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Sample records for wave attenuation coefficients

  1. Measurement of attenuation coefficients of the fundamental and second harmonic waves in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shuzeng; Jeong, Hyunjo; Cho, Sungjong; Li, Xiongbing

    2016-02-01

    Attenuation corrections in nonlinear acoustics play an important role in the study of nonlinear fluids, biomedical imaging, or solid material characterization. The measurement of attenuation coefficients in a nonlinear regime is not easy because they depend on the source pressure and requires accurate diffraction corrections. In this work, the attenuation coefficients of the fundamental and second harmonic waves which come from the absorption of water are measured in nonlinear ultrasonic experiments. Based on the quasilinear theory of the KZK equation, the nonlinear sound field equations are derived and the diffraction correction terms are extracted. The measured sound pressure amplitudes are adjusted first for diffraction corrections in order to reduce the impact on the measurement of attenuation coefficients from diffractions. The attenuation coefficients of the fundamental and second harmonics are calculated precisely from a nonlinear least squares curve-fitting process of the experiment data. The results show that attenuation coefficients in a nonlinear condition depend on both frequency and source pressure, which are much different from a linear regime. In a relatively lower drive pressure, the attenuation coefficients increase linearly with frequency. However, they present the characteristic of nonlinear growth in a high drive pressure. As the diffraction corrections are obtained based on the quasilinear theory, it is important to use an appropriate source pressure for accurate attenuation measurements.

  2. Estimating Attenuation Coefficients and P-Wave Velocities of the Shallow San Jacinto Fault Zone from Betsy Gunshots Data Recorded by a Spatially Dense Array with 1108 Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozakin, Yaman; Ben-Zion, Yehuda

    2016-04-01

    We estimate values of P wave velocity and P attenuation coefficients (QP) for the subsurface material at the Sage Brush Flat site along the Clark branch of the San Jacinto Fault Zone. The data are generated by 33 Betsy gunshots and recorded by a spatially dense array of 1108 vertical component geophones deployed in a rectangular grid that is approximately 600 m x 600 m. We automatically pick the arrival times of the seismic body waves from each explosion arriving at stations within 200 m. These measurements are used to derive an average velocity map with velocity values ranging from 500 m/s to 1250 m/s. We estimate the energy of the early P waves by squaring the amplitudes in a short window relative to the automatic picks. These energies are fitted to a decay function representing the geometrical spreading and intrinsic attenuation. By separating the stations into spatial bins and calculating attenuation values for each by linear regression, we construct a QP values map. Most of the QP values are in 5-20 range, which is consistent with other studies of shallow fault zone regions.

  3. Optical attenuation coefficient in individual ZnO nanowires.

    PubMed

    Little, Anree; Hoffman, Abigail; Haegel, Nancy M

    2013-03-11

    Attenuation coefficient measurements for the propagation of bandedge luminescence are made on individual ZnO nanowires by combining the localized excitation capability of a scanning electron microscope (SEM) with near-field scanning optical microscopy (NSOM) to record the distribution and intensity of wave-guided emission. Measurements were made for individual nanostructures with triangular cross-sections ranging in diameter from 680 to 2300 nm. The effective attenuation coefficient shows an inverse dependence on nanowire diameter (d(-1)), indicating scattering losses due to non-ideal waveguiding behavior. PMID:23482201

  4. Attenuation coefficients for water quality trading.

    PubMed

    Keller, Arturo A; Chen, Xiaoli; Fox, Jessica; Fulda, Matt; Dorsey, Rebecca; Seapy, Briana; Glenday, Julia; Bray, Erin

    2014-06-17

    Water quality trading has been proposed as a cost-effective approach for reducing nutrient loads through credit generation from agricultural or point source reductions sold to buyers facing costly options. We present a systematic approach to determine attenuation coefficients and their uncertainty. Using a process-based model, we determine attenuation with safety margins at many watersheds for total nitrogen (TN) and total phosphorus (TP) loads as they transport from point of load reduction to the credit buyer. TN and TP in-stream attenuation generally increases with decreasing mean river flow; smaller rivers in the modeled region of the Ohio River Basin had TN attenuation factors per km, including safety margins, of 0.19-1.6%, medium rivers of 0.14-1.2%, large rivers of 0.13-1.1%, and very large rivers of 0.04-0.42%. Attenuation in ditches transporting nutrients from farms to receiving rivers is 0.4%/km for TN, while for TP attenuation in ditches can be up to 2%/km. A 95 percentile safety margin of 30-40% for TN and 6-10% for TP, applied to the attenuation per km factors, was determined from the in-stream sensitivity of load reductions to watershed model parameters. For perspective, over 50 km a 1% per km factor would result in 50% attenuation = 2:1 trading ratio. PMID:24866482

  5. Waves in fragmented geomaterials with impact attenuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyskin, Arcady; Pasternak, Elena

    2016-04-01

    Attenuation of waves in geomaterials, such as seismic waves is usually attributed to energy dissipation due to the presence of viscous fluid and/or viscous cement between the constituents. In fragmented geomaterials such as blocky rock mass there is another possible source of energy dissipation - impacting between the fragments. This can be characterised by the coefficient of restitution, which is the ratio between the rotational velocities after and before the impact. In particular, this manifests itself in the process of mutual rotations of the fragments/blocks, whereby in the process of oscillation different ends of the contacting faces of the fragments are impacting. During the rotational oscillations the energy dissipation is concentrated in the neutral position that is the one in which the relative rotation between two fragments is zero. We show that in a simple system of two fragments this dissipation is equivalent, in a long run, to the presence of viscous damper between the fragments (the Voigt model of visco-elasticity). Generalisation of this concept to the material consisting of many fragments leads to a Voigt model of wave propagation where the attenuation coefficient is proportional to the logarithm of restitution coefficient. The waves in such a medium show slight dispersion caused by damping and strong dependence of the attenuation on the wave frequency.

  6. Effects of Wave Nonlinearity on Wave Attenuation by Vegetation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, W. C.; Cox, D. T.

    2014-12-01

    The need to explore sustainable approaches to maintain coastal ecological systems has been widely recognized for decades and is increasingly important due to global climate change and patterns in coastal population growth. Submerged aquatic vegetation and emergent vegetation in estuaries and shorelines can provide ecosystem services, including wave-energy reduction and erosion control. Idealized models of wave-vegetation interaction often assume rigid, vertically uniform vegetation under the action of waves described by linear wave theory. A physical model experiment was conducted to investigate the effects of wave nonlinearity on the attenuation of random waves propagating through a stand of uniform, emergent vegetation in constant water depth. The experimental conditions spanned a relative water depth from near shallow to near deep water waves (0.45 < kh <1.49) and wave steepness from linear to nonlinear conditions (0.03 < ak < 0.18). The wave height to water depth ratios were in the range 0.12 < Hs/h < 0.34, and the Ursell parameter was in the range 2 < Ur < 68. Frictional losses from the side wall and friction were measured and removed from the wave attenuation in the vegetated cases to isolate the impact of vegetation. The normalized wave height attenuation decay for each case was fit to the decay equation of Dalrymple et al. (1984) to determine the damping factor, which was then used to calculate the bulk drag coefficients CD. This paper shows that the damping factor is dependent on the wave steepness ak across the range of relative water depths from shallow to deep water and that the damping factor can increase by a factor of two when the value of ak approximately doubles. In turn, this causes the drag coefficient CD to decrease on average by 23%. The drag coefficient can be modeled using the Keulegan-Carpenter number using the horizontal orbital wave velocity estimate from linear wave theory as the characteristic velocity scale. Alternatively, the Ursell

  7. Simulation Of Attenuation Regularity Of Detonation Wave In Pmma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Wei; Xiaomian, Hu

    2012-03-01

    Polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) is often used as clapboard or protective medium in the parameter measurement of detonation wave propagation. Theoretical and experimental researches show that the pressure of shock wave in condensed material has the regularity of exponential attenuation with the distance of propagation. Simulation of detonation produced shock wave propagation in PMMA was conducted using a two-dimensional Lagrangian computational fluid dynamics program, and results were compared with the experimental data. Different charge diameters and different angles between the direction of detonation wave propagation and the normal direction of confined boundary were considered during the calculation. Results show that the detonation produced shock wave propagation in PMMA accords with the exponential regularity of shock wave attenuation in condensed material, and several factors are relevant to the attenuation coefficient, such as charge diameter and interface angle.

  8. Simulation of attenuation regularity of detonation wave in PMMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Wei; Xiaomian, Hu

    2011-06-01

    Polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) is often used as clapboard or protective medium in the parameter measurement of detonation wave propagation, due to its similar shock impedance with the explosive. Theoretical and experimental research show that the pressure of shock wave in condensed material has the regularity of exponential attenuation with the distance of propagation. Simulation of detonation wave propagation in PMMA is conducted using a two-dimensional Lagrangian computational fluid dynamics program, and results are compared with the experimental data. Different charge diameters and different angles between the direction of detonation wave propagation and the normal direction of confined boundary are considered during the calculation. Results show that the detonation wave propagation in PMMA accords with the exponential regularity of shock wave attenuation in condensed material, and several factors are relevant to the attenuation coefficient, such as charge diameter and interface angle.

  9. Gamma ray attenuation coefficient measurement for neutron-absorbent materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jalali, Majid; Mohammadi, Ali

    2008-05-01

    The compounds Na 2B 4O 7, H 3BO 3, CdCl 2 and NaCl and their solutions attenuate gamma rays in addition to neutron absorption. These compounds are widely used in the shielding of neutron sources, reactor control and neutron converters. Mass attenuation coefficients of gamma related to the four compounds aforementioned, in energies 662, 778.9, 867.38, 964.1, 1085.9, 1173, 1212.9, 1299.1,1332 and 1408 keV, have been determined by the γ rays transmission method in a good geometry setup; also, these coefficients were calculated by MCNP code. A comparison between experiments, simulations and Xcom code has shown that the study has potential application for determining the attenuation coefficient of various compound materials. Experiment and computation show that H 3BO 3 with the lowest average Z has the highest gamma ray attenuation coefficient among the aforementioned compounds.

  10. Attenuation Coefficient Estimation of the Healthy Human Thyroid In Vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouyer, J.; Cueva, T.; Portal, A.; Yamamoto, T.; Lavarello, R.

    Previous studies have demonstrated that attenuation coefficients can be useful towards characterizing thyroid tissues. In this work, ultrasonic attenuation coefficients were estimated from healthy human thyroids in vivo using a clinical scanner. The selected subjects were five young, healthy volunteers (age: 26 ± 6 years old, gender: three females, two males) with no reported history of thyroid diseases, no palpable thyroid nodules, no smoking habits, and body mass index less than 30 kg/m2. Echographic examinations were conducted by a trained sonographer using a SonixTouch system (Ultrasonix Medical Corporation, Richmond, BC) equipped with an L14-5 linear transducer array (nominal center frequency of 10 MHz, transducer footprint of 3.8 cm). Radiofrequency data corresponding to the collected echographic images in both transverse and longitudinal views were digitized at a sampling rate of 40 MHz and processed with Matlab codes (MathWorks, Natick, MA) to estimate attenuation coefficients using the spectral log difference method. The estimation was performed using an analysis bandwidth spanning from 4.0 to 9.0 MHz. The average value of the estimated ultrasonic attenuation coefficients was equal to 1.34 ± 0.15 dB/(cm.MHz). The standard deviation of the estimated average attenuation coefficient across different volunteers suggests a non-negligible inter-subject variability in the ultrasonic attenuation coefficient of the human thyroid.

  11. Measurements of spectral attenuation coefficients in the lower Chesapeake Bay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houghton, W. M.

    1983-01-01

    The spectral transmission was measured for water samples taken in the lower Chesapeake Bay to allow characterization of several optical properties. The coefficients of total attenuation, particle attenuation, and absorption by dissolved organic matter were determined over a wavelength range from 3500 A to 8000 A. The data were taken over a 3 year period and at a number of sites so that an indication of spatial and temporal variations could be obtained. The attenuations determined in this work are, on the average, 10 times greater than those obtained by Hulburt in 1944, which are commonly accepted in the literature for Chesapeake Bay attenuation.

  12. Imaging Rayleigh wave attenuation with USArray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Xueyang; Dalton, Colleen A.; Jin, Ge; Gaherty, James B.; Shen, Yang

    2016-04-01

    The EarthScope USArray provides an opportunity to obtain detailed images of the continental upper mantle at an unprecedented scale. The majority of mantle models derived from USArray data to date contain spatial variations in seismic-wave speed; however, in many cases these data sets do not by themselves allow a non-unique interpretation. Joint interpretation of seismic attenuation and velocity models can improve upon the interpretations based only on velocity and provide important constraints on the temperature, composition, melt content, and volatile content of the mantle. The surface-wave amplitudes that constrain upper-mantle attenuation are sensitive to factors in addition to attenuation, including the earthquake source excitation, focusing and defocusing by elastic structure, and local site amplification. Because of the difficulty of isolating attenuation from these other factors, little is known about the attenuation structure of the North American upper mantle. In this study, Rayleigh wave travel time and amplitude in the period range 25-100 s are measured using an interstation cross-correlation technique, which takes advantage of waveform similarity at nearby stations. Several estimates of Rayleigh wave attenuation and site amplification are generated at each period, using different approaches to separate the effects of attenuation and local site amplification on amplitude. It is assumed that focusing and defocusing effects can be described by the Laplacian of the travel-time field. All approaches identify the same large-scale patterns in attenuation, including areas where the attenuation values are likely contaminated by unmodelled focusing and defocusing effects. Regionally averaged attenuation maps are constructed after removal of the contaminated attenuation values, and the variations in intrinsic shear attenuation that are suggested by these Rayleigh wave attenuation maps are explored.

  13. Imaging Rayleigh wave attenuation with USArray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Xueyang; Dalton, Colleen A.; Jin, Ge; Gaherty, James B.; Shen, Yang

    2016-07-01

    The EarthScope USArray provides an opportunity to obtain detailed images of the continental upper mantle at an unprecedented scale. The majority of mantle models derived from USArray data to date contain spatial variations in seismic-wave speed; however, in many cases these data sets do not by themselves allow a non-unique interpretation. Joint interpretation of seismic attenuation and velocity models can improve upon the interpretations based only on velocity and provide important constraints on the temperature, composition, melt content, and volatile content of the mantle. The surface wave amplitudes that constrain upper-mantle attenuation are sensitive to factors in addition to attenuation, including the earthquake source excitation, focusing and defocusing by elastic structure, and local site amplification. Because of the difficulty of isolating attenuation from these other factors, little is known about the attenuation structure of the North American upper mantle. In this study, Rayleigh wave traveltime and amplitude in the period range 25-100 s are measured using an interstation cross-correlation technique, which takes advantage of waveform similarity at nearby stations. Several estimates of Rayleigh wave attenuation and site amplification are generated at each period, using different approaches to separate the effects of attenuation and local site amplification on amplitude. It is assumed that focusing and defocusing effects can be described by the Laplacian of the traveltime field. All approaches identify the same large-scale patterns in attenuation, including areas where the attenuation values are likely contaminated by unmodelled focusing and defocusing effects. Regionally averaged attenuation maps are constructed after removal of the contaminated attenuation values, and the variations in intrinsic shear attenuation that are suggested by these Rayleigh wave attenuation maps are explored.

  14. Relating P-wave attenuation to permeability

    SciTech Connect

    Akbar, N.; Dvorkin, J.; Nur, A. . Dept. of Geophysics)

    1993-01-01

    To relate P-wave attenuation to permeability, the authors examine a three-dimensional (3-D) theoretical model of a cylindrical pore filled with viscous fluid and embedded in an infinite isotropic elastic medium. They calculate both attenuation and permeability as functions of the direction of wave propagation. Attenuation estimates are based on the squirt flow mechanism; permeability is calculated using the Kozeny-Carmen relation. They find that in the case when a plane P-wave propagates parallel to this orientation (Q[sup [minus]1][delta] = 90[degree]), attenuation is always higher than when a wave propagates parallel to this orientation (Q[sup [minus]1][delta] = 0[degree]). The ratio of these two attenuation values Q[sup [minus]1][delta] = 90[degree]/Q[sup [minus]1] = 0[degree] increases with an increasing pore radius and decreasing frequency and saturation. By changing permeability, varying the radius of the pore, they find that the permeability-attenuation relation is characterized by a peak that shifts toward lower permeabilities as frequency decreases. Therefore, the attenuation of a low-frequency wave decreases with increasing permeability. They observe a similar trend on relations between attenuation and permeability experimentally obtained on sandstone samples.

  15. Graphene-Based Waveguide Terahertz Wave Attenuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jian-rong, Hu; Jiu-sheng, Li; Guo-hua, Qiu

    2016-07-01

    We design an electrically controllable terahertz wave attenuator by using graphene. We show that terahertz wave can be confined and propagate on S-shaped graphene waveguide with little radiation losses, and the confined terahertz wave is further manipulated and controlled via external applied voltage bias. The simulated results show that, when chemical potential changes from 0.03 into 0.05 eV, the extinction ratio of the terahertz wave attenuator can be tuned from 1.28 to 39.42 dB. Besides the simplicity, this novel terahertz wave attenuator has advantages of small size (24 × 30 μm2), a low insertion loss, and good controllability. It has a potential application for forthcoming planar terahertz wave integrated circuit fields.

  16. Compressional head waves in attenuative formations

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Q.H.; Chang, C.

    1994-12-31

    The attenuation of compressional head waves in a fluid-filled borehole is studied with the branch-cut integration method. The borehole fluid and solid formation are both assumed lossy with quality factors Q{sub f}({omega}) for the fluid, and Q{sub c}({omega}) and Q{sub s}({omega}) for the compressional and shear waves in the solid, respectively. The branch-cut integration method used in this work is an extension of that for a lossless medium. With this branch-cut integration method, the authors can isolate the groups of individual arrivals such as the compressional head waves and shear head waves, and study the attenuation of those particular wavefields in lossy media. This study, coupled with experimental work to be performed, may result in an effective way of measuring compressional head wave attenuation in the field.

  17. UHF Radio Wave Attenuation Factor Database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khomenko, S. I.; Kostina, V. L.; Mytsenko, I. M.; Roenko, A. N.

    2007-07-01

    As is known each sea-going vessel is equipped with navigation, communication and other radio engineering facilities that serve to secure the safety of navigation and are chiefly operated at UHF-wave band. In developing these systems and calculating the energy potential for a necessary coverage range one should be well aware of the radio signal attenuation processes on a propagation path. The key parameter of this path is the (radio) wave attenuation factor V and its distance dependence V(R). A diversity of factors influencing the radio signal attenuation over the oceanic expanses, especially well pronounced and quite stable tropospheric ducts, and the lack of experimental data were the compelling reasons why the researchers of the Institute for Radiophysics and Electronics, NASU, had spent many years on comprehensive radiophysical investigations carried out in different regions of the Atlantic, Indian, Arctic and Pacific Oceans. The experimental data obtained allow creating the database of radio wave attenuation factor V.

  18. Wave-induced fluid flow in random porous media: attenuation and dispersion of elastic waves.

    PubMed

    Müller, Tobias M; Gurevich, Boris

    2005-05-01

    A detailed analysis of the relationship between elastic waves in inhomogeneous, porous media and the effect of wave-induced fluid flow is presented. Based on the results of the poroelastic first-order statistical smoothing approximation applied to Biot's equations of poroelasticity, a model for elastic wave attenuation and dispersion due to wave-induced fluid flow in 3-D randomly inhomogeneous poroelastic media is developed. Attenuation and dispersion depend on linear combinations of the spatial correlations of the fluctuating poroelastic parameters. The observed frequency dependence is typical for a relaxation phenomenon. Further, the analytic properties of attenuation and dispersion are analyzed. It is shown that the low-frequency asymptote of the attenuation coefficient of a plane compressional wave is proportional to the square of frequency. At high frequencies the attenuation coefficient becomes proportional to the square root of frequency. A comparison with the 1-D theory shows that attenuation is of the same order but slightly larger in 3-D random media. Several modeling choices of the approach including the effect of cross correlations between fluid and solid phase properties are demonstrated. The potential application of the results to real porous materials is discussed. PMID:15957744

  19. Attenuation of sound waves in drill strings

    SciTech Connect

    Drumheller, D.S. )

    1993-10-01

    During drilling of deep wells, digital data are often transmitted from sensors located near the drill bit to the surface. Development of a new communication system with increased data capacity is of paramount importance to the drilling industry. Since steel drill strings are used, transmission of these data by elastic carrier waves traveling within the drill pipe is possible, but the potential communication range is uncertain. The problem is complicated by the presence of heavy-threaded tool joints every 10 m, which form a periodic structure and produce classical patterns of passbands and stop bands in the wave spectra. In this article, field measurements of the attenuation characteristics of a drill string in the Long Valley Scientific Well in Mammoth Lakes, California are presented. Wave propagation distances approach 2 km. A theoretical model is discussed which predicts the location, width, and attenuation of the passbands. Mode conversion between extensional and bending waves, and spurious reflections due to deviations in the periodic spacings of the tool joints are believed to be the sources of this attenuation. It is estimated that attenuation levels can be dramatically reduced by rearranging the individual pipes in the drill string according to length. 7 refs., 20 figs., 4 tabs.

  20. Bubbles attenuate elastic waves at seismic frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tisato, Nicola; Quintal, Beatriz; Chapman, Samuel; Podladchikov, Yury; Burg, Jean-Pierre

    2016-04-01

    The vertical migration of multiphase fluids in the crust can cause hazardous events such as eruptions, explosions, pollution and earthquakes. Although seismic tomography could potentially provide a detailed image of such fluid-saturated regions, the interpretation of the tomographic signals is often controversial and fails in providing a conclusive map of the subsurface saturation. Seismic tomography should be improved considering seismic wave attenuation (1/Q) and the dispersive elastic moduli which allow accounting for the energy lost by the propagating elastic wave. In particular, in saturated media a significant portion of the energy carried by the propagating wave is dissipated by the wave-induced-fluid-flow and the wave-induced-gas-exsolution-dissolution (WIGED) mechanisms. The WIGED mechanism describes how a propagating wave modifies the thermodynamic equillibrium between different fluid phases causing the exsolution and the dissolution of the gas in the liquid, which in turn causes a significant frequency dependent 1/Q and moduli dispersion. The WIGED theory was initially postulated for bubbly magmas but only recently was extended to bubbly water and experimentally demonstrated. Here we report these theory and laboratory experiments. Specifically, we present i) attenuation measurements performed by means of the Broad Band Attenuation Vessel on porous media saturated with water and different gases, and ii) numerical experiments validating the laboratory observations. Finally, we will extend the theory to fluids and to pressure-temperature conditions which are typical of phreatomagmatic and hydrocarbon domains and we will compare the propagation of seismic waves in bubble-free and bubble-bearing subsurface domains. With the present contribution we extend the knowledge about attenuation in rocks which are saturated with multiphase fluid demonstrating that the WIGED mechanism could be extremely important to image subsurface gas plumes.

  1. Attenuation coefficient of usable solar radiation of the global oceans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Junfang; Lee, Zhongping; Ondrusek, Michael; Kahru, Mati

    2016-05-01

    Usable solar radiation (USR) represents spectrally integrated solar energy in the spectral range of 400-560 nm, a domain where photons penetrate the most in oceanic waters and thus contribute to photosynthesis and heating at deeper depths. Through purely numerical simulations, it was found that the diffuse attenuation coefficient of downwelling USR (Kd(USR), m-1) is nearly a constant vertically in the upper water column for clear waters and most turbid waters. Subsequently an empirical model was developed to estimate Kd(USR) based on the diffuse attenuation coefficient at 490 nm (Kd(490), m-1). We here evaluate this relationship using data collected from a wide range of oceanic and coastal environments and found that the relationship between Kd(490) and Kd(USR) developed via the numerical simulation is quite robust. We further refined this relationship to extend the applicability to "clearest" natural waters. This refined relationship was then used to produce sample distribution of Kd(USR) of global oceans. As expected, extremely low Kd(USR) (˜0.02 m-1) was observed in ocean gyres, while significantly higher Kd(USR) (˜5.2 m-1) was found in very turbid coastal regions. A useful application of Kd(USR) is to easily and accurately propagate surface USR to deeper depths, potentially to significantly improve the estimation of basin scale primary production and heat fluxes in the upper water column.

  2. A study on photon attenuation coefficients of different wood materials with different densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saritha, B.; Nageswara Rao, A. S.

    2015-12-01

    A study on the variation of linear attenuation coefficients with the densities of the wood samples is under taken. The soft wood and hard wood samples were collected from the forest area of Pakal in Warangal district. The linear and mass attenuation coefficients are measured using gamma ray spectrometry based on NaI (Tl) scintillation detector with energies of 662 KeV and 59.5 KeV respectively. The mass attenuation coefficient values measured from experiment and are compared with theoretical methods using XCOM program. The plots of density versus linear attenuation coefficient for different wood materials correspond to higher order polynomial are presented. It is observed that variation of linear attenuation coefficient depends on densities of materials. The Chloroxylon swietenia with more density has more linear attenuation coefficient at 59.5 KeV and 662 KeV. The variation in attenuation coefficient attributed to chemical composition of wood used in the experiment.

  3. Uranium soft x-ray total attenuation coefficients

    SciTech Connect

    Del Grande, N.K.; Oliver, A.J.

    1981-01-01

    Uranium total attenuation coefficients were measured continuously from 0.84 to 6.0 keV and at selected higher energies using a vacuum single crystal diffractometer and flow-proportional counter. Statistical fluctuations ranged from 0.5% to 2%. The overall accuracy was 3%. Prominent structure was measured within 20 eV of the M/sub 5/ (3.552 keV) and M/sub 4/ (3.728 keV) edges. Jump ratios were determined from log-log polynomial fits to data at energies apart from the near-edge regions. These data were compared with calculations based on a relativistic HFS central potential model and with previously tabulated data.

  4. A consistent tissue attenuation coefficient estimator using bubble harmonic echoes.

    PubMed

    Tsao, Sheng-Kai; Tsao, Jenho

    2010-12-01

    The ultrasonic property of soft tissue can be quantified by its attenuation coefficient α. Traditionally the backscattering signal of tissue is used to estimate α. To improve precision, a large number of spatially independent samples of tissue echoes are required for averaging. In this paper, we propose a new estimation method, which makes use of microbubbles to provide temporally independent samples for averaging. It is easier for temporal sampling to maintain ergodicity and provide a large number of independent samples for statistical averaging. A stochastic model for the harmonic signals of an ideal bubble attenuated by tissue is derived based on Kuc's and Miller's works. An estimator of α is then presented. This estimator is consistent and could be biased because of the unknown squarelaw relation between the second and fundamental harmonics for non-ideal bubble oscillation. In experimental works, we design a simplified phantom for demonstrating the performance of the proposed estimator. It is shown that both first and second harmonics can estimate α consistently. However, the interference of the tissue backscattering signal may cause additional estimation error using the first harmonic. PMID:21156361

  5. Wave attenuation in the shallows of San Francisco Bay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lacy, Jessica R.; MacVean, Lissa J.

    2016-01-01

    Waves propagating over broad, gently-sloped shallows decrease in height due to frictional dissipation at the bed. We quantified wave-height evolution across 7 km of mudflat in San Pablo Bay (northern San Francisco Bay), an environment where tidal mixing prevents the formation of fluid mud. Wave height was measured along a cross shore transect (elevation range−2mto+0.45mMLLW) in winter 2011 and summer 2012. Wave height decreased more than 50% across the transect. The exponential decay coefficient λ was inversely related to depth squared (λ=6×10−4h−2). The physical roughness length scale kb, estimated from near-bed turbulence measurements, was 3.5×10−3 m in winter and 1.1×10−2 m in summer. Estimated wave friction factor fw determined from wave-height data suggests that bottom friction dominates dissipation at high Rew but not at low Rew. Predictions of near-shore wave height based on offshore wave height and a rough formulation for fw were quite accurate, with errors about half as great as those based on the smooth formulation for fw. Researchers often assume that the wave boundary layer is smooth for settings with fine-grained sediments. At this site, use of a smooth fw results in an underestimate of wave shear stress by a factor of 2 for typical waves and as much as 5 for more energetic waves. It also inadequately captures the effectiveness of the mudflats in protecting the shoreline through wave attenuation.

  6. Attenuation of an electromagnetic wave by charged dust particles in a sandstorm.

    PubMed

    Xie, Li; Li, Xingcai; Zheng, Xiaojing

    2010-12-10

    We calculate the light scattering properties of the partially charged dust particles with the Mie theory for electromagnetic waves with different frequencies, and the attenuation coefficients of an electromagnetic wave propagating in a sandstorm are also calculated. The results show that the electric charges distributed on the sand surface have a significant effect on the attenuation of the electromagnetic wave, especially for a frequency lower than 40 GHz, and attenuation coefficients increase with the magnitude of charges carried by the dust particles (expressed by the charge-to-mass ratio in this paper). For the higher frequency electromagnetic wave, such as visible light, the effect of charges carried by sand particles on its attenuation is very little, which can be ignored. PMID:21151232

  7. Attenuation of coda waves in southern Tibet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reese, C. C.; Ni, J. F.

    The alternation characteristics of the crust in the southernmost Tibetan plateau are determined from analysis of S-wave coda recorded at a temporary broadband station deployed during the 1994 INDEPTH-II experiment. A method for determining Qc is developed which utilizes the coda spectrogram observed at a single station. The average S-wave coda quality factor for this continent-continent collision zone is Qc(f) = (160 ± 69) (f/ f0)1.11±0.19, 1 < (f/f0) < 4, where f0 = 1Hz. The results are consistent with other measurements of Qc(f) in continental collisional environments which typically exhibit low values of Qc(f) at 1 Hz and a strong dependence on frequency. In particular, the attenuation characteristics obtained for the Arabian-Eurasian continental collisional boundary in western Turkey are quite similar to the results reported here for the southern Tibetan plateau.

  8. [Attenuation of photosynthetically available radiation (PAR) in Meiliang Bay under different winds and waves].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yunlin; Qin, Boqiang; Chen, Weimin; Hu, Weiping; Gao, Guang; Zhu, Guangwei; Luo, Liancong

    2005-06-01

    Based on the successive underwater irradiance measurement in situ from Jul. 12 to 17 in 2003, the attenuation of photosynthetically available radiation (PAR) and euphotic depth in Meiliang Bay were analyzed under different winds and waves. The results showed that the downward PAR attenuation coefficients ranged from 2.63 to 4.7 m(-1), with an average of 3.63 +/- 0.47 x m(-1), and the corresponding euphotic depth ranged from 0.98 to 1.75 m, with an average of 1.29 +/- 0.18 m, which demonstrated that phytoplankton and macrophyte could not grow below 1.5 m due to the lack of adequate solar radiation. The total suspended solids resulted from wind and wave increased the attenuation of light, with the downward attenuation coefficients of PAR being 2.63, 3.72 and 4.37 x m(-1) under small, medium and large wind and wave, respectively. Significant linear correlations were found between transparence, PAR attenuation coefficient, euphotic depth and total suspended solid, especially inorganic suspended solid, while chlorophyll a was the most nonsignificant light attenuator. Multiple stepwise linear regressions showed that inorganic suspended solid was the most important light attenuator dominating the light attenuation in wind-exposed Meiliang Bay. PMID:16180769

  9. A model for the diffuse attenuation coefficient of downwelling irradiance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Zhong-Ping; Du, Ke-Ping; Arnone, Robert

    2005-02-01

    The diffuse attenuation coefficient for downwelling irradiance (Kd) is an important parameter for ocean studies. For the vast ocean the only feasible means to get fine-scale measurements of Kd is by ocean color remote sensing. At present, values of Kd from remote sensing are estimated using empirical algorithms. Such an approach is insufficient to provide an understanding regarding the variation of Kd and contains large uncertainties in the derived values. In this study a semianalytical model for Kd is developed based on the radiative transfer equation, with values of the model parameters derived from Hydrolight simulations using the averaged particle phase function. The model is further tested with data simulated using significantly different particle phase functions, and the modeled Kd are found matching Hydrolight Kd very well (˜2% average error and ˜12% maximum error). Such a model provides an improved interpretation about the variation of Kd and a basis to more accurately determine Kd (especially using data from remote sensing).

  10. Bounce resonance diffusion coefficients for spatially confined waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xinxin; Tao, Xin; Lu, Quanmin; Dai, Lei

    2015-11-01

    Theoretical bounce resonance diffusion coefficients from interactions between electrons and spatially confined waves are derived and validated. Roberts and Schulz bounce resonance diffusion coefficients assume waves to be present on the whole bounce trajectory of particles; therefore, they are not directly applicable to waves that have a finite spatial extent. We theoretically derive and numerically validate a new set of bounce resonance diffusion coefficients for spatially confined waves. We apply our analysis to magnetosonic waves, which are confined to equatorial regions, using a previously published magnetosonic wave model. We find that the bounce resonance diffusion coefficients are comparable to the gyroresonance diffusion coefficients. We conclude that bounce resonance diffusion with magnetosonic waves might play an important role in relativistic electron dynamics.

  11. Extension of depth-resolved reconstruction of attenuation coefficients in optical coherence tomography for slim samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hohmann, Martin; Lengenfelder, B.; Kanawade, R.; Klämpfl, F.; Schmidt, Michael

    2015-12-01

    Coherent light propagating through turbid media is attenuated due to scattering and absorption. The decrease of the intensity of the coherent light is described by the attenuation coefficient. The measured decay of the coherent light through turbid media with optical coherence tomography (OCT) can be used to reconstruct the attenuation coefficient. Since most of the OCT systems work in the near-infrared region, they are the optical window from 800-1400 nm in tissue. Hence, the most part of the attenuation coefficient is caused due to the scattering. Therefore, deriving the attenuation coefficient is one way to get an approximation of the scattering coefficient which is difficult to access even up to day. Moreover, OCT measurements are one of the few possibilities to derive physical properties with micrometre resolution of the media under investigation.

  12. The Attenuation of Correlation Coefficients: A Statistical Literacy Issue

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trafimow, David

    2016-01-01

    Much of the science reported in the media depends on correlation coefficients. But the size of correlation coefficients depends, in part, on the reliability with which the correlated variables are measured. Understanding this is a statistical literacy issue.

  13. Attenuation coefficient determination of printed ABS and PLA samples in diagnostic radiology standard beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veneziani, G. R.; Corrêa, E. L.; Potiens, M. P. A.; Campos, L. L.

    2016-07-01

    IAEA code of practice TRS-457 states that standard phantoms should offer the same primary attenuation and scatter production as relevant body section of a representative patient. Material cost, availability and dimensional stability must also be considered. The goal of this study is to determine the attenuation coefficient of printed ABS and PLA samples in standard X-ray beams, verifying if phantoms printed with these materials could be an easier-handle substitute for PMMA, enabling the creation of different designs in an easier and cheaper way. Results show that PMMA presents higher attenuation coefficient, followed by PLA and ABS, which means that thinner PMMA layer creates higher radiation attenuation.

  14. Temperature Increase Dependence on Ultrasound Attenuation Coefficient in Innovative Tissue-mimicking Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuccaro, R.; Magnetto, C.; Albo, P. A. Giuliano; Troia, A.; Lago, S.

    Although high intensity focused ultrasound beams (HIFU) have found rapid agreement in clinical environment as a tool for non invasive surgical ablation and controlled destruction of cancer cells, some aspects related to the interaction of ultrasonic waves with tissues, such as the conversion of acoustic energy into heat, are not thoroughly understood. In this work, innovative tissue-mimicking materials (TMMs), based on Agar and zinc acetate, have been used to conduct investigations in order to determine a relation between the sample attenuation coefficient and its temperature increase measured in the focus region when exposed to an HIFU beam. An empirical relation has been deduced establishing useful basis for further processes of validations of numerical models to be adopted for customizing therapeutic treatments.

  15. Material grain size characterization method based on energy attenuation coefficient spectrum and support vector regression.

    PubMed

    Li, Min; Zhou, Tong; Song, Yanan

    2016-07-01

    A grain size characterization method based on energy attenuation coefficient spectrum and support vector regression (SVR) is proposed. First, the spectra of the first and second back-wall echoes are cut into several frequency bands to calculate the energy attenuation coefficient spectrum. Second, the frequency band that is sensitive to grain size variation is determined. Finally, a statistical model between the energy attenuation coefficient in the sensitive frequency band and average grain size is established through SVR. Experimental verification is conducted on austenitic stainless steel. The average relative error of the predicted grain size is 5.65%, which is better than that of conventional methods. PMID:26995732

  16. Shear wave speed dispersion and attenuation in granular marine sediments.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Masao

    2013-07-01

    The reported compressional wave speed dispersion and attenuation could be explained by a modified gap stiffness model incorporated into the Biot model (the BIMGS model). In contrast, shear wave speed dispersion and attenuation have not been investigated in detail. No measurements of shear wave speed dispersion have been reported, and only Brunson's data provide the frequency characteristics of shear wave attenuation. In this study, Brunson's attenuation measurements are compared to predictions using the Biot-Stoll model and the BIMGS model. It is shown that the BIMGS model accurately predicts the frequency dependence of shear wave attenuation. Then, the shear wave speed dispersion and attenuation in water-saturated silica sand are measured in the frequency range of 4-20 kHz. The vertical stress applied to the sample is 17.6 kPa. The temperature of the sample is set to be 5 °C, 20 °C, and 35 °C in order to change the relaxation frequency in the BIMGS model. The measured results are compared with those calculated using the Biot-Stoll model and the BIMGS model. It is shown that the shear wave speed dispersion and attenuation are predicted accurately by using the BIMGS model. PMID:23862793

  17. Damping factor estimation using spin wave attenuation in permalloy film

    SciTech Connect

    Manago, Takashi; Yamanoi, Kazuto; Kasai, Shinya; Mitani, Seiji

    2015-05-07

    Damping factor of a Permalloy (Py) thin film is estimated by using the magnetostatic spin wave propagation. The attenuation lengths are obtained by the dependence of the transmission intensity on the antenna distance, and decrease with increasing magnetic fields. The relationship between the attenuation length, damping factor, and external magnetic field is derived theoretically, and the damping factor was determined to be 0.0063 by fitting the magnetic field dependence of the attenuation length, using the derived equation. The obtained value is in good agreement with the general value of Py. Thus, this estimation method of the damping factor using spin waves attenuation can be useful tool for ferromagnetic thin films.

  18. Monitoring changes of optical attenuation coefficients of acupuncture points during laser acupuncture by optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yimei; Yang, Hongqin; Wang, Yuhua; Zheng, Liqin; Xie, Shusen

    2010-11-01

    The physical properties of acupuncture point were important to discover the mechanism of acupuncture meridian. In this paper, we used an optical coherence tomography to monitor in vivo the changes of optical attenuation coefficients of Hegu acupuncture point and non-acupuncture point during laser irradiation on Yangxi acupuncture point. The optical attenuation coefficients of Hegu acupuncture point and non-acupuncture point were obtained by fitting the raw data according to the Beer-Lambert's law. The experimental results showed that the optical attenuation coefficient of Hegu acupuncture point decreased during the laser acupuncture, in contrast to a barely changed result in that of non-acupuncture point. The significant change of optical attenuation coefficient of Hegu acupuncture point indicated that there was a correlation between Hegu and Yangxi acupuncture points to some extent.

  19. Correlation equation for the marine drag coefficient and wave steepness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foreman, Richard J.; Emeis, Stefan

    2012-09-01

    This work questions, starting from dimensional considerations, the generality of the belief that the marine drag coefficient levels off with increasing wind speed. Dimensional analysis shows that the drag coefficient scales with the wave steepness as opposed to a wave-age scaling. A correlation equation is employed here that uses wave steepness scaling at low aspect ratios (inverse wave steepnesses) and a constant drag coefficient at high aspect ratios. Invoked in support of the correlation are measurements sourced from the literature and at the FINO1 platform in the North Sea. The correlation equation is then applied to measurements recorded from buoys during the passage of hurricanes Rita, Katrina (2005) and Ike (2008). Results show that the correlation equation anticipates the expected levelling off in deeper water, but a drag coefficient more consistent with a Charnock type relation is also possible in more shallower water. Some suggestions are made for proceeding with a higher-order analysis than that conducted here.

  20. Comparison of RNFL thickness and RPE-normalized RNFL attenuation coefficient for glaucoma diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vermeer, K. A.; van der Schoot, J.; Lemij, H. G.; de Boer, J. F.

    2013-03-01

    Recently, a method to determine the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) attenuation coefficient, based on normalization on the retinal pigment epithelium, was introduced. In contrast to conventional RNFL thickness measures, this novel measure represents a scattering property of the RNFL tissue. In this paper, we compare the RNFL thickness and the RNFL attenuation coefficient on 10 normal and 8 glaucomatous eyes by analyzing the correlation coefficient and the receiver operator curves (ROCs). The thickness and attenuation coefficient showed moderate correlation (r=0.82). Smaller correlation coefficients were found within normal (r=0.55) and glaucomatous (r=0.48) eyes. The full separation between normal and glaucomatous eyes based on the RNFL attenuation coefficient yielded an area under the ROC (AROC) of 1.0. The AROC for the RNFL thickness was 0.9875. No statistically significant difference between the two measures was found by comparing the AROC. RNFL attenuation coefficients may thus replace current RNFL thickness measurements or be combined with it to improve glaucoma diagnosis.

  1. Attenuation of the Squared Canonical Correlation Coefficient under Varying Estimates of Score Reliability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Celia M.

    2010-01-01

    Research pertaining to the distortion of the squared canonical correlation coefficient has traditionally been limited to the effects of sampling error and associated correction formulas. The purpose of this study was to compare the degree of attenuation of the squared canonical correlation coefficient under varying conditions of score reliability.…

  2. Mass attenuation coefficients of composite materials by Geant4, XCOM and experimental data: comparative study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medhat, M. E.; Singh, V. P.

    2014-09-01

    The main goal of this present study is focused on testing the applicability of Geant4 electromagnetic models for studying mass attenuations coefficients for different types of composite materials at 59.5, 80, 356, 661.6, 1173.2 and 1332.5 keV photon energies. The simulated results of mass attenuation coefficients were compared with the experimental and theoretical XCOM data for the same samples and a good agreement has been observed. The results indicate that this process can be followed to determine the data on the attenuation of gamma rays with the several energies in different materials. The modeling for photon interaction parameters was standard for any type of composite samples. The Geant4 code can be utilized for gamma ray attenuation coefficients for the sample at different energies, which may sometimes be impractical by experiment investigation.

  3. The first direct measurements of upper oceanic crustal compressional wave attenuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobson, R. S.; Lewis, B. T. R.

    1990-10-01

    The first direct measurement of compressional wave attenuation of the uppermost 650 m of oceanic crust was performed using data recorded by seafloor hydrophones and large (56-116 kg), deep, explosive sources. The site was 13 km east of the southernmost Juan de Fuca Ridge on crust 0.4 m.y. old Spectral ratios were performed between bottom refracting waves and direct water waves, adjusted for spreading losses and transmission coefficient losses. Several tests of the data were performed, demonstrating that attenuation is linearly related to frequency between 15 and 140 Hz, but frequency-independent components of attenuation are also evident. Values of compressional wave Q cluster between 20 and 50 and do not show any systematic variation with depth over 650 m. The attenuation results also indicate the presence of heterogeneities within the crust, as the solutions for each receiver's data set are significantly different. No evidence for azimuthal variations of attenuation are supported by the data, although the data do not optimally sample a wide variation of azimuths. Our attenuation values are judged to be normal to higher than expected for the whole oceanic crust, based upon comparisons to results from synthetic seismogram modeling by others and by modeling signal to noise ratios of typical seismic refraction profiles. The results are consistent with recent laboratory measurements at ultrasonic frequencies for dry and saturated basalts at seafloor pressures and temperatures.

  4. Calculation of Diffusion Coefficients from Bounce Resonance with Magnetosonic Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, X.; Li, X.; Lu, Q.; Dai, L.

    2015-12-01

    Theoretical bounce resonance diffusion coefficients for interactions between electrons and magnetosonic waves are calculated and validated using guiding-center test particle simulations. First, we compare the theoretical diffusion coefficients of Roberts and Schulz with test particle simulations and find perfect agreement. However, the theoretical diffusion coefficients of Roberts and Schulz assume waves to be present on the whole trajectories of particles; therefore, they are not directly applicable to magnetosonic waves, which are found to be confined to equatorial regions from observations. Second, we derive a new set of bounce-resonance diffusion coefficients, taking into consideration the equatorial confinement of magnetosonic waves. These new diffusion coefficients are also validated by test particle simulations. Using a previously published magnetosonic wave model, our results demonstrate that bounce-resonance diffusion mainly results in strong pitch angle scattering of energetic electrons even with a moderate wave amplitude of 50 pT. We conclude that bounce-resonance diffusion plays an important role in relativistic electron dynamics and should be incorporated into global radiation belt modeling.

  5. Brain tumor CT attenuation coefficients: semiquantitative analysis of histograms.

    PubMed

    Ratzka, M; Haubitz, I

    1983-01-01

    This paper reports on work in progress on semiquantitative curve analyses of histograms of brain tumors. Separation of statistical groups of attenuation values obtained by computer calculation is done separately from scanning, using histogram printouts as the data input for a programmable calculator. This method is discussed together with its results in 50 cases of malignant gliomas. The detection of hidden tissue portions and the more accurate evaluation of partial enhancement effects have been the investigators' main concerns to the present time; however, this method may allow more specific diagnosis of malignancy and changes in tumor characteristics than visual assessment alone. This has not been proven by studies that have evaluated large numbers of cases, but seems to be worth pursuing as a new approach. PMID:6410783

  6. Mass attenuation coefficient calculations of different detector crystals by means of FLUKA Monte Carlo method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebru Ermis, Elif; Celiktas, Cuneyt

    2015-07-01

    Calculations of gamma-ray mass attenuation coefficients of various detector materials (crystals) were carried out by means of FLUKA Monte Carlo (MC) method at different gamma-ray energies. NaI, PVT, GSO, GaAs and CdWO4 detector materials were chosen in the calculations. Calculated coefficients were also compared with the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) values. Obtained results through this method were highly in accordance with those of the NIST values. It was concluded from the study that FLUKA MC method can be an alternative way to calculate the gamma-ray mass attenuation coefficients of the detector materials.

  7. Attenuation layer for magnetostatic wave (MSW) absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glass, H. L.; Adkins, L. R.; Stearns, F. S.

    1984-09-01

    A new technique has been developed for the suppression of MSW end reflections which give rise to passband ripple. The basic idea is to provide a thin film of highly attenuating epitaxial material at the ends of a MSW delay line while preserving high quality YIG in the active region of the device. The GGG wafer preparation is a three step process which involves: (1) the growth of the attenuation layer, (2) the removal of this layer from the central region of the wafer and (3) the growth of high quality YIG on the remaining structure. Delay lines using the attenuation layer for end terminations have been evaluated experimentally and compared to devices utilizing other termination methods. The results indicate that the attenuation layer method produces ripple suppression characteristics which are the equal of those obtained with other termination techniques. The advantage of this new method lies in its suitability for large quantity fabrication requirements.

  8. Attenuation of Seismic Waves by Grain Boundary Relaxation

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, David D.

    1971-01-01

    Experimental observations of the attenuation of elastic waves in polycrystalline ceramics and rocks reveal an attenuation mechanism, called grain boundary relaxation, which is likely to be predominant cause of seismic attenuation in the earth's mantle. For this mechanism, the internal friction (the reciprocal of the “intrinsic Q” of the material) depends strongly upon frequency and is in good agreement with Walsh's theory of attenuation (J. Geophys. Res., 74, 4333, 1969) in partially melted rock. When Walsh's theory is extended to provide a model of the anelasticity of the earth, using the experimental values of physical parameters reported here, the results are in excellent agreement with seismic observations. PMID:16591937

  9. The role of the reflection coefficient in precision measurement of ultrasonic attenuation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Generazio, E. R.

    1984-01-01

    Ultrasonic attenuation measurements using contact, pulse-echo techniques are sensitive to surface roughness and couplant thickness variations. This can reduce considerable inaccuracies in the measurement of the attenuation coefficient for broadband pulses. Inaccuracies arise from variations in the reflection coefficient at the buffer-couplant-sample interface. The reflection coefficient is examined as a function of the surface roughness and corresponding couplant thickness variations. Interrelations with ultrasonic frequency are illustrated. Reliable attenuation measurements are obtained only when the frequency dependence of the reflection coefficient is incorporated in signal analysis. Data are given for nickel 200 samples and a silicon nitride ceramic bar having surface roughness variations in the 0.3 to 3.0 microns range for signal bandwidths in the 50 to 100 MHz range.

  10. The role of the reflection coefficient in precision measurement of ultrasonic attenuation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Generazio, E. R.

    1985-01-01

    Ultrasonic attenuation measurements using contact, pulse-echo techniques are sensitive to surface roughness and couplant thickness variations. This can reduce considerable inaccuracies in the measurement of the attenuation coefficient for broadband pulses. Inaccuracies arise from variations in the reflection coefficient at the buffer-couplant-sample interface. The reflection coefficient is examined as a function of the surface roughness and corresponding couplant thickness variations. Interrelations with ultrasonic frequency are illustrated. Reliable attenuation measurements are obtained only when the frequency dependence of the reflection coefficient is incorporated in signal analysis. Data are given for nickel 200 samples and a silicon nitride ceramic bar having surface roughness variations in the 0.3 to 3.0 microns range for signal bandwidths in the 50 to 100 MHz range.

  11. FXG mass attenuation coefficient evaluation for radiotherapy routine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreira, M. V.; de Almeida, A.; Costa, R. T.; Perles, L. A.

    2004-01-01

    The knowledge of a radioactive beam energy or quality is important in radiotherapy once it is correlated with the type, size, and localization of the tumor. One indicative of the radiation quality is the half-value-layer (HVL), the material thickness which reduces the beam intensity to half. The analysis of a treatment beam spectrum can be inferred through its homogeneity coefficient (HC, ratio between the first and the second HVL) that for values >= 0.7 has the indication to be adequate for treatments. Another important indicator of radiation quality is the mass absorption coefficient (cm2/g), related to the photons energies absorbed in a particular exposed material. Once that several materials can be used as radiation detectors for X and γ dosimetry, this work has the purpose to verify the ferrous Xylenol gelatin (FXG) material performance, through its μ/ρ behavior and compare it with the μ/ρ behavior for soft tissue. The X and γ energies where selected, in the energies normally used in radiotherapy and their spectra were evaluated using the HC coefficient. The μ/ρ, for the FXG material, were obtained experimentally and from simulation with X-COM and a developed routine using the GEANT4 Library. From the results from all μ/ρ values obtained for the FXG material, when compared to those from water, one can see similar behaviors, when one considers measurements for energies greater than 78.0 keV. These results indicate that, once the human body is composed with +/-80 % of water, the FXG for the energies used, could also be used as soft tissue simulator.

  12. Analytic expressions for ULF wave radiation belt radial diffusion coefficients

    PubMed Central

    Ozeke, Louis G; Mann, Ian R; Murphy, Kyle R; Jonathan Rae, I; Milling, David K

    2014-01-01

    We present analytic expressions for ULF wave-derived radiation belt radial diffusion coefficients, as a function of L and Kp, which can easily be incorporated into global radiation belt transport models. The diffusion coefficients are derived from statistical representations of ULF wave power, electric field power mapped from ground magnetometer data, and compressional magnetic field power from in situ measurements. We show that the overall electric and magnetic diffusion coefficients are to a good approximation both independent of energy. We present example 1-D radial diffusion results from simulations driven by CRRES-observed time-dependent energy spectra at the outer boundary, under the action of radial diffusion driven by the new ULF wave radial diffusion coefficients and with empirical chorus wave loss terms (as a function of energy, Kp and L). There is excellent agreement between the differential flux produced by the 1-D, Kp-driven, radial diffusion model and CRRES observations of differential electron flux at 0.976 MeV—even though the model does not include the effects of local internal acceleration sources. Our results highlight not only the importance of correct specification of radial diffusion coefficients for developing accurate models but also show significant promise for belt specification based on relatively simple models driven by solar wind parameters such as solar wind speed or geomagnetic indices such as Kp. Key Points Analytic expressions for the radial diffusion coefficients are presented The coefficients do not dependent on energy or wave m value The electric field diffusion coefficient dominates over the magnetic PMID:26167440

  13. Relative velocity of seagrass blades: Implications for wave attenuation in low-energy environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradley, Kevin; Houser, Chris

    2009-03-01

    While the ability of subaquatic vegetation to attenuate wave energy is well recognized in general, there is a paucity of data from the field to describe the rate and mechanisms of wave decay, particularly with respect to the relative motion of the vegetation. The purpose of this study was to quantify the attenuation of incident wave height through a seagrass meadow and characterize the blade movement under oscillatory flow under the low-energy conditions characteristic of fetch-limited and sheltered environments. The horizontal motion of the seagrass blades and the velocity just above the seagrass canopy were measured using a digital video camera and an acoustic Doppler velicometer (ADV) respectively in order to refine the estimates of the drag coefficient based on the relative velocity. Significant wave heights (Hs) were observed to increase by ˜0.02 m (˜20%) through the first 5 m of the seagrass bed but subsequently decrease exponentially over the remainder of the bed. The exponential decay coefficient varied in response to the Reynolds number calculated using blade width (as the length scale) and the oscillatory velocity measured immediately above the canopy. The ability of the seagrass to attenuate wave energy decreases as incident wave heights increase and conditions become more turbulent. Estimates of the time-averaged canopy height and the calculated hydraulic roughness suggest that, as the oscillatory velocity increases, the seagrass becomes fully extended and leans in the direction of flow for a longer part of the wave cycle. The relationship between the drag coefficient and the Reynolds number further suggests that the vegetation is swaying (going with the flow) at low-energy conditions but becomes increasingly rigid as oscillatory velocities increase over the limited range of the conditions observed (200 < Re < 800). In addition to the changing behavior of the seagrass motion, the attenuation was not uniform with wave frequency, and waves at a

  14. Studies on effective atomic numbers, electron densities and mass attenuation coefficients in Au alloys.

    PubMed

    Han, I; Demir, L

    2010-01-01

    The total mass attenuation coefficients (mu/rho) for pure Au and Au99Be1, Au88Ge12, Au95Zn5 alloys were measured at 59.5 and 88.0 keV photon energies. The samples were irradiated with 241Am and 109Cd radioactive point source using transmission arrangement. The gamma- rays were counted by a Si(Li) detector with resolution of 160 eV at 5.9 keV. Total atomic and electronic cross-sections (sigmat and sigmae), effective atomic and electron densities (Zeff and Nel) were determined using the obtained mass attenuation coefficients for investigated Au alloys. The theoretical mass attenuation coefficients of each alloy were estimated using mixture rule. PMID:20421703

  15. Measurement of atomic number and mass attenuation coefficient in magnesium ferrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadam, R. H.; Alone, S. T.; Bichile, G. K.; Jadhav, K. M.

    2007-05-01

    Pure magnesium ferrite sample was prepared by standard ceramic technique and characterized by X-ray diffraction method. XRD pattern revealed that the sample possess single-phase cubic spinel structure. The linear attenuation coefficient (μ), mass attenuation coefficient (μ/ρ), total atomic cross-section (σ_{tot}), total electronic cross-section (σ_{ele}) and the effective atomic number (Z_{eff}) were calculated for pure magnesium ferrite (MgFe_{2}O_{4}). The values of γ-ray mass attenuation coefficient were obtained using a NaI energy selective scintillation counter with radioactive γ-ray sources having energy 0.36, 0.511, 0.662, 1.17 and 1.28 MeV. The experimentally obtained values of μ/ρ and Z_{eff} agreed fairly well with those obtained theoretically.

  16. Determination of mass attenuation coefficient of low-Z dosimetric materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Khayatt, A. M.; Ali, A. M.; Singh, Vishwanath P.; Badiger, N. M.

    2014-12-01

    The mass attenuation coefficients of some low-Z dosimetric materials with potential applications in dosimetry, medical and radiation protection have been investigated using the Monte Carlo simulation code Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP). Appreciable variations are noted for the mass attenuation coefficient by changing the photon energy. The MCNP-simulated parameters are compared with the experimental data wherever possible and theoretical values through the WinXcom program. The simulated results obtained by MCNP generally agree well with the experiment and WinXcom predictions for various low-Z dosimetric and tissue substitute materials. In addition, the mass attenuation coefficients around the k-edges for low-Z dosimetric materials estimated from the MCNP code agree very well with WinXcom prediction. Finally, the results indicate that this simulation process can be followed to determine the interaction parameters of gamma rays in such low-Z materials for which there are no satisfactory experimental values available.

  17. Investigation of photon attenuation coefficient of some building materials used in Turkey

    SciTech Connect

    Dogan, B.; Altinsoy, N.

    2015-03-30

    In this study, some building materials regularly used in Turkey, such as concrete, gas concrete, pumice and brick have been investigated in terms of mass attenuation coefficient at different gamma-ray energies. Measurements were carried out by gamma spectrometry containing NaI(Tl) detector. Narrow beam gamma-ray transmission geometry was used for the attenuation measurements. The results are in good agreement with the theoretical calculation of XCOM code.

  18. Study of photon attenuation coefficients of some multielement materials. [123-1250 keV

    SciTech Connect

    Bhandal, G.S. ); Singh, K. . Dept. of Physics)

    1994-03-01

    Total photon mass attenuation of six multielement shielding materials (concrete, plaster of paris, quick lime, black cement, white cement, and silica) is measured in the 123- to 1,250-keV energy range. The experimental results are analyzed in terms of cross sections, effective atomic numbers, and electron densities. Considerable sensitivity of the total mass attenuation coefficients and effective atomic numbers to variations in oxygen content are found in these multielement materials.

  19. Investigation of photon attenuation coefficient of some building materials used in Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dogan, B.; Altinsoy, N.

    2015-03-01

    In this study, some building materials regularly used in Turkey, such as concrete, gas concrete, pumice and brick have been investigated in terms of mass attenuation coefficient at different gamma-ray energies. Measurements were carried out by gamma spectrometry containing NaI(Tl) detector. Narrow beam gamma-ray transmission geometry was used for the attenuation measurements. The results are in good agreement with the theoretical calculation of XCOM code.

  20. Attenuation character of seismic waves in Sikkim Himalaya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazarika, Pinki; Kumar, M. Ravi; Kumar, Dinesh

    2013-10-01

    In this study, we investigate the seismic wave attenuation beneath Sikkim Himalaya using P, S and coda waves from 68 local earthquakes registered by eight broad-band stations of the SIKKIM network. The attenuation quality factor (Q) depends on frequency as well as lapse time and depth. The value of Q varies from (i) 141 to 639 for P waves, (ii) 143 to 1108 for S waves and (iii) 274 to 1678 for coda waves, at central frequencies of 1.5 Hz and 9 Hz, respectively. The relations that govern the attenuation versus frequency dependence are Qα = (96 ± 0.9) f (0.94 ± 0.01), Qβ = (100 ± 1.4) f (1.16 ± 0.01) and Qc = (189 ± 1.5) f (1.2 ± 0.01) for P, S and coda waves, respectively. The ratio between Qβ and Qα is larger than unity, implying larger attenuation of P compared to S waves. Also, the values of Qc are higher than Qβ. Estimation of the relative contribution of intrinsic (Qi) and scattering (Qs) attenuation reveals that the former mechanism is dominant in Sikkim Himalaya. We note that the estimates of Qc lie in between Qi and Qs and are very close to Qi at lower frequencies. This is in agreement with the theoretical and laboratory experiments. The strong frequency and depth dependence of the attenuation quality factor suggests a highly heterogeneous crust in the Sikkim Himalaya. Also, the high Q values estimated for this region compared to the other segments of Himalaya can be reconciled in terms of moderate seismic activity, unlike rest of the Himalaya, which is seismically more active.

  1. Analysis of dispersion and attenuation of surface waves in poroelastic media in the exploration-seismic frequency band

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zhang, Y.; Xu, Y.; Xia, J.

    2011-01-01

    We analyse dispersion and attenuation of surface waves at free surfaces of possible vacuum/poroelastic media: permeable-'open pore', impermeable-'closed pore' and partially permeable boundaries, which have not been previously reported in detail by researchers, under different surface-permeable, viscous-damping, elastic and fluid-flowing conditions. Our discussion is focused on their characteristics in the exploration-seismic frequency band (a few through 200 Hz) for near-surface applications. We find two surface-wave modes exist, R1 waves for all conditions, and R2 waves for closed-pore and partially permeable conditions. For R1 waves, velocities disperse most under partially permeable conditions and least under the open-pore condition. High-coupling damping coefficients move the main dispersion frequency range to high frequencies. There is an f1 frequency dependence as a constant-Q model for attenuation at high frequencies. R1 waves for the open pore are most sensitive to elastic modulus variation, but least sensitive to tortuosities variation. R1 waves for partially permeable surface radiate as non-physical waves (Im(k) < 0) at low frequencies. For R2 waves, velocities are slightly lower than the bulk slow P2 waves. At low frequencies, both velocity and attenuation are diffusive of f1/2 frequency dependence, as P2 waves. It is found that for partially permeable surfaces, the attenuation displays -f1 frequency dependence as frequency increasing. High surface permeability, low-coupling damping coefficients, low Poisson's ratios, and low tortuosities increase the slope of the -f1 dependence. When the attenuation coefficients reach 0, R2 waves for partially permeable surface begin to radiate as non-physical waves. ?? 2011 The Authors Geophysical Journal International ?? 2011 RAS.

  2. A calibration transmission method to determine the gamma-ray linear attenuation coefficient without a collimator.

    PubMed

    Byun, Jong-In; Yun, Ju-Yong

    2015-08-01

    It is shown that the gamma-ray linear attenuation coefficient of a sample with unknown chemical composition can be determined through a systematic calibration of the correlation between the linear attenuation coefficient, gamma-ray energy and the relative degree of attenuation. For calibration, H2O, MnO2, NaCl, Na2CO3 and (NH4)2SO4 were used as reference materials. Point-like gamma-ray sources with modest activity of approximately 37kBq, along with an HPGe detector, were used in the measurements. A semi-empirical formula was derived to calculate the linear attenuation coefficients as a function of the relative count rate and the gamma-ray energy. The method was applied to the determination of the linear attenuation coefficients for K2CrO4 and SiO2 test samples in the same setup used in calibration. The experimental result agreed well with the ones calculated by elementary data. PMID:25997111

  3. Measurement of the linear attenuation coefficients of breast tissues by synchrotron radiation computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, R. C.; Longo, R.; Rigon, L.; Zanconati, F.; De Pellegrin, A.; Arfelli, F.; Dreossi, D.; Menk, R.-H.; Vallazza, E.; Xiao, T. Q.; Castelli, E.

    2010-09-01

    The measurement of the linear attenuation coefficients of breast tissues is of fundamental importance in the field of breast x-ray diagnostic imaging. Different groups have evaluated the linear attenuation coefficients of breast tissues by carrying out direct attenuation measurements in which the specimens were thin and selected as homogeneous as possible. Here, we use monochromatic and high-intensity synchrotron radiation computed tomography (SR CT) to evaluate the linear attenuation coefficients of surgical breast tissues in the energy range from 15 to 26.5 keV. X-ray detection is performed by a custom digital silicon micro-strip device, developed in the framework of the PICASSO INFN experiment. Twenty-three human surgical breast samples were selected for SR CT and histological study. Six of them underwent CT, both as fresh tissue and after formalin fixation, while the remaining 17 were imaged only as formalin-fixed tissues. Our results for fat and fibrous tissues are in good agreement with the published values. However, in contrast to the published data, our measurements show no significant differences between fibrous and tumor tissues. Moreover, our results for fresh and formalin-fixed tissues demonstrate a reduction of the linear attenuation coefficient for fibrous and tumor tissues after fixation.

  4. Effective density and mass attenuation coefficient for building material in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Salinas, I C P; Conti, C C; Lopes, R T

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents values for density and mass attenuation coefficient of building materials commonly used in Brazil. Transmission measurements were performed to provide input information for simulations with MCNP4B code. The structure for the clay bricks was simulated as a mix of all material layers and an effective density determined. The mass attenuation coefficients were determined for the 50-3,000 keV gamma-ray energy range. A comparison with results for similar materials found in the literature showed good agreement. PMID:16257357

  5. Robust determination of mass attenuation coefficients of materials with unknown thickness and density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurudirek, M.; Medhat, M. E.

    2014-07-01

    An alternative approach is used to measure normalized mass attenuation coefficients (µ/ρ) of materials with unknown thickness and density. The adopted procedure is based on the use of simultaneous emission of Kα and Kβ X-ray lines as well as gamma peaks from radioactive sources in transmission geometry. 109Cd and 60Co radioactive sources were used for the purpose of the investigation. It has been observed that using the simultaneous X- and/or gamma rays of different energy allows accurate determination of relative mass attenuation coefficients by eliminating the dependence of µ/ρ on thickness and density of the material.

  6. On attenuation of seismic waves associated with flow in fractures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinci, C.; Renner, J.; Steeb, H.

    2014-11-01

    Heterogeneity of porous media induces a number of fluid-flow mechanisms causing attenuation of seismic waves. Attenuation induced by squirt-type mechanisms has previously been analyzed for aspect ratios smaller or equal to 103. Using a hybrid-dimensional modeling approach, particularly apt for large aspect ratio conduits, we numerically simulated deformation-induced fluid flow along two intersecting fractures to investigate the physics of attenuation related to the interaction of fracture-induced fluid flow and to leak-off. Attenuation related to fracture flow increases in magnitude with increasing geometrical aspect ratio of the fracture. The inherent time scales of both flow mechanisms do not influence each other, but the faster process is associated with stronger attenuation than the slower process. Models relying on simple diffusion equations have rather limited potential for approximation of pressure transients.

  7. [Optical properties and remote sensing retrieval model of diffuse attenuation coefficient of Taihu Lake water body].

    PubMed

    Le, Cheng-Feng; Li, Yun-Mei; Zha, Yong; Sun, De-Yong; Wang, Li-Zhen

    2009-02-01

    The spectral and chemical analytical data of Taihu Lake water quality in Nov. 8-22, 2007 were used to analyze the spectral characteristics of diffuse attenuation coefficient (Kd) of the water body in autumn and related affecting factors. On the basis of this analysis, the Kd at band 490 nm, Kd (490), was used as a variable to build the relationship between Kd and remote sensing reflectance. The results indicated that within the scope of visible band, the Kd of the water body at most locations of Taihu Lake presented an exponent decreasing trend with the increase of wave length. Due to the higher concentration of phytoplankton in some locations, a peak value of Kd was presented at band 675 nm. Non-organic suspended particles, because of their higher content in suspended sediment, had larger effects on Kd than organic suspended ones. There was a good correlation between Kd and remote sensing reflectance. Taking Rrs (550), Rrs (675) and Rrs (731) as independent variables and doing regression analysis with Kd (490), a good linear relationship was found between Kd (490) and Rrs (731), and multi-variate linear regression analysis using variables Rrs (550), Rrs (675) and Rrs (731) could get better effect (R2 > 0.96) than the regression analysis using variable Rrs (731). PMID:19459373

  8. Effect of soil texture and excitation frequency on the propagation and attenuation of acoustic waves at saturated conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo, Wei-Cheng; Yeh, Chao-Lung; Jan, Chyan-Deng

    2008-08-01

    SummaryThe study of the propagation and dissipation of acoustic waves through a fluid-containing porous medium is crucial for the successful application of seismic methods to characterize subsurface hydrological properties. To gain a better understanding of changes in two important acoustic wave characteristics (speed and attenuation) due to the effect of soil texture and excitation frequency, a complex-valued dispersion relation obtained from the Biot theory of poroelasticity was solved numerically for eleven soil texture classes whose pore space is fully saturated by one of two very different fluids, air or water. Two modes of acoustic motion can be demonstrated to exist, known as the Biot fast and slow waves. Five lower excitation frequencies (100-500 Hz) were selected for numerical simulation, below which Darcy's law remains valid for describing porous media flow under wave perturbation. Numerical results show that in the frequency range we examined, the predicted phase speed of the Biot fast wave takes the same value as the Biot reference speed. The variation in speed is not obvious in a water-filled system, but becomes more significant in an air-filled system. When the pore fluid is water, an inverse linear relation exists between the phase speed of the Biot fast wave and porosity. An important physical parameter controlling its attenuation coefficient is intrinsic permeability, which renders a positive impact. A statistical analysis indicates that the attenuation coefficient of the Biot fast wave linearly increases with an increase in intrinsic permeability. In an air-saturated system, the phase speed of the Biot slow wave is found to be quadratically proportional to intrinsic permeability, whereas the attenuation coefficient of the Biot slow wave bears a quadratic relation with the inverse of intrinsic permeability. A study on the influence of pore fluid reveals that the Biot fast wave attenuates more in the water-saturated system than in the air

  9. Relating wave attenuation to pancake ice thickness, using field measurements and model results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doble, Martin J.; De Carolis, Giacomo; Meylan, Michael H.; Bidlot, Jean-Raymond; Wadhams, Peter

    2015-06-01

    Wave attenuation coefficients (α, m-1) were calculated from in situ data transmitted by custom wave buoys deployed into the advancing pancake ice region of the Weddell Sea. Data cover a 12 day period as the buoy array was first compressed and then dilated under the influence of a passing low-pressure system. Attenuation was found to vary over more than 2 orders of magnitude and to be far higher than that observed in broken-floe marginal ice zones. A clear linear relation between α and ice thickness was demonstrated, using ice thickness from a novel dynamic/thermodynamic model. A simple expression for α in terms of wave period and ice thickness was derived, for application in research and operational models. The variation of α was further investigated with a two-layer viscous model, and a linear relation was found between eddy viscosity in the sub-ice boundary layer and ice thickness.

  10. Pore-Scale Modeling of Pore Structure Effects on P-Wave Scattering Attenuation in Dry Rocks

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tianyang; Qiu, Hao; Wang, Feifei

    2015-01-01

    Underground rocks usually have complex pore system with a variety of pore types and a wide range of pore size. The effects of pore structure on elastic wave attenuation cannot be neglected. We investigated the pore structure effects on P-wave scattering attenuation in dry rocks by pore-scale modeling based on the wave theory and the similarity principle. Our modeling results indicate that pore size, pore shape (such as aspect ratio), and pore density are important factors influencing P-wave scattering attenuation in porous rocks, and can explain the variation of scattering attenuation at the same porosity. From the perspective of scattering attenuation, porous rocks can safely suit to the long wavelength assumption when the ratio of wavelength to pore size is larger than 15. Under the long wavelength condition, the scattering attenuation coefficient increases as a power function as the pore density increases, and it increases exponentially with the increase in aspect ratio. For a certain porosity, rocks with smaller aspect ratio and/or larger pore size have stronger scattering attenuation. When the pore aspect ratio is larger than 0.5, the variation of scattering attenuation at the same porosity is dominantly caused by pore size and almost independent of the pore aspect ratio. These results lay a foundation for pore structure inversion from elastic wave responses in porous rocks. PMID:25961729

  11. Pore-scale modeling of pore structure effects on P-wave scattering attenuation in dry rocks.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zizhen; Wang, Ruihe; Li, Tianyang; Qiu, Hao; Wang, Feifei

    2015-01-01

    Underground rocks usually have complex pore system with a variety of pore types and a wide range of pore size. The effects of pore structure on elastic wave attenuation cannot be neglected. We investigated the pore structure effects on P-wave scattering attenuation in dry rocks by pore-scale modeling based on the wave theory and the similarity principle. Our modeling results indicate that pore size, pore shape (such as aspect ratio), and pore density are important factors influencing P-wave scattering attenuation in porous rocks, and can explain the variation of scattering attenuation at the same porosity. From the perspective of scattering attenuation, porous rocks can safely suit to the long wavelength assumption when the ratio of wavelength to pore size is larger than 15. Under the long wavelength condition, the scattering attenuation coefficient increases as a power function as the pore density increases, and it increases exponentially with the increase in aspect ratio. For a certain porosity, rocks with smaller aspect ratio and/or larger pore size have stronger scattering attenuation. When the pore aspect ratio is larger than 0.5, the variation of scattering attenuation at the same porosity is dominantly caused by pore size and almost independent of the pore aspect ratio. These results lay a foundation for pore structure inversion from elastic wave responses in porous rocks. PMID:25961729

  12. Shear wave velocity and attenuation from pulse-echo studies of Berea sandstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Douglas H.; Wang, Herbert F.

