CARRYING OIL IN BULK Dedicated Clean Ballast Tanks on Tank...

  19. 33 CFR 157.224 - Dedicated Clean Ballast Tanks Operations Manual.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Dedicated Clean Ballast Tanks Operations Manual...224 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT...CARRYING OIL IN BULK Dedicated Clean Ballast Tanks on Tank...

  20. 33 CFR 157.224 - Dedicated Clean Ballast Tanks Operations Manual.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Dedicated Clean Ballast Tanks Operations Manual...224 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT...CARRYING OIL IN BULK Dedicated Clean Ballast Tanks on Tank...

  1. 33 CFR 157.212 - Dedicated Clean Ballast Tanks Operations Manual: Not approved.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Dedicated Clean Ballast Tanks Operations Manual...212 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT...CARRYING OIL IN BULK Dedicated Clean Ballast Tanks on Tank...

  2. Reverse osmosis (RO) treatment of Tucson's share of Central Arizona Project (CAP) water is being con-

    E-print Network

    Fay, Noah

    Reverse osmosis (RO) treatment of Tucson's share of Central Arizona Project (CAP) water is being for RO Treatment of CAP Water PROJECT TEAM This Arizona Water Institute PROJECT FACT SHEET is part improve- ments in both are needed to make RO treatment of CAP water truly cost-effective. The results

  3. Denver Potable Water Reuse Demonstration Project: comprehensive chronic rat study.

    PubMed

    Condie, L W; Lauer, W C; Wolfe, G W; Czeh, E T; Burns, J M

    1994-11-01

    The health effects testing program for the Denver Water Department's Potable Water Reuse Demonstration Project was designed to evaluate the relative health effects of highly treated reclaimed water derived from secondary wastewater in comparison with Denver's present high-quality drinking water. The 1 x 10(6) gal/day treatment plant provided 500-fold concentrates of water that had been treated by multiple processes to remove microbial and chemical contaminants. Fischer 344 rats were exposed to the complex mixture solutions for up to 2 yr to evaluate chronic toxicity and oncogenicity effects. The following parameters were evaluated: clinical observations, survival rate, growth, food and water consumption, haematology, clinical chemistry, urinalysis, organ weights, gross autopsy and histopathological examination of all lesions, major tissues and organs. Clinical pathology, gross pathology, and microscopic pathology conducted at wk 26 and 65 and at the end of the study did not reveal any findings that could be considered to be treatment related. Administration of drinking water concentrates at up to 500 times the original concentration in the original water samples to F344 rats for up to 104 wk did not result in any overt toxicological or carcinogenic effects. PMID:7959456

  4. Diversity of culturable sulfidogenic bacteria in two oil-water separation tanks in the north-eastern oil fields of India.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Akhil; Vanbroekhoven, Karolien; Lal, Banwari

    2010-02-01

    Sulfidogenic communities in the production waters of onshore oil fields in north-eastern India were examined using a culturing approach. Production water samples were inoculated into medium selective for Sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) and Thiosulfate Reducing Bacteria (TRB). The total number of viable sulfidogenic microorganisms in the samples obtained from the two production water tanks was approximately 10(5) MPN ml(-1) (most probable number per ml). Most of the isolates were thermo-tolerant and could be grown between 40 and 45 degrees C. Hydrogen sulfide production by TRB was significantly higher than by SRB. Based on 16S rRNA gene sequencing, the isolates were grouped in nine different phylotypes. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that most of the SRB were affiliated with the phylum Proteobacteria, encompassing Gram-negative bacteria, belonging to the genera Desulfovibrio, Desulfomicrobium, and Desulfobulbus. However, five isolates grouped with the genus Desulfotomaculum were found to be gram-positive SRB. Most of the thiosulfate reducing isolates was affiliated with the phylum Firmicutes, including Clostridium and Fusibacter and also with the phylum Proteobacteria, including the genera Enterobacter and Citrobacter. Phylotypes related to Clostridium (69%) and Desulfovibrio (53%) dominated the community in the production water samples. This study demonstrates the diversity of the TRB and SRB that play a critical role in the souring mediated corrosion of the oil-water separation tanks in the north-eastern India oil fields. PMID:19427389

  5. Monitoring temporal opacity fluctuations of large structures with muon tomography : a calibration experiment using a water tower tank

    E-print Network

    Kevin Jourde; Dominique Gibert; Jacques Marteau; Jean de Bremond d'Ars; Serge Gardien; Claude Girerd; Jean-Christophe Ianigro

    2015-04-09

    The idea of using secondary cosmic muons to scan the internal structure of a given body has known significant developments since the first archaeological application by Alvarez and collaborators on the Gizah pyramids. Recent applications cover the fields of volcanology, hydrology, civil engineering, mining, archaeology etc. Muon radiography features are essentially identical to those of medical X-ray imaging techniques. It is a contrast densitometry method using the screening effect of the body under study on the natural flux of cosmic muons. This technique is non-invasive and complements the standard geophysical techniques, e.g. electrical tomography or gravimetry. It may be applied to a large variety of geological targets, among which the domes of active volcanoes. In this context muon tomography presents the noticeable advantage to perform measurements of large volumes, with a large aperture, from a distant point, far from the potentially dangerous zones. The same conclusions apply regarding the monitoring of the volcano's activity since muon tomography provides continuous data taking, provided the muon detectors are sufficiently well designed and autonomous. Recent measurements on La Soufri\\`ere of Guadeloupe (Lesser Antilles, France) show, over a one year period, large modulations of the crossing muon flux, correlated with an increase of the activity in the dome. In order to firmly establish the sensitivity of the method and of our detectors and to disentangle the effects on the muon flux modulations induced by the volcano's hydrothermal system from those induced by other sources, e.g. atmospheric temperature and pressure, we perform a dedicated calibration experiment inside a water tower tank. We show how the method is fully capable of dynamically following fast variations in the density.

  6. 456 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON CONTROL SYSTEMS TECHNOLOGY, VOL. 8, NO. 3, MAY 2000 The Quadruple-Tank Process: A Multivariable

    E-print Network

    Johansson, Karl Henrik

    . The process is called the quadruple-tank process and consists of four interconnected water tanks and two pumps are the water levels in the lower two tanks. The quadruple-tank process can easily be build by using two double-tank456 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON CONTROL SYSTEMS TECHNOLOGY, VOL. 8, NO. 3, MAY 2000 The Quadruple-Tank

  7. Selecting downscaled climate projections for water resource impacts and adaptation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidal, Jean-Philippe; Hingray, Benoît

    2015-04-01

    Increasingly large ensembles of global and regional climate projections are being produced and delivered to the climate impact community. However, such an enormous amount of information can hardly been dealt with by some impact models due to computational constraints. Strategies for transparently selecting climate projections are therefore urgently needed for informing small-scale impact and adaptation studies and preventing potential pitfalls in interpreting ensemble results from impact models. This work proposes results from a selection approach implemented for an integrated water resource impact and adaptation study in the Durance river basin (Southern French Alps). A large ensemble of 3000 daily transient gridded climate projections was made available for this study. It was built from different runs of 4 ENSEMBLES Stream2 GCMs, statistically downscaled by 3 probabilistic methods based on the K-nearest neighbours resampling approach (Lafaysse et al., 2014). The selection approach considered here exemplifies one of the multiple possible approaches described in a framework for identifying tailored subsets of climate projections for impact and adaptation studies proposed by Vidal & Hingray (2014). It was chosen based on the specificities of both the study objectives and the characteristics of the projection dataset. This selection approach aims at propagating as far as possible the relative contributions of the four different sources of uncertainties considered, namely GCM structure, large-scale natural variability, structure of the downscaling method, and catchment-scale natural variability. Moreover, it took the form of a hierarchical structure to deal with the specific constraints of several types of impact models (hydrological models, irrigation demand models and reservoir management models). The implemented 3-layer selection approach is therefore mainly based on conditioned Latin Hypercube sampling (Christierson et al., 2012). The choice of conditioning variables - climate change signal in temporally and spatially integrated variables - has been carefully made with respect their relevance for water resource management. This work proposes a twofold assessment of this selection approach. First, a climate validation allows checking the selection response of more extreme climate variables critical for hydrological impacts as well as spatially distributed ones. Second, a hydrological validation allows checking the selection response of streamflow variables relevant for water resource management. Findings highlight that such validations may critically help preventing misinterpretations and misuses of impact model ensemble outputs for integrated adaptation purposes. This work is part of the GICC R2D2-2050 project (Risk, water Resources and sustainable Development of the Durance catchment in 2050) and the EU FP7 COMPLEX project (Knowledge Based Climate Mitigation Systems for a Low Carbon Economy). Christierson, B. v., Vidal, J.-P., & Wade, S. D. (2012) Using UKCP09 probabilistic climate information for UK water resource planning}. J. Hydrol., {424-425}, 48-67. doi: 10.1016/j.jhydrol.2011.12.020} Lafaysse, M.; Hingray, B.; Terray, L.; Mezghani, A. & Gailhard, J. (2014) Internal variability and model uncertainty components in future hydrometeorological projections: The Alpine Durance basin. Water Resour. Res., {50}, 3317-3341. doi: 10.1002/2013WR014897 Vidal, J.-P. & Hingray, B. (2014) A framework for identifying tailored subsets of climate projections for impact and adaptation studies. EGU2014-7851

