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Sample records for wave attenuation measurements

  1. A new instrumentation to measure seismic waves attenuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tisato, N.; Madonna, C.; Boutareaud, S.; Burg, J.

    2010-12-01

    Attenuation of seismic waves is the general expression describing the loss of energy of an elastic perturbation during its propagation in a medium. As a geophysical method, measuring the attenuation of seismic waves is a key to uncover essential information about fluid saturation of buried rocks. Attenuation of seismic waves depends on several mechanisms. In the case of saturated rock, fluids play an important role. Seismic waves create zones of overpressure by mobilizing the fluids in the pores of the rock. Starting from Gassmann-Biot theory (Gassman, 1951), several models (e.g. White, 1975; Mavko and Jizba, 1991) have been formulated to describe the energy absorption by flow of fluids. According to Mavko et al. (1998) for rock with permeability equals or less than 1 D, fluid viscosity between 1 cP and 10 cP and low frequencies seismic wave (< 100 Hz), the most important processes that subtract energy from the seismic waves are squirt flow and patchy saturation. Numerical models like Quintal et al. (2009) calculate how a patchy saturated vertical rock section (25 cm height), after stress steps of several kPa (i.e. 30 kPa) show a dissimilar increase in pore pressure between gas-saturated and liquid-saturated layers. The Rock Deformation Laboratory at ETH-Zürich has designed and set up a new pressure vessel to measure seismic wave attenuation in rocks at frequencies between 0.1 and 100 Hz and to verify the predicted influence of seismic waves on the pore pressure in patchy saturated rocks. We present this pressure vessel which can reach confining pressures of 25 MPa and holds a 250 mm long and 76 mm diameter sample. Dynamic stress is applied at the top of the rock cylinder by a piezoelectric motor that can generate a stress of several kPa (> 100 KPa) in less than 10 ms. The vessel is equipped with 5 pressure sensors buried within the rock sample, a load cell and a strain sensor to measure axial shortening while the motor generates the seismic waves. The sensor

  2. Characterization of guided wave velocity and attenuation in anisotropic materials from wavefield measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Westin B.; Michaels, Thomas E.; Michaels, Jennifer E.

    2016-02-01

    The behavior of guided waves propagating in anisotropic composite panels can be substantially more complicated than for isotropic, metallic plates. The angular dependency of wave propagation characteristics need to be understood and quantified before applying methods for damage detection and characterization. This study experimentally investigates the anisotropy of wave speed and attenuation for the fundamental A0-like guided wave mode propagating in a solid laminate composite panel. A piezoelectric transducer is the wave source and a laser Doppler vibrometer is used to measure the outward propagating waves along radial lines originating at the source transducer. Group velocity, phase velocity and attenuation are characterized as a function of angle for a single center frequency. The methods shown in this paper serve as a framework for future adaptation to damage imaging methods using guided waves for structural health monitoring.

  3. Laboratory measurements of wave attenuation through model and live vegetation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Surge and waves generated by hurricanes and tropical storms often cause severe damage and loss of life in coastal areas. It is widely recognized that wetlands along coastal fringes reduce storm surge and waves. Yet, the potential role and primary mechanisms of wave mitigation by wetland vegetation a...

  4. Electromagnetic wave attenuation measurements in a ring-shaped inductively coupled air plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Xiaolong; Xu, Haojun; Li, Jianhai; Lin, Min; Su; Chen

    2015-05-01

    An aerocraft with the surface, inlet and radome covered large-area inductive coupled plasma (ICP) can attenuate its radar echo effectively. The shape, thickness, and electron density ( N e ) distribution of ICP are critical to electromagnetic wave attenuation. In the paper, an air all-quartz ICP generator in size of 20 × 20 × 7 cm3 without magnetic confinement is designed. The discharge results show that the ICP is amorphous in E-mode and ring-shaped in H-mode. The structure of ICP stratifies into core region and edge halo in H-mode, and its width and thickness changes from power and pressure. Such phenomena are explained by the distribution of RF magnetic field, the diffusion of negative ions plasma and the variation of skin depth. In addition, the theoretical analysis shows that the N e achieves nearly uniform within the electronegative core and sharply steepens in the edge. The N e of core region is diagnosed by microwave interferometer under varied conditions (pressure in range of 10-50 Pa, power in 300-700 W). Furthermore, the electromagnetic wave attenuation measurements were carried out with the air ICP in the frequencies of 4-5 GHz. The results show that the interspaced ICP is still effective to wave attenuation, and the wave attenuation increases with the power and pressure. The measured attenuation is approximately in accordance with the calculation data of finite-different time-domain simulations.

  5. The first direct measurements of upper oceanic crustal compressional wave attenuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobson, R. S.; Lewis, B. T. R.

    1990-10-01

    The first direct measurement of compressional wave attenuation of the uppermost 650 m of oceanic crust was performed using data recorded by seafloor hydrophones and large (56-116 kg), deep, explosive sources. The site was 13 km east of the southernmost Juan de Fuca Ridge on crust 0.4 m.y. old Spectral ratios were performed between bottom refracting waves and direct water waves, adjusted for spreading losses and transmission coefficient losses. Several tests of the data were performed, demonstrating that attenuation is linearly related to frequency between 15 and 140 Hz, but frequency-independent components of attenuation are also evident. Values of compressional wave Q cluster between 20 and 50 and do not show any systematic variation with depth over 650 m. The attenuation results also indicate the presence of heterogeneities within the crust, as the solutions for each receiver's data set are significantly different. No evidence for azimuthal variations of attenuation are supported by the data, although the data do not optimally sample a wide variation of azimuths. Our attenuation values are judged to be normal to higher than expected for the whole oceanic crust, based upon comparisons to results from synthetic seismogram modeling by others and by modeling signal to noise ratios of typical seismic refraction profiles. The results are consistent with recent laboratory measurements at ultrasonic frequencies for dry and saturated basalts at seafloor pressures and temperatures.

  6. Measurement of attenuation coefficients of the fundamental and second harmonic waves in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shuzeng; Jeong, Hyunjo; Cho, Sungjong; Li, Xiongbing

    2016-02-01

    Attenuation corrections in nonlinear acoustics play an important role in the study of nonlinear fluids, biomedical imaging, or solid material characterization. The measurement of attenuation coefficients in a nonlinear regime is not easy because they depend on the source pressure and requires accurate diffraction corrections. In this work, the attenuation coefficients of the fundamental and second harmonic waves which come from the absorption of water are measured in nonlinear ultrasonic experiments. Based on the quasilinear theory of the KZK equation, the nonlinear sound field equations are derived and the diffraction correction terms are extracted. The measured sound pressure amplitudes are adjusted first for diffraction corrections in order to reduce the impact on the measurement of attenuation coefficients from diffractions. The attenuation coefficients of the fundamental and second harmonics are calculated precisely from a nonlinear least squares curve-fitting process of the experiment data. The results show that attenuation coefficients in a nonlinear condition depend on both frequency and source pressure, which are much different from a linear regime. In a relatively lower drive pressure, the attenuation coefficients increase linearly with frequency. However, they present the characteristic of nonlinear growth in a high drive pressure. As the diffraction corrections are obtained based on the quasilinear theory, it is important to use an appropriate source pressure for accurate attenuation measurements.

  7. Electromagnetic wave attenuation measurements in a ring-shaped inductively coupled air plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Xiaolong, Wei; Haojun, Xu; Min, Lin; Chen, Su; Jianhai, Li

    2015-05-28

    An aerocraft with the surface, inlet and radome covered large-area inductive coupled plasma (ICP) can attenuate its radar echo effectively. The shape, thickness, and electron density (N{sub e}) distribution of ICP are critical to electromagnetic wave attenuation. In the paper, an air all-quartz ICP generator in size of 20 × 20 × 7 cm{sup 3} without magnetic confinement is designed. The discharge results show that the ICP is amorphous in E-mode and ring-shaped in H-mode. The structure of ICP stratifies into core region and edge halo in H-mode, and its width and thickness changes from power and pressure. Such phenomena are explained by the distribution of RF magnetic field, the diffusion of negative ions plasma and the variation of skin depth. In addition, the theoretical analysis shows that the N{sub e} achieves nearly uniform within the electronegative core and sharply steepens in the edge. The N{sub e} of core region is diagnosed by microwave interferometer under varied conditions (pressure in range of 10–50 Pa, power in 300–700 W). Furthermore, the electromagnetic wave attenuation measurements were carried out with the air ICP in the frequencies of 4–5 GHz. The results show that the interspaced ICP is still effective to wave attenuation, and the wave attenuation increases with the power and pressure. The measured attenuation is approximately in accordance with the calculation data of finite-different time-domain simulations.

  8. Measurements and mechanisms investigation of seismic wave attenuation for frequencies between 1 and 100 Hz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tisato, N.; Madonna, C.; Saenger, E. H.

    2012-04-01

    Seismic wave attenuation at low frequencies in the earth crust has been explained by partial saturation as well as permeability models. We present results obtained by the Broad Band Attenuation Vessel (BBAV) which measures seismic wave attenuation using the sub-resonance method in the frequency range 0.01 - 100 Hz. The apparatus also allows the investigation of attenuation mechanisms related to fluid flow by means of five pore pressure sensors placed in the specimen. This allows continuous local measurements of pore pressure changes generated by stress field changes. Measurements were performed on 76 mm diameter, 250 mm long, 20% porosity, and ~500 mD permeability Berea sandstone samples. The confining pressure was varied between 0 and 20 MPa, and the specimens were saturated with water between 0% and 90%. Attenuation measurements show dependence with saturation. For instance, when samples are at dry conditions they exhibit attenuation values around 0.01, the same sample saturated with 90% water shows attenuation values between 0.018 and 0.028 across the entire frequency range. Attenuation is also confining pressure dependent. For instance, variations of confining pressure ranging between 0 and 8 MPa lead to quality factors between 40 and 10 at 60 Hz and 60% water saturation. Best fits on these measurements reveal that the corner frequency of the attenuation mechanism decreases from ~800 to ~200 Hz with increasing confining pressure. Using calibration measurements with Aluminum the possibility of apparatus resonances can be ruled out. Local pore pressure measurements corroborate this observation showing pore pressure evolution as a function of saturation. The results are discussed and interpreted in light of known attenuation mechanisms for partially saturated rocks (patchy saturation and squirt flow). We rule out the possibility of patchy saturation occurrence, but squirt flow would offer an explanation. The confining pressure dependence could be the result of

  9. A novel protocol to measure the attenuation of electromagnetic waves through smoke

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan-wu, Li; Hong-yong, Yuan; Yang, Lu; Xiaoxiang, Zhang; Ru-feng, Xu; Ming, Fu

    2016-06-01

    The electromagnetic properties of smoke from a structure fire are important in terms of their relation to the stability of wireless communication systems used in fire rescue. As it is hard to make a measurable electromagnetic environment for particles in the air, compressed and bulk samples are used instead to measure sand storms and smoke plumes. In this paper, an experiment system was designed to measure smoke particles in the air, in consideration of both smoke control and electromagnetic measurement. Several measures had been taken to create a fulfilled smoke environment. The simulated and measured transmission parameters of the electromagnetic testing area were approximate and the electromagnetic wave frequencies were set from 350 to 400 MHz. Repeated experiments have been conducted to test the stability of the results and they showed that there was no obvious attenuation until the smoke concentration was more than 10 dB m‑1. It was found that the frequency around 355 and 360 MHz had a larger attenuation coefficient. The relationship between the attenuation coefficient and the smoke concentration was concluded to be linear. The results may help us understand the attenuation of electromagnetic waves within a smoke column.

  10. Laboratory measurement of elastic-wave velocity, associated dispersion, attenuation and particle resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molyneux, Joseph Benedict

    Laboratory velocity measurements are an integral component of solid earth seismic investigations. Typically, ultrasonic measurements from centimeter scale plug samples are used to model large sections of the crust, core and mantle. By using the laboratory determined velocities, the seismic arrival time can more accurately calibrate spatial physical properties of the solid-earth. A semi-automated picking procedure is presented which determines the velocity measured from recorded ultrasonic pulses propagated through laboratory samples. This procedure is quicker and more consistent than the standard hand picking method, allowing larger data sets to be accurately investigated. Furthermore, a series of common velocity analyses are compared to the physical properties of phase and group velocity in an attenuating medium of glycerol saturated glass bead packs (Q ˜ 3). It is found that the velocity determined from the first break of the waveform (signal velocity) is up to 13% different from group and phase velocities. This illustrates that signal velocity is unsuitable to determine rock properties in highly attenuating media. Also, greater than 81% velocity dispersion is observed when the dominant propagating wavelength is comparable to the bead size. More surprisingly, on propagation of the broad band input signal a bimodal amplitude spectrum becomes apparent. The low frequency peak is consistent with standard attenuation, whereas the high frequency peak is related to resonance of either the constituent beads or the interbead fluid cavity. Such resonance partitions energy of the main incoming signal. This phenomenon represents a new and fundamental attenuation mechanism that should be considered in many wave-propagation experiments.

  11. Diffraction, attenuation, and source corrections for nonlinear Rayleigh wave ultrasonic measurements.

    PubMed

    Torello, David; Thiele, Sebastian; Matlack, Kathryn H; Kim, Jin-Yeon; Qu, Jianmin; Jacobs, Laurence J

    2015-02-01

    This research considers the effects of diffraction, attenuation, and the nonlinearity of generating sources on measurements of nonlinear ultrasonic Rayleigh wave propagation. A new theoretical framework for correcting measurements made with air-coupled and contact piezoelectric receivers for the aforementioned effects is provided based on analytical models and experimental considerations. A method for extracting the nonlinearity parameter β11 is proposed based on a nonlinear least squares curve-fitting algorithm that is tailored for Rayleigh wave measurements. Quantitative experiments are conducted to confirm the predictions for the nonlinearity of the piezoelectric source and to demonstrate the effectiveness of the curve-fitting procedure. These experiments are conducted on aluminum 2024 and 7075 specimens and a β11(7075)/β11(2024) measure of 1.363 agrees well with previous literature and earlier work. The proposed work is also applied to a set of 2205 duplex stainless steel specimens that underwent various degrees of heat-treatment over 24h, and the results improve upon conclusions drawn from previous analysis. PMID:25287976

  12. Laboratory Measurements of Seismic Wave Attenuation in Upper-mantle Materials: the Effect of Partial Melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, I.; Faul, U. H.; Fitz Gerald, J. D.

    2001-12-01

    The frequency-dependent mechanical behaviour expected of Earth materials at high temperature places a special premium on laboratory measurements of wave speeds and attenuation at seismic frequencies. The symposium in honour of Mervyn Paterson provides a welcome opportunity to acknowledge his vital role in the design of the specialised equipment for this purpose described by Jackson and Paterson (PEPI 45: 349-367, 1987; Pageoph 141: 445-466, 1993). This instrument allows the study of low-strain high-temperature viscoelastic behaviour through the application of torsional forced oscillation/ microcreep techniques within the P-T environment (200 MPa, 1600 K) provided by an internally heated gas apparatus. Application of these techniques to fine-grained synthetic olivine polycrystals is beginning to provide a robust basis for the understanding of seismic wave attenuation (and dispersion) in the upper mantle under sub-solidus conditions. More recently, we have begun to explore the effects of partial melting through the fabrication, characterisation and mechanical testing of a suite of fine-grained olivine polycrystals containing up to 4% basaltic melt. The most striking effect of the added melt is the appearance of a melt-related dissipation peak superimposed upon the dissipation background characteristic of melt-free materials - which varies monotonically with period and temperature. The melt-related dissipation peak is adequately modelled as a Gaussian in log X, where X = To exp(E/RT). The melt-related dissipation peak sweeps across the seismic band from period To > 100 s to To < 1 s as temperature increases across the range 1300 - 1600 K producing pronounced systematic changes in the frequency dependence of 1/Q, that may be seismologically observable. >http://rses.anu.adu.au/petrophysics/PetroHome.html

  13. Relating wave attenuation to pancake ice thickness, using field measurements and model results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doble, Martin J.; De Carolis, Giacomo; Meylan, Michael H.; Bidlot, Jean-Raymond; Wadhams, Peter

    2015-06-01

    Wave attenuation coefficients (α, m-1) were calculated from in situ data transmitted by custom wave buoys deployed into the advancing pancake ice region of the Weddell Sea. Data cover a 12 day period as the buoy array was first compressed and then dilated under the influence of a passing low-pressure system. Attenuation was found to vary over more than 2 orders of magnitude and to be far higher than that observed in broken-floe marginal ice zones. A clear linear relation between α and ice thickness was demonstrated, using ice thickness from a novel dynamic/thermodynamic model. A simple expression for α in terms of wave period and ice thickness was derived, for application in research and operational models. The variation of α was further investigated with a two-layer viscous model, and a linear relation was found between eddy viscosity in the sub-ice boundary layer and ice thickness.

  14. Imaging Rayleigh wave attenuation with USArray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Xueyang; Dalton, Colleen A.; Jin, Ge; Gaherty, James B.; Shen, Yang

    2016-04-01

    The EarthScope USArray provides an opportunity to obtain detailed images of the continental upper mantle at an unprecedented scale. The majority of mantle models derived from USArray data to date contain spatial variations in seismic-wave speed; however, in many cases these data sets do not by themselves allow a non-unique interpretation. Joint interpretation of seismic attenuation and velocity models can improve upon the interpretations based only on velocity and provide important constraints on the temperature, composition, melt content, and volatile content of the mantle. The surface-wave amplitudes that constrain upper-mantle attenuation are sensitive to factors in addition to attenuation, including the earthquake source excitation, focusing and defocusing by elastic structure, and local site amplification. Because of the difficulty of isolating attenuation from these other factors, little is known about the attenuation structure of the North American upper mantle. In this study, Rayleigh wave travel time and amplitude in the period range 25-100 s are measured using an interstation cross-correlation technique, which takes advantage of waveform similarity at nearby stations. Several estimates of Rayleigh wave attenuation and site amplification are generated at each period, using different approaches to separate the effects of attenuation and local site amplification on amplitude. It is assumed that focusing and defocusing effects can be described by the Laplacian of the travel-time field. All approaches identify the same large-scale patterns in attenuation, including areas where the attenuation values are likely contaminated by unmodelled focusing and defocusing effects. Regionally averaged attenuation maps are constructed after removal of the contaminated attenuation values, and the variations in intrinsic shear attenuation that are suggested by these Rayleigh wave attenuation maps are explored.

  15. Imaging Rayleigh wave attenuation with USArray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Xueyang; Dalton, Colleen A.; Jin, Ge; Gaherty, James B.; Shen, Yang

    2016-07-01

    The EarthScope USArray provides an opportunity to obtain detailed images of the continental upper mantle at an unprecedented scale. The majority of mantle models derived from USArray data to date contain spatial variations in seismic-wave speed; however, in many cases these data sets do not by themselves allow a non-unique interpretation. Joint interpretation of seismic attenuation and velocity models can improve upon the interpretations based only on velocity and provide important constraints on the temperature, composition, melt content, and volatile content of the mantle. The surface wave amplitudes that constrain upper-mantle attenuation are sensitive to factors in addition to attenuation, including the earthquake source excitation, focusing and defocusing by elastic structure, and local site amplification. Because of the difficulty of isolating attenuation from these other factors, little is known about the attenuation structure of the North American upper mantle. In this study, Rayleigh wave traveltime and amplitude in the period range 25-100 s are measured using an interstation cross-correlation technique, which takes advantage of waveform similarity at nearby stations. Several estimates of Rayleigh wave attenuation and site amplification are generated at each period, using different approaches to separate the effects of attenuation and local site amplification on amplitude. It is assumed that focusing and defocusing effects can be described by the Laplacian of the traveltime field. All approaches identify the same large-scale patterns in attenuation, including areas where the attenuation values are likely contaminated by unmodelled focusing and defocusing effects. Regionally averaged attenuation maps are constructed after removal of the contaminated attenuation values, and the variations in intrinsic shear attenuation that are suggested by these Rayleigh wave attenuation maps are explored.

  16. Compressional head waves in attenuative formations

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Q.H.; Chang, C.

    1994-12-31

    The attenuation of compressional head waves in a fluid-filled borehole is studied with the branch-cut integration method. The borehole fluid and solid formation are both assumed lossy with quality factors Q{sub f}({omega}) for the fluid, and Q{sub c}({omega}) and Q{sub s}({omega}) for the compressional and shear waves in the solid, respectively. The branch-cut integration method used in this work is an extension of that for a lossless medium. With this branch-cut integration method, the authors can isolate the groups of individual arrivals such as the compressional head waves and shear head waves, and study the attenuation of those particular wavefields in lossy media. This study, coupled with experimental work to be performed, may result in an effective way of measuring compressional head wave attenuation in the field.

  17. Elastic wave attenuation and velocity of Berea sandstone measured in the frequency domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shankland, T. J.; Johnson, P. A.; Hopson, T. M.

    1993-03-01

    Using measurements in the frequency domain we have measured quality factor Q and travel times of direct and side-reflected elastic waves in a 1.8 m long sample of Berea sandstone. The frequency domain travel time (FDTT) method produces the continuous-wave (CW) response of a propagating wave by stepwise sweeping frequency of a driving source and detecting amplitude and phase of the received signal in reference to the source. Each separate travel path yields a characteristic repetition cycle in frequency space as its wave vector-distance product is stepped; an inverse fast Fourier transform (IFFT) reveals the corresponding travel time at the group velocity. Because arrival times of direct and reflected elastic waves appear as spikes along the time axis, travel times can be obtained precisely, and different arrivals can be clearly separated. Q can be determined from the amplitude vs frequency response of each peak as obtained from a moving window IFFT of the frequency-domain signal. In this sample at ambient conditions compressional velocity Vp is 2380 m/s and Qp is 55.

  18. Measuring sea ice permeability as a function of the attenuation and phase velocity shift of an acoustic wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudier, E. J.; Bahoura, M.

    2012-12-01

    Sea ice is a two-phase porous medium consisting of a solid matrix of pure ice and a salty liquid phase. At spring when ice permeability increases, it has been observed that pressure gradients induced at the ice-water interface upstream and downstream of pressure ridge keels can cause sea water and brine to be forced through the ice water boundary. It suggests that salt and heat fluxes through the bottom ice layers may be a major factor controlling the decay of an ice sheet. Knowing how water flows through the ice matrix is fundamental to a modeling of ocean-ice heat exchanges integrating the advective import/export of latent heat that result from melting/freezing within the ice. Permeability is the measurement of the ease with which fluids flow through a porous medium, however one of the most tricky to measure without altering the porosity of the sampled medium. To further complicate the challenge, horizontal and vertical permeability of the ice, referred as ice anisotropy, is significant. Acoustic wave propagation through porous media have been theorized to relate the acoustic velocity and attenuation to the physical properties of the tested material. It is a non-invasive technique, and as such could provide more reliable measurements of sea ice permeability than anything presently used. Simulations combining the Biot's and squirt flow mechanisms are performed to investigate the effect of permeability on the attenuation and phase velocity as a function of frequency. We first present the attenuation dispersion curves for an isotropic sea ice, then low-frequency and high-frequency limits are determined. Optimal frequency range and resolution requirements are evaluated for testing.

  19. Attenuation of sound waves in drill strings

    SciTech Connect

    Drumheller, D.S. )

    1993-10-01

    During drilling of deep wells, digital data are often transmitted from sensors located near the drill bit to the surface. Development of a new communication system with increased data capacity is of paramount importance to the drilling industry. Since steel drill strings are used, transmission of these data by elastic carrier waves traveling within the drill pipe is possible, but the potential communication range is uncertain. The problem is complicated by the presence of heavy-threaded tool joints every 10 m, which form a periodic structure and produce classical patterns of passbands and stop bands in the wave spectra. In this article, field measurements of the attenuation characteristics of a drill string in the Long Valley Scientific Well in Mammoth Lakes, California are presented. Wave propagation distances approach 2 km. A theoretical model is discussed which predicts the location, width, and attenuation of the passbands. Mode conversion between extensional and bending waves, and spurious reflections due to deviations in the periodic spacings of the tool joints are believed to be the sources of this attenuation. It is estimated that attenuation levels can be dramatically reduced by rearranging the individual pipes in the drill string according to length. 7 refs., 20 figs., 4 tabs.

  20. Bubbles attenuate elastic waves at seismic frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tisato, Nicola; Quintal, Beatriz; Chapman, Samuel; Podladchikov, Yury; Burg, Jean-Pierre

    2016-04-01

    The vertical migration of multiphase fluids in the crust can cause hazardous events such as eruptions, explosions, pollution and earthquakes. Although seismic tomography could potentially provide a detailed image of such fluid-saturated regions, the interpretation of the tomographic signals is often controversial and fails in providing a conclusive map of the subsurface saturation. Seismic tomography should be improved considering seismic wave attenuation (1/Q) and the dispersive elastic moduli which allow accounting for the energy lost by the propagating elastic wave. In particular, in saturated media a significant portion of the energy carried by the propagating wave is dissipated by the wave-induced-fluid-flow and the wave-induced-gas-exsolution-dissolution (WIGED) mechanisms. The WIGED mechanism describes how a propagating wave modifies the thermodynamic equillibrium between different fluid phases causing the exsolution and the dissolution of the gas in the liquid, which in turn causes a significant frequency dependent 1/Q and moduli dispersion. The WIGED theory was initially postulated for bubbly magmas but only recently was extended to bubbly water and experimentally demonstrated. Here we report these theory and laboratory experiments. Specifically, we present i) attenuation measurements performed by means of the Broad Band Attenuation Vessel on porous media saturated with water and different gases, and ii) numerical experiments validating the laboratory observations. Finally, we will extend the theory to fluids and to pressure-temperature conditions which are typical of phreatomagmatic and hydrocarbon domains and we will compare the propagation of seismic waves in bubble-free and bubble-bearing subsurface domains. With the present contribution we extend the knowledge about attenuation in rocks which are saturated with multiphase fluid demonstrating that the WIGED mechanism could be extremely important to image subsurface gas plumes.

  1. Measurement of intrinsic and scattering attenuation of shear waves in two sedimentary basins and comparison to crystalline sites in Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eulenfeld, Tom; Wegler, Ulrich

    2016-05-01

    We developed an improved method for the separation of intrinsic and scattering attenuation of seismic shear waves by envelope inversion called Qopen. The method optimizes the fit between Green's functions for the acoustic, isotropic radiative transfer theory and observed energy densities of earthquakes. The inversion allows the determination of scattering and intrinsic attenuation, site corrections and spectral source energies for the investigated frequency bands. Source displacement spectrum and the seismic moment of the analysed events can be estimated from the obtained spectral source energies. We report intrinsic and scattering attenuation coefficients of shear waves near three geothermal reservoirs in Germany for frequencies between 1 and 70 Hz. The geothermal reservoirs are located in Insheim, Landau (both Upper Rhine Graben) and Unterhaching (Molasse basin). We compare these three sedimentary sites to two sites located in crystalline rock with respect to scattering and intrinsic attenuation. The inverse quality factor for intrinsic attenuation is constant in sediments for frequencies smaller than 10 Hz and decreasing for higher frequencies. For crystalline rock, it is on a lower level and strictly monotonic decreasing with frequency. Intrinsic attenuation dominates scattering except for the Upper Rhine Graben, where scattering is dominant for frequencies below 10 Hz. Observed source displacement spectra show a high-frequency fall-off greater than or equal to 3.

  2. Effects of Wave Nonlinearity on Wave Attenuation by Vegetation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, W. C.; Cox, D. T.