    1994-06-01

    The pulse-echo spectral-ratio technique has been adapted to the determination of ultrasonic shear wave attenuation in sandstone at variable states of saturation and pressure. The method can measure shear attenuation coefficients in the range 0.5 dB/cm to 8 dB/cm to within +/- 0.5 dB/cm. For the Berea sandstone, this range corresponds to values of the shear quality factor Q(sub s) between 10 and 100. Spectra Q(sub s) show that between 600 and 1110 kHz, Q(sub s) decreases with frequency, particularly at high pressures (up to 70 MPa). Ultrasonic shear wave attenuation in a 90% water-saturated sample was intermediate between that for dry samples and the relatively high attenuation in fully saturated rock. Strong pressure dependence is seen in the shear attentuation for all saturation states, indicating a dominant role of dissipation mechanisms operating within open and compliant cracks. Substantial shear attenuation remains at the highest effective pressure applied to the saturated sample, which may be due to a more 'global' fluid-flow loss mechanism. Scattering losses as described by weak scattering theories for compressional waves, do not appear to be dominant at these frequencies.

  13. Calculation of radiation attenuation coefficients, effective atomic numbers and electron densities for some building materials.

    PubMed

    Damla, N; Baltas, H; Celik, A; Kiris, E; Cevik, U

    2012-07-01

    Some building materials, regularly used in Turkey, such as sand, cement, gas concrete (lightweight, aerated concrete), tile and brick, have been investigated in terms of mass attenuation coefficient (μ/ρ), effective atomic, numbers (Z(eff)), effective electron densities (N(e)) and photon interaction cross section (σ(a)) at 14 different energies from 81- to 1332-keV gamma-ray energies. The gamma rays were detected by using gamma-ray spectroscopy, a High Purity Germanium (HPGe) detector. The elemental compositions of samples were analysed using an energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometer. Mass attenuation coefficients of these samples have been compared with tabulations based upon the results of WinXcom. The theoretical mass attenuation coefficients were estimated using the mixture rule and the experimental values of investigated parameters were compared with the calculated values. The agreement of measured values of mass attenuation coefficient, effective atomic numbers, effective electron densities and photon interaction cross section with the theory has been found to be quite satisfactory. PMID:22128356

  14. Comparison of attenuation coefficients for VVER-440 and VVER-1000 pressure vessels

    SciTech Connect

    Marek, M.; Rataj, J.; Vandlik, S.

    2011-07-01

    The paper summarizes the attenuation coefficient of the neutron fluence with E > 0.5 MeV through a reactor pressure vessel for vodo-vodyanoi energetichesky reactor (VVER) reactor types measured and/or calculated for mock-up experiments, as well as for operated nuclear power plant (NPP) units. The attenuation coefficient is possible to evaluate directly only by using the retro-dosimetry, based on a combination of the measured activities from the weld sample and concurrent ex-vessel measurement. The available neutron fluence attenuation coefficients (E > 0.5 MeV), calculated and measured at a mock-up experiment simulating the VVER-440-unit conditions, vary from 3.5 to 6.15. A similar situation is used for the calculations and mock-up experiment measurements for the VVER-1000 RPV, where the attenuation coefficient of the neutron fluence varies from 5.99 to 8.85. Because of the difference in calculations for the real units and the mock-up experiments, the necessity to design and perform calculation benchmarks both for VVER-440 and VVER-1000 would be meaningful if the calculation model is designed adequately to a given unit. (authors)

  15. Effect of ilmenite on the attenuation coefficient of gamma ray shielding cementious matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Faramawy, Nabil; Ramadan, Wageeh; El-Zakla, Tarek; Sayed, Magda; El-Dessouky, Mohamed; Sakr, Khaled

    2015-11-01

    The current work investigated the effect of the Portland cement mixed with different percentages of water and ilmenite ore on the attenuation of gamma radiation as shielding blocks. Different concentrations of ilmenite from 5% up to 20% with different grain size were mixed with cement. The properties of the investigated blocks, as compressive strength, wet and dry density, absorption and porosity percentages, were studied. The thermal stability of the studied samples and their X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns were examined through thermogravimetric analysis and XRD respectively. In addition, the attenuation coefficients of the considered samples for gamma radiation were performed using gamma ray spectrometer. The results revealed that, the maximum linear attenuation coefficient (µ) and minimum transmission fraction were performed for cement mixed with 10% of ilmenite and with the size range 106-250 µm.

  16. Efficiency of shock wave attenuation in ducts by various methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frolov, S. M.

    1993-02-01

    Different methods of shock wave attenuation in ducts are compared in terms of efficiency. The methods investigated include expansion of the duct cross section, the use of perforated side walls, and the use of porous screens and screen cascades. The attentuation of air shock waves is estimated by using a unified approach which provides satisfactory agreement with experimental data. Based on the results of the study, a nomogram is plotted which can be used for practical calculations.

  17. Quantification of numerical aperture-dependence of the OCT attenuation coefficient (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peinado, Liliana M.; Bloemen, Paul R.; Almasian, Mitra; van Leeuwen, Ton G.; Faber, Dirk J.

    2016-03-01

    Despite the improvements in early cancer diagnosis, adequate diagnostic tools for early staging of bladder cancer tumors are lacking [1]. MEMS-probes based on optical coherence tomography (OCT) provide cross-sectional imaging with a high-spatial resolution at a high-imaging speed, improving visualization of cancerous tissue [2-3]. Additionally, studies show that the measurement of localized attenuation coefficient allows discrimination between healthy and cancerous tissue [4]. We have designed a new miniaturized MEMS-probe based on OCT that will optimize early diagnosis by improving functional visualization of suspicious lesions in bladder. During the optical design phase of the probe, we have studied the effect of the numerical aperture (NA) on the OCT signal attenuation. For this study, we have employed an InnerVision Santec OCT system with several numerical apertures (25mm, 40mm, 60mm, 100mm, 150mm and 200mm using achromatic lenses). The change in attenuation coefficient was studied using 15 dilutions of intralipid ranging between 6*10-5 volume% and 20 volume%. We obtained the attenuation coefficient from the OCT images at several fixed positions of the focuses using established OCT models (e.g. single scattering with known confocal point spread function (PSF) [5] and multiple scattering using the Extended Huygens Fresnel model [6]). As a result, a non-linear increase of the scattering coefficient as a function of intralipid concentration (due to dependent scattering) was obtained for all numerical apertures. For all intralipid samples, the measured attenuation coefficient decreased with a decrease in NA. Our results suggest a non-negligible influence of the NA on the measured attenuation coefficient. [1] Khochikar MV. Rationale for an early detection program for bladder cancer. Indian J Urol 2011 Apr-Jun; 27(2): 218-225. [2] Sun J and Xie H. Review Article MEMS-Based Endoscopic Optical Coherence Tomography. IJO 2011, Article ID 825629, 12 pages. doi:10

  18. Fault-zone attenuation of high-frequency seismic waves

    SciTech Connect

    Blakeslee, S.; Malin, P.; Alvarez, M. )

    1989-11-01

    The authors have developed a technique to measure seismic attenuation within an active fault-zone at seismogenic depths. Utilizing a pair of stations and pairs of earthquakes, spectral ratios are performed to isolate attenuation produced by wave-propagation within the fault-zone. The empirical approach eliminates common source, propagation, instrument and near-surface site effects. The technique was applied to a cluster of 19 earthquakes recorded by a pair of downhole instruments located within the San Andreas fault-zone, at instruments located within the San Andreas fault-zone, at Parkfield, California. Over the 1-40 Hz bandwidth used in this analysis, amplitudes are found to decrease exponentially with frequency. Furthermore, the fault-zone propagation distance correlates with severity of attenuation. Assuming a constant Q attenuation operator, the S-wave quality factor within the fault-zone at a depth of 5-6 kilometers is 31 (+7,{minus}5). If fault-zones are low-Q environments, then near-source attenuation of high-frequency seismic waves may help to explain phenomenon such as f{sub max}. Fault-zone Q may prove to be a valuable indicator of the mechanical behavior and rheology of fault-zones. Specific asperities can be monitored for precursory changes associated with the evolving stress-field within the fault-zone. The spatial and temporal resolution of the technique is fundamentally limited by the uncertainty in earthquake location and the interval time between earthquakes.

  19. Numerical simulation of attenuation and group velocity of guided ultrasonic wave in grouted rock bolts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Y.; Zou, D. H.

    2006-08-01

    In this paper, the guided ultrasonic wave propagating in grouted rock bolts was simulated with finite element method. An 800 mm partially grouted cylindrical rock bolt model was created. Dynamic input signals with frequency from 25 to 100 kHz were used to excite ultrasonic wave. The simulated waveform, group velocity and amplitude ratio matched well with the experimental results. This model made it possible to study the behaviour of the guided waves in the grouted bolt along its central axis. Analysis of the simulated results showed that the group velocity in grouted rock bolts is constant along the grouted length, and the boundary effect on the group velocity is negligible. This paper also presents methods to determine the attenuation coefficient from simulation and to determine the boundary effect on attenuation at the bolt ends. The analysis showed that the attenuation of the guided wave propagating inside the grouted bolts is similar to the theoretical solution in steel bar with infinite length. After correction for the boundary effects the grout length of a grouted rock bolt can be determined using the measured attenuation, with sufficient accuracy.

  20. Reduction of TGS image reconstruction times using separable attenuation coefficient models

    SciTech Connect

    Estep, R.J.; Prettyman, T.H.; Sheppard, G.A.

    1995-12-31

    The tomographic gamma scanner (TGS) method for assaying transuranic and low-level waste produces low-resolution {open_quotes}density{close_quotes} images of 208-l waste drums at two or more transmission gamma-ray energies and uses these to make detailed attenuation corrections at neighboring emission gamma-ray energies. For example, we have used the 136-, 285-, and 401-keV lines from a {sup 75}Se transmission source to correct for attenuation of the 129-, 203-, 345-, and 414-keV lines in {sup 239}Pu assays. The list can expand to 20 or more emission energies when performing multiple-isotope assays. Methods for projecting attenuation images from transmission to emission energies were recently discussed with emphasis on the problems encountered when the opacity of a sample leads to poor counting statistics. This report focuses on increases in computational speed that can be attained by using separable attenuation coefficient models.

  1. A new instrumentation to measure seismic waves attenuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tisato, N.; Madonna, C.; Boutareaud, S.; Burg, J.

    2010-12-01

    Attenuation of seismic waves is the general expression describing the loss of energy of an elastic perturbation during its propagation in a medium. As a geophysical method, measuring the attenuation of seismic waves is a key to uncover essential information about fluid saturation of buried rocks. Attenuation of seismic waves depends on several mechanisms. In the case of saturated rock, fluids play an important role. Seismic waves create zones of overpressure by mobilizing the fluids in the pores of the rock. Starting from Gassmann-Biot theory (Gassman, 1951), several models (e.g. White, 1975; Mavko and Jizba, 1991) have been formulated to describe the energy absorption by flow of fluids. According to Mavko et al. (1998) for rock with permeability equals or less than 1 D, fluid viscosity between 1 cP and 10 cP and low frequencies seismic wave (< 100 Hz), the most important processes that subtract energy from the seismic waves are squirt flow and patchy saturation. Numerical models like Quintal et al. (2009) calculate how a patchy saturated vertical rock section (25 cm height), after stress steps of several kPa (i.e. 30 kPa) show a dissimilar increase in pore pressure between gas-saturated and liquid-saturated layers. The Rock Deformation Laboratory at ETH-Zürich has designed and set up a new pressure vessel to measure seismic wave attenuation in rocks at frequencies between 0.1 and 100 Hz and to verify the predicted influence of seismic waves on the pore pressure in patchy saturated rocks. We present this pressure vessel which can reach confining pressures of 25 MPa and holds a 250 mm long and 76 mm diameter sample. Dynamic stress is applied at the top of the rock cylinder by a piezoelectric motor that can generate a stress of several kPa (> 100 KPa) in less than 10 ms. The vessel is equipped with 5 pressure sensors buried within the rock sample, a load cell and a strain sensor to measure axial shortening while the motor generates the seismic waves. The sensor

  2. Estimates of millimeter wave attenuation for 18 United States cities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, K. C.; Liebe, H. J.; Rush, C. M.

    1983-05-01

    Brief discussions of three mechanisms that attenuate millimeter waves in the atmosphere are presented: rain attenuation, clear air absorption, and atmospheric multipath. Propagation models were combined with meteorological statistics to obtain estimates of average year attenuation distributions for 18 cities in the United States. The estimates are presented in such a way to elucidate the restrictions on system parameters required for reliable operation, i.e. frequency, path length for terrestrial paths, and path elevation angle for earth-satellite paths. The variation imposed by the diverse climates within the United States is demonstrated. Generally, in regions that have humid climates, millimeter wave systems perform less favorably than in areas where arid or semi-arid conditions prevail.

  3. Mantle-Lid P Wave Attenuation in the Korean Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, K.; Hong, T.

    2012-12-01

    The mantle-lid P wave, Pn, is the first arrival phase in regional distances. The Pn waves are widely analyzed for estimation of event sizes. Also, it is known that analysis of Pn waves is effective for discrimination of nuclear explosions from natural earthquakes. The attenuation of Pn waves provides us information on medium properties in mantle lid. It is crucial to understand the nature of Pn attenuation for correct estimation of event sizes from Pn amplitudes. We investigate the lateral variation of Pn attenuation in the mantle lid of the Korean Peninsula from vertical regional seismograms for events around the Korean Peninsula and Japanese islands. The number of events is 149, and the focal depths are less than 50 km. The seismic records with signal-to-noise ratios greater than 1.5 are analyzed. The number of stations is 121. The Pn quality factors are calculated using a two-station method in which ratios of Pn displacement spectra of stations on the same azimuths are used. The power-law frequency dependence term is estimated using a least-squares fitting for quality factors at frequencies from 0.37 Hz to 25 Hz. The number of station pairs is 3317. The average quality factor at 1 Hz is determined to be about 67, which is consistent with previous studies. We present the resultant Pn attenuation model, and discuss the correlations with geological and geophysical properties in the medium.

  4. Review of methods to attenuate shock/blast waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Igra, O.; Falcovitz, J.; Houas, L.; Jourdan, G.

    2013-04-01

    Quick and reliable shock wave attenuation is the goal of every protection facility and therefore it is not surprising that achieving this has drawn much attention during the past hundred years. Different options have been suggested; their usefulness varying from a reasonable protection to the opposite, a shock enhancement. An example for a suggestion for shock mitigation that turned out to be an enhancement of the impinging shock wave was the idea to cover a protected object with a foam layer. While the pressure behind the reflected shock wave from the foam frontal surface was smaller than that recorded in a similar reflection from a rigid wall [25], the pressure on the “protected” surface, attached to the foam's rear-surface, was significantly higher than that recorded in a similar reflection from a bare, rigid wall [11]. In protecting humans and installations from destructive shock and/or blast waves the prime goal is to reduce the wave amplitude and the rate of pressure increase across the wave front. Both measures result in reducing the wave harmful effects. During the past six decades several approaches for achieving the desired protection have been offered in the open literature. We point out in this review that while some of the suggestions offered are practical, others are impractical. In our discussion we focus on recent schemes for shock/blast wave attenuation, characterized by the availability of reliable measurements (notably pressure and optical diagnostics) as well as high-resolution numerical simulations.

  5. Emission-based estimation of lung attenuation coefficients for attenuation correction in time-of-flight PET/MR.

    PubMed

    Mehranian, Abolfazl; Zaidi, Habib

    2015-06-21

    In standard segmentation-based MRI-guided attenuation correction (MRAC) of PET data on hybrid PET/MRI systems, the inter/intra-patient variability of linear attenuation coefficients (LACs) is ignored owing to the assignment of a constant LAC to each tissue class. This can lead to PET quantification errors, especially in the lung regions. In this work, we aim to derive continuous and patient-specific lung LACs from time-of-flight (TOF) PET emission data using the maximum likelihood reconstruction of activity and attenuation (MLAA) algorithm. The MLAA algorithm was constrained for estimation of lung LACs only in the standard 4-class MR attenuation map using Gaussian lung tissue preference and Markov random field smoothness priors. MRAC maps were derived from segmentation of CT images of 19 TOF-PET/CT clinical studies into background air, lung, soft tissue and fat tissue classes, followed by assignment of predefined LACs of 0, 0.0224, 0.0864 and 0.0975 cm(-1), respectively. The lung LACs of the resulting attenuation maps were then estimated from emission data using the proposed MLAA algorithm. PET quantification accuracy of MRAC and MLAA methods was evaluated against the reference CT-based AC method in the lungs, lesions located in/near the lungs and neighbouring tissues. The results show that the proposed MLAA algorithm is capable of retrieving lung density gradients and compensate fairly for respiratory-phase mismatch between PET and corresponding attenuation maps. It was found that the mean of the estimated lung LACs generally follow the trend of the reference CT-based attenuation correction (CTAC) method. Quantitative analysis revealed that the MRAC method resulted in average relative errors of -5.2 ± 7.1% and -6.1 ± 6.7% in the lungs and lesions, respectively. These were reduced by the MLAA algorithm to -0.8 ± 6.3% and -3.3 ± 4.7%, respectively. In conclusion, we demonstrated the potential and capability of emission-based methods in deriving patient

  6. Generating attenuation-resistant frozen waves in absorbing fluid.

    PubMed

    Dorrah, Ahmed H; Zamboni-Rached, Michel; Mojahedi, Mo

    2016-08-15

    We demonstrate a class of nondiffracting beams, called frozen waves, with a central spot that can be made to maintain a predefined intensity profile while propagating in an absorbing fluid. Frozen waves are composed of Bessel beams with different transverse and longitudinal wavenumbers, and are generated using a programmable spatial light modulator. The attenuation-resistant frozen waves demonstrated here address the problem of propagation losses in absorbing media. This development can be beneficial for many applications in particle micro-manipulation, data communications, remote sensing, and imaging. PMID:27519067

  7. A novel protocol to measure the attenuation of electromagnetic waves through smoke

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan-wu, Li; Hong-yong, Yuan; Yang, Lu; Xiaoxiang, Zhang; Ru-feng, Xu; Ming, Fu

    2016-06-01

    The electromagnetic properties of smoke from a structure fire are important in terms of their relation to the stability of wireless communication systems used in fire rescue. As it is hard to make a measurable electromagnetic environment for particles in the air, compressed and bulk samples are used instead to measure sand storms and smoke plumes. In this paper, an experiment system was designed to measure smoke particles in the air, in consideration of both smoke control and electromagnetic measurement. Several measures had been taken to create a fulfilled smoke environment. The simulated and measured transmission parameters of the electromagnetic testing area were approximate and the electromagnetic wave frequencies were set from 350 to 400 MHz. Repeated experiments have been conducted to test the stability of the results and they showed that there was no obvious attenuation until the smoke concentration was more than 10 dB m‑1. It was found that the frequency around 355 and 360 MHz had a larger attenuation coefficient. The relationship between the attenuation coefficient and the smoke concentration was concluded to be linear. The results may help us understand the attenuation of electromagnetic waves within a smoke column.

  8. Material decomposition with the multi-energy attenuation coefficient ratio by using a multiple discriminant analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Woo-Jin; Kang, Se-Ryong; Choi, Soon-Chul; Lee, Sam-Sun; Heo, Min-Suk; Huh, Kyung-Hoe; Yi, Won-Jin

    2016-07-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a spectral CT system using a photon counting detector and to decompose materials by applying a multiple discriminant analysis (MDA) to the energy-dependent attenuation coefficient ratios. We imaged cylindrical phantoms of Polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) with four holes filled with calcium chloride, iodine, and gold nanoparticle contrast agents. The attenuation coefficients were measured via reconstructed multi-energy images, and the linear attenuation ratio was used for material identification. The MDA projection matrix, determined from training phantoms, was used to identify the four materials in the testing phantoms. For quantification purposes, the relationships between the attenuation coefficients at multiple energy bins and the concentrations were characterized by using the least-squares method for each material. The mean identification accuracy for each of the three materials were 0.94 ± 0.09 for iodine, 0.96 ± 0.07 for gold nanoparticles, and 0.92 ± 0.05 for calcium chloride. The mean quantification errors were 1.90 ± 1.58% for iodine, 3.85 ± 3.13% for gold nanoparticle, and 3.40 ± 2.62% for calcium chloride. The developed multi-energy CT system based on the photon-counting detector with MDA can precisely decompose the four materials.

  9. Developing a Short-Period, Fundamental-Mode Rayleigh-Wave Attenuation Model for Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, X.; Levshin, A. L.; Barmin, M. P.; Ritzwoller, M. H.

    2008-12-01

    measurements, we analyzed the attenuation behavior of the amplitudes using source- and receiver-specific terms calculated from a 3D velocity model of the region. Based on the results, we removed amplitudes that yielded negative average attenuation coefficients, and included an additional parameter in the inversion to account for the possible bias of the CMT moments. Using the high-quality amplitude measurements in a tomographic inversion, we obtained a fundamental-mode Rayleigh-wave attenuation- coefficient model for periods between 12 and 22 s for Asia and surrounding regions. The inverted attenuation model is consistent with the geological features of Asia. We observe low attenuation in stable regions such as eastern Europe, the Siberian platforms, the Indian shield, the Arabian platform, the Yangtze craton, and others. High attenuation is observed in tectonically active regions such as the Himalayas, the Tian Shan, Pamir and Zagros mountains.

  10. Wave Dispersion and Attenuation in Partially Saturated Sandstones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nie, Jian-Xin; Yang, Ding-Hui; Yang, Hui-Zhu

    2004-03-01

    We investigate the wave dispersion and attenuation in partially water-saturated sandstones based on the improved Biot/squirt (BISQ) model in which the saturation is introduced. Numerical experiments indicate that the phase velocity of the fast P-wave decreases as the saturation increases in the low-frequency range (102-104 Hz), and reaches the minimum at the full-saturation state. The behaviour of the phase velocity varying with the saturation in the high-frequency range (104-106 Hz), however, is opposite to that in the low-frequency range. The peak value of P-wave attenuation increases with increasing saturation, and is the maximum at the fully saturated state. Numerical models and experiments show that the improved BISQ model is better than the traditional Gassmann-Biot model.

  11. Simultaneous evaluation of acoustic nonlinearity parameter and attenuation coefficients using the finite amplitude method

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Shuzeng; Li, Xiongbing; Jeong, Hyunjo Cho, Sungjong

    2015-07-15

    A novel method to determine acoustic parameters involved in measuring the nonlinearity parameter of fluids or solids is proposed. The approach is based on the measurement of fundamental and second harmonic pressures with a calibrated receiver, and on a nonlinear least squares data-fitting to multi-Gaussian beam (MGB) equations which explicitly define the attenuation and diffraction effects in the quasilinear regime. Results obtained in water validate the proposed method. The choice of suitable source pressure is discussed with regard to the quasilinear approximation involved. The attenuation coefficients are also acquired in nonlinear regime and their relations are discussed.

  12. Reflection and Transmission Coefficients for an Incident Plane Shear Wave at an Interface Separating Two Dissimilar Poroelastic Solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xu; Greenhalgh, Stewart

    2014-09-01

    Using Biot's poroelasticity theory, we derive expressions for the reflection and transmission coefficients for a plane shear wave incident on an interface separating two different poroelastic solids. The coefficients are formulated as a function of the wave incidence angle, frequency and rock properties. Specific cases calculated include the boundary between water-saturated sand and water-saturated sandstone and the gas-water interface in sand. The results show a very different interface response to that of an incident P wave. Plane SV wave incidence does not significantly excite the Biot slow P wave if the frequency of the wave is below the transition frequency. Above this frequency, an incident plane SV wave can generate a mode-converted slow Biot P wave which is actually a normal propagating wave and not highly attenuating as in the usual (diffusive) case. For an incident SV wave onto a gas-water interface, even at very high frequency, there is no significant Biot second P wave produced. For small incident angles, the gas-water interface is essentially transparent. With increasing angles, there can arise an unusual "definitive angle" in the reflection/transmission coefficient curves which is related to the change of fluid viscosity on both sides of the interface and provides a possible new means for underground fluid assessment.

  13. Quantitative RNFL attenuation coefficient measurements by RPE-normalized OCT data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vermeer, K. A.; van der Schoot, J.; Lemij, H. G.; de Boer, J. F.

    2012-03-01

    We demonstrate significantly different scattering coefficients of the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) between normal and glaucoma subjects. In clinical care, SD-OCT is routinely used to assess the RNFL thickness for glaucoma management. In this way, the full OCT data set is conveniently reduced to an easy to interpret output, matching results from older (non- OCT) instruments. However, OCT provides more data, such as the signal strength itself, which is due to backscattering in the retinal layers. For quantitative analysis, this signal should be normalized to adjust for local differences in the intensity of the beam that reaches the retina. In this paper, we introduce a model that relates the OCT signal to the attenuation coefficient of the tissue. The average RNFL signal (within an A-line) was then normalized based on the observed RPE signal, resulting in normalized RNFL attenuation coefficient maps. These maps showed local defects matching those found in thickness data. The average (normalized) RNFL attenuation coefficient of a fixed band around the optic nerve head was significantly lower in glaucomatous eyes than in normal eyes (3.0mm-1 vs. 4.9mm-1, P<0.01, Mann-Whitney test).

  14. Attenuation of seismic waves obtained by coda waves analysis in the West Bohemia earthquake swarm region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachura, Martin; Fischer, Tomas

    2014-05-01

    Seismic waves are attenuated by number of factors, including geometrical spreading, scattering on heterogeneities and intrinsic loss due the anelasticity of medium. Contribution of the latter two processes can be derived from the tail part of the seismogram - coda (strictly speaking S-wave coda), as these factors influence the shape and amplitudes of coda. Numerous methods have been developed for estimation of attenuation properties from the decay rate of coda amplitudes. Most of them work with the S-wave coda, some are designed for the P-wave coda (only on teleseismic distances) or for the whole waveforms. We used methods to estimate the 1/Qc - attenuation of coda waves, methods to separate scattering and intrinsic loss - 1/Qsc, Qi and methods to estimate attenuation of direct P and S wave - 1/Qp, 1/Qs. In this study, we analyzed the S-wave coda of local earthquake data recorded in the West Bohemia/Vogtland area. This region is well known thanks to the repeated occurrence of earthquake swarms. We worked with data from the 2011 earthquake swarm, which started late August and lasted with decreasing intensity for another 4 months. During the first week of swarm thousands of events were detected with maximum magnitudes ML = 3.6. Amount of high quality data (including continuous datasets and catalogues with an abundance of well-located events) is available due to installation of WEBNET seismic network (13 permanent and 9 temporary stations) monitoring seismic activity in the area. Results of the single-scattering model show seismic attenuations decreasing with frequency, what is in agreement with observations worldwide. We also found decrease of attenuation with increasing hypocentral distance and increasing lapse time, which was interpreted as a decrease of attenuation with depth (coda waves on later lapse times are generated in bigger depths - in our case in upper lithosphere, where attenuations are small). We also noticed a decrease of frequency dependence of 1/Qc

  15. A generalized method of converting CT image to PET linear attenuation coefficient distribution in PET/CT imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lu; Wu, Li-Wei; Wei, Le; Gao, Juan; Sun, Cui-Li; Chai, Pei; Li, Dao-Wu

    2014-02-01

    The accuracy of attenuation correction in positron emission tomography scanners depends mainly on deriving the reliable 511-keV linear attenuation coefficient distribution in the scanned objects. In the PET/CT system, the linear attenuation distribution is usually obtained from the intensities of the CT image. However, the intensities of the CT image relate to the attenuation of photons in an energy range of 40 keV-140 keV. Before implementing PET attenuation correction, the intensities of CT images must be transformed into the PET 511-keV linear attenuation coefficients. However, the CT scan parameters can affect the effective energy of CT X-ray photons and thus affect the intensities of the CT image. Therefore, for PET/CT attenuation correction, it is crucial to determine the conversion curve with a given set of CT scan parameters and convert the CT image into a PET linear attenuation coefficient distribution. A generalized method is proposed for converting a CT image into a PET linear attenuation coefficient distribution. Instead of some parameter-dependent phantom calibration experiments, the conversion curve is calculated directly by employing the consistency conditions to yield the most consistent attenuation map with the measured PET data. The method is evaluated with phantom experiments and small animal experiments. In phantom studies, the estimated conversion curve fits the true attenuation coefficients accurately, and accurate PET attenuation maps are obtained by the estimated conversion curves and provide nearly the same correction results as the true attenuation map. In small animal studies, a more complicated attenuation distribution of the mouse is obtained successfully to remove the attenuation artifact and improve the PET image contrast efficiently.

  16. Acoustic speed and attenuation coefficient in sheep aorta measured at 5-9 MHz.

    PubMed

    Fraser, Katharine H; Poepping, Tamie L; McNeilly, Alan; Megson, Ian L; Hoskins, Peter R

    2006-06-01

    B-mode ultrasound (US) images from blood vessels in vivo differ significantly from vascular flow phantom images. Phantoms with acoustic properties more closely matched to those of in vivo arteries may give better images. A method was developed for measuring the speed and attenuation coefficient of US over the range 5 to 9 MHz in samples of sheep aorta using a pulse-echo technique. The times-of-flight method was used with envelope functions to identify the reference points. The method was tested with samples of tissue-mimicking material of known acoustic properties. The tissue samples were stored in Krebs physiologic buffer solution and measured over a range of temperatures. At 37 degrees C, the acoustic speed and attenuation coefficient as a function of frequency in MHz were 1600 +/- 50 ms(-1) and 1.5 +/- 4f(0.94 +/- 1.3) dB cm(-1), respectively. PMID:16785018

  17. Measurement of photon mass attenuation coefficients of plutonium from 60 to 2615 keV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rettschlag, M.; Berndt, R.; Mortreau, P.

    2007-11-01

    Measurements have been made to determine plutonium photon mass attenuation coefficients by using a collimated-beam transmission method in the energy range from 60 to 2615 keV. These experimental results were compared with previous experimental and theoretical data. Good agreements are observed in the 240-800 keV energy range, whereas differences up to maximum 10% are observed out of these limits.

  18. Spectral wave flow attenuation within submerged canopies: Implications for wave energy dissipation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowe, Ryan J.; Falter, James L.; Koseff, Jeffrey R.; Monismith, Stephen G.; Atkinson, Marlin J.

    2007-05-01

    Communities of benthic organisms can form very rough surfaces (canopies) on the seafloor. Previous studies have shown that an oscillatory flow induced by monochromatic surface waves will drive more flow inside a canopy than a comparable unidirectional current. This paper builds on these previous studies by investigating how wave energy is attenuated within canopies under spectral wave conditions, or random wave fields defined by many frequencies. A theoretical model is first developed to predict how flow attenuation within a canopy varies among the different wave components and predicts that shorter-period components will generally be more effective at driving flow within a canopy than longer-period components. To investigate the model performance, a field experiment was conducted on a shallow reef flat in which flow was measured both inside and above a model canopy array. Results confirm that longer-period components in the spectrum are significantly more attenuated than shorter-period components, in good agreement with the model prediction. This paper concludes by showing that the rate at which wave energy is dissipated by a canopy is closely linked to the flow structure within the canopy. Under spectral wave conditions, wave energy within a model canopy array is dissipated at a greater rate among the shorter-period wave components. These observations are consistent with previous observations of how wave energy is dissipated by the bottom roughness of a coral reef.

  19. Results of a monte carlo investigation of the diffuse attenuation coefficient.

    PubMed

    Concannon, B M; Davis, J P

    1999-08-20

    There has been a large effort to relate the apparent optical properties of ocean water to the inherent optical properties, which are the absorption coefficient a, the scattering coefficient b, and the scattering phase function rho(theta). The diffuse attenuation coefficient kdiff' has most often been considered an apparent optical property. However, kdiff' can be considered a quasi-inherent property kdiff' when defined as a steady-state light distribution attenuation coefficient. The Honey-Wilson research empirically relates kdiff' to a and b. The Honey-Wilson relation most likely applies to a limited range of water types because it does not include dependence on rho(theta). A series of Monte Carlo simulations were initiated to calculate kdiff' in an unstratified water column. The calculations, which reflected open ocean water types, used ranges of the single-scattering albedo omega(0) and the mean forward-scattering angle theta(m) for two analytic phase functions with different shapes. It was found that kdiff' is nearly independent of the shape of rho(theta) and can be easily parameterized in terms of a, b, and theta(m) for 0.11

  20. Guided wave attenuation in coated pipes buried in sand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leinov, Eli; Cawley, Peter; Lowe, Michael J. S.

    2016-02-01

    Long-range guided wave testing (GWT) is routinely used for the monitoring and detection of corrosion defects in above ground pipelines in various industries. The GWT test range in buried, coated pipelines is greatly reduced compared to aboveground pipelines due to energy leakage into the embedding soil. In this study, we aim to increase test ranges for buried pipelines. The effect of pipe coatings on the T(0,1) and L(0,2) guided wave attenuation is investigated using a full-scale experimental apparatus and model predictions. Tests are performed on a fusion-bonded epoxy (FBE)-coated 8" pipe, buried in loose and compacted sand over a frequency range of 10-35 kHz. The application of a low impedance coating is shown to effectively decouple the influence of the sand on the ultrasound leakage from the buried pipe. We demonstrate ultrasonic isolation of a buried pipe by coating the pipe with a Polyethylene (PE)-foam layer that has a smaller impedance than both pipe and sand and the ability to withstand the overburden load from the sand. The measured attenuation in the buried PE-foam-FBE-coated pipe is substantially reduced, in the range of 0.3-1.2 dBm-1 for loose and compacted sand conditions, compared to buried FBE-coated pipe without the PE-foam, where the measured attenuation is in the range of 1.7-4.7 dBm-1. The acoustic properties of the PE-foam are measured independently using ultrasonic interferometry technique and used in model predictions of guided wave propagation in a buried coated pipe. Good agreement is found between the attenuation measurements and model predictions. The attenuation exhibits periodic peaks in the frequency domain corresponding to the through-thickness resonance frequencies of the coating layer. The large reduction in guided wave attenuation for PE-coated pipes would lead to greatly increased GWT test ranges, so such coatings would be attractive for new pipeline installations.

  1. Shear wave velocity and attenuation structure for the shallow crust of the southern Korean peninsula from short period Rayleigh waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Heeok; Jang, Yong-seok; Lee, Jung Mo; Moon, Wooil M.; Baag, Chang-Eob; Kim, Ki Young; Jo, Bong Gon

    2007-01-01

    We analyzed the short period Rayleigh waves from the first crustal-scale seismic refraction experiment in the Korean peninsula, KCRUST2002, to determine the shear wave velocity and attenuation structure of the uppermost 1 km of the crust in different tectonic zones of the Korean peninsula and to examine if this can be related to the surface geology of the study area. The experiment was conducted with two large explosive sources along a 300-km long profile in 2002. The seismic traces, recorded on 170 vertical-component, 2-Hz portable seismometers, show distinct Rayleigh waves in the period range between 0.2 s and 1.2 s, which are easily recognizable up to 30-60 km from the sources. The seismic profiles, which traverse three tectonic regions (Gyeonggi massif, Okcheon fold belt and Yeongnam massif), were divided into five subsections based on tectonic boundaries as well as lithology. Group and phase velocities for the five subsections obtained by a continuous wavelet transform method and a slant stack method, respectively, were inverted for the shear wave models. We obtained shear wave velocity models up to a depth of 1.0 km. Overall, the shear wave velocity of the Okcheon fold belt is lower than that of the Gyeonggi and Yeongnam massifs by ˜ 0.4 km/s in the shallowmost 0.2 km and by 0.2 km/s at depths below 0.2 km. Attenuation coefficients, determined from the decay of the fundamental mode Rayleigh waves, were used to obtain the shear wave attenuation structures for three subsections (one for each of the three different tectonic regions). We obtained an average value of Qβ- 1 in the upper 0.5 km for each subsection. Qβ- 1 for the Okcheon fold belt (˜ 0.026) is approximately three times larger than Qβ- 1 for the massif areas (˜ 0.008). The low shear wave velocity in the Okcheon fold belt is consistent with the high attenuation in this region.

  2. Attenuation of shock waves in copper and stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Harvey, W.B.

    1986-06-01

    By using shock pins, data were gathered on the trajectories of shock waves in stainless steel (SS-304L) and oxygen-free-high-conductivity copper (OFHC-Cu). Shock pressures were generated in these materials by impacting the appropriate target with thin (approx.1.5 mm) flying plates. The flying plates in these experiments were accelerated to high velocities (approx.4 km/s) by high explosives. Six experiments were conducted, three using SS-304L as the target material and three experiments using OFHC-Cu as the target material. Peak shock pressures generated in the steel experiments were approximately 109, 130, and 147 GPa and in the copper experiments, the peak shock pressures were approximately 111, 132, and 143 GPa. In each experiment, an attenuation of the shock wave by a following release wave was clearly observed. An extensive effort using two characteristic codes (described in this work) to theoretically calculate the attenuation of the shock waves was made. The efficacy of several different constitutive equations to successfully model the experiments was studied by comparing the calculated shock trajectories to the experimental data. Based on such comparisons, the conclusion can be drawn that OFHC-Cu enters a melt phase at about 130 GPa on the principal Hugoniot. There was no sign of phase changes in the stainless-steel experiments. In order to match the observed attenuation of the shock waves in the SS-304L experiments, it was necessary to include strength effects in the calculations. It was found that the values for the parameters in the strength equations were dependent on the equation of state used in the modeling of the experiments. 66 refs., 194 figs., 77 tabs.

  3. Seismic interferometry of scattered surface waves in attenuative media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halliday, David; Curtis, Andrew

    2009-07-01

    Seismic interferometry can be used to estimate interreceiver surface wave signals by cross-correlation of signals recorded at each receiver that are emitted from a surrounding boundary of impulsive or uncorrelated noise sources. We study seismic interferometry for scattered surface waves using a stationary-phase analysis and surface wave Green's functions for isotropic point scatterers embedded in laterally homogeneous media. Our analysis reveals key differences between the interferometric construction of reflected and point-scattered body or surface waves, since point scatterers radiate energy in all directions but a reflection from a finite flat reflector is specular. In the case of surface waves, we find that additional cancelling terms are introduced in the stationary-phase analysis for scattered waves related to the constraint imposed by the optical theorem for surface waves. The additional terms are of second order even for single-scattered waves, and we show that these can be highly significant in multiple-scattering cases. In attenuative media errors are introduced due to amplitude errors in these additional terms. Further, we find that as the distribution of scatterers in a medium becomes more complex the errors in correlation-type interferometry caused by attenuation in the background medium become larger. Convolution-type interferometry has been shown to be effective when considering electromagnetic wavefields in lossy media, and we show that this is also true for scattered surface waves in attenuating elastic media. By adapting our stationary-phase approach to this case, we reveal why convolution-type interferometry performs well in such media: the second-order cancelling terms that appear in the correlation-type approach do not appear in convolution-type interferometry. Finally, we find that when using both correlation- and convolution-type interferometry with realistic source geometries (illustrative of both industrial seismics and `passive noise

  4. P wave attenuation structure below the Tokyo Metropolitan area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panayotopoulos, Y.; Sakai, S.; Nakagawa, S.; Kasahara, K.; Hirata, N.; Aketagawa, T.; Kimura, H.; Lee, C.

    2010-12-01

    The material properties of the complex subduction zone beneath the Tokyo Metropolitan can be estimated by the seismic attenuation Q-1 of seismic waves observed at local seismic stations. The attenuation of seismic waves is represented by the t* attenuation operator that can be estimated by fitting the observed P wave amplitude spectrum to a theoretical spectrum using an ω2 source model. The waveform data used in this study are recorded at the dense seismic array of the Metropolitan Seismic Observation network (MeSO-net). The station network is distributed on five lines with an average spacing of 3 km and in an area with a spacing of 5 km in the central part of Kanto plane. The MeSO-net stations are equipped with a three-component accelerometer at a bottom of a 20-m-deep borehole, signals from which are digitized at a sampling rate of 200 Hz with a dynamic range of 135 dB.The waveforms of 141 earthquakes observed at 226 stations were selected from the Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA) unified earthquake list from January 1st 2010 to August 4th 2010. Only high-quality amplitude spectra of earthquakes with M > 3 were used for the estimation of reliable attenuation parameters. The acceleration waveforms were integrated twice to yield the corresponding displacement vectors, applying a high pass filter to remove the effect of the low-frequency background noise. Taking into account that the majority of the events occurred at depth greater than 30 km a search window of 5 sec starting 1 sec before the P wave arrival was implemented for the creation of the dataset. The t* values were estimated from the amplitude spectra of approximately 33800 P wave waveforms conducting a fast Fourier transform analysis. The Q values for the Tokyo Metropolitan area estimate by this study range from 100 to 500 in the upper 30 km of the crust. A site effect on the attenuation near stations inside a densely populated area is also a possible reason for the large Q variations observed.

  5. A Heterogeneous Nonlinear Attenuating Full-Wave Model of Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Pinton, Gianmarco F.; Dahl, Jeremy; Rosenzweig, Stephen; Trahey, Gregg E.

    2015-01-01

    A full-wave equation that describes nonlinear propagation in a heterogeneous attenuating medium is solved numerically with finite differences in the time domain (FDTD). Three-dimensional solutions of the equation are verified with water tank measurements of a commercial diagnostic ultrasound transducer and are shown to be in excellent agreement in terms of the fundamental and harmonic acoustic fields and the power spectrum at the focus. The linear and nonlinear components of the algorithm are also verified independently. In the linear nonattenuating regime solutions match results from Field II, a well established software package used in transducer modeling, to within 0.3 dB. Nonlinear plane wave propagation is shown to closely match results from the Galerkin method up to 4 times the fundamental frequency. In addition to thermoviscous attenuation we present a numerical solution of the relaxation attenuation laws that allows modeling of arbitrary frequency dependent attenuation, such as that observed in tissue. A perfectly matched layer (PML) is implemented at the boundaries with a numerical implementation that allows the PML to be used with high-order discretizations. A −78 dB reduction in the reflected amplitude is demonstrated. The numerical algorithm is used to simulate a diagnostic ultrasound pulse propagating through a histologically measured representation of human abdominal wall with spatial variation in the speed of sound, attenuation, nonlinearity, and density. An ultrasound image is created in silico using the same physical and algorithmic process used in an ultrasound scanner: a series of pulses are transmitted through heterogeneous scattering tissue and the received echoes are used in a delay-and-sum beam-forming algorithm to generate a images. The resulting harmonic image exhibits characteristic improvement in lesion boundary definition and contrast when compared with the fundamental image. We demonstrate a mechanism of harmonic image quality

  6. Extracting seismic attenuation coefficients from cross-correlations of ambient noise at linear triplets of stations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xin; Ben-Zion, Yehuda; Zigone, Dimitri

    2015-11-01

    We develop and apply an algorithm for deriving interstation seismic attenuation from cross-correlations of ambient noise recorded by linear arrays. Theoretical results on amplitude decay due to attenuation are used to form a linear least-square inversion for interstation QR values of Rayleigh surface waves propagating along linear arrays having three or more stations. The noise wave field is assumed stationary within each day and the interstation distances should be greater than the employed wavelength. The inversion uses differences of logarithmic amplitude decay curves measured at different stations from cross-correlation functions within a given frequency band. The background attenuation between noise sources and receivers is effectively cancelled with this method. The site amplification factors are assumed constant (or following similar patterns) in the frequency band of interest. The inversion scheme is validated with synthetic tests using ambient noise generated by ray-theory-based calculations with heterogeneous attenuation and homogenous velocity structure. The interstation attenuation and phase velocity dispersion curves are inverted from cross-correlations of the synthetic data. The method is then applied to triplets of stations from the regional southern California seismic network crossing the Mojave section of the San Andreas fault, and a dense linear array crossing the southern San Jacinto Fault zone. Bootstrap technique is used to derive empirical mean and confidence interval for the obtained inverse Q values. The results for the regional stations yield QR values around 25 for a frequency band 0.2-0.36 Hz. The results for the San Jacinto fault zone array give QR values of about 6-30 for frequencies in the range 15-25 Hz.

  7. Attenuation characteristics of nonlinear pressure waves propagating in pipes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih, C. C.

    1974-01-01

    A series of experiments was conducted to investigate temporal and spatial velocity distributions of fluid flow in 3-in. open-end pipes of various lengths up to 210 ft, produced by the propagation of nonlinear pressure waves of various intensities. Velocity profiles across each of five sections along the pipes were measured as a function of time with the use of hot-film and hot-wire anemometers for two pressure waves produced by a piston. Peculiar configurations of the velocity profiles across the pipe section were noted, which are uncommon for steady pipe flow. Theoretical consideration was given to this phenomenon of higher velocity near the pipe wall for qualitative confirmation. Experimentally time-dependent velocity distributions along the pipe axis were compared with one-dimensional theoretical results obtained by the method of characteristics with or without diffusion term for the purpose of determining the attenuation characteristics of the nonlinear wave propagation in the pipes.

  8. Simultaneous reconstruction of emission activity and attenuation coefficient distribution from TOF data, acquired with external transmission source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panin, V. Y.; Aykac, M.; Casey, M. E.

    2013-06-01

    The simultaneous PET data reconstruction of emission activity and attenuation coefficient distribution is presented, where the attenuation image is constrained by exploiting an external transmission source. Data are acquired in time-of-flight (TOF) mode, allowing in principle for separation of emission and transmission data. Nevertheless, here all data are reconstructed at once, eliminating the need to trace the position of the transmission source in sinogram space. Contamination of emission data by the transmission source and vice versa is naturally modeled. Attenuated emission activity data also provide additional information about object attenuation coefficient values. The algorithm alternates between attenuation and emission activity image updates. We also proposed a method of estimation of spatial scatter distribution from the transmission source by incorporating knowledge about the expected range of attenuation map values. The reconstruction of experimental data from the Siemens mCT scanner suggests that simultaneous reconstruction improves attenuation map image quality, as compared to when data are separated. In the presented example, the attenuation map image noise was reduced and non-uniformity artifacts that occurred due to scatter estimation were suppressed. On the other hand, the use of transmission data stabilizes attenuation coefficient distribution reconstruction from TOF emission data alone. The example of improving emission images by refining a CT-based patient attenuation map is presented, revealing potential benefits of simultaneous CT and PET data reconstruction.

  9. Simultaneous reconstruction of emission activity and attenuation coefficient distribution from TOF data, acquired with external transmission source.

    PubMed

    Panin, V Y; Aykac, M; Casey, M E

    2013-06-01

    The simultaneous PET data reconstruction of emission activity and attenuation coefficient distribution is presented, where the attenuation image is constrained by exploiting an external transmission source. Data are acquired in time-of-flight (TOF) mode, allowing in principle for separation of emission and transmission data. Nevertheless, here all data are reconstructed at once, eliminating the need to trace the position of the transmission source in sinogram space. Contamination of emission data by the transmission source and vice versa is naturally modeled. Attenuated emission activity data also provide additional information about object attenuation coefficient values. The algorithm alternates between attenuation and emission activity image updates. We also proposed a method of estimation of spatial scatter distribution from the transmission source by incorporating knowledge about the expected range of attenuation map values. The reconstruction of experimental data from the Siemens mCT scanner suggests that simultaneous reconstruction improves attenuation map image quality, as compared to when data are separated. In the presented example, the attenuation map image noise was reduced and non-uniformity artifacts that occurred due to scatter estimation were suppressed. On the other hand, the use of transmission data stabilizes attenuation coefficient distribution reconstruction from TOF emission data alone. The example of improving emission images by refining a CT-based patient attenuation map is presented, revealing potential benefits of simultaneous CT and PET data reconstruction. PMID:23648397

  10. Seismic Attenuation Technology for the Advanced Virgo Gravitational Wave Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beker, M. G.; Blom, M.; van den Brand, J. F. J.; Bulten, H. J.; Hennes, E.; Rabeling, D. S.

    The current interferometric gravitational wave detectors are being upgraded to what are termed 'second generation' devices. Sensitivities will be increased by an order of magnitude and these new instruments are expected to uncover the field of gravitational astronomy. A main challenge in this endeavor is the mitigation of noise induced by seismic motion. Detailed studies with Virgo show that seismic noise can be reinjected into the dark fringe signal. For example, laser beam jitter and backscattered light limit the sensitivity of the interferometer. Here, we focus on seismic attenuators based on compact inverted pendulums in combination with geometric anti-prings to obtain 40 dB of attenuation above 4 Hz in six degrees of freedom. Low frequency resonances (< 0.5 Hz) are damped by using a control system based on input from LVDTs and geophones. Such systems are under development for the seismic attenuation of optical benches operated both in air and vacuum. The design and realization of the seismic attenuation system for the Virgo external injection bench, including its control scheme, will be discussed and stand-alone performance presented.

  11. Attenuation coefficients of soils and some building materials of Bangladesh in the energy range 276-1332 keV.

    PubMed

    Alam, M N; Miah, M M; Chowdhury, M I; Kamal, M; Ghose, S; Rahman, R

    2001-06-01

    The linear and mass attenuation coefficients of different types of soil, sand, building materials and heavy beach mineral samples from the Chittagong and Cox's Bazar area of Bangladesh were measured using a high-resolution HPGe detector and the gamma-ray energies 276.1, 302.8, 356.0, 383.8, 661.6 and 1173.2 and 1332.5 keV emitted from point sources of 133Ba, 137Cs and 60Co, respectively. The linear attenuation coefficients show a linear relationship with the corresponding densities of the samples studied. The variations of the mass attenuation coefficient with gamma-ray energy were exponential in nature. The measured mass attenuation coefficient values were compared with measurements made in other countries for similar kinds of materials. The values are in good agreement with each other in most cases. PMID:11300413

  12. Estimate of the attenuation coefficient using a clinical array transducer for the detection of cervical ripening in human pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Labyed, Yassin; Bigelow, Timothy A; McFarlin, Barbara L

    2011-01-01

    Premature delivery is the leading cause of infant mortality in the United States. Currently, premature delivery cannot be prevented and new treatments are difficult to develop due to the inability to diagnose symptoms prior to uterine contractions. Cervical ripening is a long period that precedes the active phase of uterine contractions and cervical dilation. The changes in the microstructure of the cervix during cervical ripening suggest that the ultrasonic attenuation should decrease. The objective of this study is to use the reference phantom algorithm to estimate the ultrasonic attenuation in the cervix of pregnant human patients. Prior to applying the algorithm to in vivo human data, two homogeneous phantoms with known attenuation coefficients were used to validate the algorithm and to find the length and the width of the region of interest (ROI) that achieves the smallest error in the attenuation coefficient estimates. In the phantom data, we found that the errors in the attenuation coefficients estimates are less than 12% for ROIs that contain 40 wavelengths or more axially and 30 echo lines or more laterally. The reference phantom algorithm was then used to obtain attenuation maps of the echoes from two human pregnant cervices at different gestational ages. It was observed that the mean of the attenuation coefficient estimates in the cervix of the patient at a more advanced gestational age is smaller than the mean of the attenuation coefficient estimates in the cervix of the patient at an earlier gestational age which suggests that ultrasonic attenuation decreases with increasing gestational age. We also observed a large variance between the attenuation coefficient estimates in the different regions of the cervix due to the natural variation in tissue micro-structures across the cervix. The preliminary results indicate that the algorithm could potentially provide an important diagnostic tool for diagnosing the risk of premature delivery. PMID:20570308

  13. Variability of the downwelling diffuse attenuation coefficient with consideration of inelastic scattering.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xiaobing; Dickey, Tommy; Chang, Grace

    2002-10-20

    In situ time-series measurements of spectral diffuse downwelling irradiance from the Bermuda Testbed Mooring are presented. Averaged diffuse attenuation coefficients of downwelling irradiance, Kd,and their elastic and inelastic components are investigated at seven wavelengths. At shorter wavelengths (<510 nm), Kd is weakly dependent on the solar zenith angle owing to the prevailing scattering effect and therefore can be considered a quasi-inherent optical property. At longer wavelengths (>510 nm), Kd shows a strong dependence on the solar zenith angle. As depth increases, inelastic scattering plays a greater role for the underwater light field at red wavelengths. PMID:12396201

  14. Stress wave attenuation in thin structures by ultrasonic through-transmission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, S. S.; Williams, J. H., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    The steady state amplitude of the output of an ultrasonic through transmission measurement is analyzed and the result is given in closed form. Provided that the product of the input and output transduction ratios; the specimen-transducer reflection coefficient; the specimen-transducer phase shift parameter; and the material phase velocity are known, this analysis gives a means for determining the through-thickness attenuation of an individual thin sample. Multiple stress wave reflections are taken into account and so signal echoes do not represent a difficulty. An example is presented for a graphite fiber epoxy composite (Hercules AS/3501-6). A direct method for continuous or intermittent monitoring of through thickness attenuation of plate structures which may be subject to service structural degradation is provided.

  15. Stress-wave attenuation in thin structures by ultrasonic through-transmission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, S. S.; Williams, J. H., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    The steady-state amplitude of the output of an ultrasonic through-transmission measurement is analyzed and the result is given in closed form. Provided that the product of the input and output transduction ratios, the specimen-transducer reflection coefficient, the specimen-transducer phase-shift parameter, and the material phase velocity are known, this analysis gives a means for determining the through-thickness attenuation of an individual thin sample. Multiple stress-wave reflections are taken into account, and so signal echoes do not represent a difficulty. An example is presented for a graphite fiber epoxy composite (Hercules AS/3501-6). Thus, the technique provides a direct method for continuous or intermittent monitoring of through-thickness attenuation of plate structures which may be subject to service structural degradation.

  16. Wave Dispersion and Attenuation on Human Femur Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Strantza, Maria; Louis, Olivia; Polyzos, Demosthenes; Boulpaep, Frans; van Hemelrijck, Danny; Aggelis, Dimitrios G.

    2014-01-01

    Cortical bone is a highly heterogeneous material at the microscale and has one of the most complex structures among materials. Application of elastic wave techniques to this material is thus very challenging. In such media the initial excitation energy goes into the formation of elastic waves of different modes. Due to “dispersion”, these modes tend to separate according to the velocities of the frequency components. This work demonstrates elastic wave measurements on human femur specimens. The aim of the study is to measure parameters like wave velocity, dispersion and attenuation by using broadband acoustic emission sensors. First, four sensors were placed at small intervals on the surface of the bone to record the response after pencil lead break excitations. Next, the results were compared to measurements on a bulk steel block which does not exhibit heterogeneity at the same wave lengths. It can be concluded that the microstructure of the tissue imposes a dispersive behavior for frequencies below 1 MHz and care should be taken for interpretation of the signals. Of particular interest are waveform parameters like the duration, rise time and average frequency, since in the next stage of research the bone specimens will be fractured with concurrent monitoring of acoustic emission. PMID:25196011

  17. Retrieval of diffuse attenuation coefficient in the China seas from surface reflectance.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Zhongfeng; Wu, Tingting; Su, Yuanyuan

    2013-07-01

    Accurate estimation of the diffuse attenuation coefficient is important for our understanding the availability of light to underwater communities, which provide critical information for the China seas ecosystem. However, algorithm developments and validations of the diffuse attenuation coefficient in the China seas have been seldom performed before and therefore our knowledge on the quality of retrieval of the diffuse attenuate coefficient is poor. In this paper optical data at 306 sites collected in coastal waters of the China seas between July 2000 and February 2004 are used to evaluate three typical existing Kd(490) models. The in situ Kd(490) varied greatly among different sites from 0.029 m(-1) to 10.3 m(-1), with a mean of 0.92 ± 1.59 m(-1). Results show that the empirical model and the semi-analytical model significantly underestimate the Kd(490) value, with estimated mean values of 0.24 m(-1) and 0.5 m(-1), respectively. The combined model also shows significant differences when the in situ Kd(490) range from 0.2 m(-1) to 1 m(-1). Thus, the present study proposes that the three algorithms cannot be directly used to appropriately estimate Kd(490) in the turbid coastal waters of the China seas without a fine tuning for regional applications. In this paper, new Kd(490) algorithms are developed based on the semi-analytical retrieval of the absorption coefficient a(m(-1)) and the backscattering coefficient bb(m(-1)) from the reflectance at two wavelengths, 488 and 667 nm for the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and 490 and 705 nm for the Medium Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MERIS) applications, respectively. With the new approaches, the mean ratio and the relative percentage difference are 1.05 and 4.6%, respectively, based on an independent in situ data set. Furthermore, the estimates are reliable within a factor of 1.9 (95% confidence interval). Comparisons also show that the Kd(490) derived with the new algorithms are well correlated

  18. Dynamic changes of integrated backscatter, attenuation coefficient and bubble activities during high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) treatment.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Siyuan; Wan, Mingxi; Zhong, Hui; Xu, Cheng; Liao, Zhenzhong; Liu, Huanqing; Wang, Supin

    2009-11-01

    This paper simultaneously investigated the transient characteristics of integrated backscatter (IBS), attenuation coefficient and bubble activities as time traces before, during and after HIFU treatment, with different HIFU parameters (acoustic power and duty cycle) in both transparent tissue-mimicking phantoms and freshly excised bovine livers. These dynamic changes of acoustic parameters and bubble activities were correlated with the visualization of lesion development selected from photos, conventional B-mode ultrasound images and differential IBS images over the whole procedure of HIFU treatment. Two-dimensional radiofrequency (RF) data were acquired by a modified diagnostic ultrasound scanner to estimate the changes of mean IBS and attenuation coefficient averaged in the lesion region, and to construct the differential IBS images and B-mode ultrasound images simultaneously. Bubble activities over the whole procedure of HIFU treatment were investigated by the passive cavitation detection (PCD) method and the changes in subharmonic and broadband noise were correlated with the transient characteristics of IBS and attenuation coefficient. When HIFU was switched on, IBS and attenuation coefficient increased with the appearance of bubble clouds in the B-mode and differential IBS image. At the same time, the level of subharmonic and broadband noise rose abruptly. Then, there was an initial decrease in the attenuation coefficient, followed by an increase when at lower HIFU power. As the lesion appeared, IBS and attenuation coefficient both increased rapidly to a value twice that of normal. Then the changes in IBS and attenuation coefficient showed more complex patterns, but still showed a slower trend of increases with lesion development. Violent bubble activities were visible in the gel and were evident as strongly echogenic regions in the differential IBS images and B-mode images simultaneously. This was detected by a dramatic high level of subharmonic and broadband

  19. Wave velocity dispersion and attenuation in media exhibiting internal oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frehner, Marcel; Steeb, Holger; Schmalholz, Stefan M.

    2010-05-01

    Understanding the dynamical and acoustical behavior of porous and heterogeneous rocks is of great importance in geophysics, e.g. earthquakes, and for various seismic engineering applications, e.g. hydrocarbon exploration. Within a heterogeneous medium oscillations with a characteristic resonance frequency, depending on the mass and internal length of the heterogeneity, can occur. When excited, heterogeneities can self-oscillate with their natural frequency. Another example of internal oscillations is the dynamical behavior of non-wetting fluid blobs or fluid patches in residually saturated pore spaces. Surface tension forces or capillary forces act as the restoring force that drives the oscillation. Whatever mechanism is involved, an oscillatory phenomena within a heterogeneous medium will have an effect on acoustic or seismic waves propagating through such a medium, i.e. wave velocity dispersion and frequency-dependent attenuation. We present two models for media exhibiting internal oscillations and discuss the frequency-dependent wave propagation mechanism. Both models give similar results: (1) The low-frequency (i.e. quasi-static) limit for the phase velocity is identical with the Gassmann-Wood limit and the high-frequency limit is larger than this value and (2) Around the resonance frequency a very strong phase velocity change and the largest attenuation occurs. (1) Model for a homogeneous medium exhibiting internal oscillations We present a continuum model for an acoustic medium exhibiting internal damped oscillations. The obvious application of this model is water containing oscillating gas bubbles, providing the material and model parameters for this study. Two physically based momentum interaction terms between the two inherent constituents are used: (1) A purely elastic term of oscillatory nature that scales with the volume of the bubbles and (2) A viscous term that scales with the specific surface of the bubble. The model is capable of taking into account

  20. Measurements of mass attenuation coefficient, effective atomic number and electron density of some amino acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kore, Prashant S.; Pawar, Pravina P.

    2014-05-01

    The mass attenuation coefficients of some amino acids, such as DL-aspartic acid-LR(C4H7NO4), L-glutamine (C4H10N2O3), creatine monohydrate LR(C4H9N3O2H2O), creatinine hydrochloride (C4H7N3O·HCl) L-asparagine monohydrate(C4H9N3O2H2O), L-methionine LR(C5H11NO2S), were measured at 122, 356, 511, 662, 1170, 1275 and 1330 keV photon energies using a well-collimated narrow beam good geometry set-up. The gamma-rays were detected using NaI (Tl) scintillation detection system with a resolution of 0.101785 at 662 keV. The attenuation coefficient data were then used to obtain the effective atomic numbers (Zeff), and effective electron densities (Neff) of amino acids. It was observed that the effective atomic number (Zeff) and effective electron densities (Neff) initially decrease and tend to be almost constant as a function of gamma-ray energy. Zeff and Neff experimental values showed good agreement with the theoretical values with less than 1% error for amino acids.

  1. Remote sensing of the diffuse attenuation coefficient of ocean water. [coastal zone color scanner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Austin, R. W.

    1981-01-01

    A technique was devised which uses remotely sensed spectral radiances from the sea to assess the optical diffuse attenuation coefficient, K (lambda) of near-surface ocean water. With spectral image data from a sensor such as the coastal zone color scanner (CZCS) carried on NIMBUS-7, it is possible to rapidly compute the K (lambda) fields for large ocean areas and obtain K "images" which show synoptic, spatial distribution of this attenuation coefficient. The technique utilizes a relationship that has been determined between the value of K and the ratio of the upwelling radiances leaving the sea surface at two wavelengths. The relationship was developed to provide an algorithm for inferring K from the radiance images obtained by the CZCS, thus the wavelengths were selected from those used by this sensor, viz., 443, 520, 550 and 670 nm. The majority of the radiance arriving at the spacecraft is the result of scattering in the atmospheric and is unrelated to the radiance signal generated by the water. A necessary step in the processing of the data received by the sensor is, therefore, the effective removal of these atmospheric path radiance signals before the K algorithm is applied. Examples of the efficacy of these removal techniques are given together with examples of the spatial distributions of K in several ocean areas.

  2. Characterization of the ultrasonic attenuation coefficient and its frequency dependence in a polymer gel dosimeter.

    PubMed

    Crescenti, Remo A; Bamber, Jeffrey C; Partridge, Mike; Bush, Nigel L; Webb, Steve

    2007-11-21

    Research on polymer-gel dosimetry has been driven by the need for three-dimensional dosimetry, and because alternative dosimeters are unsatisfactory or too slow for that task. Magnetic resonance tomography is currently the most well-developed technique for determining radiation-induced changes in polymer structure, but quick low-cost alternatives remain of significant interest. In previous work, ultrasound attenuation and speed of sound were found to change as a function of absorbed radiation dose in polymer-gel dosimeters, although the investigations were restricted to one ultrasound frequency. Here, the ultrasound attenuation coefficient mu in one polymer gel (MAGIC) was investigated as a function of radiation dose D and as a function of ultrasonic frequency f in a frequency range relevant for imaging dose distributions. The nonlinearity of the frequency dependence was characterized, fitting a power-law model mu = af(b); the fitting parameters were examined for potential use as additional dose readout parameters. In the observed relationship between the attenuation coefficient and dose, the slopes in a quasi-linear dose range from 0 to 30 Gy were found to vary with the gel batch but lie between 0.0222 and 0.0348 dB cm(-1) Gy(-1) at 2.3 MHz, between 0.0447 and 0.0608 dB cm(-1) Gy(-1) at 4.1 MHz and between 0.0663 and 0.0880 dB cm(-1) Gy(-1) at 6.0 MHz. The mean standard deviation of the slope for all samples and frequencies was 15.8%. The slope was greater at higher frequencies, but so were the intra-batch fluctuations and intra-sample standard deviations. Further investigations are required to overcome the observed variability, which was largely associated with the sample preparation technique, before it can be determined whether any frequency is superior to others in terms of accuracy and precision in dose determination. Nevertheless, lower frequencies will allow measurements through larger samples. The fit parameter a of the frequency dependence, describing the

  3. Seismic attenuation due to wave-induced flow

    SciTech Connect

    Pride, S.R.; Berryman, J.G.; Harris, J.M.

    2003-10-09

    Analytical expressions for three P-wave attenuation mechanisms in sedimentary rocks are given a unified theoretical framework. Two of the models concern wave-induced flow due to heterogeneity in the elastic moduli at mesoscopic scales (scales greater than grain sizes but smaller than wavelengths). In the first model, the heterogeneity is due to lithological variations (e.g., mixtures of sands and clays) with a single fluid saturating all the pores. In the second model, a single uniform lithology is saturated in mesoscopic ''patches'' by two immiscible fluids (e.g., air and water). In the third model, the heterogeneity is at ''microscopic'' grain scales (broken grain contacts and/or micro-cracks in the grains) and the associated fluid response corresponds to ''squirt flow''. The model of squirt flow derived here reduces to proper limits as any of the fluid bulk modulus, crack porosity, and/or frequency is reduced to zero. It is shown that squirt flow is incapable of explaining the measured level of loss (10{sup -2} < Q{sup -1} < 10{sup -1}) within the seismic band of frequencies (1 to 10{sup 4} Hz); however, either of the two mesoscopic scale models easily produce enough attenuation to explain the field data.

  4. Seismic attenuation due to wave-induced flow

    SciTech Connect

    Pride, S; Berryman, J; Harris, J

    2003-10-17

    Analytical expressions for three P-wave attenuation mechanisms in sedimentary rocks are given a unified theoretical framework. Two of the models concern wave-induced flow due to heterogeneity in the elastic moduli at ''mesoscopic'' scales (scales greater than grain sizes but smaller than wavelengths). In the first model, the heterogeneity is due to lithological variations (e.g., mixtures of sands and clays) with a single fluid saturating all the pores. In the second model, a single uniform lithology is saturated in mesoscopic ''patches'' by two immiscible fluids (e.g., air and water). In the third model, the heterogeneity is at ''microscopic'' grain scales (broken grain contacts and/or micro-cracks in the grains) and the associated fluid response corresponds to ''squirt flow''. The model of squirt flow derived here reduces to proper limits as any of the fluid bulk modulus, crack porosity, and/or frequency is reduced to zero. It is shown that squirt flow is incapable of explaining the measured level of loss (10{sup -2} < Q{sup -1} < 10{sup -1}) within the seismic band of frequencies (1 to 10{sup 4} Hz); however, either of the two mesoscopic scale models easily produce enough attenuation to explain field data.

  5. Mass attenuation coefficients of soil and sediment samples using gamma energies from 46.5 to 1332 keV.

    PubMed

    Al-Masri, M S; Hasan, M; Al-Hamwi, A; Amin, Y; Doubal, A W

    2013-02-01

    Mass attenuation coefficients of various soil and sediment samples (density range between 1.0 and 1.7 g cm(-3)) collected from 60 sites distributed in Syrian land have been determined for gamma lines of 46.5, 59.5, 88, 122, 165, 392, 661, 1173, and 1332 keV using gamma spectrometry and simulation software program X-com. The average mass attenuation coefficients for the studied samples were found to be 0.513, 0.316, 0.195, 0.155, 0.134, 0.096, 0.077, 0.058, and 0.055 cm(2) g(-1) at previous energies, respectively. The results have shown that Ca and Fe contents of the samples have strong effect on the mass attenuation coefficient at lower energies. In addition, self-attenuation correction factors determined using mass attenuation coefficient was in good agreement with addition spiked reference material method provided that the sample thickness is 2.7 cm. However, mass attenuation coefficients determined in this study can be used for determination of gamma emitters at energy ranges from 46.5 to 1332 keV in any soil and sediment samples having density of 1.0-1.7 g cm(-3). PMID:23103572

  6. Wave attenuation and sediment transport over an intertidal sand flat on the Fraser River Delta (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houser, C.; Hill, P. R.

    2010-12-01

    This paper describes the results of two instrument field studies to examine sediment transport processes and wave attenuation across Roberts Bank, a sandy intertidal bank on the Fraser River Delta. The field work was completed as part of a three-year study of the sensitivity of Roberts Bank to sea level rise and changing storminess. It was hypothesized that the response of the mudflats and salt marshes along the landward margin of the delta were dependent on the ability of the fronting sand flat to attenuate wave height and energy. The attenuation of wave height and energy was monitored at four stations along a shore-normal transect between December 23, 2003 and February 10, 2004. The attenuation varied with the relative wave height ratio (Hs h-1) along the seaward margin, with dissipation increasing as water depths decrease and/or incident wave heights increase. Under the most dissipative conditions observed (Hs h-1 ≈ 0.25), the exponential decay coefficient reached 0.00045. This decay coefficient is an order of magnitude smaller than predicted by a simple wave transformation model due to the relatively large wind fetch over the sand flat. Despite the maintenance of wave energy, the range of wave heights remains constrained in the landward direction, with the frequency of waves capable of entraining sediment on the sand flat decreasing from 11% at the outer flat to 2% at the inner stations. In response, bed elevation change and depth of sediment activation are greatest at the seaward margin and decrease exponentially landward. It is argued that the sand flat provides a natural barrier that defines the extent of mudflat development by limiting the potential for sediment resuspension and morphological change on the mudflat. The ability of the sand flat to provide continued protection to the mudflats and salt marshes depends on how it will respond to change in sea level and storminess. A comparison of the dimensionless, current-induced skin friction with the

  7. Seismic-wave attenuation associated with crustal faults in the New Madrid seismic zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hamilton, R.M.; Mooney, W.D.

    1990-01-01

    The attenuation of upper crustal seismic waves that are refracted with a velocity of about 6 kilometers per second varies greatly among profiles in the area of the New Madrid seismic zone in the central Mississippi Valley. The waves that have the strongest attenuation pass through the seismic trend along the axis of the Reelfoot rift in the area of the Blytheville arch. Defocusing of the waves in a low-velocity zone and/ or seismic scattering and absorption could cause the attenuation; these effects are most likely associated with the highly deformed rocks along the arch. Consequently, strong seismic-wave attenuation may be a useful criterion for identifying seismogenic fault zones.

  8. Effect of Viscous Cross Coupling between two Immiscible Fluids on Elastic Wave Propagation and Attenuation in Unsaturated Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo, WeiCheng; Lee, JheWei; Lee, ChengHaw

    2015-04-01

    A central issue in the theoretical treatment of a multiphase system is the proper mathematical description of momentum transfer across fluid-solid and fluid-fluid interfaces. Although recent studies have advanced our knowledge on modeling the coupling behavior between a porous framework and the fluids permeating it, the effect of viscous resistance caused by two-fluid flow on elastic wave behavior in unsaturated porous media still remains unaddressed. In the present study, we generalize the theory of dynamic poroelasticity to incorporate viscous cross coupling arising from the velocity difference between two adjacent fluids for examining the dynamic behavior of fluid flow in deformable porous media related to harmonic wave perturbation. The corresponding dispersion relations that characterize three compressional waves and one shear wave are precisely formulated, with the coefficients featuring all elasticity, inertial coupling, and viscous coupling parameters, for describing how wave number changes as excitation frequency is stipulated. To evaluate quantitatively this as-yet unknown effect, numerical simulations are implemented to solve the dispersion relations for Columbia fine sandy loam bearing an oil-water mixture with respect to three representative wave excitation frequencies. Our results show that the phase speed and attenuation coefficient of the third compressional wave which has the smallest speed is strongly sensitive to the presence of viscous cross coupling, as expected for this wave being attributed primarily to the out-of-phase motion of the two pore fluids. Viscous cross coupling also exerts an impact on the attenuation coefficient of the shear wave and the first compressional wave whose speed is greatest, which exhibits two opposite trends at different ranges of low and high water contents. A sensitivity analysis is further conducted to provide information on the importance of the coupling parameter, revealing that the effect becomes more

  9. Attenuation of coda waves in the Northeastern Region of India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazarika, Devajit; Baruah, Saurabh; Gogoi, Naba Kumar

    2009-01-01

    Coda wave attenuation quality factor Qc is estimated in the northeastern region of India using 45 local earthquakes recorded by regional seismic network. The quality factor Qc was estimated using the single backscattering model modified by Sato (J Phys Earth 25:27-41, 1977), in the frequency range 1-18 Hz. The attenuation and frequency dependence for different paths and the correlation of the results with geotectonics of the region are described in this paper. A total of 3,890 Qc measurements covering 187 varying paths are made for different lapse time window of 20, 30, 40, 50, 60, 70, 80, and 90 s in coda wave. The magnitudes of the analyzed events range from 1.2 to 3.9 and focal depths range between 7 and 38 km. The source-receiver distances of the selected events range between 16 and 270 km. For 30-s duration, the mean values of the estimated Qc vary from 50 ± 12 (at 1 Hz) to 2,078 ± 211(at 18 Hz) for the Arunachal Himalaya, 49 ± 14 (at 1 Hz) to 2,466 ± 197 (at 18 Hz) for the Indo-Burman, and 45 ± 13 (at 1 Hz) to 2,069 ± 198 (at 18 Hz) for Shillong group of earthquakes. It is observed that Qc increases with frequency portraying an average attenuation relation Qc=52.315± 1.07f ^{left( {1.32 ± 0.036} right)} for the region. Moreover, the pattern of Qc - 1 with frequency is analogous to the estimates obtained in other tectonic areas in the world, except with the observation that the Qc - 1 is much higher at 1 Hz for the northeastern region. The Qc - 1 is about 10 - 1.8 at 1 Hz and decreases to about 10 - 3.6 at 18 Hz indicating clear frequency dependence. Pertaining to the spatial distribution of Qc values, Mikir Hills and western part of Shillong Plateau are characterized by lower attenuation.