  8. TOP VIEW OF CYANIDE PLANT FOUNDATIONS, ZINC BOXES, TANKS, AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    TOP VIEW OF CYANIDE PLANT FOUNDATIONS, ZINC BOXES, TANKS, AND TAILINGS PILES, LOOKING SOUTHWEST FROM MAIN ACCESS ROAD. THE FOUNDATIONS AT CENTER SUPPORTED SIX 25 FT. OR GREATER DIAMETER SETTLING TANKS. IN THE FOREGROUND ARE REMAINS OF TWO PREPARATION TANKS AT LEFT NEXT TO A BUILDING FOOTPRINT AT RIGHT. ZINC BOXES ARE JUST ABOVE THE PREPARATION TANKS ON LEFT. THE WATER TANK AT CENTER IS NEARBY A SHAFT. THE COLLAPSED TANK JUST IN FRONT OF THE WATER TANK IS ANOTHER WATER HOLDING TANK THAT CONNECTS DIRECTLY TO THE PIPELINE THAT CARRIED WATER FROM A NEARBY SPRING A QUARTER MILE OFF TO THE RIGHT (SEE CA-291-41 FOR DETAIL). THE LEFT OF THE CENTER WATER TANK IS A LARGE TAILINGS PILE. DEATH VALLEY IS IN THE DISTANCE. SEE CA-291-53 (CT) FOR IDENTICAL COLOR TRANSPARENCY. - Keane Wonder Mine, Park Route 4 (Daylight Pass Cutoff), Death Valley Junction, Inyo County, CA

  9. TOP VIEW OF CYANIDE PLANT FOUNDATIONS. ZINC BOXES, TANKS, AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    TOP VIEW OF CYANIDE PLANT FOUNDATIONS. ZINC BOXES, TANKS, AND TAILINGS PILES, LOOKING SOUTHWEST FROM MAIN ACCESS ROAD. THE FOUNDATIONS AT CENTER SUPPORTED SIX 25 FT. OR GREATER DIAMETER SETTLING TANKS. IN THE FOREGROUND ARE REMAINS OF TWO PREPARATION TANKS AT LEFT NEXT TO A BUILDING FOOTPRINT AT RIGHT. ZINC BOXES ARE JUST ABOVE THE PREPARATION TANKS ON LEFT. THE WATER TANK AT CENTER IS NEARBY A SHAFT. THE COLLAPSED TANK JUST IN FRONT OF THE WATER TANK IS ANOTHER WATER HOLDING TANK THAT CONNECTS DIRECTLY TO THE PIPELINE THAT CARRIED WATER FROM A NEARBY SPRING A QUARTER MILE OFF TO THE RIGHT (SEE CA-291-41 FOR DETAIL). THE LEFT OF THE CENTER WATER TANK IS A LARGE TAILINGS PILE. DEATH VALLEY IS IN THE DISTANCE. SEE CA-291-40 FOR IDENTICAL B&W NEGATIVE. - Keane Wonder Mine, Park Route 4 (Daylight Pass Cutoff), Death Valley Junction, Inyo County, CA

  10. Science in an Integrated Primary School Project on Water: Part 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ward, Alan

    1984-01-01

    Describes water-related activities in an elementary school science project. These activities focus on electric generators, rainfall, erosion, floating, water conservation, and other areas. Brief comments on developing such a project are included. (JN)

  11. 71 FR 20072 - Clarke County Water Supply Project, Clarke County, IA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2006-04-19

    ...DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Natural Resources Conservation...Service Clarke County Water Supply Project, Clarke...U.S. Department of Agriculture gives notice that an...for the Clarke County Water Supply Project,...

  12. Problems #3, Math 204, Dr. M. Bohner. Sep 10, 2003. Due Sep 15, 11 am. 12. A tank has ten gallons of water in which two pounds of salt has been dissolved. Brine with

    E-print Network

    Bohner, Martin

    Problems #3, Math 204, Dr. M. Bohner. Sep 10, 2003. Due Sep 15, 11 am. 12. A tank has ten gallons of water in which two pounds of salt has been dissolved. Brine with 1.5 pound of salt per gallon enters. Find the amount of salt in the tank at any time, given that (a) x = 3 (b) x = 4 (c) x = 2. 13

  13. Project health and safety plan for the Gunite and Associated Tanks at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Abston, J.P.

    1997-04-01

    The Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc. (Energy Systems) policy is to provide a safe and healthful workplace for all employees and subcontractors. The accomplishment of this policy requires that operations at the Gunite and Associated Tanks (GAAT) in the North and South Tank Farms (NTF and STF) at the Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge National Laboratory are guided by an overall plan and consistent proactive approach to health and safety (H and S) issues. The policy and procedures in this plan apply to all GAAT operations in the NTF and STF. The provisions of this plan are to be carried out whenever activities identifies s part of the GAAT are initiated that could be a threat to human health or the environment. This plan implements a policy and establishes criteria for the development of procedures for day-to-day operations to prevent or minimize any adverse impact to the environment and personnel safety and health and to meet standards that define acceptable management of hazardous and radioactive materials and wastes. The plan is written to utilize past experience and best management practices in order to minimize hazards to human health or the environment from events such as fires, explosions, falls, mechanical hazards, or any unplanned release of hazardous or radioactive materials to the air. This plan explains additional task-specific health and safety requirements such as the Site Safety and health Addendum and Activity Hazard Analysis, which should be used in concert with this plan and existing established procedures.

  14. Requirements Verification Report AN Farm to 200 E Waste Transfer System for Project W-314 Tank Farm Restoration & Safe Operations

    SciTech Connect

    MCGREW, D.L.

    2001-10-31

    This Requirements Verification Report provides the traceability of how Project W-314 fulfilled the Project Development Specification requirements for the AN Farm to 200E Waste Transfer System Upgrade package.

  15. Tank characterization report for Single-Shell Tank B-111

    SciTech Connect

    Remund, K.M.; Tingey, J.M.; Heasler, P.G.; Toth, J.J.; Ryan, F.M.; Hartley, S.A.; Simpson, D.B.; Simpson, B.C.

    1994-09-01

    Tank 241-B-111 (hereafter referred to as B-111) is a 2,006,300 liter (530,000 gallon) single-shell waste tank located in the 200 East B tank farm at Hanford. Two cores were taken from this tank in 1991 and analysis of the cores was conducted by Battelle`s 325-A Laboratory in 1993. Characterization of the waste in this tank is being done to support Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) Milestone M-44-05. Tank B-111 was constructed in 1943 and put into service in 1945; it is the second tank in a cascade system with Tanks B-110 and B-112. During its process history, B-111 received mostly second-decontamination-cycle waste and fission products waste via the cascade from Tank B-110. This tank was retired from service in 1976, and in 1978 the tank was assumed to have leaked 30,300 liters (8,000 gallons). The tank was interim stabilized and interim isolated in 1985. The tank presently contains approximately 893,400 liters (236,000 gallons) of sludge-like waste and approximately 3,800 liters (1,000 gallons) of supernate. Historically, there are no unreviewed safety issues associated with this tank and none were revealed after reviewing the data from the latest core sampling event in 1991. An extensive set of analytical measurements was performed on the core composites. The major constituents (> 0.5 wt%) measured in the waste are water, sodium, nitrate, phosphate, nitrite, bismuth, iron, sulfate and silicon, ordered from largest concentration to the smallest. The concentrations and inventories of these and other constituents are given. Since Tanks B-110 and B-111 have similar process histories, their sampling results were compared. The results of the chemical analyses have been compared to the dangerous waste codes in the Washington Dangerous Waste Regulations (WAC 173-303). This assessment was conducted by comparing tank analyses against dangerous waste characteristics `D` waste codes; and against state waste codes.

  16. 49 CFR 179.500-14 - Test of tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...Specification for Cryogenic Liquid Tank Car Tanks and Seamless Steel Tanks (Classes DOT-113 and 107A) § 179.500-14 Test...heat-treatment, tanks shall be subjected to hydrostatic tests in a water jacket, or by other accurate method, operated so...

  17. Ferrocyanide tank safety program: Cesium uptake capacity of simulated ferrocyanide tank waste. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Burgeson, I.E.; Bryan, S.A.

    1995-07-01

    The objective of this project is to determine the capacity for {sup 137}Cs uptake by mixed metal ferrocyanides present in Hanford Site waste tanks, and to assess the potential for aggregation of these {sup 137}Cs-exchanged materials to form ``hot-spots`` in the tanks. This research, performed at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for Westinghouse Hanford Company, stems from concerns regarding possible localized radiolytic heating within the tanks. After ferrocyanide was added to 18 high-level waste tanks in the 1950s, some of the ferrocyanide tanks received considerable quantities of saltcake waste that was rich in {sup 137}Cs. If radioactive cesium was exchanged and concentrated by the nickel ferrocyanide present in the tanks, the associated heating could cause tank temperatures to rise above the safety limits specified for the ferrocyanide-containing tanks, especially if the supernate in the tanks is pumped out and the waste becomes drier.