    2014-12-01

    The need to explore sustainable approaches to maintain coastal ecological systems has been widely recognized for decades and is increasingly important due to global climate change and patterns in coastal population growth. Submerged aquatic vegetation and emergent vegetation in estuaries and shorelines can provide ecosystem services, including wave-energy reduction and erosion control. Idealized models of wave-vegetation interaction often assume rigid, vertically uniform vegetation under the action of waves described by linear wave theory. A physical model experiment was conducted to investigate the effects of wave nonlinearity on the attenuation of random waves propagating through a stand of uniform, emergent vegetation in constant water depth. The experimental conditions spanned a relative water depth from near shallow to near deep water waves (0.45 < kh <1.49) and wave steepness from linear to nonlinear conditions (0.03 < ak < 0.18). The wave height to water depth ratios were in the range 0.12 < Hs/h < 0.34, and the Ursell parameter was in the range 2 < Ur < 68. Frictional losses from the side wall and friction were measured and removed from the wave attenuation in the vegetated cases to isolate the impact of vegetation. The normalized wave height attenuation decay for each case was fit to the decay equation of Dalrymple et al. (1984) to determine the damping factor, which was then used to calculate the bulk drag coefficients CD. This paper shows that the damping factor is dependent on the wave steepness ak across the range of relative water depths from shallow to deep water and that the damping factor can increase by a factor of two when the value of ak approximately doubles. In turn, this causes the drag coefficient CD to decrease on average by 23%. The drag coefficient can be modeled using the Keulegan-Carpenter number using the horizontal orbital wave velocity estimate from linear wave theory as the characteristic velocity scale. Alternatively, the Ursell

  3. Shear wave speed dispersion and attenuation in granular marine sediments.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Masao

    2013-07-01

    The reported compressional wave speed dispersion and attenuation could be explained by a modified gap stiffness model incorporated into the Biot model (the BIMGS model). In contrast, shear wave speed dispersion and attenuation have not been investigated in detail. No measurements of shear wave speed dispersion have been reported, and only Brunson's data provide the frequency characteristics of shear wave attenuation. In this study, Brunson's attenuation measurements are compared to predictions using the Biot-Stoll model and the BIMGS model. It is shown that the BIMGS model accurately predicts the frequency dependence of shear wave attenuation. Then, the shear wave speed dispersion and attenuation in water-saturated silica sand are measured in the frequency range of 4-20 kHz. The vertical stress applied to the sample is 17.6 kPa. The temperature of the sample is set to be 5 °C, 20 °C, and 35 °C in order to change the relaxation frequency in the BIMGS model. The measured results are compared with those calculated using the Biot-Stoll model and the BIMGS model. It is shown that the shear wave speed dispersion and attenuation are predicted accurately by using the BIMGS model. PMID:23862793

  4. Relating P-wave attenuation to permeability

    SciTech Connect

    Akbar, N.; Dvorkin, J.; Nur, A. . Dept. of Geophysics)

    1993-01-01

    To relate P-wave attenuation to permeability, the authors examine a three-dimensional (3-D) theoretical model of a cylindrical pore filled with viscous fluid and embedded in an infinite isotropic elastic medium. They calculate both attenuation and permeability as functions of the direction of wave propagation. Attenuation estimates are based on the squirt flow mechanism; permeability is calculated using the Kozeny-Carmen relation. They find that in the case when a plane P-wave propagates parallel to this orientation (Q[sup [minus]1][delta] = 90[degree]), attenuation is always higher than when a wave propagates parallel to this orientation (Q[sup [minus]1][delta] = 0[degree]). The ratio of these two attenuation values Q[sup [minus]1][delta] = 90[degree]/Q[sup [minus]1] = 0[degree] increases with an increasing pore radius and decreasing frequency and saturation. By changing permeability, varying the radius of the pore, they find that the permeability-attenuation relation is characterized by a peak that shifts toward lower permeabilities as frequency decreases. Therefore, the attenuation of a low-frequency wave decreases with increasing permeability. They observe a similar trend on relations between attenuation and permeability experimentally obtained on sandstone samples.

  5. Graphene-Based Waveguide Terahertz Wave Attenuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jian-rong, Hu; Jiu-sheng, Li; Guo-hua, Qiu

    2016-07-01

    We design an electrically controllable terahertz wave attenuator by using graphene. We show that terahertz wave can be confined and propagate on S-shaped graphene waveguide with little radiation losses, and the confined terahertz wave is further manipulated and controlled via external applied voltage bias. The simulated results show that, when chemical potential changes from 0.03 into 0.05 eV, the extinction ratio of the terahertz wave attenuator can be tuned from 1.28 to 39.42 dB. Besides the simplicity, this novel terahertz wave attenuator has advantages of small size (24 × 30 μm2), a low insertion loss, and good controllability. It has a potential application for forthcoming planar terahertz wave integrated circuit fields.

  6. Attenuation of coda waves in southern Tibet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reese, C. C.; Ni, J. F.

    The alternation characteristics of the crust in the southernmost Tibetan plateau are determined from analysis of S-wave coda recorded at a temporary broadband station deployed during the 1994 INDEPTH-II experiment. A method for determining Qc is developed which utilizes the coda spectrogram observed at a single station. The average S-wave coda quality factor for this continent-continent collision zone is Qc(f) = (160 ± 69) (f/ f0)1.11±0.19, 1 < (f/f0) < 4, where f0 = 1Hz. The results are consistent with other measurements of Qc(f) in continental collisional environments which typically exhibit low values of Qc(f) at 1 Hz and a strong dependence on frequency. In particular, the attenuation characteristics obtained for the Arabian-Eurasian continental collisional boundary in western Turkey are quite similar to the results reported here for the southern Tibetan plateau.

  7. Simulation Of Attenuation Regularity Of Detonation Wave In Pmma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Wei; Xiaomian, Hu

    2012-03-01

    Polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) is often used as clapboard or protective medium in the parameter measurement of detonation wave propagation. Theoretical and experimental researches show that the pressure of shock wave in condensed material has the regularity of exponential attenuation with the distance of propagation. Simulation of detonation produced shock wave propagation in PMMA was conducted using a two-dimensional Lagrangian computational fluid dynamics program, and results were compared with the experimental data. Different charge diameters and different angles between the direction of detonation wave propagation and the normal direction of confined boundary were considered during the calculation. Results show that the detonation produced shock wave propagation in PMMA accords with the exponential regularity of shock wave attenuation in condensed material, and several factors are relevant to the attenuation coefficient, such as charge diameter and interface angle.

  8. Simulation of attenuation regularity of detonation wave in PMMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Wei; Xiaomian, Hu

    2011-06-01

    Polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) is often used as clapboard or protective medium in the parameter measurement of detonation wave propagation, due to its similar shock impedance with the explosive. Theoretical and experimental research show that the pressure of shock wave in condensed material has the regularity of exponential attenuation with the distance of propagation. Simulation of detonation wave propagation in PMMA is conducted using a two-dimensional Lagrangian computational fluid dynamics program, and results are compared with the experimental data. Different charge diameters and different angles between the direction of detonation wave propagation and the normal direction of confined boundary are considered during the calculation. Results show that the detonation wave propagation in PMMA accords with the exponential regularity of shock wave attenuation in condensed material, and several factors are relevant to the attenuation coefficient, such as charge diameter and interface angle.

  9. UHF Radio Wave Attenuation Factor Database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khomenko, S. I.; Kostina, V. L.; Mytsenko, I. M.; Roenko, A. N.

    2007-07-01

    As is known each sea-going vessel is equipped with navigation, communication and other radio engineering facilities that serve to secure the safety of navigation and are chiefly operated at UHF-wave band. In developing these systems and calculating the energy potential for a necessary coverage range one should be well aware of the radio signal attenuation processes on a propagation path. The key parameter of this path is the (radio) wave attenuation factor V and its distance dependence V(R). A diversity of factors influencing the radio signal attenuation over the oceanic expanses, especially well pronounced and quite stable tropospheric ducts, and the lack of experimental data were the compelling reasons why the researchers of the Institute for Radiophysics and Electronics, NASU, had spent many years on comprehensive radiophysical investigations carried out in different regions of the Atlantic, Indian, Arctic and Pacific Oceans. The experimental data obtained allow creating the database of radio wave attenuation factor V.

  10. Waves in fragmented geomaterials with impact attenuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyskin, Arcady; Pasternak, Elena

    2016-04-01

    Attenuation of waves in geomaterials, such as seismic waves is usually attributed to energy dissipation due to the presence of viscous fluid and/or viscous cement between the constituents. In fragmented geomaterials such as blocky rock mass there is another possible source of energy dissipation - impacting between the fragments. This can be characterised by the coefficient of restitution, which is the ratio between the rotational velocities after and before the impact. In particular, this manifests itself in the process of mutual rotations of the fragments/blocks, whereby in the process of oscillation different ends of the contacting faces of the fragments are impacting. During the rotational oscillations the energy dissipation is concentrated in the neutral position that is the one in which the relative rotation between two fragments is zero. We show that in a simple system of two fragments this dissipation is equivalent, in a long run, to the presence of viscous damper between the fragments (the Voigt model of visco-elasticity). Generalisation of this concept to the material consisting of many fragments leads to a Voigt model of wave propagation where the attenuation coefficient is proportional to the logarithm of restitution coefficient. The waves in such a medium show slight dispersion caused by damping and strong dependence of the attenuation on the wave frequency.

  11. Review of methods to attenuate shock/blast waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Igra, O.; Falcovitz, J.; Houas, L.; Jourdan, G.

    2013-04-01

    Quick and reliable shock wave attenuation is the goal of every protection facility and therefore it is not surprising that achieving this has drawn much attention during the past hundred years. Different options have been suggested; their usefulness varying from a reasonable protection to the opposite, a shock enhancement. An example for a suggestion for shock mitigation that turned out to be an enhancement of the impinging shock wave was the idea to cover a protected object with a foam layer. While the pressure behind the reflected shock wave from the foam frontal surface was smaller than that recorded in a similar reflection from a rigid wall [25], the pressure on the “protected” surface, attached to the foam's rear-surface, was significantly higher than that recorded in a similar reflection from a bare, rigid wall [11]. In protecting humans and installations from destructive shock and/or blast waves the prime goal is to reduce the wave amplitude and the rate of pressure increase across the wave front. Both measures result in reducing the wave harmful effects. During the past six decades several approaches for achieving the desired protection have been offered in the open literature. We point out in this review that while some of the suggestions offered are practical, others are impractical. In our discussion we focus on recent schemes for shock/blast wave attenuation, characterized by the availability of reliable measurements (notably pressure and optical diagnostics) as well as high-resolution numerical simulations.

  12. Fault-zone attenuation of high-frequency seismic waves

    SciTech Connect

    Blakeslee, S.; Malin, P.; Alvarez, M. )

    1989-11-01

    The authors have developed a technique to measure seismic attenuation within an active fault-zone at seismogenic depths. Utilizing a pair of stations and pairs of earthquakes, spectral ratios are performed to isolate attenuation produced by wave-propagation within the fault-zone. The empirical approach eliminates common source, propagation, instrument and near-surface site effects. The technique was applied to a cluster of 19 earthquakes recorded by a pair of downhole instruments located within the San Andreas fault-zone, at instruments located within the San Andreas fault-zone, at Parkfield, California. Over the 1-40 Hz bandwidth used in this analysis, amplitudes are found to decrease exponentially with frequency. Furthermore, the fault-zone propagation distance correlates with severity of attenuation. Assuming a constant Q attenuation operator, the S-wave quality factor within the fault-zone at a depth of 5-6 kilometers is 31 (+7,{minus}5). If fault-zones are low-Q environments, then near-source attenuation of high-frequency seismic waves may help to explain phenomenon such as f{sub max}. Fault-zone Q may prove to be a valuable indicator of the mechanical behavior and rheology of fault-zones. Specific asperities can be monitored for precursory changes associated with the evolving stress-field within the fault-zone. The spatial and temporal resolution of the technique is fundamentally limited by the uncertainty in earthquake location and the interval time between earthquakes.

  13. Spectral wave flow attenuation within submerged canopies: Implications for wave energy dissipation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowe, Ryan J.; Falter, James L.; Koseff, Jeffrey R.; Monismith, Stephen G.; Atkinson, Marlin J.

    2007-05-01

    Communities of benthic organisms can form very rough surfaces (canopies) on the seafloor. Previous studies have shown that an oscillatory flow induced by monochromatic surface waves will drive more flow inside a canopy than a comparable unidirectional current. This paper builds on these previous studies by investigating how wave energy is attenuated within canopies under spectral wave conditions, or random wave fields defined by many frequencies. A theoretical model is first developed to predict how flow attenuation within a canopy varies among the different wave components and predicts that shorter-period components will generally be more effective at driving flow within a canopy than longer-period components. To investigate the model performance, a field experiment was conducted on a shallow reef flat in which flow was measured both inside and above a model canopy array. Results confirm that longer-period components in the spectrum are significantly more attenuated than shorter-period components, in good agreement with the model prediction. This paper concludes by showing that the rate at which wave energy is dissipated by a canopy is closely linked to the flow structure within the canopy. Under spectral wave conditions, wave energy within a model canopy array is dissipated at a greater rate among the shorter-period wave components. These observations are consistent with previous observations of how wave energy is dissipated by the bottom roughness of a coral reef.

  14. Wave attenuation in the shallows of San Francisco Bay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lacy, Jessica R.; MacVean, Lissa J.

    2016-01-01

    Waves propagating over broad, gently-sloped shallows decrease in height due to frictional dissipation at the bed. We quantified wave-height evolution across 7 km of mudflat in San Pablo Bay (northern San Francisco Bay), an environment where tidal mixing prevents the formation of fluid mud. Wave height was measured along a cross shore transect (elevation range−2mto+0.45mMLLW) in winter 2011 and summer 2012. Wave height decreased more than 50% across the transect. The exponential decay coefficient λ was inversely related to depth squared (λ=6×10−4h−2). The physical roughness length scale kb, estimated from near-bed turbulence measurements, was 3.5×10−3 m in winter and 1.1×10−2 m in summer. Estimated wave friction factor fw determined from wave-height data suggests that bottom friction dominates dissipation at high Rew but not at low Rew. Predictions of near-shore wave height based on offshore wave height and a rough formulation for fw were quite accurate, with errors about half as great as those based on the smooth formulation for fw. Researchers often assume that the wave boundary layer is smooth for settings with fine-grained sediments. At this site, use of a smooth fw results in an underestimate of wave shear stress by a factor of 2 for typical waves and as much as 5 for more energetic waves. It also inadequately captures the effectiveness of the mudflats in protecting the shoreline through wave attenuation.

  15. Guided wave attenuation in coated pipes buried in sand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leinov, Eli; Cawley, Peter; Lowe, Michael J. S.

    2016-02-01

    Long-range guided wave testing (GWT) is routinely used for the monitoring and detection of corrosion defects in above ground pipelines in various industries. The GWT test range in buried, coated pipelines is greatly reduced compared to aboveground pipelines due to energy leakage into the embedding soil. In this study, we aim to increase test ranges for buried pipelines. The effect of pipe coatings on the T(0,1) and L(0,2) guided wave attenuation is investigated using a full-scale experimental apparatus and model predictions. Tests are performed on a fusion-bonded epoxy (FBE)-coated 8" pipe, buried in loose and compacted sand over a frequency range of 10-35 kHz. The application of a low impedance coating is shown to effectively decouple the influence of the sand on the ultrasound leakage from the buried pipe. We demonstrate ultrasonic isolation of a buried pipe by coating the pipe with a Polyethylene (PE)-foam layer that has a smaller impedance than both pipe and sand and the ability to withstand the overburden load from the sand. The measured attenuation in the buried PE-foam-FBE-coated pipe is substantially reduced, in the range of 0.3-1.2 dBm-1 for loose and compacted sand conditions, compared to buried FBE-coated pipe without the PE-foam, where the measured attenuation is in the range of 1.7-4.7 dBm-1. The acoustic properties of the PE-foam are measured independently using ultrasonic interferometry technique and used in model predictions of guided wave propagation in a buried coated pipe. Good agreement is found between the attenuation measurements and model predictions. The attenuation exhibits periodic peaks in the frequency domain corresponding to the through-thickness resonance frequencies of the coating layer. The large reduction in guided wave attenuation for PE-coated pipes would lead to greatly increased GWT test ranges, so such coatings would be attractive for new pipeline installations.

  16. Seismic attenuation: Laboratory measurements in fluid saturated rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subramaniyan, Shankar; Madonna, Claudio; Tisato, Nicola; Saenger, Erik; Quintal, Beatriz

    2014-05-01

    Seismic wave attenuation could be used as an indicator of reservoir fluids due to its dependence on rock and fluid properties. Over the past 30 years, many laboratory methodologies to study attenuation in rocks have been employed, such as ultrasonic (MHz), resonant bar (kHz) and forced oscillation methods in the low frequency range (0.01-100Hz) (Tisato & Madonna 2012; Madonna & Tisato 2013). Forced oscillation methods have gained prominence over time as the frequency range of measurements correspond to that of field seismic data acquired for oil/gas exploration. These experiments measure attenuation as the phase shift between the applied stress (sinusoidal) and measured strain. Since the magnitudes of measured phase shifts are quite low (Q-1 ~0.01-0.1) and the amplitudes of strain applied to the rock samples are of the order ~10-6 (i.e., similar orders of magnitude to seismic waves), it is challenging. A comparison of such forced oscillation setups will be presented to provide an overview of the various possibilities of design and implementation for future setups. In general, there is a lack of laboratory data and most of the published data are for sandstones. Currently, attenuation measurements are being carried out on carbonate and sandstone samples. We employ the Seismic Wave Attenuation Module (SWAM, Madonna & Tisato 2013) to measure seismic attenuation in these samples for different saturation degrees (90% and 100% water) and under three different confining pressures (5, 10 and 15MPa). Preliminary results from these investigations will be discussed. REFERENCES Madonna, C. & Tisato, N. 2013: A new seismic wave attenuation module to experimentally measure low-frequency attenuation in extensional mode. Geophysical Prospecting, doi: 10.1111/1365-2478.12015. Tisato, N. & Madonna, C. 2012: Attenuation at low seismic frequencies in partially saturated rocks: Measurements and description of a new apparatus. Journal of Applied Geophysics, 86, 44-53.

  17. A Heterogeneous Nonlinear Attenuating Full-Wave Model of Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Pinton, Gianmarco F.; Dahl, Jeremy; Rosenzweig, Stephen; Trahey, Gregg E.

    2015-01-01

    A full-wave equation that describes nonlinear propagation in a heterogeneous attenuating medium is solved numerically with finite differences in the time domain (FDTD). Three-dimensional solutions of the equation are verified with water tank measurements of a commercial diagnostic ultrasound transducer and are shown to be in excellent agreement in terms of the fundamental and harmonic acoustic fields and the power spectrum at the focus. The linear and nonlinear components of the algorithm are also verified independently. In the linear nonattenuating regime solutions match results from Field II, a well established software package used in transducer modeling, to within 0.3 dB. Nonlinear plane wave propagation is shown to closely match results from the Galerkin method up to 4 times the fundamental frequency. In addition to thermoviscous attenuation we present a numerical solution of the relaxation attenuation laws that allows modeling of arbitrary frequency dependent attenuation, such as that observed in tissue. A perfectly matched layer (PML) is implemented at the boundaries with a numerical implementation that allows the PML to be used with high-order discretizations. A −78 dB reduction in the reflected amplitude is demonstrated. The numerical algorithm is used to simulate a diagnostic ultrasound pulse propagating through a histologically measured representation of human abdominal wall with spatial variation in the speed of sound, attenuation, nonlinearity, and density. An ultrasound image is created in silico using the same physical and algorithmic process used in an ultrasound scanner: a series of pulses are transmitted through heterogeneous scattering tissue and the received echoes are used in a delay-and-sum beam-forming algorithm to generate a images. The resulting harmonic image exhibits characteristic improvement in lesion boundary definition and contrast when compared with the fundamental image. We demonstrate a mechanism of harmonic image quality

  18. Attenuation characteristics of nonlinear pressure waves propagating in pipes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih, C. C.

    1974-01-01

    A series of experiments was conducted to investigate temporal and spatial velocity distributions of fluid flow in 3-in. open-end pipes of various lengths up to 210 ft, produced by the propagation of nonlinear pressure waves of various intensities. Velocity profiles across each of five sections along the pipes were measured as a function of time with the use of hot-film and hot-wire anemometers for two pressure waves produced by a piston. Peculiar configurations of the velocity profiles across the pipe section were noted, which are uncommon for steady pipe flow. Theoretical consideration was given to this phenomenon of higher velocity near the pipe wall for qualitative confirmation. Experimentally time-dependent velocity distributions along the pipe axis were compared with one-dimensional theoretical results obtained by the method of characteristics with or without diffusion term for the purpose of determining the attenuation characteristics of the nonlinear wave propagation in the pipes.

  19. Wave Dispersion and Attenuation on Human Femur Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Strantza, Maria; Louis, Olivia; Polyzos, Demosthenes; Boulpaep, Frans; van Hemelrijck, Danny; Aggelis, Dimitrios G.

    2014-01-01

    Cortical bone is a highly heterogeneous material at the microscale and has one of the most complex structures among materials. Application of elastic wave techniques to this material is thus very challenging. In such media the initial excitation energy goes into the formation of elastic waves of different modes. Due to “dispersion”, these modes tend to separate according to the velocities of the frequency components. This work demonstrates elastic wave measurements on human femur specimens. The aim of the study is to measure parameters like wave velocity, dispersion and attenuation by using broadband acoustic emission sensors. First, four sensors were placed at small intervals on the surface of the bone to record the response after pencil lead break excitations. Next, the results were compared to measurements on a bulk steel block which does not exhibit heterogeneity at the same wave lengths. It can be concluded that the microstructure of the tissue imposes a dispersive behavior for frequencies below 1 MHz and care should be taken for interpretation of the signals. Of particular interest are waveform parameters like the duration, rise time and average frequency, since in the next stage of research the bone specimens will be fractured with concurrent monitoring of acoustic emission. PMID:25196011

  20. Damping factor estimation using spin wave attenuation in permalloy film

    SciTech Connect

    Manago, Takashi; Yamanoi, Kazuto; Kasai, Shinya; Mitani, Seiji

    2015-05-07

    Damping factor of a Permalloy (Py) thin film is estimated by using the magnetostatic spin wave propagation. The attenuation lengths are obtained by the dependence of the transmission intensity on the antenna distance, and decrease with increasing magnetic fields. The relationship between the attenuation length, damping factor, and external magnetic field is derived theoretically, and the damping factor was determined to be 0.0063 by fitting the magnetic field dependence of the attenuation length, using the derived equation. The obtained value is in good agreement with the general value of Py. Thus, this estimation method of the damping factor using spin waves attenuation can be useful tool for ferromagnetic thin films.

  1. A poroelastic model for ultrasonic wave attenuation in partially frozen brines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsushima, Jun; Nibe, Takao; Suzuki, Makoto; Kato, Yoshibumi; Rokugawa, Shuichi

    2011-02-01

    Although there are many possible mechanisms for the intrinsic seismic attenuation in composite materials that include fluids, relative motion between solids and fluids during seismic wave propagation is one of the most important attenuation mechanisms. In our previous study, we conducted ultrasonic wave transmission measurements on an ice-brine coexisting system to examine the influence on ultrasonic waves of the unfrozen brine in the pore microstructure of ice. In order to elucidate the physical mechanism responsible for ultrasonic wave attenuation in the frequency range of 350-600kHz, measured at different temperatures in partially frozen brines, we employed a poroelastic model based on the Biot theory to describe the propagation of ultrasonic waves through partially frozen brines. By assuming that the solid phase is ice and the liquid phase is the unfrozen brine, fluid properties measured by a pulsed nuclear magnetic resonance technique were used to calculate porosities at different temperatures. The computed intrinsic attenuation at 500kHz cannot completely predict the measured attenuation results from the experimental study in an ice-brine coexisting system, which suggests that other attenuation mechanisms such as the squirt-flow mechanism and wave scattering effect should be taken into account.

  2. Attenuation of electromagnetic wave propagation in sandstorms incorporating charged sand particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, You-He; Shu He, Qin; Zheng, Xiao Jing

    2005-06-01

    A theoretical approach for predicting the attenuation of microwave propagation in sandstorms is presented, with electric charges generated on the sand grains taken into account. It is found that the effect of electric charges distributed partially on the sand surface is notable. The calculated attenuation is in good agreement with that measured in certain conditions. The distribution of electric charges on the surface of sand grains, which is not easy to measure, can be approximately determined by measuring the attenuation value of electromagnetic waves. Some effects of sand radius, dielectric permittivity, frequency of electromagnetic wave, and visibility of sandstorms on the attenuation are also discussed quantitatively. Finally, a new electric parameter is introduced to describe the roles of scattering, absorption and effect of charges in attenuation.

  3. Oceanic wave measurement system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, J. F.; Miles, R. T. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    An oceanic wave measured system is disclosed wherein wave height is sensed by a barometer mounted on a buoy. The distance between the trough and crest of a wave is monitored by sequentially detecting positive and negative peaks of the output of the barometer and by combining (adding) each set of two successive half cycle peaks. The timing of this measurement is achieved by detecting the period of a half cycle of wave motion.

  4. Attenuation layer for magnetostatic wave (MSW) absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glass, H. L.; Adkins, L. R.; Stearns, F. S.

    1984-09-01

    A new technique has been developed for the suppression of MSW end reflections which give rise to passband ripple. The basic idea is to provide a thin film of highly attenuating epitaxial material at the ends of a MSW delay line while preserving high quality YIG in the active region of the device. The GGG wafer preparation is a three step process which involves: (1) the growth of the attenuation layer, (2) the removal of this layer from the central region of the wafer and (3) the growth of high quality YIG on the remaining structure. Delay lines using the attenuation layer for end terminations have been evaluated experimentally and compared to devices utilizing other termination methods. The results indicate that the attenuation layer method produces ripple suppression characteristics which are the equal of those obtained with other termination techniques. The advantage of this new method lies in its suitability for large quantity fabrication requirements.

  5. Attenuation of Seismic Waves by Grain Boundary Relaxation

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, David D.

    1971-01-01

    Experimental observations of the attenuation of elastic waves in polycrystalline ceramics and rocks reveal an attenuation mechanism, called grain boundary relaxation, which is likely to be predominant cause of seismic attenuation in the earth's mantle. For this mechanism, the internal friction (the reciprocal of the “intrinsic Q” of the material) depends strongly upon frequency and is in good agreement with Walsh's theory of attenuation (J. Geophys. Res., 74, 4333, 1969) in partially melted rock. When Walsh's theory is extended to provide a model of the anelasticity of the earth, using the experimental values of physical parameters reported here, the results are in excellent agreement with seismic observations. PMID:16591937

  6. Seismic attenuation due to wave-induced flow

    SciTech Connect

    Pride, S.R.; Berryman, J.G.; Harris, J.M.

    2003-10-09

    Analytical expressions for three P-wave attenuation mechanisms in sedimentary rocks are given a unified theoretical framework. Two of the models concern wave-induced flow due to heterogeneity in the elastic moduli at mesoscopic scales (scales greater than grain sizes but smaller than wavelengths). In the first model, the heterogeneity is due to lithological variations (e.g., mixtures of sands and clays) with a single fluid saturating all the pores. In the second model, a single uniform lithology is saturated in mesoscopic ''patches'' by two immiscible fluids (e.g., air and water). In the third model, the heterogeneity is at ''microscopic'' grain scales (broken grain contacts and/or micro-cracks in the grains) and the associated fluid response corresponds to ''squirt flow''. The model of squirt flow derived here reduces to proper limits as any of the fluid bulk modulus, crack porosity, and/or frequency is reduced to zero. It is shown that squirt flow is incapable of explaining the measured level of loss (10{sup -2} < Q{sup -1} < 10{sup -1}) within the seismic band of frequencies (1 to 10{sup 4} Hz); however, either of the two mesoscopic scale models easily produce enough attenuation to explain the field data.

  7. Seismic attenuation due to wave-induced flow

    SciTech Connect

    Pride, S; Berryman, J; Harris, J

    2003-10-17

    Analytical expressions for three P-wave attenuation mechanisms in sedimentary rocks are given a unified theoretical framework. Two of the models concern wave-induced flow due to heterogeneity in the elastic moduli at ''mesoscopic'' scales (scales greater than grain sizes but smaller than wavelengths). In the first model, the heterogeneity is due to lithological variations (e.g., mixtures of sands and clays) with a single fluid saturating all the pores. In the second model, a single uniform lithology is saturated in mesoscopic ''patches'' by two immiscible fluids (e.g., air and water). In the third model, the heterogeneity is at ''microscopic'' grain scales (broken grain contacts and/or micro-cracks in the grains) and the associated fluid response corresponds to ''squirt flow''. The model of squirt flow derived here reduces to proper limits as any of the fluid bulk modulus, crack porosity, and/or frequency is reduced to zero. It is shown that squirt flow is incapable of explaining the measured level of loss (10{sup -2} < Q{sup -1} < 10{sup -1}) within the seismic band of frequencies (1 to 10{sup 4} Hz); however, either of the two mesoscopic scale models easily produce enough attenuation to explain field data.

  8. Wave velocity dispersion and attenuation in media exhibiting internal oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frehner, Marcel; Steeb, Holger; Schmalholz, Stefan M.