  10. Determination of mass attenuation coefficients, effective atomic and electron numbers for some natural minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, I.; Demir, L.; Şahin, M.

    2009-09-01

    The total mass attenuation coefficients ( μ m) for SiO 2 {Quartz (1 1 0 1), Quartz (1 1 0 0) and Quartz (0 0 0 1)}, KAlSi 3O 8 {Orthoclase (0 1 0), Orthoclase (1 0 0)}, CaSO 4·2H 2O (gypsum), FeS 2 (pyrite) and Mg 2Si 2O 6 (pyroxene) natural minerals were measured at 22.1, 25.0, 59.5 and 88.0 keV photon energies. The γ- and X-rays were counted by a Si(Li) detector with a resolution of 160 eV at 5.9 keV. Atomic and electronic cross sections ( σ t and σ e), the effective atomic and electron numbers or electron densities ( Z eff and N eff) were determined using the obtained μ m values for investigated samples.

  11. Determination of attenuation coefficients, thicknesses and effective atomic numbers for CuInSe 2 semiconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Çevik, Ugˇur; Baltaş, Hasan; Çelik, Ahmet; Bacaksız, Emin

    2006-06-01

    The X-rays attenuation coefficients for Cu, In and Se in elemental state and the semiconductor CuInSe2 were measured at 15 different energies from 11.9 to 37.3 keV by using the secondary excitation method. Monochromatic photons were obtained using the following secondary targets: Br, Sr, Mo, Cd, Te and Ba. 59.5 keV gamma rays emitted from an annular 241Am radioactive source were used to excite secondary target and X-rays emitted from secondary target were counted by a Si(Li) detector with a resolution of 0.16 keV at 5.9 keV. A method to determine the thickness of thin film with XRF is described. Additionally, the effect of absorption edges on effective atomic numbers and their variation with photon energy in composite semiconductor sample was discussed. Obtained values were compared with calculated values.

  12. Correction for multiple scattering of unpolarized photons in attenuation coefficient measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez, J.E.; Sumini, M.; Satori, R.

    1995-01-01

    Calculations of the diffusion of unpolarized photons in thin thickness targets have been performed with recourse to a vector transport model taking rigorously into account the polarization introduced by the scattering interactions. An order-of-interactions solution of the Boltzmann transport equation for photons was used to describe the multiple scattering terms due to the prevailing effects in the X-ray regime. An analytical expression for the correction factor to the attenuation coefficient is given in term of the solid angle subtended by the detector and the energy interval characterizing the detection response. Although the main corrections are due to the influence of the pure Rayleigh effect, first- and second-order chains involving the Rayleigh and Compton effects have been considered as possible sources of overlapping contributions to the transmitted intensity. The extent of the corrections is estimated and some examples are given for pure element targets.

  13. A method for estimating the diffuse attenuation coefficient (KdPAR)from paired temperature sensors

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Read, Jordan S.; Rose, Kevin C.; Winslow, Luke A.; Read, Emily Kara

    2015-01-01

    A new method for estimating the diffuse attenuation coefficient for photosynthetically active radiation (KdPAR) from paired temperature sensors was derived. We show that during cases where the attenuation of penetrating shortwave solar radiation is the dominant source of temperature changes, time series measurements of water temperatures at multiple depths (z1 and z2) are related to one another by a linear scaling factor (a). KdPAR can then be estimated by the simple equation KdPAR ln(a)/(z2/z1). A suggested workflow is presented that outlines procedures for calculating KdPAR according to this paired temperature sensor (PTS) method. This method is best suited for conditions when radiative temperature gains are large relative to physical noise. These conditions occur frequently on water bodies with low wind and/or high KdPARs but can be used for other types of lakes during time periods of low wind and/or where spatially redundant measurements of temperatures are available. The optimal vertical placement of temperature sensors according to a priori knowledge of KdPAR is also described. This information can be used to inform the design of future sensor deployments using the PTS method or for campaigns where characterizing sub-daily changes in temperatures is important. The PTS method provides a novel method to characterize light attenuation in aquatic ecosystems without expensive radiometric equipment or the user subjectivity inherent in Secchi depth measurements. This method also can enable the estimation of KdPAR at higher frequencies than many manual monitoring programs allow.

  14. Diffuse attenuation coefficient of downwelling irradiance: An evaluation of remote sensing methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Zhong-Ping; Darecki, Miroslaw; Carder, Kendall L.; Davis, Curtiss O.; Stramski, Dariusz; Rhea, W. Joseph

    2005-02-01

    The propagation of downwelling irradiance at wavelength λ from surface to a depth (z) in the ocean is governed by the diffuse attenuation coefficient, ?(λ). There are two standard methods for the derivation of ?(λ) in remote sensing, which both are based on empirical relationships involving the blue-to-green ratio of ocean color. Recently, a semianalytical method to derive ?(λ) from reflectance has also been developed. In this study, using ?(490) and ?(443) as examples, we compare the ?(λ) values derived from the three methods using data collected in three different regions that cover oceanic and coastal waters, with ?(490) ranging from ˜0.04 to 4.0 m-1. The derived values are compared with the data calculated from in situ measurements of the vertical profiles of downwelling irradiance. The comparisons show that the two standard methods produced satisfactory estimates of ?(λ) in oceanic waters where attenuation is relatively low but resulted in significant errors in coastal waters. The newly developed semianalytical method appears to have no such limitation as it performed well for both oceanic and coastal waters. For all data in this study the average of absolute percentage difference between the in situ measured and the semianalytically derived ? is ˜14% for λ = 490 nm and ˜11% for λ = 443 nm.

  15. Imaging the attenuation coefficients of magnetically constrained positron beams in matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, Charles C.

    2016-09-01

    This paper describes a method for tomographically imaging the linear attenuation coefficients (LACs) of positron beams in heterogeneous materials. A β+ ray emitter such as 68Ga, placed in a uniform 3T static magnetic field, generates a well-defined positron beam that maintains its spatial coherence over an attenuation of more than 10-3 while signaling its intensity via the annihilation radiation it generates. A positron emission tomography (PET) system embedded in the magnetic field measures the positron-electron annihilation distribution within objects illuminated by the beam. It's shown that this image can be decomposed into maps of the positron beam's flux and its material-dependent LACs without need for auxiliary measurements or transmission of the beam completely through the object. The initial implementation employs a hybrid PET/magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner developed for medical applications. Mass thicknesses up to 0.55 g/cm2 at a spatial resolution of a few millimeters have been imaged.

  16. Effect of viscous cross coupling between two immiscible fluids on elastic wave propagation and attenuation in unsaturated porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo, Wei-Cheng; Yeh, Chao-Lung; Lee, Jhe-Wei

    2015-09-01

    A central issue in the theoretical treatment of a multiphase system is the proper mathematical description of momentum transfer across fluid-solid and fluid-fluid interfaces. Although recent studies have advanced our knowledge on modeling the coupling behavior between a porous framework and the fluids permeating it, the effect of viscous resistance caused by two-fluid flow on elastic wave behavior in unsaturated porous media still remains elusive. In the present study, the theoretical model developed for describing immiscible two-phase fluid flows in a deformable porous medium related to harmonic wave perturbation is generalized to account for viscous cross coupling due to relative velocity between two adjacent fluids. The corresponding dispersion relations whose coefficients feature all elasticity, inertial-drag, and viscous-drag parameters are then precisely formulated, in a physical context characterizing three compressional waves and one shear wave. To evaluate quantitatively this as-yet unknown effect, numerical calculations are conducted to solve the dispersion relations for Columbia fine sandy loam bearing an oil-water mixture as a function of water saturation and excitation frequency. Our results show that the phase speed and attenuation coefficient of the P3 wave which has the smallest speed is strongly sensitive to the presence of viscous cross coupling, as expected since this wave is attributed primarily to the out-of-phase motion of the two pore fluids. Viscous cross coupling also exerts an impact on the attenuation coefficient of the shear wave and the P1 wave whose speed is greatest, which exhibits two opposite trends at different ranges of low and high water contents. Relative differences in these wave attributes are principally independent of excitation frequency. A sensitivity analysis is carried out to assess how changes in viscous cross coupling affect these differences, revealing that some of them become more significant as viscous cross

  17. Surface wave attenuation in the shallow subsurface from multichannel-multishot seismic data: a new approach for detecting fractures and lithological discontinuities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeda, Tatsunori; Tsuji, Takeshi

    2016-07-01

    Surface wave analysis generally neglects amplitude information, instead using phase information to delineate near-surface S-wave velocity structures. To effectively characterize subsurface heterogeneities from amplitude information, we propose a method of estimating lateral variation of attenuation coefficients of surface waves from multichannel-multishot (multifold) seismic data. We extend the concept of the common midpoint cross-correlation method, used for phase velocity estimation, to the analysis of attenuation coefficients. Our numerical experiments demonstrated that when used together, attenuation coefficients and phase velocities could characterize a lithological boundary as well as fracture zone. We applied the proposed method to multifold seismic reflection data acquired in Shikoku Island, Japan. We clearly observed abrupt changes in lateral variation of estimated attenuation coefficients around fault locations associated with a lithological boundary and with well-developed fractures, whereas phase velocity results could detect only the lithological boundary. Our study demonstrated that simultaneous interpretation of attenuation coefficients and phase velocities has the potential to distinguish localized fractures from lithological boundaries.

  18. Attenuation of High-Frequency Seismic Waves in Eastern Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahood, M.

    2014-09-01

    We investigated the frequency-dependent attenuation of the crust in Eastern Iran by analysis data from 132 local earthquakes having focal depths in the range of 5-25 km. We estimated the quality factor of coda waves ( Q c) and body waves ( Q p and Q s) in the frequency band of 1.5-24 Hz by applying the single backscattering theory of S-coda envelopes and the extended coda-normalization method, respectively. Considering records from recent earthquakes (Rigan M w 6.5, 2010/12/20, Goharan M w 6.2, 2013/5/11 and Sirch M w 5.5, 2013/1/21), the estimated values of Q c, Q p and Q s vary from 151 ± 49, 63 ± 6, and 93 ± 14 at 1.5 Hz to 1,994 ± 124, 945 ± 84 and 1,520 ± 123 at 24 Hz, respectively. The average frequency-dependent relationships ( Q = Q o f n ) estimated for the region are Q c = (108 ± 10) f (0.96±0.01), Q p = (50 ± 5) f (1.01±0.04), and Q s = (75 ± 6) f (1.03±0.06). These results evidenced a frequency dependence of the quality factors Q c, Q p, and Q s, as commonly observed in tectonically active zones characterized by a high degree of heterogeneity, and the low value of Q indicated an attenuative crust beneath the entire region.

  19. Measurement of intrinsic and scattering attenuation of shear waves in two sedimentary basins and comparison to crystalline sites in Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eulenfeld, Tom; Wegler, Ulrich

    2016-05-01

    We developed an improved method for the separation of intrinsic and scattering attenuation of seismic shear waves by envelope inversion called Qopen. The method optimizes the fit between Green's functions for the acoustic, isotropic radiative transfer theory and observed energy densities of earthquakes. The inversion allows the determination of scattering and intrinsic attenuation, site corrections and spectral source energies for the investigated frequency bands. Source displacement spectrum and the seismic moment of the analysed events can be estimated from the obtained spectral source energies. We report intrinsic and scattering attenuation coefficients of shear waves near three geothermal reservoirs in Germany for frequencies between 1 and 70 Hz. The geothermal reservoirs are located in Insheim, Landau (both Upper Rhine Graben) and Unterhaching (Molasse basin). We compare these three sedimentary sites to two sites located in crystalline rock with respect to scattering and intrinsic attenuation. The inverse quality factor for intrinsic attenuation is constant in sediments for frequencies smaller than 10 Hz and decreasing for higher frequencies. For crystalline rock, it is on a lower level and strictly monotonic decreasing with frequency. Intrinsic attenuation dominates scattering except for the Upper Rhine Graben, where scattering is dominant for frequencies below 10 Hz. Observed source displacement spectra show a high-frequency fall-off greater than or equal to 3.

  20. Noninvasive monitoring of photodynamic therapy on skin neoplastic lesions using the optical attenuation coefficient measured by optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goulart, Viviane P.; dos Santos, Moisés O.; Latrive, Anne; Freitas, Anderson Z.; Correa, Luciana; Zezell, Denise M.

    2015-05-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) has become a promising alternative for treatment of skin lesions such as squamous cell carcinoma. We propose a method to monitor the effects of PDT in a noninvasive way by using the optical attenuation coefficient (OAC) calculated from optical coherence tomography (OCT) images. We conducted a study on mice with chemically induced neoplastic lesions and performed PDT on these lesions using homemade photosensitizers. The response of neoplastic lesions to therapy was monitored using, at the same time, macroscopic clinical visualization, histopathological analysis, OCT imaging, and OCT-based attenuation coefficient measurement. Results with all four modalities demonstrated a positive response to treatment. The attenuation coefficient was found to be 1.4 higher in skin lesions than in healthy tissue and it decreased after therapy. This study shows that the OAC is a potential tool to noninvasively assess the evolution of skin neoplastic lesions with time after treatment.

  1. Blast wave attenuation by lightly destructable granular materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golub, V. V.; Lu, F. K.; Medin, S. A.; Mirova, O. A.; Parshikov, A. N.; Petukhov, V. A.; Volodin, V. V.

    Terrorist bombings are a dismal reality nowadays. One of the most effective ways for protection against blast overpressure is the use of lightly compacted materials such as sand [1] and aqueous foam [2] as a protective envelope or barrier. According to [1], shock wave attenuation in a mine tunnel (one-dimensional case) behind a destroyed object is given by q_e ≈ q {1}/{1 + 4(S/q)^{1/6} bρ _{mat} /L^{1/3} }where qe — effective charge, S — exposed area of the obstacle, q — TNT equivalent (grams), L — distance between charge and obstacle, b — obstacle thickness and ρ mat — material density. This empirical equation is applicable only in a one-dimensional case but not for a less confined environment. Another way of protecting a structure against blast is to coat the surface with a sacrificial layer. In [3] full-scale experiments were carried out to investigate the behaviour of a covering of aluminum foam under the effect of a blast wave.

  2. Simplified two media method: a modified approach for measuring linear attenuation coefficient of odd shaped archaeological samples of unknown thickness.

    PubMed

    Sidhu, Baltej Singh; Dhaliwal, A S; Mann, K S; Kahlon, K S

    2011-10-01

    Linear attenuation coefficients of regular as well as irregular shaped archaeological samples of FaLG (flyash-lime-gypsum) of unknown thickness have been measured employing 'simplified two media' method. Seven different liquid materials plus air have been used as media to measure attenuation coefficient of these samples. Obtained results have been compared with those for regular shaped samples. Experimental values have also been compared with theoretical values calculated from FFAST and XCOM. A good agreement has been observed between experimental and theoretical values. Present measurements employing 'simplified two media' method have been reported for the first time for checking its validation and reliability. PMID:21727010

  3. Investigation of the Attenuation of Plane Shock Waves Moving over very Rough Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huber, Paul W.; McFarland, Donald R.; Levine, Philip

    1953-01-01

    Experimental measurements of the attenuation of plane shock waves moving over rough walls have been made in a shock tube. Measurements of the boundary-layer characteristics, including thickness and velocity distribution behind the shock, have also been made with the aid of new cal techniques which provide direct information on the local boundary-layer conditions at the rough walls. Measurements of shock speed and shock pressure ratio are presented for both smooth-wall and rough-wall flow over lengths of machined-smooth and rough strips which lined all four walls of the shock tube. A simplified theory based on Von Karman's expression for skin-friction coefficient for flow over rough walls, along with a wave-model concept and extensions to include time effects, is presented. In this theory, the shock-tube flow is assumed to be one-dimensional at all times and the wave-model concept is used to relate the local layer growth to decreases in shock strength. This concept assumes that local boundary-layer growths act as local mass-flow sinks, which give rise to expansion waves which, in turn, overtake the shock and lower its mass flow accordingly.

  4. Broadband attenuation of Lamb waves through a periodic array of thin rectangular junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moiseyenko, Rayisa P.; Pennec, Yan; Marchal, Rémi; Bonello, Bernard; Djafari-Rouhani, Bahram

    2014-10-01

    We study theoretically subwavelength physical phenomena, such as resonant transmission and broadband sound shielding for Lamb waves propagating in an acoustic metamaterial made of a thin plate drilled with one or two row(s) of rectangular holes. The resonances and antiresonances of periodically arranged rectangular junctions separated by holes are investigated as a function of the geometrical parameters of the junctions. With one and two row(s) of holes, high frequency specific features in the transmission coefficient are explained in terms of a coupling of incident waves with both Fabry-Perot oscillations inside the junctions and induced surface acoustic waves between the homogeneous part of the plate and the row of holes. With two rows of holes, low frequency peaks and dips appear in the transmission spectrum. The choice of the distance between the two rows of holes allows the realization of a broadband low frequency acoustic shielding with attenuation over 99% for symmetric waves in a wide low frequency range and over 90% for antisymmetric ones. The origin of the transmission gap is discussed in terms of localized modes of the "H" element made by the junctions, connecting the two homogeneous parts of the plate.

  5. Nonautonomous rogue waves and 'catch' dynamics for the combined Hirota-LPD equation with variable coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Fajun

    2016-05-01

    We study multi-rogue wave solutions of a Schro¨dinger equation with higher-order terms employing the generalized Darboux transformation. Some properties of the nonautonomous rogue waves are investigated analytically for the combined Hirota-Lakshmanan-Porsezian-Daniel (LPD) equation. We consider the controllable behaviors of this nonautonomous rogue wave solution with the nonlinearity management function and gain/loss coefficient. It is reported that there are possibilities to 'catch' rogue waves through manipulating nonlinear function and gain/loss coefficient. Our approach can provide many possibilities to manipulate rogue waves and present the potential applications for the rogue wave phenomena.

  6. Frequency-dependent Lg-wave attenuation in northern Morocco

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noriega, Raquel; Ugalde, Arantza; Villaseñor, Antonio; Harnafi, Mimoun

    2015-11-01

    Frequency-dependent attenuation (Q- 1) in the crust of northern Morocco is estimated from Lg-wave spectral amplitude measurements every quarter octave in the frequency band 0.8 to 8 Hz. This study takes advantage of the improved broadband data coverage in the region provided by the deployment of the IberArray seismic network. Earthquake data consist of 71 crustal events with magnitudes 4 ≤ mb ≤ 5.5 recorded on 110 permanent and temporary seismic stations between January 2008 and December 2013 with hypocentral distances between 100 and 900 km. 1274 high-quality Lg waveforms provide dense path coverage of northern Morocco, crossing a region with a complex structure and heterogeneous tectonic setting as a result of continuous interactions between the African and Eurasian plates. We use two different methods: the coda normalization (CN) analysis, that allows removal of the source and site effects from the Lg spectra, and the spectral amplitude decay (SAD) method, that simultaneously inverts for source, site, and path attenuation terms. The CN and SAD methods return similar results, indicating that the Lg Q models are robust to differences in the methodologies. Larger errors and no significant frequency dependence are observed for frequencies lower than 1.5 Hz. For distances up to 400 km and the frequency band 1.5 ≤ ƒ (Hz) ≤ 4.5, the model functions Q(f) = (529- 22+ 23)(f/1.5)0.23 ± 0.06 and Q(f) = (457- 7+ 7)(f/1.5)0.44 ± 0.02 are obtained using the CN and SAD methods, respectively. A change in the frequency dependence is observed above 4.5 Hz for both methods which may be related to the influence of the Sn energy on the Lg window. The frequency-dependent Q- 1 estimates represent an average attenuation beneath a broad region including the Rif and Tell mountains, the Moroccan and Algerian mesetas, the Atlas Mountains and the Sahara Platform structural domains, and correlate well with areas of moderate seismicity where intermediate Q values have been obtained.

  7. Q c and Q S wave attenuation of South African earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandt, Martin B. C.

    2016-04-01

    Quality factor Q, which describes the attenuation of seismic waves with distance, was determined for South Africa using data recorded by the South African National Seismograph Network. Because of an objective paucity of seismicity in South Africa and modernisation of the seismograph network only in 2007, I carried out a coda wave decay analysis on only 13 tectonic earthquakes and 7 mine-related events for the magnitude range 3.6 ≤ M L ≤ 4.4. Up to five seismograph stations were utilised to determine Q c for frequencies at 2, 4, 8 and 16 Hz resulting in 84 individual measurements. The constants Q 0 and α were determined for the attenuation relation Q c( f) = Q 0 f α . The result was Q 0 = 396 ± 29 and α = 0.72 ± 0.04 for a lapse time of 1.9*( t s - t 0) (time from origin time t 0 to the start of coda analysis window is 1.9 times the S-travel time, t s) and a coda window length of 80 s. This lapse time and coda window length were found to fit the most individual frequencies for a signal-to-noise ratio of at least 3 and a minimum absolute correlation coefficient for the envelope of 0.5. For a positive correlation coefficient, the envelope amplitude increases with time and Q c was not calculated. The derived Q c was verified using the spectral ratio method on a smaller data set consisting of nine earthquakes and one mine-related event recorded by up to four seismograph stations. Since the spectral ratio method requires absolute amplitudes in its calculations, site response tests were performed to select four appropriate stations without soil amplification and/or signal distortion. The result obtained for Q S was Q 0 = 391 ± 130 and α = 0.60 ± 0.16, which agrees well with the coda Q c result.

  8. Out-of-field activity in the estimation of mean lung attenuation coefficient in PET/MR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berker, Yannick; Salomon, André; Kiessling, Fabian; Schulz, Volkmar

    2014-01-01

    In clinical PET/MR, photon attenuation is a source of potentially severe image artifacts. Correction approaches include those based on MR image segmentation, in which image voxels are classified and assigned predefined attenuation coefficients to obtain an attenuation map. In whole-body imaging, however, mean lung attenuation coefficients (LAC) can vary by a factor of 2, and the choice of inappropriate mean LAC can have significant impact on PET quantification. Previously, we proposed a method combining MR image segmentation, tissue classification and Maximum Likelihood reconstruction of Attenuation and Activity (MLAA) to estimate mean LAC values. In this work, we quantify the influence of out-of-field (OOF) accidental coincidences when acquiring data in a single bed position. We therefore carried out GATE simulations of realistic, whole-body activity and attenuation distributions derived from data of three patients. A bias of 15% was found and significantly reduced by removing OOF accidentals from our data, suggesting that OOF accidentals are the major contributor to the bias. We found approximately equal contributions from OOF scatter and OOF randoms, and present results after correction of the bias by rescaling of results. Results using temporal subsets suggest that 30-second acquisitions may be sufficient for estimation mean LAC with less than 5% uncertainty if mean bias can be corrected for.

  9. Evaluation of Moisture-Related Attenuation Coefficient and Water Diffusion Velocity in Human Skin Using Optical Coherence Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Cheng-Kuang; Tsai, Meng-Tsan; Chang, Feng-Yu; Yang, Chih-Hsun; Shen, Su-Chin; Yuan, Ouyang; Yang, Chih-He

    2013-01-01

    In this study, time-resolved optical coherence tomography (OCT) scanning images of the process of water diffusion in the skin that illustrate the enhancement in the backscattered intensities due to the increased water concentration are presented. In our experiments, the water concentration in the skin was increased by soaking the hand in water, and the same region of the skin was scanned and measured with the OCT system and a commercial moisture monitor every three minutes. To quantitatively analyze the moisture-related optical properties and the velocity of water diffusion in human skin, the attenuation coefficients of the skin, including the epidermis and dermis layers, were evaluated. Furthermore, the evaluated attenuation coefficients were compared with the measurements made using the commercial moisture monitor. The results demonstrate that the attenuation coefficient increases as the water concentration increases. Furthermore, by evaluating the positions of center-of mass of the backscattered intensities from OCT images, the diffusion velocity can be estimated. In contrast to the commercial moisture monitor, OCT can provide three-dimensional structural images of the skin and characterize its optical property, which together can be used to observe morphological changes and quantitatively evaluate the moisture-related attenuation coefficients in different skin layers. PMID:23529149

  10. Attenuation coefficient of the light in skin of BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, C. R.; Camargo, C. F. M.; Aureliano, D. P.; De Pretto, L. R.; Freitas, A. Z.; Ribeiro, M. S.

    2015-06-01

    Optical properties of the biological tissue play an important role to a correct use of optical techniques for therapy and diagnosis. The mice skin presents morphological differences due to characteristics such as gender, body mass and age. Murine models are frequently used in pre-clinical trials in optical therapy and diagnosis. Therefore, the assessment of the skin tissue in animal models is needed for a proper understanding of how light interacts with skin. Noninvasive techniques such as optical coherence tomography (OCT) have been used to obtain optical information of the tissue, as the attenuation coefficient, with the advantage of obtaining sectional images in real time. In this study, eight female BALB/c albino mice (twenty-four weeks old) and eight male C57BL/6 black mice (eight weeks old) were used to measure the attenuation coefficient of the light in the skin, utilizing the OCT technique, aiming to check for influence of the aging process. Two moments were assessed twenty-two weeks apart from each other. Our data show that the aging process significantly affects the light attenuation coefficient in mice skin. Twenty-two weeks after, statistical significant differences were observed between groups within a same strain. We conclude that light attenuation coefficient of mice skin may be influenced by factors such as disorganization of the dermis. Morphological aspects of skin should be taken into account in studies that involve optical strategies in murine models.

  11. Radiation dose estimation and mass attenuation coefficients of cement samples used in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Damla, N; Cevik, U; Kobya, A I; Celik, A; Celik, N; Van Grieken, R

    2010-04-15

    Different cement samples commonly used in building construction in Turkey have been analyzed for natural radioactivity using gamma-ray spectrometry. The mean activity concentrations observed in the cement samples were 52, 40 and 324 Bq kg(-1) for (226)Ra, (232)Th and (40)K, respectively. The measured activity concentrations for these radionuclides were compared with the reported data of other countries and world average limits. The radiological hazard parameters such as radium equivalent activities (Ra(eq)), gamma index (I(gamma)) and alpha index (I(alpha)) indices as well as terrestrial absorbed dose and annual effective dose rate were calculated and compared with the international data. The Ra(eq) values of cement are lower than the limit of 370 Bq kg(-1), equivalent to a gamma dose of 1.5 mSv y(-1). Moreover, the mass attenuation coefficients were determined experimentally and calculated theoretically using XCOM in some cement samples. Also, chemical compositions analyses of the cement samples were investigated. PMID:20018450

  12. Measurement of mass attenuation coefficients for YBaCuO superconductor at different energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Çevik, U.; Baltas, H.; Çelik, S.; Karaca, I.; Kopya, I.

    2005-01-01

    The mass attenuation coefficients for Y2O3, BaCO3, CuO compounds, and solid-state forms of YBa2Cu3O7 superconductor were determined at energies of 57.5, 59.5, 65.2, 74.8, 77.1, 87.3, 94.6, 98.4, 122, and 136 keV. The samples were irradiated using a 241Am point source emitting 59.5 keV photon energies and a 57Co point source emitting 122 and 136 keV photon energies. The other energies were obtained using secondary targets such as Ta, Bi2O3, and (CH3COO)2UO22H2O. The gamma- and x-rays were counted by a Si(Li) detector with a resolution of 160 eV at 5.9 keV. Samples were selected on the basis of known composition and mass densities were measured using a densitometer. The experimental results obtained in this study are compared with theoretical values.

  13. Mass attenuation coefficients, effective atomic numbers and effective electron densities for some polymers.

    PubMed

    Kucuk, Nil; Cakir, Merve; Isitman, Nihat Ali

    2013-01-01

    In this study, the total mass attenuation coefficients (μ(m)) for some homo- and hetero-chain polymers, namely polyamide-6 (PA-6), poly-methyl methacrylate (PMMA), low-density polyethylene (LDPE), polypropylene (PP) and polystyrene (PS) were measured at 59.5, 511, 661.6, 1173.2, 1274.5 and 1332.5 keV photon energies. The samples were separately irradiated with (241)Am, (22)Na, (137)Cs and (60)Co (638 kBq) radioactive gamma sources. The measurements were made by performing transmission experiments with a 2″×2″ NaI(Tl) scintillation detector having an energy resolution of 7 % at 662 keV gamma ray from the decay of (137)Cs. The effective atomic numbers (Z(eff)) and the effective electron densities (N(eff)) were determined experimentally and theoretically using the obtained μ(m) values for the investigated samples. Furthermore, Z(eff) and N(eff) of each polymer were computed for total photon interaction cross-sections using theoretical data over a wide energy region from 1 keV to 10 MeV. The experimental values of the selected polymers were found to be in good agreement with the theoretical values. PMID:22645382

  14. Calculation of gamma-ray mass attenuation coefficients of some Egyptian soil samples using Monte Carlo methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medhat, M. E.; Demir, Nilgun; Akar Tarim, Urkiye; Gurler, Orhan

    2014-08-01

    Monte Carlo simulations, FLUKA and Geant4, were performed to study mass attenuation for various types of soil at 59.5, 356.5, 661.6, 1173.2 and 1332.5 keV photon energies. Appreciable variations are noted for all parameters by changing the photon energy and the chemical composition of the sample. The simulations parameters were compared with experimental data and the XCOM program. The simulations show that the calculated mass attenuation coefficient values were closer to experimental values better than those obtained theoretically using the XCOM database for the same soil samples. The results indicate that Geant4 and FLUKA can be applied to estimate mass attenuation for various biological materials at different energies. The Monte Carlo method may be employed to make additional calculations on the photon attenuation characteristics of different soil samples collected from other places.

  15. Subduction zone guided waves: 3D modelling and attenuation effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garth, T.; Rietbrock, A.

    2013-12-01

    Waveform modelling is an important tool for understanding complex seismic structures such as subduction zone waveguides. These structures are often simplified to 2D structures for modelling purposes to reduce computational costs. In the case of subduction zone waveguide affects, 2D models have shown that dispersed arrivals are caused by a low velocity waveguide, inferred to be subducted oceanic crust and/or hydrated outer rise normal faults. However, due to the 2D modelling limitations the inferred seismic properties such as velocity contrast and waveguide thickness are still debated. Here we test these limitations with full 3D waveform modelling. For waveguide effects to be observable the waveform must be accurately modelled to relatively high frequencies (> 2 Hz). This requires a small grid spacing due to the high seismic velocities present in subduction zones. A large area must be modelled as well due to the long propagation distances (400 - 600 km) of waves interacting with subduction zone waveguides. The combination of the large model area and small grid spacing required means that these simulations require a large amount of computational resources, only available at high performance computational centres like the UK National super computer HECTOR (used in this study). To minimize the cost of modelling for such a large area, the width of the model area perpendicular to the subduction trench (the y-direction) is made as small as possible. This reduces the overall volume of the 3D model domain. Therefore the wave field is simulated in a model ';corridor' of the subduction zone velocity structure. This introduces new potential sources of error particularly from grazing wave side reflections in the y-direction. Various dampening methods are explored to reduce these grazing side reflections, including perfectly matched layers (PML) and more traditional exponential dampening layers. Defining a corridor model allows waveguide affects to be modelled up to at least 2

  16. Studies on mass attenuation coefficients, effective atomic numbers and electron densities for CoCuAg alloy thin film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apaydın, G.; Cengiz, E.; Tıraşoğlu, E.; Aylıkcı, V.; Bakkaloğlu, Ö. F.

    2009-05-01

    The mass attenuation coefficients for the elements Co, Cu and Ag and a thin film of CoCuAg alloy were measured in the energy range 4.029-38.729 keV. Effective atomic numbers and electron densities were calculated by using these coefficients. The energies were obtained by using secondary targets that were irradiated with gamma-ray photons of 241Am. The x-rays were counted by using a Canberra Ultra-LEGe detector with a resolution of 150 eV at 5.9 keV. The results were compared with theoretical calculated values and fairly good agreement was found between them within an average experimental error. The mass attenuation coefficients, effective atomic numbers and electron densities were plotted versus photon energy.

  17. Theoretical explanation of the relationship between backscattered electron and x-ray linear attenuation coefficients in calcified tissues.

    PubMed

    Wong, F S; Elliott, J C

    1997-11-01

    X-ray absorption and backscattered electron (BSE) microscopies are two commonly used techniques for estimating mineral contents in calcified tissues. The resolution in BSE images is usually higher than in x-ray images, but due to the previous lack of good standards to quantify the grey levels in BSE images of bones and teeth, x-ray microtomography (XMT) images of the same specimens have been used for calibration. However, the physics of these two techniques is different: for a specimen with a given composition, the x-ray linear attenuation coefficient is proportional to density, but there is no such relation with the BSE coefficient. To understand the reason that this calibration appears to be valid, the behaviour of simulated bone samples was investigated. In this, the bone samples were modelled as having three phases: hydroxyapatite (Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2), protein, and void (either empty or completely filled with polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA), a resin which is usually used for embedding bones and teeth in microscopic studies). The x-ray linear attenuation coefficients (calculated using published data) and the BSE coefficients (calculated using Monte Carlo simulation) were compared for samples of various phase proportions. It was found that the BSE coefficient correlated only with the x-ray attenuation coefficient for samples with PMMA infiltration. This was attributed to the properties of PMMA (density and mean atomic number) being very similar to those of the protein; therefore, the sample behaves like a two-phase system which allows the establishment of a monotonic relation between density and BSE coefficient. With the newly developed standards (brominated and iodinated dimethacrylate esters) for BSE microscopy of bone, grey levels can be converted to absolute BSE coefficients by linear interpolation, from which equivalent densities can be determined. PMID:9418207

  18. The precise measurement of the attenuation coefficients of various IR optical materials applicable to immersion grating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaji, Sayumi; Sarugaku, Yuki; Ikeda, Yuji; Kobayashi, Naoto; Nakanishi, Kenshi; Kondo, Sohei; Yasui, Chikako; Kawakita, Hideyo

    2014-07-01

    Immersion grating is a next-generation diffraction grating which has the immersed the diffraction surface in an optical material with high refractive index of n > 2, and can provide higher spectral resolution than a classical reflective grating. Our group is developing various immersion gratings from the near- to mid-infrared region (Ikeda et al.1, 2, 3, 4, Sarugaku et al.5, and Sukegawa et al.6). The internal attenuation αatt of the candidate materials is especially very important to achieve the high efficiency immersion gratings used for astronomical applications. Nevertheless, because there are few available data as αatt < 0.01cm-1 in the infrared region, except for measurements of CVD-ZnSe, CVD-ZnS, and single-crystal Si in the short near-infrared region reported by Ikeda et al.7, we cannot select suitable materials as an immersion grating in an aimed wavelength range. Therefore, we measure the attenuation coefficients of CdTe, CdZnTe, Ge, Si, ZnSe, and ZnS that could be applicable to immersion gratings. We used an originally developed optical unit attached to a commercial FTIR which covers the wide wavelength range from 1.3μm to 28μm. This measurement system achieves the high accuracy of (triangle)αatt ~ 0.01cm-1. As a result, high-resistivity single-crystal CdZnTe, single-crystal Ge, single-crystal Si, CVD-ZnSe, and CVD-ZnS show αatt < 0.01cm-1 at the wavelength range of 5.5 - 19.0μm, 2.0 - 10.5μm, 1.3 - 5.4μm, 1.7 - 13.2μm, and 1.9 - 9.2μm, respectively. This indicates that these materials are good candidates for high efficiency immersion grating covering those wavelength ranges. We plan to make similar measurement under the cryogenic condition as T <= 10K for the infrared, especially mid-infrared applications.

  19. A New Approach for Quantitative Evaluation of Ultrasonic Wave Attenuation in Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Qing-Qing; Li, Ran; Xia, Hong

    2016-06-01

    When ultrasonic waves propagate in composite materials, the propagation behaviors result from the combination effects of various factors, such as material anisotropy and viscoelastic property, internal microstructure and defects, incident wave characteristics and interface condition between composite components. It is essential to make it clear how these factors affect the ultrasonic wave propagation and attenuation characteristics, and how they mutually interact on each other. In the present paper, based on a newly developed time-domain finite element analysis code, PZflex, a unique approach for clarifying the detailed influence mechanism of aforementioned factors is proposed, in which each attenuation component can be extracted from the overall attenuation and analyzed respectively. By taking into consideration the interrelation between each individual attenuation component, the variation behaviors of each component and internal dynamic stress distribution against material anisotropy and matrix viscosity are separately and quantitatively evaluated. From the detailed analysis results of each attenuation component, the energy dissipation at interface is a major component in ultrasonic wave attenuation characteristics, which can provide a maximum contribution rate of 68.2 % to the overall attenuation, and each attenuation component is closely related to the material anisotropy and viscoelasticity. The results clarify the correlation between ultrasonic wave propagation characteristics and material viscoelastic properties, which will be useful in the further development of ultrasonic technology in defect detection.

  20. Attenuation of P-Waves by Wave-Induced Fluid Flow

    SciTech Connect

    Pride, S R; Berryman, J G

    2002-03-29

    Analytical expressions for three P-wave attenuation mechanisms in rocks are given and numerically-compared. The mechanisms are: (1) Biot loss, in which flow occurs at the scale of the wavelength between the peaks and troughs of a P wave; (2) squirt loss, in which flow occurs at the grain scale between microcracks the grains and the adjacent pores; and (3) mesoscopic loss, in which flow occurs at intermediate scales between the various lithological bodies that are present in an averaging volume of earth material. Each mechanism is of importance over different frequency bands. Typically, Biot loss is only important at the highest of ultrasonic frequencies (> 1 MHz), squirt-loss (when it occurs) is important in the range of 10 kHz to 1 MHz, while mesoscale loss dominates at the lower frequencies (<10 kHz) employed in seismology.

  1. Assessment of human burn scars with optical coherence tomography by imaging the attenuation coefficient of tissue after vascular masking.

    PubMed

    Gong, Peijun; McLaughlin, Robert A; Liew, Yih Miin; Munro, Peter R T; Wood, Fiona M; Sampson, David D

    2014-02-01

    The formation of burn-scar tissue in human skin profoundly alters, among other things, the structure of the dermis. We present a method to characterize dermal scar tissue by the measurement of the near-infrared attenuation coefficient using optical coherence tomography (OCT). To generate accurate en face parametric images of attenuation, we found it critical to first identify (using speckle decorrelation) and mask the tissue vasculature from the three-dimensional OCT data. The resulting attenuation coefficients in the vasculature-masked regions of the dermis of human burn-scar patients are lower in hypertrophic (3.8±0.4  mm(-1)) and normotrophic (4.2±0.9  mm(-1)) scars than in contralateral or adjacent normal skin (6.3±0.5  mm(-1)). Our results suggest that the attenuation coefficient of vasculature-masked tissue could be used as an objective means to assess human burn scars. PMID:24192908

  2. Banded structures in electron pitch angle diffusion coefficients from resonant wave-particle interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathi, A. K.; Singhal, R. P.; Khazanov, G. V.; Avanov, L. A.

    2016-04-01

    Electron pitch angle (Dαα) and momentum (Dpp) diffusion coefficients have been calculated due to resonant interactions with electrostatic electron cyclotron harmonic (ECH) and whistler mode chorus waves. Calculations have been performed at two spatial locations L = 4.6 and 6.8 for electron energies ≤10 keV. Landau (n = 0) resonance and cyclotron harmonic resonances n = ±1, ±2, … ±5 have been included in the calculations. It is found that diffusion coefficient versus pitch angle (α) profiles show large dips and oscillations or banded structures. The structures are more pronounced for ECH and lower band chorus (LBC) and particularly at location 4.6. Calculations of diffusion coefficients have also been performed for individual resonances. It is noticed that the main contribution of ECH waves in pitch angle diffusion coefficient is due to resonances n = +1 and n = +2. A major contribution to momentum diffusion coefficients appears from n = +2. However, the banded structures in Dαα and Dpp coefficients appear only in the profile of diffusion coefficients for n = +2. The contribution of other resonances to diffusion coefficients is found to be, in general, quite small or even negligible. For LBC and upper band chorus waves, the banded structures appear only in Landau resonance. The Dpp diffusion coefficient for ECH waves is one to two orders smaller than Dαα coefficients. For chorus waves, Dpp coefficients are about an order of magnitude smaller than Dαα coefficients for the case n ≠ 0. In case of Landau resonance, the values of Dpp coefficient are generally larger than the values of Dαα coefficients particularly at lower energies. As an aid to the interpretation of results, we have also determined the resonant frequencies. For ECH waves, resonant frequencies have been estimated for wave normal angle 89° and harmonic resonances n = +1, +2, and +3, whereas for whistler mode waves, the frequencies have been calculated for angle 10° and Landau

  3. Mass attenuation coefficients of Martian meteorites and Earth composition in the energy range 1 keV-100 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ün, M.; Han, E. Narmanli; Ün, A.

    2016-04-01

    Mass attenuation coefficients for 24 Martian meteorites have been determined in the energy range from 1 keV to 100 GeV. The values of mass attenuation coefficients (µ/ρ) of the samples were calculated the WINXCOM program. The obtained results for Martian meteorites have been compared with the results for Earth composition and similarities or differences also evaluated.

  4. Velocity-Space Diffusion Coefficients Due to Full-Wave ICRF Fields in Toroidal Geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Harvey, R.W.; Jaeger, F.; Berry, L.A.; Batchelor, D.B.; D'Azevedo, E.; Carter, M.D.; Ershov, N.M.; Smirnov, A.P.; Bonoli, P.; Wright, J.C.; Smithe, D.N.

    2005-09-26

    Jaeger et al. have calculated bounce-averaged QL diffusion coefficients from AORSA full-wave fields, based on non-Maxwellian distributions from CQL3D Fokker-Planck code. A zero banana-width approximation is employed. Complementing this calculation, a fully numerical calculation of ion velocity diffusion coefficients using the full-wave fields in numerical tokamak equilibria has been implemented to determine the finite orbit width effects. The un-approximated Lorentz equation of motion is integrated to obtain the change in velocity after one complete poloidal transit of the tokamak. Averaging velocity changes over initial starting gyro-phase and toroidal angle gives bounce-averaged diffusion coefficients. The coefficients from the full-wave and Lorentz orbit methods are compared for an ITER DT second harmonic tritium ICRF heating case: the diffusion coefficients are similar in magnitude but reveal substantial finite orbit effects.

  5. A poroelastic model for ultrasonic wave attenuation in partially frozen brines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsushima, Jun; Nibe, Takao; Suzuki, Makoto; Kato, Yoshibumi; Rokugawa, Shuichi

    2011-02-01

    Although there are many possible mechanisms for the intrinsic seismic attenuation in composite materials that include fluids, relative motion between solids and fluids during seismic wave propagation is one of the most important attenuation mechanisms. In our previous study, we conducted ultrasonic wave transmission measurements on an ice-brine coexisting system to examine the influence on ultrasonic waves of the unfrozen brine in the pore microstructure of ice. In order to elucidate the physical mechanism responsible for ultrasonic wave attenuation in the frequency range of 350-600kHz, measured at different temperatures in partially frozen brines, we employed a poroelastic model based on the Biot theory to describe the propagation of ultrasonic waves through partially frozen brines. By assuming that the solid phase is ice and the liquid phase is the unfrozen brine, fluid properties measured by a pulsed nuclear magnetic resonance technique were used to calculate porosities at different temperatures. The computed intrinsic attenuation at 500kHz cannot completely predict the measured attenuation results from the experimental study in an ice-brine coexisting system, which suggests that other attenuation mechanisms such as the squirt-flow mechanism and wave scattering effect should be taken into account.

  6. Attenuation and distortion of compression waves propagating in very long tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Shinya; Sasa, Daisuke; Aoki, Toshiyuki

    2011-03-01

    A lot of phenomena related to propagating various waves are seen when the high-speed train goes through the tunnel, the gas pipeline is broken due to an accident or the air brake of the wagon operates. For instance, a compression wave generated ahead of a high-speed train entering a tunnel propagates to the tunnel exit and spouts as a micro pressure wave, which causes an exploding sound. In order to estimate the magnitude correctly, the mechanism of the attenuation and distortion of a compression wave propagating along a very long tunnel must be understood and the experimental information on these phenomena is required. An experimental investigation is carried out to clarify the attenuation and distortion of the propagating compression wave in a very long tube. Experimental results show that the strength of a compression wave decreases with distance. The attenuation and distortion of compression waves are affected by the initial waveform of the compression wave and by the unsteady boundary layer induced by the propagating wave. The shape of a compression wave becomes different with the propagating distance; that is, a shock wave appears just head of a wavefront and an overshoot on pressure distribution is observed behind a shock wave due to the transition of the unsteady boundary layer.

  7. On shallow water waves in a medium with time-dependent dispersion and nonlinearity coefficients

    PubMed Central

    Abdel-Gawad, Hamdy I.; Osman, Mohamed

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we studied the progression of shallow water waves relevant to the variable coefficient Korteweg–de Vries (vcKdV) equation. We investigated two kinds of cases: when the dispersion and nonlinearity coefficients are proportional, and when they are not linearly dependent. In the first case, it was shown that the progressive waves have some geometric structures as in the case of KdV equation with constant coefficients but the waves travel with time dependent speed. In the second case, the wave structure is maintained when the nonlinearity balances the dispersion. Otherwise, water waves collapse. The objectives of the study are to find a wide class of exact solutions by using the extended unified method and to present a new algorithm for treating the coupled nonlinear PDE’s. PMID:26199750

  8. On shallow water waves in a medium with time-dependent dispersion and nonlinearity coefficients.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Gawad, Hamdy I; Osman, Mohamed

    2015-07-01

    In this paper, we studied the progression of shallow water waves relevant to the variable coefficient Korteweg-de Vries (vcKdV) equation. We investigated two kinds of cases: when the dispersion and nonlinearity coefficients are proportional, and when they are not linearly dependent. In the first case, it was shown that the progressive waves have some geometric structures as in the case of KdV equation with constant coefficients but the waves travel with time dependent speed. In the second case, the wave structure is maintained when the nonlinearity balances the dispersion. Otherwise, water waves collapse. The objectives of the study are to find a wide class of exact solutions by using the extended unified method and to present a new algorithm for treating the coupled nonlinear PDE's. PMID:26199750

  9. Calibration of a turbidity meter for making estimates of total suspended solids concentrations and beam attenuation coefficients in field experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Usry, J. W.; Whitlock, C. H.

    1981-01-01

    Management of water resources such as a reservoir requires using analytical models which describe such parameters as the suspended sediment field. To select or develop an appropriate model requires making many measurements to describe the distribution of this parameter in the water column. One potential method for making those measurements expeditiously is to measure light transmission or turbidity and relate that parameter to total suspended solids concentrations. An instrument which may be used for this purpose was calibrated by generating curves of transmission measurements plotted against measured values of total suspended solids concentrations and beam attenuation coefficients. Results of these experiments indicate that field measurements made with this instrument using curves generated in this study should correlate with total suspended solids concentrations and beam attenuation coefficients in the water column within 20 percent.

  10. Determination of Mass Attenuation Coefficients for CuInSe2 and CuGaSe2 Semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Çelik, Ahmet; Çevik, Uǧur; Baltaş, Hasan; Bacaksiz, Emin

    2007-04-01

    This work presents mass attenuation coefficients values of CuInSe2 and CuGaSe2 semiconductor thin films commonly used in photovoltaic devices. The mass attenuation coefficients were measured at different energies from 11.9 to 37.3 keV by using the secondary excitation method. Monochromatic photons were obtained using the Br, Sr, Mo, Cd, Te, Ba and Nd secondary targets. 59.5 keV gamma rays emitted from an annular Am-241 radioactive source were used to excite secondary targets. Characteristic X-rays emitted from secondary target were counted by a Si(Li) detector with a resolution of 0.16 keV at 5.9 keV. The measured values were compared with theoretical values calculated using WinXCOM program.

  11. Determination of Mass Attenuation Coefficients for CuInSe2 and CuGaSe2 Semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Celik, Ahmet; Cevik, Ugur; Baltas, Hasan; Bacaksiz, Emin

    2007-04-23

    This work presents mass attenuation coefficients values of CuInSe2 and CuGaSe2 semiconductor thin films commonly used in photovoltaic devices. The mass attenuation coefficients were measured at different energies from 11.9 to 37.3 keV by using the secondary excitation method. Monochromatic photons were obtained using the Br, Sr, Mo, Cd, Te, Ba and Nd secondary targets. 59.5 keV gamma rays emitted from an annular Am-241 radioactive source were used to excite secondary targets. Characteristic X-rays emitted from secondary target were counted by a Si(Li) detector with a resolution of 0.16 keV at 5.9 keV. The measured values were compared with theoretical values calculated using WinXCOM program.

  12. Improved Algorithms for Accurate Retrieval of UV - Visible Diffuse Attenuation Coefficients in Optically Complex, Inshore Waters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cao, Fang; Fichot, Cedric G.; Hooker, Stanford B.; Miller, William L.

    2014-01-01

    Photochemical processes driven by high-energy ultraviolet radiation (UVR) in inshore, estuarine, and coastal waters play an important role in global bio geochemical cycles and biological systems. A key to modeling photochemical processes in these optically complex waters is an accurate description of the vertical distribution of UVR in the water column which can be obtained using the diffuse attenuation coefficients of down welling irradiance (Kd()). The Sea UV Sea UVc algorithms (Fichot et al., 2008) can accurately retrieve Kd ( 320, 340, 380,412, 443 and 490 nm) in oceanic and coastal waters using multispectral remote sensing reflectances (Rrs(), Sea WiFS bands). However, SeaUVSeaUVc algorithms are currently not optimized for use in optically complex, inshore waters, where they tend to severely underestimate Kd(). Here, a new training data set of optical properties collected in optically complex, inshore waters was used to re-parameterize the published SeaUVSeaUVc algorithms, resulting in improved Kd() retrievals for turbid, estuarine waters. Although the updated SeaUVSeaUVc algorithms perform best in optically complex waters, the published SeaUVSeaUVc models still perform well in most coastal and oceanic waters. Therefore, we propose a composite set of SeaUVSeaUVc algorithms, optimized for Kd() retrieval in almost all marine systems, ranging from oceanic to inshore waters. The composite algorithm set can retrieve Kd from ocean color with good accuracy across this wide range of water types (e.g., within 13 mean relative error for Kd(340)). A validation step using three independent, in situ data sets indicates that the composite SeaUVSeaUVc can generate accurate Kd values from 320 490 nm using satellite imagery on a global scale. Taking advantage of the inherent benefits of our statistical methods, we pooled the validation data with the training set, obtaining an optimized composite model for estimating Kd() in UV wavelengths for almost all marine waters. This

  13. Characterization of guided wave velocity and attenuation in anisotropic materials from wavefield measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Westin B.; Michaels, Thomas E.; Michaels, Jennifer E.

    2016-02-01

    The behavior of guided waves propagating in anisotropic composite panels can be substantially more complicated than for isotropic, metallic plates. The angular dependency of wave propagation characteristics need to be understood and quantified before applying methods for damage detection and characterization. This study experimentally investigates the anisotropy of wave speed and attenuation for the fundamental A0-like guided wave mode propagating in a solid laminate composite panel. A piezoelectric transducer is the wave source and a laser Doppler vibrometer is used to measure the outward propagating waves along radial lines originating at the source transducer. Group velocity, phase velocity and attenuation are characterized as a function of angle for a single center frequency. The methods shown in this paper serve as a framework for future adaptation to damage imaging methods using guided waves for structural health monitoring.

  14. Wave attenuation and mode dispersion in a waveguide coated with lossy dielectric material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, C. S.; Chuang, S. L.; Lee, S. W.; Lo, Y. T.

    1984-01-01

    The modal attenuation constants in a cylindrical waveguide coated with a lossy dielectric material are studied as functions of frequency, dielectric constant, and thickness of the dielectric layer. A dielectric material best suited for a large attenuation is suggested. Using Kirchhoff's approximation, the field attenuation in a coated waveguide which is illuminated by a normally incident plane wave is also studied. For a circular guide which has a diameter of two wavelengths and is coated with a thin lossy dielectric layer (omega sub r = 9.1 - j2.3, thickness = 3% of the radius), a 3 dB attenuation is achieved within 16 diameters.

  15. Teleseismic Body-Wave Attenuation beneath the Western and Central United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, B.; Reed, C. A.; Liu, K. H.; Gao, S. S.

    2014-12-01

    Attenuation of seismic waves is the consequence of anelasticity of the Earth's layers along the path of propagation. Joint analyses of seismic velocity with attenuation anomalies can significantly reduce the non-uniqueness in the interpretation of velocity images and result in a better understanding of the Earth's interior structure, composition, and dynamics. Employing a Bayesian approach with a common spectrum simultaneous inversion for attenuation factors (Gao, 1997), we have processed over 14,000 teleseismic body-wave seismograms recorded by all publicly available broadband seismic stations in the western and central United States. Preliminary results show extensive low-attenuation areas beneath the central United States probably related to fragments of the ancient Farallon slab, while less pronounced regions of likely cold material underlie the Colorado Plateau. High-attenuation anomalies are discovered in association with the Snake River Plain and the Rio Grande Rift. We apply station-averaged parameters and P-S attenuation ratios and compare our findings with published shear-wave splitting results to examine the presence of partial melt and asthenospheric upwelling. Additionally, we examine the azimuthal variation of attenuation measurements to constrain the possible existence of attenuation anisotropy and attempt to constrain the source depth of anisotropy through tomographic methods.

  16. Attenuation of electromagnetic wave propagation in sandstorms incorporating charged sand particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, You-He; Shu He, Qin; Zheng, Xiao Jing

    2005-06-01

    A theoretical approach for predicting the attenuation of microwave propagation in sandstorms is presented, with electric charges generated on the sand grains taken into account. It is found that the effect of electric charges distributed partially on the sand surface is notable. The calculated attenuation is in good agreement with that measured in certain conditions. The distribution of electric charges on the surface of sand grains, which is not easy to measure, can be approximately determined by measuring the attenuation value of electromagnetic waves. Some effects of sand radius, dielectric permittivity, frequency of electromagnetic wave, and visibility of sandstorms on the attenuation are also discussed quantitatively. Finally, a new electric parameter is introduced to describe the roles of scattering, absorption and effect of charges in attenuation.

  17. Shear wave velocity, seismic attenuation, and thermal structure of the continental upper mantle

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Artemieva, I.M.; Billien, M.; Leveque, J.-J.; Mooney, W.D.

    2004-01-01

    Seismic velocity and attenuation anomalies in the mantle are commonly interpreted in terms of temperature variations on the basis of laboratory studies of elastic and anelastic properties of rocks. In order to evaluate the relative contributions of thermal and non-thermal effects on anomalies of attenuation of seismic shear waves, QS-1, and seismic velocity, VS, we compare global maps of the thermal structure of the continental upper mantle with global QS-1 and Vs maps as determined from Rayleigh waves at periods between 40 and 150 S. We limit the comparison to three continental mantle depths (50, 100 and 150 km), where model resolution is relatively high. The available data set does not indicate that, at a global scale, seismic anomalies in the upper mantle are controlled solely by temperature variations. Continental maps have correlation coefficients of <0.56 between VS and T and of <0.47 between QS and T at any depth. Such low correlation coefficients can partially be attributed to modelling arrefacts; however, they also suggest that not all of the VS and QS anomalies in the continental upper mantle can be explained by T variations. Global maps show that, by the sign of the anomaly, VS and QS usually inversely correlate with lithospheric temperatures: most cratonic regions show high VS and QS and low T, while most active regions have seismic and thermal anomalies of the opposite sign. The strongest inverse correlation is found at a depth of 100 km, where the attenuation model is best resolved. Significantly, at this depth, the contours of near-zero QS anomalies approximately correspond to the 1000 ??C isotherm, in agreement with laboratory measurements that show a pronounced increase in seismic attenuation in upper mantle rocks at 1000-1100 ??C. East-west profiles of VS, QS and T where continental data coverage is best (50??N latitude for North America and 60??N latitude for Eurasia) further demonstrate that temperature plays a dominant, but non-unique, role in

  18. Anomalous shear wave attenuation in the shallow crust beneath the Coso volcanic regionn, California ( USA).

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sanders, C.; Ho-Liu, P.; Rinn, D.; Hiroo, Kanamori

    1988-01-01

    We use seismograms of local earthquakes to image relative shear wave attenuation structure in the shallow crust beneath the region containing the Coso volcanic-geothermal area of E California. Seismograms of 16 small earthquakes show SV amplitudes which are greatly diminished at some azimuths and takeoff angles, indicating strong lateral variations in S wave attenuation in the area. 3-D images of the relative S wave attenuation structure are obtained from forward modeling and a back projection inversion of the amplitude data. The results indicate regions within a 20 by 30 by 10 km volume of the shallow crust (one shallower than 5 km) that severely attenuate SV waves passing through them. These anomalies lie beneath the Indian Wells Valley, 30 km S of the Coso volcanic field, and are coincident with the epicentral locations of recent earthquake swarms. No anomalous attenuation is seen beneath the Coso volcanic field above about 5 km depth. Geologic relations and the coincidence of anomalously slow P wave velocities suggest that the attenuation anomalies may be related to magmatism along the E Sierra front.-from Authors

  19. Laboratory measurements of wave attenuation through model and live vegetation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Surge and waves generated by hurricanes and tropical storms often cause severe damage and loss of life in coastal areas. It is widely recognized that wetlands along coastal fringes reduce storm surge and waves. Yet, the potential role and primary mechanisms of wave mitigation by wetland vegetation a...

  20. Dispersion and attenuation of acoustic guided waves in layered fluid-filled porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Parra, J.O.; Xu, P. )

    1994-01-01

    The analysis of acoustic wave propagation in fluid-filled porous media based on Biot and homogenization theories has been adapted to calculate dispersion and attenuation of guided waves trapped in low-velocity layered media. Constitutive relations, the balance equation, and the generalized Darcy law of the modified Biot theory yield a coupled system of differential equations which governs the wave motion in each layer. The displacement and stress fields satisfy the boundary conditions of continuity of displacements and tractions across each interface, and the radiation condition at infinity. To avoid precision problems caused by the growing exponential in individual matrices for large wave numbers, the global matrix method was implemented as an alternative to the traditional propagation approach to determine the periodic equations. The complex wave numbers of the guided wave modes were determined using a combination of two-dimensional bracketing and minimization techniques. The results of this work indicate that the acoustic guided wave attenuation is sensitive to the [ital in] [ital situ] permeability. In particular, the attenuation changes significantly as the [ital in] [ital situ] permeability of the low-velocity layer is varied at the frequency corresponding to the minimum group velocity (Airy phase). Alternatively, the attenuation of the wave modes are practically unaffected by those permeability variations in the layer at the frequency corresponding to the maximum group velocity.

  1. Application of sound-absorbent plastic to weak-shock-wave attenuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ootsuta, Katsuhisa; Matsuoka, Kei; Sasoh, Akihiro; Takayama, Kazuyoshi

    1998-04-01

    A device for attenuating weak shock waves propagating in a duct has been developed utilizing sound-absorbent plastic which is usually used for attenuating sound waves. The device has a tube made of the sound-absorbent plastic installed coaxially to a surrounding metal tube with a clearance between them. The clearance acts as an air layer to enhance the performance of the shock wave attenuation. When a weak shock wave propagates through this device, the pressure gradient of the shock wave is gradually smeared and hence its overpressure is decreased. The performance of the device was examined using a 1/250-scaled train tunnel simulator which simulated the discharge of weak shock waves created by high-speed entry of trains to tunnels. The overpressure of the shock waves ranged up to 5 kPa. The shock wave overpressure was decreased by 90% with the present attenuator attached. This device can be applied to various industrial noise suppressions which are associated with unsteady compressible flows.

  2. Effects of partial liquid/gas saturation on extensional wave attenuation in Berea sandstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, C.-S.; Batzle, M. L.; Smith, B. J.

    1992-07-01

    Extensional wave attenuation measurements on Berea sandstone were made during increasing (imbibition) and decreasing (drainage) brine saturations. Measurements on samples with both open-pore and closed-pore surfaces were made using the resonant-bar technique. The frequency dependence was examined using the forced-deformation method. The attenuation was found to be dependent on saturation history as well as degree of saturation and boundary flow conditions. The sample with open-pore surface had a larger attenuation which peaked at greater brine saturations than the sample with closed-pore surface. During drainage, the attenuation reached a maximum at about 90% brine saturation as opposed to about 97% brine saturation during imbibition. The variation of the size and number of air pockets within the rock can account for this discrepancy. The magnitude of the attenuation peak value decreases substantially with decreasing frequency to the extent that no attenuation peak with saturation was apparent at seismic frequencies, say, below 100 Hz.

  3. Anisotropic changes in P-wave velocity and attenuation during deformation and fluid infiltration of granite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stanchits, S.A.; Lockner, D.A.; Ponomarev, A.V.

    2003-01-01

    Fluid infiltration and pore fluid pressure changes are known to have a significant effect on the occurrence of earthquakes. Yet, for most damaging earthquakes, with nucleation zones below a few kilometers depth, direct measurements of fluid pressure variations are not available. Instead, pore fluid pressures are inferred primarily from seismic-wave propagation characteristics such as Vp/Vs ratio, attenuation, and reflectivity contacts. We present laboratory measurements of changes in P-wave velocity and attenuation during the injection of water into a granite sample as it was loaded to failure. A cylindrical sample of Westerly granite was deformed at constant confining and pore pressures of 50 and 1 MPa, respectively. Axial load was increased in discrete steps by controlling axial displacement. Anisotropic P-wave velocity and attenuation fields were determined during the experiment using an array of 13 piezoelectric transducers. At the final loading steps (86% and 95% of peak stress), both spatial and temporal changes in P-wave velocity and peak-to-peak amplitudes of P and S waves were observed. P-wave velocity anisotropy reached a maximum of 26%. Transient increases in attenuation of up to 483 dB/m were also observed and were associated with diffusion of water into the sample. We show that velocity and attenuation of P waves are sensitive to the process of opening of microcracks and the subsequent resaturation of these cracks as water diffuses in from the surrounding region. Symmetry of the orientation of newly formed microcracks results in anisotropic velocity and attenuation fields that systematically evolve in response to changes in stress and influx of water. With proper scaling, these measurements provide constraints on the magnitude and duration of velocity and attenuation transients that can be expected to accompany the nucleation of earthquakes in the Earth's crust.

  4. The large-scale influence of the Great Barrier Reef matrix on wave attenuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallop, Shari L.; Young, Ian R.; Ranasinghe, Roshanka; Durrant, Tom H.; Haigh, Ivan D.

    2014-12-01

    Offshore reef systems consist of individual reefs, with spaces in between, which together constitute the reef matrix. This is the first comprehensive, large-scale study, of the influence of an offshore reef system on wave climate and wave transmission. The focus was on the Great Barrier Reef (GBR), Australia, utilizing a 16-yr record of wave height from seven satellite altimeters. Within the GBR matrix, the wave climate is not strongly dependent on reef matrix submergence. This suggests that after initial wave breaking at the seaward edge of the reef matrix, wave energy that penetrates the matrix has little depth modulation. There is no clear evidence to suggest that as reef matrix porosity (ratio of spaces between individual reefs to reef area) decreases, wave attenuation increases. This is because individual reefs cast a wave shadow much larger than the reef itself; thus, a matrix of isolated reefs is remarkably effective at attenuating wave energy. This weak dependence of transmitted wave energy on depth of reef submergence, and reef matrix porosity, is also evident in the lee of the GBR matrix. Here, wave conditions appear to be dependent largely on local wind speed, rather than wave conditions either seaward, or within the reef matrix. This is because the GBR matrix is a very effective wave absorber, irrespective of water depth and reef matrix porosity.

  5. Underdetermined system theory applied to qualitative analysis of response caused by attenuating plane waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sano, Yukio

    1989-05-01

    A qualitative analysis of the mechanical response of rate-dependent media caused by a one-dimensional plane smooth wave front and by a continuous wave front attenuating in the media is performed by an underdetermined system of nonlinear partial differential equations. The analysis reveals that smooth strain, particle velocity, and stress profiles, which the smooth wave front has, are not similar and that the wave front is composed of some partial waves having different properties. The property is represented by a set of strain rate, acceleration, and stress rate. The wave front derived here from the analysis is composed of four different partial waves. The front of the wave front is necessarily a contraction wave in which strain, particle velocity, and stress increase with time, while the rear is a rarefaction wave where they all decrease with time. Between these two wave fronts there are two remaining wave fronts. We call these wave fronts mesocontraction waves I and II. Wave front I is a wave in which stress decreases notwithstanding the increase in strain and particle velocity with time, which is followed by the other, i.e., wave front II, where with time, particle velocity, and stress decrease in spite of the increase in strain. The continuous wave front having continuous and nonsmooth profiles of strain, particle velocity, and stress can also be composed of four waves. These waves possess the same property as the corresponding waves in the smooth wave front mentioned above. The velocities at three boundaries that the waves have are discontinuous. Therefore, these four wave fronts are independent waves, just as a shock wave and a rarefraction wave. Specifically, the front wave, i.e., a contraction wave front is being outrun by a second wave front, the second one is being outrun by a third wave front, and the third is being outrun by a fourth wave front, i.e., a rarefaction wave. We call the second wave front degenerate contraction wave I. We also call the third

  6. Measurement of X-ray mass attenuation coefficients in biological and geological samples in the energy range of 7-12keV.

    PubMed

    Trunova, Valentina; Sidorina, Anna; Kriventsov, Vladimir

    2014-10-17

    Information about X-ray mass attenuation coefficients in different materials is necessary for accurate X-ray fluorescent analysis. The X-ray mass attenuation coefficients for energy of 7-12keV were measured in biological (Mussel and Oyster tissues, blood, hair, liver, and Cabbage leaves) and geological (Baikal sludge, soil, and Alaskite granite) samples. The measurements were carried out at the EXAFS Station of Siberian Synchrotron Radiation Center (VEPP-3). Obtained experimental mass attenuation coefficients were compared with theoretical values calculated for some samples. PMID:25464176

  7. Electromagnetic wave attenuation measurements in a ring-shaped inductively coupled air plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Xiaolong; Xu, Haojun; Li, Jianhai; Lin, Min; Su; Chen

    2015-05-01

    An aerocraft with the surface, inlet and radome covered large-area inductive coupled plasma (ICP) can attenuate its radar echo effectively. The shape, thickness, and electron density ( N e ) distribution of ICP are critical to electromagnetic wave attenuation. In the paper, an air all-quartz ICP generator in size of 20 × 20 × 7 cm3 without magnetic confinement is designed. The discharge results show that the ICP is amorphous in E-mode and ring-shaped in H-mode. The structure of ICP stratifies into core region and edge halo in H-mode, and its width and thickness changes from power and pressure. Such phenomena are explained by the distribution of RF magnetic field, the diffusion of negative ions plasma and the variation of skin depth. In addition, the theoretical analysis shows that the N e achieves nearly uniform within the electronegative core and sharply steepens in the edge. The N e of core region is diagnosed by microwave interferometer under varied conditions (pressure in range of 10-50 Pa, power in 300-700 W). Furthermore, the electromagnetic wave attenuation measurements were carried out with the air ICP in the frequencies of 4-5 GHz. The results show that the interspaced ICP is still effective to wave attenuation, and the wave attenuation increases with the power and pressure. The measured attenuation is approximately in accordance with the calculation data of finite-different time-domain simulations.

  8. Imaging Rayleigh wave attenuation and phase velocity in the western and central United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, X.; Dalton, C. A.; Jin, G.; Gaherty, J. B.

    2013-12-01

    The EarthScope USArray provides an opportunity to obtain detailed images of the continental upper mantle at an unprecedented scale. The majority of mantle models derived from USArray data to date contain spatial variations in seismic-wave speed; however, little is known about the attenuation structure of the North American upper mantle. Joint interpretation of seismic attenuation and velocity models can improve upon the interpretations based only on velocity, and provide important constraints on the temperature, composition, melt content, and volatile content of the mantle. We jointly invert Rayleigh wave phase and amplitude observations for phase velocity and attenuation maps for the western and central United States using USArray data. This approach exploits the amplitudes' sensitivity to velocity and the phase delays' sensitivity to attenuation. The phase and amplitude data are measured in the period range 20--100 s using a new interstation cross-correlation approach, based on the Generalized Seismological Data Functional algorithm, that takes advantage of waveform similarity at nearby stations. The Rayleigh waves are generated from 670 large teleseismic earthquakes that occurred between 2006 and 2012, and measured from all available Transportable Array stations. We consider two separate and complementary approaches for imaging attenuation variations: (1) the Helmholtz tomography (Lin et al., 2012) and (2) two-station path tomography. Results obtained from the two methods are contrasted. We provide a preliminary interpretation based on the observed relationship between Rayleigh wave attenuation and phase velocity.

  9. Shear wave anisotropy from aligned inclusions: ultrasonic frequency dependence of velocity and attenuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Figueiredo, J. J. S.; Schleicher, J.; Stewart, R. R.; Dayur, N.; Omoboya, B.; Wiley, R.; William, A.

    2013-04-01

    To understand their influence on elastic wave propagation, anisotropic cracked media have been widely investigated in many theoretical and experimental studies. In this work, we report on laboratory ultrasound measurements carried out to investigate the effect of source frequency on the elastic parameters (wave velocities and the Thomsen parameter γ) and shear wave attenuation) of fractured anisotropic media. Under controlled conditions, we prepared anisotropic model samples containing penny-shaped rubber inclusions in a solid epoxy resin matrix with crack densities ranging from 0 to 6.2 per cent. Two of the three cracked samples have 10 layers and one has 17 layers. The number of uniform rubber inclusions per layer ranges from 0 to 100. S-wave splitting measurements have shown that scattering effects are more prominent in samples where the seismic wavelength to crack aperture ratio ranges from 1.6 to 1.64 than in others where the ratio varied from 2.72 to 2.85. The sample with the largest cracks showed a magnitude of scattering attenuation three times higher compared with another sample that had small inclusions. Our S-wave ultrasound results demonstrate that elastic scattering, scattering and anelastic attenuation, velocity dispersion and crack size interfere directly in shear wave splitting in a source-frequency dependent manner, resulting in an increase of scattering attenuation and a reduction of shear wave anisotropy with increasing frequency.

  10. Scattering attenuation, dispersion and reflection of SH waves in two-dimensional elastic media with densely distributed cracks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murai, Yoshio

    2007-01-01

    We compute the synthetic seismograms of multiply scattered SH waves in 2-D elastic media with densely distributed parallel cracks. We assume randomly distributed cracks in a rectangular-bounded region, which simulate a cracked zone. The crack surfaces are assumed to be stress-free. When the incident wavelength is longer than the crack size, the delay in the arrival of the primary wave is observed at stations beyond the cracked zone and the amplitude of the primary wave is amplified in the cracked zone in the synthetic seismograms. This is because the cracked zone behaves as a low velocity and soft material to the incident long-wavelength wave due to the crack distribution. When the half-wavelength of the incident wave is shorter than the crack length, the scattered waves are clearly observed in the synthetic seismograms and the amplitude of the primary wave is largely attenuated beyond the cracked zone. The calculated attenuation coefficient Q-1 of the primary wave is directly proportional to the crack density in the range of νa2 <= 0.1, where ν and a are the number density and half the length of cracks, respectively. This is consistent with that obtained by a stochastic analysis based on Foldy's approximation. A periodic distribution of cracks in a zone is considered as an utterly different model in order to investigate the effect of spatial distributions on the attenuation and dispersion of seismic waves. When cracks are distributed densely, the values of Q-1 for the periodic crack distribution appear to differ from those for the random distribution of cracks in the low wavenumber range. This suggests that the effect of multiple interactions among densely distributed cracks depends on not only the density but also the spatial distribution of cracks at low wavenumbers. The calculated phase velocity of the primary wave is consistent with that from the stochastic analysis in the range of νa2 <= 0.1 and does not depend on the spatial distribution of cracks. This

  11. Experimental investigation of wave attenuation through model and live vegetation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hurricanes and tropical storms often cause severe damage and loss of life in coastal areas. It is widely recognized that wetlands along coastal fringes reduce storm surge and waves. Yet, the potential role and primary mechanisms of wave mitigation by wetland vegetation are not fully understood. K...