  18. Management of water extracted from carbon sequestration projects

    SciTech Connect

    Harto, C. B.; Veil, J. A. (Environmental Science Division)

    2011-03-11

    Throughout the past decade, frequent discussions and debates have centered on the geological sequestration of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}). For sequestration to have a reasonably positive impact on atmospheric carbon levels, the anticipated volume of CO{sub 2} that would need to be injected is very large (many millions of tons per year). Many stakeholders have expressed concern about elevated formation pressure following the extended injection of CO{sub 2}. The injected CO{sub 2} plume could potentially extend for many kilometers from the injection well. If not properly managed and monitored, the increased formation pressure could stimulate new fractures or enlarge existing natural cracks or faults, so the CO{sub 2} or the brine pushed ahead of the plume could migrate vertically. One possible tool for management of formation pressure would be to extract water already residing in the formation where CO{sub 2} is being stored. The concept is that by removing water from the receiving formations (referred to as 'extracted water' to distinguish it from 'oil and gas produced water'), the pressure gradients caused by injection could be reduced, and additional pore space could be freed up to sequester CO{sub 2}. Such water extraction would occur away from the CO{sub 2} plume to avoid extracting a portion of the sequestered CO{sub 2} along with the formation water. While water extraction would not be a mandatory component of large-scale carbon storage programs, it could provide many benefits, such as reduction of pressure, increased space for CO{sub 2} storage, and potentially, 'plume steering.' Argonne National Laboratory is developing information for the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) to evaluate management of extracted water. If water is extracted from geological formations designated to receive injected CO{sub 2} for sequestration, the project operator will need to identify methods for managing very large volumes of water most of which will contain large quantities of salt and other dissolved minerals. Produced water from oil and gas production also typically contains large quantities of dissolved solids. Therefore, many of the same practices that are established and used for managing produced water also may be applicable for extracted water. This report describes the probable composition of the extracted water that is removed from the formations, options for managing the extracted water, the pros and cons of those options, and some opportunities for beneficial use of the water. Following the introductory material in Chapter 1, the report is divided into chapters covering the following topics: (Chapter 2) examines the formations that are likely candidates for CO{sub 2} sequestration and provides a general evaluation of the geochemical characteristics of the formations; (Chapter 3) makes some preliminary estimates of the volume of water that could be extracted; (Chapter 4) provides a qualitative review of many potential technologies and practices for managing extracted water and for each technology or management practice, pros and cons are provided; (Chapter 5) explores the potential costs of water management; and (Chapter 6) presents the conclusions.

  19. Millimeter-wave radar scattering from the water surface : a wind-wave tank study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerin, Charles-Antoine; Boisot, Olivier; Pioch, Sébastien; Caulliez, Guillemette; Lalaurie, Jean-Claude; Fatras, Christophe; Borderies, Pierre

    2014-05-01

    We report on a recent experiment conducted in the large wind-wave tank of Marseille-Luminy aimed at characterizing the small-scale statistics of ocean- and river-like surfaces as well as their radar return at millimeter waves (Ka-band). Simultaneous measurements of waves elevations and slopes from gravity to capillarity-gravity scale as well as the corresponding Ka-band Normalised Radar Cross Section (NRCS) have been performed for various wind speeds and scattering configurations. For each wind speed, the incidence angle of the radar beam has been varied between 0 and 15 degrees away from nadir and several azimuthal directions with respect to wind have been investigated by step of 45 degrees. Based on this data set we have developed an original technique to estimate the directional wave number spectrum of the water surface from decimeter to millimeter scales. We show that the inclusion of surface current is crucial in the correct derivation of the omnidirectional spectrum and that a non-trivial angular spreading function can be obtained from the measurements of the up-wind and down-wind slope spectra, providing some additional reasonable assumptions. The resulting spectrum is compared with the high-frequency part of the classical oceanic models such as Elfouhaily unified spectrum and Kudryavtsev et al. spectrum. Some consistency tests are proposed to validate the surface model, which is then incorporated in classical analytical scattering models. The main qualitative features of the observed NRCS are a minimum of sensibility to wind speed around 7-8 degrees incidence, non-monotonic variations with incidence at small wind speeds and a marked up/cross wind asymetry. We show that the Physical Optics approximation provides a very satisfactory estimation of the NRCS as compared the experimental values at all wind speeds and azimuths, contrarily to the Geometrical Optics model which is found inaccurate even at the larger wind speeds. The unconventional behavior of the NRCS at small wind is well explained and predicted by a Bragg mechanism. Non-Gaussian corrections are included in the scattering model and their effect evaluated.

  20. Ground-water resources of Riverton irrigation project area, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morris, Donald Arthur; Hackett, O.M.; Vanlier, K.E.; Moulder, E.A.; Durum, W.H.

    1959-01-01

    The Riverton irrigation project area is in the northwestern part of the Wind River basin in west-central Wyoming. Because the annual precipitation is only about 9 inches, agriculture, which is the principal occupation in the area, is dependent upon irrigation. Irrigation by surface-water diversion was begum is 1906; water is now supplied to 77,716 acres and irrigation has been proposed for an additional 31,344 acres. This study of the geology and ground-water resources of the Riverton irrigation project, of adjacent irrigated land, and of nearby land proposed for irrigation was begun during the summer of 1948 and was completed in 1951. The purpose of the investigation was to evaluate the ground-water resources of the area and to study the factors that should be considered in the solution of drainage and erosional problems within the area. The Riverton irrigation project area is characterized by flat to gently sloping stream terraces, which are flanked by a combination of badlands, pediment slopes, and broad valleys. These features were formed by long-continued erosion in an arid climate of the essentially horizontal, poorly consolidated beds of the Wind River formation. The principal streams of the area flow south-eastward. Wind River and Fivemile Creek are perennial streams and the others are intermittent. Ground-water discharge and irrigation return flow have created a major problem in erosion control along Fivemile Creek. Similar conditions might develop along Muddy and lower Cottonwood Creeks when land in their drainage basins is irrigated. The bedrock exposed in the area ranges in age from Late Cretaceous to early Tertiary (middle Eocene). The Wind River formation of early and middle Eocene age forms the uppermost bedrock formation in the greater part of the area. Unconsolidated deposits of Quaternary age, which consist of terrace gravel, colluvium, eolian sand and silt. and alluvium, mantle the Wind River formation in much of the area. In the irrigated parts of the project, water from domestic use is obtained chiefly from the sandstone beds of the Wind River formation although some is obtained from the alluvium underlying the bottom land and from the unconsolidated deposits underlying the lower terraces along the Wind River. Although adequate quantities if water for domestic use are available from the Wind River formation, there quantities are not considered to be large enough to warrant pumping of ground water for irrigation. Only a few wells are in the nonirrigated part of the area. When this new land is irrigated, a body of ground water will gradually form in the terrace deposits and the alluvial and colluvial-alluvial deposits. Eventually, the terrace deposits may yield adequate quantities of water for domestic and stock use, but only locally are the alluvial and colluvial-alluvial deposits likely to become suitable aquifers. In the Riverton irrigation project area, ground water occurs under water-table conditions near the surface and under artesian conditions in certain strata at both shallow and greater depths. Irrigation is the principal source of recharge to the shallow aquifers; the water level in wells that tap these aquifers fluctuates with irrigation. The depth to water in the shallow wells ranges from less than 1 foot to about 30 feet below the land surface, depending on the season of the year and on the length of time the land has been irrigated. The water level in the wells that tap the deep confined aquifers , which receive recharge indirectly from surface sources, fluctuates only slightly because the recharge and discharge are more constant. In most places the depth to water in wells penetrating the deep confined aquifers is mush greater than that in shallow wells. but in certain low areas water from the deep aquifers flows at the surface from wells. Ground water moves from the area of recharge in the direction of the hydraulic gradient and is discharges either by evapotranspiration; by inflow into streams, drains, or lakes; by pumping or flow of wells; or by flow of springs. Waterlogging and the a

  1. Performance of a solid oxide fuel cell CHP system coupled with a hot water storage tank for

    E-print Network

    Berning, Torsten

    a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) system for cogeneration of heat and power integrated with a stratified heat and returning the coldest fluid back to SOFC heat recovery heat-exchanger. A model of the SOFC system gradients over the tank height. The results of the numerical simulation are used to size the SOFC system

  2. Hydrodynamic and oxygen mass transfer studies in a three-phase (air–water–ionic liquid) stirred tank bioreactor

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. Torres-Martínez; R. Melgarejo-Torres; M. Gutiérrez-Rojas; L. Aguilera-Vázquez; M. Micheletti; G. J. Lye; S. Huerta-Ochoa