    2010-05-01

    an arbitrary number of oscillators with different resonance frequencies. Exemplarily, we show a log-normal distribution of resonance frequencies. Such a distribution changes the acoustic properties significantly compared to the case with only one resonance frequency. The dispersion and attenuation resulting from our model agree well with the dispersion and attenuation (1) derived with a more exact mathematical treatment and (2) measured in laboratory experiments. (2) Three-phase model for residually saturated porous media We present a three-phase model describing wave propagation phenomena in residually saturated porous media. The model consists of a continuous non-wetting phase and a discontinuous wetting phase and is an extension of classical biphasic (Biot-type) models. The model includes resonance effects of single liquid bridges or liquid clusters with miscellaneous eigenfrequencies taking into account a visco-elastic restoring force (pinned oscillations and/or sliding motion of the contact line). In the present investigation, our aim is to study attenuation due to fluid oscillations and due to wave-induced flow with a macroscopic three-phase continuum model, i.e. a mixture consisting of one solid constituent building the elastic skeleton and two immiscible fluid constituents. Furthermore, we study monochromatic waves in transversal and longitudinal direction and discuss the resulting dispersion relations for a typical reservoir sandstone equivalent (Berea sandstone).

  9. Effects of partial liquid/gas saturation on extensional wave attenuation in Berea sandstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, C.-S.; Batzle, M. L.; Smith, B. J.

    1992-07-01

    Extensional wave attenuation measurements on Berea sandstone were made during increasing (imbibition) and decreasing (drainage) brine saturations. Measurements on samples with both open-pore and closed-pore surfaces were made using the resonant-bar technique. The frequency dependence was examined using the forced-deformation method. The attenuation was found to be dependent on saturation history as well as degree of saturation and boundary flow conditions. The sample with open-pore surface had a larger attenuation which peaked at greater brine saturations than the sample with closed-pore surface. During drainage, the attenuation reached a maximum at about 90% brine saturation as opposed to about 97% brine saturation during imbibition. The variation of the size and number of air pockets within the rock can account for this discrepancy. The magnitude of the attenuation peak value decreases substantially with decreasing frequency to the extent that no attenuation peak with saturation was apparent at seismic frequencies, say, below 100 Hz.

  10. Attenuation character of seismic waves in Sikkim Himalaya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazarika, Pinki; Kumar, M. Ravi; Kumar, Dinesh

    2013-10-01

    In this study, we investigate the seismic wave attenuation beneath Sikkim Himalaya using P, S and coda waves from 68 local earthquakes registered by eight broad-band stations of the SIKKIM network. The attenuation quality factor (Q) depends on frequency as well as lapse time and depth. The value of Q varies from (i) 141 to 639 for P waves, (ii) 143 to 1108 for S waves and (iii) 274 to 1678 for coda waves, at central frequencies of 1.5 Hz and 9 Hz, respectively. The relations that govern the attenuation versus frequency dependence are Qα = (96 ± 0.9) f (0.94 ± 0.01), Qβ = (100 ± 1.4) f (1.16 ± 0.01) and Qc = (189 ± 1.5) f (1.2 ± 0.01) for P, S and coda waves, respectively. The ratio between Qβ and Qα is larger than unity, implying larger attenuation of P compared to S waves. Also, the values of Qc are higher than Qβ. Estimation of the relative contribution of intrinsic (Qi) and scattering (Qs) attenuation reveals that the former mechanism is dominant in Sikkim Himalaya. We note that the estimates of Qc lie in between Qi and Qs and are very close to Qi at lower frequencies. This is in agreement with the theoretical and laboratory experiments. The strong frequency and depth dependence of the attenuation quality factor suggests a highly heterogeneous crust in the Sikkim Himalaya. Also, the high Q values estimated for this region compared to the other segments of Himalaya can be reconciled in terms of moderate seismic activity, unlike rest of the Himalaya, which is seismically more active.

  11. ATS-6 attenuation diversity measurements at 20 and 30 GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vogel, W. J.; Straiton, A. W.; Fannin, B. M.; Wagner, N. K.

    1975-01-01

    The results of data obtained at The University of Texas at Austin in conjunction with the ATS-6 millimeter wave experiment are presented. Attenuation measurements at 30 GHz and sky noise data at 20 GHz were obtained simultaneously at each of two sites separated by 11 km. Space diversity reduces outage time for a system in Austin, Texas with a 10 dB fade margin at 30 GHz from 15 hours to 16 minutes per year. The maximum cloud height shows a good correlation to the maximum attenuations measured.

  12. Anisotropic changes in P-wave velocity and attenuation during deformation and fluid infiltration of granite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stanchits, S.A.; Lockner, D.A.; Ponomarev, A.V.

    2003-01-01

    Fluid infiltration and pore fluid pressure changes are known to have a significant effect on the occurrence of earthquakes. Yet, for most damaging earthquakes, with nucleation zones below a few kilometers depth, direct measurements of fluid pressure variations are not available. Instead, pore fluid pressures are inferred primarily from seismic-wave propagation characteristics such as Vp/Vs ratio, attenuation, and reflectivity contacts. We present laboratory measurements of changes in P-wave velocity and attenuation during the injection of water into a granite sample as it was loaded to failure. A cylindrical sample of Westerly granite was deformed at constant confining and pore pressures of 50 and 1 MPa, respectively. Axial load was increased in discrete steps by controlling axial displacement. Anisotropic P-wave velocity and attenuation fields were determined during the experiment using an array of 13 piezoelectric transducers. At the final loading steps (86% and 95% of peak stress), both spatial and temporal changes in P-wave velocity and peak-to-peak amplitudes of P and S waves were observed. P-wave velocity anisotropy reached a maximum of 26%. Transient increases in attenuation of up to 483 dB/m were also observed and were associated with diffusion of water into the sample. We show that velocity and attenuation of P waves are sensitive to the process of opening of microcracks and the subsequent resaturation of these cracks as water diffuses in from the surrounding region. Symmetry of the orientation of newly formed microcracks results in anisotropic velocity and attenuation fields that systematically evolve in response to changes in stress and influx of water. With proper scaling, these measurements provide constraints on the magnitude and duration of velocity and attenuation transients that can be expected to accompany the nucleation of earthquakes in the Earth's crust.

  13. On attenuation of seismic waves associated with flow in fractures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinci, C.; Renner, J.; Steeb, H.

    2014-11-01

    Heterogeneity of porous media induces a number of fluid-flow mechanisms causing attenuation of seismic waves. Attenuation induced by squirt-type mechanisms has previously been analyzed for aspect ratios smaller or equal to 103. Using a hybrid-dimensional modeling approach, particularly apt for large aspect ratio conduits, we numerically simulated deformation-induced fluid flow along two intersecting fractures to investigate the physics of attenuation related to the interaction of fracture-induced fluid flow and to leak-off. Attenuation related to fracture flow increases in magnitude with increasing geometrical aspect ratio of the fracture. The inherent time scales of both flow mechanisms do not influence each other, but the faster process is associated with stronger attenuation than the slower process. Models relying on simple diffusion equations have rather limited potential for approximation of pressure transients.

  14. Attenuation of coda waves in the Northeastern Region of India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazarika, Devajit; Baruah, Saurabh; Gogoi, Naba Kumar

    2009-01-01

    Coda wave attenuation quality factor Qc is estimated in the northeastern region of India using 45 local earthquakes recorded by regional seismic network. The quality factor Qc was estimated using the single backscattering model modified by Sato (J Phys Earth 25:27-41, 1977), in the frequency range 1-18 Hz. The attenuation and frequency dependence for different paths and the correlation of the results with geotectonics of the region are described in this paper. A total of 3,890 Qc measurements covering 187 varying paths are made for different lapse time window of 20, 30, 40, 50, 60, 70, 80, and 90 s in coda wave. The magnitudes of the analyzed events range from 1.2 to 3.9 and focal depths range between 7 and 38 km. The source-receiver distances of the selected events range between 16 and 270 km. For 30-s duration, the mean values of the estimated Qc vary from 50 ± 12 (at 1 Hz) to 2,078 ± 211(at 18 Hz) for the Arunachal Himalaya, 49 ± 14 (at 1 Hz) to 2,466 ± 197 (at 18 Hz) for the Indo-Burman, and 45 ± 13 (at 1 Hz) to 2,069 ± 198 (at 18 Hz) for Shillong group of earthquakes. It is observed that Qc increases with frequency portraying an average attenuation relation Qc=52.315± 1.07f ^{left( {1.32 ± 0.036} right)} for the region. Moreover, the pattern of Qc - 1 with frequency is analogous to the estimates obtained in other tectonic areas in the world, except with the observation that the Qc - 1 is much higher at 1 Hz for the northeastern region. The Qc - 1 is about 10 - 1.8 at 1 Hz and decreases to about 10 - 3.6 at 18 Hz indicating clear frequency dependence. Pertaining to the spatial distribution of Qc values, Mikir Hills and western part of Shillong Plateau are characterized by lower attenuation.

  15. [Attenuation of photosynthetically available radiation (PAR) in Meiliang Bay under different winds and waves].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yunlin; Qin, Boqiang; Chen, Weimin; Hu, Weiping; Gao, Guang; Zhu, Guangwei; Luo, Liancong

    2005-06-01

    Based on the successive underwater irradiance measurement in situ from Jul. 12 to 17 in 2003, the attenuation of photosynthetically available radiation (PAR) and euphotic depth in Meiliang Bay were analyzed under different winds and waves. The results showed that the downward PAR attenuation coefficients ranged from 2.63 to 4.7 m(-1), with an average of 3.63 +/- 0.47 x m(-1), and the corresponding euphotic depth ranged from 0.98 to 1.75 m, with an average of 1.29 +/- 0.18 m, which demonstrated that phytoplankton and macrophyte could not grow below 1.5 m due to the lack of adequate solar radiation. The total suspended solids resulted from wind and wave increased the attenuation of light, with the downward attenuation coefficients of PAR being 2.63, 3.72 and 4.37 x m(-1) under small, medium and large wind and wave, respectively. Significant linear correlations were found between transparence, PAR attenuation coefficient, euphotic depth and total suspended solid, especially inorganic suspended solid, while chlorophyll a was the most nonsignificant light attenuator. Multiple stepwise linear regressions showed that inorganic suspended solid was the most important light attenuator dominating the light attenuation in wind-exposed Meiliang Bay. PMID:16180769

  16. Teleseismic Body-Wave Attenuation beneath the Western and Central United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, B.; Reed, C. A.; Liu, K. H.; Gao, S. S.

    2014-12-01

    Attenuation of seismic waves is the consequence of anelasticity of the Earth's layers along the path of propagation. Joint analyses of seismic velocity with attenuation anomalies can significantly reduce the non-uniqueness in the interpretation of velocity images and result in a better understanding of the Earth's interior structure, composition, and dynamics. Employing a Bayesian approach with a common spectrum simultaneous inversion for attenuation factors (Gao, 1997), we have processed over 14,000 teleseismic body-wave seismograms recorded by all publicly available broadband seismic stations in the western and central United States. Preliminary results show extensive low-attenuation areas beneath the central United States probably related to fragments of the ancient Farallon slab, while less pronounced regions of likely cold material underlie the Colorado Plateau. High-attenuation anomalies are discovered in association with the Snake River Plain and the Rio Grande Rift. We apply station-averaged parameters and P-S attenuation ratios and compare our findings with published shear-wave splitting results to examine the presence of partial melt and asthenospheric upwelling. Additionally, we examine the azimuthal variation of attenuation measurements to constrain the possible existence of attenuation anisotropy and attempt to constrain the source depth of anisotropy through tomographic methods.

  17. Crack closure and healing studies in WIPP (Waste Isolation Pilot Plant) salt using compressional wave velocity and attenuation measurements: Test methods and results

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, N.S. )

    1990-11-01

    Compressional wave ultrasonic data were used to qualitatively assess the extent of crack closure during hydrostatic compression of damaged specimens of WIPP salt. Cracks were introduced during constant strain-rate triaxial tests at low confining pressure (0.5 MPa) as specimens were taken to either 0.5, 1.0, or 1.5 percent axial strain. For three specimens taken to 1.0 percent axial strain, the pressure was increased to 5, 10 or 15 MPa. For the remaining specimens, pressure was raised to 15 MPa. Waveforms for compressional waves traveling both parallel and perpendicular to the direction of maximum principal stress were measured in the undamaged state, during constant strain-rate tests, and then monitored as functions of time while the specimens were held at pressure. Both wave velocities and amplitudes increased over time at pressure, indicating that cracks closed and perhaps healed. The recovery of ultrasonic wave characteristics depended upon both pressure and damage level. The higher the pressure, the greater the velocity recovery; however, amplitude recovery showed no clear correlation with pressure. For both amplitudes and velocities, recoveries were greatest in the specimens with the least damage. 13 refs., 15 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Imaging Rayleigh wave attenuation and phase velocity in the western and central United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, X.; Dalton, C. A.; Jin, G.; Gaherty, J. B.

    2013-12-01

    The EarthScope USArray provides an opportunity to obtain detailed images of the continental upper mantle at an unprecedented scale. The majority of mantle models derived from USArray data to date contain spatial variations in seismic-wave speed; however, little is known about the attenuation structure of the North American upper mantle. Joint interpretation of seismic attenuation and velocity models can improve upon the interpretations based only on velocity, and provide important constraints on the temperature, composition, melt content, and volatile content of the mantle. We jointly invert Rayleigh wave phase and amplitude observations for phase velocity and attenuation maps for the western and central United States using USArray data. This approach exploits the amplitudes' sensitivity to velocity and the phase delays' sensitivity to attenuation. The phase and amplitude data are measured in the period range 20--100 s using a new interstation cross-correlation approach, based on the Generalized Seismological Data Functional algorithm, that takes advantage of waveform similarity at nearby stations. The Rayleigh waves are generated from 670 large teleseismic earthquakes that occurred between 2006 and 2012, and measured from all available Transportable Array stations. We consider two separate and complementary approaches for imaging attenuation variations: (1) the Helmholtz tomography (Lin et al., 2012) and (2) two-station path tomography. Results obtained from the two methods are contrasted. We provide a preliminary interpretation based on the observed relationship between Rayleigh wave attenuation and phase velocity.

  19. Shear wave anisotropy from aligned inclusions: ultrasonic frequency dependence of velocity and attenuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Figueiredo, J. J. S.; Schleicher, J.; Stewart, R. R.; Dayur, N.; Omoboya, B.; Wiley, R.; William, A.

    2013-04-01

    To understand their influence on elastic wave propagation, anisotropic cracked media have been widely investigated in many theoretical and experimental studies. In this work, we report on laboratory ultrasound measurements carried out to investigate the effect of source frequency on the elastic parameters (wave velocities and the Thomsen parameter γ) and shear wave attenuation) of fractured anisotropic media. Under controlled conditions, we prepared anisotropic model samples containing penny-shaped rubber inclusions in a solid epoxy resin matrix with crack densities ranging from 0 to 6.2 per cent. Two of the three cracked samples have 10 layers and one has 17 layers. The number of uniform rubber inclusions per layer ranges from 0 to 100. S-wave splitting measurements have shown that scattering effects are more prominent in samples where the seismic wavelength to crack aperture ratio ranges from 1.6 to 1.64 than in others where the ratio varied from 2.72 to 2.85. The sample with the largest cracks showed a magnitude of scattering attenuation three times higher compared with another sample that had small inclusions. Our S-wave ultrasound results demonstrate that elastic scattering, scattering and anelastic attenuation, velocity dispersion and crack size interfere directly in shear wave splitting in a source-frequency dependent manner, resulting in an increase of scattering attenuation and a reduction of shear wave anisotropy with increasing frequency.

  20. Efficiency of shock wave attenuation in ducts by various methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frolov, S. M.

    1993-02-01

    Different methods of shock wave attenuation in ducts are compared in terms of efficiency. The methods investigated include expansion of the duct cross section, the use of perforated side walls, and the use of porous screens and screen cascades. The attentuation of air shock waves is estimated by using a unified approach which provides satisfactory agreement with experimental data. Based on the results of the study, a nomogram is plotted which can be used for practical calculations.

  1. Grain-size dependence of shear wave speed dispersion and attenuation in granular marine sediments.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Masao

    2014-07-01

    The author has shown that measured shear wave speed dispersion and attenuation in water-saturated silica sand can be predicted by using a gap stiffness model incorporated into the Biot model (the BIMGS model) [Kimura, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 134, 144-155 (2013)]. In this study, the grain-size dependence of shear wave speed dispersion and attenuation in four kinds of water-saturated silica sands with different grain sizes is measured and calculated. As a result, the grain-size dependence of the aspect ratio in the BIMGS model can be validated and the effects of multiple scattering for larger grain sizes are demonstrated. PMID:24993238

  2. On wave radar measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ewans, Kevin; Feld, Graham; Jonathan, Philip

    2014-09-01

    The SAAB REX WaveRadar sensor is widely used for platform-based wave measurement systems by the offshore oil and gas industry. It offers in situ surface elevation wave measurements at relatively low operational costs. Furthermore, there is adequate flexibility in sampling rates, allowing in principle sampling frequencies from 1 to 10 Hz, but with an angular microwave beam width of 10° and an implied ocean surface footprint in the order of metres, significant limitations on the spatial and temporal resolution might be expected. Indeed there are reports that the accuracy of the measurements from wave radars may not be as good as expected. We review the functionality of a WaveRadar using numerical simulations to better understand how WaveRadar estimates compare with known surface elevations. In addition, we review recent field measurements made with a WaveRadar set at the maximum sampling frequency, in the light of the expected functionality and the numerical simulations, and we include inter-comparisons between SAAB radars and buoy measurements for locations in the North Sea.

  3. Estimates of millimeter wave attenuation for 18 United States cities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, K. C.; Liebe, H. J.; Rush, C. M.

    1983-05-01

    Brief discussions of three mechanisms that attenuate millimeter waves in the atmosphere are presented: rain attenuation, clear air absorption, and atmospheric multipath. Propagation models were combined with meteorological statistics to obtain estimates of average year attenuation distributions for 18 cities in the United States. The estimates are presented in such a way to elucidate the restrictions on system parameters required for reliable operation, i.e. frequency, path length for terrestrial paths, and path elevation angle for earth-satellite paths. The variation imposed by the diverse climates within the United States is demonstrated. Generally, in regions that have humid climates, millimeter wave systems perform less favorably than in areas where arid or semi-arid conditions prevail.

  4. Mantle-Lid P Wave Attenuation in the Korean Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, K.; Hong, T.

    2012-12-01

    The mantle-lid P wave, Pn, is the first arrival phase in regional distances. The Pn waves are widely analyzed for estimation of event sizes. Also, it is known that analysis of Pn waves is effective for discrimination of nuclear explosions from natural earthquakes. The attenuation of Pn waves provides us information on medium properties in mantle lid. It is crucial to understand the nature of Pn attenuation for correct estimation of event sizes from Pn amplitudes. We investigate the lateral variation of Pn attenuation in the mantle lid of the Korean Peninsula from vertical regional seismograms for events around the Korean Peninsula and Japanese islands. The number of events is 149, and the focal depths are less than 50 km. The seismic records with signal-to-noise ratios greater than 1.5 are analyzed. The number of stations is 121. The Pn quality factors are calculated using a two-station method in which ratios of Pn displacement spectra of stations on the same azimuths are used. The power-law frequency dependence term is estimated using a least-squares fitting for quality factors at frequencies from 0.37 Hz to 25 Hz. The number of station pairs is 3317. The average quality factor at 1 Hz is determined to be about 67, which is consistent with previous studies. We present the resultant Pn attenuation model, and discuss the correlations with geological and geophysical properties in the medium.

  5. Attenuation of seismic waves in methane gas hydrate-bearing sand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Priest, Jeffrey A.; Best, Angus I.; Clayton, Christopher R. I.

    2006-01-01

    Compressional wave (P wave) and shear wave (S wave) velocities (Vp and Vs, respectively) from remote seismic methods have been used to infer the distribution and volume of gas hydrate within marine sediments. Recent advances in seismic methods now allow compressional and shear wave attenuations (Q-1p and Q-1s, respectively) to be measured. However, the interpretation of these data is problematic due to our limited understanding of the effects of gas hydrate on physical properties. Therefore, a laboratory gas hydrate resonant column was developed to simulate pressure and temperature conditions suitable for methane gas hydrate formation in sand specimens and the subsequent measurement of both Q-1p and Q-1s at frequencies and strains relevant to marine seismic surveys. 13 dry (gas saturated) sand specimens were investigated with different amounts of methane gas hydrate evenly dispersed throughout each specimen. The results show that for these dry specimens both Q-1p and Q-1s are highly sensitive to hydrate saturation with unexpected peaks observed between 3 and 5 per cent hydrate saturation. It is thought that viscous squirt flow of absorbed water or free gas within the pore space is enhanced by hydrate cement at grain contacts and by the nanoporosity of the hydrate itself. These results show for the first time the dramatic effect methane gas hydrate can have on seismic wave attenuation in sand, and provide insight into wave propagation mechanisms. These results will aid the interpretation of elastic wave attenuation data obtained using marine seismic prospecting methods.

  6. Generating attenuation-resistant frozen waves in absorbing fluid.

    PubMed

    Dorrah, Ahmed H; Zamboni-Rached, Michel; Mojahedi, Mo

    2016-08-15

    We demonstrate a class of nondiffracting beams, called frozen waves, with a central spot that can be made to maintain a predefined intensity profile while propagating in an absorbing fluid. Frozen waves are composed of Bessel beams with different transverse and longitudinal wavenumbers, and are generated using a programmable spatial light modulator. The attenuation-resistant frozen waves demonstrated here address the problem of propagation losses in absorbing media. This development can be beneficial for many applications in particle micro-manipulation, data communications, remote sensing, and imaging. PMID:27519067

  7. Resonant attenuation of surface acoustic waves by a disordered monolayer of microspheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eliason, J. K.; Vega-Flick, A.; Hiraiwa, M.; Khanolkar, A.; Gan, T.; Boechler, N.; Fang, N.; Nelson, K. A.; Maznev, A. A.

    2016-02-01

    Attenuation of surface acoustic waves (SAWs) by a disordered monolayer of polystyrene microspheres is investigated. Surface acoustic wave packets are generated by a pair of crossed laser pulses in a glass substrate coated with a thin aluminum film and detected via the diffraction of a probe laser beam. When a 170 μm-wide strip of micron-sized spheres is placed on the substrate between the excitation and detection spots, strong resonant attenuation of SAWs near 240 MHz is observed. The attenuation is caused by the interaction of SAWs with a contact resonance of the microspheres, as confirmed by acoustic dispersion measurements on the microsphere-coated area. Frequency-selective attenuation of SAWs by such a locally resonant metamaterial may lead to reconfigurable SAW devices and sensors, which can be easily manufactured via self-assembly techniques.

  8. Wave Dispersion and Attenuation in Partially Saturated Sandstones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nie, Jian-Xin; Yang, Ding-Hui; Yang, Hui-Zhu

    2004-03-01

    We investigate the wave dispersion and attenuation in partially water-saturated sandstones based on the improved Biot/squirt (BISQ) model in which the saturation is introduced. Numerical experiments indicate that the phase velocity of the fast P-wave decreases as the saturation increases in the low-frequency range (102-104 Hz), and reaches the minimum at the full-saturation state. The behaviour of the phase velocity varying with the saturation in the high-frequency range (104-106 Hz), however, is opposite to that in the low-frequency range. The peak value of P-wave attenuation increases with increasing saturation, and is the maximum at the fully saturated state. Numerical models and experiments show that the improved BISQ model is better than the traditional Gassmann-Biot model.

  9. Attenuation of seismic waves obtained by coda waves analysis in the West Bohemia earthquake swarm region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachura, Martin; Fischer, Tomas

    2014-05-01

    Seismic waves are attenuated by number of factors, including geometrical spreading, scattering on heterogeneities and intrinsic loss due the anelasticity of medium. Contribution of the latter two processes can be derived from the tail part of the seismogram - coda (strictly speaking S-wave coda), as these factors influence the shape and amplitudes of coda. Numerous methods have been developed for estimation of attenuation properties from the decay rate of coda amplitudes. Most of them work with the S-wave coda, some are designed for the P-wave coda (only on teleseismic distances) or for the whole waveforms. We used methods to estimate the 1/Qc - attenuation of coda waves, methods to separate scattering and intrinsic loss - 1/Qsc, Qi and methods to estimate attenuation of direct P and S wave - 1/Qp, 1/Qs. In this study, we analyzed the S-wave coda of local earthquake data recorded in the West Bohemia/Vogtland area. This region is well known thanks to the repeated occurrence of earthquake swarms. We worked with data from the 2011 earthquake swarm, which started late August and lasted with decreasing intensity for another 4 months. During the first week of swarm thousands of events were detected with maximum magnitudes ML = 3.6. Amount of high quality data (including continuous datasets and catalogues with an abundance of well-located events) is available due to installation of WEBNET seismic network (13 permanent and 9 temporary stations) monitoring seismic activity in the area. Results of the single-scattering model show seismic attenuations decreasing with frequency, what is in agreement with observations worldwide. We also found decrease of attenuation with increasing hypocentral distance and increasing lapse time, which was interpreted as a decrease of attenuation with depth (coda waves on later lapse times are generated in bigger depths - in our case in upper lithosphere, where attenuations are small). We also noticed a decrease of frequency dependence of 1/Qc

  10. Attenuation Tomography of Body Waves in Thickness-varying Layered Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, H.; Zhou, H.

    2006-12-01

    The intrinsic attenuation of seismic waves, which is quantified as inverse to the quality factor (Q) of a medium, is a well-publicized and yet poorly studied subject. While it is common to deduce Q values from measured dispersion data for surface waves, previous studies on the intrinsic attenuation of body waves have relied on measurements of the waveform of first arrivals or reflections. Better understanding is needed for both solid Earth geophysics and applied seismology to quantify the contributing factors to seismic attenuation and decompose Q from other factors because Q is closely related to rock property and fluid saturation. This study focuses on forward modeling and tomographic inversion for the Q values in thickness-varying layered media. Many of the existing theoretical Q models work in such media. Our work is an extension of the deformable- layer tomography (Zhou, 2004) to dissipative media. In the first phase of this study, we evaluated, through numerical modeling the various factors contributing to the attenuation of body waves. Theoretically, there are intrinsic attenuation, which is related to rock and pore fluid properties, and attenuation due to wave propagation effects, such as geometrical spreading and energy partition across interfaces (transmission and reflection). We made several representative numerical models, and conducted forward modeling using both wave theory and ray theory to quantify the amount of the attenuation of body waves due to different factors. In the second phase, we are integrating the forward modeling with the deformable-layer tomography algorithm to develop means to invert for Q distribution in thickness-varying layer media. While the deformable-layer tomography determines layer velocities and geometry, the current work intends to invert for Q values of the thickness-varying model layers as well as parameters associated with interface energy partition and geometric spreading. In the third phase, we plan to apply the

  11. Wave-induced fluid flow in random porous media: attenuation and dispersion of elastic waves.

    PubMed

    Müller, Tobias M; Gurevich, Boris

    2005-05-01

    A detailed analysis of the relationship between elastic waves in inhomogeneous, porous media and the effect of wave-induced fluid flow is presented. Based on the results of the poroelastic first-order statistical smoothing approximation applied to Biot's equations of poroelasticity, a model for elastic wave attenuation and dispersion due to wave-induced fluid flow in 3-D randomly inhomogeneous poroelastic media is developed. Attenuation and dispersion depend on linear combinations of the spatial correlations of the fluctuating poroelastic parameters. The observed frequency dependence is typical for a relaxation phenomenon. Further, the analytic properties of attenuation and dispersion are analyzed. It is shown that the low-frequency asymptote of the attenuation coefficient of a plane compressional wave is proportional to the square of frequency. At high frequencies the attenuation coefficient becomes proportional to the square root of frequency. A comparison with the 1-D theory shows that attenuation is of the same order but slightly larger in 3-D random media. Several modeling choices of the approach including the effect of cross correlations between fluid and solid phase properties are demonstrated. The potential application of the results to real porous materials is discussed. PMID:15957744

  12. Experimental and Numerical Investigation of Pressure Wave Attenuation due to Bubbly Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayaprakash, Arvind; Fourmeau, Tiffany; Hsiao, Chao-Tsung; Chahine, Georges; Dynaflow Inc. Team

    2013-03-01

    In this work, the effects of dispersed microbubbles on a steep pressure wave and its attenuation are investigated both numerically and experimentally. Numerical simulations were carried out using a compressible Euler equation solver, where the liquid-gas mixture was modeled using direct numerical simulations involving discrete deforming bubbles. To reduce computational costs a 1D configuration is used and the bubbles are assumed distributed in layers and the initial pressure profile is selected similar to that of a one-dimensional shock tube problem. Experimentally, the pressure pulse was generated using a submerged spark electric discharge, which generates a large vapor bubble, while the microbubbles in the bubbly layer are generated using electrolysis. High speed movies were recorded in tandem with high fidelity pressure measurements. The dependence of pressure wave attenuation on the bubble radii, the void fraction, and the bubbly layer thickness were parametrically studied. It has been found that the pressure wave attenuation can be seen as due to waves reflecting and dispersing in the inter-bubble regions, with the energy absorbed by bubble volume oscillations and re-radiation. Layer thickness and small bubble sizes were also seen as having a strong effect on the attenuation with enhanced attenuation as the bubble size is reduced for the same void fraction. This study was supported by the Department of Energy, under SBIR Phase II Contract DE-FG02-07ER84839.