  12. A Nonlinear Theory for Predicting the Effects of Unsteady Laminar, Turbulent, or Transitional Boundary Layers on the Attenuation of Shock Waves in a Shock Tube with Experimental Comparison

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trimpi, Robert L.; Cohen, Nathaniel B.

    1961-01-01

    The linearized attenuation theory of NACA Technical Note 3375 is modified in the following manner: (a) an unsteady compressible local skin-friction coefficient is employed rather than the equivalent steady-flow incompressible coefficient; (b) a nonlinear approach is used to permit application of the theory to large attenuations; and (c) transition effects are considered. Curves are presented for predicting attenuation for a shock pressure ratio up to 20 and a range of shock-tube Reynolds numbers. Comparison of theory and experimental data for shock-wave strengths between 1.5 and 10 over a wide range of Reynolds numbers shows good agreement with the nonlinear theory evaluated for a transition Reynolds number of 2.5 X 10(exp 5).

  13. Photon attenuation coefficients of Heavy-Metal Oxide glasses by MCNP code, XCOM program and experimental data: A comparison study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Khayatt, A. M.; Ali, A. M.; Singh, Vishwanath P.

    2014-01-01

    The mass attenuation coefficients, μ/ρ, total interaction cross-section, σt, and mean free path (MFP) of some Heavy Metal Oxides (HMO) glasses, with potential applications as gamma ray shielding materials, have been investigated using the MCNP-4C code. Appreciable variations are noted for all parameters by changing the photon energy and the chemical composition of HMO glasses. The numerical simulations parameters are compared with experimental data wherever possible. Comparisons are also made with predictions from the XCOM program in the energy region from 1 keV to 100 MeV. Good agreement noticed indicates that the chosen Monte Carlo method may be employed to make additional calculations on the photon attenuation characteristics of different glass systems, a capability particularly useful in cases where no analogous experimental data exist.

  14. Resonant attenuation of surface acoustic waves by a disordered monolayer of microspheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eliason, J. K.; Vega-Flick, A.; Hiraiwa, M.; Khanolkar, A.; Gan, T.; Boechler, N.; Fang, N.; Nelson, K. A.; Maznev, A. A.

    2016-02-01

    Attenuation of surface acoustic waves (SAWs) by a disordered monolayer of polystyrene microspheres is investigated. Surface acoustic wave packets are generated by a pair of crossed laser pulses in a glass substrate coated with a thin aluminum film and detected via the diffraction of a probe laser beam. When a 170 μm-wide strip of micron-sized spheres is placed on the substrate between the excitation and detection spots, strong resonant attenuation of SAWs near 240 MHz is observed. The attenuation is caused by the interaction of SAWs with a contact resonance of the microspheres, as confirmed by acoustic dispersion measurements on the microsphere-coated area. Frequency-selective attenuation of SAWs by such a locally resonant metamaterial may lead to reconfigurable SAW devices and sensors, which can be easily manufactured via self-assembly techniques.

  15. Detailed Study of Seismic Wave Attenuation in Carbonate Rocks: Application on Abu Dhabi Oil Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouchaala, F.; Ali, M. Y.; Matsushima, J.

    2015-12-01

    Seismic wave attenuation is a promising attribute for the petroleum exploration, thanks to its high sensitivity to physical properties of subsurface. It can be used to enhance the seismic imaging and improve the geophysical interpretation which is crucial for reservoir characterization. However getting an accurate attenuation profile is not an easy task, this is due to complex mechanism of this parameter, although that many studies were carried out to understand it. The degree of difficulty increases for the media composed of carbonate rocks, known to be highly heterogeneous and with complex lithology. That is why few attenuation studies were done successfully in carbonate rocks. The main objectives of this study are, Getting an accurate and high resolution attenuation profiles from several oil fields. The resolution is very important target for us, because many reservoirs in Abu Dhabi oil fields are tight.Separation between different modes of wave attenuation (scattering and intrinsic attenuations).Correlation between the attenuation profiles and other logs (Porosity, resistivity, oil saturation…), in order to establish a relationship which can be used to detect the reservoir properties from the attenuation profiles.Comparison of attenuation estimated from VSP and sonic waveforms. Provide spatial distribution of attenuation in Abu Dhabi oil fields.To reach these objectives we implemented a robust processing flow and new methodology to estimate the attenuation from the downgoing waves of the compressional VSP data and waveforms acquired from several wells drilled in Abu Dhabi. The subsurface geology of this area is primarily composed of carbonate rocks and it is known to be highly fractured which complicates more the situation, then we separated successfully the intrinsic attenuation from the scattering. The results show that the scattering is significant and cannot be ignored. We found also a very interesting correlation between the attenuation profiles and the

  16. Experimental study of the stress effect on attenuation of normally incident P-wave through coal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Junjun; Wang, Enyuan; Chen, Liang; Li, Xuelong; Xu, Zhaoyong; Li, Guoai

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this study is to experimentally investigate the stress effect on normally incident P-wave attenuation through coal specimens. Laboratory tests were carried out using a Split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) system, and a modified method was proposed to determine the quality factor (Q) of P-waves through coal specimens. Larger quality factor denotes less energy attenuated during P-wave propagating through coal. Experimental results indicate that the quality factor and stress (σ) within coal specimens are positively correlated. The P-wave propagation through coal specimens causes crack closure at the beginning of the coal fracture process in SHPB tests, an innovative model was thus proposed to describe the relationship between the crack closure length and the dynamic stress induced by P-wave. Finally, the stress effect on P-wave attenuation through coal was quantitatively represented by a power function Q = a(c-bσ)- 6, and the material constants a, b, and c were determined as 1.227, 1.314, and 0.005, respectively. The results obtained in this study would be helpful for engineers to estimate seismic energy attenuation and coal mass instability in coal mines.

  17. Attenuation of seismic waves in methane gas hydrate-bearing sand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Priest, Jeffrey A.; Best, Angus I.; Clayton, Christopher R. I.

    2006-01-01

    Compressional wave (P wave) and shear wave (S wave) velocities (Vp and Vs, respectively) from remote seismic methods have been used to infer the distribution and volume of gas hydrate within marine sediments. Recent advances in seismic methods now allow compressional and shear wave attenuations (Q-1p and Q-1s, respectively) to be measured. However, the interpretation of these data is problematic due to our limited understanding of the effects of gas hydrate on physical properties. Therefore, a laboratory gas hydrate resonant column was developed to simulate pressure and temperature conditions suitable for methane gas hydrate formation in sand specimens and the subsequent measurement of both Q-1p and Q-1s at frequencies and strains relevant to marine seismic surveys. 13 dry (gas saturated) sand specimens were investigated with different amounts of methane gas hydrate evenly dispersed throughout each specimen. The results show that for these dry specimens both Q-1p and Q-1s are highly sensitive to hydrate saturation with unexpected peaks observed between 3 and 5 per cent hydrate saturation. It is thought that viscous squirt flow of absorbed water or free gas within the pore space is enhanced by hydrate cement at grain contacts and by the nanoporosity of the hydrate itself. These results show for the first time the dramatic effect methane gas hydrate can have on seismic wave attenuation in sand, and provide insight into wave propagation mechanisms. These results will aid the interpretation of elastic wave attenuation data obtained using marine seismic prospecting methods.

  18. Determination of mass attenuation coefficients, effective atomic and electron numbers for Cr, Fe and Ni alloys at different energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, I.; Demir, L.

    2009-01-01

    The total mass attenuation coefficients ( μ m), for Cr, Fe, Ni and Fe xNi 1-x ( x = 0.8, 0.7, 0.6, 0.5, 0.4, 0.3 and 0.2), Fe xCr yNi 1-(x+y) ( x = 0.7, y = 0.1; x = 0.5, y = 0.2; x = 0.4, y = 0.3; x = 0.3, y = 0.3; x = 0.2, y = 0.2 and x = 0.1, y = 0.2) and Ni xCr 1-x ( x = 0.8, 0.6, 0.5, 0.4 and 0.2) alloys were measured at 22.1, 25.0, 59.5 and 88.0 keV photon energies. The samples were irradiated with 10 mCi Cd-109 and 100 mCi Am-241 radioactive point source using transmission arrangement. The γ- and X-rays were counted by a Si(Li) detector with a resolution of 160 eV at 5.9 keV. Total atomic and electronic cross-sections ( σ t and σ e), effective atomic and electron numbers ( Z eff and N eff) were determined experimentally and theoretically using the obtained mass attenuation coefficients for investigated 3d alloys. The theoretical mass attenuation coefficients of each alloy were estimated using mixture rule. The experimental values were compared with the calculated values for all samples.

  19. Measurements of attenuation coefficient for evaluating the hardness of a cataract lens by a high-frequency ultrasonic needle transducer

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ruimin; Tsui, Po-Hsiang; Zhou, Qifa; Humayun, Mark S; Shung, K Kirk

    2010-01-01

    A cataract is a clouding of the lens in the eye that affects vision. Phacoemulsification is the mostly common surgical method for treating cataracts, and determining that the optimal phacoemulsification energy is dependent on measuring the hardness of the lens. This study explored the use of an ultrasound needle transducer for invasive measurements of ultrasound attenuation coefficient to evaluate the hardness of the cataract lens. A 47 MHz high-frequency needle transducer with a diameter of 0.9 mm was fabricated by a polarized PMN-33%PT single crystal in the present study. The attenuation coefficients at different stages of an artificial porcine cataract lens were measured using the spectral shift approach. The hardness of the cataract lens was also evaluated by mechanical measurement of its elastic properties. The results demonstrated that the ultrasonic attenuation coefficient was increased from 0.048 ± 0.02 to 0.520 ± 0.06 dB mm−1 MHz−1 corresponding to an increase in Young’s modulus from 6 ± 0.4 to 96 ± 6.2 kPa as the cataract further developed. In order to evaluate the feasibility of combining needle transducer and phacoemulsification probe for real-time measurement during cataract surgery, the needle transducer was mounted on the phacoemulsification probe for a vibration test. The results indicated that there was no apparent damage to the tip of the needle transducer and the pulse–echo test showed that a good performance in sensitivity was maintained after the vibration test. PMID:19759408

  20. Measurements of attenuation coefficient for evaluating the hardness of a cataract lens by a high-frequency ultrasonic needle transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Chih-Chung; Chen, Ruimin; Tsui, Po-Hsiang; Zhou, Qifa; Humayun, Mark S.; Shung, K. Kirk

    2009-10-01

    A cataract is a clouding of the lens in the eye that affects vision. Phacoemulsification is the mostly common surgical method for treating cataracts, and determining that the optimal phacoemulsification energy is dependent on measuring the hardness of the lens. This study explored the use of an ultrasound needle transducer for invasive measurements of ultrasound attenuation coefficient to evaluate the hardness of the cataract lens. A 47 MHz high-frequency needle transducer with a diameter of 0.9 mm was fabricated by a polarized PMN-33%PT single crystal in the present study. The attenuation coefficients at different stages of an artificial porcine cataract lens were measured using the spectral shift approach. The hardness of the cataract lens was also evaluated by mechanical measurement of its elastic properties. The results demonstrated that the ultrasonic attenuation coefficient was increased from 0.048 ± 0.02 to 0.520 ± 0.06 dB mm-1 MHz-1 corresponding to an increase in Young's modulus from 6 ± 0.4 to 96 ± 6.2 kPa as the cataract further developed. In order to evaluate the feasibility of combining needle transducer and phacoemulsification probe for real-time measurement during cataract surgery, the needle transducer was mounted on the phacoemulsification probe for a vibration test. The results indicated that there was no apparent damage to the tip of the needle transducer and the pulse-echo test showed that a good performance in sensitivity was maintained after the vibration test.

  1. P- and S-wave seismic attenuation for deep natural gas exploration and development

    SciTech Connect

    Walls, Joel; Uden, Richard; Singleton, Scott; Shu, Rone; Mavko, Gary

    2005-04-12

    Using current methods, oil and gas in the subsurface cannot be reliably predicted from seismic data. This causes domestic oil and gas fields to go undiscovered and unexploited, thereby increasing the need to import energy.The general objective of this study was to demonstrate a simple and effective methodology for estimating reservoir properties (gas saturation in particular, but also including lithology, net to gross ratios, and porosity) from seismic attenuation and other attributes using P- and S-waves. Phase I specific technical objectives: Develop Empirical or Theoretical Rock Physics Relations for Qp and Qs; Create P-wave and S-wave Synthetic Seismic Modeling Algorithms with Q; and, Compute P-wave and S-wave Q Attributes from Multi-component Seismic Data. All objectives defined in the Phase I proposal were accomplished. During the course of this project, a new class of seismic analysis was developed based on compressional and shear wave inelastic rock properties (attenuation). This method provides a better link between seismic data and the presence of hydrocarbons. The technique employs both P and S-wave data to better discriminate between attenuation due to hydrocarbons versus energy loss due to other factors such as scattering and geometric spreading. It was demonstrated that P and S attenuation can be computed from well log data and used to generate synthetic seismograms. Rock physics models for P and S attenuation were tested on a well from the Gulf of Mexico. The P- and S-wave Q attributes were computed on multi-component 2D seismic data intersecting this well. These methods generated reasonable results, and most importantly, the Q attributes indicated gas saturation.

  2. Effective atomic number and mass attenuation coefficient of PbO-BaO-B2O3 glass system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Issa, Shams A. M.

    2016-03-01

    Gamma-rays attenuation coefficient, half-value layer, mean free path, effective atomic number and electron density have been measured in glass system of xPbO-(50-x) BaO-50B2O3 (where 5≤x≤45 mol%) for gamma ray photon energies of 0.356, 0.662, 1.173 and 1.33 MeV. The emitted gamma ray was detected by 3×3 in. NaI(Tl) scintillation gamma ray spectrometers. The results were found in good agreement with the theoretical values which calculated from WinXcom.

  3. Study of mass attenuation coefficients and effective atomic numbers of bismuth-ground granulated blast furnace slag concretes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Sandeep; Singh, Sukhpal

    2016-05-01

    Five samples of Bismuth-Ground granulated blast furnace slag (Bi-GGBFS) concretes were prepared using composition (0.6 cement + x Bi2O3 + (0.4-x) GGBFS, x = 0.05, 0.10, 0.15, 0.20 and 0.25) by keeping constant water (W) cement (C) ratio. Mass attenuation coefficients (μm) of these prepared samples were calculated using a computer program winXCOM at different gamma ray energies, whereas effective atomic numbers (Zeff) is calculated using mathematical formulas. The radiation shielding properties of Bi-GGBFS concrete has been compared with standard radiation shielding concretes.

  4. Attenuative body wave dispersion at La Cerdanya, eastern Pyrenees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Correig, Antoni M.; Mitchell, Brian J.

    1989-11-01

    Coda- Q for P- and S-waves has been measured from digitally recorded events occurring in the La Cerdanya region of the eastern Pyrenees. Interpreted in terms of a power law, Q( f) = Q0fη, Q-coda for P-waves is characterized by Q0 = 14 and η = 1.07, and S-waves by Q0 = 14 and η = 1.13. Using a generalization of a model due to Dainty (1981), we obtain a Q model for S-waves in which intrinsic- Q is 23, the frequency dependence (ζ) of intrinsic- Q is 1.17, and the turbidity factor is 0.051. Interpreted in terms of a continuous relaxation model, where Qm is minimum Q, and τ1 and τ2 are high- and low-frequency cutoffs, respectively, the values of the parameters are Qm = 5 and τ1 = 0.37 when τ2 is assumed to be 10 000. Body wave dispersion, as computed from the differences in arrival times of the wave filtered at 3, 6, 12 and 24 Hz relative to that at 6 Hz has been measured and found to range from 0.067 at 3 Hz to -0.075 at 24 Hz. This dispersion constrains τ2 to be 43.

  5. Attenuation Tomography of Body Waves in Thickness-varying Layered Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, H.; Zhou, H.

    2006-12-01

    The intrinsic attenuation of seismic waves, which is quantified as inverse to the quality factor (Q) of a medium, is a well-publicized and yet poorly studied subject. While it is common to deduce Q values from measured dispersion data for surface waves, previous studies on the intrinsic attenuation of body waves have relied on measurements of the waveform of first arrivals or reflections. Better understanding is needed for both solid Earth geophysics and applied seismology to quantify the contributing factors to seismic attenuation and decompose Q from other factors because Q is closely related to rock property and fluid saturation. This study focuses on forward modeling and tomographic inversion for the Q values in thickness-varying layered media. Many of the existing theoretical Q models work in such media. Our work is an extension of the deformable- layer tomography (Zhou, 2004) to dissipative media. In the first phase of this study, we evaluated, through numerical modeling the various factors contributing to the attenuation of body waves. Theoretically, there are intrinsic attenuation, which is related to rock and pore fluid properties, and attenuation due to wave propagation effects, such as geometrical spreading and energy partition across interfaces (transmission and reflection). We made several representative numerical models, and conducted forward modeling using both wave theory and ray theory to quantify the amount of the attenuation of body waves due to different factors. In the second phase, we are integrating the forward modeling with the deformable-layer tomography algorithm to develop means to invert for Q distribution in thickness-varying layer media. While the deformable-layer tomography determines layer velocities and geometry, the current work intends to invert for Q values of the thickness-varying model layers as well as parameters associated with interface energy partition and geometric spreading. In the third phase, we plan to apply the

  6. Experimental and Numerical Investigation of Pressure Wave Attenuation due to Bubbly Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayaprakash, Arvind; Fourmeau, Tiffany; Hsiao, Chao-Tsung; Chahine, Georges; Dynaflow Inc. Team

    2013-03-01

    In this work, the effects of dispersed microbubbles on a steep pressure wave and its attenuation are investigated both numerically and experimentally. Numerical simulations were carried out using a compressible Euler equation solver, where the liquid-gas mixture was modeled using direct numerical simulations involving discrete deforming bubbles. To reduce computational costs a 1D configuration is used and the bubbles are assumed distributed in layers and the initial pressure profile is selected similar to that of a one-dimensional shock tube problem. Experimentally, the pressure pulse was generated using a submerged spark electric discharge, which generates a large vapor bubble, while the microbubbles in the bubbly layer are generated using electrolysis. High speed movies were recorded in tandem with high fidelity pressure measurements. The dependence of pressure wave attenuation on the bubble radii, the void fraction, and the bubbly layer thickness were parametrically studied. It has been found that the pressure wave attenuation can be seen as due to waves reflecting and dispersing in the inter-bubble regions, with the energy absorbed by bubble volume oscillations and re-radiation. Layer thickness and small bubble sizes were also seen as having a strong effect on the attenuation with enhanced attenuation as the bubble size is reduced for the same void fraction. This study was supported by the Department of Energy, under SBIR Phase II Contract DE-FG02-07ER84839.

  7. Three-wave coupling coefficients for perpendicular wave propagation in a magnetized plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Brodin, G.; Stenflo, L.

    2015-10-15

    The resonant interaction between three waves in a uniform magnetized plasma is reconsidered. Starting from previous kinetic expressions, we limit our investigation to waves propagating perpendicularly to the external magnetic field. It is shown that reliable results can only be obtained in the two-dimensional case, i.e., when the wave vectors have both x and y components.

  8. Multi-frequency characterization of the speed of sound and attenuation coefficient for longitudinal transmission of freshly excised human skulls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pichardo, Samuel; Sin, Vivian W.; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2011-01-01

    For medical applications of ultrasound inside the brain, it is necessary to understand the relationship between the apparent density of skull bone and its corresponding speed of sound and attenuation coefficient. Although there have been previous studies exploring this phenomenon, there is still a need to extend the measurements to cover more of the clinically relevant frequency range. The results of measurements of the longitudinal speed of sound and attenuation coefficient are presented for specimens of human calvaria. The study was performed for the frequencies of 0.27, 0.836, 1.402, 1.965 and 2.525 MHz. Specimens were obtained from fresh cadavers through a protocol with the Division of Anatomy of the University of Toronto. The protocol was approved by the Research Ethics Board of Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre. The specimens were mounted in polycarbonate supports that were marked for stereoscopic positioning. Computer tomography (CT) scans of the skulls mounted on their supports were performed, and a three-dimensional skull surface was reconstructed. This surface was used to guide a positioning system to ensure the normal sound incidence of an acoustic signal. This signal was produced by a focused device with a diameter of 5 cm and a focal length of 10 cm. Measurements of delay in time of flight were carried out using a needle hydrophone. Measurements of effective transmitted energy were carried out using a radiation force method with a 10 µg resolution scale. Preliminary functions of speed of sound and attenuation coefficient, both of which are related to apparent density, were established using a multi-layer propagation model that takes into account speed of sound, density and thickness of the layer. An optimization process was executed from a large set of random functions and the best functions were chosen for those ones that closest reproduced the experimental observations. The final functions were obtained after a second pass of the optimization

  9. Statistical results describing the bandwidth and coherence coefficient of whistler mode waves using THEMIS waveform data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, X.; Li, W.; Thorne, R. M.; Bortnik, J.; Angelopoulos, V.; Lu, Q.; Tao, X.; Wang, S.

    2014-11-01

    The bandwidths and coherence coefficients of lower band whistler mode waves are analyzed using Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms (THEMIS) waveform data for rising tones, falling tones, and hiss-like emissions separately. We also evaluate their dependences on the spatial location, electron density, the ratio of plasma frequency to local electron gyrofrequency (fpe/fce), and the wave amplitude. Our results show that the bandwidth normalized by the local electron gyrofrequency (fce) of rising and falling tones is very narrow (~0.01 fce), smaller than that of the hiss-like emissions (~0.025 fce). Meanwhile, the normalized bandwidth of discrete emissions gradually decreases with increasing wave amplitude, whereas that of hiss-like emissions increases slowly. The coherence coefficient of rising and falling tones is extremely large (~1), while the coherence coefficient of hiss-like emissions is smaller but is still larger than 0.5. For all categories of whistler mode waves, the normalized bandwidth increases at larger L shells. Furthermore, the normalized bandwidth is positively correlated with local fpe/fce but is inversely correlated with the electron density. Interactions between radiation belt electrons and whistler mode waves have been widely described by quasi-linear diffusion theory. Our results suggest that although quasi-linear theory is not entirely applicable for modeling electron interactions with rising and falling tones due to their narrow bandwidth and high coherence coefficient, it is suitable to treat wave-particle interactions between electrons and low-amplitude hiss-like emissions. Moreover, the correlations between the normalized bandwidth of chorus waves (especially the discrete emissions) and other parameters may provide insights for the generation mechanism of chorus waves.

  10. Grain-size dependence of shear wave speed dispersion and attenuation in granular marine sediments.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Masao

    2014-07-01

    The author has shown that measured shear wave speed dispersion and attenuation in water-saturated silica sand can be predicted by using a gap stiffness model incorporated into the Biot model (the BIMGS model) [Kimura, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 134, 144-155 (2013)]. In this study, the grain-size dependence of shear wave speed dispersion and attenuation in four kinds of water-saturated silica sands with different grain sizes is measured and calculated. As a result, the grain-size dependence of the aspect ratio in the BIMGS model can be validated and the effects of multiple scattering for larger grain sizes are demonstrated. PMID:24993238

  11. Dynamic aspects of apparent attenuation and wave localization in layered media

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haney, M.M.; Van Wijk, K.

    2008-01-01

    We present a theory for multiply-scattered waves in layered media which takes into account wave interference. The inclusion of interference in the theory leads to a new description of the phenomenon of wave localization and its impact on the apparent attenuation of seismic waves. We use the theory to estimate the localization length at a CO2 sequestration site in New Mexico at sonic frequencies (2 kHz) by performing numerical simulations with a model taken from well logs. Near this frequency, we find a localization length of roughly 180 m, leading to a localization-induced quality factor Q of 360.

  12. Propagation and attenuation of Rayleigh waves in generalized thermoelastic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, M. D.

    2014-01-01

    This study considers the propagation of Rayleigh waves in a generalized thermoelastic half-space with stress-free plane boundary. The boundary has the option of being either isothermal or thermally insulated. In either case, the dispersion equation is obtained in the form of a complex irrational expression due to the presence of radicals. This dispersion equation is rationalized into a polynomial equation, which is solvable, numerically, for exact complex roots. The roots of the dispersion equation are obtained after removing the extraneous zeros of this polynomial equation. Then, these roots are filtered out for the inhomogeneous propagation of waves decaying with depth. Numerical examples are solved to analyze the effects of thermal properties of elastic materials on the dispersion of existing surface waves. For these thermoelastic Rayleigh waves, the behavior of elliptical particle motion is studied inside and at the surface of the medium. Insulation of boundary does play a significant role in changing the speed, amplitude, and polarization of Rayleigh waves in thermoelastic media.

  13. Poroelastic model to relate seismic wave attenuation and dispersion to permeability anisotropy

    SciTech Connect

    Parra, J.O.

    2000-02-01

    A transversely isotropic model with a horizontal axis of symmetry, based on the Biot and squirt-flow mechanisms, predicts seismic waves in poroelastic media. The model estimates velocity dispersion and attenuation of waves propagating in the frequency range of crosswell and high-resolution reverse vertical seismic profiling (VSP) (250--1,250 HZ) for vertical permeability value much greater than horizontal permeability parameters. The model assumes the principal axes of the stiffness constant tensor are aligned with the axes of the permeability and squirt-flow tensors. In addition, the unified Biot and squirt-flow mechanism (BISQ) model is adapted to simulate cracks in permeable media. Under these conditions, the model simulations demonstrate that the preferential direction of fluid flow in a reservoir containing fluid-filled cracks can be determined by analyzing the phase velocity and attenuation of seismic waves propagating at different azimuth and incident angles. As a result, the fast compressional wave can be related to permeability anisotropy in a reservoir. The model results demonstrate that for fast quasi-P-wave propagating perpendicular to fluid-filled cracks, the attenuation is greater than when the wave propagates parallel to the plane of the crack. Theoretical predictions and velocity dispersion of interwell seismic waves in the Kankakee Limestone Formation at the Buckhorn test site (Illinois) demonstrate that the permeable rock matrix surrounding a low-velocity heterogeneity contains vertical cracks.

  14. Multiple attenuation to reflection seismic data using Radon filter and Wave Equation Multiple Rejection (WEMR) method

    SciTech Connect

    Erlangga, Mokhammad Puput

    2015-04-16

    Separation between signal and noise, incoherent or coherent, is important in seismic data processing. Although we have processed the seismic data, the coherent noise is still mixing with the primary signal. Multiple reflections are a kind of coherent noise. In this research, we processed seismic data to attenuate multiple reflections in the both synthetic and real seismic data of Mentawai. There are several methods to attenuate multiple reflection, one of them is Radon filter method that discriminates between primary reflection and multiple reflection in the τ-p domain based on move out difference between primary reflection and multiple reflection. However, in case where the move out difference is too small, the Radon filter method is not enough to attenuate the multiple reflections. The Radon filter also produces the artifacts on the gathers data. Except the Radon filter method, we also use the Wave Equation Multiple Elimination (WEMR) method to attenuate the long period multiple reflection. The WEMR method can attenuate the long period multiple reflection based on wave equation inversion. Refer to the inversion of wave equation and the magnitude of the seismic wave amplitude that observed on the free surface, we get the water bottom reflectivity which is used to eliminate the multiple reflections. The WEMR method does not depend on the move out difference to attenuate the long period multiple reflection. Therefore, the WEMR method can be applied to the seismic data which has small move out difference as the Mentawai seismic data. The small move out difference on the Mentawai seismic data is caused by the restrictiveness of far offset, which is only 705 meter. We compared the real free multiple stacking data after processing with Radon filter and WEMR process. The conclusion is the WEMR method can more attenuate the long period multiple reflection than the Radon filter method on the real (Mentawai) seismic data.

  15. Assessment of natural radiation exposure levels and mass attenuation coefficients of lime and gypsum samples used in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Damla, Nevzat; Cevik, Uğur; Kobya, Ali Ihsan; Celik, Ahmet; Celik, Necati

    2010-11-01

    The activity concentrations of 226Ra, 232Th, and 40K in lime and gypsum samples used as building materials in Turkey were measured using gamma spectrometry. The mean activity concentrations of 226Ra, 232Th, and 40K were found to be 38±16, 20±9, and 156±54 Bq kg(-1) for lime and found to be 17±6, 13±5, and 429±24 Bq kg(-1) for gypsum, respectively. The radiological hazards due to the natural radioactivity in the samples were inferred from calculations of radium equivalent activities (Raeq), indoor absorbed dose rate in the air, the annual effective dose, and gamma and alpha indices. These radiological parameters were evaluated and compared with the internationally recommended limits. The experimental mass attenuation coefficients (μ/ρ) of the samples were determined in the energy range 81-1,332 keV. The experimental mass attenuation coefficients were compared with theoretical values obtained using XCOM. It is found that the calculated values and the experimental results are in good agreement. PMID:19921450

  16. Estimating the Underwater Diffuse Attenuation Coefficient with a Low-Cost Instrument: The KdUINO DIY Buoy

    PubMed Central

    Bardaji, Raul; Sánchez, Albert-Miquel; Simon, Carine; Wernand, Marcel R.; Piera, Jaume

    2016-01-01

    A critical parameter to assess the environmental status of water bodies is the transparency of the water, as it is strongly affected by different water quality related components (such as the presence of phytoplankton, organic matter and sediment concentrations). One parameter to assess the water transparency is the diffuse attenuation coefficient. However, the number of subsurface irradiance measurements obtained with conventional instrumentation is relatively low, due to instrument costs and the logistic requirements to provide regular and autonomous observations. In recent years, the citizen science concept has increased the number of environmental observations, both in time and space. The recent technological advances in embedded systems and sensors also enable volunteers (citizens) to create their own devices (known as Do-It-Yourself or DIY technologies). In this paper, a DIY instrument to measure irradiance at different depths and automatically calculate the diffuse attenuation Kd coefficient is presented. The instrument, named KdUINO, is based on an encapsulated low-cost photonic sensor and Arduino (an open-hardware platform for the data acquisition). The whole instrument has been successfully operated and the data validated comparing the KdUINO measurements with the commercial instruments. Workshops have been organized with high school students to validate its feasibility. PMID:26999132

  17. Estimating the Underwater Diffuse Attenuation Coefficient with a Low-Cost Instrument: The KdUINO DIY Buoy.

    PubMed

    Bardaji, Raul; Sánchez, Albert-Miquel; Simon, Carine; Wernand, Marcel R; Piera, Jaume

    2016-01-01

    A critical parameter to assess the environmental status of water bodies is the transparency of the water, as it is strongly affected by different water quality related components (such as the presence of phytoplankton, organic matter and sediment concentrations). One parameter to assess the water transparency is the diffuse attenuation coefficient. However, the number of subsurface irradiance measurements obtained with conventional instrumentation is relatively low, due to instrument costs and the logistic requirements to provide regular and autonomous observations. In recent years, the citizen science concept has increased the number of environmental observations, both in time and space. The recent technological advances in embedded systems and sensors also enable volunteers (citizens) to create their own devices (known as Do-It-Yourself or DIY technologies). In this paper, a DIY instrument to measure irradiance at different depths and automatically calculate the diffuse attenuation Kd coefficient is presented. The instrument, named KdUINO, is based on an encapsulated low-cost photonic sensor and Arduino (an open-hardware platform for the data acquisition). The whole instrument has been successfully operated and the data validated comparing the KdUINO measurements with the commercial instruments. Workshops have been organized with high school students to validate its feasibility. PMID:26999132

  18. Determination of mass attenuation coefficients and effective atomic numbers for compounds of the 3d transition elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yılmaz, Demet; Boydaş, Elif; Cömert, Esra

    2016-08-01

    In this study, we aimed to determine mass attenuation coefficient (μm) and effective atomic number (Zeff) for some compounds of the 3d transition elements such as CoO, CoF2, CoF3, Cr2O3, CrF2, CrF3, FeO, Fe2O3, MnO2, TiO2, V2O3, VF3, V2O5, VF4 and ZnO at 19.63 and 22.10 keV photon energies by using an HPGe detector with a resolution of 182 eV at 5.9 keV. The experimental results of μm are compared with the theoretical results. Also, effective atomic numbers of compounds of the 3d transition elements have been determined by using experimental and theoretical mass attenuation coefficients. The agreement of measured values of effective atomic numbers with theoretical calculations is quite satisfactory.

  19. Estimation of the Diffuse Attenuation Coefficient KdPAR Using MERIS Satellite Reflections for European Coastal Waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saulquin, Bertand; Hamdi, Anouar; Populus, Jacques; Loutier, Romain; Demaria, Julien; Mangin, Antoine; D'Andon, Odile Fanton

    2010-12-01

    Accurate estimations of the diffuse attenuation coefficient is critical to understand physical processes such as the heat transfer in the upper layer of the ocean and also biological processes such as phytoplankton photosynthesis in the ocean euphotic zone. Light availability in the water column and the seabed determine the euphotic zone and constraints the type and distribution of the algae species. The EuSeaMap project's aim is to characterize at a resolution of 250m the European infralitoral benthic zone, according to biology, physic and geology criteriums and using observations and models. Satellite observations of the diffuse attenuation coefficient of the downwelling spectral irradiance at wavelength 490 nm (Kd490) or the diffuse attenuation coefficient for the downwelling photosynthetically available radiation (KdPAR) is an effective method to provide large scale maps of these parameters at high spatial and temporal resolution. Several empirical and semi-analytical models are commonly used to derive the Kd490 and KdPAR maps from ocean colour satellite sensors such as the Medium Resolution Imaging Spectrometer Instrument (MERIS), the Sea- viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS), and the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). Most of these existing empirical or semi- analytical models have been calibrated on open ocean waters and provide good results in these areas, but tend to underestimate the attenuation of light in coastal waters, our area of interest. We propose here a new estimation of the euphotic depth and the KdPAR for coastal European waters using MERIS reflectances at the resolution of 1km and 250 m. First, a semi-analytical model is used to estimate the Kd490, and in a second step, two relationships have been developed between the KdPAR and the Kd490 for respectively clear and turbid waters. Satellite-derived fields of Kd490 and the deduced KdPAR are validated using matchups collected over the world. Distribution maps of seabed

  20. Region specific optimization of continuous linear attenuation coefficients based on UTE (RESOLUTE): application to PET/MR brain imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ladefoged, Claes N.; Benoit, Didier; Law, Ian; Holm, Søren; Kjær, Andreas; Højgaard, Liselotte; Hansen, Adam E.; Andersen, Flemming L.

    2015-10-01

    The reconstruction of PET brain data in a PET/MR hybrid scanner is challenging in the absence of transmission sources, where MR images are used for MR-based attenuation correction (MR-AC). The main challenge of MR-AC is to separate bone and air, as neither have a signal in traditional MR images, and to assign the correct linear attenuation coefficient to bone. The ultra-short echo time (UTE) MR sequence was proposed as a basis for MR-AC as this sequence shows a small signal in bone. The purpose of this study was to develop a new clinically feasible MR-AC method with patient specific continuous-valued linear attenuation coefficients in bone that provides accurate reconstructed PET image data. A total of 164 [18F]FDG PET/MR patients were included in this study, of which 10 were used for training. MR-AC was based on either standard CT (reference), UTE or our method (RESOLUTE). The reconstructed PET images were evaluated in the whole brain, as well as regionally in the brain using a ROI-based analysis. Our method segments air, brain, cerebral spinal fluid, and soft tissue voxels on the unprocessed UTE TE images, and uses a mapping of R2* values to CT Hounsfield Units (HU) to measure the density in bone voxels. The average error of our method in the brain was 0.1% and less than 1.2% in any region of the brain. On average 95% of the brain was within  ±10% of PETCT, compared to 72% when using UTE. The proposed method is clinically feasible, reducing both the global and local errors on the reconstructed PET images, as well as limiting the number and extent of the outliers.

  1. Region specific optimization of continuous linear attenuation coefficients based on UTE (RESOLUTE): application to PET/MR brain imaging.

    PubMed

    Ladefoged, Claes N; Benoit, Didier; Law, Ian; Holm, Søren; Kjær, Andreas; Højgaard, Liselotte; Hansen, Adam E; Andersen, Flemming L

    2015-10-21

    The reconstruction of PET brain data in a PET/MR hybrid scanner is challenging in the absence of transmission sources, where MR images are used for MR-based attenuation correction (MR-AC). The main challenge of MR-AC is to separate bone and air, as neither have a signal in traditional MR images, and to assign the correct linear attenuation coefficient to bone. The ultra-short echo time (UTE) MR sequence was proposed as a basis for MR-AC as this sequence shows a small signal in bone. The purpose of this study was to develop a new clinically feasible MR-AC method with patient specific continuous-valued linear attenuation coefficients in bone that provides accurate reconstructed PET image data. A total of 164 [(18)F]FDG PET/MR patients were included in this study, of which 10 were used for training. MR-AC was based on either standard CT (reference), UTE or our method (RESOLUTE). The reconstructed PET images were evaluated in the whole brain, as well as regionally in the brain using a ROI-based analysis. Our method segments air, brain, cerebral spinal fluid, and soft tissue voxels on the unprocessed UTE TE images, and uses a mapping of R(*)2 values to CT Hounsfield Units (HU) to measure the density in bone voxels. The average error of our method in the brain was 0.1% and less than 1.2% in any region of the brain. On average 95% of the brain was within  ±10% of PETCT, compared to 72% when using UTE. The proposed method is clinically feasible, reducing both the global and local errors on the reconstructed PET images, as well as limiting the number and extent of the outliers. PMID:26422177

  2. Study of transmission line attenuation in broad band millimeter wave frequency range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandya, Hitesh Kumar B.; Austin, M. E.; Ellis, R. F.

    2013-10-01

    Broad band millimeter wave transmission lines are used in fusion plasma diagnostics such as electron cyclotron emission (ECE), electron cyclotron absorption, reflectometry and interferometry systems. In particular, the ECE diagnostic for ITER will require efficient transmission over an ultra wide band, 100 to 1000 GHz. A circular corrugated waveguide transmission line is a prospective candidate to transmit such wide band with low attenuation. To evaluate this system, experiments of transmission line attenuation were performed and compared with theoretical loss calculations. A millimeter wave Michelson interferometer and a liquid nitrogen black body source are used to perform all the experiments. Atmospheric water vapor lines and continuum absorption within this band are reported. Ohmic attenuation in corrugated waveguide is very low; however, there is Bragg scattering and higher order mode conversion that can cause significant attenuation in this transmission line. The attenuation due to miter bends, gaps, joints, and curvature are estimated. The measured attenuation of 15 m length with seven miter bends and eighteen joints is 1 dB at low frequency (300 GHz) and 10 dB at high frequency (900 GHz), respectively.

  3. Q-structure beneath the north and central Indian Ocean from the inversion of observed Love and Rayleigh wave attenuation data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, D. D.

    The fundamental-mode Love and Rayleigh waves generated by 57 earthquakes which occurred in the north and central Indian Ocean (extending to 40°S) and recorded at Indian seismograph and other WWSSN stations such as HOW, SHL, VIS, MDR, HYB, KOD, CHG, TRD, POO, BOM, GOA, NDI, NIL and QUE are analysed. Love and Rayleigh wave attenuation coefficients are estimated at periods of 15-100 s using the spectral amplitude of these waves for 98 different paths across the Bay of Bengal Fan, the Arabian Fan, and the north and central Indian Ocean. The large standard deviations observed in the surface wave attenuation coefficients may be a result of regional variation of the attenuative properties of the crust and upper mantle beneath these regions. Love wave attenuation coefficients are found to vary from 0.000 03 to 0.000 45 km -1 for the Bay of Bengal Fan; from 0.000 03 to 0.000 85 km -1 for the Arabian Fan; and from 0.000 03 to 0.000 35 km -1 for the north and central Indian Ocean. Similarly, Rayleigh wave attenuation coefficients vary from 0.000 03 to 0.0004 km -1 for the Bay of Bengal Fan; from 0.000 06 to 0.0007 km -1 for the Arabian Fan; and from 0.000 03 to 0.0007 km -1 for the north and central Indian Ocean. Backus and Gilbert inversion theory is applied to these surface wave attenuation data to obtain average Q-1 models for the crust and upper mantle beneath the Bay of Bengal, the Arabian Fan, and the north and central Indian Ocean. Inversion of Love and Rayleigh wave attenuation data shows a high-attenuation zone centred at a depth of > 120 km ( Qβ ≈ 125) for the Bay of Bengal Fan. Similarly, a high-attenuation zone ( Qβ ≈ 40-70) occurs at a depth of 60-160 km for the Arabian Fan at 100-160 km ( Qβ ≈ 115) for the Indian Ocean off Ninetyeast Ridge, and at 80-160 km ( Qβ ≈ 80) for the Indian Ocean across the Ninetyeast Ridge. The Qβ-1 models show a lithosphere thickness of 120 km beneath the Bay of Bengal Fan. Similarly, lithosphere thickness of 70, 100 and

  4. Seismic Wave Attenuation Estimated from Tectonic Tremor and Radiated Energy in Tremor for Various Subduction Zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yabe, S.; Baltay, A.; Ide, S.; Beroza, G. C.

    2013-12-01

    Ground motion prediction is an essential component of earthquake hazard assessment. Seismic wave attenuation with distance is an important, yet difficult to constrain, factor for such estimation. Using the empirical method of ground motion prediction equations (GMPEs), seismic wave attenuation with distance, which includes both the effect of anelastic attenuation and scattering, can be estimated from the distance decay of peak ground velocity (PGV) or peak ground acceleration (PGA) of ordinary earthquakes; however, in some regions where plate-boundary earthquakes are infrequent, such as Cascadia and Nankai, there are fewer data with which to constrain the empirical parameters. In both of those subduction zones, tectonic tremor occurs often. In this study, we use tectonic tremor to estimate the seismic wave attenuation with distance, and in turn use the attenuation results to estimate the radiated seismic energy of tremor. Our primary interest is in the variations among subduction zones. Ground motion attenuation and the distribution of released seismic energy from tremors are two important subduction zone characteristics. Therefore, it is very interesting to see whether there are variations of these parameters in different subduction zones, or regionally within the same subduction zone. It is also useful to estimate how much energy is released by tectonic tremor from accumulated energy to help understand subduction dynamics and the difference between ordinary earthquakes and tremor. We use the tectonic tremor catalog of Ide (2012) in Nankai, Cascadia, Mexico and southern Chile. We measured PGV and PGA of individual tremor bursts at each station. We assume a simple GMPE relationship and estimate seismic attenuation and relative site amplification factors from the data. In the Nankai subduction zone, there are almost no earthquakes on the plate interface, but intra-slab earthquakes occur frequently. Both the seismic wave attenuation with distance and the site

  5. Water saturation effects on elastic wave attenuation in porous rocks with aligned fractures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amalokwu, Kelvin; Best, Angus I.; Sothcott, Jeremy; Chapman, Mark; Minshull, Tim; Li, Xiang-Yang

    2014-05-01

    Elastic wave attenuation anisotropy in porous rocks with aligned fractures is of interest to seismic remote sensing of the Earth's structure and to hydrocarbon reservoir characterization in particular. We investigated the effect of partial water saturation on attenuation in fractured rocks in the laboratory by conducting ultrasonic pulse-echo measurements on synthetic, silica-cemented, sandstones with aligned penny-shaped voids (fracture density of 0.0298 ± 0.0077), chosen to simulate the effect of natural fractures in the Earth according to theoretical models. Our results show, for the first time, contrasting variations in the attenuation (Q-1) of P and S waves with water saturation in samples with and without fractures. The observed Qs/Qp ratios are indicative of saturation state and the presence or absence of fractures, offering an important new possibility for remote fluid detection and characterization.

  6. Magnesium oxide doping reduces acoustic wave attenuation in lithium metatantalate and lithium metaniobate crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Croft, W.; Damon, R.; Kedzie, R.; Kestigian, M.; Smith, A.; Worley, J.

    1970-01-01

    Single crystals of lithium metatantalate and lithium metaniobate, grown from melts having different stoichiometries and different amounts of magnesium oxide, show that doping lowers temperature-independent portion of attenuation of acoustic waves. Doped crystals possess optical properties well suited for electro-optical and photoelastic applications.

  7. Laboratory velocities and attenuation of p-waves in limestones during freeze-thaw cycles

    SciTech Connect

    Remy, J.M.; Bellanger, M.; Homand-Etienne, F. )

    1994-02-01

    The velocity and the attenuation of compressional P-waves, measured in the laboratory at ultrasonic frequencies during a series of freezing and thawing cycles, are used as a method for predicting frost damage in a bedded limestone. Pulse transmission and spectral ratio techniques are used to determine the P-wave velocities and the attenuation values relative to an aluminum reference samples with very low attenuation. Limestone samples were water saturated under vacuum conditions, jacketed with rubber sleeves, and immersed in an antifreeze bath (50 percent methanol solution). They were submitted to repeated 24-hour freezing and thawing cycles simulating natural environment conditions. During the freeze/thaw cycles, P-wave velocities and quality factor Q diminished rapidly in thawed rock samples, indicating modification of the pore space. Measurements of crack porosity were conducted by hydrostatic compression tests on cubic rock samples that had been submitted to these freeze/thaw cycles. These measurements are used as an index of crack formation. The hydrostatic compression tests confirmed the phases of rock damage that were shown by changes in the value of Q. Furthermore, comparison between Q values and crack porosity demonstrate that the variations of P-wave attenuation are caused by the creation of new cracks and not by the enlargement of pre-existing cracks.

  8. Electromagnetic wave attenuation measurements in a ring-shaped inductively coupled air plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Xiaolong, Wei; Haojun, Xu; Min, Lin; Chen, Su; Jianhai, Li

    2015-05-28

    An aerocraft with the surface, inlet and radome covered large-area inductive coupled plasma (ICP) can attenuate its radar echo effectively. The shape, thickness, and electron density (N{sub e}) distribution of ICP are critical to electromagnetic wave attenuation. In the paper, an air all-quartz ICP generator in size of 20 × 20 × 7 cm{sup 3} without magnetic confinement is designed. The discharge results show that the ICP is amorphous in E-mode and ring-shaped in H-mode. The structure of ICP stratifies into core region and edge halo in H-mode, and its width and thickness changes from power and pressure. Such phenomena are explained by the distribution of RF magnetic field, the diffusion of negative ions plasma and the variation of skin depth. In addition, the theoretical analysis shows that the N{sub e} achieves nearly uniform within the electronegative core and sharply steepens in the edge. The N{sub e} of core region is diagnosed by microwave interferometer under varied conditions (pressure in range of 10–50 Pa, power in 300–700 W). Furthermore, the electromagnetic wave attenuation measurements were carried out with the air ICP in the frequencies of 4–5 GHz. The results show that the interspaced ICP is still effective to wave attenuation, and the wave attenuation increases with the power and pressure. The measured attenuation is approximately in accordance with the calculation data of finite-different time-domain simulations.

  9. Angular and Frequency-Dependent Wave Velocity and Attenuation in Fractured Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carcione, José M.; Gurevich, Boris; Santos, Juan E.; Picotti, Stefano

    2013-11-01

    Wave-induced fluid flow generates a dominant attenuation mechanism in porous media. It consists of energy loss due to P-wave conversion to Biot (diffusive) modes at mesoscopic-scale inhomogeneities. Fractured poroelastic media show significant attenuation and velocity dispersion due to this mechanism. The theory has first been developed for the symmetry axis of the equivalent transversely isotropic (TI) medium corresponding to a poroelastic medium containing planar fractures. In this work, we consider the theory for all propagation angles by obtaining the five complex and frequency-dependent stiffnesses of the equivalent TI medium as a function of frequency. We assume that the flow direction is perpendicular to the layering plane and is independent of the loading direction. As a consequence, the behaviour of the medium can be described by a single relaxation function. We first consider the limiting case of an open (highly permeable) fracture of negligible thickness. We then compute the associated wave velocities and quality factors as a function of the propagation direction (phase and ray angles) and frequency. The location of the relaxation peak depends on the distance between fractures (the mesoscopic distance), viscosity, permeability and fractures compliances. The flow induced by wave propagation affects the quasi-shear (qS) wave with levels of attenuation similar to those of the quasi-compressional (qP) wave. On the other hand, a general fracture can be modeled as a sequence of poroelastic layers, where one of the layers is very thin. Modeling fractures of different thickness filled with CO2 embedded in a background medium saturated with a stiffer fluid also shows considerable attenuation and velocity dispersion. If the fracture and background frames are the same, the equivalent medium is isotropic, but strong wave anisotropy occurs in the case of a frameless and highly permeable fracture material, for instance a suspension of solid particles in the fluid.

  10. Spatial changes of seismic attenuation and multiscale geological heterogeneity in the Baikal rift and surroundings from analysis of coda waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobrynina, Anna A.; Sankov, Vladimir A.; Chechelnitsky, Vladimir V.; Déverchère, Jacques

    2016-04-01

    The Baikal rift system is undergoing an active tectonic deformation expressed by a high level of seismic activity. This deformation leads to physical and mechanical changes of crustal properties which can be investigated by the seismic quality factor and its frequency dependence. Using a single backscattering model, a seismic quality-factor (QC), a frequency parameter (n) and an attenuation coefficient (δ) have been estimated by analyzing coda waves of 274 local earthquakes of the Baikal rift system for nineteen lapse time windows (W) from 10 to 100 s every 5 s and for six central frequencies (0.3, 0.75, 1.5, 3, 6 and 12 Hz). The average QC value increases with the frequency and lapse time window from 46 ± 52 (at 0.75 Hz) to 502 ± 109 (at 12 Hz) for W = 10 s and from 114 ± 49 (at 0.3 Hz) to 1865 ± 679 (at 12 Hz) for W = 100 s. The values of QC(f) and δ were estimated for the whole Baikal rift system and for separate tectonic blocks: the stable Siberian Platform, main rift basins, spurs and uplifts. Along the rift system, the Q0-value (QC-factor at the frequency f = 1 Hz) varies within 72-109 and the frequency parameter n ranges from 0.87 to 1.22, whereas Q0 is 134 and n is 0.48 for the stable Siberian Platform. Vertical variations of attenuation reveal that sharp changes of δ and n are confined to the velocity discontinuities. The comparison of lateral variations of seismic wave attenuation and geological and geophysical characteristics of the Baikal rift system shows that attenuation is correlated with both seismic activity and heat flow and in a lesser degree with the surface fault density and the age of the crust. Seismic wave attenuation found across the main shear zones of the south-western Baikal rift (Main Sayan strike-slip fault zone and Tunka, Obruchev and Primorsky normal faults) is increased by more than 25-60% compared to the neighboring areas.

  11. Attenuation of Elastic Waves due to Scattering from Spherical Cavities and Elastic Inclusions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinders, Mark Karl

    1990-01-01

    The attenuation of elastic waves due to scattering from a spherical inclusion of arbitrary size in an infinitely extended medium is investigated. The spherical scatterer and the exterior medium are isotropic, homogeneous, and linearly elastic, but of arbitrarily differing material parameters, with compressional and shear waves supported in both media. Exact expressions for scattered and transmitted fields caused by an incident plane compressional or shear wave of unit amplitude are calculated analytically and general expressions for extinction and scattering cross -sections are derived for both lossy and lossless scattering. Application to ultrasonic determination of porosity in cast aluminum is investigated.

  12. Effects of microstructure on the speed and attenuation of elastic waves

    SciTech Connect

    Gubernatis, J.E.; Domany, E.

    1982-01-01

    A unified theory pertaining to the sensitivity of the propagation of an elastic wave to changes in the microstructural details of a material is discussed. In contrast to nearly all previous treatments a first principles approach, using developments from other multiple scattering problems and adapting them to the elastic wave case, is followed. We then present several simple, standard approximations. In the process the validity of the commonly made assumption that ..cap alpha.. = n anti sigma is clarified, and the effective speed, illustrating its complementary character to the attenuation, is computed. The principal objective is to present the formal analysis necessary to treat systematically the dependency of the wave propagation on microstructural statistics.

  13. Comparison of photon attenuation coefficients (2-150 KeV) for diagnostic imaging simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dodge, Charles W., III; Flynn, Michael J.

    2004-05-01

    The Radiology Research Laboratory at the Henry Ford Hospital has been involved in modeling x-ray units in order to predict image quality. A critical part of that modeling process is the accurate choice of interaction coefficients. This paper serves as a review and comparison of existing interaction models. Our objective was to obtain accurate and easily calculated interaction coefficients, at diagnostically relevant energies. We obtained data from: McMaster, Lawrence Berkeley Lab data (LBL), XCOM and FFAST Data from NIST, and the EPDL-97 database via LLNL. Our studies involve low energy photons; therefore, comparisons were limited to Coherent (Rayleigh), Incoherent (Compton) and Photoelectric effects, which were summed to determine a total interaction cross section. Without measured data, it becomes difficult to definitively choose the most accurate method. However, known limitations in the McMaster data and smoothing of photo-edge transitions can be used as a guide to establish more valid approaches. Each method was compared to one another graphically and at individual points. We found that agreement between all methods was excellent when away from photo-edges. Near photo-edges and at low energies, most methods were less accurate. Only the Chanter (FFAST) data seems to have consistently and accurately predicted the placement of edges (through M-shell), while minimizing smoothing errors. The EPDL-97 data by LLNL was the best over method in predicting coherent and incoherent cross sections.

  14. Air-ground interface: Surface waves, surface impedance and acoustic-to-seismic coupling coefficient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daigle, Gilles; Embleton, Tony

    1990-01-01

    In atmospheric acoustics, the subject of surface waves has been an area of discussion for many years. The existence of an acoustic surface wave is now well established theoretically. The mathematical solution for spherical wave propagation above an impedance boundary includes the possibility of a contribution that possesses all the standard properties for a surface wave. Surface waves exist when the surface is sufficiently porous, relative to its acoustical resistance, that it can influence the airborne particle velocity near the surface and reduce the phase velocity of sound waves in air at the surface. This traps some of the sound energy in the air to remain near the surface as it propagates. Above porous grounds, the existence of surface waves has eluded direct experimental confirmation (pulse experiments have failed to show a separate arrival expected from the reduced phase speed) and indirect evidence for its existence has appeared contradictory. The experimental evidence for the existence of an acoustical surface wave above porous boundaries is reviewed. Recent measurements including pulse experiments are also described. A few years ago the acoustic impedance of a grass-covered surface was measured in the frequency range 30 to 300 Hz. Here, further measurements on the same site are discussed. These measurements include core samples, a shallow refractive survey to determine the seismic velocities, and measurements of the acoustic-to-seismic coupling coefficient.

  15. A multiscale poromicromechanical approach to wave propagation and attenuation in bone.

    PubMed

    Morin, Claire; Hellmich, Christian

    2014-07-01

    Ultrasonics is an important diagnostic tool for bone diseases, as it allows for non-invasive assessment of bone tissue quality through mass density-elasticity relationships. The latter are, however, quite complex for fluid-filled porous media, which motivates us to develop a rigorous multiscale poromicrodynamics approach valid across the great variety of different bone tissues. Multiscale momentum and mass balance, as well as kinematics of a hierarchical double porous medium, together with Darcy's law for fluid flow and micro-poro-elasticity for the solid phase of bone, give access to the so-called dispersion relation, linking the complex wave numbers to corresponding wave frequencies. Experimentally validated results show that 2.25 MHz acoustical signals transmit healthy cortical bone (exhibiting a low vascular porosity) only in the form of fast waves, agreeing very well with experimental data, while both fast and slow waves transmit highly osteoporotic as well as trabecular bone (exhibiting a large vascular porosity). While velocities and wavelengths of both fast and slow waves, as well as attenuation lengths of slow waves, are always monotonously increasing with the permeability of the bone sample, the attenuation length of fast waves shows a minimum when considered as function of the permeability. PMID:24457030

  16. Characteristics of vibrational wave propagation and attenuation in submarine fluid-filled pipelines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Jin; Zhang, Juan

    2015-04-01

    As an important part of lifeline engineering in the development and utilization of marine resources, the submarine fluid-filled pipeline is a complex coupling system which is subjected to both internal and external flow fields. By utilizing Kennard's shell equations and combining with Helmholtz equations of flow field, the coupling equations of submarine fluid-filled pipeline for n=0 axisymmetrical wave motion are set up. Analytical expressions of wave speed are obtained for both s=1 and s=2 waves, which correspond to a fluid-dominated wave and an axial shell wave, respectively. The numerical results for wave speed and wave attenuation are obtained and discussed subsequently. It shows that the frequency depends on phase velocity, and the attenuation of this mode depends strongly on material parameters of the pipe and the internal and the external fluid fields. The characteristics of PVC pipe are studied for a comparison. The effects of shell thickness/radius ratio and density of the contained fluid on the model are also discussed. The study provides a theoretical basis and helps to accurately predict the situation of submarine pipelines, which also has practical application prospect in the field of pipeline leakage detection.

  17. Numerical investigation of wave attenuation by vegetation using a 3D RANS model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsooli, Reza; Wu, Weiming

    2014-12-01

    Vegetation has been recognized as an important natural shoreline protection against storm surges and waves. Understanding of wave-vegetation interaction is essential for assessing the ability of vegetation patches, such as wetlands, to mitigate storm damages. In this study the wave attenuation by vegetation is investigated numerically using a 3-D model which solves the Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes equations (RANS) by means of a finite-volume method based on collocated hexahedron mesh. A mixing length model is used for turbulence closure of the RANS equations. The water surface boundary is tracked using the Volume-of-Fluid (VOF) method with the Compressive Interface Capturing Scheme for Arbitrary Meshes (CICSAM) to solve the VOF advection equation. The presence of vegetation is taken into account by adding the vegetation drag and inertia forces to the momentum equations. The model is validated by several laboratory experiments of short wave propagation through vegetation over flat and sloping beds. The comparisons show good agreement between the measured data and calculated results, but the swaying motion of flexible vegetation which is neglected in this study can influence the accuracy of the wave height predictions. The model is then applied to one of the validation tests with different vegetation properties, revealing that the wave height attenuation by vegetation depends not only on the wave conditions, but also the vegetation characteristics such as vegetation height and density.

  18. Influence of reef geometry on wave attenuation on a Brazilian coral reef

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, Mirella B. S. F.; Araújo, Moacyr; Araújo, Tereza C. M.; Siegle, Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    This study presents data from field experiments that focus on the influence of coral reef geometry on wave transformation in the Metropolitan Area of Recife (MAR) on the northeast coast of Brazil. First, a detailed bathymetric survey was conducted, revealing a submerged reef bank, measuring 18 km long by 1 km wide, parallel to the coastline with a quasi-horizontal top that varies from 0.5 m to 4 m in depth at low tide. Cluster similarity between 180 reef profiles indicates that in 75% of the area, the reef geometry has a configuration similar to a platform reef, whereas in 25% of the area it resembles a fringing reef. Measurements of wave pressure fluctuations were made at two stations (experiments E1 and E2) across the reef profile. The results indicate that wave height was tidally modulated at both experimental sites. Up to 67% (E1) and 99.9% (E2) of the incident wave height is attenuated by the reef top at low tide. This tidal modulation is most apparent at E2 due to reef geometry. At this location, the reef top is only approximately 0.5 m deep during mean low spring water, and almost all incident waves break on the outer reef edge. At E1, the reef top depth is 4 m, and waves with height ratios smaller than the critical breaking limit are free to pass onto the reef and are primarily attenuated by bottom friction. These results highlight the importance of reef geometry in controlling wave characteristics of the MAR beaches and demonstrate its effect on the morphology of the adjacent coast. Implications of differences in wave attenuation and the level of protection provided by the reefs to the adjacent shoreline are discussed.

  19. Studies on effective atomic numbers, electron densities from mass attenuation coefficients near the K edge in some samarium compounds.

    PubMed

    Akman, F; Durak, R; Turhan, M F; Kaçal, M R

    2015-07-01

    The effective atomic numbers and electron densities of some samarium compounds were determined using the experimental total mass attenuation coefficient values near the K edge in the X-ray energy range from 36.847 up to 57.142 keV. The measurements, in the region from 36.847 to 57.142 keV, were done in a transmission geometry utilizing the Kα2, Kα1, Kβ1 and Kβ2 X-rays from different secondary source targets excited by the 59.54 keV gamma-photons from an Am-241 annular source. This paper presents the first measurement of the effective atomic numbers and electron densities for some samarium compounds near the K edge. The results of the study showed that the measured values were in good agreement with the theoretically calculated ones. PMID:25880612

  20. Effect of detector collimation on the measured mass attenuation coefficients of some elements for 59.5-661.6 keV gamma-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Çelik, Necati; Çevik, Uğur; Çelik, Ahmet

    2012-06-01

    Mass attenuation coefficients were determined experimentally for Sc, Ni and W for gamma energies of 59.5, 122, 276, 302, 356, 383 and 662 keV for different detector collimator diameters ranging from 2 to 10 mm. The aim was to investigate the quantitative analysis of detector collimator diameter effect on measured mass attenuation coefficients. It was found that measured mass attenuation coefficients decrease systematically with the increasing collimator diameter. The relative difference was found to be up to around 3% in some cases. The observed decrease in mass attenuation coefficients was attributed to the detection of elastic and inelastic scattered photons from the absorber. In elastic scattering process the photons change in direction but not in energy and get counted under the full energy peak if they reach the detector. In inelastic scattering however, both direction and energy of the scattered photons change. It was seen that most of the inelastic scattered photons also get counted by the detection system since they lose an amount of energy lower than the energy resolution of the detector. It is understood from the present results that it is essential to take into account the experimental geometry when reporting mass attenuation coefficients.

  1. Temporal change in coda wave attenuation observed during an eruption of Mount St. Helens

    SciTech Connect

    Fehler, M.; Roberts, P.; Fairbanks, T.

    1988-05-10

    During the past few years there have been numerous reports of changes in coda wave attenuation occurring before major earthquakes. These observations are important because they may provide insight into stress-related structural changes taking place in the focal region prior to the occurrence of large earthquakes. The results of these studies led us to suspect that temporal changes in coda wave attenuation might also accompany volcanic eruptions. By measuring power decay envelopes for earthquakes at Mount St. Helens recorded before, during, and after an eruption that took place during September 3--6, 1981, we found that coda Q/sup -1/ for frequencies between 6 and 30 Hz was 20--30% higher before the eruption than after. The change is attributed to an increase in the density of open microcracks in the rock associated with inflation of the volcano prior to the eruption. Q/sup -1/ was found to be only weakly dependent on frequency and displayed a slight peak near 10 Hz. The weak frequency dependence is attributed to the dominance of intrinsic attenuation over scattering attenuation, since it is generally accepted that intrinsic attenuation is constant with frequency, whereas scattering attenuation decreases strongly at higher frequencies. The weak frequency dependence of Q/sup -1/ at Mount St. Helens contrasts with results reported for studies in nonvolcanic regions. The peak in Q/sup -1/ near 10 Hz at Mount St. Helens is attributed to the scale length of heterogeneity responsible for generating backscattered waves. Results for nonvolcanic regions have shown this peak to occur near 0.5 Hz. Thus a smaller scale length of heterogeneity is required to explain the 10-Hz peak at Mount St. Helens. copyright American Geophysical Union 1988

  2. Ultrasonic attenuation and backscatter coefficient estimates of rodent-tumor-mimicking structures: comparison of results among clinical scanners.

    PubMed

    Nam, Kibo; Rosado-Mendez, Ivan M; Wirtzfeld, Lauren A; Pawlicki, Alexander D; Kumar, Viksit; Madsen, Ernest L; Ghoshal, Goutam; Lavarello, Roberto J; Oelze, Michael L; Bigelow, Timothy A; Zagzebski, James A; O'Brien, William D; Hall, Timothy J

    2011-10-01

    In vivo estimations of the frequency-dependent acoustic attenuation (alpha) and backscatter (eta) coefficients using radiofrequency (rf) echoes acquired with clinical ultrasound systems must be independent of the data acquisition setup and the estimation procedures. In a recent in vivo assessment of these parameters in rodent mammary tumors, overall agreement was observed among alpha and eta estimates using data from four clinical imaging systems. In some cases, particularly in highly-attenuating heterogeneous tumors, multisystem variability was observed. This paper compares alpha and eta estimates of a well-characterized rodent-tumor-mimicking homogeneous phantom scanned using seven transducers with the same four clinical imaging systems: a Siemens Acuson S2000, an Ultrasonix RP, a Zonare Z.one and a VisualSonics Vevo2100. alpha and eta estimates of lesion-mimicking spheres in the phantom were independently assessed by three research groups, who analyzed their system's rf echo signals. Imaging-system-based estimates of alpha and eta of both lesion-mimicking spheres were comparable to through-transmission laboratory estimates and to predictions using Faran's theory, respectively. A few notable variations in results among the clinical systems were observed but the average and maximum percent difference between alpha estimates and laboratory-assessed values was 11% and 29%, respectively. Excluding a single outlier dataset, the average and maximum average difference between eta estimates for the clinical systems and values predicted from scattering theory was 16% and 33%, respectively. These results were an improvement over previous interlaboratory comparisons of attenuation and backscatter estimates. Although the standardization of our estimation methodologies can be further improved, this study validates our results from previous rodent breast-tumor model studies. PMID:22518954

  3. Attenuation of Slab determined from T-wave generation by deep earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, J.; Ni, S.

    2006-05-01

    T-wave are seismically generated acoustic waves that propagate over great distance in the ocean sound channel (SOFAR). Because of the high attenuation in both the upper mantle and the ocean crust, T wave is rarely observed for earthquakes deeper than 80 km. However some deep earthquakes deeper than 80km indeed generate apparent T-waves if the subducted slab is continuous Okal et al. (1997) . We studied the deep earthquakes in the Fiji/Tonga region, where the subducted lithosphere is old and thus with small attenuation. After analyzing 33 earthquakes with the depth from 10 Km to 650 Km in Fiji/Tonga, we observed and modeled obvious T-phases from these earthquakes observed at station RAR. We used the T-wave generated by deep earthquakes to compute the quality factor of the Fiji/Tonga slab. The method used in this study is followed the equation (1) by [Groot-Hedlin et al,2001][1]. A=A0/(1+(Ω0/Ω)2)×exp(-LΩ/Qv)×Ωn where the A is the amplitude computed by the practicable data, amplitude depending on the earthquakes, and A0 is the inherent frequency related with the earthquake's half duration, L is the length of ray path that P wave or S travel in the slab, and the V is the velocity of P-wave. In this study, we fix the n=2, by assuming the T- wave scattering points in the Fiji/Tonga island arc having the same attribution as the continental shelf. After some computing and careful analysis, we determined the quality factor of the Fiji/Tonga to be around 1000, Such result is consistent with results from the traditional P,S-wave data[Roth & Wiens,1999][2] . Okal et al. (1997) pointed out that the slab in the part of central South America was also a continuous slab, by modeling apparent T-waves from the great 1994 Bolivian deep earthquake in relation to channeling of S wave energy propagating upward through the slab[3]. [1]Catherine D. de Groot-Hedlin, John A. Orcutt, excitation of T-phases by seafloor scattering, J. Acoust. Soc, 109,1944-1954,2001. [2]Erich G.Roth and

  4. The attenuation of Love waves and toroidal oscillations of the earth.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, D. D.

    1971-01-01

    An attempt has been made to invert a large set of attenuation data for Love waves and toroidal oscillations in the earth, using a recent method by Backus and Gilbert. The difficulty in finding an acceptable model of internal friction which explains the data, under the assumption that the internal friction is independent of frequency, casts doubt on the validity of this assumption. A frequency-dependent model of internal friction is presented which is in good agreement with the seismic data and with recent experimental measurements of attenuation in rocks.

  5. Imaging Rayleigh Wave Attenuation and Phase Velocity beneath North America with USArray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, X.; Dalton, C. A.; Jin, G.; Gaherty, J. B.

    2014-12-01

    The EarthScope USArray provides an opportunity to obtain detailed images of the continental upper mantle of United States at a novel scale. The majority of mantle models derived from USArray data contain spatial variations in velocity; however, little is known about the attenuation structure of the North American upper mantle. Joint interpretation of seismic attenuation and velocity models can improve upon the interpretations based only on velocity, and provide important constraints on the temperature, composition, melt content, and volatile content of the mantle. In this study, Rayleigh wave travel time and amplitude are measured using an interstation cross-correlation version of the Generalized Seismological Data Functional algorithm, which takes advantage of waveform similarity at nearby stations. Our data are from 670 large teleseismic earthquakes that occurred from 2006 to 2014 and were recorded by 1,764 Transportable Array stations. More than 4.8 million measurements at periods between 20 and 100 s are collected into our database. Isolating the signal of attenuation in the amplitude observations is challenging because amplitudes are sensitive to a number of factors in addition to attenuation, such as focusing/defocusing and local site amplification. We generate several Rayleigh wave attenuation maps at each period, using several different approaches to account for source and receiver effects on amplitude. This suite of attenuation maps allows us to distinguish between the robust features in the maps and the features that are sensitive to the treatment of source and receiver effects. We apply Helmholtz surface-wave tomography (Lin et al., 2012) to determine velocity and attenuation maps. A significant contrast in velocity and attenuation is observed in the transition between the western and central United States along the Rocky Mountain front. We find low Q values in the western US, along the eastern coast, and the Gulf plain. These areas are also

  6. Calculation of an axial temperature distribution using the reflection coefficient of an acoustic wave.

    PubMed

    Červenka, Milan; Bednařík, Michal

    2015-10-01

    This work verifies the idea that in principle it is possible to reconstruct axial temperature distribution of fluid employing reflection or transmission of acoustic waves. It is assumed that the fluid is dissipationless and its density and speed of sound vary along the wave propagation direction because of the fluid temperature distribution. A numerical algorithm is proposed allowing for calculation of the temperature distribution on the basis of known frequency characteristics of reflection coefficient modulus. Functionality of the algorithm is illustrated on a few examples, its properties are discussed. PMID:26520344

  7. Attenuation of coda waves in the Garhwal Lesser Himalaya, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, S. K.; Gupta, S. C.; Kumar, Ashwani

    2015-04-01

    Qc estimates for the Uttarkashi and the Chamoli regions of the Garhwal Lesser Himalaya have been obtained by analyzing the coda waves of 159 local earthquakes recorded during 2008 and 2009 employing a 12-station seismological network. Earthquakes around the Uttarkashi region are located in the epicentral distance range of 5.0 to 93.9 km, focal depth range of 1.63 to 42.13 km, and coda magnitude range of 0.2 to 2.9, whereas earthquakes around Chamoli region are located in the epicentral distance range of 19.8-109.2 km, focal depth range of 1.36 to 40.72 km, and coda magnitude range of 1.0 to 3.0. The coda waves of 30 s duration, recorded on 982 seismograms, have been analyzed in seven frequencies range centered at 1.5, 3.0, 6.0, 9.0, 12.0, 18.0, and 24.0 Hz for four to five lapse time windows (LTW) using the single backscattering model given by Aki and Chouet (J Geophys Res 80:3322-3342, 1975). Mean value of Qc estimates vary from 76 at 1.5 Hz to 2201 at 24.0 Hz for LTW range of 10-40 s and from 216 at 1.5 Hz to 3243 at 24.0 Hz for LTW range of 50-80 s (for the Uttarkashi region) and from 147 at 1.5 Hz to 2273 at 24.0 Hz for LTW range of 20-50 s and from 188 at 1.5 Hz to 2826 at 24.0 Hz for LTW range of 50-80 s (for Chamoli region). The Qc values thus obtained showed a clear dependence on frequency and LTW and frequency dependence Qc relationships, Qc = Q0fη, for LTWs that have been obtained as Qc = 57f1.20 (10-40 s), Qc = 97f1.07 (20-50 s), Qc = 116f1.03 (30-60 s), Qc = 130f1.03 (40-70 s), and Qc = 162f0.95 (50-80 s) for Uttarkashi region and Qc = 107f0.95 (20-50 s), Qc = 115f0.96 (30-60 s), Qc = 128f0.95 (40-70 s), and Qc = 145f0.95 (50-80 s) for Chamoli region.