    2009-01-01

    Recently, room temperature ionic liquids have been investigated as organic solvent replacements in multiphase partitioning bioreactors. They could prove particularly useful for oxidative bioconversions due to their non-volatile and non-flammable nature. In order to promote high mass transfer rates stirred tank bioreactors are normally used. However, for multiphase systems, particularly those featuring ionic liquids, there is little hydrodynamic information available

  3. Technology Review of Nondestructive Methods for Examination of Water Intrusion Areas on Hanfordâs Double-Shell Waste Tanks

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michael L. Watkins; Allan F. Pardini

    2008-01-01

    Under a contract with CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc., PNNL has performed a review of the NDE technology and methods for examination of the concrete dome structure of Hanfordâs double-shell tanks. The objective was to provide a matrix of methodologies that could be evaluated based on applicability, ease of deployment, and results that could provide information that could be used

  4. CFD Simulation of SDHW Storage Tank with and Without Heater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhaumik, Mainak

    2012-07-01

    2D-Single Phase heat and fluid flow analysis of solar domestic hot water (SDHW) storage tank has been carried out by using CFD tools, ICEM for modelling & meshing and FLUENT for analysis. The tank fluid is in static mode. Heat diffusion and convective heat loss from the tank without heater and with the involvement of additional heater is studied. After heating water gets lighter and moves upward in the tank and cold denser water remains at the bottom of the tank. The movement of the water particles are also analysed to find the effect on heat transfer and heat loss. Time transient analysis is focused on for a constant fixed temperature of water inside the tank and the heat drop is captured. Investigation gives guidelines how long the water temperature can be maintain warmer within the tank while the tank is uninsulated. If it is required to maintain temperature constant then the involvement of heater can be useful in what extend.

  5. 18 CFR 401.36 - Water supply projects-Conservation requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Water supply projects-Conservation requirements...Section 401.36 Conservation of Power and Water Resources DELAWARE RIVER BASIN...

  6. 18 CFR 401.36 - Water supply projects-Conservation requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Water supply projects-Conservation requirements...Section 401.36 Conservation of Power and Water Resources DELAWARE RIVER BASIN...

  7. 18 CFR 401.36 - Water supply projects-Conservation requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2013-04-01 2012-04-01 true Water supply projects-Conservation requirements...Section 401.36 Conservation of Power and Water Resources DELAWARE RIVER BASIN...

  8. 18 CFR 401.36 - Water supply projects-Conservation requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Water supply projects-Conservation requirements...Section 401.36 Conservation of Power and Water Resources DELAWARE RIVER BASIN...

  9. 18 CFR 401.36 - Water supply projects-Conservation requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Water supply projects-Conservation requirements...Section 401.36 Conservation of Power and Water Resources DELAWARE RIVER BASIN...

  10. Florida River Project: Measuring discharge, sediment, and water chemistry

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Kim Hannula

    This is the data collection portion of a semester-long project. Before this lab, students will have graphed discharge data for one previous water year, graphed similar data collected by classes during a previous year, written one-page explanations of the techniques that they will be using, and speculated about the results they expect to get. After this lab, their data will be shared with other lab sections, which will have collected similar data at other sites along the same river. Each research group will present their preliminary data to the class during a later lab meeting, and the class will discuss how the different types of data relate to one another. The project culminates in a final paper (one per research group).

  11. Dual Tank Fuel System

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, Richard William (Albion, NY); Burkhard, James Frank (Churchville, NY); Dauer, Kenneth John (Avon, NY)

    1999-11-16

    A dual tank fuel system has primary and secondary fuel tanks, with the primary tank including a filler pipe to receive fuel and a discharge line to deliver fuel to an engine, and with a balance pipe interconnecting the primary tank and the secondary tank. The balance pipe opens close to the bottom of each tank to direct fuel from the primary tank to the secondary tank as the primary tank is filled, and to direct fuel from the secondary tank to the primary tank as fuel is discharged from the primary tank through the discharge line. A vent line has branches connected to each tank to direct fuel vapor from the tanks as the tanks are filled, and to admit air to the tanks as fuel is delivered to the engine.

  12. Operational Waste Volume Projection

    SciTech Connect

    STRODE, J.N.

    2000-08-28

    Waste receipts to the double-shell tank system are analyzed and wastes through the year 2015 are projected based on generation trends of the past 12 months. A computer simulation of site operations is performed, which results in projections of tank fill schedules, tank transfers, evaporator operations, tank retrieval, and aging waste tank usage. This projection incorporates current budget planning and the clean-up schedule of the Tri-Party Agreement. Assumptions were current as of June. 2000.

  13. Modelling income distribution impacts of water sector projects in Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, C S; Jones, S

    1991-09-01

    Dynamic analysis was conducted to assess the long-term impacts of water sector projects on agricultural income distribution, and sensitivity analysis was conducted to check the robustness of the 5 assumptions in this study of income distribution and water sector projects in Bangladesh. 7 transitions are analyzed for mutually exclusive irrigation and flooding projects: Nonirrigation to 1) LLP irrigation, 2) STW irrigation, 3) DTW irrigation, 4) major gravity irrigation, and manually operated shallow tubewell irrigation (MOSTI) and Flood Control Projects (FCD) of 6) medium flooded to shallow flooded, and 7) deeply flooded to shallow flooded. 5 analytical stages are involved: 1) farm budgets are derived with and without project cropping patterns for each transition. 2) Estimates are generated for value added/hectare from each transition. 3) Assumptions are made about the number of social classes, distribution of land ownership between classes, extent of tenancy for each social class, term of tenancy contracts, and extent of hiring of labor for each social class. 4) Annual value added/hectare is distributed among social classes. 5) Using Gini coefficients and simple ratios, the distribution of income between classes is estimated for with and without transition. Assumption I is that there are 4 social classes defined by land acreage: large farmers (5 acres), medium farmers (1.5-5.0), small farmers, (.01-1.49), and landless. Assumption II is that land distribution follows the 1978 Land Occupancy Survey (LOS). Biases, if any, are indicated. Assumption III is that large farmers sharecrop out 15% of land to small farmers. Assumption IV is that landlords provide nonirrigated crop land and take 50% of the crop, and, under irrigation, provide 50% of the fertilizer, pesticide, and irrigation costs and take 50% of the crop. Assumption V is that hired and family labor is assumed to be 40% for small farmers, 60% for medium farmers, and 80% for large farmers. It is understood that the analysis is partially complete, since there if no Assessment of the impact on nonagricultural income and employment, or secondary impacts such as demand for irrigation equipment, services for processing, manufacture and transport services, or investment of new agricultural surpluses. Few empirical studies have been done and the estimates apply only to individual project areas. The results show that inequality is greatest with major (gravity) irrigation, followed by STW, DTW and LLP, FCD (medium to shallow), FCD (deep to shallow), and the most equitable MOSTI. Changes in the absolute income accruing to the rural poor would lead to the rank of major gravity irrigation as raising more above the poverty line, followed by MOSTI, minor irritation (STW, DTW, and LLP), and FCD schemes. PMID:12317341

  14. Assessment of petroleum-hydrocarbon contamination in the surficial sediments and ground water at three former underground storage tank locations, Fort Jackson, South Carolina, 1995

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robertson, J.F.

    1996-01-01

    Ground-water and sediment contamination by petroleum hydrocarbons resulting from leaks and overfills was detected during tank removal activities at three former underground storage tank locations at Fort Jackson, near Columbia, South Carolina. Investigations were initiated to assess the effect of contamination to the surficial aquifer at Sites 1062, 2438, and 2444. These investigations involved the installation of permanent monitoring wells and the collection and analysis of sediment and ground-water samples at the three sites. Water-level data were collected at all sites to determine hydraulic gradients and the direction of ground-water flow. In addition, aquifer tests were made at Site 1062 to determine the hydraulic conductivity of the surficial aquifer at that site. Sediment borings were made at the three sites to collect subsurface-sediment samples for lithologic description and laboratory analyses, and for the installation of ground-water monitoring wells. Laboratory analyses of sediment samples collected from boreholes at Site 1062 indicated elevated concentrations of petroleum hydrocarbons at three locations. Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons - Diesel Range Organics were detected at one borehole at a concentration of 388,000 micrograms per kilogram. Total benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene concentrations in sediment from the site ranged from less than 350 to over 100,000 micrograms per kilogram. Total lead was detected at concentrations ranging from 2,900 to 5,900 micrograms per kilogram. Petroleum hydrocarbons were detected at Site 2438 in one borehole at a trace concentration of 112 micrograms per kilogram of para- and meta-xylenes. No concentrations exceeding the detection limits were reported for petroleum hydrocarbons in sediment samples collected from Site 2444; however, total lead was detected in sediment samples from two boreholes, each at concentrations of 600 micrograms per kilogram. Ground-water samples were collected from each site for laboratory analysis and field-property determinations. Petroleum hydrocarbons and lead were detected at concentrations exceeding regulatory limits for drinking water in ground water from Site 1062 only. Petroleum hydrocarbons were detected in ground water from three wells at Site 1062, with the highest concentrations occurring in the area of the former underground storage tanks. Benzene was detected at concentrations as much as 28 micrograms per liter; toluene as much as 558 micrograms per liter; para- and meta-xylenes as much as 993 micrograms per liter; and naphthalene as much as 236 micrograms per liter. Ethylbenzene and ortho-xylene were detected in one well at concentrations of 70 and 6 micrograms per liter, respectively. Dissolved lead was detected in ground water from four wells at concentrations from 5 to 152 micrograms per liter. Analysis of ground-water samples collected from Sites 2438 and 2444 showed little evidence of petroleum-hydrocarbon contamination. Petroleum hydrocarbons were not detected in any of the ground-water samples collected from Site 2438. With the exception of a low concentration of naphthalene (11 micrograms per liter) detected in ground water from one well, petroleum hydrocarbons and lead were not detected in ground water collected from Site 2444.