  13. Frequency-dependent Lg-wave attenuation in northern Morocco

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noriega, Raquel; Ugalde, Arantza; Villaseñor, Antonio; Harnafi, Mimoun

    2015-11-01

    Frequency-dependent attenuation (Q- 1) in the crust of northern Morocco is estimated from Lg-wave spectral amplitude measurements every quarter octave in the frequency band 0.8 to 8 Hz. This study takes advantage of the improved broadband data coverage in the region provided by the deployment of the IberArray seismic network. Earthquake data consist of 71 crustal events with magnitudes 4 ≤ mb ≤ 5.5 recorded on 110 permanent and temporary seismic stations between January 2008 and December 2013 with hypocentral distances between 100 and 900 km. 1274 high-quality Lg waveforms provide dense path coverage of northern Morocco, crossing a region with a complex structure and heterogeneous tectonic setting as a result of continuous interactions between the African and Eurasian plates. We use two different methods: the coda normalization (CN) analysis, that allows removal of the source and site effects from the Lg spectra, and the spectral amplitude decay (SAD) method, that simultaneously inverts for source, site, and path attenuation terms. The CN and SAD methods return similar results, indicating that the Lg Q models are robust to differences in the methodologies. Larger errors and no significant frequency dependence are observed for frequencies lower than 1.5 Hz. For distances up to 400 km and the frequency band 1.5 ≤ ƒ (Hz) ≤ 4.5, the model functions Q(f) = (529- 22+ 23)(f/1.5)0.23 ± 0.06 and Q(f) = (457- 7+ 7)(f/1.5)0.44 ± 0.02 are obtained using the CN and SAD methods, respectively. A change in the frequency dependence is observed above 4.5 Hz for both methods which may be related to the influence of the Sn energy on the Lg window. The frequency-dependent Q- 1 estimates represent an average attenuation beneath a broad region including the Rif and Tell mountains, the Moroccan and Algerian mesetas, the Atlas Mountains and the Sahara Platform structural domains, and correlate well with areas of moderate seismicity where intermediate Q values have been obtained.

  14. GPR measurements of attenuation in concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Eisenmann, David Margetan, Frank J. Pavel, Brittney

    2015-03-31

    Ground-penetrating radar (GPR) signals from concrete structures are affected by several phenomenon, including: (1) transmission and reflection coefficients at interfaces; (2) the radiation patterns of the antenna(s) being used; and (3) the material properties of concrete and any embedded objects. In this paper we investigate different schemes for determining the electromagnetic (EM) attenuation of concrete from measured signals obtained using commercially-available GPR equipment. We adapt procedures commonly used in ultrasonic inspections where one compares the relative strengths of two or more signals having different travel paths through the material of interest. After correcting for beam spread (i.e., diffraction), interface phenomena, and equipment amplification settings, any remaining signal differences are assumed to be due to attenuation thus allowing the attenuation coefficient (say, in dB of loss per inch of travel) to be estimated. We begin with a brief overview of our approach, and then discuss how diffraction corrections were determined for our two 1.6 GHz GPR antennas. We then present results of attenuation measurements for two types of concrete using both pulse/echo and pitch/catch measurement setups.

  15. Laboratory velocities and attenuation of p-waves in limestones during freeze-thaw cycles

    SciTech Connect

    Remy, J.M.; Bellanger, M.; Homand-Etienne, F. )

    1994-02-01

    The velocity and the attenuation of compressional P-waves, measured in the laboratory at ultrasonic frequencies during a series of freezing and thawing cycles, are used as a method for predicting frost damage in a bedded limestone. Pulse transmission and spectral ratio techniques are used to determine the P-wave velocities and the attenuation values relative to an aluminum reference samples with very low attenuation. Limestone samples were water saturated under vacuum conditions, jacketed with rubber sleeves, and immersed in an antifreeze bath (50 percent methanol solution). They were submitted to repeated 24-hour freezing and thawing cycles simulating natural environment conditions. During the freeze/thaw cycles, P-wave velocities and quality factor Q diminished rapidly in thawed rock samples, indicating modification of the pore space. Measurements of crack porosity were conducted by hydrostatic compression tests on cubic rock samples that had been submitted to these freeze/thaw cycles. These measurements are used as an index of crack formation. The hydrostatic compression tests confirmed the phases of rock damage that were shown by changes in the value of Q. Furthermore, comparison between Q values and crack porosity demonstrate that the variations of P-wave attenuation are caused by the creation of new cracks and not by the enlargement of pre-existing cracks.

  16. Ocean waves across the Arctic: Attenuation due to dissipation dominates over scattering for periods longer than 19 s

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ardhuin, Fabrice; Sutherland, Peter; Doble, Martin; Wadhams, Peter

    2016-06-01

    The poorly understood attenuation of surface waves in sea ice is generally attributed to the combination of scattering and dissipation. Scattering and dissipation have very different effects on the directional and temporal distribution of wave energy, making it possible to better understand their relative importance by analysis of swell directional spreading and arrival times. Here we compare results of a spectral wave model—using adjustable scattering and dissipation attenuation formulations—with wave measurements far inside the ice pack. In this case, scattering plays a negligible role in the attenuation of long swells. Specifically, scattering-dominated attenuation would produce directional wave spectra much broader than the ones recorded, and swell events arriving later and lasting much longer than observed. Details of the dissipation process remain uncertain. Average dissipation rates are consistent with creep effects but are 12 times those expected for a laminar boundary layer under a smooth solid ice plate.

  17. Developing a Short-Period, Fundamental-Mode Rayleigh-Wave Attenuation Model for Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, X.; Levshin, A. L.; Barmin, M. P.; Ritzwoller, M. H.

    2008-12-01

    We are developing a 2D, short-period (12 - 22 s), fundamental-mode Rayleigh-wave attenuation model for Asia. This model can be used to invert for a 3D attenuation model of the Earth's crust and upper mantle as well as to implement more accurate path corrections in regional surface-wave magnitude calculations. The prerequisite for developing a reliable Rayleigh-wave attenuation model is the availability of accurate fundamental-mode Rayleigh-wave amplitude measurements. Fundamental-mode Rayleigh-wave amplitudes could be contaminated by a variety of sources such as multipathing, focusing and defocusing, body wave, higher-mode surface wave, and other noise sources. These contaminations must be reduced to the largest extent possible. To achieve this, we designed a procedure by taking advantage of certain Rayleigh-wave characteristics, such as dispersion and elliptical particle motion, for accurate amplitude measurements. We first analyze the dispersion of the surface-wave data using a spectrogram. Based on the characteristics of the data dispersion, we design a phase-matched filter by using either a manually picked dispersion curve, or a group-velocity-model predicted dispersion curve, or the dispersion of the data, and apply the filter to the seismogram. Intelligent filtering of the seismogram and windowing of the resulting cross-correlation based on the spectrogram analysis and the comparison between the phase-match filtered data spectrum, the raw-data spectrum and the theoretical source spectrum effectively reduces amplitude contaminations and results in reliable amplitude measurements in many cases. We implemented these measuring techniques in a graphic-user-interface tool called Surface Wave Amplitude Measurement Tool (SWAMTOOL). Using the tool, we collected and processed waveform data for 200 earthquakes occurring throughout 2003-2006 inside and around Eurasia. The records from 135 broadband stations were used. After obtaining the Rayleigh-wave amplitude

  18. Attenuation of shock waves in copper and stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Harvey, W.B.

    1986-06-01

    By using shock pins, data were gathered on the trajectories of shock waves in stainless steel (SS-304L) and oxygen-free-high-conductivity copper (OFHC-Cu). Shock pressures were generated in these materials by impacting the appropriate target with thin (approx.1.5 mm) flying plates. The flying plates in these experiments were accelerated to high velocities (approx.4 km/s) by high explosives. Six experiments were conducted, three using SS-304L as the target material and three experiments using OFHC-Cu as the target material. Peak shock pressures generated in the steel experiments were approximately 109, 130, and 147 GPa and in the copper experiments, the peak shock pressures were approximately 111, 132, and 143 GPa. In each experiment, an attenuation of the shock wave by a following release wave was clearly observed. An extensive effort using two characteristic codes (described in this work) to theoretically calculate the attenuation of the shock waves was made. The efficacy of several different constitutive equations to successfully model the experiments was studied by comparing the calculated shock trajectories to the experimental data. Based on such comparisons, the conclusion can be drawn that OFHC-Cu enters a melt phase at about 130 GPa on the principal Hugoniot. There was no sign of phase changes in the stainless-steel experiments. In order to match the observed attenuation of the shock waves in the SS-304L experiments, it was necessary to include strength effects in the calculations. It was found that the values for the parameters in the strength equations were dependent on the equation of state used in the modeling of the experiments. 66 refs., 194 figs., 77 tabs.

  19. Seismic interferometry of scattered surface waves in attenuative media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halliday, David; Curtis, Andrew

    2009-07-01

    Seismic interferometry can be used to estimate interreceiver surface wave signals by cross-correlation of signals recorded at each receiver that are emitted from a surrounding boundary of impulsive or uncorrelated noise sources. We study seismic interferometry for scattered surface waves using a stationary-phase analysis and surface wave Green's functions for isotropic point scatterers embedded in laterally homogeneous media. Our analysis reveals key differences between the interferometric construction of reflected and point-scattered body or surface waves, since point scatterers radiate energy in all directions but a reflection from a finite flat reflector is specular. In the case of surface waves, we find that additional cancelling terms are introduced in the stationary-phase analysis for scattered waves related to the constraint imposed by the optical theorem for surface waves. The additional terms are of second order even for single-scattered waves, and we show that these can be highly significant in multiple-scattering cases. In attenuative media errors are introduced due to amplitude errors in these additional terms. Further, we find that as the distribution of scatterers in a medium becomes more complex the errors in correlation-type interferometry caused by attenuation in the background medium become larger. Convolution-type interferometry has been shown to be effective when considering electromagnetic wavefields in lossy media, and we show that this is also true for scattered surface waves in attenuating elastic media. By adapting our stationary-phase approach to this case, we reveal why convolution-type interferometry performs well in such media: the second-order cancelling terms that appear in the correlation-type approach do not appear in convolution-type interferometry. Finally, we find that when using both correlation- and convolution-type interferometry with realistic source geometries (illustrative of both industrial seismics and `passive noise

  20. Relative velocity of seagrass blades: Implications for wave attenuation in low-energy environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradley, Kevin; Houser, Chris

    2009-03-01

    While the ability of subaquatic vegetation to attenuate wave energy is well recognized in general, there is a paucity of data from the field to describe the rate and mechanisms of wave decay, particularly with respect to the relative motion of the vegetation. The purpose of this study was to quantify the attenuation of incident wave height through a seagrass meadow and characterize the blade movement under oscillatory flow under the low-energy conditions characteristic of fetch-limited and sheltered environments. The horizontal motion of the seagrass blades and the velocity just above the seagrass canopy were measured using a digital video camera and an acoustic Doppler velicometer (ADV) respectively in order to refine the estimates of the drag coefficient based on the relative velocity. Significant wave heights (Hs) were observed to increase by ˜0.02 m (˜20%) through the first 5 m of the seagrass bed but subsequently decrease exponentially over the remainder of the bed. The exponential decay coefficient varied in response to the Reynolds number calculated using blade width (as the length scale) and the oscillatory velocity measured immediately above the canopy. The ability of the seagrass to attenuate wave energy decreases as incident wave heights increase and conditions become more turbulent. Estimates of the time-averaged canopy height and the calculated hydraulic roughness suggest that, as the oscillatory velocity increases, the seagrass becomes fully extended and leans in the direction of flow for a longer part of the wave cycle. The relationship between the drag coefficient and the Reynolds number further suggests that the vegetation is swaying (going with the flow) at low-energy conditions but becomes increasingly rigid as oscillatory velocities increase over the limited range of the conditions observed (200 < Re < 800). In addition to the changing behavior of the seagrass motion, the attenuation was not uniform with wave frequency, and waves at a

  1. P wave attenuation structure below the Tokyo Metropolitan area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panayotopoulos, Y.; Sakai, S.; Nakagawa, S.; Kasahara, K.; Hirata, N.; Aketagawa, T.; Kimura, H.; Lee, C.

    2010-12-01

    The material properties of the complex subduction zone beneath the Tokyo Metropolitan can be estimated by the seismic attenuation Q-1 of seismic waves observed at local seismic stations. The attenuation of seismic waves is represented by the t* attenuation operator that can be estimated by fitting the observed P wave amplitude spectrum to a theoretical spectrum using an ω2 source model. The waveform data used in this study are recorded at the dense seismic array of the Metropolitan Seismic Observation network (MeSO-net). The station network is distributed on five lines with an average spacing of 3 km and in an area with a spacing of 5 km in the central part of Kanto plane. The MeSO-net stations are equipped with a three-component accelerometer at a bottom of a 20-m-deep borehole, signals from which are digitized at a sampling rate of 200 Hz with a dynamic range of 135 dB.The waveforms of 141 earthquakes observed at 226 stations were selected from the Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA) unified earthquake list from January 1st 2010 to August 4th 2010. Only high-quality amplitude spectra of earthquakes with M > 3 were used for the estimation of reliable attenuation parameters. The acceleration waveforms were integrated twice to yield the corresponding displacement vectors, applying a high pass filter to remove the effect of the low-frequency background noise. Taking into account that the majority of the events occurred at depth greater than 30 km a search window of 5 sec starting 1 sec before the P wave arrival was implemented for the creation of the dataset. The t* values were estimated from the amplitude spectra of approximately 33800 P wave waveforms conducting a fast Fourier transform analysis. The Q values for the Tokyo Metropolitan area estimate by this study range from 100 to 500 in the upper 30 km of the crust. A site effect on the attenuation near stations inside a densely populated area is also a possible reason for the large Q variations observed.

  2. Water saturation effects on elastic wave attenuation in porous rocks with aligned fractures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amalokwu, Kelvin; Best, Angus I.; Sothcott, Jeremy; Chapman, Mark; Minshull, Tim; Li, Xiang-Yang

    2014-05-01

    Elastic wave attenuation anisotropy in porous rocks with aligned fractures is of interest to seismic remote sensing of the Earth's structure and to hydrocarbon reservoir characterization in particular. We investigated the effect of partial water saturation on attenuation in fractured rocks in the laboratory by conducting ultrasonic pulse-echo measurements on synthetic, silica-cemented, sandstones with aligned penny-shaped voids (fracture density of 0.0298 ± 0.0077), chosen to simulate the effect of natural fractures in the Earth according to theoretical models. Our results show, for the first time, contrasting variations in the attenuation (Q-1) of P and S waves with water saturation in samples with and without fractures. The observed Qs/Qp ratios are indicative of saturation state and the presence or absence of fractures, offering an important new possibility for remote fluid detection and characterization.

  3. Shear wave velocity and attenuation from pulse-echo studies of Berea sandstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Douglas H.; Wang, Herbert F.

    1994-06-01

    The pulse-echo spectral-ratio technique has been adapted to the determination of ultrasonic shear wave attenuation in sandstone at variable states of saturation and pressure. The method can measure shear attenuation coefficients in the range 0.5 dB/cm to 8 dB/cm to within +/- 0.5 dB/cm. For the Berea sandstone, this range corresponds to values of the shear quality factor Q(sub s) between 10 and 100. Spectra Q(sub s) show that between 600 and 1110 kHz, Q(sub s) decreases with frequency, particularly at high pressures (up to 70 MPa). Ultrasonic shear wave attenuation in a 90% water-saturated sample was intermediate between that for dry samples and the relatively high attenuation in fully saturated rock. Strong pressure dependence is seen in the shear attentuation for all saturation states, indicating a dominant role of dissipation mechanisms operating within open and compliant cracks. Substantial shear attenuation remains at the highest effective pressure applied to the saturated sample, which may be due to a more 'global' fluid-flow loss mechanism. Scattering losses as described by weak scattering theories for compressional waves, do not appear to be dominant at these frequencies.

  4. Study of transmission line attenuation in broad band millimeter wave frequency range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandya, Hitesh Kumar B.; Austin, M. E.; Ellis, R. F.

    2013-10-01

    Broad band millimeter wave transmission lines are used in fusion plasma diagnostics such as electron cyclotron emission (ECE), electron cyclotron absorption, reflectometry and interferometry systems. In particular, the ECE diagnostic for ITER will require efficient transmission over an ultra wide band, 100 to 1000 GHz. A circular corrugated waveguide transmission line is a prospective candidate to transmit such wide band with low attenuation. To evaluate this system, experiments of transmission line attenuation were performed and compared with theoretical loss calculations. A millimeter wave Michelson interferometer and a liquid nitrogen black body source are used to perform all the experiments. Atmospheric water vapor lines and continuum absorption within this band are reported. Ohmic attenuation in corrugated waveguide is very low; however, there is Bragg scattering and higher order mode conversion that can cause significant attenuation in this transmission line. The attenuation due to miter bends, gaps, joints, and curvature are estimated. The measured attenuation of 15 m length with seven miter bends and eighteen joints is 1 dB at low frequency (300 GHz) and 10 dB at high frequency (900 GHz), respectively.

  5. Seismic Attenuation Technology for the Advanced Virgo Gravitational Wave Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beker, M. G.; Blom, M.; van den Brand, J. F. J.; Bulten, H. J.; Hennes, E.; Rabeling, D. S.

    The current interferometric gravitational wave detectors are being upgraded to what are termed 'second generation' devices. Sensitivities will be increased by an order of magnitude and these new instruments are expected to uncover the field of gravitational astronomy. A main challenge in this endeavor is the mitigation of noise induced by seismic motion. Detailed studies with Virgo show that seismic noise can be reinjected into the dark fringe signal. For example, laser beam jitter and backscattered light limit the sensitivity of the interferometer. Here, we focus on seismic attenuators based on compact inverted pendulums in combination with geometric anti-prings to obtain 40 dB of attenuation above 4 Hz in six degrees of freedom. Low frequency resonances (< 0.5 Hz) are damped by using a control system based on input from LVDTs and geophones. Such systems are under development for the seismic attenuation of optical benches operated both in air and vacuum. The design and realization of the seismic attenuation system for the Virgo external injection bench, including its control scheme, will be discussed and stand-alone performance presented.

  6. Numerical simulation of attenuation and group velocity of guided ultrasonic wave in grouted rock bolts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Y.; Zou, D. H.

    2006-08-01

    In this paper, the guided ultrasonic wave propagating in grouted rock bolts was simulated with finite element method. An 800 mm partially grouted cylindrical rock bolt model was created. Dynamic input signals with frequency from 25 to 100 kHz were used to excite ultrasonic wave. The simulated waveform, group velocity and amplitude ratio matched well with the experimental results. This model made it possible to study the behaviour of the guided waves in the grouted bolt along its central axis. Analysis of the simulated results showed that the group velocity in grouted rock bolts is constant along the grouted length, and the boundary effect on the group velocity is negligible. This paper also presents methods to determine the attenuation coefficient from simulation and to determine the boundary effect on attenuation at the bolt ends. The analysis showed that the attenuation of the guided wave propagating inside the grouted bolts is similar to the theoretical solution in steel bar with infinite length. After correction for the boundary effects the grout length of a grouted rock bolt can be determined using the measured attenuation, with sufficient accuracy.

  7. Seismic Wave Attenuation Estimated from Tectonic Tremor and Radiated Energy in Tremor for Various Subduction Zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yabe, S.; Baltay, A.; Ide, S.; Beroza, G. C.

    2013-12-01

    Ground motion prediction is an essential component of earthquake hazard assessment. Seismic wave attenuation with distance is an important, yet difficult to constrain, factor for such estimation. Using the empirical method of ground motion prediction equations (GMPEs), seismic wave attenuation with distance, which includes both the effect of anelastic attenuation and scattering, can be estimated from the distance decay of peak ground velocity (PGV) or peak ground acceleration (PGA) of ordinary earthquakes; however, in some regions where plate-boundary earthquakes are infrequent, such as Cascadia and Nankai, there are fewer data with which to constrain the empirical parameters. In both of those subduction zones, tectonic tremor occurs often. In this study, we use tectonic tremor to estimate the seismic wave attenuation with distance, and in turn use the attenuation results to estimate the radiated seismic energy of tremor. Our primary interest is in the variations among subduction zones. Ground motion attenuation and the distribution of released seismic energy from tremors are two important subduction zone characteristics. Therefore, it is very interesting to see whether there are variations of these parameters in different subduction zones, or regionally within the same subduction zone. It is also useful to estimate how much energy is released by tectonic tremor from accumulated energy to help understand subduction dynamics and the difference between ordinary earthquakes and tremor. We use the tectonic tremor catalog of Ide (2012) in Nankai, Cascadia, Mexico and southern Chile. We measured PGV and PGA of individual tremor bursts at each station. We assume a simple GMPE relationship and estimate seismic attenuation and relative site amplification factors from the data. In the Nankai subduction zone, there are almost no earthquakes on the plate interface, but intra-slab earthquakes occur frequently. Both the seismic wave attenuation with distance and the site

  8. The attenuation of Love waves and toroidal oscillations of the earth.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, D. D.

    1971-01-01

    An attempt has been made to invert a large set of attenuation data for Love waves and toroidal oscillations in the earth, using a recent method by Backus and Gilbert. The difficulty in finding an acceptable model of internal friction which explains the data, under the assumption that the internal friction is independent of frequency, casts doubt on the validity of this assumption. A frequency-dependent model of internal friction is presented which is in good agreement with the seismic data and with recent experimental measurements of attenuation in rocks.

  9. Influence of reef geometry on wave attenuation on a Brazilian coral reef

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, Mirella B. S. F.; Araújo, Moacyr; Araújo, Tereza C. M.; Siegle, Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    This study presents data from field experiments that focus on the influence of coral reef geometry on wave transformation in the Metropolitan Area of Recife (MAR) on the northeast coast of Brazil. First, a detailed bathymetric survey was conducted, revealing a submerged reef bank, measuring 18 km long by 1 km wide, parallel to the coastline with a quasi-horizontal top that varies from 0.5 m to 4 m in depth at low tide. Cluster similarity between 180 reef profiles indicates that in 75% of the area, the reef geometry has a configuration similar to a platform reef, whereas in 25% of the area it resembles a fringing reef. Measurements of wave pressure fluctuations were made at two stations (experiments E1 and E2) across the reef profile. The results indicate that wave height was tidally modulated at both experimental sites. Up to 67% (E1) and 99.9% (E2) of the incident wave height is attenuated by the reef top at low tide. This tidal modulation is most apparent at E2 due to reef geometry. At this location, the reef top is only approximately 0.5 m deep during mean low spring water, and almost all incident waves break on the outer reef edge. At E1, the reef top depth is 4 m, and waves with height ratios smaller than the critical breaking limit are free to pass onto the reef and are primarily attenuated by bottom friction. These results highlight the importance of reef geometry in controlling wave characteristics of the MAR beaches and demonstrate its effect on the morphology of the adjacent coast. Implications of differences in wave attenuation and the level of protection provided by the reefs to the adjacent shoreline are discussed.

  10. Numerical investigation of wave attenuation by vegetation using a 3D RANS model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsooli, Reza; Wu, Weiming

    2014-12-01

    Vegetation has been recognized as an important natural shoreline protection against storm surges and waves. Understanding of wave-vegetation interaction is essential for assessing the ability of vegetation patches, such as wetlands, to mitigate storm damages. In this study the wave attenuation by vegetation is investigated numerically using a 3-D model which solves the Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes equations (RANS) by means of a finite-volume method based on collocated hexahedron mesh. A mixing length model is used for turbulence closure of the RANS equations. The water surface boundary is tracked using the Volume-of-Fluid (VOF) method with the Compressive Interface Capturing Scheme for Arbitrary Meshes (CICSAM) to solve the VOF advection equation. The presence of vegetation is taken into account by adding the vegetation drag and inertia forces to the momentum equations. The model is validated by several laboratory experiments of short wave propagation through vegetation over flat and sloping beds. The comparisons show good agreement between the measured data and calculated results, but the swaying motion of flexible vegetation which is neglected in this study can influence the accuracy of the wave height predictions. The model is then applied to one of the validation tests with different vegetation properties, revealing that the wave height attenuation by vegetation depends not only on the wave conditions, but also the vegetation characteristics such as vegetation height and density.

  11. Development of attenuation and diffraction corrections for linear and nonlinear Rayleigh surface waves radiating from a uniform line source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Hyunjo; Zhang, Shuzeng; Cho, Sungjong; Li, Xiongbing

    2016-04-01

    In recent studies with nonlinear Rayleigh surface waves, harmonic generation measurements have been successfully employed to characterize material damage and microstructural changes, and found to be sensitive to early stages of damage process. A nonlinearity parameter of Rayleigh surface waves was derived and frequently measured to quantify the level of damage. The accurate measurement of the nonlinearity parameter generally requires making corrections for beam diffraction and medium attenuation. These effects are not generally known for nonlinear Rayleigh waves, and therefore not properly considered in most of previous studies. In this paper, the nonlinearity parameter for a Rayleigh surface wave is defined from the plane wave displacement solutions. We explicitly define the attenuation and diffraction corrections for fundamental and second harmonic Rayleigh wave beams radiated from a uniform line source. Attenuation corrections are obtained from the quasilinear theory of plane Rayleigh wave equations. To obtain closed-form expressions for diffraction corrections, multi-Gaussian beam (MGB) models are employed to represent the integral solutions derived from the quasilinear theory of the full two-dimensional wave equation without parabolic approximation. Diffraction corrections are presented for a couple of transmitter-receiver geometries, and the effects of making attenuation and diffraction corrections are examined through the simulation of nonlinearity parameter determination in a solid sample.

  12. Imaging Rayleigh Wave Attenuation and Phase Velocity beneath North America with USArray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, X.; Dalton, C. A.; Jin, G.; Gaherty, J. B.

    2014-12-01

    The EarthScope USArray provides an opportunity to obtain detailed images of the continental upper mantle of United States at a novel scale. The majority of mantle models derived from USArray data contain spatial variations in velocity; however, little is known about the attenuation structure of the North American upper mantle. Joint interpretation of seismic attenuation and velocity models can improve upon the interpretations based only on velocity, and provide important constraints on the temperature, composition, melt content, and volatile content of the mantle. In this study, Rayleigh wave travel time and amplitude are measured using an interstation cross-correlation version of the Generalized Seismological Data Functional algorithm, which takes advantage of waveform similarity at nearby stations. Our data are from 670 large teleseismic earthquakes that occurred from 2006 to 2014 and were recorded by 1,764 Transportable Array stations. More than 4.8 million measurements at periods between 20 and 100 s are collected into our database. Isolating the signal of attenuation in the amplitude observations is challenging because amplitudes are sensitive to a number of factors in addition to attenuation, such as focusing/defocusing and local site amplification. We generate several Rayleigh wave attenuation maps at each period, using several different approaches to account for source and receiver effects on amplitude. This suite of attenuation maps allows us to distinguish between the robust features in the maps and the features that are sensitive to the treatment of source and receiver effects. We apply Helmholtz surface-wave tomography (Lin et al., 2012) to determine velocity and attenuation maps. A significant contrast in velocity and attenuation is observed in the transition between the western and central United States along the Rocky Mountain front. We find low Q values in the western US, along the eastern coast, and the Gulf plain. These areas are also

  13. Phase velocities and attenuations of shear, Lamb, and Rayleigh waves in plate-like tissues submerged in a fluid (L).

    PubMed

    Nenadic, Ivan Z; Urban, Matthew W; Bernal, Miguel; Greenleaf, James F

    2011-12-01

    In the past several decades, the fields of ultrasound and magnetic resonance elastography have shown promising results in noninvasive estimates of mechanical properties of soft tissues. These techniques often rely on measuring shear wave velocity due to an external or internal source of force and relating the velocity to viscoelasticity of the tissue. The mathematical relationship between the measured velocity and material properties of the myocardial wall, arteries, and other organs with non-negligible boundary conditions is often complicated and computationally expensive. A simple relationship between the Lamb-Rayleigh dispersion and the shear wave dispersion is derived for both the velocity and attenuation. The relationship shows that the shear wave velocity is around 20% higher than the Lamb-Rayleigh velocity and that the shear wave attenuation is about 20% lower than the Lamb-Rayleigh attenuation. Results of numerical simulations in the frequency range 0-500 Hz are presented. PMID:22225009

  14. Temporal change in coda wave attenuation observed during an eruption of Mount St. Helens

    SciTech Connect

    Fehler, M.; Roberts, P.; Fairbanks, T.