  8. Scattering attenuation ratios of P and S waves in elastic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Tae-Kyung

    2004-07-01

    The variation of scattering attenuation ratios of P and S waves (Q-1P/Q-1S) is investigated in elastic media by using numerical simulations and theoretical expressions based on the first-order Born approximation. Numerical results from stochastic random media (von Karman, exponential, Gaussian) with mild velocity perturbation (10 per cent in this study) are represented well by theoretical attenuation curves with a minimum scattering angle of 60-90°. The level of scattering attenuation ratios is dependent on the velocity ratio (γ=α0/β0) and the type of medium. The change of perturbation in the density introduces a relatively small variation in attenuation ratio. Attenuation ratios are proportional to normalized frequency (fa, frequency-by-correlation length) at the intermediate-frequency range (0.1 km s-1 < fa < 10 km s-1) and determined constant at the high-frequency (fa > 10 km s-1) and low-frequency (fa < 1 km s-1) regimes. The von Karman-type models look appropriate for the representation of small-scale variation in the Earth. The scattering attenuation ratios can be implemented for the investigation of small-scale heterogeneities in the Earth.

  9. Strong Lg-wave attenuation in the Middle East continental collision orogenic belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Lian-Feng; Xie, Xiao-Bi

    2016-04-01

    Using Lg-wave Q tomography, we construct a broadband crustal attenuation model for the Middle East. The QLg images reveal a relationship between attenuation and geological structures. Strong attenuation is found in the continental collision orogenic belt that extends from the Turkish and Iranian plateau to the Pamir plateau. We investigate the frequency dependence of QLg in different geologic formations. The results illustrate that QLg values generally increase with increasing frequency but exhibit complex relationships both with frequency and between regions. An average QLg value between 0.2 and 2.0 Hz, QLg (0.2-2.0 Hz), may be a critical index for crustal attenuation and is used to infer the regional geology. Low-QLg anomalies are present in the eastern Turkish plateau and correlate well with low Pn-velocities and Cenozoic volcanic activity, thus indicating possible partial melting within the crust in this region. Very strong attenuation is also observed in central Iran, the Afghanistan block, and the southern Caspian Sea. This in line with the previously observed high crustal temperature, high-conductivity layers, and thick marine sediments in these areas, suggests the high Lg attenuation is caused by abnormally high tectonic and thermal activities.

  10. Measurements of the thermal coefficient of optical attenuation at different depth regions of in vivo human skins using optical coherence tomography: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Su, Ya; Yao, X. Steve; Li, Zhihong; Meng, Zhuo; Liu, Tiegen; Wang, Longzhi

    2015-01-01

    We present detailed measurement results of optical attenuation’s thermal coefficients (referenced to the temperature of the skin surface) in different depth regions of in vivo human forearm skins using optical coherence tomography (OCT). We first design a temperature control module with an integrated optical probe to precisely control the surface temperature of a section of human skin. We propose a method of using the correlation map to identify regions in the skin having strong correlations with the surface temperature of the skin and find that the attenuation coefficient in these regions closely follows the variation of the surface temperature without any hysteresis. We observe a negative thermal coefficient of attenuation in the epidermis. While in dermis, the slope signs of the thermal coefficient of attenuation are different at different depth regions for a particular subject, however, the depth regions with a positive (or negative) slope are different in different subjects. We further find that the magnitude of the thermal coefficient of attenuation coefficient is greater in epidermis than in dermis. We believe the knowledge of such thermal properties of skins is important for several noninvasive diagnostic applications, such as OCT glucose monitoring, and the method demonstrated in this paper is effective in studying the optical and biological properties in different regions of skin. PMID:25780740

  11. Wave Velocity Attenuation and Sediment Retention among Different Vegetation Types in a Pacific Northwest Estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemein, T.; Cox, D. T.; Albert, D.; Blackmar, P.

    2012-12-01

    Feedbacks between vegetation, wave climate, and sedimentation create stable ecosystem states within estuaries that provide ecosystem services such as wildlife habitat, erosion control, and pollution filtration. Flume and field studies conducted with cordgrass (Spartina spp.) and sea grasses (Zostera spp., Halodule spp.) have demonstrated that the presence of vegetation reduces wave energy and increases sediment retention. Since the spatial distribution of plant species and the presence of unique plant species differ between estuaries, there is a need to understand how individual plant species, or groups of species with similar morphology, influence wave characteristics and sedimentation. Within Tillamook Bay, Oregon, three species of emergent vascular vegetation species (Carex lyngbyei, Eleocharis sp., Schoenoplectus pungens) and one species of submergent vascular vegetation species (Zostera marina) are present in the high wave energy portion of the estuary at the border of open water and the start of vegetation. These species represent three distinct growth forms (emergent reeds, emergent grasses, submergent grasses) and occur at varying densities relative to each other, as well as within the estuary. Using paired acoustic Doppler velocimeters (ADVs), we quantify the relative attenuation of wave velocity between vegetation types and densities within the estuary and compare these results with published attenuation rates from flume and field studies in different environments. The effect of decreased wave velocity on sediment retention is measured using permanent sediment markers within and outside of vegetation stands and paired with ADV data. Sediment retention is predicted to vary seasonally with seasonal vegetation composition changes and remain constant in unvegetated areas. From this experiment we expect to identify like groups of plant species whose attenuation characteristics are the same, allowing for models of wave-vegetation-sediment interaction to be

  12. Drag coefficient comparisons between observed and model simulated directional wave spectra under hurricane conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Yalin; Rogers, W. Erick

    2016-06-01

    In this study, Donelan, M.A., Babanin, A.V., Young, I.R., Banner, M.L., 2006. J. Phys. Oceanogr. 36, 1672-1688 source function is used to calculate drag coefficients from both the scanning radar altimeter (SRA) measured two dimensional wave spectra obtained during hurricane Ivan in 2004 and the WAVEWATCH III simulated wave spectra. The drag coefficients disagree between the SRA and model spectra mainly in the right/left rear quadrant of the hurricane where the observed spectra appear to be bimodal while the model spectra are single peaked with more energy in the swell frequencies and less energy in the wind sea frequencies. These results suggest that WAVEWATCH III is currently not capable of providing sensible stress calculations in the rear quadrants of the hurricane.

  13. Attenuation of shock waves propagating through nano-structured porous materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Qananwah, Ahmad K.; Koplik, Joel; Andreopoulos, Yiannis

    2013-07-01

    Porous materials have long been known to be effective in energy absorption and shock wave attenuation. These properties make them attractive in blast mitigation strategies. Nano-structured materials have an even greater potential for blast mitigation because of their high surface-to-volume ratio, a geometric parameter which substantially attenuates shock wave propagation. A molecular dynamics approach was used to explore the effects of this remarkable property on the behavior of traveling shocks impacting on solid materials. The computational setup included a moving piston, a gas region and a target solid wall with and without a porous structure. The gas and porous solid were modeled by Lennard-Jones-like and effective atom potentials, respectively. The shock wave is resolved in space and time and its reflection from a solid wall is gradual, due to the wave's finite thickness, and entails a self-interaction as the reflected wave travels through the incoming incident wave. Cases investigated include a free standing porous structure, a porous structure attached to a wall and porous structures with graded porosity. The effects of pore shape and orientation have been also documented. The results indicate that placing a nano-porous material layer in front of the target wall reduced the stress magnitude and the energy deposited inside the solid by about 30 percent, while at the same time substantially decreasing the loading rate.

  14. Measurements and mechanisms investigation of seismic wave attenuation for frequencies between 1 and 100 Hz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tisato, N.; Madonna, C.; Saenger, E. H.

    2012-04-01

    Seismic wave attenuation at low frequencies in the earth crust has been explained by partial saturation as well as permeability models. We present results obtained by the Broad Band Attenuation Vessel (BBAV) which measures seismic wave attenuation using the sub-resonance method in the frequency range 0.01 - 100 Hz. The apparatus also allows the investigation of attenuation mechanisms related to fluid flow by means of five pore pressure sensors placed in the specimen. This allows continuous local measurements of pore pressure changes generated by stress field changes. Measurements were performed on 76 mm diameter, 250 mm long, 20% porosity, and ~500 mD permeability Berea sandstone samples. The confining pressure was varied between 0 and 20 MPa, and the specimens were saturated with water between 0% and 90%. Attenuation measurements show dependence with saturation. For instance, when samples are at dry conditions they exhibit attenuation values around 0.01, the same sample saturated with 90% water shows attenuation values between 0.018 and 0.028 across the entire frequency range. Attenuation is also confining pressure dependent. For instance, variations of confining pressure ranging between 0 and 8 MPa lead to quality factors between 40 and 10 at 60 Hz and 60% water saturation. Best fits on these measurements reveal that the corner frequency of the attenuation mechanism decreases from ~800 to ~200 Hz with increasing confining pressure. Using calibration measurements with Aluminum the possibility of apparatus resonances can be ruled out. Local pore pressure measurements corroborate this observation showing pore pressure evolution as a function of saturation. The results are discussed and interpreted in light of known attenuation mechanisms for partially saturated rocks (patchy saturation and squirt flow). We rule out the possibility of patchy saturation occurrence, but squirt flow would offer an explanation. The confining pressure dependence could be the result of

  15. Deriving effective atomic numbers from DECT based on a parameterization of the ratio of high and low linear attenuation coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landry, Guillaume; Seco, Joao; Gaudreault, Mathieu; Verhaegen, Frank

    2013-10-01

    Dual energy computed tomography (DECT) can provide simultaneous estimation of relative electron density ρe and effective atomic number Zeff. The ability to obtain these quantities (ρe, Zeff) has been shown to benefit selected radiotherapy applications where tissue characterization is required. The conventional analysis method (spectral method) relies on knowledge of the CT scanner photon spectra which may be difficult to obtain accurately. Furthermore an approximate empirical attenuation correction of the photon spectrum through the patient is necessary. We present an alternative approach based on a parameterization of the measured ratio of low and high kVp linear attenuation coefficients for deriving Zeff which does not require the estimation of the CT scanner spectra. In a first approach, the tissue substitute method (TSM), the Rutherford parameterization of the linear attenuation coefficients was employed to derive a relation between Zeff and the ratio of the linear attenuation coefficients measured at the low and high kVp of the CT scanner. A phantom containing 16 tissue mimicking inserts was scanned with a dual source DECT scanner at 80 and 140 kVp. The data from the 16 inserts phantom was used to obtain model parameters for the relation between Zeff and \\mu \\big|_{140kVp}^{80kVp}. The accuracy of the method was evaluated with a second phantom containing 4 tissue mimicking inserts. The TSM was compared to a more complex approach, the reference tissue method (RTM), which requires the derivation of stoichiometric fit parameters. These were derived from the 16 inserts phantom scans and used to calculate CT numbers at 80 and 140 kVp for a set of tabulated reference human tissues. Model parameters for the parameterization of \\mu \\big|_{140\\;kVp}^{80\\;kVp} were estimated for this reference tissue dataset and compared to the results of the TSM. Residuals on Zeff for the reference tissue dataset for both TSM and RTM were compared to those obtained from the

  16. Deriving effective atomic numbers from DECT based on a parameterization of the ratio of high and low linear attenuation coefficients.

    PubMed

    Landry, Guillaume; Seco, Joao; Gaudreault, Mathieu; Verhaegen, Frank

    2013-10-01

    Dual energy computed tomography (DECT) can provide simultaneous estimation of relative electron density ρe and effective atomic number Zeff. The ability to obtain these quantities (ρe, Zeff) has been shown to benefit selected radiotherapy applications where tissue characterization is required. The conventional analysis method (spectral method) relies on knowledge of the CT scanner photon spectra which may be difficult to obtain accurately. Furthermore an approximate empirical attenuation correction of the photon spectrum through the patient is necessary. We present an alternative approach based on a parameterization of the measured ratio of low and high kVp linear attenuation coefficients for deriving Zeff which does not require the estimation of the CT scanner spectra. In a first approach, the tissue substitute method (TSM), the Rutherford parameterization of the linear attenuation coefficients was employed to derive a relation between Zeff and the ratio of the linear attenuation coefficients measured at the low and high kVp of the CT scanner. A phantom containing 16 tissue mimicking inserts was scanned with a dual source DECT scanner at 80 and 140 kVp. The data from the 16 inserts phantom was used to obtain model parameters for the relation between Zeff and [Formula: see text]. The accuracy of the method was evaluated with a second phantom containing 4 tissue mimicking inserts. The TSM was compared to a more complex approach, the reference tissue method (RTM), which requires the derivation of stoichiometric fit parameters. These were derived from the 16 inserts phantom scans and used to calculate CT numbers at 80 and 140 kVp for a set of tabulated reference human tissues. Model parameters for the parameterization of [Formula: see text] were estimated for this reference tissue dataset and compared to the results of the TSM. Residuals on Zeff for the reference tissue dataset for both TSM and RTM were compared to those obtained from the spectral method. The

  17. New consistency tests for high-accuracy measurements of X-ray mass attenuation coefficients by the X-ray extended-range technique

    SciTech Connect

    Chantler, C.T.; Islam, M.T.; Rae, N.A.; Tran, C.Q.; Glover, J.L.; Barnea, Z.

    2012-09-25

    An extension of the X-ray extended-range technique is described for measuring X-ray mass attenuation coefficients by introducing absolute measurement of a number of foils - the multiple independent foil technique. Illustrating the technique with the results of measurements for gold in the 38-50 keV energy range, it is shown that its use enables selection of the most uniform and well defined of available foils, leading to more accurate measurements; it allows one to test the consistency of independently measured absolute values of the mass attenuation coefficient with those obtained by the thickness transfer method; and it tests the linearity of the response of the counter and counting chain throughout the range of X-ray intensities encountered in a given experiment. In light of the results for gold, the strategy to be ideally employed in measuring absolute X-ray mass attenuation coefficients, X-ray absorption fine structure and related quantities is discussed.

  18. Identification of a reflection boundary coefficient in an acoustic wave equation by optimal control techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Lenhart, S. |; Protopopescu, V.; Yong, J.

    1997-12-31

    The authors apply optimal control techniques to find approximate solutions to an inverse problem for the acoustic wave equation. The inverse problem (assumed here to have a solution) is to determine the boundary reflection coefficient from partial measurements of the acoustic signal. The sought reflection coefficient is treated as a control and the goal--quantified by an approximate functional--is to drive the model solution close to the experimental data by adjusting this coefficient. The problem is solved by finding the optimal control that minimizes the approximate functional. Then by driving the cost of the control to zero one proves that the corresponding sequence of optimal controls represents a converging sequence of estimates for the solution of the inverse problem. Compared to classical regularization methods (e.g., Tikhonov coupled with optimization schemes), their approach yields: (1) a systematic procedure to solve inverse problems of identification type and (ii) an explicit expression for the approximations of the solution.

  19. Ocean waves across the Arctic: Attenuation due to dissipation dominates over scattering for periods longer than 19 s

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ardhuin, Fabrice; Sutherland, Peter; Doble, Martin; Wadhams, Peter

    2016-06-01

    The poorly understood attenuation of surface waves in sea ice is generally attributed to the combination of scattering and dissipation. Scattering and dissipation have very different effects on the directional and temporal distribution of wave energy, making it possible to better understand their relative importance by analysis of swell directional spreading and arrival times. Here we compare results of a spectral wave model—using adjustable scattering and dissipation attenuation formulations—with wave measurements far inside the ice pack. In this case, scattering plays a negligible role in the attenuation of long swells. Specifically, scattering-dominated attenuation would produce directional wave spectra much broader than the ones recorded, and swell events arriving later and lasting much longer than observed. Details of the dissipation process remain uncertain. Average dissipation rates are consistent with creep effects but are 12 times those expected for a laminar boundary layer under a smooth solid ice plate.

  20. Phase velocity and attenuation predictions of waves in cancellous bone using an iterative effective medium approximation.

    PubMed

    Potsika, Vassiliki T; Protopappas, Vasilios C; Vavva, Maria G; Polyzos, Demosthenes; Fotiadis, Dimitrios I

    2013-01-01

    The quantitative determination of wave dispersion and attenuation in bone is an open research area as the factors responsible for ultrasound absorption and scattering in composite biological tissues have not been completely explained. In this study, we use the iterative effective medium approximation (IEMA) proposed in [1] so as to calculate phase velocity and attenuation in media with properties similar to those of cancellous bones. Calculations are performed for a frequency range of 0.4-0.8 MHz and for different inclusions' volume concentrations and sizes. Our numerical results are compared with previous experimental findings so as to assess the effectiveness of IEMA. It was made clear that attenuation and phase velocity estimations could provide supplementary information for cancellous bone characterization. PMID:24111396

  1. Seismic‐wave attenuation determined from tectonic tremor in multiple subduction zones

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yabe, Suguru; Baltay, Annemarie S.; Ide, Satoshi; Beroza, Gregory C.

    2014-01-01

    Tectonic tremor provides a new source of observations that can be used to constrain the seismic attenuation parameter for ground‐motion prediction and hazard mapping. Traditionally, recorded earthquakes of magnitude ∼3–8 are used to develop ground‐motion prediction equations; however, typical earthquake records may be sparse in areas of high hazard. In this study, we constrain the distance decay of seismic waves using measurements of the amplitude decay of tectonic tremor, which is plentiful in some regions. Tectonic tremor occurs in the frequency band of interest for ground‐motion prediction (i.e., ∼2–8  Hz) and is located on the subducting plate interface, at the lower boundary of where future large earthquakes are expected. We empirically fit the distance decay of peak ground velocity from tremor to determine the attenuation parameter in four subduction zones: Nankai, Japan; Cascadia, United States–Canada; Jalisco, Mexico; and southern Chile. With the large amount of data available from tremor, we show that in the upper plate, the lower crust is less attenuating than the upper crust. We apply the same analysis to intraslab events in Nankai and show the possibility that waves traveling from deeper intraslab events experience more attenuation than those from the shallower tremor due to ray paths that pass through the subducting and highly attenuating oceanic crust. This suggests that high pore‐fluid pressure is present in the tremor source region. These differences imply that the attenuation parameter determined from intraslab earthquakes may underestimate ground motion for future large earthquakes on the plate interface.

  2. Determination of mass attenuation coefficients, effective atomic numbers and effective electron numbers for heavy-weight and normal-weight concretes.

    PubMed

    Un, Adem; Demir, Faruk

    2013-10-01

    Total mass attenuation coefficients, effective atomic numbers and effective electron numbers values for different 16 heavy-weight and normal-weight concretes are calculated in the energy range from 1 keV to 100 GeV. The values of mass attenuation coefficients used in calculations are taken from the WinXCom computer program. The obtained results for heavy-weight concretes are compared with the results for normal-weight concretes. The results of heavy-weight concretes fairly differ from results for normal-weight concretes. PMID:23838359

  3. ATTENUATION OF REFLECTED WAVES IN MAN DURING RETROGRADE PROPAGATION FROM FEMORAL ARTERY TO PROXIMAL AORTA

    PubMed Central

    Baksi, A John; Davies, Justin E; Hadjiloizou, Nearchos; Baruah, Resham; Unsworth, Beth; Foale, Rodney A; Korolkova, Olga; Siggers, Jennifer H; Francis, Darrel P; Mayet, Jamil; Parker, Kim H; Hughes, Alun D

    2015-01-01

    Background Wave reflection may be an important influence on blood pressure, but the extent to which reflections undergo attenuation during retrograde propagation has not been studied. We quantified retrograde transmission of a reflected wave created by occlusion of the left femoral artery in man. Methods 20 subjects (age 31-83 y; 14 male) underwent invasive measurement of pressure and flow velocity with a sensor-tipped intra-arterial wire at multiple locations distal to the proximal aorta before, during and following occlusion of the left femoral artery by thigh cuff inflation. A numerical model of the circulation was also used to predict reflected wave transmission. Wave reflection was measured as the ratio of backward to forward wave energy (WRI) and the ratio of peak backward to forward pressure (Pb/Pf). Results Cuff inflation caused a marked reflection which was largest 5-10cm from the cuff (change (Δ) in WRI = 0.50 (95% CI 0.38, 0.62); p<0.001, ΔPb/Pf = 0.23 (0.18 - 0.29); p<0.001). The magnitude of the cuff-induced reflection decreased progressively at more proximal locations and was barely discernible at sites >40cm from the cuff including in the proximal aorta. Numerical modelling gave similar predictions to those observed experimentally. Conclusions Reflections due to femoral artery occlusion are markedly attenuated by the time they reach the proximal aorta. This is due to impedance mismatches of bifurcations traversed in the backward direction. This degree of attenuation is inconsistent with the idea of a large discrete reflected wave arising from the lower limb and propagating back into the aorta. PMID:26436672

  4. Rheological anisotropy of the Earth's mantle and attenuation of seismic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birger, B. I.

    2006-11-01

    The nonlinear integral (having memory) model previously proposed by the author for the description of the dislocation rheology of mantle rocks is generalized to the case of crystals with anisotropic rheology. The latter is caused by a large difference between the effective viscosities associated with dislocation glide and dislocation climb (in the crystallographic coordinate system, the dislocation glide governs simple shear, whereas the dislocation climb governs pure shear). Since the mantle is polycrystalline and crystal grains an order of a millimeter in size are oriented chaotically, anisotropy vanishes with volume averaging. However, convective flows in the mantle produce large strains and lead to a preferred orientation of grains and, thereby, anisotropy of the upper mantle. The lower mantle is dominated by diffusion rheology, which cannot cause anisotropy. The mantle rheological anisotropy gives rise to anisotropic attenuation of seismic waves. It is shown that the attenuation depends on the polarization and direction of seismic waves and on the parameters of the rheological model.

  5. Dislocation damping and anisotropic seismic wave attenuation in Earth's upper mantle.

    PubMed

    Farla, Robert J M; Jackson, Ian; Fitz Gerald, John D; Faul, Ulrich H; Zimmerman, Mark E

    2012-04-20

    Crystal defects form during tectonic deformation and are reactivated by the shear stress associated with passing seismic waves. Although these defects, known as dislocations, potentially contribute to the attenuation of seismic waves in Earth's upper mantle, evidence for dislocation damping from laboratory studies has been circumstantial. We experimentally determined the shear modulus and associated strain-energy dissipation in pre-deformed synthetic olivine aggregates under high pressures and temperatures. Enhanced high-temperature background dissipation occurred in specimens pre-deformed by dislocation creep in either compression or torsion, the enhancement being greater for prior deformation in torsion. These observations suggest the possibility of anisotropic attenuation in relatively coarse-grained rocks where olivine is or was deformed at relatively high stress by dislocation creep in Earth's upper mantle. PMID:22517856

  6. The wave equation with viscoelastic attenuation and its application in problems of shallow-sea acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, P. S.; Zakharenko, A. D.; Trofimov, M. Yu.

    2012-11-01

    A suitable tool for the simulation of low frequency acoustic pulse signals propagating in a shallow sea is the numerical integration of the nonstationary wave equation. The main feature of such simulation problems is that in this case the sound waves propagate in the geoacoustic waveguide formed by the upper layers of the bottom and the water column. By this reason, the correct dependence of the attenuation of sound waves in the bottom on their frequency must be taken into account. In this paper we obtain an integro-differential equation for the sound waves in the viscoelastic fluid, which allows to simulate the arbitrary dependence of acoustic wave attenuation on frequency in the time domain computations. The procedure of numerical solution of this equation based on its approximation by a system of differential equations is then considered and the methods of artificial limitation of computational domain are described. We also construct a simple finite-difference scheme for the proposed equation suitable for the numerical solution of nonstationary problems arising in the shallow-sea acoustics.

  7. Calculating concentration of inhaled radiolabeled particles from external gamma counting: External counting efficiency and attenuation coefficient of thorax

    SciTech Connect

    Langenback, E.G.; Foster, W.M.; Bergofsky, E.H.

    1989-01-01

    We determined the overall external counting efficiency of radiolabeled particles deposited in the sheep lung. This efficiency permits the noninvasive calculation of the number of particles and microcuries from gamma-scintillation lung images of the live sheep. Additionally, we have calculated the attenuation of gamma radiation (120 keV) by the posterior chest wall and the gamma-scintillation camera collection efficiency of radiation emitted from the lung. Four methods were employed in our experiments: (1) by light microscopic counting of discrete carbonized polystyrene particles with a count median diameter (CMD) of 2.85 microns and tagged with cobalt-57, we delineated a linear relationship between the number of particles and the emitted counts per minute (cpm) detected by well scintillation counting; (2) from this conversion relationship we determined the number of particles inhaled and deposited in the lungs by scintillation counting fragments of dissected lung at autopsy; (3) we defined a linear association between the number of particles or microcuries contained in the lung and the emitted radiation as cpm detected by a gamma scintillation camera in the live sheep prior to autopsy; and (4) we compared the emitted radiation from the lungs of the live sheep to that of whole excised lungs in order to calculate the attenuation coefficient (ac) of the chest wall. The mean external counting efficiency was 4.00 X 10(4) particles/cpm (5.1 X 10(-3) microCi/cpm), the camera collection efficiency was 1 cpm/10(4) disintegrations per minute (dpm), and the ac had a mean of 0.178/cm. The external counting efficiency remained relatively constant over a range of particles and microcuries, permitting a more general use of this ratio to estimate number of particles or microcuries depositing after inhalation in a large mammalian lung if a similarly collimated gamma camera system is used.

  8. Towards a quantitative, measurement-based estimate of the uncertainty in photon mass attenuation coefficients at radiation therapy energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, E. S. M.; Spencer, B.; McEwen, M. R.; Rogers, D. W. O.

    2015-02-01

    In this study, a quantitative estimate is derived for the uncertainty in the XCOM photon mass attenuation coefficients in the energy range of interest to external beam radiation therapy—i.e. 100 keV (orthovoltage) to 25 MeV—using direct comparisons of experimental data against Monte Carlo models and theoretical XCOM data. Two independent datasets are used. The first dataset is from our recent transmission measurements and the corresponding EGSnrc calculations (Ali et al 2012 Med. Phys. 39 5990-6003) for 10-30 MV photon beams from the research linac at the National Research Council Canada. The attenuators are graphite and lead, with a total of 140 data points and an experimental uncertainty of ˜0.5% (k = 1). An optimum energy-independent cross section scaling factor that minimizes the discrepancies between measurements and calculations is used to deduce cross section uncertainty. The second dataset is from the aggregate of cross section measurements in the literature for graphite and lead (49 experiments, 288 data points). The dataset is compared to the sum of the XCOM data plus the IAEA photonuclear data. Again, an optimum energy-independent cross section scaling factor is used to deduce the cross section uncertainty. Using the average result from the two datasets, the energy-independent cross section uncertainty estimate is 0.5% (68% confidence) and 0.7% (95% confidence). The potential for energy-dependent errors is discussed. Photon cross section uncertainty is shown to be smaller than the current qualitative ‘envelope of uncertainty’ of the order of 1-2%, as given by Hubbell (1999 Phys. Med. Biol 44 R1-22).

  9. Attenuation and velocity structure from diffuse coda waves: Constraints from underground array data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galluzzo, Danilo; La Rocca, Mario; Margerin, Ludovic; Del Pezzo, Edoardo; Scarpa, Roberto

    2015-03-01

    An analysis of coda waves excited in the 0.2-20 Hz frequency band and recorded by the underground array Underseis (central Italy) has been performed to constrain both seismic attenuation at regional scale and velocity structure in the Mount Gran Sasso area. Attenuation was estimated with the MLTWA method, and shows a predominance of scattering phenomena over intrinsic absorption. The values of Qi and Qs are compatible with other estimates obtained in similar tectonic environments. Array methods allowed for a detailed study of the propagation characteristics, demonstrating that earthquake coda at frequencies greater than about 6 Hz is composed of only body waves. Coherence and spectral characteristics of seismic waves measured along the coda of local and regional earthquakes indicate that the wavefield becomes fully diffuse only in the late coda. The frequency-dependent energy partitioning between horizontal and vertical components has been also estimated and compared with synthetic values computed in a layered half-space under the diffuse field assumption. This comparison confirms that, for frequencies higher than 6 Hz, the coda appears as a sum of body waves coming from all directions while, in the low frequency range (0.2-2 Hz), the observations can be well explained by a coda wavefield composed of an equipartition mixture of surface and body waves traveling in a multiple-layered medium. A Monte-Carlo inversion has been performed to obtain a set of acceptable velocity models of the upper crust. The present results show that a broadband coda wavefield recorded in an underground environment is useful to constrain both the regional attenuation and the velocity structure of the target area, thereby complementing the results of classical array analysis of the wavefield.

  10. Estimates of ocean wave heights and attenuation in sea ice using the SAR wave mode on Sentinel-1A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ardhuin, Fabrice; Collard, Fabrice; Chapron, Bertrand; Girard-Ardhuin, Fanny; Guitton, Gilles; Mouche, Alexis; Stopa, Justin E.

    2015-04-01

    Swell evolution from the open ocean into sea ice is poorly understood, in particular the amplitude attenuation expected from scattering and dissipation. New synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data from Sentinel-1A wave mode reveal intriguing patterns of bright oscillating lines shaped like instant noodles. We investigate cases in which the oscillations are in the azimuth direction, around a straight line in the range direction. This observation is interpreted as the distortion by the SAR processing of crests from a first swell, due to the presence of a second swell. Since deviations from a straight line should be proportional to the orbital velocity toward the satellite, swell height can be estimated, from 1.5 to 5 m in the present case. The evolution of this 13 s period swell across the ice pack is consistent with an exponential attenuation on a length scale of 200 km.

  11. Estimates of ocean wave heights and attenuation in sea ice using the SAR wave mode on Sentinel-1A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ardhuin, Fabrice; Collard, Fabrice; Chapron, Bertrand; Girard-Ardhuin, Fanny; Guitton, Gilles; Mouche, Alexis; Stopa, Justin

    2015-04-01

    Swell evolution from the open ocean into sea ice is poorly understood, in particular the amplitude attenuation expected from scattering and dissipation. New synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data from Sentinel-1 wave mode reveal intriguing patterns of bright oscillating lines shaped like instant noodles. We investigate cases in which the oscillations are in the azimuth direction, around a straight line in the range direction. This observation is interpreted as the distortion by the SAR processing of crests from a first swell, due to the presence of a second swell. As deviations from a straight line should be proportional to the orbital velocity towards the satellite, swell height can be estimated, from 1.5 to 5 m in the present case. This evolution of this 13 s period swell across the ice pack is consistent with an exponential attenuation on a length scale of 200 km.

  12. Validation of quantitative attenuation and backscattering coefficient measurements by optical coherence tomography in the concentration-dependent and multiple scattering regime.

    PubMed

    Almasian, Mitra; Bosschaart, Nienke; van Leeuwen, Ton G; Faber, Dirk J

    2015-12-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has the potential to quantitatively measure optical properties of tissue such as the attenuation coefficient and backscattering coefficient. However, to obtain reliable values for strong scattering tissues, accurate consideration of the effects of multiple scattering and the nonlinear relation between the scattering coefficient and scatterer concentration (concentration-dependent scattering) is required. We present a comprehensive model for the OCT signal in which we quantitatively account for both effects, as well as our system parameters (confocal point spread function and sensitivity roll-off). We verify our model with experimental data from controlled phantoms of monodisperse silica beads (scattering coefficients between 1 and 30  mm(−1) and scattering anisotropy between 0.4 and 0.9). The optical properties of the phantoms are calculated using Mie theory combined with the Percus–Yevick structure factor to account for concentration-dependent scattering. We demonstrate excellent agreement between the OCT attenuation and backscattering coefficient predicted by our model and experimentally derived values. We conclude that this model enables us to accurately model OCT-derived parameters (i.e., attenuation and backscattering coefficients) in the concentration-dependent and multiple scattering regime for spherical monodisperse samples. PMID:26720868

  13. MODIS-based retrieval of suspended sediment concentration and diffuse attenuation coefficient in Chinese estuarine and coastal waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokoletsky, Leonid; Yang, Xianping; Shen, Fang

    2014-11-01

    Radiative transfer modelling in atmosphere, water, and on the air-water surface was used to create an algorithm and computer code for satellite monitoring Chinese estuarine and coastal waters. The atmospheric part of the algorithm is based on the Reference Evaluation of Solar Transmittance (REST) model for calculation of optical properties of the atmosphere from the top of the atmosphere to the target; for modelling optical properties from target towards satellite's sensor, an optical reciprocity principle has been used. An algorithm uses estimates derived from three different sources: 1) the MODIS-based software; 2) radiative transfer equations, and 3) well-known empirical relationships between measured parameters and optical depths and transmittances for such atmospheric components as molecules, aerosols, ozone, nitrogen dioxide, precipitable water vapor and uniformly mixed gases. Using this model allowed us to derive a reliable relationship relating an important parameter, the diffuse-to-global solar incoming irradiance ratio, to the aerosol optical thickness, solar zenith angle and wavelength. The surface and underwater parts of the algorithm contained theoretical and semi-empirical relationships between inherent (such as absorption, scattering and backscattering coefficients) and apparent (remote-sensing reflectance and diffuse attenuation coefficient, Kd) optical properties, and suspended sediment concentration (SSC) measured in the Yangtze River Estuary and its adjacent coastal area. The first false colour maps of SSC and Kd demonstrated a well accordance with the multi-year field observations in the region, and suggest promise for use of this algorithm for the regular monitoring of Chinese and worldwide natural waters.

  14. Transmission, attenuation and reflection of shear waves in the human brain.

    PubMed

    Clayton, Erik H; Genin, Guy M; Bayly, Philip V

    2012-11-01

    Traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) are caused by acceleration of the skull or exposure to explosive blast, but the processes by which mechanical loads lead to neurological injury remain poorly understood. We adapted motion-sensitive magnetic resonance imaging methods to measure the motion of the human brain in vivo as the skull was exposed to harmonic pressure excitation (45, 60 and 80 Hz). We analysed displacement fields to quantify the transmission, attenuation and reflection of distortional (shear) waves as well as viscoelastic material properties. Results suggest that internal membranes, such as the falx cerebri and the tentorium cerebelli, play a key role in reflecting and focusing shear waves within the brain. The skull acts as a low-pass filter over the range of frequencies studied. Transmissibility of pressure waves through the skull decreases and shear wave attenuation increases with increasing frequency. The skull and brain function mechanically as an integral structure that insulates internal anatomic features; these results are valuable for building and validating mathematical models of this complex and important structural system. PMID:22675163

  15. High accuracy experimental determination of copper and zinc mass attenuation coefficients in the 100 eV to 30 keV photon energy range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ménesguen, Y.; Gerlach, M.; Pollakowski, B.; Unterumsberger, R.; Haschke, M.; Beckhoff, B.; Lépy, M.-C.

    2016-02-01

    The knowledge of atomic fundamental parameters such as mass attenuation coefficients with low uncertainties, is of decisive importance in elemental quantification using x-ray fluorescence analysis techniques. Several databases are accessible and frequently used within a large community of users. These compilations are most often in good agreement for photon energies in the hard x-ray ranges. However, they significantly differ for low photon energies and around the absorption edges of any element. In a joint cooperation of the metrology institutes of France and Germany, mass attenuation coefficients of copper and zinc were determined experimentally in the photon energy range from 100 eV to 30 keV by independent approaches using monochromatized synchrotron radiation at SOLEIL (France) and BESSY II (Germany), respectively. The application of high-accuracy experimental techniques resulted in mass attenuation coefficient datasets determined with low uncertainties that are directly compared to existing databases. The novel datasets are expected to enhance the reliability of mass attenuation coefficients.

  16. Meso-scale Computational Investigation of Shock-Wave Attenuation by Trailing Release Wave in Different Grades of Polyurea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grujicic, Mica; Snipes, J. S.; Ramaswami, S.; Yavari, R.; Ramasubramanian, M. K.

    2014-01-01

    Over the past several years, considerable research efforts have been made toward investigating polyurea, a segmented thermoplastic elastomer, and particularly its shock-mitigation capacity, i.e., an ability to attenuate and disperse shock-waves. These research efforts have clearly established that the shock-mitigation capacity of polyurea is closely related to its chemistry, processing route, and the resulting microstructure. Polyurea typically possesses a nano-segregated microstructure consisting of (high glass transition temperature, T g) hydrogen-bonded discrete hard domains and a (low T g) contiguous soft matrix. While the effect of polyurea microstructure on its shock-mitigation capacity is well-established, it is not presently clear what microstructure-dependent phenomena and processes control its shock-mitigation capacity. To help identify these phenomena and processes, meso-scale simulations of the formation of nano-segregated microstructure and its interaction with a leading shock-wave and a trailing release-wave is analyzed in the present work. The results obtained revealed that shock-induced hard-domain densification makes an important contribution to the superior shock-mitigation capacity of polyurea, and that the extent of densification is a sensitive function of the polyurea soft-segment molecular weight. In particular, the ability of release-waves to capture and neutralize shock-waves has been found to depend strongly on the extent of shock-induced hard-domain densification and, thus, on the polyurea soft-segment molecular weight.

  17. Determination of photon attenuation coefficient, porosity and field capacity of soil by gamma-ray transmission for 60, 356 and 662 keV gamma rays.

    PubMed

    Demir, D; Un, A; Ozgül, M; Sahin, Y

    2008-12-01

    Gamma-ray transmission methods have been used accurately for the study of the properties of soil in the agricultural purposes. In this study, photon attenuation coefficient, porosity and field capacity of soil are determined by using gamma-ray transmission method. To this end, the soil sample was collected from Erzurum and a 2 x 2 in NaI (Tl) scintillation detector measured the attenuation of strongly collimated monoenergetic gamma beam through soil sample. The radioactive sources used in the experiment were (241)Am, (133)Ba and (137)Cs. The mass attenuation coefficients of dry soil samples were calculated from the transmission measurements. The soil samples were irrigated by adding known quantities of water and the soil-water properties were examined. It was observed that gamma-ray transmission method for determination of the soil parameters has advantages such as practical, inexpensive, non-destructive and fast analysis. PMID:18554919

  18. Measurement of the x-ray mass attenuation coefficients of gold in the 38-50-keV energy range

    SciTech Connect

    Islam, M T; Rae, N A; Glover, J L; Barnea, Z; de Jonge, M D; Tran, C Q; Wang, J; Chantler, C T

    2010-11-12

    We used synchrotron x rays to measure the x-ray mass attenuation coefficients of gold at nine energies from 38 to 50 keV with accuracies of 0.1%. Our results are much more accurate than previous measurements in this energy range. A comparison of our measurements with calculated mass attenuation coefficients shows that our measurements fall almost exactly midway between the XCOM and FFAST calculated theoretical values, which differ from one another in this energy region by about 4%, even though the range includes no absorption edge. The consistency and accuracy of these measurements open the way to investigations of the x-ray attenuation in the region of the L absorption edge of gold.

  19. Oil droplets transport due to irregular waves: Development of large-scale spreading coefficients.

    PubMed

    Geng, Xiaolong; Boufadel, Michel C; Ozgokmen, Tamay; King, Thomas; Lee, Kenneth; Lu, Youyu; Zhao, Lin

    2016-03-15

    The movement of oil droplets due to waves and buoyancy was investigated by assuming an irregular sea state following a JONSWAP spectrum and four buoyancy values. A technique known as Wheeler stretching was used to model the movement of particles under the moving water surface. In each simulation, 500 particles were released and were tracked for a real time of 4.0 h. A Monte Carlo approach was used to obtain ensemble properties. It was found that small eddy diffusivities that decrease rapidly with depth generated the largest horizontal spreading of the plume. It was also found that large eddy diffusivities that decrease slowly with depth generated the smallest horizontal spreading coefficient of the plume. The increase in buoyancy resulted in a decrease in the horizontal spreading coefficient, which suggests that two-dimensional (horizontal) models that predict the transport of surface oil could be overestimating the spreading of oil. PMID:26795121

  20. Toward improving global attenuation models: Interpreting surface-wave amplitudes with approximate theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalton, C. A.; Hjorleifsdottir, V.; Ekstrom, G.

    2011-12-01

    Surface-wave amplitudes provide the primary constraint on upper-mantle anelastic structure and are also sensitive to small-scale elastic structure through focusing effects. However, the use of amplitudes for seismic imaging presents several challenges. One, amplitudes are affected not only by propagation through anelastic and elastic heterogeneity but also by uncertainty in the source excitation, local receiver structure, and instrument response. Two, accounting for focusing and defocusing effects, which is important if amplitudes are to be used to study anelasticity, depends considerably on the chosen theoretical treatment. Three, multiple scattering of seismic energy by elastic heterogeneity can be mapped into attenuation, especially at high frequencies. With the objective of improving our ability to image mantle seismic attenuation using real amplitude observations, we investigate how approximations in the theoretical treatment of wave excitation and propagation influence the interpretation of amplitudes. We use a spectral-element wave-propagation solver (SPECFEM3D_GLOBE) to generate accurate seismograms for global Earth models containing one-dimensional attenuation structure and three-dimensional variations in seismic velocity. The seismograms are calculated for 42 realistically distributed earthquakes. Fundamental-mode Rayleigh wave amplitudes in the period range 50--200 seconds are measured using the approach of Ekström et al. (1997), for which PREM is the assumed Earth model. We show that using the appropriate local seismic structure at the source and receiver instead of PREM has a non-negligible effect on the amplitudes and improves their interpretation. The amplitudes due to focusing and defocusing effects are predicted for great-circle ray theory, exact ray theory (JWKB theory), and finite-frequency theory. We assess the ability of each theory to predict amplitudes that agree with those measured from the SPECFEM synthetics for an Earth model that

  1. Study of the absorption coefficient of alpha particles to lower hybrid waves in tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jianbing Zhang, Xianmei Yu, Limin Zhao, Xiang

    2014-02-12

    Part of the energy of the Lower Hybrid (LH) waves may be absorbed by the α particles via the so-called perpendicular landau damping mechanism, which depends on various parameters of fusion reactors and the LH waves. In this article, we calculate the absorption coefficient γ{sub α} of LH waves due to α particles. Results show that, the γ{sub α} increases with the parallel refraction index n{sub ∥} while deceases with increasing the frequency of LH waves ω{sub LH} over a wide range. Higher background plasma temperature and toroidal magnetic field will increase the absorption, and there is a peak value of γ{sub α} when n{sub e}≈8×10{sup 19}m{sup −3} for ITER-like scenario. The thermal corrections to the cold plasma dispersion relation will change the damping rate to a certain extent under some specific conditions. We have also evaluated the fraction of LH power absorbed by the alpha particles, η ≈ 0.47% and 4.1% for an LH frequency of 5 GHz and 3.7 GHz respectively for ITER-like scenario. This work gives the effective reference for the choice of parameters of future fusion reactors.

  2. S-wave attenuation structure beneath the northern Izu-Bonin arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Tsutomu; Obana, Koichiro; Kodaira, Shuichi

    2016-04-01

    To understand temperature structure or magma distribution in the crust and uppermost mantle, it is essential to know their attenuation structure. This study estimated the 3-D S-wave attenuation structure in the crust and uppermost mantle at the northern Izu-Bonin arc, taking into account the apparent attenuation due to multiple forward scattering. In the uppermost mantle, two areas of high seismic attenuation (high Q -1) imaged beneath the volcanic front were mostly colocated with low-velocity anomalies. This coincidence suggests that these high- Q -1 areas in low-velocity zones are the most likely candidates for high-temperature regions beneath volcanoes. The distribution of random inhomogeneities indicated the presence of three anomalies beneath the volcanic front: Two were in high- Q -1 areas but the third was in a moderate- Q -1 area, indicating a low correlation between random inhomogeneities and Q -1. All three anomalies of random inhomogeneities were rich in short-wavelength spectra. The most probable interpretation of such spectra is the presence of volcanic rock, which would be related to accumulated magma intrusion during episodes of volcanic activity. Therefore, the different distributions of Q -1 and random inhomogeneities imply that the positions of hot regions in the uppermost mantle beneath this arc have changed temporally; therefore, they may provide important constraints on the evolutionary processes of arc crust and volcanoes.

  3. Estimation of the intrinsic absorption and scattering attenuation in Northeastern Venezuela (Southeastern Caribbean) using coda waves

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ugalde, A.; Pujades, L.G.; Canas, J.A.; Villasenor, A.

    1998-01-01

    Northeastern Venezuela has been studied in terms of coda wave attenuation using seismograms from local earthquakes recorded by a temporary short-period seismic network. The studied area has been separated into two subregions in order to investigate lateral variations in the attenuation parameters. Coda-Q-1 (Q(c)-1) has been obtained using the single-scattering theory. The contribution of the intrinsic absorption (Q(i)-1) and scattering (Q(s)-1) to total attenuation (Q(t)-1) has been estimated by means of a multiple lapse time window method, based on the hypothesis of multiple isotropic scattering with uniform distribution of scatterers. Results show significant spatial variations of attenuation: the estimates for intermediate depth events and for shallow events present major differences. This fact may be related to different tectonic characteristics that may be due to the presence of the Lesser Antilles subduction zone, because the intermediate depth seismic zone may be coincident with the southern continuation of the subducting slab under the arc.

  4. Wave-speed dispersion associated with an attenuation obeying a frequency power law.

    PubMed

    Buckingham, Michael J

    2015-11-01

    An attenuation scaling as a power of frequency, |ω|(β), over an infinite bandwidth is neither analytic nor square-integrable, thus calling into question the application of the Kramers-Krönig dispersion relations for determining the frequency dependence of the associated phase speed. In this paper, three different approaches are developed, all of which return the dispersion formula for the wavenumber, K(ω). The first analysis relies on the properties of generalized functions and the causality requirement that the impulse response, k(t), the inverse Fourier transform of -iK(ω), must vanish for t < 0. Second, a wave equation is introduced that yields the phase-speed dispersion associated with a frequency-power-law attenuation. Finally, it is shown that, with minor modification, the Kramers-Krönig dispersion relations with no subtractions (the Plemelj formulas) do in fact hold for an attenuation scaling as |ω|(β), yielding the same dispersion formula as the other two derivations. From this dispersion formula, admissible values of the exponent β are established. Physically, the inadmissible values of β, which include all the integers, correspond to attenuation-dispersion pairs whose Fourier components cannot combine in such a way as to make the impulse response, k(t), vanish for t < 0. There is no upper or lower limit on the value that β may take. PMID:26627763

  5. Measurement of the x-ray mass attenuation coefficient and the imaginary part of the form factor of silicon using synchrotron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, C. Q.; Chantler, C. T.; Barnea, Z.; Paterson, D.; Cookson, D. J.

    2003-04-01

    We used the x-ray extended-range technique to measure the x-ray mass attenuation coefficients of silicon with an accuracy between 0.27% and 0.5% in the 5 keV-20 keV energy range. Subtraction of the x-ray scattering contribution enabled us to derive the corresponding x-ray photoelectric absorption coefficients and determine the absolute value of the imaginary part of the atomic form factor of silicon. Discrepancies between the experimental values of the mass attenuation coefficients and theoretically calculated values are discussed. New approaches to the theoretical calculation will be required to match the precision and accuracy of the experimental results.

  6. Elastic wave propagation and attenuation in a double-porosity dual-permeability medium

    SciTech Connect

    Berryman, J.G.; Wang, H.F.

    1998-10-12

    To account for large-volume low-permeability storage porosity and low-volume high-permeability fracture/crack porosity in oil and gas reservoirs, phenomenological equations for the poroelastic behavior of a double porosity medium have been formulated and the coefficients in these linear equations identified. The generalization from a single porosity model increases the number of independent inertial coefficients from three to six, the number of independent drag coefficients from three to six, and the number of independent stress-strain coefficients from three to six for an isotropic applied stress and assumed isotropy of the medium. The analysis leading to physical interpretations of the inertial and drag coefficients is relatively straightforward, whereas that for the stress-strain coefficients is more tedious. In a quasistatic analysis, the physical interpretations are based upon considerations of extremes in both spatial and temporal scales. The limit of very short times is the one most relevant for wave propagation, and in this case both matrix porosity and fractures are expected to behave in an undrained fashion, although our analysis makes no assumptions in this regard. For the very long times more relevant for reservoir drawdown, the double porosity medium behaves as an equivalent single porosity medium. At the macroscopic spatial level, the pertinent parameters (such as the total compressibility) may be determined by appropriate field tests. At the mesoscopic scale pertinent parameters of the rock matrix can be determined directly through laboratory measurements on core, and the compressibility can be measured for a single fracture. We show explicitly how to generalize the quasistatic results to incorporate wave propagation effects and how effects that are usually attributed to squirt flow under partially saturated conditions can be explained alternatively in terms of the double-porosity model. The result is therefore a theory that generalizes, but is

  7. A Split of Direction of Propagation and Attenuation of P Waves in the Po Valley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daminelli, R.; Tento, A.; Marcellini, A.

    2013-12-01

    On July 17, 2011 a ML 4.8 earthquake occurred in the PO valley at a 48 km epicentral distance from a seismic station located at Palazzo Te (Mantova). The station is situated on deep quaternary sediments: the uppermost layers are mainly composed of clay and silty clay with interbedded sands; the Robertson index is 1.4wave particle motion, that appears rather difficult to explain if we assume the homogeneity of the P waves (that means attenuation is scalar). Note that the degree of nonlinearity is very low given that the maximum strain can be roughly estimated as 10-5 on the basis of maximum ground velocity of the P wave train considered and the Vp. On the contrary we show that P wave particle motion can be fully (and easily) described by a Homogeneous Isotropic Linear Viscoelastic model (HILV). HILV, as in the 2009 Borcherdt formulation adopted here, allows two different directions of propagation and attenuation; in other words attenuation becomes a vector that is not necessarily parallel to the propagation vector. The results evidence that the incidence angle and the inhomogeneity angle (it is the angle between propagation and attenuation vectors and it is closely related to Q factor) are in good agreement with the geological conditions of the site. Finally, we observed that these results are very similar to the ones obtained when we analyzed two explosions recorded by a seismic station in Milano, also situated in the Po valley at some 140 km from Mantova (Marcellini & Tento, 2011). Borcherdt, R.D. (2009) 'Viscoelastic Waves in Layered Media', Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, United Kingdom, 305 pp. Marcellini, A. and A. Tento (2011) ' Explosive Sources Prove the Validity of Homogeneous Isotropic Linear Viscoelastic Models', BSSA, Vol. 101, No. 4, pp. 1576-1583.

  8. Seismic attenuation: effects of interfacial impedance on wave-induced pressure diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Qiaomu; Müller, Tobias M.; Rubino, J. Germán

    2014-12-01

    Seismic attenuation and dispersion in layered sedimentary structures are often interpreted in terms of the classical White model for wave-induced pressure diffusion across the layers. However, this interlayer flow is severely dependent on the properties of the interface separating two layers. This interface behaviour can be described by a pressure jump boundary condition involving a non-vanishing interfacial impedance. In this paper, we incorporate the interfacial impedance into the White model by solving a boundary value problem in the framework of quasi-static poroelasticity. We show that the White model predictions for attenuation and dispersion substantially change. These changes can be attributed to petrophysically plausible scenarios such as imperfect hydraulic contacts or the presence of capillarity.

  9. Technological cost-reduction pathways for attenuator wave energy converters in the marine hydrokinetic environment.

    SciTech Connect

    Bull, Diana L; Ochs, Margaret Ellen

    2013-09-01

    This report considers and prioritizes the primary potential technical costreduction pathways for offshore wave activated body attenuators designed for ocean resources. This report focuses on technical research and development costreduction pathways related to the device technology rather than environmental monitoring or permitting opportunities. Three sources of information were used to understand current cost drivers and develop a prioritized list of potential costreduction pathways: a literature review of technical work related to attenuators, a reference device compiled from literature sources, and a webinar with each of three industry device developers. Data from these information sources were aggregated and prioritized with respect to the potential impact on the lifetime levelized cost of energy, the potential for progress, the potential for success, and the confidence in success. Results indicate the five most promising costreduction pathways include advanced controls, an optimized structural design, improved power conversion, planned maintenance scheduling, and an optimized device profile.

  10. Apparent Attenuation and Dispersion Arising in Seismic Body-Wave Velocity Retrieval

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wirgin, Armand

    2016-04-01

    The fact that seismologists often make measurements, using natural seismic solicitations, of properties of the Earth on rather large scales (laterally and in terms of depth) has led to interrogations as to whether attenuation of body waves is dispersive and even significant. The present study, whose aim is to clarify these complicated issues, via a controlled thought measurement, concerns the retrieval of a single, real body wave velocity of a simple geophysical configuration (involving two homogeneous, isotropic, non-dissipative media, one occupying the layer, the other the substratum), from its simulated response to pulsed plane wave probe radiation. This inverse problem is solved, at all frequencies within the bandwidth of the pulse. Due to discordance between the models associated with the assumed and trial responses, the imaginary part of the retrieved velocity turns out to be non-nil even when both the layer and substratum are non-lossy, and, in fact, to be all the greater, the larger is the discordance. The reason for this cannot be due to intrinsic attenuation, scattering, or geometrical spreading since these phenomena are absent in the chosen thought experiment, but rather to uncertainty in the measurement model.

  11. Apparent Attenuation and Dispersion Arising in Seismic Body-Wave Velocity Retrieval

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wirgin, Armand

    2016-07-01

    The fact that seismologists often make measurements, using natural seismic solicitations, of properties of the Earth on rather large scales (laterally and in terms of depth) has led to interrogations as to whether attenuation of body waves is dispersive and even significant. The present study, whose aim is to clarify these complicated issues, via a controlled thought measurement, concerns the retrieval of a single, real body wave velocity of a simple geophysical configuration (involving two homogeneous, isotropic, non-dissipative media, one occupying the layer, the other the substratum), from its simulated response to pulsed plane wave probe radiation. This inverse problem is solved, at all frequencies within the bandwidth of the pulse. Due to discordance between the models associated with the assumed and trial responses, the imaginary part of the retrieved velocity turns out to be non-nil even when both the layer and substratum are non-lossy, and, in fact, to be all the greater, the larger is the discordance. The reason for this cannot be due to intrinsic attenuation, scattering, or geometrical spreading since these phenomena are absent in the chosen thought experiment, but rather to uncertainty in the measurement model.

  12. Spatial variation of Lg-wave attenuation in the Iberian Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noriega, Raquel; Ugalde, Arantza; Villaseñor, Antonio; José Jurado, María

    2014-05-01

    Within a global context, the Iberian Peninsula is a region where low to moderate (Mw < 5.5) earthquakes occur, most of them at shallow depths (h < 40 km). Seismicity concentrates mainly around the Pyrenean Range, the northwestern part of the peninsula, and the southern deformation zone that includes the Betics, the Alborán Sea and the Gulf of Cádiz. In recent years, considerable improvements in seismic data quality and geographic coverage have been made by the deployment of new permanent and portable broadband seismic stations in the Iberian Peninsula. The dense accumulation of seismic data has allowed us to investigate lateral variation of crustal seismic attenuation to develop the first regional 2D Lg-wave attenuation model for the entire Iberian Peninsula and its frequency dependence. Seismic data used consist of 71 events with magnitudes 3 ≤ mbLg ≤ 5.4 focal depths less than 30 km and epicentral distances from 100 to 1000 km which were recorded by 343 seismic stations between January 2008 and October 2013. To avoid confusion with fundamental-mode Love-wave energy on the transverse components, we only analyzed vertical component recordings. Among all the methods proposed to measure Lg attenuation, we considered the reliable Two-Station Method that allows removing the common source term by taking the ratio of Lg amplitudes recorded at two different stations along the same great-circle path from the same event. It requires, however, strict source-station configuration and dense event and station coverage. The spectral ratios collected over high-quality interstation paths were used to determine 1 Hz Lg Q (Q0) and its frequency dependence η. Then, the lateral variations of the attenuation parameters were mapped using inversion. Lg-wave propagation was found to be inefficient or blocked for most of the paths crossing the Mediterranean Sea, the western Alborán Sea and the Strait of Gibraltar. Our results reflect large variations in Q0 values across the Iberian

  13. Lapse time dependence of coda wave attenuation in Central West Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akyol, Nihal

    2015-09-01

    The attenuation of coda waves has been inferred for Central West Turkey, which is characterized by a very complex tectonic evolution. The selected dataset is composed of 440 waveforms from 228 local earthquakes with a magnitude range of 2.9-4.9. The coda quality factor (Qc) was estimated for five central frequencies (fc = 1.5, 3, 5, 7, 10 Hz) and eight lapse times (tL, ranging from 25 to 60 s), based on the assumption of single isotropic scattering model. Estimated Qc values were strongly dependent on frequency and lapse time. The frequency dependence of Qc values for each lapse time was inferred from Qc(f) = Q0fn relationships. Q0 values change between 32.7 and 82.1, while n values changes between 0.91 and 0.79 for the lapse times of 25 and 60 s, respectively. The obtained low Q0 values show that the Central West Turkey region is characterized by a high seismic attenuation, in general. The whole region was divided into four subregions to examine spatial differences of attenuation characteristics. Obtained 1/Q0 and n values versus the lapse time for each subregion implies the tectonic complexity of the region. Lapse time dependencies of attenuation and n values were also examined for subdatasets from two different ranges of event depth (h < 10 km and h ≥ 10 km) and distance (r < 40 km and r ≥ 40 km). High attenuation and its high frequency dependence for long distances manifest the elevation of isotherms and increasing heterogeneity with depth. This could be associated with the extensional intra-continental plate setting, forming regional tectonics in the back-arc area.

  14. Development of attenuation and diffraction corrections for linear and nonlinear Rayleigh surface waves radiating from a uniform line source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Hyunjo; Zhang, Shuzeng; Cho, Sungjong; Li, Xiongbing

    2016-04-01

    In recent studies with nonlinear Rayleigh surface waves, harmonic generation measurements have been successfully employed to characterize material damage and microstructural changes, and found to be sensitive to early stages of damage process. A nonlinearity parameter of Rayleigh surface waves was derived and frequently measured to quantify the level of damage. The accurate measurement of the nonlinearity parameter generally requires making corrections for beam diffraction and medium attenuation. These effects are not generally known for nonlinear Rayleigh waves, and therefore not properly considered in most of previous studies. In this paper, the nonlinearity parameter for a Rayleigh surface wave is defined from the plane wave displacement solutions. We explicitly define the attenuation and diffraction corrections for fundamental and second harmonic Rayleigh wave beams radiated from a uniform line source. Attenuation corrections are obtained from the quasilinear theory of plane Rayleigh wave equations. To obtain closed-form expressions for diffraction corrections, multi-Gaussian beam (MGB) models are employed to represent the integral solutions derived from the quasilinear theory of the full two-dimensional wave equation without parabolic approximation. Diffraction corrections are presented for a couple of transmitter-receiver geometries, and the effects of making attenuation and diffraction corrections are examined through the simulation of nonlinearity parameter determination in a solid sample.

  15. Ultrasonic viscosity measurement using the shear-wave reflection coefficient with a novel signal processing technique.

    PubMed

    Franco, Ediguer E; Adamowski, Julio C; Buiochi, Flávio

    2010-05-01

    Real-time viscosity measurement remains a necessity for highly automated industry. To resolve this problem, many studies have been carried out using an ultrasonic shear wave reflectance method. This method is based on the determination of the complex reflection coefficient's magnitude and phase at the solid-liquid interface. Although magnitude is a stable quantity and its measurement is relatively simple and precise, phase measurement is a difficult task because of strong temperature dependence. A simplified method that uses only the magnitude of the reflection coefficient and that is valid under the Newtonian regimen has been proposed by some authors, but the obtained viscosity values do not match conventional viscometry measurements. In this work, a mode conversion measurement cell was used to measure glycerin viscosity as a function of temperature (15 to 25 degrees C) and corn syrup-water mixtures as a function of concentration (70 to 100 wt% of corn syrup). Tests were carried out at 1 MHz. A novel signal processing technique that calculates the reflection coefficient magnitude in a frequency band, instead of a single frequency, was studied. The effects of the bandwidth on magnitude and viscosity were analyzed and the results were compared with the values predicted by the Newtonian liquid model. The frequency band technique improved the magnitude results. The obtained viscosity values came close to those measured by the rotational viscometer with percentage errors up to 14%, whereas errors up to 96% were found for the single frequency method. PMID:20442023

  16. Attenuation of High Frequency P and S Waves in the Gujarat Region, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chopra, Sumer; Kumar, Dinesh; Rastogi, B. K.

    2011-05-01

    The local earthquake waveforms recorded on broadband seismograph network of Institute of Seismological Research in Gujarat, India have been analyzed to understand the attenuation of high frequency (2-25 Hz) P and S waves in the region. The frequency dependent relationships for quality factors for P ( Q P) and S ( Q S) waves have been obtained using the spectral ratio method for three regions namely, Kachchh, Saurashtra and Mainland Gujarat. The earthquakes recorded at nine stations of Kachchh, five stations of Saurashtra and one station in mainland Gujarat have been used for this analysis. The estimated relations for average Q P and Q S are: Q P = (105 ± 2) f 0.82 ± 0.01, Q S = (74 ± 2) f 1.06 ± 0.01 for Kachchh region; Q P = (148 ± 2) f 0.92 ± 0.01, Q S = (149 ± 14) f 1.43 ± 0.05 for Saurashtra region and Q P = (163 ± 7) f 0.77 ± 0.03, Q S = (118 ± 34) f 0.65 ± 0.14 for mainland Gujarat region. The low Q (<200) and high exponent of f (>0.5) as obtained from present analysis indicate the predominant seismic activities in the region. The lowest Q values obtained for the Kachchh region implies that the area is relatively more attenuative and heterogeneous than other two regions. A comparison between Q S estimated in this study and coda Q ( Qc) previously reported by others for Kachchh region shows that Q C > Q S for the frequency range of interest showing the enrichment of coda waves and the importance of scattering attenuation to the attenuation of S waves in the Kachchh region infested with faults and fractures. The Q S/ Q P ratio is found to be less than 1 for Kachchh and Mainland Gujarat regions and close to unity for Saurashtra region. This reflects the difference in the geological composition of rocks in the regions. The frequency dependent relations developed in this study could be used for the estimation of earthquake source parameters as well as for simulating the strong earthquake ground motions in the region.

  17. Trapped Field Attenuation Characteristics of HTS Bulk Magnet Exposed to External Traveling-Wave Magnetic Field in an HTSLSM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Jianxun; Zheng, Luhai

    Traveling-wave magnetic field generated by a linear motor is a typical AC time-varying field. In order to identify the trapped magnetic flux attenuation characteristics of the high temperature superconducting (HTS) bulk magnet exposed to the external traveling-wave field generated by the primary of a developed HTS linear synchronous motor (HTSLSM), relevant experiments have been carried out through a built measurement system. As results, the relationships between the trapped magnetic flux attenuation of the HTS bulk magnet and the amplitude, frequency and direction of the external traveling-wave magnetic field are experimentally obtained to allow the HTSLSM characteristics to be practically verified.

  18. Phase velocities and attenuations of shear, Lamb, and Rayleigh waves in plate-like tissues submerged in a fluid (L).

    PubMed

    Nenadic, Ivan Z; Urban, Matthew W; Bernal, Miguel; Greenleaf, James F

    2011-12-01

    In the past several decades, the fields of ultrasound and magnetic resonance elastography have shown promising results in noninvasive estimates of mechanical properties of soft tissues. These techniques often rely on measuring shear wave velocity due to an external or internal source of force and relating the velocity to viscoelasticity of the tissue. The mathematical relationship between the measured velocity and material properties of the myocardial wall, arteries, and other organs with non-negligible boundary conditions is often complicated and computationally expensive. A simple relationship between the Lamb-Rayleigh dispersion and the shear wave dispersion is derived for both the velocity and attenuation. The relationship shows that the shear wave velocity is around 20% higher than the Lamb-Rayleigh velocity and that the shear wave attenuation is about 20% lower than the Lamb-Rayleigh attenuation. Results of numerical simulations in the frequency range 0-500 Hz are presented. PMID:22225009

  19. Velocity and attenuation of scalar and elastic waves in random media: a spectral function approach.

    PubMed

    Calvet, Marie; Margerin, Ludovic

    2012-03-01

    This paper investigates the scattering of scalar and elastic waves in two-phase materials and single-mineral-cubic, hexagonal, orthorhombic-polycrystalline aggregates with randomly oriented grains. Based on the Dyson equation for the mean field, explicit expressions for the imaginary part of Green's function in the frequency-wavenumber domain (ω, p), also known as the spectral function, are derived. This approach allows the identification of propagating modes with their relative contribution, and the computation of both attenuation and phase velocity for each mode. The results should be valid from the Rayleigh (low-frequency) to the geometrical optics (high-frequency) regime. Comparisons with other approaches are presented for both scalar and elastic waves. PMID:22423683

  20. Coda wave attenuation parallel and perpendicular to the Mexican Pacific coast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novelo-Casanova, D. A.; Valdés-González, C.

    2000-10-01

    We calculated the quality factor, Qc, at frequencies from 6 to 24 Hz using coda waves of 97 aftershocks of the Petatlan, Mexico, earthquake (March 14, 1979; MS=7.6). The data were recorded parallel (between Acapulco and Playa Azul) and perpendicular (between Petatlan and Mexico City) to the coast. The results are the following: at 12 and 24 Hz there is no significant difference in the attenuation ( Qc-1) along the two paths; at 6 Hz, Qc-1 has a large scatter in both directions. This observation indicates strong site effects at this frequency; average Qc-1 is slightly higher between Petatlan-Acapulco (toward SE) than between Petatlan-Playa Azul (toward NW); and at high frequencies, Qc-1 remains essentially constant perpendicular to the coast. These results show that the large seismic wave amplifications in Mexico City are caused by shallow site effects.

  1. Attenuation of Higher Order Circumferential Thermoacoustic Waves in Viscous Fluid Lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, P. N.; Scarton, H. A.

    1996-06-01

    The acoustic waves propagation in viscous water, glycerin and air contained in a rigid wall, thermally insulated, infinite long, circular tube are studied using the exact three-dimensional thermal-fluid coupled equations for the vibrations in the n= 0, 1 circumferential modes. The first three axially symmetric modes at n= 0 and the first three non-axially symmetric modes at n= 1 are presented. The corresponding two-dimensional mode shapes are plotted so that the wave vibrations can be identified. It is found that the dispersion spectra, mode shapes and phase velocity dispersion plots of the three fluid mediums are very close. But the attenuation rates of glycerin and air are about 37 and 9 times higher than water, respectively.

  2. Differential shear wave attenuation and its lateral variation in the North Atlantic region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheehan, Anne F.; Solomon, Sean C.

    1992-01-01

    A digital data base of over 150 seismograms and a spectral radio technique are used to measure SS-S differential attenuation in the North Atlantic region. Differential attenuation is positively correlated with SS-S travel time residual, and both differential attentuation and travel time residual decrease with increasing seafloor age. Models are developed for seismic Q in which lateral variations include contributions from the asthenospheric low-Q zone as well as from lithospheric cooling. The Q models obtained under this assumption are in good agreement with those obtained from surface wave studies and are therefore preferred over those models with lateral variations confined to the upper 125 km. Systematic long-wavelength (1000-7000 km) variations in differential attenuation, corrected for seafloor age, are evident along the axis of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. These variations can be qualitatively correlated with long-wavelength variations in SS-S differential travel time residuals and are attributed to along-axis differences in upper mantle temperature.

  3. Crosswell seismic studies in gas hydrate-bearing sediments: P wave velocity and attenuation tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, K.; Haberland, Ch.; Pratt, R. G.; Ryberg, T.; Weber, M. H.; Mallik Working Group

    2003-04-01

    We present crosswell seismic data from the Mallik 2002 Production Research Well Program, an international research project on Gas Hydrates in the Northwest Territories of Canada. The program participants include 8 partners; The Geological Survey of Canada (GSC), The Japan National Oil Corporation (JNOC), GeoForschungsZentrum Potsdam (GFZ), United States Geological Survey (USGS), United States Department of the Energy (USDOE), India Ministry of Petroleum and Natural Gas (MOPNG)/Gas Authority of India (GAIL) and the Chevron-BP-Burlington joint venture group. The crosswell seismic measurements were carried out by making use of two 1160 m deep observation wells (Mallik 3L-38 and 4L-38) both 45 m from and co-planar with the 1188 m deep production research well (5L-38). A high power piezo-ceramic source was used to generate sweeped signals with frequencies between 100 and 2000 Hz recorded with arrays of 8 hydrophones per depth level. A depth range between 800 and 1150 m was covered, with shot and receiver spacings of 0.75 m. High quality data could be collected during the survey which allow for application of a wide range of crosswell seismic methods. The initial data analysis included suppression of tube wave energy and picking of first arrivals. A damped least-squares algorithm was used to derive P-wave velocities from the travel time data. Next, t* values were derived from the decay of the amplitude spectra, which served as input parameters for a damped least-squares attenuation tomography. The initial results of the P-wave velocity and attenuation tomography reveal significant features reflecting the stratigraphic environment and allow for detection and eventually quantification of gas hydrate bearing sediments. A prominent correlation between P velocity and attenuation was found for the gas hydrate layers. This contradicts to the apparently more meaningful inverse correlation as it was determined for the gas hydrates at the Blake Ridge but supports the results from

  4. Stable harmonic multiplying gyrotron traveling-wave amplifier with distributed wall losses and attenuating severs

    SciTech Connect

    Yeh, Y. S.; Cheng, J. H.; Chen, L. K.; Hung, C. W.; Lo, C. Y.; Liao, C. W.

    2008-02-15

    Harmonic multiplying gyrotron traveling-wave amplifiers (gyro-TWTs) provide magnetic field reduction and frequency multiplication. However, spurious oscillations may reduce the amplification of the gyro-TWT. Most distributed-loss structures are stabilized in gyro-TWTs that operate at low beam currents. Attenuating severs are added to the interaction circuit of a distributed-loss gyro-TWT to prevent high beam currents that result in mode competition. This study proposes a Ka-band harmonic multiplying gyro-TWT, using distributed wall losses and attenuating severs, to improve the stability of the amplification and the performance of the amplifier. Simulation results reveal that the absolute instabilities are effectively suppressed by wall losses of the lossy and severed sections, especially in the low-k{sub z} and high-order modes. Meanwhile, the severed section, dividing an interaction circuit into several short sections, reduces the effective interaction lengths of the absolute instabilities. The stable harmonic multiplying gyro-TWT is predicted to yield a peak output power of 230 kW at 33.65 GHz with an efficiency of 30%, a saturated gain of 40 dB, and a 3 dB bandwidth of 0.8 GHz for a 60 kV, 13 A electron beam with an axial velocity spread of {delta}v{sub z}/v{sub z}=8%. The power/gain scaling and phase relation between the drive and the output waves are elucidated.

  5. Laser-generated shock wave attenuation aimed at microscale pyrotechnic device design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Hyeonju; Yoh, Jack J.

    2016-05-01

    To meet the rising demand for miniaturizing the pyrotechnic device that consists of donor/acceptor pair separated by a bulkhead or a thin gap, the shock initiation sensitivity in the microscale gap test configuration is investigated. For understanding the shock attenuation within a gap sample (304 stainless steel) thickness of 10˜800 μm, the laser-generated shock wave in water confinement is adopted. The shock properties are obtained from the free surface velocity by making use of a velocity interferometer system for any reflector (VISAR). Analytical models for plasma generation in a confined geometry and for evolution and decay of shock waves during the propagation are considered. The shape and amplitude of the laser-driven initial pressure load and its attenuation pattern in the gap are effectively controlled for targeting the microscale propagation distance and subsequent triggering pressure for the acceptor charge. The reported results are important in the precise controlling of the shock strength during the laser initiation of microscale pyrotechnic devices.

  6. Seismic tomography of compressional wave attenuation structure for Kı¯lauea Volcano, Hawai`i

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Guoqing; Shearer, Peter M.; Amelung, Falk; Okubo, Paul G.