  15. Green River Formation water flood demonstration project. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Pennington, B.I.; Dyer, J.E.; Lomax, J.D. [Inland Resources, Inc. (United States); [Lomax Exploration Co., Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Deo, M.D. [Utah Univ., Salt Lake City, UT (United States). Dept. of Chemical and Fuels Engineering

    1996-11-01

    The objectives of the project were to understand the oil production mechanisms in the Monument Butte unit via reservoir characterization and reservoir simulations and to transfer the water flooding technology to similar units in the vicinity, particularly the Travis and the Boundary units. The reservoir characterization activity in the project basically consisted of extraction and analysis of a full diameter core, Formation Micro Imaging (FMI) logs from several wells and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) logs from two wells. In addition, several side-wall cores were drilled and analyzed, oil samples from a number of wells were physically and chemically characterized (using high-temperature gas chromatography), oil-water relative permeabilities were measured and pour points and cloud points of a few oil samples were determined. The reservoir modeling activity comprised of reservoir simulation of all the three units at different scales and near well-bore modeling of the wax precipitation effects. The reservoir simulation activities established the extent of pressurization of the sections of the reservoirs in the immediate vicinity of the Monument Butte unit. This resulted in a major expansion of the unit and the production from this expanded unit increased from about 300 barrels per day to about 2,000 barrels per day.

  16. Safety review of the DCS (Distributed Control System) controlled full scale SRAT/SME (Sludge Receipt Adjustment Tank/Slurry Mix Evaporator) for water runs

    SciTech Connect

    Hacker, B.A.

    1988-01-29

    This memorandum addresses safety concerns of the Full Scale Sludge Receipt Adjustment Tank/Slurry Mix Evaporator (SRAT/SME) resulting from the installation of the new Distributed Control System (DCS). The present configuration of the SRAT/SME with DCS has been determined to be safe for operational testing with water. Another memorandum will be written after experience has been gained during water runs for actual operation. Previous safety evaluations and process hazard reviews for this facility have addressed normal industrial safety hazards and hazards associated with formic acid handling and operation with organics in the feed. Process operation with the new DCS controls will be very similar to the earlier operation controlled by the Modicon programmable logic controller (PLC). The interlocks for the SRAT/SME that were in the PLC have been programmed into the new DCS and will be reviewed here. 6 refs.

  17. View of Stand Pipe (Surge Tank) from FS 502. Looking ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of Stand Pipe (Surge Tank) from FS 502. Looking northeast - Childs-Irving Hydroelectric Project, Childs System, Stand Pipe (Surge Tank), Forest Service Road 708/502, Camp Verde, Yavapai County, AZ

  18. Soil Management Plan For The Potable Water System Upgrades Project

    SciTech Connect

    Field, S. M.

    2007-04-01

    This plan describes and applies to the handling and management of soils excavated in support of the Y-12 Potable Water Systems Upgrades (PWSU) Project. The plan is specific to the PWSU Project and is intended as a working document that provides guidance consistent with the 'Soil Management Plan for the Oak Ridge Y-12 National Security Complex' (Y/SUB/92-28B99923C-Y05) and the 'Record of Decision for Phase II Interim Remedial Actions for Contaminated Soils and Scrapyard in Upper East Fork Popular Creek, Oak Ridge, Tennessee' (DOE/OR/01-2229&D2). The purpose of this plan is to prevent and/or limit the spread of contamination when moving soil within the Y-12 complex. The major feature of the soil management plan is the decision tree. The intent of the decision tree is to provide step-by-step guidance for the handling and management of soil from excavation of soil through final disposition. The decision tree provides a framework of decisions and actions to facilitate Y-12 or subcontractor decisions on the reuse of excavated soil on site and whether excavated soil can be reused on site or managed as waste. Soil characterization results from soil sampling in support of the project are also presented.

  19. Calico Tanks

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    A view of the Calico Tanks, a sandstone formation in Red Rock Canyon. Red Rock Canyon is a National Conservation Area managed by the Bureau of Land Management, located just outside of Las Vegas, Nevada. It is part of the Mojave Desert....

  20. Petroleum Tank

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Petroleum first saw widespread use in the transporation industry as a lubricant. It was refined into various products depending on which part of the engine they were meant to lubricate. Once transported by tanker car, it was stored in large tanks such as this one....

  1. Suspending Zeolite Particles In Tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Poirier, M.R.

    1999-01-19

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) is in the process of removing waste (sludge and salt cake) from million gallon waste tanks. The current practice for removing waste from the tanks is adding water, agitating the tanks with long shaft vertical centrifugal pumps, and pumping the sludge/salt solution from the tank to downstream treatment processes. This practice has left sludge heels ({tilde} 30,000 gallons) in the bottom of the tanks. SRS is evaluating shrouded axial impeller mixers for removing the sludge heels in the waste tanks. The authors conducted a test program to determine mixer requirements for suspending sludge heels using the shrouded axial impeller mixers. The tests were performed with zeolite in scaled tanks which have diameters of 1.5, 6.0, and 18.75 feet. The mixer speeds required to suspend zeolite particles were measured at each scale. The data were analyzed with various scaling methods to compare their ability to describe the suspension of insoluble solids with the mixers and to apply the data to a full-scale waste tank. The impact of changes in particle properties and operating parameters was also evaluated. The conclusions of the work are: Scaling of the suspension of fast settling zeolite particles was best described by the constant power per unit volume method. Increasing the zeolite particle concentration increased the required mixer power needed to suspend the particles. Decreasing the zeolite particle size from 0.7 mm ? 0.3 mm decreased the required mixer power needed to suspend the particles. Increasing the number of mixers in the tank decreased the required mixer power needed to suspend the particles. A velocity of 1.6 ft/sec two inches above the tank bottom is needed to suspend zeolite particles.

  2. 49 CFR 179.400-18 - Test of inner tank.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...Specification for Cryogenic Liquid Tank Car Tanks and Seamless Steel Tanks (Classes DOT-113 and 107A) § 179.400-18...test the container and piping must be emptied of all water and purged of all water vapor. (b) Caulking of welded joints to...

  3. Give Water a Hand. School Site Action Guide. Organizing Water Conservation and Pollution Prevention Service Projects in Your Community.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wisconsin Univ., Madison. Coll. of Agricultural and Life Sciences.

    Students grades 4-8 can use this guide to explore the topics of water, and water conservation at a school site, while conducting an environmental community service project. Youth groups, led by a group leader, work with local experts from business, government, or environmental organizations to complete the project. Nine activity sections involve…

  4. Give Water a Hand. Home Site Action Guide. Organizing Water Conservation and Pollution Prevention Service Projects in Your Community.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wisconsin Univ., Madison. Coll. of Agricultural and Life Sciences.

    Students grades 4-8 can use this guide to explore the topics of water and water conservation within the home while conducting an environmental community service project. Youth groups, led by a group leader, work with local experts from business, government, or environmental organizations to complete the project. Nine activity sections involve…

  5. Give Water a Hand. Community Site Action Guide. Organizing Water Conservation and Pollution Prevention Service Projects in Your Community.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wisconsin Univ., Madison. Coll. of Agricultural and Life Sciences.

    Students grades 4-8 can use this guide to explore the topics of water, and water conservation within a community, while conducting an environmental community service project. Youth groups, led by a group leader, work with local experts from business, government, or environmental organizations to complete the project. Nine activity sections involve…

  6. ANALYSIS OF SAMPLES FROM TANK 6F CHEMICAL CLEANING

    SciTech Connect

    Poirier, M.; Fink, S.