    1988-05-10

    During the past few years there have been numerous reports of changes in coda wave attenuation occurring before major earthquakes. These observations are important because they may provide insight into stress-related structural changes taking place in the focal region prior to the occurrence of large earthquakes. The results of these studies led us to suspect that temporal changes in coda wave attenuation might also accompany volcanic eruptions. By measuring power decay envelopes for earthquakes at Mount St. Helens recorded before, during, and after an eruption that took place during September 3--6, 1981, we found that coda Q/sup -1/ for frequencies between 6 and 30 Hz was 20--30% higher before the eruption than after. The change is attributed to an increase in the density of open microcracks in the rock associated with inflation of the volcano prior to the eruption. Q/sup -1/ was found to be only weakly dependent on frequency and displayed a slight peak near 10 Hz. The weak frequency dependence is attributed to the dominance of intrinsic attenuation over scattering attenuation, since it is generally accepted that intrinsic attenuation is constant with frequency, whereas scattering attenuation decreases strongly at higher frequencies. The weak frequency dependence of Q/sup -1/ at Mount St. Helens contrasts with results reported for studies in nonvolcanic regions. The peak in Q/sup -1/ near 10 Hz at Mount St. Helens is attributed to the scale length of heterogeneity responsible for generating backscattered waves. Results for nonvolcanic regions have shown this peak to occur near 0.5 Hz. Thus a smaller scale length of heterogeneity is required to explain the 10-Hz peak at Mount St. Helens. copyright American Geophysical Union 1988

  15. Trapped Field Attenuation Characteristics of HTS Bulk Magnet Exposed to External Traveling-Wave Magnetic Field in an HTSLSM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Jianxun; Zheng, Luhai

    Traveling-wave magnetic field generated by a linear motor is a typical AC time-varying field. In order to identify the trapped magnetic flux attenuation characteristics of the high temperature superconducting (HTS) bulk magnet exposed to the external traveling-wave field generated by the primary of a developed HTS linear synchronous motor (HTSLSM), relevant experiments have been carried out through a built measurement system. As results, the relationships between the trapped magnetic flux attenuation of the HTS bulk magnet and the amplitude, frequency and direction of the external traveling-wave magnetic field are experimentally obtained to allow the HTSLSM characteristics to be practically verified.

  16. Seismic-wave attenuation associated with crustal faults in the New Madrid seismic zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hamilton, R.M.; Mooney, W.D.

    1990-01-01

    The attenuation of upper crustal seismic waves that are refracted with a velocity of about 6 kilometers per second varies greatly among profiles in the area of the New Madrid seismic zone in the central Mississippi Valley. The waves that have the strongest attenuation pass through the seismic trend along the axis of the Reelfoot rift in the area of the Blytheville arch. Defocusing of the waves in a low-velocity zone and/ or seismic scattering and absorption could cause the attenuation; these effects are most likely associated with the highly deformed rocks along the arch. Consequently, strong seismic-wave attenuation may be a useful criterion for identifying seismogenic fault zones.

  17. Wave Velocity Attenuation and Sediment Retention among Different Vegetation Types in a Pacific Northwest Estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemein, T.; Cox, D. T.; Albert, D.; Blackmar, P.

    2012-12-01

    Feedbacks between vegetation, wave climate, and sedimentation create stable ecosystem states within estuaries that provide ecosystem services such as wildlife habitat, erosion control, and pollution filtration. Flume and field studies conducted with cordgrass (Spartina spp.) and sea grasses (Zostera spp., Halodule spp.) have demonstrated that the presence of vegetation reduces wave energy and increases sediment retention. Since the spatial distribution of plant species and the presence of unique plant species differ between estuaries, there is a need to understand how individual plant species, or groups of species with similar morphology, influence wave characteristics and sedimentation. Within Tillamook Bay, Oregon, three species of emergent vascular vegetation species (Carex lyngbyei, Eleocharis sp., Schoenoplectus pungens) and one species of submergent vascular vegetation species (Zostera marina) are present in the high wave energy portion of the estuary at the border of open water and the start of vegetation. These species represent three distinct growth forms (emergent reeds, emergent grasses, submergent grasses) and occur at varying densities relative to each other, as well as within the estuary. Using paired acoustic Doppler velocimeters (ADVs), we quantify the relative attenuation of wave velocity between vegetation types and densities within the estuary and compare these results with published attenuation rates from flume and field studies in different environments. The effect of decreased wave velocity on sediment retention is measured using permanent sediment markers within and outside of vegetation stands and paired with ADV data. Sediment retention is predicted to vary seasonally with seasonal vegetation composition changes and remain constant in unvegetated areas. From this experiment we expect to identify like groups of plant species whose attenuation characteristics are the same, allowing for models of wave-vegetation-sediment interaction to be

  18. ATTENUATION OF REFLECTED WAVES IN MAN DURING RETROGRADE PROPAGATION FROM FEMORAL ARTERY TO PROXIMAL AORTA

    PubMed Central

    Baksi, A John; Davies, Justin E; Hadjiloizou, Nearchos; Baruah, Resham; Unsworth, Beth; Foale, Rodney A; Korolkova, Olga; Siggers, Jennifer H; Francis, Darrel P; Mayet, Jamil; Parker, Kim H; Hughes, Alun D

    2015-01-01

    Background Wave reflection may be an important influence on blood pressure, but the extent to which reflections undergo attenuation during retrograde propagation has not been studied. We quantified retrograde transmission of a reflected wave created by occlusion of the left femoral artery in man. Methods 20 subjects (age 31-83 y; 14 male) underwent invasive measurement of pressure and flow velocity with a sensor-tipped intra-arterial wire at multiple locations distal to the proximal aorta before, during and following occlusion of the left femoral artery by thigh cuff inflation. A numerical model of the circulation was also used to predict reflected wave transmission. Wave reflection was measured as the ratio of backward to forward wave energy (WRI) and the ratio of peak backward to forward pressure (Pb/Pf). Results Cuff inflation caused a marked reflection which was largest 5-10cm from the cuff (change (Δ) in WRI = 0.50 (95% CI 0.38, 0.62); p<0.001, ΔPb/Pf = 0.23 (0.18 - 0.29); p<0.001). The magnitude of the cuff-induced reflection decreased progressively at more proximal locations and was barely discernible at sites >40cm from the cuff including in the proximal aorta. Numerical modelling gave similar predictions to those observed experimentally. Conclusions Reflections due to femoral artery occlusion are markedly attenuated by the time they reach the proximal aorta. This is due to impedance mismatches of bifurcations traversed in the backward direction. This degree of attenuation is inconsistent with the idea of a large discrete reflected wave arising from the lower limb and propagating back into the aorta. PMID:26436672

  19. Laboratory Measurements of Velocity and Attenuation in Sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmer, M A; Berge, P A; Bonner, B P; Prasad, M

    2004-06-08

    Laboratory measurements are required to establish relationships between the physical properties of unconsolidated sediments and P- and S-wave propagation through them. Previous work has either focused on measurements of compressional wave properties at depths greater than 500 m for oil industry applications or on measurements of dynamic shear properties at pressures corresponding to depths of less than 50 m for geotechnical applications. Therefore, the effects of lithology, fluid saturation, and compaction on impedance and P- and S-wave velocities of shallow soils are largely unknown. We describe two state-of-the-art laboratory experiments. One setup allows us to measure ultrasonic P-wave velocities at very low pressures in unconsolidated sediments (up to 0.1 MPa). The other experiment allows P- and S-wave velocity measurements at low to medium pressures (up to 20 MPa). We summarize the main velocity and attenuation results on sands and sand - clay mixtures under partially saturated and fully saturated conditions in two ranges of pressures (0 - 0.1 MPa and 0.1 - 20 MPa) representative of the top few meters and the top 1 km, respectively. Under hydrostatic pressures of 0.1 to 20 MPa, our measurements demonstrate a P- and S-wave velocity-dependence in dry sands around a fourth root (0.23 -0.26) with the pressure dependence for S-waves being slightly lower. The P- velocity-dependence in wet sands lies around 0.4. The Vp-Vs and the Qp-Qs ratios together can be useful tools to distinguish between different lithologies and between pressure and saturation effects. These experimental velocities at the frequency of measurement (200 kHz) are slightly higher that Gassmann's static result. For low pressures under uniaxial stress, Vp and Vs were a few hundred meters per second with velocities showing a strong dependence on packing, clay content, and microstructure. We provide a typical shallow soil scenario in a clean sand environment and reconstruct the velocity profile of

  20. Attenuation of High-Frequency Seismic Waves in Eastern Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahood, M.

    2014-09-01

    We investigated the frequency-dependent attenuation of the crust in Eastern Iran by analysis data from 132 local earthquakes having focal depths in the range of 5-25 km. We estimated the quality factor of coda waves ( Q c) and body waves ( Q p and Q s) in the frequency band of 1.5-24 Hz by applying the single backscattering theory of S-coda envelopes and the extended coda-normalization method, respectively. Considering records from recent earthquakes (Rigan M w 6.5, 2010/12/20, Goharan M w 6.2, 2013/5/11 and Sirch M w 5.5, 2013/1/21), the estimated values of Q c, Q p and Q s vary from 151 ± 49, 63 ± 6, and 93 ± 14 at 1.5 Hz to 1,994 ± 124, 945 ± 84 and 1,520 ± 123 at 24 Hz, respectively. The average frequency-dependent relationships ( Q = Q o f n ) estimated for the region are Q c = (108 ± 10) f (0.96±0.01), Q p = (50 ± 5) f (1.01±0.04), and Q s = (75 ± 6) f (1.03±0.06). These results evidenced a frequency dependence of the quality factors Q c, Q p, and Q s, as commonly observed in tectonically active zones characterized by a high degree of heterogeneity, and the low value of Q indicated an attenuative crust beneath the entire region.

  1. Attenuative body wave dispersion at La Cerdanya, eastern Pyrenees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Correig, Antoni M.; Mitchell, Brian J.

    1989-11-01

    Coda- Q for P- and S-waves has been measured from digitally recorded events occurring in the La Cerdanya region of the eastern Pyrenees. Interpreted in terms of a power law, Q( f) = Q0fη, Q-coda for P-waves is characterized by Q0 = 14 and η = 1.07, and S-waves by Q0 = 14 and η = 1.13. Using a generalization of a model due to Dainty (1981), we obtain a Q model for S-waves in which intrinsic- Q is 23, the frequency dependence (ζ) of intrinsic- Q is 1.17, and the turbidity factor is 0.051. Interpreted in terms of a continuous relaxation model, where Qm is minimum Q, and τ1 and τ2 are high- and low-frequency cutoffs, respectively, the values of the parameters are Qm = 5 and τ1 = 0.37 when τ2 is assumed to be 10 000. Body wave dispersion, as computed from the differences in arrival times of the wave filtered at 3, 6, 12 and 24 Hz relative to that at 6 Hz has been measured and found to range from 0.067 at 3 Hz to -0.075 at 24 Hz. This dispersion constrains τ2 to be 43.

  2. Seismic‐wave attenuation determined from tectonic tremor in multiple subduction zones

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yabe, Suguru; Baltay, Annemarie S.; Ide, Satoshi; Beroza, Gregory C.

    2014-01-01

    Tectonic tremor provides a new source of observations that can be used to constrain the seismic attenuation parameter for ground‐motion prediction and hazard mapping. Traditionally, recorded earthquakes of magnitude ∼3–8 are used to develop ground‐motion prediction equations; however, typical earthquake records may be sparse in areas of high hazard. In this study, we constrain the distance decay of seismic waves using measurements of the amplitude decay of tectonic tremor, which is plentiful in some regions. Tectonic tremor occurs in the frequency band of interest for ground‐motion prediction (i.e., ∼2–8  Hz) and is located on the subducting plate interface, at the lower boundary of where future large earthquakes are expected. We empirically fit the distance decay of peak ground velocity from tremor to determine the attenuation parameter in four subduction zones: Nankai, Japan; Cascadia, United States–Canada; Jalisco, Mexico; and southern Chile. With the large amount of data available from tremor, we show that in the upper plate, the lower crust is less attenuating than the upper crust. We apply the same analysis to intraslab events in Nankai and show the possibility that waves traveling from deeper intraslab events experience more attenuation than those from the shallower tremor due to ray paths that pass through the subducting and highly attenuating oceanic crust. This suggests that high pore‐fluid pressure is present in the tremor source region. These differences imply that the attenuation parameter determined from intraslab earthquakes may underestimate ground motion for future large earthquakes on the plate interface.

  3. Surface wave tomography with USArray based on phase front tracking and amplitude mapping: isotropic, anisotropic, and intrinsic attenuation structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, F.; Ritzwoller, M. H.

    2011-12-01

    The deployment of the EarthScope/USArray Transportable Array has promoted new and better ways to utilize the dense array configuration and to resolve higher resolution crustal and upper mantle structures beneath the US. Here, we present a local inversion method for surface wave that utilizes the USArray first to determine the surface wave wavefield empirically and then to directly measure the surface wave propagation characteristics such as isotropic velocity, azimuthal anisotropy, and intrinsic attenuation by solving the 2D Helmholtz wave equation. The method starts with single event analysis, where for each period and earthquake all measurements across the array are aggregated to determine maps of phase travel time and amplitude on a fine spatial grid, which essentially describes the surface wave wavefield. The solution of the 2D wave equation contains real and imaginary parts, which are relevant to velocity and attenuation measurements, respectively. For the real part, directionally dependent phase velocities at each location are estimated from the gradient of phase travel time along with the Laplacian of amplitude. For the imaginary part, on the other hand, intrinsic attenuation at each location is estimated from the dot product of the gradients of phase travel time and amplitude along with the Laplacian of phase travel time. In both cases, the terms that contain the gradient operator are directly related to traditional ray theoretic approaches (e.g., eikonal equation for velocity measurement) whereas the terms involving the Laplacian operator provide corrections for off-ray sensitivity. In principle, by applying the correction terms, finite frequency effects such as wave interference, wavefront healing, and backward scattering are accounted for in phase velocity measurements and focus/defocusing is accounted for in attenuation measurements. We apply the method to Rayleigh wave measurements between 30 and 100 sec period from more than 700 earthquakes and all

  4. Imaging the attenuation structure beneath the northwestern margin of Colorado Plateau: Integrating seismic body-wave observations and forward modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellis, C.; Lin, P.; Holtzman, B. K.; Gaherty, J. B.; Roy, M.

    2013-12-01

    The upper mantle beneath the Colorado Plateau (CP) is characterized by high seismic velocities in the plateau interior and lower seismic velocities beneath the plateau margins, below the Basin and Range to the west and the Rio Grande Rift to the east. The seismic velocity contrast across the margins has been interpreted as a thermal- mechanical modification of the sub-CP lithospheric keel, by various mechanisms. Using teleseismic P- and S-wave spectra from the La Ristra 1.5 Array and EarthScope USArray Transportable Array (TA), we measure t*, the seismic parameter representing integrated attenuation along a ray path, across the western margin of the CP. For wave fields from two sets of earthquakes to the Northwest and Southeast of the CP, we measured the spectra of P- and S-waves at each station, relative to the spectra of the reference stations and extracted the differential attenuation factor (dt*) across the frequency band 0.2-4 Hz for P waves and 0.1-1.5 Hz for S waves for each event-station pair. To first order, both tp* and ts* varies from higher in the Basin and Range to lower on the CP, which suggests that coherent variations in attenuation are present across the Northwestern margin of the CP. However, the gradients of dt* for the two sets of NW and SE wave fields are significantly different, with a sharper gradient observed for the NW set. One of our primary questions concerns the origin of these variations: to what extent do they reflect the spatial distribution of intrinsic attenuation structure or wave propagation effects such as focusing and defocusing. To address these questions, our approach is to first build 1- and 2-D models for hypothetical spatial variations in state and compositional variables (T, water and melt content), and then calculate attenuation structures based on experimentally derived power-law frequency-dependent anelastic models. These structures are transferred into our anelastic finite difference wave propagation code, from which

  5. Attenuation at low seismic frequencies in partially saturated rocks: Measurements and description of a new apparatus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tisato, Nicola; Madonna, Claudio

    2012-11-01

    Wave attenuation at low seismic frequencies (0.1-100 Hz) in the earth crust has been explained by stress-induced fluid flow in partially saturated porous media. We present the pressure vessel called Broad Band Attenuation Vessel (BBAV) and two series of attenuation (QE- 1) measurements conducted on Berea sandstone. The BBAV employs the sub-resonance method to measure seismic wave attenuation in the frequency range from 0.01 to 100 Hz, under confining pressure up to 25 MPa and generating a bulk strain around 10- 6 in a cylindrical sample with maximum size of 76 mm in diameter and 250 mm in length. The BBAV has been successfully designed, built and tested. The calibrations obtained with aluminum (EN AW-6082) and Polymethyl-methacrylate (PMMA or Plexiglas) agree with literature values. Two 20% porosity and 1.97 × 10- 13 - 9.87 × 10- 13 m2 permeability Berea sandstone samples were tested. The stress conditions were: i) unconfined, ii) confined at 2 MPa and iii) confined at 15 MPa. Dry samples exhibited always attenuation around 0.01, while saturated samples exhibited attenuation between 0.01 and 0.04. Attenuation values in ≥ 60% water saturated samples were frequency-dependent only for confining pressures ≤ 2 MPa. One explanation to this observation, which requires more experiments to be established, is that for confining pressures > 10 MPa the microcracks in the sample would be closed, impeding attenuation related to squirt flow.

  6. Blast wave attenuation by lightly destructable granular materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golub, V. V.; Lu, F. K.; Medin, S. A.; Mirova, O. A.; Parshikov, A. N.; Petukhov, V. A.; Volodin, V. V.

    Terrorist bombings are a dismal reality nowadays. One of the most effective ways for protection against blast overpressure is the use of lightly compacted materials such as sand [1] and aqueous foam [2] as a protective envelope or barrier. According to [1], shock wave attenuation in a mine tunnel (one-dimensional case) behind a destroyed object is given by q_e ≈ q {1}/{1 + 4(S/q)^{1/6} bρ _{mat} /L^{1/3} }where qe — effective charge, S — exposed area of the obstacle, q — TNT equivalent (grams), L — distance between charge and obstacle, b — obstacle thickness and ρ mat — material density. This empirical equation is applicable only in a one-dimensional case but not for a less confined environment. Another way of protecting a structure against blast is to coat the surface with a sacrificial layer. In [3] full-scale experiments were carried out to investigate the behaviour of a covering of aluminum foam under the effect of a blast wave.

  7. Attenuation and velocity structure from diffuse coda waves: Constraints from underground array data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galluzzo, Danilo; La Rocca, Mario; Margerin, Ludovic; Del Pezzo, Edoardo; Scarpa, Roberto

    2015-03-01

    An analysis of coda waves excited in the 0.2-20 Hz frequency band and recorded by the underground array Underseis (central Italy) has been performed to constrain both seismic attenuation at regional scale and velocity structure in the Mount Gran Sasso area. Attenuation was estimated with the MLTWA method, and shows a predominance of scattering phenomena over intrinsic absorption. The values of Qi and Qs are compatible with other estimates obtained in similar tectonic environments. Array methods allowed for a detailed study of the propagation characteristics, demonstrating that earthquake coda at frequencies greater than about 6 Hz is composed of only body waves. Coherence and spectral characteristics of seismic waves measured along the coda of local and regional earthquakes indicate that the wavefield becomes fully diffuse only in the late coda. The frequency-dependent energy partitioning between horizontal and vertical components has been also estimated and compared with synthetic values computed in a layered half-space under the diffuse field assumption. This comparison confirms that, for frequencies higher than 6 Hz, the coda appears as a sum of body waves coming from all directions while, in the low frequency range (0.2-2 Hz), the observations can be well explained by a coda wavefield composed of an equipartition mixture of surface and body waves traveling in a multiple-layered medium. A Monte-Carlo inversion has been performed to obtain a set of acceptable velocity models of the upper crust. The present results show that a broadband coda wavefield recorded in an underground environment is useful to constrain both the regional attenuation and the velocity structure of the target area, thereby complementing the results of classical array analysis of the wavefield.

  8. Apparent Attenuation and Dispersion Arising in Seismic Body-Wave Velocity Retrieval

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wirgin, Armand

    2016-04-01

    The fact that seismologists often make measurements, using natural seismic solicitations, of properties of the Earth on rather large scales (laterally and in terms of depth) has led to interrogations as to whether attenuation of body waves is dispersive and even significant. The present study, whose aim is to clarify these complicated issues, via a controlled thought measurement, concerns the retrieval of a single, real body wave velocity of a simple geophysical configuration (involving two homogeneous, isotropic, non-dissipative media, one occupying the layer, the other the substratum), from its simulated response to pulsed plane wave probe radiation. This inverse problem is solved, at all frequencies within the bandwidth of the pulse. Due to discordance between the models associated with the assumed and trial responses, the imaginary part of the retrieved velocity turns out to be non-nil even when both the layer and substratum are non-lossy, and, in fact, to be all the greater, the larger is the discordance. The reason for this cannot be due to intrinsic attenuation, scattering, or geometrical spreading since these phenomena are absent in the chosen thought experiment, but rather to uncertainty in the measurement model.

  9. Apparent Attenuation and Dispersion Arising in Seismic Body-Wave Velocity Retrieval

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wirgin, Armand

    2016-07-01

    The fact that seismologists often make measurements, using natural seismic solicitations, of properties of the Earth on rather large scales (laterally and in terms of depth) has led to interrogations as to whether attenuation of body waves is dispersive and even significant. The present study, whose aim is to clarify these complicated issues, via a controlled thought measurement, concerns the retrieval of a single, real body wave velocity of a simple geophysical configuration (involving two homogeneous, isotropic, non-dissipative media, one occupying the layer, the other the substratum), from its simulated response to pulsed plane wave probe radiation. This inverse problem is solved, at all frequencies within the bandwidth of the pulse. Due to discordance between the models associated with the assumed and trial responses, the imaginary part of the retrieved velocity turns out to be non-nil even when both the layer and substratum are non-lossy, and, in fact, to be all the greater, the larger is the discordance. The reason for this cannot be due to intrinsic attenuation, scattering, or geometrical spreading since these phenomena are absent in the chosen thought experiment, but rather to uncertainty in the measurement model.

  10. Transmission, attenuation and reflection of shear waves in the human brain.

    PubMed

    Clayton, Erik H; Genin, Guy M; Bayly, Philip V

    2012-11-01

    Traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) are caused by acceleration of the skull or exposure to explosive blast, but the processes by which mechanical loads lead to neurological injury remain poorly understood. We adapted motion-sensitive magnetic resonance imaging methods to measure the motion of the human brain in vivo as the skull was exposed to harmonic pressure excitation (45, 60 and 80 Hz). We analysed displacement fields to quantify the transmission, attenuation and reflection of distortional (shear) waves as well as viscoelastic material properties. Results suggest that internal membranes, such as the falx cerebri and the tentorium cerebelli, play a key role in reflecting and focusing shear waves within the brain. The skull acts as a low-pass filter over the range of frequencies studied. Transmissibility of pressure waves through the skull decreases and shear wave attenuation increases with increasing frequency. The skull and brain function mechanically as an integral structure that insulates internal anatomic features; these results are valuable for building and validating mathematical models of this complex and important structural system. PMID:22675163

  11. Toward improving global attenuation models: Interpreting surface-wave amplitudes with approximate theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalton, C. A.; Hjorleifsdottir, V.; Ekstrom, G.

    2011-12-01

    Surface-wave amplitudes provide the primary constraint on upper-mantle anelastic structure and are also sensitive to small-scale elastic structure through focusing effects. However, the use of amplitudes for seismic imaging presents several challenges. One, amplitudes are affected not only by propagation through anelastic and elastic heterogeneity but also by uncertainty in the source excitation, local receiver structure, and instrument response. Two, accounting for focusing and defocusing effects, which is important if amplitudes are to be used to study anelasticity, depends considerably on the chosen theoretical treatment. Three, multiple scattering of seismic energy by elastic heterogeneity can be mapped into attenuation, especially at high frequencies. With the objective of improving our ability to image mantle seismic attenuation using real amplitude observations, we investigate how approximations in the theoretical treatment of wave excitation and propagation influence the interpretation of amplitudes. We use a spectral-element wave-propagation solver (SPECFEM3D_GLOBE) to generate accurate seismograms for global Earth models containing one-dimensional attenuation structure and three-dimensional variations in seismic velocity. The seismograms are calculated for 42 realistically distributed earthquakes. Fundamental-mode Rayleigh wave amplitudes in the period range 50--200 seconds are measured using the approach of Ekström et al. (1997), for which PREM is the assumed Earth model. We show that using the appropriate local seismic structure at the source and receiver instead of PREM has a non-negligible effect on the amplitudes and improves their interpretation. The amplitudes due to focusing and defocusing effects are predicted for great-circle ray theory, exact ray theory (JWKB theory), and finite-frequency theory. We assess the ability of each theory to predict amplitudes that agree with those measured from the SPECFEM synthetics for an Earth model that

  12. Flame attenuation effects on surface temperature measurements using IR thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Vries, Jaap; Tabinowski, Robert

    2016-05-01

    Long-wave infrared (LWIR) cameras provide the unique ability to see through smoke and condensed water vapor. However, soot generated inside the flame does attenuate the LWIR signal. This work focuses on gas flame attenuation effects of LWIR signals originating from a blackbody. The experimental setup consists of time averaged, laboratory-scale turbulent diffusion flames with heat release rates set at 5 kW, 10 kW, and 15 kW. Propylene and ethylene were used as fuel, providing two different soot yields. A 30 cm by 30 cm blackbody was used with maximum surface temperatures set to 600°C. Both instantaneous and time-averaged blackbody temperature profiles through the flame were measured using a LWIR microbolometer camera (7.5-14 μm). Flame intermittency was quantified by color segmenting visible images. The experiments showed that low blackbody temperatures were significantly affected by the presence of the flame. At 600°C, the effect of flame absorption matches the emitted radiation from the flame itself. Using data obtained at various blackbody temperatures, the flame transmittance was obtained using a Generalized Reduced Gradient optimization method. The transmittance was lower for propylene flames compared to ethylene flames. Ethylene flames were shown to have higher temperatures. Using the values for flame radiance and transmissivity, the total averaged radiance of the flame plus the blackbody could be reproduced with 1% accuracy.

  13. Stress wave attenuation in thin structures by ultrasonic through-transmission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, S. S.; Williams, J. H., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    The steady state amplitude of the output of an ultrasonic through transmission measurement is analyzed and the result is given in closed form. Provided that the product of the input and output transduction ratios; the specimen-transducer reflection coefficient; the specimen-transducer phase shift parameter; and the material phase velocity are known, this analysis gives a means for determining the through-thickness attenuation of an individual thin sample. Multiple stress wave reflections are taken into account and so signal echoes do not represent a difficulty. An example is presented for a graphite fiber epoxy composite (Hercules AS/3501-6). A direct method for continuous or intermittent monitoring of through thickness attenuation of plate structures which may be subject to service structural degradation is provided.

  14. Stress-wave attenuation in thin structures by ultrasonic through-transmission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, S. S.; Williams, J. H., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    The steady-state amplitude of the output of an ultrasonic through-transmission measurement is analyzed and the result is given in closed form. Provided that the product of the input and output transduction ratios, the specimen-transducer reflection coefficient, the specimen-transducer phase-shift parameter, and the material phase velocity are known, this analysis gives a means for determining the through-thickness attenuation of an individual thin sample. Multiple stress-wave reflections are taken into account, and so signal echoes do not represent a difficulty. An example is presented for a graphite fiber epoxy composite (Hercules AS/3501-6). Thus, the technique provides a direct method for continuous or intermittent monitoring of through-thickness attenuation of plate structures which may be subject to service structural degradation.

  15. Subduction zone guided waves: 3D modelling and attenuation effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garth, T.; Rietbrock, A.