    2015-04-01

    We present a frequency-independent three-dimensional (3-D) compressional wave attenuation model (indicated by the reciprocal of quality factor Qp) for Kı¯lauea Volcano in Hawai`i. We apply the simul2000 tomographic algorithm to the attenuation operator t* values for the inversion of Qp perturbations through a recent 3-D seismic velocity model and earthquake location catalog. The t* values are measured from amplitude spectra of 26708 P wave arrivals of 1036 events recorded by 61 seismic stations at the Hawaiian Volcanology Observatory. The 3-D Qp model has a uniform horizontal grid spacing of 3 km, and the vertical node intervals range between 2 and 10 km down to 35 km depth. In general, the resolved Qp values increase with depth, and there is a correlation between seismic activity and low-Qp values. The area beneath the summit caldera is dominated by low-Qp anomalies throughout the entire resolved depth range. The Southwest Rift Zone and the East Rift Zone exhibit very high Qp values at about 9 km depth, whereas the shallow depths are characterized with low-Qp anomalies comparable with those in the summit area. The seismic zones and fault systems generally display relatively high Qp values relative to the summit. The newly developed Qp model provides an important complement to the existing velocity models for exploring the magmatic system and evaluating and interpreting intrinsic physical properties of the rocks in the study area.

  7. Finite Difference Numerical Modeling of Gravito-Acoustic Wave Propagation in a Windy and Attenuating Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brissaud, Q.; Garcia, R.; Martin, R.; Komatitsch, D.

    2015-12-01

    The acoustic and gravity waves propagating in the planetary atmospheres have been studied intensively as markers of specific phenomena (tectonic events, explosions) or as contributors to the atmosphere dynamics. To get a better understanding of the physic behind these dynamic processes, both acoustic and gravity waves propagation should be modeled in an attenuating and windy 3D atmosphere from the ground to the upper thermosphere. Thus, In order to provide an efficient numerical tool at the regional or the global scale a high order finite difference time domain (FDTD) approach is proposed that relies on the linearized compressible Navier-Stokes equations (Landau 1959) with non constant physical parameters (density, viscosities and speed of sound) and background velocities (wind). One significant benefit from this code is its versatility. Indeed, it handles both acoustic and gravity waves in the same simulation that enables one to observe correlations between the two. Simulations will also be performed on 2D/3D realistic cases such as tsunamis in a full MSISE-00 atmosphere and gravity-wave generation through atmospheric explosions. Computations are validated by comparison to well-known analytical solutions based on dispersion relations in specific benchmark cases (atmospheric explosion and bottom displacement forcing).

  8. Finite-difference numerical modelling of gravitoacoustic wave propagation in a windy and attenuating atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brissaud, Quentin; Martin, Roland; Garcia, Raphaël F.; Komatitsch, Dimitri

    2016-07-01

    Acoustic and gravity waves propagating in planetary atmospheres have been studied intensively as markers of specific phenomena such as tectonic events or explosions or as contributors to atmosphere dynamics. To get a better understanding of the physics behind these dynamic processes, both acoustic and gravity waves propagation should be modelled in a 3-D attenuating and windy atmosphere extending from the ground to the upper thermosphere. Thus, in order to provide an efficient numerical tool at the regional or global scale, we introduce a finite difference in the time domain (FDTD) approach that relies on the linearized compressible Navier-Stokes equations with a background flow (wind). One significant benefit of such a method is its versatility because it handles both acoustic and gravity waves in the same simulation, which enables one to observe interactions between them. Simulations can be performed for 2-D or 3-D realistic cases such as tsunamis in a full MSISE-00 atmosphere or gravity-wave generation by atmospheric explosions. We validate the computations by comparing them to analytical solutions based on dispersion relations in specific benchmark cases: an atmospheric explosion, and a ground displacement forcing.

  9. Measurement of attenuation coefficients for bone, muscle, fat and water at 140, 364 and 662 keV γ-ray energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akar, A.; Baltaş, H.; Çevik, U.; Korkmaz, F.; Okumuşoğlu, N. T.

    2006-11-01

    The half-value thicknesses, linear and mass attenuation coefficients of biological samples such as bone, muscle, fat and water have been measured at 140, 364 and 662 keV γ-ray energies by using the ATOMLABTM-930 medical spectrometer. The γ-rays were obtained from 99mTc, 131I and 137Cs γ-ray point sources. Also theoretical calculations have been performed in order to obtain the half-value thicknesses and, mass and linear attenuation coefficients at photon energies 0.001 keV 20 MeV for bone, muscle and water samples. The calculated value and the experimental results of this work and the other results in literature are found to be in good agreement.

  10. Mass attenuation coefficient of binderless, pre-treated and tannin-based Rhizophora spp. particleboards using 16.59 - 25.26 keV photon energy range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohd Yusof, Mohd Fahmi; Hamid, Puteri Nor Khatijah Abdul; Bauk, Sabar; Hashim, Rokiah; Tajuddin, Abdul Aziz

    2015-04-01

    The Rhizophora spp. particleboards were fabricated using ≤ 104 µm particle size at three different fabrication methods; binderless, steam pre-treated and tannin-added. The mass attenuation coefficient of Rhizophora spp. particleboards were measured using x-ray fluorescent (XRF) photon from niobium, molybdenum, palladium, silver and tin metal plates that provided photon energy between 16.59 to 25.26 keV. The results were compared to theoretical values for water calculated using photon cross-section database (XCOM).The results showed that all Rhizophora spp. particleboards having mass attenuation coefficient close to calculated XCOM for water. Tannin-added Rizophora spp. particleboard was nearest to calculated XCOM for water with χ2 value of 13.008 followed by binderless Rizophora spp. (25.859) and pre-treated Rizophora spp. (91.941).

  11. Determination of mass attenuation coefficient by numerical absorption calibration with Monte-Carlo simulations at 59.54 keV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degrelle, D.; Mavon, C.; Groetz, J.-E.

    2016-04-01

    This study presents a numerical method in order to determine the mass attenuation coefficient of a sample with an unknown chemical composition at low energy. It is compared with two experimental methods: a graphic method and a transmission method. The method proposes to realise a numerical absorption calibration curve to process experimental results. Demineralised water with known mass attenuation coefficient (0.2066cm2g-1 at 59.54 keV) is chosen to confirm the method. 0.1964 ± 0.0350cm2g-1 is the average value determined by the numerical method, that is to say less than 5% relative deviation compared to more than 47% for the experimental methods.

  12. Ultrasonic attenuation in pearlitic steel.

    PubMed

    Du, Hualong; Turner, Joseph A

    2014-03-01

    Expressions for the attenuation coefficients of longitudinal and transverse ultrasonic waves are developed for steel with pearlitic microstructure. This type of lamellar duplex microstructure influences attenuation because of the lamellar spacing. In addition, longitudinal attenuation measurements were conducted using an unfocused transducer with 10 MHz central frequency on the cross section of a quenched railroad wheel sample. The dependence of longitudinal attenuation on the pearlite microstructure is observed from the changes of longitudinal attenuation from the quenched tread surface to deeper locations. The results show that the attenuation value is lowest and relatively constant within the quench depth, then increases linearly. The experimental results demonstrate a reasonable agreement with results from the theoretical model. Ultrasonic attenuation provides an important non-destructive method to evaluate duplex microstructure within grains which can be implemented for quality control in conjunction with other manufacturing processes. PMID:24268679

  13. Laboratory measurement of elastic-wave velocity, associated dispersion, attenuation and particle resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molyneux, Joseph Benedict

    Laboratory velocity measurements are an integral component of solid earth seismic investigations. Typically, ultrasonic measurements from centimeter scale plug samples are used to model large sections of the crust, core and mantle. By using the laboratory determined velocities, the seismic arrival time can more accurately calibrate spatial physical properties of the solid-earth. A semi-automated picking procedure is presented which determines the velocity measured from recorded ultrasonic pulses propagated through laboratory samples. This procedure is quicker and more consistent than the standard hand picking method, allowing larger data sets to be accurately investigated. Furthermore, a series of common velocity analyses are compared to the physical properties of phase and group velocity in an attenuating medium of glycerol saturated glass bead packs (Q ˜ 3). It is found that the velocity determined from the first break of the waveform (signal velocity) is up to 13% different from group and phase velocities. This illustrates that signal velocity is unsuitable to determine rock properties in highly attenuating media. Also, greater than 81% velocity dispersion is observed when the dominant propagating wavelength is comparable to the bead size. More surprisingly, on propagation of the broad band input signal a bimodal amplitude spectrum becomes apparent. The low frequency peak is consistent with standard attenuation, whereas the high frequency peak is related to resonance of either the constituent beads or the interbead fluid cavity. Such resonance partitions energy of the main incoming signal. This phenomenon represents a new and fundamental attenuation mechanism that should be considered in many wave-propagation experiments.

  14. Propagation through a stratified ocean wave guide with random volume and surface inhomogeneities, Part I. Theory: Attenuation, dispersion, and acoustic mirages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratilal, Purnima; Makris, Nicholas C.

    2002-11-01

    Analytic expressions for the mean field propagated through a stratified ocean with random volume or sufrace inhomogeneities of arbitrary size compared to the wavelength are derived from a wave guide scattering model stemming from Green's theorem. It is found that multiple scattering through inhomogeneities in the forward direction can be succinctly expressed in terms of modal attenuation and dispersion coefficients under widely satisfied conditions. The inhomogeneities can have an arbitrary distribution in depth so that the model can realistically apply to scattering from internal waves, bubbles, fish, seafloor and seasurface roughness as well as sub-bottom anomalies. An understanding of the coherence of the forward scattered field can be gained by analogy with the formation of optical mirages in low-grazing angle forward scatter from random surfaces.

  15. Studies on mass attenuation coefficient, effective atomic number and electron density of some amino acids in the energy range 0.122-1.330 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pawar, Pravina P.; Bichile, Govind K.

    2013-11-01

    The total mass attenuation coefficients of some amino acids, such as Glycine (C2H5NO2), DL-Alanine (C3H7NO2), Proline (C5H9NO2), L-Leucine (C6H13NO2 ), L-Arginine (C6H14N4O2) and L-Arginine Monohydrochloride (C6H15ClN4O2), were measured at 122, 356, 511, 662, 1170, 1275 and 1330 keV photon energies using a well-collimated narrow beam good geometry set-up. The gamma rays were detected using NaI (Tl) scintillation detection system with a resolution of 10.2% at 662 keV. The attenuation coefficient data were then used to obtain the effective atomic numbers (Zeff) and effective electron densities (Neff) of amino acids. It was observed that the effective atomic number (Zeff) and effective electron densities (Neff) tend to be almost constant as a function of gamma-ray energy. The results show that, the experimental values of mass attenuation coefficients, effective atomic numbers and effective electron densities are in good agreement with the theoretical values with less than 1% error.

  16. Imaging the attenuation structure beneath the northwestern margin of Colorado Plateau: Integrating seismic body-wave observations and forward modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellis, C.; Lin, P.; Holtzman, B. K.; Gaherty, J. B.; Roy, M.

    2013-12-01

    The upper mantle beneath the Colorado Plateau (CP) is characterized by high seismic velocities in the plateau interior and lower seismic velocities beneath the plateau margins, below the Basin and Range to the west and the Rio Grande Rift to the east. The seismic velocity contrast across the margins has been interpreted as a thermal- mechanical modification of the sub-CP lithospheric keel, by various mechanisms. Using teleseismic P- and S-wave spectra from the La Ristra 1.5 Array and EarthScope USArray Transportable Array (TA), we measure t*, the seismic parameter representing integrated attenuation along a ray path, across the western margin of the CP. For wave fields from two sets of earthquakes to the Northwest and Southeast of the CP, we measured the spectra of P- and S-waves at each station, relative to the spectra of the reference stations and extracted the differential attenuation factor (dt*) across the frequency band 0.2-4 Hz for P waves and 0.1-1.5 Hz for S waves for each event-station pair. To first order, both tp* and ts* varies from higher in the Basin and Range to lower on the CP, which suggests that coherent variations in attenuation are present across the Northwestern margin of the CP. However, the gradients of dt* for the two sets of NW and SE wave fields are significantly different, with a sharper gradient observed for the NW set. One of our primary questions concerns the origin of these variations: to what extent do they reflect the spatial distribution of intrinsic attenuation structure or wave propagation effects such as focusing and defocusing. To address these questions, our approach is to first build 1- and 2-D models for hypothetical spatial variations in state and compositional variables (T, water and melt content), and then calculate attenuation structures based on experimentally derived power-law frequency-dependent anelastic models. These structures are transferred into our anelastic finite difference wave propagation code, from which

  17. Effects of fracture contact areas on seismic attenuation due to wave-induced fluid flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Germán Rubino, J.; Müller, Tobias M.; Milani, Marco; Holliger, Klaus

    2014-05-01

    Wave-induced fluid flow (WIFF) between fractures and the embedding matrix is considered to be a predominant seismic attenuation mechanism in fractured rocks. That is, due to the strong compressibility contrast between fractures and embedding matrix, seismic waves induce strong fluid pressure gradients, followed by local fluid flow between such regions, which in turn produces significant energy dissipation. Natural fractures can be conceptualized as two surfaces in partial contact, containing very soft and highly permeable material in the inner region. It is known that the characteristics of the fracture contact areas control the mechanical properties of the rock sample, since as the contact area increases, the fracture becomes stiffer. Correspondingly, the detailed characteristics of the contact area of fractures are expected to play a major role in WIFF-related attenuation. To study this topic, we consider a simple model consisting of a horizontal fracture located at the center of a porous rock sample and represented by a number of rectangular cracks of constant height separated by contact areas. The cracks are modelled as highly compliant, porous, and permeable heterogeneities, which are hydraulically connected to the background material. We include a number of rectangular regions of background material separating the cracks, which represent the presence of contact areas of the fracture. In order to estimate the WIFF effects, we apply numerical oscillatory relaxation tests based on the quasi-static poro-elastic equations. The equivalent undrained, complex plane-wave modulus, which allows to estimate seismic attenuation and velocity dispersion for the vertical direction of propagation, is expressed in terms of the imposed displacement and the resulting average vertical stress at the top boundary. In order to explore the effects of the presence of fracture contact areas on WIFF effects, we perform an exhaustive sensitivity analysis considering different

  18. S wave attenuation and site effects in the region of Friuli, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro, Raúl R.; Pacor, Francesca; Sala, Alfio; Petrungaro, Carmine

    1996-10-01

    We used strong motion records from the 1976 Friuli earthquake (M 6.4) and 10 of the biggest aftershocks recorded by the National Accelerograph Network of the Electrical Power Company of Italy to estimate the quality factor Q of S waves in this region. The wide distance range of the recordings (10 < r < 190 km) permits us to analyze the spectral amplitude decay of the records using a nonparametric approach [e.g., Anderson and Quaas, 1988; Castro et al., 1990; Anderson, 1991]. We obtained attenuation functions for a set of 18 frequencies ranging between 0.4 and 25.0 Hz. The values of Q retrieved from the attenuation functions obtained follow the frequency-dependent relation Q = 20.4f. A test of the method was made using a second data set consisting of digital seismograms from the Friuli-Venezia Giulia Seismograph Network. In spite of the different size of the volume sampled by these data (10 < r < 131 km), the frequency dependence of Q obtained (Q = 16.1f0.92) is similar to that obtained with the strong motion data set. The near-surface attenuation was also estimated using the model proposed by Anderson and Hough [1984] and Anderson [1991]. We found that κ0 is smaller for the strong motion stations located on rock compared to stations located on either shallow or soft sediments. To estimate the site response of the strong motion stations, we corrected the spectral records for the attenuation effect and then inverted the corrected records to separate source and site effects using the inversion scheme proposed by Andrews [1986]. To verify the site amplification estimates obtained, we also calculated the transfer function of each site using Nakamura's [1989] method for S wave [e.g., Lermo and Chavez-García, 1993]. In general, the shapes of the site functions obtained with the inversion are consistent with the transfer functions obtained calculating the horizontal to vertical component ratio.

  19. Body-wave Attenuation in the South-Central Region of the Gulf of California, México

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro, R. R.; Vidales-Basurto, C. A.; Huerta, C. I.; Sumy, D. F.; Gaherty, J. B.; Collins, J. A.

    2014-12-01

    We present results from a recent study of seismic attenuation of body waves in the south-central region of the Gulf of California (GoC) obtained using records from the Network of Autonomously Recording Seismographs of Baja California (NARS-Baja), from the CICESE's Broadband Seismological Network of the GoC (RESBAN), and from the Ocean Bottom Seismographs (OBS) deployed as part of the Sea of Cortez Ocean Bottom Array experiment (SCOOBA). We examine 27 well-located earthquakes that occurred from October 2005 to October 2006 with magnitudes (Mw) between 3.5 and 4.8. We estimated S-wave site effects by calculating horizontal to vertical spectral ratios and determined attenuation functions with a nonparametric model by inverting the observed spectral amplitudes of 21 frequencies between 0.13 and 12.59 Hz for the SCOOBA (OBS) stations and 19 frequencies between 0.16 and 7.94 Hz for NARS-Baja and RESBAN stations. We calculated the geometrical spreading and the attenuation (1/Q) factors for two distance intervals (10-120 km and 120-220 km, respectively) for each frequency considered. The estimates of Q obtained with the SCOOBA (OBS) records for the interval 10-120 km indicate that the P waves attenuate more than S waves (QP=34 f 0.82, QS=59 f 0.90) for frequencies between 0.6 and 12.6 Hz; while for the 120-220 km interval, where ray-paths travel deeper, S waves attenuate more than P waves (QP=117 f 0.44, QS=51 f 1.12). The estimates of Q obtained using NARS-Baja and RESBAN records, within 10-120 km, indicate that P waves attenuate more than S waves (QP=69 f 0.87, QS=176 f 0.61) at frequencies between 0.3 and 6.3 Hz; while at the 120-220 km distance interval S waves attenuate slightly more than P waves (QP=39 f 0.64, QS=48 f 0.37) at high frequencies (f > 3 Hz). These results, based on a unique OBS dataset, provide an indirect mean to constrain future models of the thermal structure beneth the GoC.

  20. Numerical simulation of electromagnetic wave attenuation in a nonequilibrium chemically reacting hypervelocity flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nusca, Michael Joseph, Jr.

    The effects of various gasdynamic phenomena on the attenuation of an electromagnetic wave propagating through the nonequilibrium chemically reacting air flow field generated by an aerodynamic body travelling at high velocity is investigated. The nonequilibrium flow field is assumed to consist of seven species including nitric oxide ions and free electrons. The ionization of oxygen and nitrogen atoms is ignored. The aerodynamic body considered is a blunt wedge. The nonequilibrium chemically reacting flow field around this body is numerically simulated using a computer code based on computational fluid dynamics. The computer code solves the Navier-Stokes equations including mass diffusion and heat transfer, using a time-marching, explicit Runge-Kutta scheme. A nonequilibrium air kinetics model consisting of seven species and twenty-eight reactions as well as an equilibrium air model consisting of the same seven species are used. The body surface boundaries are considered as adiabatic or isothermal walls, as well as fully-catalytic and non-catalytic surfaces. Both laminar and turbulent flows are considered; wall generated flow turbulence is simulated using an algebraic mixing length model. An electromagnetic wave is considered as originating from an antenna within the body and is effected by the free electrons in the chemically reacting flow. Analysis of the electromagnetics is performed separately from the fluid dynamic analysis using a series solution of Maxwell's equations valid for the propagation of a long-wavelength plane electromagnetic wave through a thin (i.e., in comparison to wavelength) inhomogeneous plasma layer. The plasma layer is the chemically reacting shock layer around the body. The Navier-Stokes equations are uncoupled from Maxwell's equations. The results of this computational study demonstrate for the first time and in a systematic fashion, the importance of several parameters including equilibrium chemistry, nonequilibrium chemical kinetics, the

  1. Seismic wave attenuation and dispersion due to wave-induced fluid flow in rocks with strong permeability fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Germán Rubino, J; Monachesi, Leonardo B; Müller, Tobias M; Guarracino, Luis; Holliger, Klaus

    2013-12-01

    Oscillatory fluid movements in heterogeneous porous rocks induced by seismic waves cause dissipation of wave field energy. The resulting seismic signature depends not only on the rock compressibility distribution, but also on a statistically averaged permeability. This so-called equivalent seismic permeability does not, however, coincide with the respective equivalent flow permeability. While this issue has been analyzed for one-dimensional (1D) media, the corresponding two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) cases remain unexplored. In this work, this topic is analyzed for 2D random medium realizations having strong permeability fluctuations. With this objective, oscillatory compressibility simulations based on the quasi-static poroelasticity equations are performed. Numerical analysis shows that strong permeability fluctuations diminish the magnitude of attenuation and velocity dispersion due to fluid flow, while the frequency range where these effects are significant gets broader. By comparing the acoustic responses obtained using different permeability averages, it is also shown that at very low frequencies the equivalent seismic permeability is similar to the equivalent flow permeability, while for very high frequencies this parameter approaches the arithmetic average of the permeability field. These seemingly generic findings have potentially important implications with regard to the estimation of equivalent flow permeability from seismic data. PMID:25669286

  2. High-power gyrotron traveling-wave amplifier with distributed wall losses and attenuating severs

    SciTech Connect

    Yeh, Y.S.; Shin, Y.Y.; You, Y.C.; Chen, L.K.

    2005-04-15

    Distributed-loss gyrotron traveling-wave amplifiers (gyro-TWTs) with high-gain, broadband, and millimeter-wave capabilities have been demonstrated. Most structures with distributed wall losses are stabilized in gyro-TWTs that operate at low beam currents. Attenuating severs are added to the interaction circuit of a distributed-loss gyro-TWT to prevent high beam currents that result in mode competition. Simulation results show that gyrotron backward-wave oscillations (gyro-BWOs) are not effectively suppressed by the lossy section; in contrast, the severed sections can effectively enhance the start-oscillation threshold of gyro-BWOs in the proposed gyro-TWT. Meanwhile, localized reflective oscillations seem not to occur in the gyro-TWT unless it operates at a high magnetic field or with a high interaction length. The stable gyro-TWT, operating in the low-loss TE{sub 01} mode, is predicted to yield a peak output power of 405 kW at 33 GHz with an efficiency of 20%, a saturated gain of 77 dB and a 3 dB bandwidth of 2.5 GHz for a 100 kV, 20 A electron beam with an axial velocity spread of {delta}v{sub z}/v{sub z}=5%.

  3. Attenuation, source parameters and site effects of SH waves in Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Shun-Chiang; Wen, Kuo-Liang

    2016-04-01

    Generalized inversion technique (GIT) (Castro et al., 1990) was used to derive SH-wave in the frequency range 0.2-25 Hz (interval 0.1 Hz). The inversion results can find attenuation characteristics, earthquake source parameters and site amplification functions. The characteristics of the site amplification are referred to horizontal-to-vertical (H/V) Fourier spectral ratios of microtremor for a referent rock site. The SH-wave from 28 earthquakes with magnitude ranging from ML 5 to 7, of 1319 earthquake records at 146 TSMIP strong motion stations in Jianan Plain, southwestern Taiwan are used in this analysis. The SH-wave quality factor Q(f) is estimated as 52.83f0.77 for 0.2<= f < =25 Hz. The stress drops can be found from source spectra by using the omega-square model. The results of site amplification are similar to horizontal-to-vertical spectral ratio of the microtremor which have clearly and similar predominant peaks.

  4. Frequency dependent attenuation characteristics of coda waves in the Northwestern Himalayan (India) region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Sushil; Singh, Priyamvada; Singh, Pitam; Biswal, Shubhasmita; Parija, Mahesh Prasad

    2016-03-01

    Digital seismogram data of 82 earthquakes from the Northwestern Himalayan (India) region recorded at different stations during 2004-2006 were analyzed to study the seismic coda wave attenuation characteristics in this region. We used 132 seismic observations from local earthquakes with a hypocentral distance <240 km and a magnitude range of 1.2-4.9 to study the coda QC using the single isotropic scattering model. These earthquakes were recorded at 20 temporary seismic stations installed in the Northwestern Himalayas (India) by the Wadia institute of Himalayan Geology, Dehradun. The QC values were estimated at 10 central frequencies: 1.5, 3, 5, 7, 9, 12, 16, 20, 24, and 28 Hz using starting lapse-times of 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, and 60 s and coda window-lengths of 10, 20, 30, 40, and 50 s. The QC fits the frequency dependent power-law, QC =Q0fn . For a 10 s lapse time with a 10-s coda window length QC = 47.42f1.012 and for a 50 s lapse time with a 50 s coda window length, QC = 204.1f0.934 . Q0 (QC at 1 Hz) varied from ∼47 for a 10 s lapse time and a 10 s window length, to ∼204 for a 50 s lapse time and a 50 s window length. An average frequency dependent power law fit for the study region may be given as QC = 116.716f0.9943 . The exponent of the frequency dependence law n ranged from 1.08 to 0.9, which correlates well with values obtained in other seismically and tectonically active and heterogeneous regions of the world. In our study region, QC increases both with respect to lapse time and frequency, i.e., the attenuation decreases as the quality factor is inversely proportional to attenuation. The low QC values or high attenuation at lower frequencies and high QC values or low attenuation at higher frequencies suggest that the heterogeneity decreases with increasing depth in our study region.

  5. Surface wave tomography with USArray based on phase front tracking and amplitude mapping: isotropic, anisotropic, and intrinsic attenuation structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, F.; Ritzwoller, M. H.

    2011-12-01

    The deployment of the EarthScope/USArray Transportable Array has promoted new and better ways to utilize the dense array configuration and to resolve higher resolution crustal and upper mantle structures beneath the US. Here, we present a local inversion method for surface wave that utilizes the USArray first to determine the surface wave wavefield empirically and then to directly measure the surface wave propagation characteristics such as isotropic velocity, azimuthal anisotropy, and intrinsic attenuation by solving the 2D Helmholtz wave equation. The method starts with single event analysis, where for each period and earthquake all measurements across the array are aggregated to determine maps of phase travel time and amplitude on a fine spatial grid, which essentially describes the surface wave wavefield. The solution of the 2D wave equation contains real and imaginary parts, which are relevant to velocity and attenuation measurements, respectively. For the real part, directionally dependent phase velocities at each location are estimated from the gradient of phase travel time along with the Laplacian of amplitude. For the imaginary part, on the other hand, intrinsic attenuation at each location is estimated from the dot product of the gradients of phase travel time and amplitude along with the Laplacian of phase travel time. In both cases, the terms that contain the gradient operator are directly related to traditional ray theoretic approaches (e.g., eikonal equation for velocity measurement) whereas the terms involving the Laplacian operator provide corrections for off-ray sensitivity. In principle, by applying the correction terms, finite frequency effects such as wave interference, wavefront healing, and backward scattering are accounted for in phase velocity measurements and focus/defocusing is accounted for in attenuation measurements. We apply the method to Rayleigh wave measurements between 30 and 100 sec period from more than 700 earthquakes and all

  6. Statistical results describing the bandwidth and coherence coefficient of whistler-mode waves using THEMIS waveform data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, X.; Li, W.; Bortnik, J.; Thorne, R. M.; Angelopoulos, V.; Lu, Q.; Tao, X.

    2014-12-01

    The bandwidth and coherence coefficient of lower-band whistler mode waves are analyzed using THEMIS waveform data for rising tone, falling tone, and hiss-like emissions separately. We also evaluate their dependences on the spatial location, electron density, the ratio of plasma frequency to local electron gyrofrequency, and the wave amplitude. Our results show that the bandwidth normalized by the local electron gyrofrequency (fce) of rising and falling tones is very narrow (~0.01 fce), much smaller than that of the hiss-like emissions (~0.025 fce). Meanwhile, with the increasing wave amplitude, the normalized bandwidth of discrete emissions gradually decreases, whereas that of hiss-like emissions increases slowly. The coherence coefficient of rising and falling tones is extremely large (~1), while the coherence coefficient of hiss-like emissions is a little smaller, but is still larger than 0.5. For all categories of whistler-mode waves, the normalized bandwidth increases at larger L-shells. Furthermore, the normalized bandwidth is positively correlated with the ratio of plasma frequency to local electron gyrofrequency, but is inversely correlated with the electron density. Interaction between radiation belt electrons and whistler mode waves has been widely described within quasi-linear diffusion theory. Our observations show that the quasi-linear theory is not entirely applicable for modeling electron interaction with rising and falling tones due to their narrow bandwidth and high coherence coefficient. However, it is suitable to simulate wave-particle interaction between electrons and hiss-like emissions. Moreover, the correlations between the normalized bandwidth of chorus waves (especially the discrete emissions) and other parameters may provide insights for the generation mechanism of chorus waves.

  7. Shear wave attenuation and micro-fluidics in water-saturated sand and glass beads.

    PubMed

    Chotiros, Nicholas P; Isakson, Marcia J

    2014-06-01

    An improvement in the modeling of shear wave attenuation and speed in water-saturated sand and glass beads is introduced. Some dry and water-saturated materials are known to follow a constant-Q model in which the attenuation, expressed as Q(-1), is independent of frequency. The associated loss mechanism is thought to lie within the solid frame. A second loss mechanism in fluid-saturated porous materials is the viscous loss due to relative motion between pore fluid and solid frame predicted by the Biot-Stoll model. It contains a relaxation process that makes the Q(-1) change with frequency, reaching a peak at a characteristic frequency. Examination of the published measurements above 1 kHz, particularly those of Brunson (Ph.D. thesis, Oregon State University, Corvalis, 1983), shows another peak, which is explained in terms of a relaxation process associated with the squirt flow process at the grain-grain contact. In the process of deriving a model for this phenomenon, it is necessary to consider the micro-fluidic effects associated with the flow within a thin film of water confined in the gap at the grain-grain contact and the resulting increase in the effective viscosity of water. The result is an extended Biot model that is applicable over a broad band of frequencies. PMID:24907791

  8. The Attenuation of a Detonation Wave by an Aircraft Engine Axial Turbine Stage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanZante, Dale; Envia, Edmane; Turner, Mark G.

    2007-01-01

    A Constant Volume Combustion Cycle Engine concept consisting of a Pulse Detonation Combustor (PDC) followed by a conventional axial turbine was simulated numerically to determine the attenuation and reflection of a notional PDC pulse by the turbine. The multi-stage, time-accurate, turbomachinery solver TURBO was used to perform the calculation. The solution domain consisted of one notional detonation tube coupled to 5 vane passages and 8 rotor passages representing 1/8th of the annulus. The detonation tube was implemented as an initial value problem with the thermodynamic state of the tube contents, when the detonation wave is about to exit, provided by a 1D code. Pressure time history data from the numerical simulation was compared to experimental data from a similar configuration to verify that the simulation is giving reasonable results. Analysis of the pressure data showed a spectrally averaged attenuation of about 15 dB across the turbine stage. An evaluation of turbine performance is also presented.

  9. Attenuation Characteristics of Body-Waves for the Bilaspur Region of Himachal Lesser Himalaya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandana; Kumar, Ashwani; Gupta, S. C.

    2016-02-01

    The attenuation characteristics around Bilaspur region of the Himachal Lesser Himalaya have been estimated adopting extended-coda-normalization method, and using a data set of 41 local events (0.5 < M L ≤ 2.9) that occurred in the region from May 2013 to March 2014. The frequency-dependent relations governing the quality factors of P-waves ( Q α ) and S-waves ( Q β ) in the frequency range from 1.5 to 24 Hz are: ( Q α ) = (43 ± 4) f 1.30±0.04 and Q β = (79 ± 6) f 1.25±0.02. The average estimates of ( Q α ) and ( Q β ) are found to vary from 71 and 125 at 1.5 Hz to 2901 and 4243 at 24 Hz, respectively. The ( Q α ) and ( Q β ) estimates are compared to the similar estimates obtained for the other seismically active regions of the Himalaya. It is found that for the various Himalayan regions, the ( Q α ) estimates at 1 Hz vary between 22 (for the Kumaon Himalaya) and 97 (for the northwest Himalaya), whereas ( Q β ) estimates range between 63 (for the Garhwal Himalaya) and 127 (for the northwest Himalaya). For the Bilaspur region, the ( Q β )/( Q α ) ratio is greater than unity and varies between 1.84 and 1.45 in the frequency range from 1 to 24 Hz. The region-specific attenuation relations can be adopted for estimating earthquake source parameters, simulating strong ground motion and assessing seismic hazard for the Bilaspur region of Himachal Lesser Himalaya.

  10. Laboratory Measurements of Seismic Wave Attenuation in Upper-mantle Materials: the Effect of Partial Melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, I.; Faul, U. H.; Fitz Gerald, J. D.

    2001-12-01

    The frequency-dependent mechanical behaviour expected of Earth materials at high temperature places a special premium on laboratory measurements of wave speeds and attenuation at seismic frequencies. The symposium in honour of Mervyn Paterson provides a welcome opportunity to acknowledge his vital role in the design of the specialised equipment for this purpose described by Jackson and Paterson (PEPI 45: 349-367, 1987; Pageoph 141: 445-466, 1993). This instrument allows the study of low-strain high-temperature viscoelastic behaviour through the application of torsional forced oscillation/ microcreep techniques within the P-T environment (200 MPa, 1600 K) provided by an internally heated gas apparatus. Application of these techniques to fine-grained synthetic olivine polycrystals is beginning to provide a robust basis for the understanding of seismic wave attenuation (and dispersion) in the upper mantle under sub-solidus conditions. More recently, we have begun to explore the effects of partial melting through the fabrication, characterisation and mechanical testing of a suite of fine-grained olivine polycrystals containing up to 4% basaltic melt. The most striking effect of the added melt is the appearance of a melt-related dissipation peak superimposed upon the dissipation background characteristic of melt-free materials - which varies monotonically with period and temperature. The melt-related dissipation peak is adequately modelled as a Gaussian in log X, where X = To exp(E/RT). The melt-related dissipation peak sweeps across the seismic band from period To > 100 s to To < 1 s as temperature increases across the range 1300 - 1600 K producing pronounced systematic changes in the frequency dependence of 1/Q, that may be seismologically observable. >http://rses.anu.adu.au/petrophysics/PetroHome.html

  11. Measurement of the x-ray mass attenuation coefficient of copper using 8.85-20 keV synchrotron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chantler, C. T.; Tran, C. Q.; Barnea, Z.; Paterson, D.; Cookson, D. J.; Balaic, D. X.

    2001-12-01

    This work presents the x-ray extended range technique for measuring x-ray mass attenuation coefficients. This technique includes the use of multiple foil attenuators at each energy investigated, allowing independent tests of detector linearity and of the harmonic contributions to the monochromated synchrotron beam. Measurements over a wide energy range allow the uncertainty of local foil thickness to be minimized by the calibration of thin sample measurements to those of thick samples. The use of an extended criterion for sample thickness selection allows direct determination of dominant systematics, with an improvement of accuracies compared to previous measurements by up to factors of 20. Resulting accuracies for attenuation coefficients of copper (8.84 to 20 keV) are 0.27-0.5 %, with reproducibility of 0.02%. We also extract the imaginary component of the form factor from the data with the same accuracy. Results are compared to theoretical calculations near and away from the absorption edge. The accuracy challenges available theoretical calculations, and observed discrepancies of 10% between current theory and experiments can now be addressed.

  12. Attenuation of stress waves in single and multi-layered structures. [mitigation of elastic and plastic stress waves during spacecraft landing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, J. C. S.; Tsui, C. Y.

    1972-01-01

    Analytical and experimental studies were made of the attenuation of the stress waves during passage through single and multilayer structures. The investigation included studies on elastic and plastic stress wave propagation in the composites and those on shock mitigating material characteristics such as dynamic stress-strain relations and energy absorbing properties. The results of the studies are applied to methods for reducing the stresses imposed on a spacecraft during planetary or ocean landings.

  13. Comparison of hyperspectral measurements of the attenuation and scattering coefficients spectra with modeling results in the north-eastern Baltic Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sipelgas, Liis; Raudsepp, Urmas

    2015-11-01

    The spectral variations in the attenuation and scattering coefficients measured with a hyperspectral ac-spectra (Wetlabs) instrument were analyzed from a dataset collected in the vicinity of commercial harbors on the Estonian coast of the Gulf of Finland, Baltic Sea. In total, the measured TSM concentration varied from 0.4 to 30 mg L-1 and the concentration of Chl a varied from values below the detection limit (0.05) to 23 mg m-3. The reliability of the power law describing the particle attenuation cp (λ) and scattering bp(λ) coefficients was evaluated by means of a determination coefficient (R2). The power law described the particle attenuation spectra with high accuracy (R2 > 0.67), giving the dataset an average cp (λ) slope of 1.3. In the case of particle scattering coefficients, the power law did not represent the whole dataset. Depending on a particular spectrum, the R2 varied from 0 to 1.0 and the slope varied from 1.15 to -0.56. Decomposition of bp(λ) into dominant modes using principal component analyses resulted in the first principal mode accounting for the power law dependence of bp(λ), i.e. the "mineral-type" spectrum, and the second and third mode representing the characteristic bp(λ) of dominant algal particles, i.e. the "algae-type" spectrum. From our dataset we estimated that if Chl a concentration is above 10 mg m-3 or below 5 mg m-3 then most likely the "algae-type" or the "mineral-type" spectrum is dominant, respectively. There was strong linear relationship (R2 > 0.92) between TSM concentration and cp(555) and bp(555),irrespective of the dominant shape of the particle scattering spectra. The estimated TSM-specific attenuation and scattering coefficients at 555 nm were 0.8 m2 g-1 and 0.68 m2 g-1, respectively. Corresponding values for water samples with a dominant "mineral-type" spectrum were 0.85 m2 g-1 and 0.73 m2 g-1, respectively and for water samples with a dominant "algae-type" spectrum were 0.64 m2 g-1 and 0.52 m2 g-1, respectively.

  14. Numerical and Experimental Investigation on the Attenuation of Electromagnetic Waves in Unmagnetized Plasmas Using Inductively Coupled Plasma Actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Min; Xu, Haojun; Wei, Xiaolong; Liang, Hua; Song, Huimin; Sun, Quan; Zhang, Yanhua

    2015-10-01

    The attenuation of electromagnetic (EM) waves in unmagnetized plasma generated by an inductively coupled plasma (ICP) actuator has been investigated both theoretically and experimentally. A numerical study is conducted to investigate the propagation of EM waves in multilayer plasma structures which cover a square flat plate. Experimentally, an ICP actuator with dimensions of 20 cm×20 cm×4 cm is designed to produce a steady plasma slab. The attenuation of EM waves in the plasma generated by the ICP actuator is measured by a reflectivity arch test method at incident waves of 2.3 GHz and 10.1 GHz, respectively. A contrastive analysis of calculated and measured results of these incident wave frequencies is presented, which suggests that the experiment accords well with our theory. As expected, the plasma slab generated by the ICP actuator can effectively attenuate the EM waves, which may have great potential application prospects in aircraft stealth. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 51276197, 11472306 and 11402301)

  15. A Simultaneous Multi-phase Approach to Determine P-wave and S-wave Attenuation of the Crust and Upper Mantle

    SciTech Connect

    Pasyanos, M E; Walter, W R; Matzel, E M

    2009-02-26

    We have generalized the methodology of our regional amplitude tomography from the Lg phase to the four primary regional phases (Pn, Pg, Sn, Lg). Differences in the geometrical spreading, source term, site term, and travel paths are accounted for, while event source parameters such as seismic moment are consistent among phases. In the process, we have developed the first regional attenuation model that uses the amplitudes of four regional phases to determine a comprehensive P-wave and S-wave attenuation model of the crust and upper mantle. When applied to an area encompassing the Middle East, eastern Europe, western Asia, south Asia, and northeast Africa for the 1-2 Hz passband, we find large differences in the attenuation of the lithosphere across the region. The tectonic Tethys collision zone has high attenuation, while stable outlying regions have low attenuation. While crust and mantle Q variations are often consistent, we do find several notable areas where they differ considerably, but are appropriate given the region's tectonic history. Lastly, the relative values of Qp and Qs indicate that scattering Q is likely the dominant source of attenuation in the crust at these frequencies.

  16. Determining the mass attenuation coefficient, effective atomic number, and electron density of raw wood and binderless particleboards of Rhizophora spp. by using Monte Carlo simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marashdeh, Mohammad W.; Al-Hamarneh, Ibrahim F.; Abdel Munem, Eid M.; Tajuddin, A. A.; Ariffin, Alawiah; Al-Omari, Saleh

    Rhizophora spp. wood has the potential to serve as a solid water or tissue equivalent phantom for photon and electron beam dosimetry. In this study, the effective atomic number (Zeff) and effective electron density (Neff) of raw wood and binderless Rhizophora spp. particleboards in four different particle sizes were determined in the 10-60 keV energy region. The mass attenuation coefficients used in the calculations were obtained using the Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP5) simulation code. The MCNP5 calculations of the attenuation parameters for the Rhizophora spp. samples were plotted graphically against photon energy and discussed in terms of their relative differences compared with those of water and breast tissue. Moreover, the validity of the MCNP5 code was examined by comparing the calculated attenuation parameters with the theoretical values obtained by the XCOM program based on the mixture rule. The results indicated that the MCNP5 process can be followed to determine the attenuation of gamma rays with several photon energies in other materials.

  17. Study of stress waves in geomedia and effect of a soil cover layer on wave attenuation using a 1-D finite-difference method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhi-liang; Li, Yong-chi; Wang, J. G.

    2006-12-01

    The propagation and attenuation of blast-induced stress waves differs between geomedia such as rock or soil mass. This paper numerically studies the propagation and attenuation of blast-induced elastoplastic waves in deep geomedia by using a one-dimensional (1-D) finite-difference code. Firstly, the elastoplastic Cap models for rock and soil masses are introduced into the governing equations of spherical wave motion and a FORTRAN code based on the finite difference method is developed. Secondly, an underground spherical blast is simulated with this code and verified by software, RENEWTO. The propagation of stress-waves in rock and soil masses is numerically investigated, respectively. Finally, the effect of a soil cover layer on the attenuation of stress waves in the rear rock mass is studied. It is determined that large plastic deformation of geomedia can effectively dissipate the energy of stress-waves inward and the developed 1-D finite difference code coupled with elastoplastic Cap models is convenient and effective in the numerical simulations for underground spherical explosion.

  18. Imaging Lower Mantle Heterogeniety With Differential Dispersion and Attenuation of Core- Diffracted Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Euler, G. G.; Wysession, M. E.; Huhmann, B.

    2007-12-01

    We investigate global differential travel-time dispersion and attenuation of core-diffracted phases from large, deep earthquakes. This technique aids in constraining radial velocity structure at the core-mantle interface in a manner analogous to surface wave observables constraining upper mantle structure. We confirm that there is noticeable differential dispersion and attenuation caused by diffraction on a global basis for both Pdiff and Sdiff. Variations in differential dispersion and attenuation are observed with both geographic location and between Pdiff and Sdiff along the same azimuth suggesting lateral variations in Vp, Vs and Vp/Vs ratio in the lowermost mantle. We attempt to utilize dispersion and attenuation characteristics to put bounds on the magnitude and distribution of large-scale velocity perturbations in the lowermost mantle and draw comparisons to variations found in several 3D whole-mantle models. Our dataset consists of broadband records available from the IRIS DMC for deep (>180 km), large (>5.6 mb) teleseismic events. Preprocessing of the records includes deconvolution of the instrument response, rotation of horizontal components, filtering using a set of bandpass filters, and sample-rate decimation (5 sps). Relative arrival times and amplitudes are found by computing cross correlegrams in the frequency domain, detecting and removing poor recordings with cluster analysis, and iteratively converging on a stable low-variance solution with a weighted least-squares inversion while automatically remediating phase-skips utilizing a database of potential relative arrivals. Raypath-approximated corrections for reciever-side differences in ellipticity, mantle, and crust are applied for the derivation of phase velocites in the lowermost mantle as a function of azimuth and frequency. Following previous studies of diffracted signals, we limit our analysis to station pairs located in narrow azimuthal windows spread over a considerable distance while

  19. A model for strong attenuation and dispersion of seismic P-waves in a partially saturated fractured reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brajanovski, Miroslav; Müller, Tobias M.; Parra, Jorge O.

    2010-08-01

    In this work we interpret the data showing unusually strong velocity dispersion of P-waves (up to 30%) and attenuation in a relatively narrow frequency range. The cross-hole and VSP data were measured in a reservoir, which is in the porous zone of the Silurian Kankakee Limestone Formation formed by vertical fractures within a porous matrix saturated by oil, and gas patches. Such a medium exhibits significant attenuation due to wave-induced fluid flow across the interfaces between different types of inclusions (fractures, fluid patches) and background. Other models of intrinsic attenuation (in particular squirt flow models) cannot explain the amount of observed dispersion when using realistic rock properties. In order to interpret data in a satisfactory way we develop a superposition model for fractured porous rocks accounting also for the patchy saturation effect.

  20. An improvement in the VIRGO Super Attenuator for interferometric detection of gravitational waves: The use of a magnetic antispring

    SciTech Connect

    Braccini, S.; Bradaschia, C.; Cobal, M.; Del Fabbro, R.; Di Virgilio, A.; Flaminio, R.; Giazotto, A.; Kautzky, H.; Morganti, M.; Passuello, D. ); Calloni, E.; Di Fiore, L. ); Holloway, L.E. ); Montelatici, V. )

    1993-02-01

    We present a method of lowering below 2.5 Hz the vertical normal mode frequencies of the Pisa Super Attenuator by using permanent magnets which provide an antispring force. This method allows a more efficient suppression of the seismic noise decreasing the lower limit of the frequency region devoted to gravitational wave detection.

  1. X-ray extended-range technique for precision measurement of the X-ray mass attenuation coefficient and Im( f) for copper using synchrotron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chantler, C. T.; Tran, C. Q.; Paterson, D.; Cookson, D.; Barnea, Z.

    2001-08-01

    We reconsider the long-standing problem of accurate measurement of atomic form factors for fundamental and applied problems. We discuss the X-ray extended-range technique for accurate measurement of the mass attenuation coefficient and the imaginary component of the atomic form factor. Novelties of this approach include the use of a synchrotron with detector normalisation, the direct calibration of dominant systematics using multiple thicknesses, and measurement over wide energy ranges with a resulting improvement of accuracies by an order of magnitude. This new technique achieves accuracies of 0.27-0.5% and reproducibility of 0.02% for attenuation of copper from 8.84 to 20 keV, compared to accuracies of 10% using atomic vapours. This precision challenges available theoretical calculations. Discrepancies of 10% between current theory and experiments can now be addressed.

  2. Calculation of ground wave attenuation over irregular, inhomogeneous, layered media using PROGRAM WAGNER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ott, R. H.

    1983-09-01

    A method for calculating the ground wave field over irregular, inhomogeneous terrain was developed, and comparisons with alternative analytical methods were made for idealized terrain profiles such as concave parabolas, sea-land-sea paths, and single Gaussian ridges. This method employs a numerically efficient algorithm, PROGRAM WAGNER, based on an integral equation. PROGRAM WAGNER appears the only method general enough for calculating ground wave attenuation along detailed paths. The fundamentals of PROGRAM WAGNER to the user seeking to make path loss calculations are explained. A users guide, the complete FORTRAN IV program listing, and sample input and output are included. Comparisons of computed field strengths are presented, with measured values over a path in the Netherlands at 10 frequencies from 2 to 30 MHz. Also, PROGRAM WAGNER at 5 and 30 MHz is compared with a method based on scattering from multiple knife edges. Finally, reciprocity is shown to provide necessary and useful criteria for spacing the observation points along the terrain profile.

  3. Diffraction, attenuation, and source corrections for nonlinear Rayleigh wave ultrasonic measurements.

    PubMed

    Torello, David; Thiele, Sebastian; Matlack, Kathryn H; Kim, Jin-Yeon; Qu, Jianmin; Jacobs, Laurence J

    2015-02-01

    This research considers the effects of diffraction, attenuation, and the nonlinearity of generating sources on measurements of nonlinear ultrasonic Rayleigh wave propagation. A new theoretical framework for correcting measurements made with air-coupled and contact piezoelectric receivers for the aforementioned effects is provided based on analytical models and experimental considerations. A method for extracting the nonlinearity parameter β11 is proposed based on a nonlinear least squares curve-fitting algorithm that is tailored for Rayleigh wave measurements. Quantitative experiments are conducted to confirm the predictions for the nonlinearity of the piezoelectric source and to demonstrate the effectiveness of the curve-fitting procedure. These experiments are conducted on aluminum 2024 and 7075 specimens and a β11(7075)/β11(2024) measure of 1.363 agrees well with previous literature and earlier work. The proposed work is also applied to a set of 2205 duplex stainless steel specimens that underwent various degrees of heat-treatment over 24h, and the results improve upon conclusions drawn from previous analysis. PMID:25287976

  4. Viscoacoustic wave form inversion of transmission data for velocity and attenuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Toshiki; Nihei, Kurt T.; Nakagawa, Seiji; Myer, Larry R.

    2004-06-01

    This study investigates the performance of a frequency domain viscoacoustic full wave form nonlinear inversion to obtain high resolution images of velocity and attenuation. An efficient frequency domain implementation is applied that consists of performing a series of single frequency inversions sweeping from low to high frequency. A cascaded inversion was adopted in which the real part of the velocity is first imaged using the phase information, then the quality factor (Q) is imaged using the amplitude information. Tests with synthetic data indicate that our approach yielded better images than the simultaneous determination of the real and imaginary parts of the complex velocity. The method is applied to laboratory data obtained in a water tank with suspended acrylic bars. Broadband 200 kHz data are obtained for a crosshole configuration with a computer-controlled scanning system and piezofilm source and detector. The velocity image produced by the full wave form inversion is compared to a curved ray travel time tomography velocity image, and was observed to possess higher resolution and more precise locations of the acrylic bars. The Q image shows a lower resolution than the velocity image, but recovers the correct Q for acrylic. This method can be applied for geophysical applications targeted to soil, unconsolidated rocks, and marine sediments and also nondestructive evaluation and medical applications.

  5. 2-D Coda and Direct Wave Attenuation Tomography in Northern Italy

    SciTech Connect

    Morasca, P; Mayeda, K; Gok, R; Phillips, W S; Malagnini, L

    2007-10-17

    A 1-D coda method was proposed by Mayeda et al. (2003) in order to obtain stable seismic source moment-rate spectra using narrowband coda envelope measurements. That study took advantage of the averaging nature of coda waves to derive stable amplitude measurements taking into account all propagation, site, and Sto-coda transfer function effects. Recently this methodology was applied to micro earthquake data sets from three sub-regions of northern Italy (i.e., western Alps, northern Apennines and eastern Alps). Since the study regions were small, ranging between local-to-near-regional distances, the simple 1-D path assumptions used in the coda method worked very well. The lateral complexity of this region would suggest, however, that a 2-D path correction might provide even better results if the datasets were combined, especially when paths traverse larger distances and complicated regions. The structural heterogeneity of northern Italy makes the region ideal to test the extent to which coda variance can be reduced further by using a 2-D Q tomography technique. The approach we use has been developed by Phillips et al. (2005) and is an extension of previous amplitude ratio techniques to remove source effects from the inversion. The method requires some assumptions such as isotropic source radiation which is generally true for coda waves. Our results are compared against direct Swave inversions for 1/Q and results from both share very similar attenuation features that coincide with known geologic structures. We compare our results with those derived from direct waves as well as some recent results from northern California obtained by Mayeda et al. (2005) which tested the same tomographic methodology applied in this study to invert for 1/Q. We find that 2-D coda path corrections for this region significantly improve upon the 1-D corrections, in contrast to California where only a marginal improvement was observed. We attribute this difference to stronger lateral

  6. Measurement of the mass attenuation coefficient from 81 keV to 1333 keV for elemental materials Al, Cu and Pb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gjorgieva, Slavica; Barandovski, Lambe

    2016-03-01

    The mass attenuation coefficients (μ/ρ) for 3 high purity elemental materials Al, Cu and Pb were measured in the γ-ray energy range from 81 keV up to 1333 keV using 22Na, 60Co 133Ba and 133Cs as sources of gamma radiation. Well shielded detector (NaI (Tl) semiconductor detector) was used to measure the intensity of the transmitted beam. The measurements were made under condition of good geometry, assuring that any photon absorbed or deflected appreciably does not reach the detector. The measured values are compared with the theoretical ones obtained by Seltzer (1993).

  7. Teleseismic P wave spectra from USArray and implications for upper mantle attenuation and scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cafferky, Samantha; Schmandt, Brandon

    2015-10-01

    Teleseismic P wave amplitude spectra from deep earthquakes recorded by USArray are inverted for maps of upper mantle Δt* for multiple frequency bands within 0.08-2 Hz. All frequency bands show high Δt* regions in the southwestern U.S., southern Rocky Mountains, and Appalachian margin. Low Δt* is more common across the cratonic interior. Inversions with narrower frequency bands yield similar patterns, but greater Δt* magnitudes. Even the two standard deviation Δt* magnitude for the widest band is ˜2-7 times greater than predicted by global QS tomography or an anelastic olivine thermal model, suggesting that much of the Δt* signal is nonthermal in origin. Nonthermal contributions are further indicated by only a moderate correlation between Δt* and P travel times. Some geographic variations, such as high Δt* in parts of the cratonic interior with high mantle velocities and low heat flow, demonstrate that the influence of temperature is regionally overwhelmed. Transverse spectra are used to investigate the importance of scattering because they would receive no P energy in the absence of 3-D heterogeneity or anisotropy. Transverse to vertical (T/Z) spectral ratios for stations with high Δt* are higher and exhibit steeper increases with frequency compared to T/Z spectra for low Δt* stations. The large magnitude of Δt* estimates and the T/Z spectra are consistent with major contributions to Δt* from scattering. A weak positive correlation between intrinsic attenuation and apparent attenuation due to scattering may contribute to Δt* magnitude and the moderate correlation of Δt* with travel times.

  8. Two-dimensional global Rayleigh wave attenuation model by accounting for finite-frequency focusing and defocusing effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Zhitu; Masters, Guy; Mancinelli, Nicholas

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we obtain a set of 2-D global phase velocity and attenuation maps for Rayleigh waves between 5 and 25 mHz. Correcting the effect of focusing-defocusing is crucial in order to obtain reliable attenuation structure. Great circle linearized ray theory, which has been used to date, can give useful predictions of this effect if careful attention is paid to how the phase velocity model is smoothed. In contrast, predictions based on the 2-D finite-frequency kernels are quite robust in this frequency range and suggest that they are better suited as a basis for inversion. We use a large data set of Rayleigh wave phase and amplitude measurements to invert for the phase velocity, attenuation, source and receiver terms simultaneously. Our models provide 60-70 per cent variance reduction to the raw data though the source terms are the biggest contribution to the fit of the data. The attenuation maps show structures that correlate well with surface tectonics and the age progression trend of the attenuation is clearly seen in the ocean basins. We have also identified problematic stations and earthquake sources as a by-product of our data selection process.

  9. Distribution of attenuation in the Kaoiki, Hawaii, source volume estimated by inversion of P wave spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scherbaum, Frank; Wyss, Max

    1990-08-01

    A new method to simultaneously invert for Q structure and source parameters was used on a set of 635 microearthquakes (0.9 < M < 2.0) in the Kaoiki area of southern Hawaii. Approximately 2800 signals were analyzed which had been recorded by 6 short period vertical seismographs at epicentral distances of a few to 10 km. The hypocentral depths ranged from O to 14 km, with the bulk of the sources in the 7.5-10.5 km range. The hypothesis to be tested was that the source volume of the M = 6.6 Kaoiki main shock of November 16, 1983, may be heterogeneous in attenuation distribution. We assumed that the observed P wave displacement spectra could be modelled by a source spectrum with an ω-2 high-frequency decay, a single-layer resonance filler to account for local site resonances and whole path attenuation along the ray path. In a next step the attenuation factor Q was constrained by tomographically reconstructing the three-dimensional Q structure for the source region and using it as starting model for a nonlinear inversion of the corner frequency, the seismic moment M0, and a new Q value. This process was iterated until the results changed less than 0.1% and were accepted as final. The average Q was approximately constant and very low (105

  10. Regional Body-Wave Attenuation Using a Coda Source Normalization Method: Application to MEDNET Records of Earthquakes in Italy

    SciTech Connect

    Walter, W R; Mayeda, K; Malagnini, L; Scognamiglio, L

    2007-02-01

    We develop a new methodology to determine apparent attenuation for the regional seismic phases Pn, Pg, Sn, and Lg using coda-derived source spectra. The local-to-regional coda methodology (Mayeda, 1993; Mayeda and Walter, 1996; Mayeda et al., 2003) is a very stable way to obtain source spectra from sparse networks using as few as one station, even if direct waves are clipped. We develop a two-step process to isolate the frequency-dependent Q. First, we correct the observed direct wave amplitudes for an assumed geometrical spreading. Next, an apparent Q, combining path and site attenuation, is determined from the difference between the spreading-corrected amplitude and the independently determined source spectra derived from the coda methodology. We apply the technique to 50 earthquakes with magnitudes greater than 4.0 in central Italy as recorded by MEDNET broadband stations around the Mediterranean at local-to-regional distances. This is an ideal test region due to its high attenuation, complex propagation, and availability of many moderate sized earthquakes. We find that a power law attenuation of the form Q(f) = Q{sub 0}f{sup Y} fit all the phases quite well over the 0.5 to 8 Hz band. At most stations, the measured apparent Q values are quite repeatable from event to event. Finding the attenuation function in this manner guarantees a close match between inferred source spectra from direct waves and coda techniques. This is important if coda and direct wave amplitudes are to produce consistent seismic results.

  11. Non-destructive Inspection of Chloride Ion in Concrete Structures Using Attenuated Total Reflection of Millimeter Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathi, Saroj R.; Inoue, Hiroo; Hasegawa, Tsuyoshi; Kawase, Kodo

    2013-02-01

    The chloride induced corrosion of reinforcing steel bar is one of the major causes of deterioration of concrete structures. Therefore, it is essential to periodically monitor the level of chloride ion (Cl-) concentration in concrete structures. In this work, we developed millimeter wave attenuated total reflection measurement setup in order to determine the Cl- concentration in concrete structures. We prepared concrete samples with different compositions and varying Cl- concentrations and we measured their attenuated total reflectance at 65 GHz. We observed that the reflectance decreases almost linearly with the increase in Cl- concentration indicating that this technique could be used to inspect the Cl- concentration in concrete structures nondestructively.

  12. Studies on effective atomic numbers, electron densities from mass attenuation coefficients in Ti xCo 1-x and Co xCu 1-x alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, I.; Demir, L.

    2009-11-01

    The total mass attenuation coefficients ( μ/ρ), for pure Ti, Co, Cu and Co and Cu ( x = 0.8, 0.7, 0.6, 0.5, 0.4, 0.3 and 0.2) alloys were measured at 22.1, 25.0, 59.5 and 88.0 keV photon energies. The samples were irradiated with 109Cd and 241Am radioactive point source using transmission arrangement. The X- and γ-rays were counted by a Si(Li) detector with resolution of 160 eV at 5.9 keV. Total atomic and electronic cross-sections ( σt and σe), effective atomic numbers ( Z eff) and electron densities ( N el) were determined using the obtained μ/ρ values for investigated 3d alloys. The theoretical mass attenuation coefficients were estimated using mixture rule and the experimental values of investigated parameters were compared with the calculated values.

  13. Measurement of mass attenuation coefficients in some Cr, Co and Fe compounds around the absorption edge and the validity of the mixture rule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turgut, U.; Simsek, O.; Büyükkasap, E.

    2007-08-01

    The total mass attenuation coefficients for elements Cr, Co and Fe and compounds CrCl_{2}, CrCl_{3}, Cr_{2}(SO_{4})_{3}K_{2}SO_{4}\\cdot24H_{2}O, CoO, CoCl_{2}, Co(CH_{3}COO)_{2}, FePO_{4}, FeCl_{3}\\cdot6H_{2}O, Fe(SO_{4})_{2}NH_{4}\\cdot12H_{2}O were measured at different energies between 4.508 and 14.142 keV using secondary excitation method. Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Se, Br, Rb, Sr were chosen as secondary exciters. 59.5 keV γ-rays emitted from a ^{241}Am annular source were used to excite a secondary exciter and K_{α}(K-L_{3}, L_{2}) lines emitted by the secondary exciter were counted by a Si(Li) detector with a resolution of 160 eV at 5.9 keV. It was observed that mixture rule method is not a suitable method for determination of the mass attenuation coefficients of compounds, especially at an energy that is near the absorption edge. The obtained values were compared with theoretical values.

  14. Ex vivo determination of glucose permeability and optical attenuation coefficient in normal and adenomatous human colon tissues using spectral domain optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Qingliang; Zhou, Chuanqing; Wei, Huajiang; He, Yonghong; Chai, Xinyu; Ren, Qiushi

    2012-10-01

    Recent reports have suggested that spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) is a useful tool for quantifying the permeability of hyperosmotic agents in various tissues. We report our preliminary results on quantification of glucose diffusion and assessment of the optical attenuation change due to the diffusion of glucose in normal and adenomatous human colon tissues in vitro by using a SD-OCT and then calculated the permeability coefficients (PC) and optical attenuation coefficients (AC). The PC of a 30% aqueous solution of glucose was 3.37±0.23×10-6 cm/s in normal tissue and 5.65±0.16×10-6 cm/s in cancerous colon tissue. Optical AC in a normal colon ranged from 3.48±0.37 to 2.68±0.82 mm-1 and was significantly lower than those seen in the cancerous tissue (8.48±0.95 to 3.16±0.69 mm-1, p<0.05). The results suggest that quantitative measurements of using PC and AC from OCT images could be a potentially powerful method for colon cancer detection.

  15. Exponential Stability of the Energy of the Wave Equation with Variable Coefficients and a Boundary Distributed Delay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wenjun

    2014-11-01

    In this paper, we consider a wave equation with space variable coefficients. Due to physical considerations, a distributed delay damping is acted on the part of the boundary. Under suitable assumptions, we prove the exponential stability of the energy based on the use of Riemannian geometry method, the perturbed energy argument, and some observability inequalities. From the applications point of view, our results may provide some qualitative analysis and intuition for the researchers in fields such as engineering, biophysics, and mechanics. And the method is rather general and can be adapted to other evolution systems with variable coefficients (e. g. elasticity plates) as well.

  16. Complex Contact-Based Dynamics of Microsphere Monolayers Revealed by Resonant Attenuation of Surface Acoustic Waves.

    PubMed

    Hiraiwa, M; Abi Ghanem, M; Wallen, S P; Khanolkar, A; Maznev, A A; Boechler, N

    2016-05-13

    Contact-based vibrations play an essential role in the dynamics of granular materials. Significant insights into vibrational granular dynamics have previously been obtained with reduced-dimensional systems containing macroscale particles. We study contact-based vibrations of a two-dimensional monolayer of micron-sized spheres on a solid substrate that forms a microscale granular crystal. Measurements of the resonant attenuation of laser-generated surface acoustic waves reveal three collective vibrational modes that involve displacements and rotations of the microspheres, as well as interparticle and particle-substrate interactions. To identify the modes, we tune the interparticle stiffness, which shifts the frequency of the horizontal-rotational resonances while leaving the vertical resonance unaffected. From the measured contact resonance frequencies we determine both particle-substrate and interparticle contact stiffnesses and find that the former is an order of magnitude larger than the latter. This study paves the way for investigating complex contact-based dynamics of microscale granular crystals and yields a new approach to studying micro- to nanoscale contact mechanics in multiparticle networks. PMID:27232047

  17. Complex Contact-Based Dynamics of Microsphere Monolayers Revealed by Resonant Attenuation of Surface Acoustic Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiraiwa, M.; Abi Ghanem, M.; Wallen, S. P.; Khanolkar, A.; Maznev, A. A.; Boechler, N.

    2016-05-01

    Contact-based vibrations play an essential role in the dynamics of granular materials. Significant insights into vibrational granular dynamics have previously been obtained with reduced-dimensional systems containing macroscale particles. We study contact-based vibrations of a two-dimensional monolayer of micron-sized spheres on a solid substrate that forms a microscale granular crystal. Measurements of the resonant attenuation of laser-generated surface acoustic waves reveal three collective vibrational modes that involve displacements and rotations of the microspheres, as well as interparticle and particle-substrate interactions. To identify the modes, we tune the interparticle stiffness, which shifts the frequency of the horizontal-rotational resonances while leaving the vertical resonance unaffected. From the measured contact resonance frequencies we determine both particle-substrate and interparticle contact stiffnesses and find that the former is an order of magnitude larger than the latter. This study paves the way for investigating complex contact-based dynamics of microscale granular crystals and yields a new approach to studying micro- to nanoscale contact mechanics in multiparticle networks.

  18. Wave dispersion and attenuation in viscoelastic isotropic media containing multiphase flow and its application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Lei; Yang, DingHui; Nie, JianXin

    2014-06-01

    In this paper, we introduce the complex modulus to express the viscoelasticity of a medium. According to the correspondence principle, the Biot-Squirt (BISQ) equations in the steady-state case are presented for the space-frequency domain described by solid displacements and fluid pressure in a homogeneous viscoelastic medium. The effective bulk modulus of a multiphase flow is computed by the Voigt formula, and the characteristic squirt-flow length is revised for the gas-included case. We then build a viscoelastic BISQ model containing a multiphase flow. Through using this model, wave dispersion and attenuation are studied in a medium with low porosity and low permeability. Furthermore, this model is applied to observed interwell seismic data. Analysis of these data reveals that the viscoelastic parameter tan δ is not a constant. Thus, we present a linear frequency-dependent function in the interwell seismic frequency range to express tan δ. This improves the fit between the observed data and theoretical results.

  19. Seismic wave attenuation in Israel region estimated from the multiple lapse time window analysis and S-wave coda decay rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meirova, Tatiana; Pinsky, Vladimir

    2014-04-01

    For the first time, a regional seismic attenuation for the Israel region is quantitatively estimated as a combination of intrinsic and scattering attenuations. We use a multiple lapse time windows analysis (MLTWA) to determinate the relative contributions of intrinsic absorption and scattering processes to the total regional attenuation in the crust. A single isotropic scattering model assuming a uniform half-space lithosphere is used to fit MLTWA predicted and measured energies from the records of 232 regional earthquakes recorded at 17 short-period and 5 broad-band local seismic stations. Analysis is performed for a set of 10 frequencies between 0.5 and 10 Hz. The frequency-dependent quality factor Q obtained by MLTWA ranges between Q = 77f0.96 in the Northern Israel and Q = 132f0.96 in Southern Israel. Independent estimates of regional coda Q value based on S-wave coda decay rate obtained by averaging of five broad-band Israel Seismic Network stations are approximated by the relation Qc = 126f1.05. As a whole, our findings indicate that in the Israel region, intrinsic absorption prevails over scattering attenuation. Separate analysis for three tectonically different regions in Israel region-Galilee-Lebanon, Judea-Samaria and Eastern Sinai-shows a regional dependence of attenuation parameters. The variation of attenuation characteristics implies different physical mechanisms of seismic attenuation in the Israel region and is related to the differences of structure in the Earth's crust beneath Israel. Such variation in the attenuation patterns is in agreement with the assumption that Northern Israel is tectonically more active than Southern Israel and that in the northern and central parts of Israel the upper crust is more heterogeneous than in the southern part.

  20. Attenuation of elastic waves in bentonite and monitoring of radioactive waste repositories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biryukov, A.; Tisato, N.; Grasselli, G.

    2016-04-01

    Deep geological repositories, isolated from the geosphere by an engineered bentonite barrier, are currently considered the safest solution for high-level radioactive waste (HLRW) disposal. As the physical conditions and properties of the bentonite barrier are anticipated to change with time, seismic tomography was suggested as a viable technique to monitor the physical state and integrity of the barrier and to timely detect any unforeseen failure. To do so, the seismic monitoring system needs to be optimized, and this can be achieved by conducting numerical simulations of wave propagation in the repository geometry. Previous studies treated bentonite as an elastic medium, whereas recent experimental investigations indicate its pronounced viscoelastic behaviour. The aims of this contribution are (i) to numerically estimate the effective attenuation of bentonite as a function of temperature T and water content Wc, so that synthetic data can accurately reproduce experimental traces and (ii) assess the feasibility and limitation of the HLRW repository monitoring by simulating the propagation of sonic waves in a realistic repository geometry. A finite difference method was utilized to simulate the wave propagation in experimental and repository setups. First, the input of the viscoelastic model was varied to achieve a match between experimental and numerical traces. The routine was repeated for several values of Wc and T, so that quality factors Qp(Wc, T) and Qs(Wc, T) were obtained. Then, the full-scale monitoring procedure was simulated for six scenarios, representing the evolution of bentonite's physical state. The estimated Qp and Qs exhibited a minimum at Wc = 20 per cent and higher sensitivity to Wc, rather than T, suggesting that pronounced inelasticity of the clay has to be taken into account in geophysical modelling and analysis. The repository-model traces confirm that active seismic monitoring is, in principle, capable of depicting physical changes in the

  1. Experimental study on the determination of the shear-wave reflection coefficient at the solid-liquid interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franco, Ediguer E.; Adamowski, Julio C.; Buiochi, Flávio

    2012-05-01

    This work implements the ultrasonic shear-wave reflectance method for viscosity measurements. A modeconversion device was used for the dynamic viscosity measurement of mineral oil, SAE 40 automotive oil and glycerin samples at room temperature and 1 MHz. A novel signals processing technique that calculates the reflection coefficient magnitude in a frequency band, instead of a single frequency, was employed, showing an important improvement on the measurement accuracy.

  2. Influence of plasma parameters on the absorption coefficient of alpha particles to lower hybrid waves in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J.; Zhang, X. Yu, L.; Zhao, X.

    2014-12-15

    In tokamaks, fusion generated α particles may absorb lower hybrid (LH) wave energy, thus reducing the LH current drive efficiency. The absorption coefficient γ{sub α} of LH waves due to α particles changing with some typical parameters is calculated in this paper. Results show that γ{sub α} increases with the parallel refraction index n{sub ‖}, while decreases with the frequency of LH waves ω over a wide range. Higher background plasma temperature and toroidal magnetic field will increase the absorption. The absorption coefficient γ{sub α} increases with n{sub e} when n{sub e} ≤ 8 × 10{sup 19} m{sup −3}, while decreases with n{sub e} when n{sub e} becomes larger, and there is a peak value of γ{sub α} when n{sub e} ≈ 8 × 10{sup 19} m{sup −1} for the ITER-like scenario. The influence of spectral broadening in parametric decay instabilities on the absorption coefficient is evaluated. The value of γ{sub α} with n{sub ‖} being 2.5 is almost two times larger than that with n{sub ‖} being 2.0 and is even lager in the case of 2.9, which will obviously increase the absorption of the LH power by alpha particles.

  3. Preparation, Characterization, and Millimeter Wave Attenuation of Carbon Fibers Coated with Ni-Cu-P and Ni-Co-P Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Mingquan; Li, Zhitao; Wang, Chen; Han, Aijun

    2015-12-01

    Composite carbon fibers (CFs) coated with Ni-X-P (X = Cu, Co, none) alloys were prepared by electroless plating. The morphology, crystal structure, elemental composition, and millimeter wave (MMW) attenuation performance of the alloy-coated CFs were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffractometry, energy-dispersive spectrometry, and microwave attenuation. CFs were coated with a layer of alloy particles. The P content in the Ni-Cu-P or Ni-Co-P-coated alloy was lower than that in the Ni-P alloy, and coating alloy Ni-P was amorphous. Coating alloys exhibited crystal characteristics after Cu or Co introduction. MMW-attenuation performance of alloy-coated CFs showed that the 3 and 8 mm wave-attenuation effects of CF/Ni-Cu-P and CF/Ni-Co-P were better than those of CF/Ni-P and CFs. The 8 mm wave-attenuation values and their increases were larger than those of the 3 mm wave. The MMW-attenuation performance is attributable to the alloy bulk resistivity and P content. The 3 mm wave-attenuation effects of wavelength-coated CF samples were slightly larger than those of the half wavelength samples. An optimal weight gain value existed for the MMW-attenuation performance of alloy-coated CFs.

  4. An evaluation of two millimeter wave propagation models for horizontal atmospheric attenuation at 70-115 GHZ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, Gerard N.

    1988-02-01

    An evaluation is performed for two millimeter wave propagation models: the LIEBE model, developed at the Institute for Telecommunications, Boulder, CO, under the guidance of Dr. H. Liebe; and the EOSAEL model, developed at the U. S. Army Atmospheric Laboratory at White Sands Missile Range, NM. This evaluation is conducted for horizontal attenuation due to both clear atmosphere and hydrometer effects under typical surface meteorological conditions, and within the frequency range 70-115 GHz. Intercomparisons of model theories and predictions show slight differences for molecular oxygen and fog attenuations, but significant differences for water vapor and rain attenuations. Results indicate that, while the qualitative agreement between either the EOSAEL or LIEBE model predictions, and measurements, for horizontal attenuation due to oxygen, water vapor, fog and rain is certainly satisfactory, there is a definite need for improvement. Overall, no clear preference for either the EOSAEL or LIEBE model for operational use is ascertained. Data comparisons suggest that, for several attenuation types, model preference is dependent on either the frequency or meteorological conditions.