    2010-02-02

    Savannah River Remediation (SRR) is preparing Tank 6F for closure. The first step in preparing the tank for closure is mechanical sludge removal. In mechanical sludge removal, personnel add liquid (e.g., inhibited water or supernate salt solution) to the tank to form a slurry. They mix the liquid and sludge with pumps, and transfer the slurry to another tank for further processing. Mechanical sludge removal effectively removes the bulk of the sludge from a tank, but is not able to remove all of the sludge. In Tank 6F, SRR estimated a sludge heel of 5,984 gallons remained after mechanical sludge removal. To remove this sludge heel, SRR performed chemical cleaning. The chemical cleaning included two oxalic acid strikes, a spray wash, and a water wash. SRR conducted the first oxalic acid strike as follows. Personnel added 110,830 gallons of 8 wt % oxalic acid to Tank 6F and mixed the contents of Tank 6F with two submersible mixer pumps (SMPs) for approximately four days. Following the mixing, they transferred 115,903 gallons of Tank 6F material to Tank 7F. The SMPs were operating when the transfer started and were shut down approximately five hours after the transfer started. SRR collected a sample of the liquid from Tank 6F and submitted it to SRNL for analysis. Mapping of the tank following the transfer indicated that 2,400 gallons of solids remained in the tank. SRR conducted the second oxalic acid strike as follows. Personnel added 28,881 gallons of 8 wt % oxalic acid to Tank 6F. Following the acid addition, they visually inspected the tank and transferred 32,247 gallons of Tank 6F material to Tank 7F. SRR collected a sample of the liquid from Tank 6F and submitted it to SRNL for analysis. Mapping of the tank following the transfer indicated that 3,248 gallons of solids remained in the tank. Following the oxalic acid strikes, SRR performed Spray Washing with oxalic acid to remove waste collected on internal structures, cooling coils, tank top internals, and tank walls. The Acid Spray Wash was followed by a Water Spray Wash to remove oxalic acid from the tank internals. SRR conducted the Spray Wash as follows. Personnel added 4,802 gallons of 8 wt % oxalic acid to Tank 6F through the spray mast installed in Riser 2, added 4,875 gallons of oxalic acid through Riser 7, added 5,000 gallons of deionized water into the tank via Riser 2, and 5,000 gallons of deionized water into the tank via Riser 7. Following the Spray Wash, they visually inspected the tank and transferred 22,430 gallons of Tank 6F material to Tank 7F. SRR collected a sample of the liquid from Tank 6F and submitted it to SRNL for analysis. Following the Spray Wash and transfer, Savannah River Site (SRS) added 113,935 gallons of well water to Tank 6F. They mixed the tank contents with a single SMP and transferred 112,699 gallons from Tank 6F to Tank 7F. SRR collected a sample of the liquid from Tank 6F and submitted to SRNL for analysis. Mapping of the tank following the transfer indicated that 3,488 gallons of solids remained in the tank. Following the Water Wash, SRR personnel collected a solid sample and submitted it to SRNL for analysis to assess the effectiveness of the chemical cleaning and to provide a preliminary indication of the composition of the material remaining in the tank.

  7. 49 CFR 179.100-18 - Tests of tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... (a) Each tank shall be tested by completely filling tank and manway nozzle with water or other liquid having similar viscosity, at a temperature which shall not exceed 100 °F during the test; and applying the pressure prescribed in §...

  8. 49 CFR 179.100-18 - Tests of tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... (a) Each tank shall be tested by completely filling tank and manway nozzle with water or other liquid having similar viscosity, at a temperature which shall not exceed 100 °F during the test; and applying the pressure prescribed in §...

  9. FY 1996 Tank waste analysis plan

    SciTech Connect

    Homi, C.S.

    1996-09-18

    This Tank Waste Analysis Plan (TWAP) describes the activities of the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Characterization Project to plan, schedule, obtain, and document characterization information on Hanford waste tanks. This information is required to meet several commitments of Programmatic End-Users and the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, also known as the Tri-Party Agreement. This TWAP applies to the activities scheduled to be completed in fiscal year 1996.

  10. Stabilization of In-Tank Residual Wastes and External-Tank Soil Contamination for the Hanford Tank Closure Program: Applications to the AX Tank Farm

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. L. Anderson; B. P. Dwyer; C. Ho; J. L. Krumhansl; G. McKeen; M. A. Molecke; H. R. Westrich; P. Zhang

    1998-01-01

    Technical support for the Hanford Tank Closure Program focused on evaluation of concepts for immobilization of residual contaminants in the Hanford AX tanks and underlying soils, and identification of cost-effective approaches to improve long-term performance of AX tank farm cIosure systems. Project objectives are to develop materials or engineered systems that would significantly reduce the radionuclide transport to the groundwater

  11. HANFORD SITE RIVER PROTECTION PROJECT (RPP) TRANSURANIC (TRU) TANK WASTE IDENTIFICATION & PLANNING FOR REVRIEVAL TREATMENT & EVENTUAL DISPOSAL AT WIPP

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. G. KRISTOFZSKI; R. TEDESCHI; M. E. JOHNSON; M JENNINGS

    2006-01-01

    The CH2M HILL Manford Group, Inc. (CHG) conducts business to achieve the goals of the Office of River Protection (ORP) at Hanford. As an employee owned company, CHG employees have a strong motivation to develop innovative solutions to enhance project and company performance while ensuring protection of human health and the environment. CHG is responsible to manage and perform work

  12. Tank characterization report for double-shell tank 241-AN-102

    SciTech Connect

    Jo, J., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-08-29

    This characterization report summarizes the available information on the historical uses, current status, and sampling and analysis results of waste stored in double-shell underground storage tank 241- AN-102. This report supports the requirements of the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, Milestone M-44-09 (Ecology et al. 1996). Tank 241-AN-102 is one of seven double-shell tanks located in the AN Tank Farm in the Hanford Site 200 East Area. The tank was hydrotested in 1981, and when the water was removed, a 6-inch heel was left. Tank 241-AN-102 began receiving waste from tank 241-SY-102 beginning in 1982. The tank was nearly emptied in the third quarter of 1983, leaving only 125 kL (33 kgal) of waste. Between the fourth quarter of 1983 and the first quarter of 1984, tank 241-AN-102 received waste from tanks 241-AY-102, 241-SY-102, 241-AW-105, and 241- AN-101. The tank was nearly emptied in the second quarter of 1984, leaving a heel of 129 kL (34 kgal). During the second and third quarters of 1984, the tank was filled with concentrated complexant waste from tank 241-AW-101. Since that time, only minor amounts of Plutonium-Uranium Extraction (PUREX) Plant miscellaneous waste and water have been received; there have been no waste transfer to or from the tank since 1992. Therefore, the waste currently in the tank is considered to be concentrated complexant waste. Tank 241-AN-102 is sound and is not included on any of the Watch Lists.

  13. Double Shell Tank (DST) Transfer Valving Subsystem Specification

    SciTech Connect

    GRAVES, C.E.

    2000-03-22

    This specification establishes the performance requirements and provides references to the requisite codes and standards to be applied during design of the Double-Shell Tank (DST) Transfer Valving Subsystem that supports the first phase of Waste Feed Delivery. This specification establishes the performance requirements and provides references to the requisite codes and standards to be applied during design of the Double-Shell Tank (DST) Transfer Valving Subsystem that supports the first phase of Waste Feed Delivery (WFD). The DST Transfer Valving Subsystem routes waste and other media (e.g., diluent, flush water, filtered raw water) among DSTs and from the low-activity waste (LAW) and high-level waste (HLW) feed staging tanks to the River Protection Project (RPP) Privatization Contractor facility, where it will be processed into an immobilized waste form. This specification is intended to be the basis for new projects/installations (W-521, etc.). This specification is not intended to retroactively affect previously established project design criteria without specific direction by the program.

  14. Tank Insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    For NASA's Apollo program, McDonnell Douglas Astronautics Company, Huntington Beach, California, developed and built the S-IVB, uppermost stage of the three-stage Saturn V moonbooster. An important part of the development task was fabrication of a tank to contain liquid hydrogen fuel for the stage's rocket engine. The liquid hydrogen had to be contained at the supercold temperature of 423 degrees below zero Fahrenheit. The tank had to be perfectly insulated to keep engine or solar heat from reaching the fuel; if the hydrogen were permitted to warm up, it would have boiled off, or converted to gaseous form, reducing the amount of fuel available to the engine. McDonnell Douglas' answer was a supereffective insulation called 3D, which consisted of a one-inch thickness of polyurethane foam reinforced in three dimensions with fiberglass threads. Over a 13-year development and construction period, the company built 30 tanks and never experienced a failure. Now, after years of additional development, an advanced version of 3D is finding application as part of a containment system for transporting Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) by ship.

  15. Sampling plan to support HLW tank 16

    SciTech Connect

    Rodwell, P.O.; Martin, B.