    2013-12-01

    Waveform modelling is an important tool for understanding complex seismic structures such as subduction zone waveguides. These structures are often simplified to 2D structures for modelling purposes to reduce computational costs. In the case of subduction zone waveguide affects, 2D models have shown that dispersed arrivals are caused by a low velocity waveguide, inferred to be subducted oceanic crust and/or hydrated outer rise normal faults. However, due to the 2D modelling limitations the inferred seismic properties such as velocity contrast and waveguide thickness are still debated. Here we test these limitations with full 3D waveform modelling. For waveguide effects to be observable the waveform must be accurately modelled to relatively high frequencies (> 2 Hz). This requires a small grid spacing due to the high seismic velocities present in subduction zones. A large area must be modelled as well due to the long propagation distances (400 - 600 km) of waves interacting with subduction zone waveguides. The combination of the large model area and small grid spacing required means that these simulations require a large amount of computational resources, only available at high performance computational centres like the UK National super computer HECTOR (used in this study). To minimize the cost of modelling for such a large area, the width of the model area perpendicular to the subduction trench (the y-direction) is made as small as possible. This reduces the overall volume of the 3D model domain. Therefore the wave field is simulated in a model ';corridor' of the subduction zone velocity structure. This introduces new potential sources of error particularly from grazing wave side reflections in the y-direction. Various dampening methods are explored to reduce these grazing side reflections, including perfectly matched layers (PML) and more traditional exponential dampening layers. Defining a corridor model allows waveguide affects to be modelled up to at least 2

  16. A New Approach for Quantitative Evaluation of Ultrasonic Wave Attenuation in Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Qing-Qing; Li, Ran; Xia, Hong

    2016-06-01

    When ultrasonic waves propagate in composite materials, the propagation behaviors result from the combination effects of various factors, such as material anisotropy and viscoelastic property, internal microstructure and defects, incident wave characteristics and interface condition between composite components. It is essential to make it clear how these factors affect the ultrasonic wave propagation and attenuation characteristics, and how they mutually interact on each other. In the present paper, based on a newly developed time-domain finite element analysis code, PZflex, a unique approach for clarifying the detailed influence mechanism of aforementioned factors is proposed, in which each attenuation component can be extracted from the overall attenuation and analyzed respectively. By taking into consideration the interrelation between each individual attenuation component, the variation behaviors of each component and internal dynamic stress distribution against material anisotropy and matrix viscosity are separately and quantitatively evaluated. From the detailed analysis results of each attenuation component, the energy dissipation at interface is a major component in ultrasonic wave attenuation characteristics, which can provide a maximum contribution rate of 68.2 % to the overall attenuation, and each attenuation component is closely related to the material anisotropy and viscoelasticity. The results clarify the correlation between ultrasonic wave propagation characteristics and material viscoelastic properties, which will be useful in the further development of ultrasonic technology in defect detection.

  17. Wave attenuation and sediment transport over an intertidal sand flat on the Fraser River Delta (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houser, C.; Hill, P. R.

    2010-12-01

    This paper describes the results of two instrument field studies to examine sediment transport processes and wave attenuation across Roberts Bank, a sandy intertidal bank on the Fraser River Delta. The field work was completed as part of a three-year study of the sensitivity of Roberts Bank to sea level rise and changing storminess. It was hypothesized that the response of the mudflats and salt marshes along the landward margin of the delta were dependent on the ability of the fronting sand flat to attenuate wave height and energy. The attenuation of wave height and energy was monitored at four stations along a shore-normal transect between December 23, 2003 and February 10, 2004. The attenuation varied with the relative wave height ratio (Hs h-1) along the seaward margin, with dissipation increasing as water depths decrease and/or incident wave heights increase. Under the most dissipative conditions observed (Hs h-1 ≈ 0.25), the exponential decay coefficient reached 0.00045. This decay coefficient is an order of magnitude smaller than predicted by a simple wave transformation model due to the relatively large wind fetch over the sand flat. Despite the maintenance of wave energy, the range of wave heights remains constrained in the landward direction, with the frequency of waves capable of entraining sediment on the sand flat decreasing from 11% at the outer flat to 2% at the inner stations. In response, bed elevation change and depth of sediment activation are greatest at the seaward margin and decrease exponentially landward. It is argued that the sand flat provides a natural barrier that defines the extent of mudflat development by limiting the potential for sediment resuspension and morphological change on the mudflat. The ability of the sand flat to provide continued protection to the mudflats and salt marshes depends on how it will respond to change in sea level and storminess. A comparison of the dimensionless, current-induced skin friction with the

  18. Measurements of spectral attenuation coefficients in the lower Chesapeake Bay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houghton, W. M.

    1983-01-01

    The spectral transmission was measured for water samples taken in the lower Chesapeake Bay to allow characterization of several optical properties. The coefficients of total attenuation, particle attenuation, and absorption by dissolved organic matter were determined over a wavelength range from 3500 A to 8000 A. The data were taken over a 3 year period and at a number of sites so that an indication of spatial and temporal variations could be obtained. The attenuations determined in this work are, on the average, 10 times greater than those obtained by Hulburt in 1944, which are commonly accepted in the literature for Chesapeake Bay attenuation.

  19. Attenuation of P-Waves by Wave-Induced Fluid Flow

    SciTech Connect

    Pride, S R; Berryman, J G

    2002-03-29

    Analytical expressions for three P-wave attenuation mechanisms in rocks are given and numerically-compared. The mechanisms are: (1) Biot loss, in which flow occurs at the scale of the wavelength between the peaks and troughs of a P wave; (2) squirt loss, in which flow occurs at the grain scale between microcracks the grains and the adjacent pores; and (3) mesoscopic loss, in which flow occurs at intermediate scales between the various lithological bodies that are present in an averaging volume of earth material. Each mechanism is of importance over different frequency bands. Typically, Biot loss is only important at the highest of ultrasonic frequencies (> 1 MHz), squirt-loss (when it occurs) is important in the range of 10 kHz to 1 MHz, while mesoscale loss dominates at the lower frequencies (<10 kHz) employed in seismology.

  20. Numerical and Experimental Investigation on the Attenuation of Electromagnetic Waves in Unmagnetized Plasmas Using Inductively Coupled Plasma Actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Min; Xu, Haojun; Wei, Xiaolong; Liang, Hua; Song, Huimin; Sun, Quan; Zhang, Yanhua

    2015-10-01

    The attenuation of electromagnetic (EM) waves in unmagnetized plasma generated by an inductively coupled plasma (ICP) actuator has been investigated both theoretically and experimentally. A numerical study is conducted to investigate the propagation of EM waves in multilayer plasma structures which cover a square flat plate. Experimentally, an ICP actuator with dimensions of 20 cm×20 cm×4 cm is designed to produce a steady plasma slab. The attenuation of EM waves in the plasma generated by the ICP actuator is measured by a reflectivity arch test method at incident waves of 2.3 GHz and 10.1 GHz, respectively. A contrastive analysis of calculated and measured results of these incident wave frequencies is presented, which suggests that the experiment accords well with our theory. As expected, the plasma slab generated by the ICP actuator can effectively attenuate the EM waves, which may have great potential application prospects in aircraft stealth. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 51276197, 11472306 and 11402301)

  1. Investigation of the Attenuation of Plane Shock Waves Moving over very Rough Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huber, Paul W.; McFarland, Donald R.; Levine, Philip

    1953-01-01

    Experimental measurements of the attenuation of plane shock waves moving over rough walls have been made in a shock tube. Measurements of the boundary-layer characteristics, including thickness and velocity distribution behind the shock, have also been made with the aid of new cal techniques which provide direct information on the local boundary-layer conditions at the rough walls. Measurements of shock speed and shock pressure ratio are presented for both smooth-wall and rough-wall flow over lengths of machined-smooth and rough strips which lined all four walls of the shock tube. A simplified theory based on Von Karman's expression for skin-friction coefficient for flow over rough walls, along with a wave-model concept and extensions to include time effects, is presented. In this theory, the shock-tube flow is assumed to be one-dimensional at all times and the wave-model concept is used to relate the local layer growth to decreases in shock strength. This concept assumes that local boundary-layer growths act as local mass-flow sinks, which give rise to expansion waves which, in turn, overtake the shock and lower its mass flow accordingly.

  2. Attenuation of an electromagnetic wave by charged dust particles in a sandstorm.

    PubMed

    Xie, Li; Li, Xingcai; Zheng, Xiaojing

    2010-12-10

    We calculate the light scattering properties of the partially charged dust particles with the Mie theory for electromagnetic waves with different frequencies, and the attenuation coefficients of an electromagnetic wave propagating in a sandstorm are also calculated. The results show that the electric charges distributed on the sand surface have a significant effect on the attenuation of the electromagnetic wave, especially for a frequency lower than 40 GHz, and attenuation coefficients increase with the magnitude of charges carried by the dust particles (expressed by the charge-to-mass ratio in this paper). For the higher frequency electromagnetic wave, such as visible light, the effect of charges carried by sand particles on its attenuation is very little, which can be ignored. PMID:21151232

  3. Non-destructive Inspection of Chloride Ion in Concrete Structures Using Attenuated Total Reflection of Millimeter Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathi, Saroj R.; Inoue, Hiroo; Hasegawa, Tsuyoshi; Kawase, Kodo

    2013-02-01

    The chloride induced corrosion of reinforcing steel bar is one of the major causes of deterioration of concrete structures. Therefore, it is essential to periodically monitor the level of chloride ion (Cl-) concentration in concrete structures. In this work, we developed millimeter wave attenuated total reflection measurement setup in order to determine the Cl- concentration in concrete structures. We prepared concrete samples with different compositions and varying Cl- concentrations and we measured their attenuated total reflectance at 65 GHz. We observed that the reflectance decreases almost linearly with the increase in Cl- concentration indicating that this technique could be used to inspect the Cl- concentration in concrete structures nondestructively.

  4. A model for strong attenuation and dispersion of seismic P-waves in a partially saturated fractured reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brajanovski, Miroslav; Müller, Tobias M.; Parra, Jorge O.

    2010-08-01

    In this work we interpret the data showing unusually strong velocity dispersion of P-waves (up to 30%) and attenuation in a relatively narrow frequency range. The cross-hole and VSP data were measured in a reservoir, which is in the porous zone of the Silurian Kankakee Limestone Formation formed by vertical fractures within a porous matrix saturated by oil, and gas patches. Such a medium exhibits significant attenuation due to wave-induced fluid flow across the interfaces between different types of inclusions (fractures, fluid patches) and background. Other models of intrinsic attenuation (in particular squirt flow models) cannot explain the amount of observed dispersion when using realistic rock properties. In order to interpret data in a satisfactory way we develop a superposition model for fractured porous rocks accounting also for the patchy saturation effect.

  5. Determination of particle size distributions from acoustic wave propagation measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Spelt, P.D.; Norato, M.A.; Sangani, A.S.; Tavlarides, L.L.

    1999-05-01

    The wave equations for the interior and exterior of the particles are ensemble averaged and combined with an analysis by Allegra and Hawley [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. {bold 51}, 1545 (1972)] for the interaction of a single particle with the incident wave to determine the phase speed and attenuation of sound waves propagating through dilute slurries. The theory is shown to compare very well with the measured attenuation. The inverse problem, i.e., the problem of determining the particle size distribution given the attenuation as a function of frequency, is examined using regularization techniques that have been successful for bubbly liquids. It is shown that, unlike the bubbly liquids, the success of solving the inverse problem is limited since it depends strongly on the nature of particles and the frequency range used in inverse calculations. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  6. Spatial variation of Lg-wave attenuation in the Iberian Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noriega, Raquel; Ugalde, Arantza; Villaseñor, Antonio; José Jurado, María

    2014-05-01

    Within a global context, the Iberian Peninsula is a region where low to moderate (Mw < 5.5) earthquakes occur, most of them at shallow depths (h < 40 km). Seismicity concentrates mainly around the Pyrenean Range, the northwestern part of the peninsula, and the southern deformation zone that includes the Betics, the Alborán Sea and the Gulf of Cádiz. In recent years, considerable improvements in seismic data quality and geographic coverage have been made by the deployment of new permanent and portable broadband seismic stations in the Iberian Peninsula. The dense accumulation of seismic data has allowed us to investigate lateral variation of crustal seismic attenuation to develop the first regional 2D Lg-wave attenuation model for the entire Iberian Peninsula and its frequency dependence. Seismic data used consist of 71 events with magnitudes 3 ≤ mbLg ≤ 5.4 focal depths less than 30 km and epicentral distances from 100 to 1000 km which were recorded by 343 seismic stations between January 2008 and October 2013. To avoid confusion with fundamental-mode Love-wave energy on the transverse components, we only analyzed vertical component recordings. Among all the methods proposed to measure Lg attenuation, we considered the reliable Two-Station Method that allows removing the common source term by taking the ratio of Lg amplitudes recorded at two different stations along the same great-circle path from the same event. It requires, however, strict source-station configuration and dense event and station coverage. The spectral ratios collected over high-quality interstation paths were used to determine 1 Hz Lg Q (Q0) and its frequency dependence η. Then, the lateral variations of the attenuation parameters were mapped using inversion. Lg-wave propagation was found to be inefficient or blocked for most of the paths crossing the Mediterranean Sea, the western Alborán Sea and the Strait of Gibraltar. Our results reflect large variations in Q0 values across the Iberian

  7. BROADBAND ATTENUATION MEASUREMENTS OF PHOSPHOLIPID-SHELLED ULTRASOUND CONTRAST AGENTS

    PubMed Central

    Raymond, Jason L.; Haworth, Kevin J.; Bader, Kenneth B.; Radhakrishnan, Kirthi; Griffin, Joseph K.; Huang, Shao-Ling; McPherson, David D.; Holland, Christy K.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize the frequency-dependent acoustic attenuation of three phospholipid-shelled ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs): Definity, MicroMarker and echogenic liposomes. A broadband through-transmission technique allowed for measurement over 2 to 25 MHz with a single pair of transducers. Viscoelastic shell parameters of the UCAs were estimated using a linearized model developed by N. de Jong, L. Hoff, T. Skotland and N. Bom (Ultrasonics 1992; 30:95–103). The effect of diluent on the attenuation of these UCA suspensions was evaluated by performing attenuation measurements in 0.5% (w/v) bovine serum albumin and whole blood. Changes in attenuation and shell parameters of the UCAs were investigated at room temperature (25°C) and physiologic temperature (37°C). The attenuation of the UCAs diluted in 0.5% (w/v) bovine serum albumin was found to be identical to the attenuation of UCAs in whole blood. For each UCA, attenuation was higher at 37°C than at 25°C, underscoring the importance of conducting characterization studies at physiologic temperature. Echogenic liposomes exhibited a larger increase in attenuation at 37°C versus 25°C than either Definity or MicroMarker. PMID:24262056

  8. Attenuation and distortion of compression waves propagating in very long tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Shinya; Sasa, Daisuke; Aoki, Toshiyuki

    2011-03-01

    A lot of phenomena related to propagating various waves are seen when the high-speed train goes through the tunnel, the gas pipeline is broken due to an accident or the air brake of the wagon operates. For instance, a compression wave generated ahead of a high-speed train entering a tunnel propagates to the tunnel exit and spouts as a micro pressure wave, which causes an exploding sound. In order to estimate the magnitude correctly, the mechanism of the attenuation and distortion of a compression wave propagating along a very long tunnel must be understood and the experimental information on these phenomena is required. An experimental investigation is carried out to clarify the attenuation and distortion of the propagating compression wave in a very long tube. Experimental results show that the strength of a compression wave decreases with distance. The attenuation and distortion of compression waves are affected by the initial waveform of the compression wave and by the unsteady boundary layer induced by the propagating wave. The shape of a compression wave becomes different with the propagating distance; that is, a shock wave appears just head of a wavefront and an overshoot on pressure distribution is observed behind a shock wave due to the transition of the unsteady boundary layer.

  9. A direct measurement of skull attenuation for quantitative SPECT

    SciTech Connect

    Turkington, T.G.; Gilland, D.R.; Jaszczak, R.J.; Greer, K.L.; Coleman, R.E. . Dept. of Radiology); Smith, M.F. . Dept. of Biomedical Engineering)

    1993-08-01

    The attenuation of 140 keV photons was measured in three empty skulls by placing a [sup 99m]Tc line source inside each one and acquiring projection data. These projections were compared to projections of the line source alone to determine the transmission through each point in the skull surrounding the line source. The effective skull thickness was calculated for each point using an assumed dense bone attenuation coefficient. The relative attenuation for this thickness of bone was compared to that of an equivalent amount of soft tissue to evaluate the increased attenuation of photons in brain SPECT relative to a uniform soft tissue approximation. For the skull regions surrounding most of the brain, the effective bone thickness varied considerably, but was generally less than 6 mm, resulting in a relative attenuation increases of less than 6%.

  10. Wave attenuation and mode dispersion in a waveguide coated with lossy dielectric material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, C. S.; Chuang, S. L.; Lee, S. W.; Lo, Y. T.

    1984-01-01

    The modal attenuation constants in a cylindrical waveguide coated with a lossy dielectric material are studied as functions of frequency, dielectric constant, and thickness of the dielectric layer. A dielectric material best suited for a large attenuation is suggested. Using Kirchhoff's approximation, the field attenuation in a coated waveguide which is illuminated by a normally incident plane wave is also studied. For a circular guide which has a diameter of two wavelengths and is coated with a thin lossy dielectric layer (omega sub r = 9.1 - j2.3, thickness = 3% of the radius), a 3 dB attenuation is achieved within 16 diameters.

  11. Differential shear wave attenuation and its lateral variation in the North Atlantic region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheehan, Anne F.; Solomon, Sean C.

    1992-01-01

    A digital data base of over 150 seismograms and a spectral radio technique are used to measure SS-S differential attenuation in the North Atlantic region. Differential attenuation is positively correlated with SS-S travel time residual, and both differential attentuation and travel time residual decrease with increasing seafloor age. Models are developed for seismic Q in which lateral variations include contributions from the asthenospheric low-Q zone as well as from lithospheric cooling. The Q models obtained under this assumption are in good agreement with those obtained from surface wave studies and are therefore preferred over those models with lateral variations confined to the upper 125 km. Systematic long-wavelength (1000-7000 km) variations in differential attenuation, corrected for seafloor age, are evident along the axis of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. These variations can be qualitatively correlated with long-wavelength variations in SS-S differential travel time residuals and are attributed to along-axis differences in upper mantle temperature.

  12. ORNL system for measurement of telephone-line attenuation

    SciTech Connect

    Rochelle, R.W.; Williams, I.E.

    1988-06-01

    The purpose of modifying the TS-100 Automated Tempest Test System software was to use the equipment for making radio-frequency attenuation measurements between an input port and an output port of a telephone network. One set of tests was performed to simulate the electromagnetic radiation from a secure computer terminal and its coupling to telephone lines within a building. Another set of tests was conducted to determine the procedures for measuring attenuation on telephone lines between buildings that are all within the secure zone. The measurements indicate that attenuation between the terminal and the telephone is a function of many variables; however, attenuation in the cable between the buildings is proportional to the length of the cable between the buildings. 1 ref., 2 figs.

  13. Anomalous shear wave attenuation in the shallow crust beneath the Coso volcanic regionn, California ( USA).

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sanders, C.; Ho-Liu, P.; Rinn, D.; Hiroo, Kanamori

    1988-01-01

    We use seismograms of local earthquakes to image relative shear wave attenuation structure in the shallow crust beneath the region containing the Coso volcanic-geothermal area of E California. Seismograms of 16 small earthquakes show SV amplitudes which are greatly diminished at some azimuths and takeoff angles, indicating strong lateral variations in S wave attenuation in the area. 3-D images of the relative S wave attenuation structure are obtained from forward modeling and a back projection inversion of the amplitude data. The results indicate regions within a 20 by 30 by 10 km volume of the shallow crust (one shallower than 5 km) that severely attenuate SV waves passing through them. These anomalies lie beneath the Indian Wells Valley, 30 km S of the Coso volcanic field, and are coincident with the epicentral locations of recent earthquake swarms. No anomalous attenuation is seen beneath the Coso volcanic field above about 5 km depth. Geologic relations and the coincidence of anomalously slow P wave velocities suggest that the attenuation anomalies may be related to magmatism along the E Sierra front.-from Authors

  14. Seismic tomography of compressional wave attenuation structure for Kı¯lauea Volcano, Hawai`i

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Guoqing; Shearer, Peter M.; Amelung, Falk; Okubo, Paul G.

    2015-04-01

    We present a frequency-independent three-dimensional (3-D) compressional wave attenuation model (indicated by the reciprocal of quality factor Qp) for Kı¯lauea Volcano in Hawai`i. We apply the simul2000 tomographic algorithm to the attenuation operator t* values for the inversion of Qp perturbations through a recent 3-D seismic velocity model and earthquake location catalog. The t* values are measured from amplitude spectra of 26708 P wave arrivals of 1036 events recorded by 61 seismic stations at the Hawaiian Volcanology Observatory. The 3-D Qp model has a uniform horizontal grid spacing of 3 km, and the vertical node intervals range between 2 and 10 km down to 35 km depth. In general, the resolved Qp values increase with depth, and there is a correlation between seismic activity and low-Qp values. The area beneath the summit caldera is dominated by low-Qp anomalies throughout the entire resolved depth range. The Southwest Rift Zone and the East Rift Zone exhibit very high Qp values at about 9 km depth, whereas the shallow depths are characterized with low-Qp anomalies comparable with those in the summit area. The seismic zones and fault systems generally display relatively high Qp values relative to the summit. The newly developed Qp model provides an important complement to the existing velocity models for exploring the magmatic system and evaluating and interpreting intrinsic physical properties of the rocks in the study area.

  15. Dispersion and attenuation of acoustic guided waves in layered fluid-filled porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Parra, J.O.; Xu, P. )

    1994-01-01

    The analysis of acoustic wave propagation in fluid-filled porous media based on Biot and homogenization theories has been adapted to calculate dispersion and attenuation of guided waves trapped in low-velocity layered media. Constitutive relations, the balance equation, and the generalized Darcy law of the modified Biot theory yield a coupled system of differential equations which governs the wave motion in each layer. The displacement and stress fields satisfy the boundary conditions of continuity of displacements and tractions across each interface, and the radiation condition at infinity. To avoid precision problems caused by the growing exponential in individual matrices for large wave numbers, the global matrix method was implemented as an alternative to the traditional propagation approach to determine the periodic equations. The complex wave numbers of the guided wave modes were determined using a combination of two-dimensional bracketing and minimization techniques. The results of this work indicate that the acoustic guided wave attenuation is sensitive to the [ital in] [ital situ] permeability. In particular, the attenuation changes significantly as the [ital in] [ital situ] permeability of the low-velocity layer is varied at the frequency corresponding to the minimum group velocity (Airy phase). Alternatively, the attenuation of the wave modes are practically unaffected by those permeability variations in the layer at the frequency corresponding to the maximum group velocity.

  16. Application of sound-absorbent plastic to weak-shock-wave attenuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ootsuta, Katsuhisa; Matsuoka, Kei; Sasoh, Akihiro; Takayama, Kazuyoshi

    1998-04-01

    A device for attenuating weak shock waves propagating in a duct has been developed utilizing sound-absorbent plastic which is usually used for attenuating sound waves. The device has a tube made of the sound-absorbent plastic installed coaxially to a surrounding metal tube with a clearance between them. The clearance acts as an air layer to enhance the performance of the shock wave attenuation. When a weak shock wave propagates through this device, the pressure gradient of the shock wave is gradually smeared and hence its overpressure is decreased. The performance of the device was examined using a 1/250-scaled train tunnel simulator which simulated the discharge of weak shock waves created by high-speed entry of trains to tunnels. The overpressure of the shock waves ranged up to 5 kPa. The shock wave overpressure was decreased by 90% with the present attenuator attached. This device can be applied to various industrial noise suppressions which are associated with unsteady compressible flows.

  17. Reflective attenuator for high-energy laser measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Lehman, John H.; Livigni, David; Li Xiaoyu; Cromer, Christopher L.; Dowell, Marla L

    2008-06-20

    A high-energy laser attenuator in the range of 250 mJ (20 ns pulse width, 10 Hz repetition rate, 1064 nm wavelength) is described. The optical elements that constitute the attenuator are mirrors with relatively low reflectance, oriented at a 45 deg. angle of incidence. By combining three pairs of mirrors, the incoming radiation is collinear and has the same polarization orientation as the exit. We present damage testing and polarization-dependent reflectance measurements for 1064 nm laser light at 45 deg. angle of incidence for molybdenum, silicon carbide, and copper mirrors. A six element, 74 times (18 dB) attenuator is presented as an example.

  18. Mid frequency shallow water fine-grained sediment attenuation measurements.

    PubMed

    Holland, Charles W; Dosso, Stan E

    2013-07-01

    Attenuation is perhaps the most difficult sediment acoustic property to measure, but arguably one of the most important for predicting passive and active sonar performance. Measurement techniques can be separated into "direct" measurements (e.g., via sediment probes, sediment cores, and laboratory studies on "ideal" sediments) which are typically at high frequencies, O(10(4)-10(5)) Hz, and "indirect" measurements where attenuation is inferred from long-range propagation or reflection data, generally O(10(2)-10(3)) Hz. A frequency gap in measurements exists in the 600-4000 Hz band and also a general acknowledgement that much of the historical measurements on fine-grained sediments have been biased due to a non-negligible silt and sand component. A shallow water measurement technique using long range reverberation is critically explored. An approximate solution derived using energy flux theory shows that the reverberation is very sensitive to depth-integrated attenuation in a fine-grained sediment layer and separable from most other unknown geoacoustic parameters. Simulation using Bayesian methods confirms the theory. Reverberation measurements across a 10 m fine-grained sediment layer yield an attenuation of 0.009 dB/m/kHz with 95% confidence bounds of 0.006-0.013 dB/m/kHz. This is among the lowest values for sediment attenuation reported in shallow water. PMID:23862792

  19. The large-scale influence of the Great Barrier Reef matrix on wave attenuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallop, Shari L.; Young, Ian R.; Ranasinghe, Roshanka; Durrant, Tom H.; Haigh, Ivan D.

    2014-12-01

    Offshore reef systems consist of individual reefs, with spaces in between, which together constitute the reef matrix. This is the first comprehensive, large-scale study, of the influence of an offshore reef system on wave climate and wave transmission. The focus was on the Great Barrier Reef (GBR), Australia, utilizing a 16-yr record of wave height from seven satellite altimeters. Within the GBR matrix, the wave climate is not strongly dependent on reef matrix submergence. This suggests that after initial wave breaking at the seaward edge of the reef matrix, wave energy that penetrates the matrix has little depth modulation. There is no clear evidence to suggest that as reef matrix porosity (ratio of spaces between individual reefs to reef area) decreases, wave attenuation increases. This is because individual reefs cast a wave shadow much larger than the reef itself; thus, a matrix of isolated reefs is remarkably effective at attenuating wave energy. This weak dependence of transmitted wave energy on depth of reef submergence, and reef matrix porosity, is also evident in the lee of the GBR matrix. Here, wave conditions appear to be dependent largely on local wind speed, rather than wave conditions either seaward, or within the reef matrix. This is because the GBR matrix is a very effective wave absorber, irrespective of water depth and reef matrix porosity.