  5. Highly accurate stability-preserving optimization of the Zener viscoelastic model, with application to wave propagation in the presence of strong attenuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanc, Émilie; Komatitsch, Dimitri; Chaljub, Emmanuel; Lombard, Bruno; Xie, Zhinan

    2016-04-01

    This paper concerns the numerical modelling of time-domain mechanical waves in viscoelastic media based on a generalized Zener model. To do so, classically in the literature relaxation mechanisms are introduced, resulting in a set of the so-called memory variables and thus in large computational arrays that need to be stored. A challenge is thus to accurately mimic a given attenuation law using a minimal set of relaxation mechanisms. For this purpose, we replace the classical linear approach of Emmerich & Korn with a nonlinear optimization approach with constraints of positivity. We show that this technique is more accurate than the linear approach. Moreover, it ensures that physically meaningful relaxation times that always honour the constraint of decay of total energy with time are obtained. As a result, these relaxation times can always be used in a stable way in a modelling algorithm, even in the case of very strong attenuation for which the classical linear approach may provide some negative and thus unusable coefficients.

  6. Accurate and efficient modeling of global seismic wave propagation for an attenuative Earth model including the center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toyokuni, Genti; Takenaka, Hiroshi

    2012-06-01

    We propose a method for modeling global seismic wave propagation through an attenuative Earth model including the center. This method enables accurate and efficient computations since it is based on the 2.5-D approach, which solves wave equations only on a 2-D cross section of the whole Earth and can correctly model 3-D geometrical spreading. We extend a numerical scheme for the elastic waves in spherical coordinates using the finite-difference method (FDM), to solve the viscoelastodynamic equation. For computation of realistic seismic wave propagation, incorporation of anelastic attenuation is crucial. Since the nature of Earth material is both elastic solid and viscous fluid, we should solve stress-strain relations of viscoelastic material, including attenuative structures. These relations represent the stress as a convolution integral in time, which has had difficulty treating viscoelasticity in time-domain computation such as the FDM. However, we now have a method using so-called memory variables, invented in the 1980s, followed by improvements in Cartesian coordinates. Arbitrary values of the quality factor (Q) can be incorporated into the wave equation via an array of Zener bodies. We also introduce the multi-domain, an FD grid of several layers with different grid spacings, into our FDM scheme. This allows wider lateral grid spacings with depth, so as not to perturb the FD stability criterion around the Earth center. In addition, we propose a technique to avoid the singularity problem of the wave equation in spherical coordinates at the Earth center. We develop a scheme to calculate wavefield variables on this point, based on linear interpolation for the velocity-stress, staggered-grid FDM. This scheme is validated through a comparison of synthetic seismograms with those obtained by the Direct Solution Method for a spherically symmetric Earth model, showing excellent accuracy for our FDM scheme. As a numerical example, we apply the method to simulate seismic

  7. Measurements of the X-ray linear attenuation coefficient for low atomic number materials at energies 32-66 and 140 keV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Midgley, S. M.

    2005-03-01

    The X-ray linear attenuation coefficient was measured for materials containing elements hydrogen to calcium. Characteristic X-rays with energies 32- 66 keV were produced by X-ray fluorescence using a secondary target system, and 140 keV gamma rays were obtained from an unsealed 99 mTc source. The photon beams were highly collimated and recorded using energy dispersive detection. A high-purity germanium detector was utilised to distinguish between measurements with K α and K β characteristic X-rays, and the gamma ray measurements used a sodium iodide detector. Samples were selected on the basis of having known composition and mass densities were measured using a pycnometer. The samples comprised six plastics, seven crystalline materials, three tissue substitute materials, three liquids and six salt solutions. Our results have an uncertainty of less than 2% and are a few percent lower than values predicted by the tabulations.

  8. Element analysis and calculation of the attenuation coefficients for gold, bronze and water matrixes using MCNP, WinXCom and experimental data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esfandiari, M.; Shirmardi, S. P.; Medhat, M. E.

    2014-06-01

    In this study, element analysis and the mass attenuation coefficient for matrixes of gold, bronze and water with various impurities and the concentrations of heavy metals (Cu, Mn, Pb and Zn) are evaluated and calculated by the MCNP simulation code for photons emitted from Barium-133, Americium-241 and sources with energies between 1 and 100 keV. The MCNP data are compared with the experimental data and WinXCom code simulated results by Medhat. The results showed that the obtained results of bronze and gold matrix are in good agreement with the other methods for energies above 40 and 60 keV, respectively. However for water matrixes with various impurities, there is a good agreement between the three methods MCNP, WinXCom and the experimental one in low and high energies.

  9. A new model for the vertical spectral diffuse attenuation coefficient of downwelling irradiance in turbid coastal waters: validation with in situ measurements.

    PubMed

    Simon, Arthi; Shanmugam, Palanisamy

    2013-12-01

    The vertical spectral diffuse attenuation coefficient of Kd is an important optical property related to the penetration and availability of light underwater, which is of fundamental interest in studies of ocean physics and biology. Models developed in the recent decades were mainly based on theoretical analyses and numerical (radiative transfer) simulations to estimate this property in optically deep waters, thus leaving inadequate knowledge of its variability at multiple depths and wavelengths, covering a wide range of solar incident geometry, in turbid coastal waters. In the present study, a new model is developed to quantify the vertical, spatial and temporal variability of K(d) at multiple wavelengths and to quantify its dependence with respect to solar incident geometry under differing sky conditions. Thus, the new model is derived as a function of inherent optical properties (IOPs - absorption a and backscattering b(b)), solar zenith angle and depth parameters. The model results are rigorously evaluated using time-series and discrete in situ data from clear and turbid coastal waters. The K(d) values derived from the new model are found to agree with measured data within the mean relative error 0.02~6.24% and R² 0.94~0.99. By contrast, the existing models have large errors when applied to the same data sets. Statistical results of the new model for the vertical spectral distribution of K(d) in clear oceanic waters (for different solar zenith and in-water conditions) are also good when compared to those of the existing models. These results suggest that the new model can provide an improved interpretation about the variation of the vertical spectral diffuse attenuation coefficient of downwelling irradiance, which will have important implications for ocean physics, biogeochemical cycles and underwater applications in both relatively clear and turbid coastal waters. PMID:24514558

  10. Absorption and Attenuation Coefficients Using the WET Labs ac-s in the Mid-Atlantic Bight: Field Measurements and Data Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ohi, Nobuaki; Makinen, Carla P.; Mitchell, Richard; Moisan, Tiffany A.

    2008-01-01

    Ocean color algorithms are based on the parameterization of apparent optical properties as a function of inherent optical properties. WET Labs underwater absorption and attenuation meters (ac-9 and ac-s) measure both the spectral beam attenuation [c (lambda)] and absorption coefficient [a (lambda)]. The ac-s reports in a continuous range of 390-750 nm with a band pass of 4 nm, totaling approximately 83 distinct wavelengths, while the ac-9 reports at 9 wavelengths. We performed the ac-s field measurements at nine stations in the Mid-Atlantic Bight from water calibrations to data analysis. Onboard the ship, the ac-s was calibrated daily using Milli Q-water. Corrections for the in situ temperature and salinity effects on optical properties of water were applied. Corrections for incomplete recovery of the scattered light in the ac-s absorption tube were performed. The fine scale of spectral and vertical distributions of c (lambda) and a (lambda) were described from the ac-s. The significant relationships between a (674) and that of spectrophotometric analysis and chlorophyll a concentration of discrete water samples were observed.

  11. The effect of methane hydrate morphology and water saturation on seismic wave attenuation in sand under shallow sub-seafloor conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Best, Angus I.; Priest, Jeffrey A.; Clayton, Christopher R. I.; Rees, Emily V. L.

    2013-04-01

    A better understanding of seismic wave attenuation in hydrate-bearing sediments is needed for the improved geophysical quantification of seafloor methane hydrates, important for climate change, geohazard and economic resource assessment. Hence, we conducted a series of small strain (<10-6), seismic frequency (50-550 Hz), laboratory resonant column experiments on synthetic methane hydrate-bearing sands under excess-water seafloor conditions. The results show a complex dependence of P- and S-wave attenuation on hydrate saturation and morphology. P- and S-wave attenuation in excess-water hydrate-bearing sand is much higher than in excess-gas hydrate-bearing sand and increases with hydrate saturation between 0 and 0.44 (the experimental range). Theoretical modelling suggests that load-bearing hydrate is an important cause of heightened attenuation for both P- and S-waves in gas and water saturated sands, while pore-filling hydrate also contributes significantly to P-wave attenuation in water saturated sands. A squirt flow attenuation mechanism, related to microporous hydrate and low aspect ratio pores at the interface between sand grains and hydrate, is thought to be responsible for the heightened levels of attenuation in hydrate-bearing sands at low hydrate saturations (<0.44).

  12. Geodynamic Environment by Satellite Geodesy, Seismic Attenuation and S-wave Splitting. Example from Vrancea Seismogenic Zone, SE Carpathians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mocanu, Victor; Russo, Raymond; Ambrosius, Boudewijn

    2010-05-01

    In the Vrancea seismogenic zone (SE Carpathians), where very strong earthquakes (Mw > 7) are reported several times a century, the seismotectonics is very complex. It develops beneath the contact between the Moldavian East European Platform, the Scythian Platform, and the Moesian Platform, to the east and southeast, and terranes of the Transylvania Basin lying within the Carpathian arc. Several hypothesis have been considered by scientists in order to explain the clustered foci of crustal and intermediate events (as deep as 200 km). However, until now, there is no tectonic scenario which could explain all geological and geophysical observations. We try to integrate long-term permanent and campaign GPS outcomes with contributions from seismic attenuation and S-wave splitting results. GPS contributions mainly refer to determination of velocity vectors. 15 campaigns and seven permanent stations are being used in order to determine the detailed kinematics of an area characterized by very small velocities (1-2 mm/y), bringing the satellite technique to almost its limit. The results suggest a counterclockwise mantle flow around the Vrancea seismogenic zone, which is a high velocity body developed in an almost vertical position, developing deeper than 200 km. This results is also supported by seismic attenuation studies. We found that models like delamination and subduction could be supported by seismic attenuation studies in this zone. The delamination model implies strong upwelling and horizontal inflow of asthenosphere into the gap between the delaminating and remnant lithosphere. The other model implies downwelling and perhaps lateral-horizontal inflow along the slab detachment or tear. The models imply different distributions of density and rheological properties associated with the different lithosphere - asthenosphere structures. We use the ratio of spectral amplitudes of P and S waves from vertical and transverse seismograms to estimate the S to P ratio in the

  13. Influence of pressure, temperature, and pore fluid on the frequency-dependent attenuation of elastic waves in Berea sandstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'hara, Stephen G.

    1985-07-01

    The effects of pore fluid, effective stress, pore fluid pressure, and temperature on the frequency dependence of elastic wave attenuation in Berea sandstone are interrelated in a series of systematic experiments. The attenuation of both the extensional and torsional modes of cylindrical samples of the sandstone is measured on the frequency range 3-30 kHz. To simulate conditions within the earth, the sandstone is subjected to confining stress to 70.0 MPa and temperature from 24.0 °C to 120.0 °C. Confining pressure and pore fluid pressure are varied independently. Data for two different pore fluids, brine and n-heptane, suggest that a scaling law exists for the pressure and temperature dependence of the attenuation in terms of the pore fluid. The logarithmic decrement of the sandstone is almost frequency independent in a vacuum evacuated sample, but shows a linear frequency dependence, once the sample is saturated. Extrapolation of this linear trend to low frequencies suggests that the decrement in fluid-filled sandstone is effectively frequency independent at seismic frequencies (<100 Hz). The frequency dependence becomes more pronounced as either the effective stress or the temperature is decreased. When the difference between the external stress on the sandstone and the pore fluid pressure is large, the attenuation depends only on the effective stress and is relatively temperature independent. But at low effective stress, the attenuation increases linearly with increasing pore fluid pressure and decreases linearly with increasing temperature. While a specific model is lacking, the attenuation process is apparently influenced most strongly by chemical processes at the pore fluid-matrix interface accompanied by subtle changes in the sandstone matrix dimensions.

  14. An embedded boundary method for the wave equation with discontinuous coefficients

    SciTech Connect

    Kreiss, H O; Petersson, N A

    2005-09-26

    A second order accurate embedded boundary method for the two-dimensional wave equation with discontinuous wave propagation speed is described. The wave equation is discretized on a Cartesian grid with constant grid size and the interface (across which the wave speed is discontinuous) is allowed to intersect the mesh in an arbitrary fashion. By using ghost points on either side of the interface, previous embedded boundary techniques for the Neumann and Dirichlet problems are generalized to satisfy the jump conditions across the interface to second order accuracy. The resulting discretization of the jump conditions has the desirable property that each ghost point can be updated independently of all other ghost points, resulting in a fully explicit time-integration method. Numerical examples are given where the method is used to study electro-magnetic scattering of a plane wave by a dielectric cylinder. The numerical solutions are evaluated against the analytical solution due to Mie, and point-wise second order accuracy is confirmed.

  15. Seismic-Wave Attenuation and Source Excitation in La Paz-Los Cabos, Baja California Sur, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortega, R.; Gonzalez, M.

    2007-05-01

    We present results from a regional study of seismic-wave attenuation and source excitation from small- magnitude earthquakes recorded at distances from 6 to 180 km in the La Paz-Los Cabos region, at the south end of the Baja California Peninsula. Data were recorded using 32 strong-motion seismic stations from the La Paz network (LAP). A least squares regression separating the excitation, site, and propagation effects was carried out. We performed the analyses in the time and frequency domains, and we compared these results with results from a coda-normalization method. The propagation term was parameterized to represent a geometrical spreading function and a frequency-dependent Q(f) at a reference distance of 40 km. We estimated the regional attenuation by measuring the maximum amplitude of the S- or Lg-waves as a function of frequency, defining a continuous piecewise propagation term, D(r,f), after separating the excitation and site terms. Our results show that the attenuation is lower compared to that of central or northern Mexico. Recorded data were of remarkably good quality in spite of the fact that the strong-motion network recorded only small-size earthquake.

  16. Invariance of Hypersonic Normal Force Coefficients with Reynolds Number and Determination of Inviscid Wave Drag from Laminar Experimental Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hawkins, Richard; Penland, Jim A.

    1997-01-01

    Observations have been made and reported that the experimental normal force coefficients at a constant angle of attack were constant with a variation of more than 2 orders of magnitude of Reynolds number at a free-stream Mach number M(sub infinity) of 8.00 and more than 1 order of magnitude variation at M(sub infinity) = 6.00 on the same body-wing hypersonic cruise configuration. These data were recorded under laminar, transitional, and turbulent boundary layer conditions with both hot-wall and cold-wall models. This report presents experimental data on 25 configurations of 17 models of both simple and complex geometry taken at M(sub infinity) = 6.00, 6.86, and 8.00 in 4 different hypersonic facilities. Aerodynamic calculations were made by computational fluid dynamics (CID) and engineering methods to analyze these data. The conclusions were that the normal force coefficients at a given altitude are constant with Reynolds numbers at hypersonic speeds and that the axial force coefficients recorded under laminar boundary-layer conditions at several Reynolds numbers may be plotted against the laminar parameter (the reciprocal of the Reynolds number to the one-half power) and extrapolated to the ordinate axis to determine the inviscid-wave-drag coefficient at the intercept.

  17. Estimation of anisotropy coefficient and total attenuation of swine liver at 850 nm based on a goniometric technique: influence of sample thickness.

    PubMed

    Saccomandi, P; Vogel, V; Bazrafshan, B; Schena, E; Vogl, T J; Silvestri, S; Mäntele, W

    2014-01-01

    Estimation of optical properties of biologic tissue is crucial for theoretical modeling of laser treatments in medicine. Tissue highly absorbs and scatters the light between 650 nm and 1300 nm, where the laser provides therapeutic effects. Among other properties, the characteristic of biological tissues to scatter the light traveling trough, is described by the anisotropy coefficient (g). The relationship between g and the distribution of the scattered light at different angles is described by Henyey-Greenstein phase function. The measurement of angular distribution of scattered light is performed by the goniometric technique. This paper describes the estimation of g and attenuation coefficient, μt, of swine liver at 850 nm, performed by an ad hoc designed goniometric-based system, where a spectrometer measures intensities of scattered light at fixed angles (0°, 30°, 45°, 60, 120°, 135° and 150°). Both one-term and two-term Henyey-Greenstein phase function have been employed to estimate anisotropy coefficient for forward (gfs) and backward scattering (gbs). Measurements are performed on samples of two thicknesses (60 um and 30 urn) to investigate the influence of this factor on g, and repeated 6 times for each thickness. The estimated values of gfs were 0.947 and 0.951 for thickness of 60 μm and 30 μm, respectively; the estimations of gfs were -0.498 and -0.270 for thickness of 60 μm and 30 μm, respectively. Moreover, μt of liver has been estimated (i.e., 90±20 cm(1)), through Lambert-Beer equation. The comparison of our results with data reported in literature encourages the use of the ad hoc designed tool for performing experiments on other tissue, and at other wavelengths. PMID:25571198

  18. Analytical determination of the reflection coefficient by the evanescent modes model during the wave-current-horizontal plate interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Errifaiy, Meriem; Naasse, Smail; Chahine, Chakib

    2016-07-01

    Our work presents an analytical study of the determination of the reflection coefficient during the interaction between the regular wave current and a horizontal plate. This study was done using the linearized potential flow theory with the evanescent modes model, while searching for complex solutions to the dispersion equation that are neither real pure nor imaginary pure. To validate the established model, it has been confronted with the experimental results of V. Rey and J. Touboul, in a first phase, and then compared to those of the numerical study by H.-X. Lin et al. Then, this model was used to study the effect of current on the reflection coefficient. xml:lang="fr"

  19. A Crustal Fluid Based Interpretation of the Frequency Dependent Shear Wave Attenuation Observed in the Lithosphere Beneath the Kanto Area, Japan.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouleau, P. M.

    2004-05-01

    Seismic attenuation measurements in the band 0.01 - 10 Hz have now been reported for a large number of tectonic areas. For tectonically active regions, the measured attenuation appears higher and more frequency-dependent than for passive regions. It has been hypothesised that such an observation reflects the presence of a high density of fluid-saturated fractures along the paths of the seismic waves used to estimate the attenuation. In order to quantitatively test this hypothesis, both a seismic attenuation data set that spans a large band of frequencies and a quantitative seismic absorption model that involves fluids are needed. This hypothesis is tested here using the set of shear-wave attenuation data reported for the Kanto Area, which shows a clear maximum in attenuation near one Hz, and the squeeze-flow mechanism model (i.e. squirt-flow adapted to the field-based fracture-porosity scale and crustal hydraulic attributes), which predicts well-defined attenuation maxima. The modelling results show that the squeezing of fracture-bound saline fluid produces shear-wave Q values that match the magnitude and frequency dependence of the data-inferred shear-wave Qs. In particular, the depth-distribution of squeeze-flow Qs for the sampled area shows a zone of very high absorption and pronounced frequency dependence that correlates well with a zone of impedance contrast imaged via body wave tomographs reported for the same area. Thus, the squeeze-flow mechanism supports the hypothesis that viscous flow of crustal fluids effectively attenuates high-frequency seismic waves in the crust and so suggests a cause for the shear-wave Q versus frequency trend observed in the Kanto area.

  20. Temperature dependence of shear wave attenuation in partially molten gabbronorite at seismic frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontaine, Fabrice R.; Ildefonse, Benoit; Bagdassarov, Nickolai S.

    2005-12-01

    Torsion oscillatory deformation experiments have been performed at high temperatures (600-1170°C) and over a wide range of low frequencies (20-2.10-3 Hz) on fine-grained gabbronorite samples from the Oman ophiolite in order to determine the shear wave attenuation as a function of temperature and melt fraction. The specimens have a small and uniform grain size (0.25-0.3 mm) and do not contain secondary, hydrated minerals. Measurements of internal friction (Q-1) were performed using a forced oscillatory torsion apparatus at small strains (~10-7), and with increasing small temperature steps to reduce thermal microcracking. The general dependence of Q-1 to frequency is Q-1~ω-α, where ω is the angular velocity of forced oscillations and α is an empirical exponent. Below the melting temperature (~1050°C), α has average values of ~0.15 at low frequency (<=0.5 Hz) and 0.06 at higher frequency. Above the melting temperature, α has average values of ~0.22 at low frequency and -0.02 at higher frequency. This frequency dependence of Q-1 is attributed to a viscoelastic behaviour due to the diffusion controlled grain boundary sliding, and partially to the squirt flow of the melt-phase wetting grain boundaries. The onset of melting is associated with a markedly higher Q-1 and a stronger dependence of Q-1 on temperature. The melt-related mechanical dissipation process could be a melt squirt flow. The characteristic frequency for the melt squirt flow is ωm~ 0.15-300 Hz when the melt pocket aspect ratio is ~10-3-10-2. Around the melting temperature the internal friction can be approximated by an experimental power law Q-1=A.[ω-1.d-1. exp(-Ea/RT)]α with α~ 0.08, A= 34.72s-αμm-α and Ea~ 873 kJmol-1.

  1. The contribution of activated processes to Q. [stress corrosion cracking in seismic wave attenuation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spetzler, H. A.; Getting, I. C.; Swanson, P. L.

    1980-01-01

    The possible role of activated processes in seismic attenuation is investigated. In this study, a solid is modeled by a parallel and series configuration of dashpots and springs. The contribution of stress and temperature activated processes to the long term dissipative behavior of this system is analyzed. Data from brittle rock deformation experiments suggest that one such process, stress corrosion cracking, may make a significant contribution to the attenuation factor, Q, especially for long period oscillations under significant tectonic stress.

  2. Determining the nominal power transfer coefficient for passive surface acoustic wave devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timoshenko, A. N.; Palamarchuk, A. A.; Semenko, A. I.

    1982-05-01

    A method for calculating the nominal power transfer coefficient of passive SAW devices operating in a linear mode is described. Relations of practical importance are obtained, making it possible, on the basis of known characteristics of acousto-electric transducers and acoustic lines, to determine the losses incurred by devices when they are connected to radioelectronic equipment. The relations also permit an assessment of the uniformity of the amplitude-frequency characteristics of the devices.

  3. Toward Improved Methods of Estimating Attenuation, Phase and Group velocity of surface waves observed on Shallow Seismic Records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diallo, M. S.; Holschneider, M.; Kulesh, M.; Scherbaum, F.; Ohrnberger, M.; Lück, E.

    2004-05-01

    This contribution is concerned with the estimate of attenuation and dispersion characteristics of surface waves observed on a shallow seismic record. The analysis is based on a initial parameterization of the phase and attenuation functions which are then estimated by minimizing a properly defined merit function. To minimize the effect of random noise on the estimates of dispersion and attenuation we use cross-correlations (in Fourier domain) of preselected traces from some region of interest along the survey line. These cross-correlations are then expressed in terms of the parameterized attenuation and phase functions and the auto-correlation of the so-called source trace or reference trace. Cross-corelation that enter the optimization are selected so as to provide an average estimate of both the attenuation function and the phase (group) velocity of the area under investigation. The advantage of the method over the standard two stations method using Fourier technique is that uncertainties related to the phase unwrapping and the estimate of the number of 2π cycle skip in the phase phase are eliminated. However when mutliple modes arrival are observed, its become merely impossible to obtain reliable estimate the dipsersion curves for the different modes using optimization method alone. To circumvent this limitations we using the presented approach in conjunction with the wavelet propagation operator (Kulesh et al., 2003) which allows the application of band pass filtering in (ω -t) domain, to select a particular mode for the minimization. Also by expressing the cost function in the wavelet domain the optimization can be performed either with respect to the phase, the modulus of the transform or a combination of both. This flexibility in the design of the cost function provides an additional mean of constraining the optimization results. Results from the application of this dispersion and attenuation analysis method are shown for both synthetic and real 2D shallow

  4. Attenuation and Shock Waves in Linear Hereditary Viscoelastic Media; Strick-Mainardi, Jeffreys-Lomnitz-Strick and Andrade Creep Compliances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanyga, Andrzej

    2014-09-01

    Dispersion, attenuation and wavefronts in a class of linear viscoelastic media proposed by Strick and Mainardi (Geophys J R Astr Soc 69:415-429, 1982) and a related class of models due to Lomnitz, Jeffreys and Strick are studied by a new method due to the author. Unlike the previously studied explicit models of relaxation modulus or creep compliance, these two classes support propagation of discontinuities. Due to an extension made by Strick, either of these two classes of models comprise both viscoelastic solids and fluids. We also discuss the Andrade viscoelastic media. The Andrade media do not support discontinuity waves and exhibit the pedestal effect.

  5. Designing mid-wave infrared (MWIR) thermo-optic coefficient (dn/dT) in chalcogenide glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gleason, Benn; Sisken, Laura; Smith, Charmayne; Richardson, Kathleen

    2016-05-01

    Seventeen infrared-transmitting GeAsSe chalcogenide glasses were fabricated to determine the role of chemistry and structure on mid-wave infrared (MWIR) optical properties. The refractive index and thermoptic coefficients of samples were measured at λ = 4.515 μm using an IR-modified Metricon prism coupler, located at University of Central Florida. Thermo-optic coefficient (dn/dT) values were shown to range from approximately -40 ppm/°C to +65 ppm/°C, and refractive index was shown to vary between approximately 2.5000 and 2.8000. Trends in refractive index and dn/dT were found to be related to the atomic structures present within the glassy network, as opposed to the atomic percentage of any individual constituent. A linear correlation was found between the quantity (n-3•dn/dT) and the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) of the glass, suggesting the ability to compositionally design chalcogenide glass compositions with zero dn/dT, regardless of refractive index or dispersion performance. The tunability of these novel glasses offer increased thermal and mechanical stability as compared to the current commercial zero dn/dT options such as AMTIR-5 from Amorphous Materials Inc. For IR imaging systems designed to achieve passive athermalization, utilizing chalcogenide glasses with their tunable ranges of dn/dT (including zero) can be key to addressing system size, weight, and power (SWaP) limitations.

  6. Evaluation of Compton attenuation and photoelectric absorption coefficients by convolution of scattering and primary functions and counts ratio on energy spectra

    PubMed Central

    Ashoor, Mansour; Asgari, Afrouz; Khorshidi, Abdollah; Rezaei, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Estimation of Compton attenuation and the photoelectric absorption coefficients were explored at various depths. Methods: A new method was proposed for estimating the depth based on the convolution of two exponential functions, namely convolution of scattering and primary functions (CSPF), which the convolved result will conform to the photopeak region of energy spectrum with the variable energy-window widths (EWWs) and a theory on the scattering cross-section. The triple energy-windows (TEW) and extended triple energy-windows scatter correction (ETEW) methods were used to estimate the scattered and primary photons according to the energy spectra at various depths due to a better performance than the other methods in nuclear medicine. For this purpose, the energy spectra were employed, and a distinct phantom along with a technetium-99 m source was simulated by Monte Carlo method. Results: The simulated results indicate that the EWW, used to calculate the scattered and primary counts in terms of the integral operators on the functions, was proportional to the depth as an exponential function. The depth will be calculated by the combination of either TEW or ETEW and proposed method resulting in the distinct energy-window. The EWWs for primary photons were in good agreement with those of scattered photons at the same as depths. The average errors between these windows for both methods TEW, and ETEW were 7.25% and 6.03% at different depths, respectively. The EWW value for functions of scattered and primary photons was reduced by increasing the depth in the CSPF method. Conclusions: This coefficient may be an index for the scattering cross-section. PMID:26170567

  7. Determination of the s-Wave Scattering Length and the C{sub 6} van der Waals Coefficient of {sup 174}Yb via Photoassociation Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Enomoto, K.; Kitagawa, M.; Kasa, K.; Tojo, S.; Takahashi, Y.

    2007-05-18

    We report photoassociation spectroscopy of {sup 174}Yb for the {sup 1}S{sub 0}-{sup 1}P{sub 1} transition at 1 {mu}K, where only the s-wave scattering state contributes to the spectra. The wave function of the s-wave scattering state is obtained from the photoassociation efficiency, and we determine that the C{sub 6} potential coefficient is 2300{+-}250 a.u. and the s-wave scattering length is 5.53{+-}0.11 nm. Based on these parameters, we discuss the scattering properties of s- and d-wave states.

  8. Determination of the s-wave scattering length and the C6 van der Waals coefficient of 174Yb via photoassociation spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Enomoto, K; Kitagawa, M; Kasa, K; Tojo, S; Takahashi, Y

    2007-05-18

    We report photoassociation spectroscopy of 174Yb for the 1S(0)-1P1 transition at 1 microK, where only the s-wave scattering state contributes to the spectra. The wave function of the s-wave scattering state is obtained from the photoassociation efficiency, and we determine that the C6 potential coefficient is 2300+/-250 a.u. and the s-wave scattering length is 5.53+/-0.11 nm. Based on these parameters, we discuss the scattering properties of s- and d-wave states. PMID:17677695

  9. Attenuation distance of low frequency waves upstream of the pre-dawn bow shock: GEOTAIL and ISEE 3 comparison

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sugiyama, T.; Terasawa, T.; Kawano, H.; Yamamoto, T.; Kokubun, S.; Frank, L. A.; Ackerson, K.; Tsurutani, B. T.

    1995-01-01

    We have made a statistical study of the spatial distribution of low frequency waves (approx. 0.01-0.1 Hz) in the region upstream of the pre-dawn to dawn side bow shock (-50 Re less than X less than 15 Re) using both GEOTAIL and international sun earth explorer 3 (ISEE-3) magnetometer data. We have found that the wave amplitude dependence on D and X(sub s), where D is the distance from the bow shock and X(sub s) the x-coordinate position of shock foot point of the IMF, can be described by a functional form of A exp (X(sub s)/L(sub X)-D/L(sub D), with the characteristic attenuation distances, L(sub X) = 62 +/- 12 Re and L(sub D) = 59 +/- 38 Re.

  10. X-ray mass attenuation coefficients and imaginary components of the atomic form factor of zinc over the energy range of 7.2-15.2 keV

    SciTech Connect

    Rae, Nicholas A.; Chantler, Christopher T.; Barnea, Zwi; Jonge, Martin D. de; Tran, Chanh Q.; Hester, James R.

    2010-02-15

    The x-ray mass attenuation coefficients of zinc are measured in a high-accuracy experiment between 7.2 and 15.2 keV with an absolute accuracy of 0.044% and 0.197%. This is the most accurate determination of any attenuation coefficient on a bending-magnet beamline and reduces the absolute uncertainty by a factor of 3 compared to earlier work by advances in integrated column density determination and the full-foil mapping technique described herein. We define a relative accuracy of 0.006%, which is not the same as either the precision or the absolute accuracy. Relative accuracy is the appropriate parameter for standard implementation of analysis of near-edge spectra. Values of the imaginary components f'' of the x-ray form factor of zinc are derived. Observed differences between the measured mass attenuation coefficients and various theoretical calculations reach a maximum of about 5% at the absorption edge and up to 2% further than 1 keV away from the edge. The measurements invite improvements in the theoretical calculations of mass attenuation coefficients of zinc.

  11. Attenuation of transverse waves by using a metamaterial beam with lateral local resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Hsin-Haou; Lin, Chi-Kuang; Tan, Kwek-Tze

    2016-08-01

    This study numerically and experimentally investigated the wave propagation and vibrational behavior of a metamaterial beam with lateral local resonators. A two-dimensional simplified analytical model was proposed for feasibly and accurately capturing the in-plane dispersion behavior, which can be used for the initial design. The out-of-plane wave motions, however, required advanced three-dimensional (3D) modeling. Through experimental validations, 3D finite element simulations were demonstrated to be suitable for advanced design and analysis. This study provided a basis for designing metabeams for transverse wave mitigation. The proposed concept can be further extended to 3D metamaterial plates for wave and vibrational mitigation applications.

  12. Estimation of the spectral diffuse attenuation coefficient of downwelling irradiance in inland and coastal waters from hyperspectral remote sensing data: Validation with experimental data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Arthi; Shanmugam, Palanisamy

    2016-07-01

    A semi-analytical model is developed for estimating the spectral diffuse attenuation coefficient of downwelling irradiance (Kd(λ)) in inland and coastal waters. The model works as a function of the inherent optical properties (absorption and backscattering), depth, and solar zenith angle. Results of this model are validated using a large number of in-situ measurements of Kd(λ) in clear oceanic, turbid coastal and productive lagoon waters. To further evaluate its relative performance, Kd(λ) values obtained from this model are compared with results from three existing models. Validation results show that the present model is a better descriptor of Kd(λ) and shows an overall better performance compared to the existing models. The applicability of the present model is further tested on two Hyperspectral Imager for the Coastal Ocean (HICO) remote sensing images acquired simultaneously with our field measurements. The Kd(λ) spectra derived from HICO imageries have good agreement with measured data with the mean relative percent error of less than 12% which are well within the benchmark for a validated uncertainty of ±35% endorsed for the remote sensing products in oceanic waters. The model offers potential advantages for predicting changes in spectral and vertical Kd values in a wide variety of waters within inland and coastal environments.

  13. Measurement of the mass attenuation coefficients and electron densities for BiPbSrCaCuO superconductor at different energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Çevik, U.; Baltaş, H.

    2007-03-01

    The mass attenuation coefficients for Bi, Pb, Sr, Ca, Cu metals, Bi2O3, PbO, SrCO3, CaO, CuO compounds and solid-state forms of Bi1.7Pb0.3Sr2Ca2Cu3O10 superconductor were determined at 57.5, 65.2, 77.1, 87.3, 94.6, 122 and 136 keV energies. The samples were irradiated using a 57Co point source emitted 122 and 136 keV γ-ray energies. The X-ray energies were obtained using secondary targets such as Ta, Bi2O3 and (CH3COO)2UO22H2O. The γ- and X-rays were counted by a Si(Li) detector with a resolution of 0.16 keV at 5.9 keV. The effect of absorption edges on electron density, effective atomic numbers and their variation with photon energy in composite superconductor samples was discussed. Obtained values were compared with theoretical values.

  14. K-shell absorption jump factors and jump ratios in elements between Tm ( Z = 69) and Os ( Z = 76) derived from new mass attenuation coefficient measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaya, Necati; Tıraşoğlu, Engin; Apaydın, Gökhan; Aylıkcı, Volkan; Cengiz, Erhan

    2007-08-01

    The K-shell absorption jump factors and jump ratios were derived from new mass attenuation coefficients measured using an energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) spectrometer for Tm, Yb elements being Tm 2O 3, Yb 2O 3 compounds and pure Lu, Hf, Ta, W, Re and Os. The measurements, in the region 56-77 keV, were done in a transmission geometry utilizing the K α1 , K α2 , K β1 and K β2 X- rays from different secondary source targets (Yb, Ta, Os, W, Re and Ir, etc.) excited by the 123.6 keV γ-photons from an 57Co annular source and detected by an Ultra-LEGe solid state detector with a resolution of 150 eV at 5.9 keV. Experimental results have been compared with theoretically calculated values. The measured values of Tm, Yb, Lu, Hf, Ta, W, Re and Os are reported here for the first time.

  15. Changes in the linear attenuation coefficient of canine appendicular bone following intravenous infusion of strontium lactate, measured using gamma-ray computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Overton, T R; Snyder, R E; Hangartner, T N; Girgis, S; Audette, R J; Secord, D C

    1992-04-01

    Changes in the average linear attenuation coefficient (LAC) within a fixed measurement volume in the proximal end of the dog tibia, which contains trabecular bone and associated soft tissues (the trabecular bone "space"), were monitored continuously using gamma-ray computed tomography (gamma-CT) prior to, during, and following intravenous infusion of strontium (Sr) lactate. An infusion of 1.3-4.7 g of Sr over a period of 110-160 minutes into 20-kg dogs resulted, within 6-8 hours, in an increase of 0.019-0.045 cm-1 (P less than 0.002) in the LAC. Calibration of the gamma-CT system showed that 0.44 mg/cm3 of Sr produced a change of 0.01 cm-1 in the LAC. Using this conversion factor, the Sr concentration in the trabecular bone space resulting from infusion, as measured by flame atomic absorption spectroscopy, agreed with that predicted by the change observed in the LAC. Sr present in the serum and urine was consistent with the changes observed in the LAC over the study period. Control dogs infused with mineral-free solutions showed no change in LAC. Calcium equivalents required to give the changes observed in the LAC using Sr indicate that variations in skeletal turnover in man can be monitored in the peripheral skeleton using gamma-CT. PMID:1571847

  16. Finite-difference numerical modelling of gravito-acoustic wave propagation in a windy and attenuating atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brissaud, Quentin; Martin, Roland; Garcia, Raphaël F.; Komatitsch, Dimitri

    2016-04-01

    Acoustic and gravity waves propagating in planetary atmospheres have been studied intensively as markers of specific phenomena such as tectonic events or explosions or as contributors to atmosphere dynamics. To get a better understanding of the physics behind these dynamic processes, both acoustic and gravity waves propagation should be modelled in a 3D attenuating and windy atmosphere extending from the ground to the upper thermosphere. Thus, in order to provide an efficient numerical tool at the regional or global scale we introduce a finite difference in the time domain (FDTD) approach that relies on the linearized compressible Navier-Stokes equations with a background flow (wind). One significant benefit of such a method is its versatility because it handles both acoustic and gravity waves in the same simulation, which enables one to observe interactions between them. Simulations can be performed for 2D or 3D realistic cases such as tsunamis in a full MSISE-00 atmosphere or gravity-wave generation by atmospheric explosions. We validate the computations by comparing them to analytical solutions based on dispersion relations in specific benchmark cases: an atmospheric explosion, and a ground displacement forcing.

  17. OM/OC Ratio and Specific Attenuation Coefficient in Ambient Particulate Matter at a Rural Site in Southern Ontario: Implications for Aerosol Aging and Emission Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, T. W.; Huang, L.; Leaitch, R.; Sharma, S.; Brook, J.; Slowik, J.; Abbatt, J.

    2008-05-01

    Carbonaceous species (organic carbon (OC) and elemental carbon (EC)) contribute a large portion of atmospheric fine particle mass and influence air quality, human health, and climate forcing. However, their emission sources and atmospheric aging processes are not well understood. The OM/OC ratio, defined as the organic mass per unit OC mass, is useful to understand the degree of oxidation of aerosol particles in atmospheric processes. We define the modified BC/EC (mod BC/EC) ratio as the ratio of the non-scattering corrected absorption coefficient per unit mass of EC. The mod BC/EC ratio has a similar meaning as the site specific attenuation coefficient, which is an important parameter used to convert light absorption measurements to black carbon mass. The mod BC/EC ratio can vary due to light scattering effect on absorption measurements, in which the oxygenated organics may play a role. The pyrolysis organic carbon (POC) is defined as the carbon mass fraction obtained at T= 870°C under a pure helium environment using the thermal separation method [Huang et al., 2006]. Since POC mass is generally proportional to the amount of oxygenated OC, studying the relationships among OC, EC, POC, as well as OM/OC and mod BC/EC ratios may help us understand the mechanisms of aerosol aging from different emission sources. Two 1-month field studies were conducted at a rural site in southern Ontario (NW of Toronto) during fall 2005 and spring 2007. Quartz filter samples were collected and analyzed for OC, POC, and EC concentrations using a thermal/optical method [Huang et al., 2006]. Together with the total organic matter measured by an Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS) and the absorption coefficient obtained from a Particle Soot Absorption Photometer (PSAP), the OM/OC and mod BC/EC ratios for ambient aerosols were obtained. Our results show that when air mass was mainly from south, OC, POC, and EC were relatively high, with average ratios of OC/EC, OM/OC, and POC/EC as 1

  18. Pn wave geometrical spreading and attenuation in Northeast China and the Korean Peninsula constrained by observations from North Korean nuclear explosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Lian-Feng; Xie, Xiao-Bi; Tian, Bao-Feng; Chen, Qi-Fu; Hao, Tian-Yao; Yao, Zhen-Xing

    2015-11-01

    We investigate the geometric spreading and attenuation of seismic Pn waves in Northeast China and the Korean Peninsula. A high-quality broadband Pn wave data set generated by North Korean nuclear tests is used to constrain the parameters of a frequency-dependent log-quadratic geometric spreading function and a power law Pn Q model. The geometric spreading function and apparent Pn wave Q are obtained for Northeast China and the Korean Peninsula between 2.0 and 10.0 Hz. Using the two-station amplitude ratios of the Pn spectra and correcting them with the known spreading function, we remove the contributions of the source and crust from the apparent Pn Q and retrieve the P wave attenuation information along the pure upper mantle path. We then use both Pn amplitudes and amplitude ratios in a tomographic approach to obtain the upper mantle P wave attenuation in the studied area. The Pn wave spectra observed in China are compared with those recorded in Japan, and the result reveals that the high-frequency Pn signal across the oceanic path attenuated faster compared with those through the continental path.

  19. Microwave and Millimeter Wave Characteristics and Attenuation of Clouds over some Malaysian Equatorial Stations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandeep, J. S.; Hassan, S. I. S.

    2008-03-01

    Based on radar range height indicator (RHI) measurements, cloud characteristics in relation to radiowave propagation over three locations in different geographical region in western Malaysia have been presented. It is seen that low cloud occurrence over these locations are quite significant. Cloud attenuation and noise temperature can result in serious degradation of telecommunication link performances. This paper presents cloud coverage in different months, 0°C isotherm height and cloud attenuation results at 12 GHz, 20 GHz, 36 GHz, 50 GHz, 70 GHz and 100 GHz over measurement site. The low level cloud over the measurement sites has been found to occur for many days and nights and particularly in the months of April to May and October to December. Such results are useful for satellite communication and remote sensing application in Malaysia.

  20. Variation of coda wave attenuation in the Alborz region and central Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahimi, H.; Motaghi, K.; Mukhopadhyay, S.; Hamzehloo, H.

    2010-06-01

    More than 340 earthquakes recorded by the Institute of Geophysics, University of Tehran (IGUT) short period stations from 1996 to 2004 were analysed to estimate the S-coda attenuation in the Alborz region, the northern part of the Alpine-Himalayan orogen in western Asia, and in central Iran, which is the foreland of this orogen. The coda quality factor, Qc, was estimated using the single backscattering model in frequency bands of 1-25 Hz. In this research, lateral and depth variation of Qc in the Alborz region and central Iran are studied. It is observed that in the Alborz region there is absence of significant lateral variation in Qc. The average frequency relation for this region is Qc = 79 +/- 2f1.07+/-0.08. Two anomalous high-attenuation areas in central Iran are recognized around the stations LAS and RAZ. The average frequency relation for central Iran excluding the values of these two stations is Qc = 94 +/- 2f0.97+/-0.12. To investigate the attenuation variation with depth, Qc value was calculated for 14 lapse times (25, 30, 35,... 90s) for two data sets having epicentral distance range R < 100 km (data set 1) and 100 < R < 200 km (data set 2) in each area. It is observed that Qc increases with depth. However, the rate of increase of Qc with depth is not uniform in our study area. Beneath central Iran the rate of increase of Qc is greater at depths less than 100 km compared to that at larger depths indicating the existence of a high attenuation anomalous structure under the lithosphere of central Iran. In addition, below ~180 km, the Qc value does not vary much with depth under both study areas, indicating the presence of a transparent mantle under them.

  1. High performance AlScN thin film based surface acoustic wave devices with large electromechanical coupling coefficient

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Wenbo; He, Xingli; Ye, Zhi E-mail: jl2@bolton.ac.uk; Wang, Xiaozhi; Mayrhofer, Patrick M.; Gillinger, Manuel; Bittner, Achim; Schmid, Ulrich

    2014-09-29

    AlN and AlScN thin films with 27% scandium (Sc) were synthesized by DC magnetron sputtering deposition and used to fabricate surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices. Compared with AlN-based devices, the AlScN SAW devices exhibit much better transmission properties. Scandium doping results in electromechanical coupling coefficient, K{sup 2}, in the range of 2.0% ∼ 2.2% for a wide normalized thickness range, more than a 300% increase compared to that of AlN-based SAW devices, thus demonstrating the potential applications of AlScN in high frequency resonators, sensors, and high efficiency energy harvesting devices. The coupling coefficients of the present AlScN based SAW devices are much higher than that of the theoretical calculation based on some assumptions for AlScN piezoelectric material properties, implying there is a need for in-depth investigations on the material properties of AlScN.

  2. Comparisons of polymer/gas partition coefficients calculated from responses of thickness shear mode and surface acoustic wave vapor sensors.

    PubMed

    Grate, J W; Kaganove, S N; Bhethanabotla, V R

    1998-01-01

    Apparent partition coefficients, K, for the sorption of toluene by four different polymer thin films on thickness shear mode (TSM) and surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices are compared. The polymers examined were poly(isobutylene) (PIB), poly(epichlorohydrin) (PECH), poly(butadiene) (PBD), and poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS). Independent data on partition coefficients for toluene in these polymers were compiled for comparison, and TSM sensor measurements were made using both oscillator and impedance analysis methods. K values from SAW sensor measurements were about twice those calculated from TSM sensor measurements when the polymers were PIB and PECH, and they were also at least twice the values of the independent partition coefficient data, which is interpreted as indicating that the SAW sensor responds to polymer modulus changes as well as to mass changes. K values from SAW and TSM measurements were in agreement with each other and with independent data when the polymer was PBD. Similarly, K values from the PDMS-coated SAW sensor were not much larger than values from independent measurements. These results indicate that modulus effects were not contributing to the SAW sensor responses in the cases of PBD and PDMS. However, K values from the PDMS-coated TSM device were larger than the values from the SAW device or independent measurements, and the impedance analyzer results indicated that this sensor using our sample of PDMS at the applied thickness did not behave as a simple mass sensor. Differences in behavior among the test polymers on SAW devices are interpreted in terms of their differing viscoelastic properties. PMID:21644612

  3. Time-domain comparisons of power law attenuation in causal and noncausal time-fractional wave equations.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xiaofeng; McGough, Robert J

    2016-05-01

    The attenuation of ultrasound propagating in human tissue follows a power law with respect to frequency that is modeled by several different causal and noncausal fractional partial differential equations. To demonstrate some of the similarities and differences that are observed in three related time-fractional partial differential equations, time-domain Green's functions are calculated numerically for the power law wave equation, the Szabo wave equation, and for the Caputo wave equation. These Green's functions are evaluated for water with a power law exponent of y = 2, breast with a power law exponent of y = 1.5, and liver with a power law exponent of y = 1.139. Simulation results show that the noncausal features of the numerically calculated time-domain response are only evident very close to the source and that these causal and noncausal time-domain Green's functions converge to the same result away from the source. When noncausal time-domain Green's functions are convolved with a short pulse, no evidence of noncausal behavior remains in the time-domain, which suggests that these causal and noncausal time-fractional models are equally effective for these numerical calculations. PMID:27250193

  4. Pressure diffusion waves in porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Silin, Dmitry; Korneev, Valeri; Goloshubin, Gennady

    2003-04-08

    Pressure diffusion wave in porous rocks are under consideration. The pressure diffusion mechanism can provide an explanation of the high attenuation of low-frequency signals in fluid-saturated rocks. Both single and dual porosity models are considered. In either case, the attenuation coefficient is a function of the frequency.

  5. Elastic wave attenuation and velocity of Berea sandstone measured in the frequency domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shankland, T. J.; Johnson, P. A.; Hopson, T. M.

    1993-03-01

    Using measurements in the frequency domain we have measured quality factor Q and travel times of direct and side-reflected elastic waves in a 1.8 m long sample of Berea sandstone. The frequency domain travel time (FDTT) method produces the continuous-wave (CW) response of a propagating wave by stepwise sweeping frequency of a driving source and detecting amplitude and phase of the received signal in reference to the source. Each separate travel path yields a characteristic repetition cycle in frequency space as its wave vector-distance product is stepped; an inverse fast Fourier transform (IFFT) reveals the corresponding travel time at the group velocity. Because arrival times of direct and reflected elastic waves appear as spikes along the time axis, travel times can be obtained precisely, and different arrivals can be clearly separated. Q can be determined from the amplitude vs frequency response of each peak as obtained from a moving window IFFT of the frequency-domain signal. In this sample at ambient conditions compressional velocity Vp is 2380 m/s and Qp is 55.

  6. High Resolution of Crustal Seismic Wave Attenuation Tomography in Eastern Tibetan Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, X.; Sandvol, E. A.; Ni, J. F.; Hearn, T. M.; Chen, Y. J.; Shen, Y.

    2010-12-01

    We investigate the frequency dependent attenuation tomography of regional seismic phases Lg and Pg. The intrinsic attenuation of Lg and Pg is employed as an approximation of Qs and Qp in the crust and used as a constraint in interpretation of crustal geothermy, rheology and tectonics. We have generated tomographic images with the best resolution to observe structures as small as 100km2. We applied waveform data from 769 regional events and 222 stations of permanent or temporary networks including CDSN, INDEPTH-IV-ASCENT, NETS, Namche Barwa, and MIT-China within this region. We used a Reverse Two-station/event Method (RTM) to measure inter-station Q; this method theoretically eliminates any contributions from source excitation and site amplification from the estimation of path-based Q. The tomographic images with significant lateral variations in Q suggest a strong lateral variation in the geothermal and rheological properties of the Tibetan crust. The disadvantage of the Two-Station Method (TSM) is that the measurements is contaminated by site amplification terms, thus the RTM is a significant improvement in the methodology of measuring Q. Large-scale scattering is a significant contributor to Lg and Pg attenuation however, we suggest the patterns in our tomographic images suggest that the intrinsic attenuation is the dominant factor causing the observed Q anomalies. The most remarkable results in this study include that (1) a high Q zone bands around the eastern Himalayan syntaxis and even spreads to the entire three-river zone tectonically between the Indus-Yalu suture and the Bangong-Nujiang suture in the southeastern TP; (2) the TP has widespread low to middle Q values, except the mid-eastern Qiangtang terrane, east of the INDEPTH-III profile, with relatively middle to high Q values; (3) approximately along the Kunlun Fault system there is a nearly 1000km E-W very low Q band; (4) high Q values are observed widely in the Qaidam Basin, Tarim Basin, Sichuan Basin

  7. Measuring sea ice permeability as a function of the attenuation and phase velocity shift of an acoustic wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudier, E. J.; Bahoura, M.

    2012-12-01

    Sea ice is a two-phase porous medium consisting of a solid matrix of pure ice and a salty liquid phase. At spring when ice permeability increases, it has been observed that pressure gradients induced at the ice-water interface upstream and downstream of pressure ridge keels can cause sea water and brine to be forced through the ice water boundary. It suggests that salt and heat fluxes through the bottom ice layers may be a major factor controlling the decay of an ice sheet. Knowing how water flows through the ice matrix is fundamental to a modeling of ocean-ice heat exchanges integrating the advective import/export of latent heat that result from melting/freezing within the ice. Permeability is the measurement of the ease with which fluids flow through a porous medium, however one of the most tricky to measure without altering the porosity of the sampled medium. To further complicate the challenge, horizontal and vertical permeability of the ice, referred as ice anisotropy, is significant. Acoustic wave propagation through porous media have been theorized to relate the acoustic velocity and attenuation to the physical properties of the tested material. It is a non-invasive technique, and as such could provide more reliable measurements of sea ice permeability than anything presently used. Simulations combining the Biot's and squirt flow mechanisms are performed to investigate the effect of permeability on the attenuation and phase velocity as a function of frequency. We first present the attenuation dispersion curves for an isotropic sea ice, then low-frequency and high-frequency limits are determined. Optimal frequency range and resolution requirements are evaluated for testing.

  8. Radiometric observations of atmospheric attenuation at 20.6 and 31.65 GHz: The Wave Propagation Laboratory data base

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, Mark D.; Snider, J. B.; Westwater, E. R.

    1993-01-01

    The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Wave Propagation Laboratory (WPL) presently operates five dual-channel microwave radiometers, one triple-channel microwave radiometer, and one six-channel microwave radiometer. The dual-channel radiometers operate at frequencies of 20.6 or 23.87 GHz and 31.4 or 31.65 GHz. The triple-channel radiometer operates at 20.6, 31.65, and 90.0 GHz. The six-channel radiometer operates at frequencies of 20.6, 31.65, 52.85, 53.85, 55.45, and 58.8 GHz. Recent brightness temperature measurements and attenuation values from some of the above radiometers are presented. These radiometric measurements, taken in different locations throughout the world, have given WPL a diverse set of measurements under a variety of atmospheric conditions. We propose to do a more complete attenuation analysis on these measurements in the future. In addition, a new spinning reflector was installed recently for the dual-channel radiometer at the Platteville, Colorado site. This reflector will extend our measurement capabilities during precipating conditions. Locating the three-channel and portable dual-channel radiometers at or near Greeley, Colorado to support the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) program is discussed.

  9. Modelling of wave propagation and attenuation in the Osaka sedimentary basin, western Japan, during the 2013 Awaji Island earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asano, Kimiyuki; Sekiguchi, Haruko; Iwata, Tomotaka; Yoshimi, Masayuki; Hayashida, Takumi; Saomoto, Hidetaka; Horikawa, Haruo

    2016-03-01

    On 2013 April 13, an inland earthquake of Mw 5.8 occurred in Awaji Island, which forms the western boundary of the Osaka sedimentary basin in western Japan. The strong ground motion data were collected from more than 100 stations within the basin and it was found that in the Osaka Plain, the pseudo velocity response spectra at a period of around 6.5 s were significantly larger than at other stations of similar epicentral distance outside the basin. The ground motion lasted longer than 3 min in the Osaka Plain where its bedrock depth spatially varies from approximately 1 to 2 km. We modelled long-period (higher than 2 s) ground motions excited by this earthquake, using the finite difference method assuming a point source, to validate the present velocity structure model and to obtain better constraint of the attenuation factor of the sedimentary part of the basin. The effect of attenuation in the simulation was included in the form of Q(f) = Q0(f/f0), where Q0 at a reference frequency f0 was given by a function of the S-wave velocity, Q0 = αVS. We searched for appropriate Q0 values by changing α for a fixed value of f0 = 0.2 Hz. It was found that values of α from 0.2 to 0.5 fitted the observations reasonably well, but that the value of α = 0.3 performed best. Good agreement between the observed and simulated velocity waveforms was obtained for most stations within the Osaka Basin in terms of both amplitude and ground motion duration. However, underestimation of the pseudo velocity response spectra in the period range of 5-7 s was recognized in the central part of the Osaka Plain, which was caused by the inadequate modelling of later phases or wave packets in this period range observed approximately 2 min after the direct S-wave arrival. We analysed this observed later phase and concluded that it was a Love wave originating from the direction of the east coast of Awaji Island.

  10. Solitons, Bäcklund Transformation, Lax Pair, and Infinitely Many Conservation Law for a (2+1)-Dimensional Generalised Variable-Coefficient Shallow Water Wave Equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Zhong-Zhou; Gao, Yi-Tian; Yang, Jin-Wei; Su, Chuan-Qi; Zuo, Da-Wei

    2016-01-01

    Under investigation in this article is a (2+1)-dimensional generalised variable-coefficient shallow water wave equation, which describes the interaction of the Riemann wave propagating along the y axis with a long-wave propagating along the x axis in a fluid, where x and y are the scaled space coordinates. Bilinear forms, Bäcklund transformation, Lax pair, and infinitely many conservation law are derived based on the binary Bell polynomials. Multi-soliton solutions are constructed via the Hirota method. Propagation and interaction of the solitons are illustrated graphically: (i) variable coefficients affect the shape of the multi-soliton interaction in the scaled space and time coordinates. (ii) Positions of the solitons depend on the sign of wave numbers after each interaction. (iii) Interaction of the solitons is elastic, i.e. the amplitude, velocity, and shape of each soliton remain invariant after each interaction except for a phase shift.

  11. A More Precise Empirical Formula for Estimating Normalized Fog Attenuation in the Millimeter-Wave Frequency Range 30 ~ 100 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Xia; Liu, Yun-Long; Chen, Li-Jiang; Xue, Yu-Li

    2013-04-01

    At millimeter wavelengths, normalized fog attenuation (NFA) in units of (dB/km)/ (g/m3) is generally calculated by the Rayleigh approximation when working wavelengths are much larger than the average diameter of fog droplets. The calculations of the Rayleigh approximation are much less than those of Mie scattering theory, but still complex and heavy. To solve the above problem and facilitate the engineering applications of the Rayleigh approximation, a new empirical formula is discussed to estimate NFA in the frequency range 30 ~ 100 GHz and the fog common temperature range -8 ~ 20 °C. The simulation results of the new formula are compared with those got by other three empirical formulae: the Altshuler empirical formula, the Liebe empirical formula and the Zhao empirical formula. Maximal absolute value of the relative errors (MAVRE) and Pearson correlation coefficient (PCC) indicate the largest deviation of estimated results and the fitting performance of an empirical formula, respectively. Comparisons show that the MAVRE of the new formula is only 4.482 %, which is much smaller than those of the other three formulae. The mean value of the Pearson correlation coefficients (PCCs) of the proposed formula is 0.999943, larger than those of other methods. Additionally, relative error (RE) curves of the four empirical formulae are given at four certain temperatures -8 °C, 0 °C, 10 °C and 20 °C.

  12. Mass attenuation coefficient of binderless, pre-treated and tannin-based Rhizophora spp. particleboards using 16.59 – 25.26 keV photon energy range

    SciTech Connect

    Mohd Yusof, Mohd Fahmi Hamid, Puteri Nor Khatijah Abdul; Tajuddin, Abdul Aziz; Bauk, Sabar; Hashim, Rokiah

    2015-04-29

    The Rhizophora spp. particleboards were fabricated using ≤ 104 µm particle size at three different fabrication methods; binderless, steam pre-treated and tannin-added. The mass attenuation coefficient of Rhizophora spp. particleboards were measured using x-ray fluorescent (XRF) photon from niobium, molybdenum, palladium, silver and tin metal plates that provided photon energy between 16.59 to 25.26 keV. The results were compared to theoretical values for water calculated using photon cross-section database (XCOM).The results showed that all Rhizophora spp. particleboards having mass attenuation coefficient close to calculated XCOM for water. Tannin-added Rizophora spp. particleboard was nearest to calculated XCOM for water with χ2 value of 13.008 followed by binderless Rizophora spp. (25.859) and pre-treated Rizophora spp. (91.941)

  13. Heterogeneities of the field of short-period shear wave attenuation in the lithosphere of Central Asia and their relationship with seismicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopnichev, Yu. F.; Sokolova, I. N.

    2011-03-01

    The characteristics of the short-period shear wave attenuation field in the lithosphere of the Turanian Plate, West Tien Shan, Pamir, and Hindu Kush have been studied. The method based on analysis of the logarithm of the ratio between maximal amplitudes of Sn and Pn waves ( Sn/ Pn parameter) has been applied. More than 400 records of earthquakes, obtained at distances of ˜400-1000 km from the AAK digital station, have been processed. It has been found that relatively weak attenuation is observed in the regions of the West Tien Shan and Pamir. The largest area of strong attenuation is located in the region of the Afghan-Tadjik Depression adjacent to Hindu Kush. A wide band of low Sn/ Pn parameter values, stretched northeastwards, has been distinguished. Along with the analogous band of strong attenuation, distinguished before in the regions of Central Tien Shan and Dzungaria, it is the continuation of the largest Chaman Fault, which stretches 850 km along the boundary of the Indian Plate. Source zones of strong earthquakes with M ≥ 7.0 that occurred in the first half of 20th century correspond to relatively weak attenuation. Areas of high attenuation, where strong seismic events have not occurred for the last 110 years, are outlined. Analogously to other seismoactive regions, it is supposed that these areas are related to preparation of strong earthquakes.

  14. Shear wave attenuation estimated from the spectral decay rate in the vicinity of the Petropavlovsk station, Kamchatka

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gusev, A. A.; Guseva, E. M.

    2016-07-01

    The parameters of S-wave attenuation (the total effect of absorption and scattering) near the Petropavlovsk (PET) station in Kamchatka were estimated by means of the spectral method through an original procedure. The spectral method typically analyzes the changes with distance of the shape of spectra of the acceleration records assuming that the acceleration spectrum at the earthquake source is flat. In reality, this assumption is violated: the source acceleration spectra often have a high-frequency cutoff (the source-controlled f max) which limits the spectral working bandwidth. Ignoring this phenomenon not only leads to a broad scatter of the individual estimates but also causes systematic errors in the form of overestimation of losses. In the approach applied in the present study, we primarily estimated the frequency of the mentioned high-frequency cutoff and then constructed the loss estimates only within the frequency range where the source spectrum is approximately flat. The shape of the source spectrum was preliminarily assessed by the approximate loss compensation technique. For this purpose, we used the tentative attenuation estimates which are close to the final ones. The difference in the logarithms of the spectral amplitudes at the edges of the working bandwidth is the input for calculating the attenuation. We used the digital accelerograms from the PET station, with 80 samples per second digitization rate, and based on them, we calculated the averaged spectrum of the S-waves as the root mean square along two horizontal components. Our analysis incorporates 384 spectra from the local earthquakes with M = 4-6.5 at the hypocentral distances ranging from 80 to 220 km. By applying the nonlinear least-square method, we found the following parameters of the loss model: the Q-factor Q 0 = 156 ± 33 at frequency f = 1 Hz for the distance interval r = 0-100 km; the exponent in the power-law relationship describing the growth of the Q-factor with frequency,

  15. Surface wave propagation characteristics in atmospheric pressure plasma column

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pencheva, M.; Benova, E.; Zhelyazkov, I.

    2007-04-01

    In the typical experiments of surface wave sustained plasma columns at atmospheric pressure the ratio of collision to wave frequency (ν/ω) is much greater than unity. Therefore, one might expect that the usual analysis of the wave dispersion relation, performed under the assumption ν/ω = 0, cannot give adequate description of the wave propagation characteristics. In order to study these characteristics we have analyzed the wave dispersion relationship for arbitrary ν/ω. Our analysis includes phase and wave dispersion curves, attenuation coefficient, and wave phase and group velocities. The numerical results show that a turning back point appears in the phase diagram, after which a region of backward wave propagation exists. The experimentally observed plasma column is only in a region where wave propagation coefficient is higher than the attenuation coefficient. At the plasma column end the electron density is much higher than that corresponding to the turning back point and the resonance.

  16. Surface-wave amplitude analysis for array data with non-linear waveform fitting: Toward high-resolution attenuation models of the upper mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamada, K.; Yoshizawa, K.

    2013-12-01

    Anelastic attenuation of seismic waves provides us with valuable information on temperature and water content in the Earth's mantle. While seismic velocity models have been investigated by many researchers, anelastic attenuation (or Q) models have yet to be investigated in detail mainly due to the intrinsic difficulties and uncertainties in the amplitude analysis of observed seismic waveforms. To increase the horizontal resolution of surface wave attenuation models on a regional scale, we have developed a new method of fully non-linear waveform fitting to measure inter-station phase velocities and amplitude ratios simultaneously, using the Neighborhood Algorithm (NA) as a global optimizer. Model parameter space (perturbations of phase speed and amplitude ratio) is explored to fit two observed waveforms on a common great-circle path by perturbing both phase and amplitude of the fundamental-mode surface waves. This method has been applied to observed waveform data of the USArray from 2007 to 2008, and a large-number of inter-station amplitude and phase speed data are corrected in a period range from 20 to 200 seconds. We have constructed preliminary phase speed and attenuation models using the observed phase and amplitude data, with careful considerations of the effects of elastic focusing and station correction factors for amplitude data. The phase velocity models indicate good correlation with the conventional tomographic results in North America on a large-scale; e.g., significant slow velocity anomaly in volcanic regions in the western United States. The preliminary results of surface-wave attenuation achieved a better variance reduction when the amplitude data are inverted for attenuation models in conjunction with corrections for receiver factors. We have also taken into account the amplitude correction for elastic focusing based on a geometrical ray theory, but its effects on the final model is somewhat limited and our attenuation model show anti

  17. Properties of sound attenuation around a two-dimensional underwater vehicle with a large cavitation number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Peng-Cheng; Pan, Guang

    2015-06-01

    Due to the high speed of underwater vehicles, cavitation is generated inevitably along with the sound attenuation when the sound signal traverses through the cavity region around the underwater vehicle. The linear wave propagation is studied to obtain the influence of bubbly liquid on the acoustic wave propagation in the cavity region. The sound attenuation coefficient and the sound speed formula of the bubbly liquid are presented. Based on the sound attenuation coefficients with various vapor volume fractions, the attenuation of sound intensity is calculated under large cavitation number conditions. The result shows that the sound intensity attenuation is fairly small in a certain condition. Consequently, the intensity attenuation can be neglected in engineering. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 51279165 and 51479170) and the National Defense Basic Scientific Research Program of China (Grant No. B2720133014).

  18. Influence of compensator thickness, field size, and off-axis distance on the effective attenuation coefficient of a cerrobend compensator for intensity-modulated radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Haghparast, Abbas; Hashemi, Bijan; Eivazi, Mohammad Taghi

    2013-04-01

    Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) can be performed by using compensators. To make a compensator for an IMRT practice, it is required to calculate the effective attenuation coefficient (μ{sub eff}) of its material, which is affected by various factors. We studied the effect of the variation of the most important factors on the calculation of the μ{sub eff} of the cerrobend compensator for 6-MV photon beams, including the field size, compensator thickness, and off-axis distance. Experimental measurements were carried out at 100 cm source-to-surface distance and 10 cm depth for the 6-MV photon beams of an Elekta linac using various field size, compensator thickness, and off-axis settings. The field sizes investigated ranged from 4 × 4 to 25 × 25 cm{sup 2} and the cerrobend compensator thicknesses from 0.5–6 cm. For a fixed compensator thickness, variation of the μ{sub eff} with the field size ranged from 3.7–6.8%, with the highest value attributed to the largest compensator thickness. At the reference field size of 10 × 10 cm{sup 2}, the μ{sub eff} varied by 16.5% when the compensator thickness was increased from 0.5–6 cm. However, the variation of the μ{sub eff} with the off-axis distance was only 0.99% at this field size, whereas for the largest field size, it was more significant. Our results indicated that the compensator thickness and field size have the most significant effect on the calculation of the compensator μ{sub eff} for the 6-MV photon beam. Therefore, it is recommended to consider these parameters when calculating the compensator thickness for an IMRT practice designed for these beams. The off-axis distance had a significant effect on the calculation of the μ{sub eff} only for the largest field size. Hence, it is recommended to consider the effect of this parameter only for field sizes larger than 25 × 25 cm{sup 2}.

  19. Three-dimensional compressional wave attenuation tomography for the crust and uppermost mantle of northern and central California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, G.

    2013-12-01

    I present a frequency-independent three-dimensional (3D) compressional wave attenuation model (indicated by quality factor Qp) for the crust and uppermost mantle of northern and central California. The tomographic inversion used t* values measured from amplitude spectra of 80,988 P-wave arrivals of 3247 events recorded by 463 network stations through a 3D seismic velocity model. The model has a uniform horizontal grid spacing of 15 km and the vertical node intervals range between 2 and 10 km down to 45 km depth. The resulting Qp model provides an important complement to the existing regional-scale velocity models for interpreting structural heterogeneity and fluid saturation of rocks in the study area. In general, the Qp values increase with depth and agree with the surface geology at shallow depth layers. The most significant features observed in the Qp model are the high Qp values in the Sierra Nevada mountains and low Qp anomalies in the western fault zones. Low Qp values are also imaged in Owens Valley and Long Valley at shallow depths and the Mendocino fault zones in the lower crust. An overall contrast of Qp values across the fault is observed in the creeping, Parkfield and Cholame-Carrizo sections of the San Andreas Fault. Very high Qp anomalies are seen near and below the seismogenic zones at depths in several faults. A nice correlation between shallow Qp values and hear flow is also shown.

  20. Three-dimensional compressional wave attenuation tomography for the crust and uppermost mantle of Northern and central California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Guoqing

    2014-04-01

    I present a frequency-independent three-dimensional (3-D) compressional wave attenuation model (indicated by quality factor Qp) for the crust and uppermost mantle of Northern and central California. The tomographic inversion used t∗ values measured from amplitude spectra of 80,988 P wave arrivals of 3247 events recorded by 463 network stations through a 3-D seismic velocity model. The model has a uniform horizontal grid spacing of 15 km, and the vertical node intervals range between 2 and 10 km down to 45 km depth. In general, the resulting Qp values increase with depth and agree with the surface geology at shallow depth layers. The most significant features observed in the Qp model are the high Qp values in the Sierra Nevada mountains and low Qp anomalies in the western fault zones. Low Qp values are also imaged in Owens Valley and Long Valley at shallow depths and the Cape Mendocino region in the lower crust (˜25 km depth). An overall contrast of Qp values across the fault is observed in the creeping, Parkfield and Cholame-Carrizo sections of the San Andreas Fault. The new 3-D Qp model provides an important complement to the existing regional-scale velocity models for interpreting structural heterogeneity and fluid saturation of rocks in the study area.

  1. Measurement of the x-ray mass attenuation coefficient and determination of the imaginary component of the atomic form factor of molybdenum over the 13.5-41.5-keV energy range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Jonge, Martin D.; Tran, Chanh Q.; Chantler, Christopher T.; Barnea, Zwi; Dhal, Bipin B.; Cookson, David J.; Lee, Wah-Keat; Mashayekhi, Ali

    2005-03-01

    We use the x-ray extended-range technique (XERT) [Chantler , Phys. Rev. A 64, 062506 (2001)] to measure the mass attenuation coefficients of molybdenum in the x-ray energy range of 13.5-41.5keV to 0.02-0.15 % accuracy. Measurements made over an extended range of the measurement parameter space are critically examined to identify, quantify, and correct where necessary a number of experimental systematic errors. These results represent the most extensive experimental data set for molybdenum and include absolute mass attenuation coefficients in the regions of the x-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) and x-ray-absorption near-edge structure (XANES). The imaginary component of the atomic form-factor f2 is derived from the photoelectric absorption after subtracting calculated Rayleigh and Compton scattering cross sections from the total attenuation. Comparison of the result with tabulations of calculated photoelectric absorption coefficients indicates that differences of 1-15 % persist between the calculated and observed values.

  2. Measurement of the x-ray mass attenuation coefficient and determination of the imaginary component of the atomic form-factor of tin over the energy range of 29 keV-60 keV.

    SciTech Connect

    de Jonge, M. D.; Tran, C. Q.; Chantler, C. T.; Barnea, Z.; Dhal, B. P.; Paterson, D.; Kanter, E. P.; Southworth, S. H.; Young, L.; Beno, M. A.; Linton, J. A.; Jennings, G.; Univ. of Melbourne; Australian Synchrotron Project

    2007-01-01

    We use the x-ray extended-range technique (XERT) [C. T. Chantler et al., Phys. Rev. A 64, 062506 (2001)] to measure the mass attenuation coefficients of tin in the x-ray energy range of 29-60 keV to 0.04-3 % accuracy, and typically in the range 0.1-0.2 %. Measurements made over an extended range of the measurement parameter space are critically examined to identify, quantify, and correct a number of potential experimental systematic errors. These results represent the most extensive experimental data set for tin and include absolute mass attenuation coefficients in the regions of x-ray absorption fine structure, extended x-ray absorption fine structure, and x-ray absorption near-edge structure. The imaginary component of the atomic form factor f{sub 2} is derived from the photoelectric absorption after subtracting calculated Rayleigh and Compton scattering cross sections from the total attenuation. Comparison of the result with tabulations of calculated photoelectric absorption coefficients indicates that differences of 1-2 % persist between calculated and observed values.

  3. Influence of bubble size and thermal dissipation on compressive wave attenuation in liquid foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monloubou, M.; Saint-Jalmes, A.; Dollet, B.; Cantat, I.

    2015-11-01

    Acoustic or blast wave absorption by liquid foams is especially efficient and bubble size or liquid fraction optimization is an important challenge in this context. A resonant behavior of foams has recently been observed, but the main local dissipative process is still unknown. In this paper, we evidence the thermal origin of the dissipation, with an optimal bubble size close to the thermal boundary layer thickness. Using a shock tube, we produce typical pressure variation at time scales of the order of the millisecond, which propagates in the foam in linear and slightly nonlinear regimes.