    1997-10-30

    Plans are to remove the residual waste from the annulus of High-Level Waste Tank 16, located in the H-Area Tank Farm, in 1998. The interior of the tank is virtually clean. In the late 1970`s, the waste was removed from the interior of the tank by several campaigns of waste removal with slurry pumps, spray washing, and oxalic acid cleaning. The annulus of the tank at one time had several thousand gallons of waste salt, which had leaked from the tank interior. Some of this salt was removed by adding water to the annulus and circulating, but much of the salt remains in the annulus. In order to confirm the source term used for fate and transport modeling, samples of the tank interior and annulus will be obtained and analyzed. If the results of the analyses indicate that the data used for the initial modeling is bounding then no changes will be made to the model. However, if the results indicate that the source term is higher than that assumed in the initial modeling, thus not bounding, additional modeling will be performed. The purpose of this Plan is to outline the approach to sampling the annulus and interior of Tank 16 as a prerequisite to salt removal in the annulus and closure of the entire tank system. The sampling and analysis of this tank system must be robust to reasonably ensure the actual tank residual is within the bounds of analysis error.

  16. Catchment Area Treatment (CAT) Plan and Crop Area Optimization for Integrated Management in a Water Resource Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaiswal, R. K.; Thomas, T.; Galkate, R. V.; Ghosh, N. C.; Singh, S.

    2013-09-01

    A scientifically developed catchment area treatment (CAT) plan and optimized pattern of crop areas may be the key for sustainable development of water resource, profitability in agriculture and improvement of overall economy in drought affected Bundelkhand region of Madhya Pradesh (India). In this study, an attempt has been made to develop a CAT plan using spatial variation of geology, geomorphology, soil, drainage, land use in geographical information system for selection of soil and water conservation measures and crop area optimization using linear programming for maximization of return considering water availability, area affinity, fertilizers, social and market constraints in Benisagar reservoir project of Chhatarpur district (M.P.). The scientifically developed CAT plan based on overlaying of spatial information consists of 58 mechanical measure (49 boulder bunds, 1 check dam, 7 cully plug and 1 percolation tank), 2.60 km2 land for agro forestry, 2.08 km2 land for afforestation in Benisagar dam and 67 mechanical measures (45 boulder bunds and 22 gully plugs), 7.79 km2 land for agro forestry, 5.24 km2 land for afforestation in Beniganj weir catchment with various agronomic measures for agriculture areas. The linear programming has been used for optimization of crop areas in Benisagar command for sustainable development considering various scenarios of water availability, efficiencies, affinity and fertilizers availability in the command. Considering present supply condition of water, fertilizers, area affinity and making command self sufficient in most of crops, the net benefit can be increase to Rs. 1.93 crores from 41.70 km2 irrigable area in Benisagar command by optimizing cropping pattern and reducing losses during conveyance and application of water.

  17. 49 CFR 172.331 - Bulk packagings other than portable tanks, cargo tanks, tank cars and multi-unit tank car tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...packagings other than portable tanks, cargo tanks, tank cars and multi-unit tank car tanks. 172.331 Section 172.331 Transportation...packagings other than portable tanks, cargo tanks, tank cars and multi-unit tank car tanks. (a)...

  18. Norway's historical and projected water balance in TWh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haddeland, Ingjerd; Holmqvist, Erik

    2015-04-01

    Hydroelectric power production is closely linked to the water cycle, and variations in power production numbers reflect variations in weather. The expected climate changes will influence electricity supply through changes in annual and seasonal inflow of water to hydropower reservoirs. In Norway, more than 95 percent of the electricity production is from hydroelectric plants, and industry linked to hydropower has been an important part of the society for more than a century. Reliable information on historical and future available water resources is hence of crucial importance both for short and long-term planning and adaptation purposes in the hydropower sector. Traditionally, the Multi-area Power-market Simulator (EMPS) is used for modelling hydropower production in Norway. However, due to the models' high level of details and computational demand, this model is only used for historical analyses and a limited number of climate projections. A method has been developed that transfers water fluxes (mm day-1) and states (mm) into energy units (GWh mm-1), based on hydrological modelling of a limited number of catchments representing reservoir inflow to more than 700 hydropower plants in Norway. The advantages of using the conversion factor method, compared to EMPS, are its simplicity and low computational requirements. The main disadvantages are that it does not take into account flood losses and the time lag between inflow and power production. The method is used operationally for weekly and seasonal energy forecasts, and has proven successful at the range of results obtained for reproducing historical hydropower production numbers. In hydropower energy units, mean annual precipitation for the period 1981-2010 is estimated at 154 TWh year-1. On average, 24 TWh year-1 is lost through evapotranspiration, meaning runoff equals 130 TWh year-1. There are large interannual variations, and runoff available for power production ranges from 91 to 165 TWh year-1. The snow pack on average peaks in the middle of April at 54 TWh, ranging from 33 to 84 TWh. Given its simplicity, the method of using conversion factors is a time and computational efficient way of producing projections of hydropower production potential from an ensemble of climate model simulations. Regional climate model (RCM) projections are obtained from Euro-Cordex, and precipitation and temperature are bias corrected to observation based datasets at 1 km2. Preliminary results, based on an ensemble consisting of 16 members (8 RCMs, RCP4.5 and RCP8.5) and transient hydrological simulations for the period 1981-2100, indicate an increase in hydroelectric power production of up to 10 percent by the end of the century, given the effect of climate change alone. The expected increase in temperature causes a negative trend for the energy potential stored in the annual maximum snow pack. At the end of the century (2071-2100), the maximum snow pack holds 43 TWh and 30 TWh for RCP4.5 and RCP8.5, respectively, compared to 54 TWh in 1981-2010. The substantial decrease in the peak snow pack is reflected in the seasonally more even inflow to reservoirs expected in the next decades.

  19. GIS Analysis of Available Data to Identify regions in the U.S. Where Shallow Ground Water Supplies are Particularly Vulnerable to Contamination by Releases to Biofuels from Underground Storage Tanks

    EPA Science Inventory

    GIS analysis of available data to identify regions in the U.S. where shallow ground water supplies are particularly vulnerable to contamination by releases of biofuels from underground storage tanks. In this slide presentation, GIS was used to perform a simple numerical and ...

  20. 67 FR 48869 - Little Red River Water Management Project; White County, AR

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2002-07-26

    ...DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Natural Resources Conservation...Service Little Red River Water Management Project...U.S. Department of Agriculture, gives notice that an...for the creation of a water management plan to...

  1. 64 FR 9304 - Mill and Deer Creeks Water Exchange Projects; Determination of Primary Purpose of Program...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    1999-02-25

    ...DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Natural Resources Conservation...Mill and Deer Creeks Water Exchange Projects...if the Secretary of Agriculture determines that payments...conserving soil and water resources, protecting...The Secretary of Agriculture evaluates these...

  2. 62 FR 33392 - City of Albany, KY, Cagle Water Expansion Project; Final Environmental Impact Statement

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    1997-06-19

    ...DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Rural Utilities Service...Albany, KY, Cagle Water Expansion Project...required by the Kentucky Agriculture Water Quality Plan, which...implemented. Each new agriculture operation would...

  3. 62 FR 19099 - City of Albany, Kentucky, Cagle Water Expansion Project; Draft Environmental Impact Statement

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    1997-04-18

    ...DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Rural Utilities Service...Albany, Kentucky, Cagle Water Expansion Project...required by the Kentucky Agriculture Water Quality Plan, which...implemented. Each new agriculture operation would...

  4. 67 FR 44421 - South Logan/Scott Counties Water Supply Project; Logan and Scott Counties, AR

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2002-07-02

    ...DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Natural Resources Conservation...Logan/Scott Counties Water Supply Project; Logan...U.S. Department of Agriculture, gives notice that an...municipal and industrial water supply for the...

  5. 43 CFR 404.51 - Are proposed projects under the Rural Water Supply Program reviewed by the Administration?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...false Are proposed projects under the Rural Water Supply Program reviewed by the Administration...DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR RECLAMATION RURAL WATER SUPPLY PROGRAM Feasibility Studies...51 Are proposed projects under the Rural Water Supply Program reviewed by the...

  6. 43 CFR 404.56 - If a financial assistance agreement is entered into for a rural water supply project that...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...agreement is entered into for a rural water supply project that benefits more than...THE INTERIOR RECLAMATION RURAL WATER SUPPLY PROGRAM Miscellaneous § 404...agreement is entered into for a rural water supply project that benefits more...

  7. 43 CFR 404.56 - If a financial assistance agreement is entered into for a rural water supply project that...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...agreement is entered into for a rural water supply project that benefits more than...THE INTERIOR RECLAMATION RURAL WATER SUPPLY PROGRAM Miscellaneous § 404...agreement is entered into for a rural water supply project that benefits more...

  8. 43 CFR 404.51 - Are proposed projects under the Rural Water Supply Program reviewed by the Administration?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...proposed projects under the Rural Water Supply Program reviewed by the Administration...THE INTERIOR RECLAMATION RURAL WATER SUPPLY PROGRAM Feasibility Studies...proposed projects under the Rural Water Supply Program reviewed by the...

  9. 43 CFR 404.51 - Are proposed projects under the Rural Water Supply Program reviewed by the Administration?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...proposed projects under the Rural Water Supply Program reviewed by the Administration...THE INTERIOR RECLAMATION RURAL WATER SUPPLY PROGRAM Feasibility Studies...proposed projects under the Rural Water Supply Program reviewed by the...