  20. Underdetermined system theory applied to qualitative analysis of response caused by attenuating plane waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sano, Yukio

    1989-05-01

    A qualitative analysis of the mechanical response of rate-dependent media caused by a one-dimensional plane smooth wave front and by a continuous wave front attenuating in the media is performed by an underdetermined system of nonlinear partial differential equations. The analysis reveals that smooth strain, particle velocity, and stress profiles, which the smooth wave front has, are not similar and that the wave front is composed of some partial waves having different properties. The property is represented by a set of strain rate, acceleration, and stress rate. The wave front derived here from the analysis is composed of four different partial waves. The front of the wave front is necessarily a contraction wave in which strain, particle velocity, and stress increase with time, while the rear is a rarefaction wave where they all decrease with time. Between these two wave fronts there are two remaining wave fronts. We call these wave fronts mesocontraction waves I and II. Wave front I is a wave in which stress decreases notwithstanding the increase in strain and particle velocity with time, which is followed by the other, i.e., wave front II, where with time, particle velocity, and stress decrease in spite of the increase in strain. The continuous wave front having continuous and nonsmooth profiles of strain, particle velocity, and stress can also be composed of four waves. These waves possess the same property as the corresponding waves in the smooth wave front mentioned above. The velocities at three boundaries that the waves have are discontinuous. Therefore, these four wave fronts are independent waves, just as a shock wave and a rarefraction wave. Specifically, the front wave, i.e., a contraction wave front is being outrun by a second wave front, the second one is being outrun by a third wave front, and the third is being outrun by a fourth wave front, i.e., a rarefaction wave. We call the second wave front degenerate contraction wave I. We also call the third

  1. Crosswell seismic studies in gas hydrate-bearing sediments: P wave velocity and attenuation tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, K.; Haberland, Ch.; Pratt, R. G.; Ryberg, T.; Weber, M. H.; Mallik Working Group

    2003-04-01

    We present crosswell seismic data from the Mallik 2002 Production Research Well Program, an international research project on Gas Hydrates in the Northwest Territories of Canada. The program participants include 8 partners; The Geological Survey of Canada (GSC), The Japan National Oil Corporation (JNOC), GeoForschungsZentrum Potsdam (GFZ), United States Geological Survey (USGS), United States Department of the Energy (USDOE), India Ministry of Petroleum and Natural Gas (MOPNG)/Gas Authority of India (GAIL) and the Chevron-BP-Burlington joint venture group. The crosswell seismic measurements were carried out by making use of two 1160 m deep observation wells (Mallik 3L-38 and 4L-38) both 45 m from and co-planar with the 1188 m deep production research well (5L-38). A high power piezo-ceramic source was used to generate sweeped signals with frequencies between 100 and 2000 Hz recorded with arrays of 8 hydrophones per depth level. A depth range between 800 and 1150 m was covered, with shot and receiver spacings of 0.75 m. High quality data could be collected during the survey which allow for application of a wide range of crosswell seismic methods. The initial data analysis included suppression of tube wave energy and picking of first arrivals. A damped least-squares algorithm was used to derive P-wave velocities from the travel time data. Next, t* values were derived from the decay of the amplitude spectra, which served as input parameters for a damped least-squares attenuation tomography. The initial results of the P-wave velocity and attenuation tomography reveal significant features reflecting the stratigraphic environment and allow for detection and eventually quantification of gas hydrate bearing sediments. A prominent correlation between P velocity and attenuation was found for the gas hydrate layers. This contradicts to the apparently more meaningful inverse correlation as it was determined for the gas hydrates at the Blake Ridge but supports the results from

  2. Two-dimensional global Rayleigh wave attenuation model by accounting for finite-frequency focusing and defocusing effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Zhitu; Masters, Guy; Mancinelli, Nicholas

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we obtain a set of 2-D global phase velocity and attenuation maps for Rayleigh waves between 5 and 25 mHz. Correcting the effect of focusing-defocusing is crucial in order to obtain reliable attenuation structure. Great circle linearized ray theory, which has been used to date, can give useful predictions of this effect if careful attention is paid to how the phase velocity model is smoothed. In contrast, predictions based on the 2-D finite-frequency kernels are quite robust in this frequency range and suggest that they are better suited as a basis for inversion. We use a large data set of Rayleigh wave phase and amplitude measurements to invert for the phase velocity, attenuation, source and receiver terms simultaneously. Our models provide 60-70 per cent variance reduction to the raw data though the source terms are the biggest contribution to the fit of the data. The attenuation maps show structures that correlate well with surface tectonics and the age progression trend of the attenuation is clearly seen in the ocean basins. We have also identified problematic stations and earthquake sources as a by-product of our data selection process.

  3. A Crustal Fluid Based Interpretation of the Frequency Dependent Shear Wave Attenuation Observed in the Lithosphere Beneath the Kanto Area, Japan.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouleau, P. M.

    2004-05-01

    Seismic attenuation measurements in the band 0.01 - 10 Hz have now been reported for a large number of tectonic areas. For tectonically active regions, the measured attenuation appears higher and more frequency-dependent than for passive regions. It has been hypothesised that such an observation reflects the presence of a high density of fluid-saturated fractures along the paths of the seismic waves used to estimate the attenuation. In order to quantitatively test this hypothesis, both a seismic attenuation data set that spans a large band of frequencies and a quantitative seismic absorption model that involves fluids are needed. This hypothesis is tested here using the set of shear-wave attenuation data reported for the Kanto Area, which shows a clear maximum in attenuation near one Hz, and the squeeze-flow mechanism model (i.e. squirt-flow adapted to the field-based fracture-porosity scale and crustal hydraulic attributes), which predicts well-defined attenuation maxima. The modelling results show that the squeezing of fracture-bound saline fluid produces shear-wave Q values that match the magnitude and frequency dependence of the data-inferred shear-wave Qs. In particular, the depth-distribution of squeeze-flow Qs for the sampled area shows a zone of very high absorption and pronounced frequency dependence that correlates well with a zone of impedance contrast imaged via body wave tomographs reported for the same area. Thus, the squeeze-flow mechanism supports the hypothesis that viscous flow of crustal fluids effectively attenuates high-frequency seismic waves in the crust and so suggests a cause for the shear-wave Q versus frequency trend observed in the Kanto area.

  4. Experimental investigation of wave attenuation through model and live vegetation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hurricanes and tropical storms often cause severe damage and loss of life in coastal areas. It is widely recognized that wetlands along coastal fringes reduce storm surge and waves. Yet, the potential role and primary mechanisms of wave mitigation by wetland vegetation are not fully understood. K...

  5. Rain attenuation measurements: Variability and data quality assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crane, Robert K.

    1989-01-01

    Year to year variations in the cumulative distributions of rain rate or rain attenuation are evident in any of the published measurements for a single propagation path that span a period of several years of observation. These variations must be described by models for the prediction of rain attenuation statistics. Now that a large measurement data base has been assembled by the International Radio Consultative Committee, the information needed to assess variability is available. On the basis of 252 sample cumulative distribution functions for the occurrence of attenuation by rain, the expected year to year variation in attenuation at a fixed probability level in the 0.1 to 0.001 percent of a year range is estimated to be 27 percent. The expected deviation from an attenuation model prediction for a single year of observations is estimated to exceed 33 percent when any of the available global rain climate model are employed to estimate the rain rate statistics. The probability distribution for the variation in attenuation or rain rate at a fixed fraction of a year is lognormal. The lognormal behavior of the variate was used to compile the statistics for variability.

  6. Detailed Study of Seismic Wave Attenuation in Carbonate Rocks: Application on Abu Dhabi Oil Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouchaala, F.; Ali, M. Y.; Matsushima, J.

    2015-12-01

    Seismic wave attenuation is a promising attribute for the petroleum exploration, thanks to its high sensitivity to physical properties of subsurface. It can be used to enhance the seismic imaging and improve the geophysical interpretation which is crucial for reservoir characterization. However getting an accurate attenuation profile is not an easy task, this is due to complex mechanism of this parameter, although that many studies were carried out to understand it. The degree of difficulty increases for the media composed of carbonate rocks, known to be highly heterogeneous and with complex lithology. That is why few attenuation studies were done successfully in carbonate rocks. The main objectives of this study are, Getting an accurate and high resolution attenuation profiles from several oil fields. The resolution is very important target for us, because many reservoirs in Abu Dhabi oil fields are tight.Separation between different modes of wave attenuation (scattering and intrinsic attenuations).Correlation between the attenuation profiles and other logs (Porosity, resistivity, oil saturation…), in order to establish a relationship which can be used to detect the reservoir properties from the attenuation profiles.Comparison of attenuation estimated from VSP and sonic waveforms. Provide spatial distribution of attenuation in Abu Dhabi oil fields.To reach these objectives we implemented a robust processing flow and new methodology to estimate the attenuation from the downgoing waves of the compressional VSP data and waveforms acquired from several wells drilled in Abu Dhabi. The subsurface geology of this area is primarily composed of carbonate rocks and it is known to be highly fractured which complicates more the situation, then we separated successfully the intrinsic attenuation from the scattering. The results show that the scattering is significant and cannot be ignored. We found also a very interesting correlation between the attenuation profiles and the

  7. Regional Body-Wave Attenuation Using a Coda Source Normalization Method: Application to MEDNET Records of Earthquakes in Italy

    SciTech Connect

    Walter, W R; Mayeda, K; Malagnini, L; Scognamiglio, L

    2007-02-01

    We develop a new methodology to determine apparent attenuation for the regional seismic phases Pn, Pg, Sn, and Lg using coda-derived source spectra. The local-to-regional coda methodology (Mayeda, 1993; Mayeda and Walter, 1996; Mayeda et al., 2003) is a very stable way to obtain source spectra from sparse networks using as few as one station, even if direct waves are clipped. We develop a two-step process to isolate the frequency-dependent Q. First, we correct the observed direct wave amplitudes for an assumed geometrical spreading. Next, an apparent Q, combining path and site attenuation, is determined from the difference between the spreading-corrected amplitude and the independently determined source spectra derived from the coda methodology. We apply the technique to 50 earthquakes with magnitudes greater than 4.0 in central Italy as recorded by MEDNET broadband stations around the Mediterranean at local-to-regional distances. This is an ideal test region due to its high attenuation, complex propagation, and availability of many moderate sized earthquakes. We find that a power law attenuation of the form Q(f) = Q{sub 0}f{sup Y} fit all the phases quite well over the 0.5 to 8 Hz band. At most stations, the measured apparent Q values are quite repeatable from event to event. Finding the attenuation function in this manner guarantees a close match between inferred source spectra from direct waves and coda techniques. This is important if coda and direct wave amplitudes are to produce consistent seismic results.

  8. Measurement and Modeling of Ultrasonic Attenuation in Aluminum Rolled Plate

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Anxiang; Kim, Hak-Joon; Margetan, Frank; Thompson, R. B.

    2006-03-06

    When fabricating a new set of calibration blocks for Aluminum 7075 plate inspections, it is advantageous that the new blocks have similar ultrasonic attenuation to existing block sets. This allows the new set to qualify under the same ASTM procedures used for older sets. In the course of surveying candidate materials for possible use as calibration blocks, some interesting attenuation results were observed. When a candidate block was cut from a thick section of rolled plate, measured back-wall attenuation values in the rolling or transverse direction were quite sensitive to position in the plate-normal direction. Such variations are presumably tied to microstructural variations within the plate, as revealed by metallography. Some measured attenuation values were found to be in good agreement with predictions of the Stanke-Kino model, while others were not. The measurements and modeling work are reviewed, and additional experiments conducted to clarify certain issues are discussed. Those additional experiments suggest that beam distortion effects, due to microstructure variations within the beam cross-section, are primarily responsible for differences between measured and predicted attenuation values.

  9. Experimental study of the stress effect on attenuation of normally incident P-wave through coal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Junjun; Wang, Enyuan; Chen, Liang; Li, Xuelong; Xu, Zhaoyong; Li, Guoai

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this study is to experimentally investigate the stress effect on normally incident P-wave attenuation through coal specimens. Laboratory tests were carried out using a Split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) system, and a modified method was proposed to determine the quality factor (Q) of P-waves through coal specimens. Larger quality factor denotes less energy attenuated during P-wave propagating through coal. Experimental results indicate that the quality factor and stress (σ) within coal specimens are positively correlated. The P-wave propagation through coal specimens causes crack closure at the beginning of the coal fracture process in SHPB tests, an innovative model was thus proposed to describe the relationship between the crack closure length and the dynamic stress induced by P-wave. Finally, the stress effect on P-wave attenuation through coal was quantitatively represented by a power function Q = a(c-bσ)- 6, and the material constants a, b, and c were determined as 1.227, 1.314, and 0.005, respectively. The results obtained in this study would be helpful for engineers to estimate seismic energy attenuation and coal mass instability in coal mines.

  10. Effects of fracture contact areas on seismic attenuation due to wave-induced fluid flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Germán Rubino, J.; Müller, Tobias M.; Milani, Marco; Holliger, Klaus

    2014-05-01

    Wave-induced fluid flow (WIFF) between fractures and the embedding matrix is considered to be a predominant seismic attenuation mechanism in fractured rocks. That is, due to the strong compressibility contrast between fractures and embedding matrix, seismic waves induce strong fluid pressure gradients, followed by local fluid flow between such regions, which in turn produces significant energy dissipation. Natural fractures can be conceptualized as two surfaces in partial contact, containing very soft and highly permeable material in the inner region. It is known that the characteristics of the fracture contact areas control the mechanical properties of the rock sample, since as the contact area increases, the fracture becomes stiffer. Correspondingly, the detailed characteristics of the contact area of fractures are expected to play a major role in WIFF-related attenuation. To study this topic, we consider a simple model consisting of a horizontal fracture located at the center of a porous rock sample and represented by a number of rectangular cracks of constant height separated by contact areas. The cracks are modelled as highly compliant, porous, and permeable heterogeneities, which are hydraulically connected to the background material. We include a number of rectangular regions of background material separating the cracks, which represent the presence of contact areas of the fracture. In order to estimate the WIFF effects, we apply numerical oscillatory relaxation tests based on the quasi-static poro-elastic equations. The equivalent undrained, complex plane-wave modulus, which allows to estimate seismic attenuation and velocity dispersion for the vertical direction of propagation, is expressed in terms of the imposed displacement and the resulting average vertical stress at the top boundary. In order to explore the effects of the presence of fracture contact areas on WIFF effects, we perform an exhaustive sensitivity analysis considering different

  11. P- and S-wave seismic attenuation for deep natural gas exploration and development

    SciTech Connect

    Walls, Joel; Uden, Richard; Singleton, Scott; Shu, Rone; Mavko, Gary

    2005-04-12

    Using current methods, oil and gas in the subsurface cannot be reliably predicted from seismic data. This causes domestic oil and gas fields to go undiscovered and unexploited, thereby increasing the need to import energy.The general objective of this study was to demonstrate a simple and effective methodology for estimating reservoir properties (gas saturation in particular, but also including lithology, net to gross ratios, and porosity) from seismic attenuation and other attributes using P- and S-waves. Phase I specific technical objectives: Develop Empirical or Theoretical Rock Physics Relations for Qp and Qs; Create P-wave and S-wave Synthetic Seismic Modeling Algorithms with Q; and, Compute P-wave and S-wave Q Attributes from Multi-component Seismic Data. All objectives defined in the Phase I proposal were accomplished. During the course of this project, a new class of seismic analysis was developed based on compressional and shear wave inelastic rock properties (attenuation). This method provides a better link between seismic data and the presence of hydrocarbons. The technique employs both P and S-wave data to better discriminate between attenuation due to hydrocarbons versus energy loss due to other factors such as scattering and geometric spreading. It was demonstrated that P and S attenuation can be computed from well log data and used to generate synthetic seismograms. Rock physics models for P and S attenuation were tested on a well from the Gulf of Mexico. The P- and S-wave Q attributes were computed on multi-component 2D seismic data intersecting this well. These methods generated reasonable results, and most importantly, the Q attributes indicated gas saturation.

  12. A web-based tutorial for ultrasonic attenuation measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margetan, Frank J.; Barnard, Dan; Orman, David; Feygin, Alex; Pavel, Brittney

    2014-02-01

    An ultrasonic attenuation-versus-frequency curve can serve as an "ultrasonic signature" which may be correlated with microstructural properties of interest such as grain size in metals or porosity level in composites. Attenuation also plays a role in ultrasonic inspections and is consequently a key input into many inspection simulation models. A web-based self-tutorial on practical attenuation measurements is under development. The focus is on pulse/echo immersion measurements made using a broadband transducer to deduce attenuation within the transducer's useable bandwidth. Two approaches are considered: one using a calibration specimen having a known attenuation curve, and one without. In the first approach a back-wall (BW) echo in the calibration specimen is compared with a BW echo in the test specimen. In the second approach various BW reverberation echoes in the test specimen are compared with one another or with a front-wall echo. The web-based tutorial incorporates three classes of materials. The first includes written documentation and videos describing the measurement setups, the data-acquisition and analysis procedures, and the underlying models use to analyze the raw UT data. Secondly, general purpose "stand-alone" data-analysis software is supplied that is designed to be used with any ultrasonic inspection system that can output A-scan data as a text file. This includes both FORTRAN software and Excel spreadsheet calculators that accept A-scan text data as inputs. Thirdly, we supply demonstration software where the data acquisition and analysis procedures are integrated with a specific class of commercial ultrasonic test instruments, namely those running UTEX Winpect control software. This paper provides an overview of the measurement methods and tutorial materials. We also present early results from round-robin trials in which selected metal and composite specimens are being sent to participating partners for attenuation measurement.

  13. Laboratory measurements of seismic attenuation in partially saturated rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, Samuel; Tisato, Nicola; Quintal, Beatriz; Holliger, Klaus

    2014-05-01

    Laboratory measurements of seismic attenuation and transient pore fluid pressure are performed on partially saturated Berea sandstone and synthetic borosilicate samples. Various degrees of water (liquid) and nitrogen (gas) saturation are considered. These measurements are carried out at room temperature and under confining pressures varying from ambient conditions up to 25 MPa. The cylindrical samples are 25 cm long and have a diameter of 7.6 cm. In the context of the experimental setup, the solid frames of both the Berea sandstone and the borosilicate samples can be considered homogenous, which in turn allows for isolating and exploring the effects of partial saturation on seismic attenuation. We employ the sub-resonance method, which is based on the application of a time-harmonic vertical stress to the top of the sample and the measurement of the thus resulting strain. For any given frequency, the attenuation is then inferred as the tangent of the phase shift between the applied stress and the observed strain. Using five equally spaced sensors along the central axis of the cylindrical sample, we measure the transient fluid pressure induced by the application of a step-function-type vertical stress to the top of the sample. Both the sensors and the sample are sealed off with the regard to the confining environment. Together with the numerical results from corresponding compressibility tests based on the quasi-static poroelastic equations, these transient fluid pressure measurements are then used to assist the interpretation of the seismic attenuation measurements.

  14. Dynamic aspects of apparent attenuation and wave localization in layered media

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haney, M.M.; Van Wijk, K.

    2008-01-01

    We present a theory for multiply-scattered waves in layered media which takes into account wave interference. The inclusion of interference in the theory leads to a new description of the phenomenon of wave localization and its impact on the apparent attenuation of seismic waves. We use the theory to estimate the localization length at a CO2 sequestration site in New Mexico at sonic frequencies (2 kHz) by performing numerical simulations with a model taken from well logs. Near this frequency, we find a localization length of roughly 180 m, leading to a localization-induced quality factor Q of 360.

  15. Seismic wave attenuation in Israel region estimated from the multiple lapse time window analysis and S-wave coda decay rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meirova, Tatiana; Pinsky, Vladimir

    2014-04-01

    For the first time, a regional seismic attenuation for the Israel region is quantitatively estimated as a combination of intrinsic and scattering attenuations. We use a multiple lapse time windows analysis (MLTWA) to determinate the relative contributions of intrinsic absorption and scattering processes to the total regional attenuation in the crust. A single isotropic scattering model assuming a uniform half-space lithosphere is used to fit MLTWA predicted and measured energies from the records of 232 regional earthquakes recorded at 17 short-period and 5 broad-band local seismic stations. Analysis is performed for a set of 10 frequencies between 0.5 and 10 Hz. The frequency-dependent quality factor Q obtained by MLTWA ranges between Q = 77f0.96 in the Northern Israel and Q = 132f0.96 in Southern Israel. Independent estimates of regional coda Q value based on S-wave coda decay rate obtained by averaging of five broad-band Israel Seismic Network stations are approximated by the relation Qc = 126f1.05. As a whole, our findings indicate that in the Israel region, intrinsic absorption prevails over scattering attenuation. Separate analysis for three tectonically different regions in Israel region-Galilee-Lebanon, Judea-Samaria and Eastern Sinai-shows a regional dependence of attenuation parameters. The variation of attenuation characteristics implies different physical mechanisms of seismic attenuation in the Israel region and is related to the differences of structure in the Earth's crust beneath Israel. Such variation in the attenuation patterns is in agreement with the assumption that Northern Israel is tectonically more active than Southern Israel and that in the northern and central parts of Israel the upper crust is more heterogeneous than in the southern part.

  16. Evaluation of laminated composite structures using ultrasonic attenuation measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Peitao; Houghton, J. R.

    The existence of delamination and porosity in laminated composite structures will degrade the strength of the structures. The detection of delamination can be easily obtained using ultrasonic C-scan or A-scan methods. But, the detection of porosity in laminated structures has been a difficult task for years, especially in production condition. This paper will analytically evaluate the current techniques used in industry, and develop accurate attenuation measurement methods for the evaluation of porosity. The test samples, which are used in the laminated structures of the German airbus by Textron Aerostructures, Inc, will be tested using ultrasonic C-scan and grid-based A-scan methods. The digitized waveforms are stored and analyzed using different attenuation measurement algorithms. The volume of porosity is calculated using digital imaging analysis. Finally, the correlation between ultrasonic attenuation and the volume fraction of porosity are calculated and analyzed.

  17. Propagation and attenuation of Rayleigh waves in generalized thermoelastic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, M. D.

    2014-01-01

    This study considers the propagation of Rayleigh waves in a generalized thermoelastic half-space with stress-free plane boundary. The boundary has the option of being either isothermal or thermally insulated. In either case, the dispersion equation is obtained in the form of a complex irrational expression due to the presence of radicals. This dispersion equation is rationalized into a polynomial equation, which is solvable, numerically, for exact complex roots. The roots of the dispersion equation are obtained after removing the extraneous zeros of this polynomial equation. Then, these roots are filtered out for the inhomogeneous propagation of waves decaying with depth. Numerical examples are solved to analyze the effects of thermal properties of elastic materials on the dispersion of existing surface waves. For these thermoelastic Rayleigh waves, the behavior of elliptical particle motion is studied inside and at the surface of the medium. Insulation of boundary does play a significant role in changing the speed, amplitude, and polarization of Rayleigh waves in thermoelastic media.

  18. Poroelastic model to relate seismic wave attenuation and dispersion to permeability anisotropy

    SciTech Connect

    Parra, J.O.

    2000-02-01

    A transversely isotropic model with a horizontal axis of symmetry, based on the Biot and squirt-flow mechanisms, predicts seismic waves in poroelastic media. The model estimates velocity dispersion and attenuation of waves propagating in the frequency range of crosswell and high-resolution reverse vertical seismic profiling (VSP) (250--1,250 HZ) for vertical permeability value much greater than horizontal permeability parameters. The model assumes the principal axes of the stiffness constant tensor are aligned with the axes of the permeability and squirt-flow tensors. In addition, the unified Biot and squirt-flow mechanism (BISQ) model is adapted to simulate cracks in permeable media. Under these conditions, the model simulations demonstrate that the preferential direction of fluid flow in a reservoir containing fluid-filled cracks can be determined by analyzing the phase velocity and attenuation of seismic waves propagating at different azimuth and incident angles. As a result, the fast compressional wave can be related to permeability anisotropy in a reservoir. The model results demonstrate that for fast quasi-P-wave propagating perpendicular to fluid-filled cracks, the attenuation is greater than when the wave propagates parallel to the plane of the crack. Theoretical predictions and velocity dispersion of interwell seismic waves in the Kankakee Limestone Formation at the Buckhorn test site (Illinois) demonstrate that the permeable rock matrix surrounding a low-velocity heterogeneity contains vertical cracks.

  19. Shear wave attenuation and micro-fluidics in water-saturated sand and glass beads.

    PubMed

    Chotiros, Nicholas P; Isakson, Marcia J

    2014-06-01

    An improvement in the modeling of shear wave attenuation and speed in water-saturated sand and glass beads is introduced. Some dry and water-saturated materials are known to follow a constant-Q model in which the attenuation, expressed as Q(-1), is independent of frequency. The associated loss mechanism is thought to lie within the solid frame. A second loss mechanism in fluid-saturated porous materials is the viscous loss due to relative motion between pore fluid and solid frame predicted by the Biot-Stoll model. It contains a relaxation process that makes the Q(-1) change with frequency, reaching a peak at a characteristic frequency. Examination of the published measurements above 1 kHz, particularly those of Brunson (Ph.D. thesis, Oregon State University, Corvalis, 1983), shows another peak, which is explained in terms of a relaxation process associated with the squirt flow process at the grain-grain contact. In the process of deriving a model for this phenomenon, it is necessary to consider the micro-fluidic effects associated with the flow within a thin film of water confined in the gap at the grain-grain contact and the resulting increase in the effective viscosity of water. The result is an extended Biot model that is applicable over a broad band of frequencies. PMID:24907791

  20. In situ measurements of an energetic wave event in the Arctic marginal ice zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, Clarence O.; Rogers, W. Erick; Marchenko, Aleksey; Babanin, Alexander V.

    2015-03-01

    R/V Lance serendipitously encountered an energetic wave event around 77°N, 26°E on 2 May 2010. Onboard GPS records, interpreted as the surface wave signal, show the largest waves recorded in the Arctic region with ice cover. Comparing the measurements with a spectral wave model indicated three phases of interaction: (1) wave blocking by ice, (2) strong attenuation of wave energy and fracturing of ice by wave forcing, and (3) uninhibited propagation of the peak waves and an extension of allowed waves to higher frequencies (above the peak). Wave properties during fracturing of ice cover indicated increased groupiness. Wave-ice interaction presented binary behavior: there was zero transmission in unbroken ice and total transmission in fractured ice. The fractured ice front traveled at some fraction of the wave group speed. Findings do not motivate new dissipation schemes for wave models, though they do indicate the need for two-way, wave-ice coupling.

  1. Multiple attenuation to reflection seismic data using Radon filter and Wave Equation Multiple Rejection (WEMR) method

    SciTech Connect

    Erlangga, Mokhammad Puput

    2015-04-16

    Separation between signal and noise, incoherent or coherent, is important in seismic data processing. Although we have processed the seismic data, the coherent noise is still mixing with the primary signal. Multiple reflections are a kind of coherent noise. In this research, we processed seismic data to attenuate multiple reflections in the both synthetic and real seismic data of Mentawai. There are several methods to attenuate multiple reflection, one of them is Radon filter method that discriminates between primary reflection and multiple reflection in the τ-p domain based on move out difference between primary reflection and multiple reflection. However, in case where the move out difference is too small, the Radon filter method is not enough to attenuate the multiple reflections. The Radon filter also produces the artifacts on the gathers data. Except the Radon filter method, we also use the Wave Equation Multiple Elimination (WEMR) method to attenuate the long period multiple reflection. The WEMR method can attenuate the long period multiple reflection based on wave equation inversion. Refer to the inversion of wave equation and the magnitude of the seismic wave amplitude that observed on the free surface, we get the water bottom reflectivity which is used to eliminate the multiple reflections. The WEMR method does not depend on the move out difference to attenuate the long period multiple reflection. Therefore, the WEMR method can be applied to the seismic data which has small move out difference as the Mentawai seismic data. The small move out difference on the Mentawai seismic data is caused by the restrictiveness of far offset, which is only 705 meter. We compared the real free multiple stacking data after processing with Radon filter and WEMR process. The conclusion is the WEMR method can more attenuate the long period multiple reflection than the Radon filter method on the real (Mentawai) seismic data.

  2. Ultrasonic attenuation - Q measurements on 70215,29. [lunar rock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warren, N.; Trice, R.; Stephens, J.

    1974-01-01

    Ultrasonic attenuation measurements have been made on an aluminum alloy, obsidian, and rock samples including lunar sample 70215,29. The measurement technique is based on a combination of the pulse transmission method and the forced resonance method. The technique is designed to explore the problem of defining experimentally, the Q of a medium or sample in which mode conversion may occur. If modes are coupled, the measured attenuation is strongly dependent on individual modes of vibration, and a range of Q-factors may be measured over various resonances or from various portions of a transient signal. On 70215,29, measurements were made over a period of a month while the sample outgassed in hard varuum. During this period, the highest measured Q of this sample increased from a few hundred into the range of 1000-1300.

  3. Q c and Q S wave attenuation of South African earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandt, Martin B. C.

    2016-04-01

    Quality factor Q, which describes the attenuation of seismic waves with distance, was determined for South Africa using data recorded by the South African National Seismograph Network. Because of an objective paucity of seismicity in South Africa and modernisation of the seismograph network only in 2007, I carried out a coda wave decay analysis on only 13 tectonic earthquakes and 7 mine-related events for the magnitude range 3.6 ≤ M L ≤ 4.4. Up to five seismograph stations were utilised to determine Q c for frequencies at 2, 4, 8 and 16 Hz resulting in 84 individual measurements. The constants Q 0 and α were determined for the attenuation relation Q c( f) = Q 0 f α . The result was Q 0 = 396 ± 29 and α = 0.72 ± 0.04 for a lapse time of 1.9*( t s - t 0) (time from origin time t 0 to the start of coda analysis window is 1.9 times the S-travel time, t s) and a coda window length of 80 s. This lapse time and coda window length were found to fit the most individual frequencies for a signal-to-noise ratio of at least 3 and a minimum absolute correlation coefficient for the envelope of 0.5. For a positive correlation coefficient, the envelope amplitude increases with time and Q c was not calculated. The derived Q c was verified using the spectral ratio method on a smaller data set consisting of nine earthquakes and one mine-related event recorded by up to four seismograph stations. Since the spectral ratio method requires absolute amplitudes in its calculations, site response tests were performed to select four appropriate stations without soil amplification and/or signal distortion. The result obtained for Q S was Q 0 = 391 ± 130 and α = 0.60 ± 0.16, which agrees well with the coda Q c result.