  4. Attenuation of the S+Lg+Surface Wave Group out to 600 km in Northeastern North America: A Baseline Study?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boatwright, J.; Seekins, L. C.

    2009-12-01

    We analyze the S+Lg+surface wave groups radiated out to 600 km by four moderate (4 ≤ M ≤ 5) earthquakes in Quebec, New York, and Maine: the 1997 Cap Rouge, 2002 Ausable Forks, 2005 Rivière du Loup, and 2006 Bar Harbor earthquakes. The raypaths predominately sample the Appalacian Province, and the crustal velocity structure is roughly homogeneous across the study area. We compute spectra using 20-60 s windows of the horizontal broadband components. We restrict our analysis to hard-rock (Vs > 1500 m/s) and soft-rock (Vs > 700 m/s) sites, avoiding resonant sedimentary sites; we model site amplification using average 1D impedance functions (Boore and Joyner, 1997). We use ro = 50 km instead of ro = 100 km for the crossover distance in the Street et al. (1975) function for geometrical spreading: this distance adjusts the corrected spectra at 10 s to the moment tensor estimates. This simple correction scheme allows us to regress for Q directly as a function of frequency: the source spectral shape is entirely unconstrained. Fitting a Qo f q function to the Q estimates from 0.2 to 25 Hz yields Q = 410 f 0.5 for a group velocity of 3.5 km/s. This attenuation is stronger than the Lg attenuation of 650 f 0.36 obtained by Erickson et al. (2004). The Q estimates are consistent for individual events. For f > 20 Hz, the Q estimates increase more rapidly than f 0.5: this deviation from the Qo f q form appears characteristic. To gauge how these Q estimates depend on the distance limit, we will rerun the analysis using broadband data out to 1000 km, adding 30% more recordings to the dataset.

  5. An arbitrary high-order Discontinuous Galerkin method for elastic waves on unstructured meshes - III. Viscoelastic attenuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Käser, Martin; Dumbser, Michael; de la Puente, Josep; Igel, Heiner

    2007-01-01

    We present a new numerical method to solve the heterogeneous anelastic, seismic wave equations with arbitrary high order accuracy in space and time on 3-D unstructured tetrahedral meshes. Using the velocity-stress formulation provides a linear hyperbolic system of equations with source terms that is completed by additional equations for the anelastic functions including the strain history of the material. These additional equations result from the rheological model of the generalized Maxwell body and permit the incorporation of realistic attenuation properties of viscoelastic material accounting for the behaviour of elastic solids and viscous fluids. The proposed method combines the Discontinuous Galerkin (DG) finite element (FE) method with the ADER approach using Arbitrary high order DERivatives for flux calculations. The DG approach, in contrast to classical FE methods, uses a piecewise polynomial approximation of the numerical solution which allows for discontinuities at element interfaces. Therefore, the well-established theory of numerical fluxes across element interfaces obtained by the solution of Riemann problems can be applied as in the finite volume framework. The main idea of the ADER time integration approach is a Taylor expansion in time in which all time derivatives are replaced by space derivatives using the so-called Cauchy-Kovalewski procedure which makes extensive use of the governing PDE. Due to the ADER time integration technique the same approximation order in space and time is achieved automatically and the method is a one-step scheme advancing the solution for one time step without intermediate stages. To this end, we introduce a new unrolled recursive algorithm for efficiently computing the Cauchy-Kovalewski procedure by making use of the sparsity of the system matrices. The numerical convergence analysis demonstrates that the new schemes provide very high order accuracy even on unstructured tetrahedral meshes while computational cost and

  6. Full Wave Analysis of RF Signal Attenuation in a Lossy Cave using a High Order Time Domain Vector Finite Element Method

    SciTech Connect

    Pingenot, J; Rieben, R; White, D

    2004-12-06

    We present a computational study of signal propagation and attenuation of a 200 MHz dipole antenna in a cave environment. The cave is modeled as a straight and lossy random rough wall. To simulate a broad frequency band, the full wave Maxwell equations are solved directly in the time domain via a high order vector finite element discretization using the massively parallel CEM code EMSolve. The simulation is performed for a series of random meshes in order to generate statistical data for the propagation and attenuation properties of the cave environment. Results for the power spectral density and phase of the electric field vector components are presented and discussed.

  7. Modulational instability, nonautonomous breathers and rogue waves for a variable-coefficient derivative nonlinear Schrödinger equation in the inhomogeneous plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Lei Li, Min; Qi, Feng-Hua; Xu, Tao

    2015-03-15

    Under investigation in this paper is a variable-coefficient derivative nonlinear Schrödinger (vc-DNLS) equation modeling the nonlinear Alfvén waves in the inhomogeneous plasmas. The modulation instability is examined for this inhomogeneous nonlinear model. The nonautonomous breather and rogue wave solutions of the vc-DNLS equation are obtained via the modified Darboux transformation. It is found that the velocity and amplitude of the breather can be controlled by the inhomogeneous magnetic field and nonuniform density. Such novel phenomena as breather amplification and nonlinear Talbot effect-like property are demonstrated with the proper choices of the inhomogeneous parameters. Furthermore, dynamics of the fundamental rogue wave, periodical rogue wave, and composite rogue wave are graphically discussed. The trajectories and amplitudes of the rogue waves can be manipulated by the inhomogeneous magnetic field and nonuniform density. In addition, the nonlinear tunneling of the rogue waves and breathers is studied. As an application, a sample model is treated with our results, and the graphical illustrations exhibit the compressing, expanding, and fluctuating phenomena of the Alfvén rogue waves.

  8. Determination of self attenuation coefficient and relative TL efficiency of CaSO 4 :Dy, LiF:Mg,Cu,P and LiF:Mg,Ti TLDs - An alternate approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakshi, A. K.; Chatterjee, S.; Palani Selvam, T.; Joshi, V. J.; Chougaonkar, M. P.

    2011-10-01

    Self attenuation of TL and relative TL efficiency of polytetra fluoro ethylene (PTFE) embedded CaSO 4:Dy disc, LiF:Mg,Ti (MTS) disc and LiF:Mg,Cu,P (MCP-N) chip were determined in the present study for photons of energy 10-34 keV. The relative TL efficiency was determined using an alternative approach in which ratio of experimental response and corrected theoretical response was used instead of measuring the absolute TL emission in photon counting mode. For CaSO 4:Dy disc, it was found that with increasing the proportion of CaSO 4:Dy phosphor in the disc, the light attenuation coefficient increases. The light attenuation coefficient of MTS disc and MCP-N chip was found to be 23.4 and 45.5 cm -1, respectively. The relative TL efficiency in the photon energy range of 10-34 keV for MTS discs and MCP-N chips, evaluated in the present study matches well with the reported values in the literature.

  9. Measurement of mass attenuation coefficients of Rhizophora spp. binderless particleboards in the 16.59-25.26 keV photon energy range and their density profile using x-ray computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Marashdeh, M W; Bauk, S; Tajuddin, A A; Hashim, R

    2012-04-01

    The mass attenuation coefficients of Rhizophora spp. binderless particleboard with four different particle sizes (samples A, B, C and D) and natural raw Rhizophora spp. wood (sample E) were determined using single-beam photon transmission in the energy range between 16.59 and 25.26 keV. This was done by determining the attenuation of K(α1) X-ray fluorescent (XRF) photons from niobium, molybdenum, palladium, silver and tin targets. The results were compared with theoretical values of young-age breast (Breast 1) and water calculated using a XCOM computer program. It was found that the mass attenuation coefficient of Rhizophora spp. binderless particleboards to be close to the calculated XCOM values in water than natural Rhizophora spp. wood. Computed tomography (CT) scans were then used to determine the density profile of the samples. The CT scan results showed that the Rhizophora spp. binderless particleboard has uniform density compared to natural Rhizophora spp. wood. In general, the differences in the variability of the profile density decrease as the particle size of the pellet samples decreases. PMID:22304963

  10. Long-Term Change of Sound Wave Propagation Attenuation Due to the Effects of Ocean Acidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gotoh, S.; Tsuchiya, T.; Hiyoshi, Y.

    2014-12-01

    In recent years, the concentration of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere is increasing due to global warming. And, the ocean acidification advances because this melts into seawater, pH decrease in seawater are concerned. The sound wave to propagate seawater, pH is known to affect absorption loss (α) by chemical buffer effects of the seawater. However, conventionally, α has not been investigated much in the calculation of pH. Therefore, when calculating the propagation distance in the sonar equation, pH =8~8.1 (Weak alkaline) are used empirically. Therefore we used an actual value of pH of 30 years from 1984 in the sea near the Japan, and investigated change over the years of absorption loss (α) at some frequency. As a result, we found that α value decreases gradually in the past 30 years, as high-latitude decreases. Further, the future, assuming that ocean acidification is more advanced, and to simulate a change of the absorption loss and propagation loss in end of this century using the pH value reported from the "Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change" (IPCC). As a result, it was just suggested that α decreased more in the end of this century and affected the submarine detection. In addition, in recent years, we examined the effects of noise that offshore wind power construction proceeds in each country emits gives to the underwater sound. As a result, in the end of this century, an underwater noise increases about 17%, and underwater sound environmental degradation of the sea is concerned.

  11. Second coefficient of viscosity in air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ash, Robert L.; Zuckerwar, Allan J.; Zheng, Zhonquan

    1991-01-01

    Acoustic attenuation measurements in air were analyzed in order to estimate the second coefficient of viscosity. Data over a temperature range of 11 C to 50 C and at relative humidities between 6 percent and 91 percent were used. This analysis showed that the second coefficient of viscosity varied between 1900 and 20,000 times larger than the dynamic or first coefficient of viscosity over the temperature and humidity range of the data. In addition, the data showed that the molecular relaxation effects, which are responsible for the magnitude of the second coefficient of viscosity, place severe limits on the use of time-independent, thermodynamic equations of state. Compressible flows containing large streamwise velocity gradients, like shock waves, which cause significant changes in particle properties to occur during time intervals shorter than hundredths of seconds, must be modeled using dynamic equations of state. The dynamic model approach is described briefly.

  12. A wave based method to predict the absorption, reflection and transmission coefficient of two-dimensional rigid frame porous structures with periodic inclusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deckers, Elke; Claeys, Claus; Atak, Onur; Groby, Jean-Philippe; Dazel, Olivier; Desmet, Wim

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents an extension to the Wave Based Method to predict the absorption, reflection and transmission coefficients of a porous material with an embedded periodic set of inclusions. The porous unit cell is described using the Multi-Level methodology and by embedding Bloch-Floquet periodicity conditions in the weighted residual scheme. The dynamic pressure field in the semi-infinite acoustic domains is approximated using a novel wave function set that fulfils the Helmholtz equation, the Bloch-Floquet periodicity conditions and the Sommerfeld radiation condition. The method is meshless and computationally efficient, which makes it well suited for optimisation studies.

  13. Travelling Wave Solutions for the Burgers Equation and the Korteweg-de Vries Equation with Variable Coefficients Using the Generalized (Ǵ/G)-Expansion Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zayed, Elsayed M. E.; Abdelaziz, Mahmoud A. M.

    2010-12-01

    In this article, a generalized (Ǵ/G)-expansion method is used to find exact travelling wave solutions of the Burgers equation and the Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equation with variable coefficients. As a result, hyperbolic, trigonometric, and rational function solutions with parameters are obtained. When these parameters are taking special values, the solitary wave solutions are derived from the hyperbolic function solution. It is shown that the proposed method is direct, effective, and can be applied to many other nonlinear evolution equations in mathematical physics.

  14. Prospects for in vivo estimation of photon linear attenuation coefficients using postprocessing dual-energy CT imaging on a commercial scanner: Comparison of analytic and polyenergetic statistical reconstruction algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, Joshua D. Yu, Yaduo; Williamson, Jeffrey F.; Whiting, Bruce R.; O’Sullivan, Joseph A.; Politte, David G.; Klahr, Paul H.

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: Accurate patient-specific photon cross-section information is needed to support more accurate model-based dose calculation for low energy photon-emitting modalities in medicine such as brachytherapy and kilovoltage x-ray imaging procedures. A postprocessing dual-energy CT (pDECT) technique for noninvasivein vivo estimation of photon linear attenuation coefficients has been experimentally implemented on a commercial CT scanner and its accuracy assessed in idealized phantom geometries. Methods: Eight test materials of known composition and density were used to compare pDECT-estimated linear attenuation coefficients to NIST reference values over an energy range from 10 keV to 1 MeV. As statistical image reconstruction (SIR) has been shown to reconstruct images with less random and systematic error than conventional filtered backprojection (FBP), the pDECT technique was implemented with both an in-house polyenergetic SIR algorithm, alternating minimization (AM), as well as a conventional FBP reconstruction algorithm. Improvement from increased spectral separation was also investigated by filtering the high-energy beam with an additional 0.5 mm of tin. The law of propagated uncertainty was employed to assess the sensitivity of the pDECT process to errors in reconstructed images. Results: Mean pDECT-estimated linear attenuation coefficients for the eight test materials agreed within 1% of NIST reference values for energies from 1 MeV down to 30 keV, with mean errors rising to between 3% and 6% at 10 keV, indicating that the method is unbiased when measurement and calibration phantom geometries are matched. Reconstruction with FBP and AM algorithms conferred similar mean pDECT accuracy. However, single-voxel pDECT estimates reconstructed on a 1 × 1 × 3 mm{sup 3} grid are shown to be highly sensitive to reconstructed image uncertainty; in some cases pDECT attenuation coefficient estimates exhibited standard deviations on the order of 20% around the mean

  15. Prospects for in vivo estimation of photon linear attenuation coefficients using postprocessing dual-energy CT imaging on a commercial scanner: Comparison of analytic and polyenergetic statistical reconstruction algorithms

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Joshua D.; Whiting, Bruce R.; O’Sullivan, Joseph A.; Politte, David G.; Klahr, Paul H.; Yu, Yaduo; Williamson, Jeffrey F.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Accurate patient-specific photon cross-section information is needed to support more accurate model-based dose calculation for low energy photon-emitting modalities in medicine such as brachytherapy and kilovoltage x-ray imaging procedures. A postprocessing dual-energy CT (pDECT) technique for noninvasive in vivo estimation of photon linear attenuation coefficients has been experimentally implemented on a commercial CT scanner and its accuracy assessed in idealized phantom geometries. Methods: Eight test materials of known composition and density were used to compare pDECT-estimated linear attenuation coefficients to NIST reference values over an energy range from 10 keV to 1 MeV. As statistical image reconstruction (SIR) has been shown to reconstruct images with less random and systematic error than conventional filtered backprojection (FBP), the pDECT technique was implemented with both an in-house polyenergetic SIR algorithm, alternating minimization (AM), as well as a conventional FBP reconstruction algorithm. Improvement from increased spectral separation was also investigated by filtering the high-energy beam with an additional 0.5 mm of tin. The law of propagated uncertainty was employed to assess the sensitivity of the pDECT process to errors in reconstructed images. Results: Mean pDECT-estimated linear attenuation coefficients for the eight test materials agreed within 1% of NIST reference values for energies from 1 MeV down to 30 keV, with mean errors rising to between 3% and 6% at 10 keV, indicating that the method is unbiased when measurement and calibration phantom geometries are matched. Reconstruction with FBP and AM algorithms conferred similar mean pDECT accuracy. However, single-voxel pDECT estimates reconstructed on a 1 × 1 × 3 mm3 grid are shown to be highly sensitive to reconstructed image uncertainty; in some cases pDECT attenuation coefficient estimates exhibited standard deviations on the order of 20% around the mean

  16. S-wave attenuation in northeastern Sonora, Mexico, near the faults that ruptured during the earthquake of 3 May 1887 Mw 7.5.

    PubMed

    Villalobos-Escobar, Gina P; Castro, Raúl R

    2014-01-01

    We used a new data set of relocated earthquakes recorded by the Seismic Network of Northeastern Sonora, Mexico (RESNES) to characterize the attenuation of S-waves in the fault zone of the 1887 Sonora earthquake (M w 7.5). We determined spectral attenuation functions for hypocentral distances (r) between 10 and 140 km using a nonparametric approach and found that in this fault zone the spectral amplitudes decay slower with distance at low frequencies (f < 4 Hz) compared to those reported in previous studies in the region using more distant recordings. The attenuation functions obtained for 23 frequencies (0.4 ≤ f ≤ 63.1 Hz) permit us estimating the average quality factor Q S  = (141 ± 1.1 )f ((0.74 ± 0.04)) and a geometrical spreading term G(r) = 1/r (0.21). The values of Q estimated for S-wave paths traveling along the fault system that rupture during the 1887 event, in the north-south direction, are considerably lower than the average Q estimated using source-station paths from multiple stations and directions. These results indicate that near the fault zone S waves attenuate considerably more than at regional scale, particularly at low frequencies. This may be the result of strong scattering near the faults due to the fractured upper crust and higher intrinsic attenuation due to stress concentration near the faults. PMID:25674476

  17. Spatio-temporal variations in the structure of the attenuation field of the S-wave in the region of Nevada nuclear test site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopnichev, Yu. F.; Sokolova, I. N.; Sokolov, K. N.

    2013-11-01

    The characteristics of the attenuation field of short-period shear waves in the region of Nevada nuclear test site (NNTS) are studied. The seismograms of underground nuclear explosions (UNEs) and earthquakes recorded by three seismic stations in 1975-2012 at the epicentral distances of up to 1000 km are processed by the methods based on the analysis of the amplitude ratios of Sn to Pn and Lg to Pg waves, as well as the S-coda envelopes for close events. It is shown that the structure of the attenuation field in the Earth's crust and upper mantle in the NNTS region experienced significant temporal variations during the interval of nuclear operations. The strongest variations were associated with UNEs conducted in the Pahute Mesa area, which held about two-thirds of the most intense explosions. Our data indicate that temporal variations in the structure of the attenuation field are related to the migration of deep fluids. A comparison of the general characteristics of the attenuation field in the regions of the three large nuclear test sites is presented.

  18. New data on seismic wave attenuation in the lithosphere and upper mantle of the northeastern flank of the Baikal rift system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobrynina, A. A.; Sankov, V. A.; Chechelnitsky, V. V.

    2016-05-01

    The investigation data on seismic wave attenuation in the lithosphere and upper mantle of the northeastern flank of the Baikal rift system obtained with a seismic coda envelope and sliding window are considered. Eleven local districts were described by one-dimensional attenuation models characterized by alternation of high and low attenuation layers, which are consistent with the results obtained previously by Yu.F. Kopnichev for the southwestern flank of the Baikal rift system [9]. The subcrust of the lithosphere contains a thin layer with high attenuation of seismic waves likely related to higher heterogeneity (fragmentation) and occurrence of fluids. The lithosphere basement depth varies from 100-120 km in the west within the Baikal folded area to 120-140 km in the east within the Siberian Platform. It is concluded that there are two asthenosphere layers. Based on specific features of the lithosphere and upper mantle structure, it can be assumed that they were subject to gradual modification involving fluidization processes and partial melting in the Late Cenozoic extension under the influence of distant tectogenesis sources.

  19. Rogue wave solutions for the higher-order nonlinear Schrödinger equation with variable coefficients by generalized Darboux transformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hai-Qiang; Chen, Jian

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we study a higher-order variable coefficient nonlinear Schrödinger (NLS) equation, which plays an important role in the control of the ultrashort optical pulse propagation in nonlinear optical systems. Then, we construct a generalized Darboux transformation (GDT) for the higher-order variable coefficient NLS equation. The Nth order rogue wave solution is obtained by the iterative rule and it can be expressed by the determinant form. As application, we calculate rogue waves (RWs) from first- to fourth-order in accordance with different kinds of parameters. In particular, the dynamical properties and spatial-temporal structures of RWs are discussed and compared with Hirota equation through some figures.

  20. Lie group analysis, numerical and non-traveling wave solutions for the (2+1)-dimensional diffusion—advection equation with variable coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vikas, Kumar; K. Gupta, R.; Ram, Jiwari

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, the variable-coefficient diffusion—advection (DA) equation, which arises in modeling various physical phenomena, is studied by the Lie symmetry approach. The similarity reductions are derived by determining the complete sets of point symmetries of this equation, and then exact and numerical solutions are reported for the reduced second-order nonlinear ordinary differential equations. Further, an extended (G'/G)-expansion method is applied to the DA equation to construct some new non-traveling wave solutions.

  1. Strong gravitational waves in semiclosed electromagnetic universes. Statement and analysis of the problem in terms of the method of spin coefficients

    SciTech Connect

    Khlebnikov, V.I.

    1988-05-01

    The problem of integration is discussed for a complete system of Newman-Penrose equations for electrovacuum spaces of the general theory of relativity with nonzero cosmological constant. In terms of the method of spin coefficients, we formulate conditions on the electormagnetic and gravitational field variables, which distinguish a special class of Riemann spaces corresponding to strong gravitational waves in semiclosed Universes of Bertotti-Robinson type.

  2. Modeling the variations of reflection coefficient of Earth's lower ionosphere using very low frequency radio wave data by artificial neural network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghanbari, Keyvan; Khakian Ghomi, Mehdi; Mohammadi, Mohammad; Marbouti, Marjan; Tan, Le Minh

    2016-08-01

    The ionized atmosphere lying from 50 to 600 km above surface, known as ionosphere, contains high amount of electrons and ions. Very Low Frequency (VLF) radio waves with frequencies between 3 and 30 kHz are reflected from the lower ionosphere specifically D-region. A lot of applications in long range communications and navigation systems have been inspired by this characteristic of ionosphere. There are several factors which affect the ionization rate in this region, such as: time of day (presence of sun in the sky), solar zenith angle (seasons) and solar activities. Due to nonlinear response of ionospheric reflection coefficient to these factors, finding an accurate relation between these parameters and reflection coefficient is an arduous task. In order to model these kinds of nonlinear functionalities, some numerical methods are employed. One of these methods is artificial neural network (ANN). In this paper, the VLF radio wave data of 4 sudden ionospheric disturbance (SID) stations are given to a multi-layer perceptron ANN in order to simulate the variations of reflection coefficient of D region ionosphere. After training, validation and testing the ANN, outputs of ANN and observed values are plotted together for 2 random cases of each station. By evaluating the results using 2 parameters of pearson correlation coefficient and root mean square error, a satisfying agreement was found between ANN outputs and real observed data.

  3. The Influence of Water on Seismic Wave Speeds and Attenuation in the Upper Mantle: an update from the Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cline, C. J., II; David, E. C.; Jackson, I.; Faul, U.; Berry, A.

    2015-12-01

    A fine-grained synthetic olivine (Fo90) polycrystal, doped with ~0.04 wt. % TiO2, has been prepared with ~70 wt. ppm H2O accommodated in the remarkably stable Ti-clinohumite defect typical of natural olivines from the Earth's generally water-undersaturated upper mantle (Berry et al., 2005). A precision-ground specimen of this material, sleeved in Pt tubing within a mild-steel jacket, was tested in torsional forced oscillation at seismic frequencies (mHz-Hz) and temperatures to 1200 °C, under 200 MPa confining pressure. The shear modulus was observed to decrease systematically with increasing oscillation period and temperature, accompanied by monotonically increasing dissipation, which are characteristic of absorption band or high-temperature-background behaviour. In a previous preliminary report, the new data were compared with the model of Jackson and Faul (Phys. Earth Planet. Interiors, 2010) for a suite of essentially anhydrous Ti-free olivine polycrystals, evaluated at the 25 μm grain size of the hydrous titaniferous olivine specimen, showing that the latter is vastly more dissipative than its anhydrous equivalent (by an order of magnitude at 1200 °C) and correspondingly lower in shear modulus. The results of additional experiments now better constrain the mechanical behaviour of the enclosing Pt sleeve and allow direct comparison with data for an anhydrous titaniferous olivine of comparable grain size. The latest results confirm a very strong influence of water on seismic wave attenuation, even under the water-undersaturated conditions expected to prevail in the Earth's upper mantle.

  4. Detailed Tabulation of Atomic Form Factors, Photoelectric Absorption and Scattering Cross Section, and Mass Attenuation Coefficients in the Vicinity of Absorption Edges in the Soft X-Ray (Z=30-36, Z=60-89, E=0.1 keV-10 keV), Addressing Convergence Issues of Earlier Work

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chantler, C. T.

    2000-07-01

    Reliable knowledge of the complex x-ray form factor [Re(f ) and f″] and the photoelectric attenuation coefficient (σPE) is required for crystallography, medical diagnosis, radiation safety, and XAFS studies. Discrepancies between currently used theoretical approaches of 200% exist for numerous elements from 1 to 3 keV x-ray energies. The key discrepancies are due to the smoothing of edge structure, the use of nonrelativistic wave functions, and the lack of appropriate convergence of wave functions. This paper addresses these key discrepancies and derives new theoretical results of substantially higher accuracy in near-edge soft x-ray regions. The high-energy limitations of the current approach are also illustrated. The energy range covered is 0.1 to 10 keV. The associated figures and tabulation demonstrate the current comparison with alternate theory and with available experimental data. In general, experimental data are not sufficiently accurate to establish the errors and inadequacies of theory at this level. However, the best experimental data and the observed experimental structure as a function of energy are strong indicators of the validity of the current approach. New developments in experimental measurement hold great promise in making critical comparisons with theory in the near future.

  5. Dual-energy X-ray analysis using synchrotron computed tomography at 35 and 60 keV for the estimation of photon interaction coefficients describing attenuation and energy absorption.

    PubMed

    Midgley, Stewart; Schleich, Nanette

    2015-05-01

    A novel method for dual-energy X-ray analysis (DEXA) is tested using measurements of the X-ray linear attenuation coefficient μ. The key is a mathematical model that describes elemental cross sections using a polynomial in atomic number. The model is combined with the mixture rule to describe μ for materials, using the same polynomial coefficients. Materials are characterized by their electron density Ne and statistical moments Rk describing their distribution of elements, analogous to the concept of effective atomic number. In an experiment with materials of known density and composition, measurements of μ are written as a system of linear simultaneous equations, which is solved for the polynomial coefficients. DEXA itself involves computed tomography (CT) scans at two energies to provide a system of non-linear simultaneous equations that are solved for Ne and the fourth statistical moment R4. Results are presented for phantoms containing dilute salt solutions and for a biological specimen. The experiment identifies 1% systematic errors in the CT measurements, arising from third-harmonic radiation, and 20-30% noise, which is reduced to 3-5% by pre-processing with the median filter and careful choice of reconstruction parameters. DEXA accuracy is quantified for the phantom as the mean absolute differences for Ne and R4: 0.8% and 1.0% for soft tissue and 1.2% and 0.8% for bone-like samples, respectively. The DEXA results for the biological specimen are combined with model coefficients obtained from the tabulations to predict μ and the mass energy absorption coefficient at energies of 10 keV to 20 MeV. PMID:25931101

  6. Full Wave Analysis of RF Signal Attenuation in a Lossy Rough Surface Cave using a High Order Time Domain Vector Finite Element Method

    SciTech Connect

    Pingenot, J; Rieben, R; White, D; Dudley, D

    2005-10-31

    We present a computational study of signal propagation and attenuation of a 200 MHz planar loop antenna in a cave environment. The cave is modeled as a straight and lossy random rough wall. To simulate a broad frequency band, the full wave Maxwell equations are solved directly in the time domain via a high order vector finite element discretization using the massively parallel CEM code EMSolve. The numerical technique is first verified against theoretical results for a planar loop antenna in a smooth lossy cave. The simulation is then performed for a series of random rough surface meshes in order to generate statistical data for the propagation and attenuation properties of the antenna in a cave environment. Results for the mean and variance of the power spectral density of the electric field are presented and discussed.

  7. Measurement of mass attenuation coefficients for four mixtures using X-rays from 13 keV up to 40 keV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angelone, M.; Esposito, A.; Chiti, M.; Gentile, A.

    2001-06-01

    The total absorption coefficients for some selected organic compounds relevant to health physics, Triaflol BN (C 3H 4O 2) n, Triaflol TN (C 12H 18O 7) n, Kapton (C 44H 20O 10) n, and Melinex (C 10H 8N 4O 4) n were measured in the X-ray energy range from 13 keV up to about 40 keV using a collimator, high purity germanium detector with thin Be window and variable energy X-ray source. The measured values are compared with the theoretical ones obtained using the XCOM code. The agreement is generally good within a few percent.

  8. Kinetic description of a free electron laser with an electromagnetic-wave wiggler and ion-channel guiding by using the Einstein coefficient technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehdian, H.; AbasiRostami, S.; Hasanbeigi, A.

    2016-04-01

    A theoretical study of electron trajectories and gain in a free electron laser (FEL) with an electromagnetic-wave wiggler and ion-channel guiding is presented based on the Einstein coefficient method. The laser gain in the low-gain regime is obtained for the case of a cold tenuous relativistic electron beam, where the beam plasma frequency is much less than the radiation frequency propagating in this configuration. The resulting gain equation is analyzed numerically over a wide range of system parameters.

  9. l-Citrulline supplementation attenuates blood pressure, wave reflection and arterial stiffness responses to metaboreflex and cold stress in overweight men.

    PubMed

    Figueroa, Arturo; Alvarez-Alvarado, Stacey; Jaime, Salvador J; Kalfon, Roy

    2016-07-01

    Combined isometric exercise or metaboreflex activation (post-exercise muscle ischaemia (PEMI)) and cold pressor test (CPT) increase cardiac afterload, which may lead to adverse cardiovascular events. l-Citrulline supplementation (l-CIT) reduces systemic arterial stiffness (brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV)) at rest and aortic haemodynamic responses to CPT. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of l-CIT on aortic haemodynamic and baPWV responses to PEMI+CPT. In all, sixteen healthy, overweight/obese males (age 24 (sem 6) years; BMI 29·3 (sem 4·0) kg/m2) were randomly assigned to placebo or l-CIT (6 g/d) for 14 d in a cross-over design. Brachial and aortic systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP) and mean arterial pressure (MAP), aortic augmented pressure (AP), augmentation index (AIx), baPWV, reflection timing (Tr) and heart rate (HR) were evaluated at rest and during isometric handgrip exercise (IHG), PEMI and PEMI+CPT at baseline and after 14 d. No significant effects were evident after l-CIT at rest. l-CIT attenuated the increases in aortic SBP and wave reflection (AP and AIx) during IHG, aortic DBP, MAP and AIx during PEMI, and aortic SBP, DBP, MAP, AP, AIx and baPWV during PEMI+CPT compared with placebo. HR and Tr were unaffected by l-CIT in all conditions. Our findings demonstrate that l-CIT attenuates aortic blood pressure and wave reflection responses to exercise-related metabolites. Moreover, l-CIT attenuates the exaggerated arterial stiffness response to combined metaboreflex activation and cold exposure, suggesting a protective effect against increased cardiac afterload during physical stress. PMID:27160957

  10. Shear wave attenuation and dispersion in melt-bearing olivine polycrystals: 2. Microstructural interpretation and seismological implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faul, Ulrich H.; Fitz Gerald, John D.; Jackson, Ian

    2004-06-01

    The torsional forced oscillation tests of melt-bearing olivine aggregates reported by [2004] consistently show a peak in attenuation that is absent from melt-free aggregates tested under similar conditions and grain sizes. Characterization by SEM shows that the melt resides in triple junction tubules and larger pockets as previously described. TEM imaging and EDS analysis reveals that olivine-olivine grain boundaries are characterized by a region ≤1 nm wide which is structurally and chemically distinct from olivine grain interiors. From the possible mechanisms that can produce an anelastic attenuation peak, melt squirt can be eliminated for our samples and experimental conditions. We attribute the observed attenuation peak to elastically accommodated grain boundary sliding, requiring that the grain boundaries are weak relative to olivine grain interiors but have a significantly higher viscosity than bulk melt. While the nanometer scale grain boundary structure in the melt-bearing aggregates is essentially the same as for melt-free aggregates studied previously, elastically accommodated sliding in the latter is apparently inhibited by tight three-grain edge intersections. The exponentially increasing high temperature background attenuation in both types of aggregate is attributed to diffusionally accommodated grain boundary sliding. Extrapolation to mantle grain sizes shows that the broad peak may be responsible for nearly frequency independent attenuation in partially molten regions of the upper mantle.

  11. Novel Logistic Regression Model of Chest CT Attenuation Coefficient Distributions for the Automated Detection of Abnormal (Emphysema or ILD) versus Normal Lung

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Kung-Sik; Jiao, Feiran; Mikulski, Marek A.; Gerke, Alicia; Guo, Junfeng; Newell, John D; Hoffman, Eric A.; Thompson, Brad; Lee, Chang Hyun; Fuortes, Laurence J.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale and Objectives We evaluated the role of automated quantitative computed tomography (CT) scan interpretation algorithm in detecting Interstitial Lung Disease (ILD) and/or emphysema in a sample of elderly subjects with mild lung disease.ypothesized that the quantification and distributions of CT attenuation values on lung CT, over a subset of Hounsfield Units (HU) range [−1000 HU, 0 HU], can differentiate early or mild disease from normal lung. Materials and Methods We compared results of quantitative spiral rapid end-exhalation (functional residual capacity; FRC) and end-inhalation (total lung capacity; TLC) CT scan analyses in 52 subjects with radiographic evidence of mild fibrotic lung disease to 17 normal subjects. Several CT value distributions were explored, including (i) that from the peripheral lung taken at TLC (with peels at 15 or 65mm), (ii) the ratio of (i) to that from the core of lung, and (iii) the ratio of (ii) to its FRC counterpart. We developed a fused-lasso logistic regression model that can automatically identify sub-intervals of [−1000 HU, 0 HU] over which a CT value distribution provides optimal discrimination between abnormal and normal scans. Results The fused-lasso logistic regression model based on (ii) with 15 mm peel identified the relative frequency of CT values over [−1000, −900] and that over [−450,−200] HU as a means of discriminating abnormal versus normal, resulting in a zero out-sample false positive rate and 15%false negative rate of that was lowered to 12% by pooling information. Conclusions We demonstrated the potential usefulness of this novel quantitative imaging analysis method in discriminating ILD and/or emphysema from normal lungs. PMID:26776294

  12. Complex inner core boundary from frequency characteristics of the reflection coefficients of PKiKP waves observed by Hi-net

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Satoru; Tkalčić, Hrvoje

    2015-12-01

    Frequency-dependent reflection coefficients of P waves at the inner core boundary (ICB) are estimated from the spectral ratios of PKiKP and PcP waves observed by the high-sensitivity seismograph network (Hi-net) in Japan. The corresponding PKiKP reflection locations at the ICB are distributed beneath the western Pacific. At frequencies where noise levels are sufficiently low, spectra of reflection coefficients show four distinct sets of characteristics: a flat spectrum, a spectrum with a significant spectral hole at approximately 1 or 3 Hz, a spectrum with a strong peak at approximately 2 or 3 Hz, and a spectrum containing both a sharp peak and a significant hole. The variety in observed spectra suggests complex lateral variations in ICB properties. To explain the measured differences in frequency characteristics of ICB reflection coefficients, we conduct 2D finite difference simulations of seismic wavefields near the ICB. The models tested in our simulations include a liquid layer and a solid layer above the ICB, as well as sinusoidal and spike-shaped ICB topography with varying heights and scale lengths. We find that the existence of a layer above the ICB can be excluded as a possible explanation for the observed spectra. Furthermore, we find that an ICB topographic model with wavelengths and heights of several kilometers is too extreme to explain our measurements. However, restricting the ICB topography to wavelengths and heights of 1.0-1.5 km can explain the observed frequency-related phenomena. The existence of laterally varying topography may be a sign of lateral variations in inner core solidification.

  13. Attenuated direct and scattered wave propagation on simulated land mobile satellite service paths in the presence of trees

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Richard L.; Estus, Robert

    1988-01-01

    Measurements were made of direct path with no trees, attenuated direct, and tree scattered signal levels at 1.3 GHz. Signals were received in two small groves of mixed hardwood trees. In the groves studied, average total signal levels were about 13 dB below adjacent no-trees locations, with attenuated direct signal levels about 14.6 dB below the no-trees case and scattered signals about 17.3 dB below the no-trees case. A simple model for land mobile satellite service (LMSS) propagation in groves of trees is proposed. The model assumes a constant scattered signal contribution at 17 dB below no-trees levels added to an attenuated direct signal which varies, depending on the number and density of trees in the direct path. When total signal levels are strong, the attenuated direct signal dominates. When total signal levels are more than 15 dB below no-trees levels, the scattered signals dominate.

  14. On the relative scattering of P- and S-waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malin, P. E.; Phinney, R. A.

    1985-01-01

    Using a single-scattering approximation, equations for the scattering attenuation coefficients of P-body and S-body waves are derived. The results are discussed in the light of the energy-renormalization approaches of Wu (1980, 1982) and Sato (1982) to seismic wave scattering. Practical methods for calculating the scattering attenuation coefficients for various earth models are emphasized. The conversions of P-waves to S-waves and S-waves to P-waves are included in the theory. The earth models are assumed to be randomly inhomogeneous, with their properties known only through their average-wavenumber power spectra. The power spectra are approximated with piecewise constant functions, each segment of which contributes to the net frequency-dependent scattering attenuation coefficient. The smallest and largest wavenumbers of a segment can be plotted along with the wavevectors of the incident and scattered waves on a wavenumber diagram. This diagram gives a geometric interpretation for the frequency behavior associated with each spectral segment, including a transition peak that is due entirely to the wavenumber limits of the segment. For regions of the earth where the inhomogeneity spectra are concentrated in a band of wavenumbers, it should be possible to observe such a peak in the apparent attenuation of seismic waves. Both the frequency and distance limits on the accuracy of the theoretical results are given.

  15. Influence of attenuation on acoustic emission signals in carbon fiber reinforced polymer panels.

    PubMed

    Asamene, Kassahun; Hudson, Larry; Sundaresan, Mannur

    2015-05-01

    Influence of attenuation on acoustic emission (AE) signals in Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer (CFRP) crossply and quasi-isotropic panels is examined in this paper. Attenuation coefficients of the fundamental antisymmetric (A0) and symmetric (S0) wave modes were determined experimentally along different directions for the two types of CFRP panels. In the frequency range from 100 kHz to 500 kHz, the A0 mode undergoes significantly greater changes due to material related attenuation compared to the S0 mode. Moderate to strong changes in the attenuation levels were noted with propagation directions. Such mode and frequency dependent attenuation introduces major changes in the characteristics of AE signals depending on the position of the AE sensor relative to the source. Results from finite element simulations of a microscopic damage event in the composite laminates are used to illustrate attenuation related changes in modal and frequency components of AE signals. PMID:25682294

  16. Attenuation Distance of Low Frequency Waves Upstream of the Pre-Dawn Bow Shock: GEOTAIL snd ISEE-3 Comparison

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sugiyama, T.; Terasawa, T.; Kawano, H.; Yamamoto, T.; Kokubun, S.; Frank, L.; Ackerson, K.; Tsurutani, B.

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents a statistical study of the spatial distribution of low frequency waves in the region upstream of the pre-dawn to dawn side bow shock using both GEOTAIL and ISEE-3 magnetometer data.

  17. Resonance zones and quasi-linear diffusion coefficients for radiation belt energetic electron interaction with oblique chorus waves in the Dungey magnetosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Shi Run; Ni, Binbin; Gu Xudong; Zhao Zhengyu; Zhou Chen

    2012-07-15

    The resonance regions for resonant interactions of radiation belt electrons with obliquely propagating whistler-mode chorus waves are investigated in detail in the Dungey magnetic fields that are parameterized by the intensity of uniform southward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) Bz or, equivalently, by the values of D=(M/B{sub z,0}){sup 1/3} (where M is the magnetic moment of the dipole and B{sub z,0} is the uniform southward IMF normal to the dipole's equatorial plane). Adoption of background magnetic field model can considerably modify the determination of resonance regions. Compared to the results for the case of D = 50 (very close to the dipole field), the latitudinal coverage of resonance regions for 200 keV electrons interacting with chorus waves tends to become narrower for smaller D-values, regardless of equatorial pitch angle, resonance harmonics, and wave normal angle. In contrast, resonance regions for 1 MeV electrons tend to have very similar spatial lengths along the field line for various Dungey magnetic field models but cover different magnetic field intervals, indicative of a strong dependence on electron energy. For any given magnetic field line, the resonance regions where chorus-electron resonant interactions can take place rely closely on equatorial pitch angle, resonance harmonics, and kinetic energy. The resonance regions tend to cover broader latitudinal ranges for smaller equatorial pitch angles, higher resonance harmonics, and lower electron energies, consistent with the results in Ni and Summers [Phys. Plasmas 17, 042902, 042903 (2010)]. Calculations of quasi-linear bounce-averaged diffusion coefficients for radiation belt electrons due to nightside chorus waves indicate that the resultant scattering rates differ from using different Dungey magnetic field models, demonstrating a strong dependence of wave-induced electron scattering effect on the adoption of magnetic field model. Our results suggest that resonant wave

  18. A new solution expressed in terms of UTD coefficients for the multiple diffraction of spherical waves by a series of buildings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    RodríGuez, José-VíCtor; Molina-GarcíA-Pardo, José-MaríA.; Juan-LláCer, Leandro

    2007-08-01

    A new formulation expressed in terms of Uniform Theory of Diffraction (UTD) coefficients for the prediction of the multiple diffraction caused by a series of buildings modeled as wedges, considering spherical-wave incidence, is presented. The solution, which has a certain heuristic nature, is validated with numerical results from technical literature and the particular cases of diffraction by buildings modeled as absorbing knife edges, as well as the one in which the mentioned buildings are replaced by flat-roofed parallel rows of blocks (building rows in cross sections considered to be rectangular in shape) are also analyzed. The computing time is reduced over existing formulations, especially when the number of buildings is large, and the results can be applied in the development of theoretical models, in order to predict a more realistic path loss in urban environments when multiple-building diffraction has to be considered.

  19. On quasi-periodic wave solutions and asymptotic behaviors to a (2 + 1)-dimensional generalized variable-coefficient Sawada-Kotera equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tu, Jian-Min; Tian, Shou-Fu; Xu, Mei-Juan; Ma, Pan-Li

    2015-07-01

    In this paper, a (2 + 1)-dimensional generalized variable-coefficient Sawada-Kotera (gvcSK) equation is investigated, which describes many nonlinear phenomena in fluid dynamics and plasma physics. Based on the properties of binary Bell polynomials, we present a Hirota’s bilinear equation to the gvcSK equation. By virtue of the Hirota’s bilinear equation, we obtain the N-soliton solutions and the quasi-periodic wave solutions of the gvcSK equation, which can be reduced to the ones of several integrable equations such as Sawada-Kotera, modified Caudrey-Dodd-Gibbon-Sawada-Kotera, isospectral BKP equations and etc. Furthermore, we obtain the relationship between the soliton solutions and periodic solutions by considering the asymptotic properties of the periodic solutions.

  20. The upper mantle structure of the central Rio Grande rift region from teleseismic P and S wave travel time delays and attenuation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Slack, P.D.; Davis, P.M.; Baldridge, W.S.; Olsen, K.H.; Glahn, A.; Achauer, U.; Spence, W.

    1996-01-01

    The lithosphere beneath a continental rift should be significantly modified due to extension. To image the lithosphere beneath the Rio Grande rift (RGR), we analyzed teleseismic travel time delays of both P and S wave arrivals and solved for the attenuation of P and S waves for four seismic experiments spanning the Rio Grande rift. Two tomographic inversions of the P wave travel time data are given: an Aki-Christofferson-Husebye (ACH) block model inversion and a downward projection inversion. The tomographic inversions reveal a NE-SW to NNE-SSW trending feature at depths of 35 to 145 km with a velocity reduction of 7 to 8% relative to mantle velocities beneath the Great Plains. This region correlates with the transition zone between the Colorado Plateau and the Rio Grande rift and is bounded on the NW by the Jemez lineament, a N52??E trending zone of late Miocene to Holocene volcanism. S wave delays plotted against P wave delays are fit with a straight line giving a slope of 3.0??0.4. This correlation and the absolute velocity reduction imply that temperatures in the lithosphere are close to the solidus, consistent with, but not requiring, the presence of partial melt in the mantle beneath the Rio Grande rift. The attenuation data could imply the presence of partial melt. We compare our results with other geophysical and geologic data. We propose that any north-south trending thermal (velocity) anomaly that may have existed in the upper mantle during earlier (Oligocene to late Miocene) phases of rifting and that may have correlated with the axis of the rift has diminished with time and has been overprinted with more recent structure. The anomalously low-velocity body presently underlying the transition zone between the core of the Colorado Plateau and the rift may reflect processes resulting from the modern (Pliocene to present) regional stress field (oriented WNW-ESE), possibly heralding future extension across the Jemez lineament and transition zone.

  1. Leptonic widths of heavy quarkonia: S-wave QCD/NRQCD matching coefficients for the electromagnetic vector annihilation current at O(αsv2)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hart, A.; von Hippel, G. M.; Horgan, R. R.

    2007-01-01

    We construct the S-wave part of the electromagnetic vector annihilation current to O(αsv2) on the lattice for heavy quarks whose dynamics are described by the NRQCD action, and v is the nonrelativistic quark velocity inside the meson. The lattice vector current for QQ¯ annihilation is expressed as a linear combination of lattice operators with quantum numbers L=0, JP=1-, and the coefficients are determined by matching this lattice current to the corresponding continuum current in QCD to O(v2) at one-loop. The annihilation channel gives a complex amplitude and a proper choice for the contours of integration is needed; a simple Wick rotation is not possible. In this way, and with a careful choice of subtraction functions in the numerical integration, the Coulomb-exchange and infrared singularities appearing in the amplitudes are successfully treated. The matching coefficients are given as a function of the heavy quark mass Ma in lattice units. An automated vertex generation program written in Python is employed, allowing us to use a realistic NRQCD action and an improved gluon lattice action. A change in the definition of either action is easily accommodated in this procedure. The final result, when combined with lattice simulation results, describes the electromagnetic decays of heavy quarkonia, notably the Υ meson.

  2. Effects of atmospheric turbulence on microwave and millimeter wave satellite communications systems. [attenuation statistics and antenna design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Devasirvatham, D. M. J.; Hodge, D. B.

    1981-01-01

    A model of the microwave and millimeter wave link in the presence of atmospheric turbulence is presented with emphasis on satellite communications systems. The analysis is based on standard methods of statistical theory. The results are directly usable by the design engineer.

  3. Diffracted and head waves associated with waves on nonseparable surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barger, Raymond L.

    1992-01-01

    A theory is presented for computing waves radiated from waves on a smooth surface. With the assumption that attention of the surface wave is due only to radiation and not to dissipation in the surface material, the radiation coefficient is derived in terms of the attenuation factor. The excitation coefficient is determined by the reciprocity condition. Formulas for the shape and the spreading of the radiated wave are derived, and some sample calculations are presented. An investigation of resonant phase matching for nonseparable surfaces is presented with a sample calculation. A discussion of how such calculations might be related to resonant frequencies of nonseparable thin shell structures is included. A description is given of nonseparable surfaces that can be modeled in the vector that facilitates use of the appropriate formulas of differential geometry.

  4. Studies of the propagation of viscoelastic spherical divergent stress waves based on the generalized Maxwell model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Qiang; Wang, Zhan-jiang

    2016-06-01

    The governing equations for viscoelastic spherical divergent stress waves are formulated, and the solutions for spherical stress waves are analytically given in the Laplace domain. Based on the generalized Maxwell model, the propagation coefficient for viscoelastic spherical stress waves is obtained analytically and the characteristics of the attenuation coefficient and the phase velocity are discussed. Meanwhile, the solutions for viscoelastic spherical stress waves are calculated by using the numerical method of the inverse Laplace transform in the case of cavity explosion. The propagating characteristics for strong discontinuous visco-elastic spherical waves and steady-state values caused by the cavity pressure are discussed using theoretical and numerical methods.

  5. Attenuation of shear-waves in the back-arc region of the Hellenic arc for frequencies from 0.6 to 16 Hz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polatidis, Antonis; Kiratzi, Anastasia; Hatzidimitriou, Panagiotis; Margaris, Basil

    2003-05-01

    Qβ for shear-waves is determined for the inner part of the Hellenic arc, the back-arc area, as a function of frequency in the range 0.6-16 Hz. We used 314 digital records from 32 earthquakes with magnitudes ( Mw) ranging from 3.9 to 5.1. Epicentral distances ranged from 65 to 515 km. The data were obtained in 1997 during a 6-month operation of a digital portable network in Greece. The Qβ estimates were made for five frequency bands centred at 0.8, 1.5, 3.0, 6.0 and 12.0 Hz and the Qβ values obtained were 47, 79, 143, 271 and 553, respectively. The results show that Qβ for S-waves increases with frequency taking the form Qβ=55 f0.91 (or Qβ-1≃0.018 f-0.91). The high attenuation and the strong frequency dependence found, which is close to the frequency dependence of coda Q for Greece, are characteristic of an area with high seismicity, rapid extension, and in agreement with other similar studies in Greece.

  6. RADIO FREQUENCY ATTENUATOR

    DOEpatents

    Giordano, S.

    1963-11-12

    A high peak power level r-f attenuator that is readily and easily insertable along a coaxial cable having an inner conductor and an outer annular conductor without breaking the ends thereof is presented. Spaced first and second flares in the outer conductor face each other with a slidable cylindrical outer conductor portion therebetween. Dielectric means, such as water, contact the cable between the flares to attenuate the radio-frequency energy received thereby. The cylindrical outer conductor portion is slidable to adjust the voltage standing wave ratio to a low level, and one of the flares is slidable to adjust the attenuation level. An integral dielectric container is also provided. (AFC)

  7. SEISMIC ATTENUATION FOR RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION

    SciTech Connect

    Joel Walls; M.T. Taner; Gary Mavko; Jack Dvorkin

    2002-04-01

    Wave-induced variations of pore pressure in a partially-saturated reservoir result in oscillatory liquid flow. The viscous losses during this flow are responsible for wave attenuation. The same viscous effects determine the changes in the dynamic bulk modulus of the system versus frequency. These changes are necessarily linked to attenuation via the causality condition. We analytically quantify the frequency dependence of the bulk modulus of a partially saturated rock by assuming that saturation is patchy and then link these changes to the inverse quality factor. As a result, the P-wave attenuation is quantitatively linked to saturation and thus can serve as a saturation indicator.

  8. Research & Developments for Millimeter-Wave Dielectric Forsterite with Low Dielectric Constant, High Q, and Zero Temperature Coefficient of Resonant Frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsunooka, Tsutomu; Ando, Minato; Suzuki, Sadahiko; Yasufuku, Yoshitoyo; Ohsato, Hitoshi

    2013-09-01

    Forsterite Mg2SiO4 is a candidate for millimeter-wave dielectrics because of its high Q and low dielectric constant ɛr. Commercial forsterite has been improved with a high Q of 240,000 GHz using high-purity and fine raw materials, and the temperature coefficient of resonant frequency (TCf) can also be adjusted to near-zero ppm/°C by adding 24 wt % rutile compared with that in a previous study. In this study, the TCf, TCɛ, and ɛr of forsterite ceramics with rutile added are studied for the tuning conditions. Zero ppm/°C TCf of the forsterite with 30 and 25 wt % rutile added was achieved at 1200 °C for 2.5 and 2.25 h, respectively. The ɛr values of the near-zero TCf forsterite with 30 and 25 wt % rutile added are 11.3 and 10.2, respectively.

  9. Range Restriction and Attenuation Corrections.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mumford, Michael D.; Mendoza, Jorge L.

    The present paper reviews the techniques commonly used to correct an observed correlation coefficient for the simultaneous influence of attenuation and range restriction effects. It is noted that the procedure which is currently in use may be somewhat biased because it treats range restriction and attenuation as independent restrictive influences.…

  10. Calculation Of Pneumatic Attenuation In Pressure Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitmore, Stephen A.

    1991-01-01

    Errors caused by attenuation of air-pressure waves in narrow tubes calculated by method based on fundamental equations of flow. Changes in ambient pressure transmitted along narrow tube to sensor. Attenuation of high-frequency components of pressure wave calculated from wave equation derived from Navier-Stokes equations of viscous flow in tube. Developed to understand and compensate for frictional attenuation in narrow tubes used to connect aircraft pressure sensors with pressure taps on affected surfaces.

  11. Ultrasonic Attenuation in Zircaloy-4

    SciTech Connect

    Gomez, M.P.; Banchik, A.D.; Lopez Pumarega, M.I.; Ruzzante, J.E.

    2005-04-09

    In this work the relationship between Zircaloy-4 grain size and ultrasonic attenuation behavior was studied for longitudinal waves in the frequency range of 10-90 MHz. The attenuation was analyzed as a function of frequency for samples with different mechanical and heat treatments having recrystallized and Widmanstatten structures with different grain size. The attenuation behavior was analyzed by different scattering models, depending on grain size, wavelength and frequency.

  12. Scattering of SH-wave for a non-welded contact fluid saturated natural fracture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ding

    2016-04-01

    Closed-form time-domain formulas have been obtained for reflected and transmitted coefficients of SH-wave across a saturated fracture. SH-wave incident upon a fluid filling saturated fracture at arbitrary angle containing the scattering attenuation and wave-induced fluid flow attenuation mechanism. The fracture linear slip theory is introduced under the saturated condition and the dynamic shear compliance is expressed by the viscous fluid mechanics. A finite jump displacement and velocity across a fracture is expressed as a function of wave frequency and geometrical parameters of fracture. The frequency-dependent wave reflection and transmission in wave equations are given by the discontinuity boundary conditions. Coupling relationship between scattering and intrinsic attenuation can be explained partially based on our model.

  13. Comment on 'Teleseismic P wave attenuation and nuclear explosion source functions inferred from Yellowknife array data' by Kin-Yip Chun, Tianfei Zhu, and Gordon F. West

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douglas, A.; Marshall, P. D.; Young, J. B.

    1993-06-01

    The t* (the ratio of the travel time to the specific quality factor) estimates of Chun et al. (1991) for P waves for paths from several test sites to the Yellowknife array (YKA) are argued to be strongly dependent on the assumptions made about the source; there is little evidence that the source models of explosions derived from close-in observations yield reliable predictions of the source pulse radiated to long range. With frequency domain methods the confidence limits on the rate of falloff of source-corrected explosion spectra may be low and give the impression that the t* estimates are well constrained. However, because of the uncertainties in the source spectra the confidence limits must be underestimates of the true values. In their reply Chun et al. argue that that their t* estimates are higher than the published single-window values. A proper determination of the frequency dependence of t* requires, among other things, elucidation of the role of scattering attenuation.

  14. Lateral Variations Of Macroseismic Intensity Attenuation In Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carletti, F.; Gasperini, P.

    Using the Italian unified intensity database, a tomographic type study of the attenua- tion of macroseismic intensity on the Italian territory has been carried out on the basis of a bilinear model recently proposed by Gasperini (2001). The spatial variations of the attenuation coefficients on meshes with sides of 50 and 25 km have been computed. By checkerboard and restore tests, with a realistic standard error of one intensity de- gree, we verified that our dataset of about 20000 paths is able to well reproduce the imposed patterns. The comparison of inversion results with crustal and upper mantle seismic wave tomography of the Italian area show a fairly good agreement between high attenuation and low velocity areas (Northern and central Apennines) and between low attenuation and high velocity ones (Po valley and Adriatic coast). The resulting attenuation pattern also agrees with a set of Nonparametric Attenuation Functions (NAF) describing the attenuation of crustal phases in different regions of Italy and shows a rather strong correspondence with heat-flow data. This study also furnished a compilation of average local residuals that have been correlated with the geological, geotechnical and morphological characteristics of sites.

  15. Attenuation of short-period P, PcP, ScP, and pP waves in the earth's mantle

    SciTech Connect

    Bock, G.; Clements, J.R.

    1982-05-10

    The parameter t* (ratio of body wave travel time to the average quality factor Q) was estimated under various assumptions of the nature of the earthquake sources for short-period P, PcP, and ScP phases originating from earthquakes in the Fiji-Tonga region and recorded at the Warramunga Seismic Array at Tennant Creek (Northern Territory, Australia). Spectral ratios were calculated for the amplitudes of PcP to P and of pP to P. The data reveal a laterally varying Q structure in the Fiji-Tonga region. The high-Q lithosphere descending beneath the Tonga Island arc is overlain above 350 km depth by a wedgelike zone of high attenuation with an average Q/sub ..cap alpha../ between 120 and 200 at short periods. The upper mantle farther to the west of the Tonga island arc is less attenuating, with Q/sub ..cap alpha../, between 370 and 560. Q/sub ..cap alpha../ is about 500 in the upper mantle on the oceanic side of the subduction zone. The t* estimates of this study are much smaller than estimates from the free oscillation model SL8. This can be partly explained by regional variations of Q in the upper mantle. If no lateral Q variations occur in the lower mantle, a frequency-dependent Q can make the PcP and ScP observations consistent with model SL8. Adopting the absorption band model to describe the frequency dependence of Q, the parameter tau/sub 2/, the cut-off period of the high-frequency end of the absorption band, was determined. For different source models with finite corner frequencies, the average tau/sub 2/ for the mantle is between 0.01 and 0.10 s (corresponding to frequencies between 16 and 1.6 Hz) as derived from the PcP data, and between 0.06 and 0.12 s (2.7 and 1.3 Hz), as derived from the ScP data.

  16. An ice-sheet-wide framework for englacial attenuation from ice-penetrating radar data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, T. M.; Bamber, J. L.; Williams, C. N.; Paden, J. D.; Siegert, M. J.; Huybrechts, P.; Gagliardini, O.; Gillet-Chaulet, F.

    2016-07-01

    Radar inference of the bulk properties of glacier beds, most notably identifying basal melting, is, in general, derived from the basal reflection coefficient. On the scale of an ice sheet, unambiguous determination of basal reflection is primarily limited by uncertainty in the englacial attenuation of the radio wave, which is an Arrhenius function of temperature. Existing bed-returned power algorithms for deriving attenuation assume that the attenuation rate is regionally constant, which is not feasible at an ice-sheet-wide scale. Here we introduce a new semi-empirical framework for deriving englacial attenuation, and, to demonstrate its efficacy, we apply it to the Greenland Ice Sheet. A central feature is the use of a prior Arrhenius temperature model to estimate the spatial variation in englacial attenuation as a first guess input for the radar algorithm. We demonstrate regions of solution convergence for two input temperature fields and for independently analysed field campaigns. The coverage achieved is a trade-off with uncertainty and we propose that the algorithm can be "tuned" for discrimination of basal melt (attenuation loss uncertainty ˜ 5 dB). This is supported by our physically realistic ( ˜ 20 dB) range for the basal reflection coefficient. Finally, we show that the attenuation solution can be used to predict the temperature bias of thermomechanical ice sheet models and is in agreement with known model temperature biases at the Dye 3 ice core.

  17. Reflection Coefficients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenslade, Thomas B., Jr.

    1994-01-01

    Discusses and provides an example of reflectivity approximation to determine whether reflection will occur. Provides a method to show thin-film interference on a projection screen. Also applies the reflectivity concepts to electromagnetic wave systems. (MVL)

  18. Penetration characteristics of VLF wave from atmosphere into lower ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Shufan; Shen, Xuhui; Pan, Weiyan; Zhang, Xuemin; Liao, Li

    2010-06-01

    The factors affecting the reflection and transmission coefficient of the ionosphere have been analyzed. These factors include wave frequency, incident angle, geomagnetic inclination, electron density and collision frequency in the ionosphere. The ionosphere refractive index is also analyzed. The ionosphere above 70 km is considered to be homogeneous and anisotropic, and the reflection and transmission coefficient matrix is calculated using matrix method. Simultaneously the Booker quartic equation is solved to get the refractive index in the ionosphere. The results show that when the wave frequency is higher, it is easier to penetrate into the ionosphere from its bottom boundary and the propagation attenuation in the ionosphere is smaller. TE (traverse electric) wave and TM (traverse magnetic) wave can both penetrate into the ionosphere with a small incident angle, while TE wave can hardly transmit into the ionosphere when the incident angle is large. The transmission coefficient decreases as the geomagnetic inclination increases. TE and TM wave cannot penetrate into the ionosphere at magnetic equator. When the electron collision frequency is higher, it is easier for VLF wave to penetrate into the ionosphere and the attenuation of ordinary wave is weaker, which may be caused by the energy transportation between the waves and the particles. The ordinary (O) wave experiences severer attenuation than extraordinary (X) wave, and X wave is a penetration mode whereas O wave is a non-penetration mode in the ionosphere. All the results indicate that VLF wave with higher frequency is easier to penetrate into the ionosphere and to be recorded by the satellites at high latitude. It is hard for ULF and the lower frequency VLF wave to transmit into the ionosphere directly for the severe reflection and attenuation. It may transmit into the ionosphere with a small incident angle due to the nonlinear effect, for example, the interaction between the waves and the particles or cross

  19. Acoustic attenuation logging using centroid frequency shift and amplitude ratio methods: A numerical study

    SciTech Connect

    Quan, Y.; Harris, J.M.; Chen, X.

    1994-12-31

    The centroid frequency shift method is proposed to estimate seismic attenuation from full waveform acoustic logs. This approach along with the amplitude ratio method is applied to investigate the attenuation properties of the P head wave in fluid-filled boreholes. The generalized reflection and transmission coefficients method is used to perform forward modeling. The authors suggest an empirical formula to describe the frequency-dependent geometrical spreading of the P-wave in a borehole. They simulate a more realistic borehole by including a mudcake and an invaded zone which are modeled by a large number of radially symmetric thin layers. The numerical tests show that this invaded zone exhibits very strong influence on the attenuation measurement.

  20. Propagation of electromagnetic wave in dusty plasma and the influence of dust size distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hui; Wu, Jian; Zhou, Zhongxiang; Yuan, Chengxun

    2016-07-01

    The effect of charged dust particle and their size distribution on the propagation of electromagnetic wave in a dusty plasma is investigated. It is shown that the additional collision mechanism provided by charged dust particles can significantly alter the electromagnetic properties of a plasma, leading to the appearance of attenuation of electromagnetic wave through dusty plasma. The attenuation coefficient mainly depends on the dust density, radius, and the charge numbers on the dust surface. The results described here will be used to enhance understanding of electromagnetic wave propagation processed in space and laboratory dusty plasma.

  1. Inverse problems of ultrasound tomography in models with attenuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goncharsky, Alexander V.; Romanov, Sergey Y.

    2014-04-01

    We develop efficient methods for solving inverse problems of ultrasound tomography in models with attenuation. We treat the inverse problem as a coefficient inverse problem for unknown coordinate-dependent functions that characterize both the speed cross section and the coefficients of the wave equation describing attenuation in the diagnosed region. We derive exact formulas for the gradient of the residual functional in models with attenuation, and develop efficient algorithms for minimizing the gradient of the residual by solving the conjugate problem. These algorithms are easy to parallelize when implemented on supercomputers, allowing the computation time to be reduced by a factor of several hundred compared to a PC. The numerical analysis of model problems shows that it is possible to reconstruct not only the speed cross section, but also the properties of the attenuating medium. We investigate the choice of the initial approximation for iterative algorithms used to solve inverse problems. The algorithms considered are primarily meant for the development of ultrasound tomographs for differential diagnosis of breast cancer.

  2. Creep-Induced Evolution of Ultrasonic Attenuation in a Martensite Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohtani, T.

    2008-02-01

    Electromagnetic acoustic resonance (EMAR) is a contactless resonance method using an electromagnetic acoustic transducer (EMAT). In this study, EMAR was applied to detect the creep damage process in a martensite stainless steel (JIS-SUS403). We used a bulk-wave EMAT and measured ultrasonic attenuation and velocity as creep progressed. Attenuation coefficient exhibits a much larger sensitivity to the damage accumulation than the velocity. It shows a maximum peak at approximately 20% and a minimum peak at 50% of the creep life.

  3. Seismic Rheological Model and Reflection Coefficients of the Brittle-Ductile Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carcione, José M.; Poletto, Flavio

    2013-12-01

    It is well established that the upper—cooler—part of the crust is brittle, while deeper zones present ductile behaviour. In some cases, this brittle-ductile transition is a single seismic reflector with an associated reflection coefficient. We first develop a stress-strain relation including the effects of crust anisotropy, seismic attenuation and ductility in which deformation takes place by shear plastic flow. Viscoelastic anisotropy is based on the eigenstrain model and the Zener and Burgers mechanical models are used to model the effects of seismic attenuation, velocity dispersion, and steady-state creep flow, respectively. The stiffness components of the brittle and ductile media depend on stress and temperature through the shear viscosity, which is obtained by the Arrhenius equation and the octahedral stress criterion. The P- and S-wave velocities decrease as depth and temperature increase due to the geothermal gradient, an effect which is more pronounced for shear waves. We then obtain the reflection and transmission coefficients of a single brittle-ductile interface and of a ductile thin layer. The PP scattering coefficient has a Brewster angle (a sign change) in both cases, and there is substantial PS conversion at intermediate angles. The PP coefficient is sensitive to the layer thickness, unlike the SS coefficient. Thick layers have a well-defined Brewster angle and show higher reflection amplitudes. Finally, we compute synthetic seismograms in a homogeneous medium as a function of temperature.

  4. Controlling frontal photopolymerization with optical attenuation and mass diffusion.

    PubMed

    Hennessy, Matthew G; Vitale, Alessandra; Matar, Omar K; Cabral, João T

    2015-06-01

    Frontal photopolymerization (FPP) is a versatile directional solidification process that can be used to rapidly fabricate polymer network materials by selectively exposing a photosensitive monomer bath to light. A characteristic feature of FPP is that the monomer-to-polymer conversion profiles take on the form of traveling waves that propagate into the unpolymerized bulk from the illuminated surface. Practical implementations of FPP require detailed knowledge about the conversion profile and speed of these traveling waves. The purpose of this theoretical study is to (i) determine the conditions under which FPP occurs and (ii) explore how optical attenuation and mass transport can be used to finely tune the conversion profile and propagation kinetics. Our findings quantify the strong optical attenuation and slow mass transport relative to the rate of polymerization required for FPP. The shape of the traveling wave is primarily controlled by the magnitude of the optical attenuation coefficients of the neat and polymerized material. Unexpectedly, we find that mass diffusion can increase the net extent of polymerization and accelerate the growth of the solid network. The theoretical predictions are found to be in excellent agreement with experimental data acquired for representative systems. PMID:26172720

  5. Controlling frontal photopolymerization with optical attenuation and mass diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hennessy, Matthew G.; Vitale, Alessandra; Matar, Omar K.; Cabral, João T.

    2015-06-01

    Frontal photopolymerization (FPP) is a versatile directional solidification process that can be used to rapidly fabricate polymer network materials by selectively exposing a photosensitive monomer bath to light. A characteristic feature of FPP is that the monomer-to-polymer conversion profiles take on the form of traveling waves that propagate into the unpolymerized bulk from the illuminated surface. Practical implementations of FPP require detailed knowledge about the conversion profile and speed of these traveling waves. The purpose of this theoretical study is to (i) determine the conditions under which FPP occurs and (ii) explore how optical attenuation and mass transport can be used to finely tune the conversion profile and propagation kinetics. Our findings quantify the strong optical attenuation and slow mass transport relative to the rate of polymerization required for FPP. The shape of the traveling wave is primarily controlled by the magnitude of the optical attenuation coefficients of the neat and polymerized material. Unexpectedly, we find that mass diffusion can increase the net extent of polymerization and accelerate the growth of the solid network. The theoretical predictions are found to be in excellent agreement with experimental data acquired for representative systems.

  6. Full-wave description of the lower hybrid reflection of whistler waves

    SciTech Connect

    Kuzichev, I. V. Shklyar, D. R.

    2013-10-15

    A quasi-electrostatic whistler wave propagating in the direction of increasing lower hybrid resonance (LHR) frequency experiences reflection from the region in which its frequency becomes lower than the LHR frequency. This phenomenon is usually described in the framework of geometrical optics. For a wave propagating along a magnetospheric trajectory, the LHR reflection frequently takes place in the ionospheric region in which electron-neutral collisions are essential and lead to wave attenuation. In this case, the wave approach to the description of the LHR reflection is most consistent. This work is aimed at developing such an approach. The coefficients of the wave reflection are calculated for different plasma parameters. The relation between the problem under consideration and the problem of exit of whistler-mode waves to the ground is considered.

  7. Analysis of the attenuation in soils and water content in remote sensing surveying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-Gracia, V.; Pujades, L. G.; Canas, J. A.; Di Capua, D.; González-Drigo, R.

    2007-10-01

    Ground-penetrating radar (GPR) is a high resolution surveying method applied to civil engineering, surface geology, archaeology and other disciplines. Mainly it is used solving the direct problem and obtaining a model of the studied medium. Otherwise, the study of the inverse problem could provide other valuable information: the electromagnetic properties of the medium. These parameters are obtained from the changes of the velocity, attenuation and frequency of the recorded wave. The physical properties of the medium related to those wave parameters are, mainly, the water content and the porosity. Several lab experiences are performed in order to obtain these parameters from different soil samples. Porosity and water content are measured and controlled. Velocity is obtained by measuring the two-way travel time of the reflected wave and comparing wave reflected amplitudes on the surface of the samples. Attenuation coefficients are determined from the analysis of the amplitude of the wave traveling in different thickness samples. Frequencies velocities and wave attenuation are analyzed in the different cases in order to characterize those different media and to relate its water content and its porosity with these measured parameters. The experimental results were also compared with the complex refraction index model (CRIM).

  8. A parametric analysis of waves propagating in a porous solid saturated by a three-phase fluid.

    PubMed

    Santos, Juan E; Savioli, Gabriela B

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents an analysis of a model for the propagation of waves in a poroelastic solid saturated by a three-phase viscous, compressible fluid. The constitutive relations and the equations of motion are stated first. Then a plane wave analysis determines the phase velocities and attenuation coefficients of the four compressional waves and one shear wave that propagate in this type of medium. A procedure to compute the elastic constants in the constitutive relations is defined next. Assuming the knowledge of the shear modulus of the dry matrix, the other elastic constants in the stress-strain relations are determined by employing ideal gedanken experiments generalizing those of Biot's theory for single-phase fluids. These experiments yield expressions for the elastic constants in terms of the properties of the individual solid and fluids phases. Finally the phase velocities and attenuation coefficients of all waves are computed for a sample of Berea sandstone saturated by oil, gas, and water. PMID:26627777

  9. The influence of porosity on ultrasound attenuation in carbon fiber reinforced plastic composites using the laser-ultrasound spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karabutov, A. A.; Podymova, N. B.; Belyaev, I. O.

    2013-11-01

    Wideband acoustic spectroscopy with a laser ultrasound source for quantitative analysis of the effect of porosity on the attenuation coefficient of longitudinal acoustic waves in carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) composite materials was experimentally implemented. The samples under study had different bulk-porosity levels (up to 10%), which were determined using X-ray computer tomography. A resonance ultrasound attenuation peak associated with the one-dimensional periodicity of the layered composite structure was observed for all samples. The absolute value of the resonance-peak maximum and its width depend on the local concentration of microscopic isolated pores and extended delaminations in the sample structure. The obtained empirical relationships between these parameters of the frequency dependence of the ultrasound attenuation coefficient and the type of inhomogeneities and their volume concentration can be used for rapid evaluation of the structural quality of CFRP composites.

  10. Realization of high coupling coefficients in 1. 53. mu. m InGaAsP/InP first-order quarter-wave shifted distributed feedback lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Hillmer, H.; Hansmann, S.; Burkhard, H. )

    1990-08-06

    Coupling coefficients as high as 300 cm{sup {minus}1} have been achieved and investigated in the performance of distributed feedback lasers. High coupling has several important advantages like lower feedback sensitivity, and lower influence on facet reflectivity, thus easy handling for coatings without any penalty in terms of mode hopping. We obtain a side-mode suppression ratio as high as 51.2 dB. 8 Gb/s nonreturn to zero'' modulation is demonstrated.

  11. Shear waves in vegetal tissues at ultrasonic frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fariñas, M. D.; Sancho-Knapik, D.; Peguero-Pina, J. J.; Gil-Pelegrín, E.; Gómez Álvarez-Arenas, T. E.

    2013-03-01

    Shear waves are investigated in leaves of two plant species using air-coupled ultrasound. Magnitude and phase spectra of the transmission coefficient around the first two orders of the thickness resonances (normal and oblique incidence) have been measured. A bilayer acoustic model for plant leaves (comprising the palisade parenchyma and the spongy mesophyll) is proposed to extract, from measured spectra, properties of these tissues like