  10. 43 CFR 404.56 - If a financial assistance agreement is entered into for a rural water supply project that...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...agreement is entered into for a rural water supply project that benefits more than...THE INTERIOR RECLAMATION RURAL WATER SUPPLY PROGRAM Miscellaneous § 404...agreement is entered into for a rural water supply project that benefits more...

  11. 43 CFR 404.56 - If a financial assistance agreement is entered into for a rural water supply project that...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...agreement is entered into for a rural water supply project that benefits more than...THE INTERIOR RECLAMATION RURAL WATER SUPPLY PROGRAM Miscellaneous § 404...agreement is entered into for a rural water supply project that benefits more...

  12. 43 CFR 404.51 - Are proposed projects under the Rural Water Supply Program reviewed by the Administration?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...proposed projects under the Rural Water Supply Program reviewed by the Administration...THE INTERIOR RECLAMATION RURAL WATER SUPPLY PROGRAM Feasibility Studies...proposed projects under the Rural Water Supply Program reviewed by the...

  13. Peace and Prospects for International Water Projects in the Jordan-Yarmouk River Basin

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Richard E. Just; John K. Horowitz; Sinaia Netanyahu

    \\u000a Water scarcity has become acute in many regions because of economic and population growth and resource degradation. Most economically\\u000a feasible but yet undeveloped water projects involve multiple jurisdictions so cooperation is required. This chapter examines\\u000a international cooperation in water sharing, with an application to two potential international water projects between Israel\\u000a and Jordan. The first requires bilateral cooperation between Israel

  14. 76 FR 54251 - Central Valley Project Improvement Act, Water Management Plans

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-31

    The following Water Management Plans are available for review: Del Puerto Water District. Chowchilla Water District. Orange Cove Irrigation District. James Irrigation District. Tranquility Irrigation District. Kaweah Delta Water Conservation District. To meet the requirements of the Central Valley Project Improvement Act of 1992 (CVPIA) and......

  15. Scenarios of Global Municipal Water-Use Demand Projections over the 21st Century

    SciTech Connect

    Hejazi, Mohamad I.; Edmonds, James A.; Chaturvedi, Vaibhav; Davies, Evan; Eom, Jiyong

    2013-03-06

    This paper establishes three future projections of global municipal water use to the end of the 21st century: A reference business-as usual (BAU) scenario, a High Technological Improvement (High Tech) scenario and a Low Technological Improvement (Low Tech) scenario. A global municipal water demand model is constructed using global water use statistics at the country-scale, calibrated to the base year of 2005, and simulated to the end of the 21st century. Since the constructed water demand model hinges on socioeconomic variables (population, income), water price, and end-use technology and efficiency improvement rates, projections of those input variables are adopted to characterize the uncertainty in future water demand estimates. The water demand model is linked to the Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM), a global change integrated assessment model. Under the reference scenario, the global total water withdrawal increases from 466 km3/year in 2005 to 941 km3/year in 2100,while withdrawals in the high and low tech scenarios are 321 km3/ year and 2000 km3/ year, respectively. This wide range (321-2000 km3/ year) indicates the level of uncertainty associated with such projections. The simulated global municipal demand projections are most sensitive to population and income projections, then to end-use technology and efficiency projections, and finally to water price. Thus, using water price alone as a policy measure to reduce municipal water use may substantiate the share of municipal water price of people’s annual incomes.

  16. Project Water Science. General Science High School Level.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Water Education Foundation, Sacramento, CA.

    This teacher's guide presents 12 hands-on laboratory activities for high school science classes that cover the environmental issue of water resources in California. The activities are separated into three sections. Five activities in the section on water quality address the topics of groundwater, water hardness, bottled water, water purity, and…

  17. Optimal Operation of Variable Speed Pumping System in China's Eastern Route Project of S-to-N Water Diversion Project

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jilin Cheng; Lihua Zhang; Rentian Zhang; Yi Gong; Honggeng Zhu; Dongsheng Deng; Xuesong Feng; Jinxian Qiu

    2010-01-01

    A dynamic planning model for optimizing operation of variable speed pumping system, aiming at minimum power consumption, was proposed to achieve economic operation. The No. 4 Jiangdu Pumping Station, a source pumping station in China's Eastern Route of South-to-North Water Diversion Project, is taken as a study case. Since the sump water level of Jiangdu Pumping Station is affected by

  18. Benchmarking of municipal waste water treatment plants (an Austrian project).

    PubMed

    Lindtner, S; Kroiss, H; Nowak, O

    2004-01-01

    An Austrian research project focused on the development of process indicators for treatment plants with different process and operation modes. The whole treatment scheme was subdivided into four processes, i.e. mechanical pretreatment (Process 1), mechanical-biological waste water treatment (Process 2), sludge thickening and stabilisation (Process 3) and further sludge treatment and disposal (Process 4). In order to get comparable process indicators it was necessary to subdivide the sample of 76 individual treatment plants all over Austria into five groups according to their mean organic load (COD) in the influent. The specific total yearly costs, the yearly operating costs and the yearly capital costs of the four processes have been related to the yearly average of the measured organic load expressed in COD (110 g COD/pe/d). The specific investment costs for the whole treatment plant and for Process 2 have been related to a calculated standard design capacity of the mechanical-biological part of the treatment plant expressed in COD. The capital costs of processes 1, 3 and 4 have been related to the design capacity of the treatment plant. For each group (related to the size of the plant) a benchmark band has been defined for the total yearly costs, the total yearly operational costs and the total yearly capital costs. For the operational costs of the Processes 1 to 4 one benchmark ([see symbol in text] per pe/year) has been defined for each group. In addition a theoretical cost reduction potential has been calculated. The cost efficiency in regard to water protection and some special sub-processes such as aeration and sludge dewatering has been analysed. PMID:15553485

  19. Projected Regime Shift in Arctic Cloud and Water Vapor Feedbacks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Yonghua; Miller, James R.; Francis, Jennifer; Russel, Gary L.

    2011-01-01

    The Arctic climate is changing faster than any other large-scale region on Earth. A variety of positive feedback mechanisms are responsible for the amplification, most of which are linked with changes in snow and ice cover, surface temperature (T(sub s)), atmospheric water vapor (WV), and cloud properties. As greenhouse gases continue to accumulate in the atmosphere, air temperature and water vapor content also increase, leading to a warmer surface and ice loss, which further enhance evaporation and WV. Many details of these interrelated feedbacks are poorly understood, yet are essential for understanding the pace and regional variations in future Arctic change. We use a global climate model (Goddard Institute for Space Studies, Atmosphere-Ocean Model) to examine several components of these feedbacks, how they vary by season, and how they are projected to change through the 21st century. One positive feedback begins with an increase in T(sub s) that produces an increase in WV, which in turn increases the downward longwave flux (DLF) and T(sub s), leading to further evaporation. Another associates the expected increases in cloud cover and optical thickness with increasing DLF and T(sub s). We examine the sensitivities between DLF and other climate variables in these feedbacks and find that they are strongest in the non-summer seasons, leading to the largest amplification in Ts during these months. Later in the 21st century, however, DLF becomes less sensitive to changes in WV and cloud optical thickness, as they cause the atmosphere to emit longwave radiation more nearly as a black body. This regime shift in sensitivity implies that the amplified pace of Arctic change relative to the northern hemisphere could relax in the future.

  20. Calculation note: project W-320 primary ventilation air flowrequirements for mitigation of steady state flammable gasconcentrations in the headspaces of tanks 241-C-106 and 241-AY-102

    SciTech Connect

    Estey, S.D.

    1997-06-04

    This calculation note analyzes headspace concentrations of hydrogen dependent upon assumed ventilation flow rates provided for tanks 241-C-106 and 241-AY-102. The analyses are based on measured or estimated steady state hydrogen release rates. Tank 241-C-106 is analyzed prior to sluicing; tank 241-AY-102 is analyzed both prior to and after completion of sluicing. Specific analyses, using both best estimated and bounding hydrogen generation rates, include the minimum primary ventilation flow rates required in the tanks to ensure that the steady state hydrogen concentration in the respective tank headspace does not exceed 25% and 100% of the LFL. The headspace hydrogen concentration as a function of time as well as the time required to reach 25% and 100% of LFL upon complete loss of active ventilation, starting from the steady state hydrogen concentration based on a 200 CFM minimum flow rate in tank 241-C-106 and a 100 CFM minimum flow rate in tank241-AY-102. The headspace hydrogen concentration as a function of thee following partial loss of active ventilation (i.e., step changes to l60, l20, 80, and 40 CFM ventilation flow rates) in tank 241-C-106, staffing from a 200 CFM flow rate and the corresponding steady state hydrogen concentration based on the 200 CFM flow rate. The headspace hydrogen concentration as a function of the following partial loss of active ventilation i.e., step changes to 80, 60, 40, and 20 CFM ventilation flow rates) in tank 241-AY-102, starting from a 100 CFM flow rate and the corresponding steady state hydrogen concentration based on the 100 CFM flow rate.