  4. Oceanic-wave-measurement system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, J. F.; Miles, R. T.

    1980-01-01

    Barometer mounted on bouy senses wave heights. As wave motion raises and lowers barometer, pressure differential is proportional to wave height. Monitoring circuit samples barometer output every half cycle of wave motion and adds magnitudes of adjacent positive and negative peaks. Resulting output signals, proportional to wave height, are transmitted to central monitoring station.

  5. Measurements of seismic attenuation in ice: A potential proxy for englacial temperature?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, L. E.; Anandakrishnan, S.

    2010-12-01

    Constraints on seismic attenuation in ice are key to determining conditions at the ice-bed interface and below. Variations in this value by as little as a factor of two can make the difference between identifying a soft, deformable sediment bed or hard bedrock stratum from seismic data (both of which have quite different effects on ice dynamics), making the need to understand this parameter imperative for accurate seismic analysis of the subglacial environment. While laboratory tests have demonstrated that seismic attenuation in ice is quite sensitive to englacial temperature, especially as the pressure-melting point is approached, little validation has been performed in the field to confirm this. The results presented here are from a series of wide-angle common midpoint (CMP) seismic datasets across Antarctica and Greenland, where both englacial and basal seismic reflections are observed, each having calculated englacial seismic attenuation values that exhibit a positive correlation with observed and predicted englacial temperatures. We investigate the effects of energy losses due to dissipation as a seismic wave propagates through the ice. Various seismic signals are analyzed in both the time and frequency domains to determine the frequency-dependency of seismic attenuation with respect to depth in the ice column, source-receiver offset, and the frequency spectra of both the source and observed seismic signal. Surface wave data from ten locations across Antarctica and Greenland are analyzed in the time domain to determine near-surface frequency-dependent seismic attenuation, focusing on the upper 100 - 500 m of the ice column where englacial temperatures are indicative of the mean annual surface temperature. These data yield lower attenuation values in the colder regions of Antarctica and higher attenuation values at the warmer locations. Spectral analysis of the basal reflection at each location produces similar results: regions where the bulk temperature of the

  6. Shear wave transmissivity measurement by color Doppler shear wave imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamakoshi, Yoshiki; Yamazaki, Mayuko; Kasahara, Toshihiro; Sunaguchi, Naoki; Yuminaka, Yasushi

    2016-07-01

    Shear wave elastography is a useful method for evaluating tissue stiffness. We have proposed a novel shear wave imaging method (color Doppler shear wave imaging: CD SWI), which utilizes a signal processing unit in ultrasound color flow imaging in order to detect the shear wave wavefront in real time. Shear wave velocity is adopted to characterize tissue stiffness; however, it is difficult to measure tissue stiffness with high spatial resolution because of the artifact produced by shear wave diffraction. Spatial average processing in the image reconstruction method also degrades the spatial resolution. In this paper, we propose a novel measurement method for the shear wave transmissivity of a tissue boundary. Shear wave wavefront maps are acquired by changing the displacement amplitude of the shear wave and the transmissivity of the shear wave, which gives the difference in shear wave velocity between two mediums separated by the boundary, is measured from the ratio of two threshold voltages required to form the shear wave wavefronts in the two mediums. From this method, a high-resolution shear wave amplitude imaging method that reconstructs a tissue boundary is proposed.

  7. Acoustic Measurement of Suspended Fine Particle Concentrations by Attenuation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Knowledge of sediment concentration is important in the study of streams and rivers. The work presented explores the appropriate frequency and transducer spacing for acoustic measurement of suspended particles in the range of 0.1 – 64 microns. High frequency (20 MHz) acoustic signal attenuation wa...

  8. An evaluation of two millimeter wave propagation models for horizontal atmospheric attenuation at 70-115 GHZ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, Gerard N.

    1988-02-01

    An evaluation is performed for two millimeter wave propagation models: the LIEBE model, developed at the Institute for Telecommunications, Boulder, CO, under the guidance of Dr. H. Liebe; and the EOSAEL model, developed at the U. S. Army Atmospheric Laboratory at White Sands Missile Range, NM. This evaluation is conducted for horizontal attenuation due to both clear atmosphere and hydrometer effects under typical surface meteorological conditions, and within the frequency range 70-115 GHz. Intercomparisons of model theories and predictions show slight differences for molecular oxygen and fog attenuations, but significant differences for water vapor and rain attenuations. Results indicate that, while the qualitative agreement between either the EOSAEL or LIEBE model predictions, and measurements, for horizontal attenuation due to oxygen, water vapor, fog and rain is certainly satisfactory, there is a definite need for improvement. Overall, no clear preference for either the EOSAEL or LIEBE model for operational use is ascertained. Data comparisons suggest that, for several attenuation types, model preference is dependent on either the frequency or meteorological conditions.

  9. Magnesium oxide doping reduces acoustic wave attenuation in lithium metatantalate and lithium metaniobate crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Croft, W.; Damon, R.; Kedzie, R.; Kestigian, M.; Smith, A.; Worley, J.

    1970-01-01

    Single crystals of lithium metatantalate and lithium metaniobate, grown from melts having different stoichiometries and different amounts of magnesium oxide, show that doping lowers temperature-independent portion of attenuation of acoustic waves. Doped crystals possess optical properties well suited for electro-optical and photoelastic applications.

  10. 2-D Coda and Direct Wave Attenuation Tomography in Northern Italy

    SciTech Connect

    Morasca, P; Mayeda, K; Gok, R; Phillips, W S; Malagnini, L

    2007-10-17

    A 1-D coda method was proposed by Mayeda et al. (2003) in order to obtain stable seismic source moment-rate spectra using narrowband coda envelope measurements. That study took advantage of the averaging nature of coda waves to derive stable amplitude measurements taking into account all propagation, site, and Sto-coda transfer function effects. Recently this methodology was applied to micro earthquake data sets from three sub-regions of northern Italy (i.e., western Alps, northern Apennines and eastern Alps). Since the study regions were small, ranging between local-to-near-regional distances, the simple 1-D path assumptions used in the coda method worked very well. The lateral complexity of this region would suggest, however, that a 2-D path correction might provide even better results if the datasets were combined, especially when paths traverse larger distances and complicated regions. The structural heterogeneity of northern Italy makes the region ideal to test the extent to which coda variance can be reduced further by using a 2-D Q tomography technique. The approach we use has been developed by Phillips et al. (2005) and is an extension of previous amplitude ratio techniques to remove source effects from the inversion. The method requires some assumptions such as isotropic source radiation which is generally true for coda waves. Our results are compared against direct Swave inversions for 1/Q and results from both share very similar attenuation features that coincide with known geologic structures. We compare our results with those derived from direct waves as well as some recent results from northern California obtained by Mayeda et al. (2005) which tested the same tomographic methodology applied in this study to invert for 1/Q. We find that 2-D coda path corrections for this region significantly improve upon the 1-D corrections, in contrast to California where only a marginal improvement was observed. We attribute this difference to stronger lateral

  11. Calculation of ground wave attenuation over irregular, inhomogeneous, layered media using PROGRAM WAGNER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ott, R. H.

    1983-09-01

    A method for calculating the ground wave field over irregular, inhomogeneous terrain was developed, and comparisons with alternative analytical methods were made for idealized terrain profiles such as concave parabolas, sea-land-sea paths, and single Gaussian ridges. This method employs a numerically efficient algorithm, PROGRAM WAGNER, based on an integral equation. PROGRAM WAGNER appears the only method general enough for calculating ground wave attenuation along detailed paths. The fundamentals of PROGRAM WAGNER to the user seeking to make path loss calculations are explained. A users guide, the complete FORTRAN IV program listing, and sample input and output are included. Comparisons of computed field strengths are presented, with measured values over a path in the Netherlands at 10 frequencies from 2 to 30 MHz. Also, PROGRAM WAGNER at 5 and 30 MHz is compared with a method based on scattering from multiple knife edges. Finally, reciprocity is shown to provide necessary and useful criteria for spacing the observation points along the terrain profile.

  12. Angular and Frequency-Dependent Wave Velocity and Attenuation in Fractured Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carcione, José M.; Gurevich, Boris; Santos, Juan E.; Picotti, Stefano

    2013-11-01

    Wave-induced fluid flow generates a dominant attenuation mechanism in porous media. It consists of energy loss due to P-wave conversion to Biot (diffusive) modes at mesoscopic-scale inhomogeneities. Fractured poroelastic media show significant attenuation and velocity dispersion due to this mechanism. The theory has first been developed for the symmetry axis of the equivalent transversely isotropic (TI) medium corresponding to a poroelastic medium containing planar fractures. In this work, we consider the theory for all propagation angles by obtaining the five complex and frequency-dependent stiffnesses of the equivalent TI medium as a function of frequency. We assume that the flow direction is perpendicular to the layering plane and is independent of the loading direction. As a consequence, the behaviour of the medium can be described by a single relaxation function. We first consider the limiting case of an open (highly permeable) fracture of negligible thickness. We then compute the associated wave velocities and quality factors as a function of the propagation direction (phase and ray angles) and frequency. The location of the relaxation peak depends on the distance between fractures (the mesoscopic distance), viscosity, permeability and fractures compliances. The flow induced by wave propagation affects the quasi-shear (qS) wave with levels of attenuation similar to those of the quasi-compressional (qP) wave. On the other hand, a general fracture can be modeled as a sequence of poroelastic layers, where one of the layers is very thin. Modeling fractures of different thickness filled with CO2 embedded in a background medium saturated with a stiffer fluid also shows considerable attenuation and velocity dispersion. If the fracture and background frames are the same, the equivalent medium is isotropic, but strong wave anisotropy occurs in the case of a frameless and highly permeable fracture material, for instance a suspension of solid particles in the fluid.

  13. Measurment and Interpretation of Seismic Attenuation for Hydrocarbon Exploration

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Batzle; Luca Duranti; James Rector; Steve Pride

    2007-12-31

    This research project is the combined effort of several leading research groups. Advanced theoretical work is being conducted at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Here, the fundamental controls on loss mechanisms are being examined, primarily by use of numerical models of heterogeneous porous media. At the University of California, Berkeley, forward modeling is combined with direct measurement of attenuation. This forward modeling provides an estimate of the influence of 1/Q on the observed seismic signature. Direct measures of losses in Vertical Seismic Profiles (VSPs) indicate mechanisms to separate scattering versus intrinsic losses. At the Colorado School of Mines, low frequency attenuation measurements are combined with geologic models of deep water sands. ChevronTexaco is our corporate cosponsor and research partner. This corporation is providing field data over the Genesis Field, Gulf of Mexico. In addition, ChevronTexaco has rebuilt and improved their low frequency measurement system. Soft samples representative of the Genesis Field can now be measured for velocities and attenuations under reservoir conditions. Throughout this project we have: Assessed the contribution of mechanical compaction on time-lapse monitoring; Developed and tested finite difference code to model dispersion and attenuation; Heterogeneous porous materials were modeled and 1/Q calculated vs. frequency; 'Self-affine' heterogeneous materials with differing Hurst exponent modeled; Laboratory confirmation was made of meso-scale fluid motion influence on 1/Q; Confirmed theory and magnitude of layer-based scattering attenuation at Genesis and at a shallow site in California; Scattering Q's of between 40 and 80 were obtained; Measured very low intrinsic Q's (2-20) in a partially saturated vadose zone VSP; First field study to separate scattering and intrinsic attenuation in real data set; Revitalized low frequency device at ChevronTexaco's Richmond lab completed; First complete

  14. Attenuation of Elastic Waves due to Scattering from Spherical Cavities and Elastic Inclusions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinders, Mark Karl

    1990-01-01

    The attenuation of elastic waves due to scattering from a spherical inclusion of arbitrary size in an infinitely extended medium is investigated. The spherical scatterer and the exterior medium are isotropic, homogeneous, and linearly elastic, but of arbitrarily differing material parameters, with compressional and shear waves supported in both media. Exact expressions for scattered and transmitted fields caused by an incident plane compressional or shear wave of unit amplitude are calculated analytically and general expressions for extinction and scattering cross -sections are derived for both lossy and lossless scattering. Application to ultrasonic determination of porosity in cast aluminum is investigated.

  15. Effects of microstructure on the speed and attenuation of elastic waves

    SciTech Connect

    Gubernatis, J.E.; Domany, E.

    1982-01-01

    A unified theory pertaining to the sensitivity of the propagation of an elastic wave to changes in the microstructural details of a material is discussed. In contrast to nearly all previous treatments a first principles approach, using developments from other multiple scattering problems and adapting them to the elastic wave case, is followed. We then present several simple, standard approximations. In the process the validity of the commonly made assumption that ..cap alpha.. = n anti sigma is clarified, and the effective speed, illustrating its complementary character to the attenuation, is computed. The principal objective is to present the formal analysis necessary to treat systematically the dependency of the wave propagation on microstructural statistics.

  16. Shear wave velocity and attenuation structure for the shallow crust of the southern Korean peninsula from short period Rayleigh waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Heeok; Jang, Yong-seok; Lee, Jung Mo; Moon, Wooil M.; Baag, Chang-Eob; Kim, Ki Young; Jo, Bong Gon

    2007-01-01

    We analyzed the short period Rayleigh waves from the first crustal-scale seismic refraction experiment in the Korean peninsula, KCRUST2002, to determine the shear wave velocity and attenuation structure of the uppermost 1 km of the crust in different tectonic zones of the Korean peninsula and to examine if this can be related to the surface geology of the study area. The experiment was conducted with two large explosive sources along a 300-km long profile in 2002. The seismic traces, recorded on 170 vertical-component, 2-Hz portable seismometers, show distinct Rayleigh waves in the period range between 0.2 s and 1.2 s, which are easily recognizable up to 30-60 km from the sources. The seismic profiles, which traverse three tectonic regions (Gyeonggi massif, Okcheon fold belt and Yeongnam massif), were divided into five subsections based on tectonic boundaries as well as lithology. Group and phase velocities for the five subsections obtained by a continuous wavelet transform method and a slant stack method, respectively, were inverted for the shear wave models. We obtained shear wave velocity models up to a depth of 1.0 km. Overall, the shear wave velocity of the Okcheon fold belt is lower than that of the Gyeonggi and Yeongnam massifs by ˜ 0.4 km/s in the shallowmost 0.2 km and by 0.2 km/s at depths below 0.2 km. Attenuation coefficients, determined from the decay of the fundamental mode Rayleigh waves, were used to obtain the shear wave attenuation structures for three subsections (one for each of the three different tectonic regions). We obtained an average value of Qβ- 1 in the upper 0.5 km for each subsection. Qβ- 1 for the Okcheon fold belt (˜ 0.026) is approximately three times larger than Qβ- 1 for the massif areas (˜ 0.008). The low shear wave velocity in the Okcheon fold belt is consistent with the high attenuation in this region.

  17. Shear wave velocity, seismic attenuation, and thermal structure of the continental upper mantle

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Artemieva, I.M.; Billien, M.; Leveque, J.-J.; Mooney, W.D.

    2004-01-01

    Seismic velocity and attenuation anomalies in the mantle are commonly interpreted in terms of temperature variations on the basis of laboratory studies of elastic and anelastic properties of rocks. In order to evaluate the relative contributions of thermal and non-thermal effects on anomalies of attenuation of seismic shear waves, QS-1, and seismic velocity, VS, we compare global maps of the thermal structure of the continental upper mantle with global QS-1 and Vs maps as determined from Rayleigh waves at periods between 40 and 150 S. We limit the comparison to three continental mantle depths (50, 100 and 150 km), where model resolution is relatively high. The available data set does not indicate that, at a global scale, seismic anomalies in the upper mantle are controlled solely by temperature variations. Continental maps have correlation coefficients of <0.56 between VS and T and of <0.47 between QS and T at any depth. Such low correlation coefficients can partially be attributed to modelling arrefacts; however, they also suggest that not all of the VS and QS anomalies in the continental upper mantle can be explained by T variations. Global maps show that, by the sign of the anomaly, VS and QS usually inversely correlate with lithospheric temperatures: most cratonic regions show high VS and QS and low T, while most active regions have seismic and thermal anomalies of the opposite sign. The strongest inverse correlation is found at a depth of 100 km, where the attenuation model is best resolved. Significantly, at this depth, the contours of near-zero QS anomalies approximately correspond to the 1000 ??C isotherm, in agreement with laboratory measurements that show a pronounced increase in seismic attenuation in upper mantle rocks at 1000-1100 ??C. East-west profiles of VS, QS and T where continental data coverage is best (50??N latitude for North America and 60??N latitude for Eurasia) further demonstrate that temperature plays a dominant, but non-unique, role in

  18. A multiscale poromicromechanical approach to wave propagation and attenuation in bone.

    PubMed

    Morin, Claire; Hellmich, Christian

    2014-07-01

    Ultrasonics is an important diagnostic tool for bone diseases, as it allows for non-invasive assessment of bone tissue quality through mass density-elasticity relationships. The latter are, however, quite complex for fluid-filled porous media, which motivates us to develop a rigorous multiscale poromicrodynamics approach valid across the great variety of different bone tissues. Multiscale momentum and mass balance, as well as kinematics of a hierarchical double porous medium, together with Darcy's law for fluid flow and micro-poro-elasticity for the solid phase of bone, give access to the so-called dispersion relation, linking the complex wave numbers to corresponding wave frequencies. Experimentally validated results show that 2.25 MHz acoustical signals transmit healthy cortical bone (exhibiting a low vascular porosity) only in the form of fast waves, agreeing very well with experimental data, while both fast and slow waves transmit highly osteoporotic as well as trabecular bone (exhibiting a large vascular porosity). While velocities and wavelengths of both fast and slow waves, as well as attenuation lengths of slow waves, are always monotonously increasing with the permeability of the bone sample, the attenuation length of fast waves shows a minimum when considered as function of the permeability. PMID:24457030

  19. Characteristics of vibrational wave propagation and attenuation in submarine fluid-filled pipelines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Jin; Zhang, Juan

    2015-04-01

    As an important part of lifeline engineering in the development and utilization of marine resources, the submarine fluid-filled pipeline is a complex coupling system which is subjected to both internal and external flow fields. By utilizing Kennard's shell equations and combining with Helmholtz equations of flow field, the coupling equations of submarine fluid-filled pipeline for n=0 axisymmetrical wave motion are set up. Analytical expressions of wave speed are obtained for both s=1 and s=2 waves, which correspond to a fluid-dominated wave and an axial shell wave, respectively. The numerical results for wave speed and wave attenuation are obtained and discussed subsequently. It shows that the frequency depends on phase velocity, and the attenuation of this mode depends strongly on material parameters of the pipe and the internal and the external fluid fields. The characteristics of PVC pipe are studied for a comparison. The effects of shell thickness/radius ratio and density of the contained fluid on the model are also discussed. The study provides a theoretical basis and helps to accurately predict the situation of submarine pipelines, which also has practical application prospect in the field of pipeline leakage detection.

  20. Freak waves statistics measured off Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinho, Uggo; Babanin, Alexander; Liu, Paul

    2015-04-01

    Freaque wave statistics is analysed based on the data of South East coast of the Brazil. It is shown that such waves can be both due to linear and nonlinear dynamics. The wave climate in this area is very often dominated by a few uncorrelated wave systems and then the superposition of waves from different directions become likely. The available wave data was measured by wave buoys deployed off Rio de Janeiro State coast, where swell coming from the south are usually concomitant with northeast windsea generated by the South Atlantic anticyclone.

  1. Plasma-parameter measurements using neutral-particle-beam attenuation

    SciTech Connect

    Foote, J H; Molvik, A W; Turner, W C

    1982-07-07

    Intense and energetic neutral-particle-beam injection used for fueling or heating magnetically confined, controlled-fusion experimental plasmas can also provide diagnostic measurements of the plasmas. The attenuation of an atomic beam (mainly from charge-exchange and ionization interactions) when passing through a plasma gives the plasma line density. Orthogonal arrays of highly collimated detectors of the secondary-electron-emission type have been used in magnetic-mirror experiments to measure neutral-beam attenuation along chords through the plasma volume at different radial and axial positions. The radial array is used to infer the radial plasma-density profile; the axial array, to infer the axial plasma-density profile and the ion angular distribution at the plasma midplane.

  2. Attenuation of Slab determined from T-wave generation by deep earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, J.; Ni, S.

    2006-05-01

    T-wave are seismically generated acoustic waves that propagate over great distance in the ocean sound channel (SOFAR). Because of the high attenuation in both the upper mantle and the ocean crust, T wave is rarely observed for earthquakes deeper than 80 km. However some deep earthquakes deeper than 80km indeed generate apparent T-waves if the subducted slab is continuous Okal et al. (1997) . We studied the deep earthquakes in the Fiji/Tonga region, where the subducted lithosphere is old and thus with small attenuation. After analyzing 33 earthquakes with the depth from 10 Km to 650 Km in Fiji/Tonga, we observed and modeled obvious T-phases from these earthquakes observed at station RAR. We used the T-wave generated by deep earthquakes to compute the quality factor of the Fiji/Tonga slab. The method used in this study is followed the equation (1) by [Groot-Hedlin et al,2001][1]. A=A0/(1+(Ω0/Ω)2)×exp(-LΩ/Qv)×Ωn where the A is the amplitude computed by the practicable data, amplitude depending on the earthquakes, and A0 is the inherent frequency related with the earthquake's half duration, L is the length of ray path that P wave or S travel in the slab, and the V is the velocity of P-wave. In this study, we fix the n=2, by assuming the T- wave scattering points in the Fiji/Tonga island arc having the same attribution as the continental shelf. After some computing and careful analysis, we determined the quality factor of the Fiji/Tonga to be around 1000, Such result is consistent with results from the traditional P,S-wave data[Roth & Wiens,1999][2] . Okal et al. (1997) pointed out that the slab in the part of central South America was also a continuous slab, by modeling apparent T-waves from the great 1994 Bolivian deep earthquake in relation to channeling of S wave energy propagating upward through the slab[3]. [1]Catherine D. de Groot-Hedlin, John A. Orcutt, excitation of T-phases by seafloor scattering, J. Acoust. Soc, 109,1944-1954,2001. [2]Erich G.Roth and

  3. Attenuation of coda waves in the Garhwal Lesser Himalaya, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, S. K.; Gupta, S. C.; Kumar, Ashwani

    2015-04-01

    Qc estimates for the Uttarkashi and the Chamoli regions of the Garhwal Lesser Himalaya have been obtained by analyzing the coda waves of 159 local earthquakes recorded during 2008 and 2009 employing a 12-station seismological network. Earthquakes around the Uttarkashi region are located in the epicentral distance range of 5.0 to 93.9 km, focal depth range of 1.63 to 42.13 km, and coda magnitude range of 0.2 to 2.9, whereas earthquakes around Chamoli region are located in the epicentral distance range of 19.8-109.2 km, focal depth range of 1.36 to 40.72 km, and coda magnitude range of 1.0 to 3.0. The coda waves of 30 s duration, recorded on 982 seismograms, have been analyzed in seven frequencies range centered at 1.5, 3.0, 6.0, 9.0, 12.0, 18.0, and 24.0 Hz for four to five lapse time windows (LTW) using the single backscattering model given by Aki and Chouet (J Geophys Res 80:3322-3342, 1975). Mean value of Qc estimates vary from 76 at 1.5 Hz to 2201 at 24.0 Hz for LTW range of 10-40 s and from 216 at 1.5 Hz to 3243 at 24.0 Hz for LTW range of 50-80 s (for the Uttarkashi region) and from 147 at 1.5 Hz to 2273 at 24.0 Hz for LTW range of 20-50 s and from 188 at 1.5 Hz to 2826 at 24.0 Hz for LTW range of 50-80 s (for Chamoli region). The Qc values thus obtained showed a clear dependence on frequency and LTW and frequency dependence Qc relationships, Qc = Q0fη, for LTWs that have been obtained as Qc = 57f1.20 (10-40 s), Qc = 97f1.07 (20-50 s), Qc = 116f1.03 (30-60 s), Qc = 130f1.03 (40-70 s), and Qc = 162f0.95 (50-80 s) for Uttarkashi region and Qc = 107f0.95 (20-50 s), Qc = 115f0.96 (30-60 s), Qc = 128f0.95 (40-70 s), and Qc = 145f0.95 (50-80 s) for Chamoli region.

  4. Scattering attenuation ratios of P and S waves in elastic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Tae-Kyung

    2004-07-01

    The variation of scattering attenuation ratios of P and S waves (Q-1P/Q-1S) is investigated in elastic media by using numerical simulations and theoretical expressions based on the first-order Born approximation. Numerical results from stochastic random media (von Karman, exponential, Gaussian) with mild velocity perturbation (10 per cent in this study) are represented well by theoretical attenuation curves with a minimum scattering angle of 60-90°. The level of scattering attenuation ratios is dependent on the velocity ratio (γ=α0/β0) and the type of medium. The change of perturbation in the density introduces a relatively small variation in attenuation ratio. Attenuation ratios are proportional to normalized frequency (fa, frequency-by-correlation length) at the intermediate-frequency range (0.1 km s-1 < fa < 10 km s-1) and determined constant at the high-frequency (fa > 10 km s-1) and low-frequency (fa < 1 km s-1) regimes. The von Karman-type models look appropriate for the representation of small-scale variation in the Earth. The scattering attenuation ratios can be implemented for the investigation of small-scale heterogeneities in the Earth.

  5. Strong Lg-wave attenuation in the Middle East continental collision orogenic belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Lian-Feng; Xie, Xiao-Bi

    2016-04-01

    Using Lg-wave Q tomography, we construct a broadband crustal attenuation model for the Middle East. The QLg images reveal a relationship between attenuation and geological structures. Strong attenuation is found in the continental collision orogenic belt that extends from the Turkish and Iranian plateau to the Pamir plateau. We investigate the frequency dependence of QLg in different geologic formations. The results illustrate that QLg values generally increase with increasing frequency but exhibit complex relationships both with frequency and between regions. An average QLg value between 0.2 and 2.0 Hz, QLg (0.2-2.0 Hz), may be a critical index for crustal attenuation and is used to infer the regional geology. Low-QLg anomalies are present in the eastern Turkish plateau and correlate well with low Pn-velocities and Cenozoic volcanic activity, thus indicating possible partial melting within the crust in this region. Very strong attenuation is also observed in central Iran, the Afghanistan block, and the southern Caspian Sea. This in line with the previously observed high crustal temperature, high-conductivity layers, and thick marine sediments in these areas, suggests the high Lg attenuation is caused by abnormally high tectonic and thermal activities.

  6. Attenuation of shock waves propagating through nano-structured porous materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Qananwah, Ahmad K.; Koplik, Joel; Andreopoulos, Yiannis

    2013-07-01

    Porous materials have long been known to be effective in energy absorption and shock wave attenuation. These properties make them attractive in blast mitigation strategies. Nano-structured materials have an even greater potential for blast mitigation because of their high surface-to-volume ratio, a geometric parameter which substantially attenuates shock wave propagation. A molecular dynamics approach was used to explore the effects of this remarkable property on the behavior of traveling shocks impacting on solid materials. The computational setup included a moving piston, a gas region and a target solid wall with and without a porous structure. The gas and porous solid were modeled by Lennard-Jones-like and effective atom potentials, respectively. The shock wave is resolved in space and time and its reflection from a solid wall is gradual, due to the wave's finite thickness, and entails a self-interaction as the reflected wave travels through the incoming incident wave. Cases investigated include a free standing porous structure, a porous structure attached to a wall and porous structures with graded porosity. The effects of pore shape and orientation have been also documented. The results indicate that placing a nano-porous material layer in front of the target wall reduced the stress magnitude and the energy deposited inside the solid by about 30 percent, while at the same time substantially decreasing the loading rate.

  7. Complex Contact-Based Dynamics of Microsphere Monolayers Revealed by Resonant Attenuation of Surface Acoustic Waves.

    PubMed

    Hiraiwa, M; Abi Ghanem, M; Wallen, S P; Khanolkar, A; Maznev, A A; Boechler, N

    2016-05-13

    Contact-based vibrations play an essential role in the dynamics of granular materials. Significant insights into vibrational granular dynamics have previously been obtained with reduced-dimensional systems containing macroscale particles. We study contact-based vibrations of a two-dimensional monolayer of micron-sized spheres on a solid substrate that forms a microscale granular crystal. Measurements of the resonant attenuation of laser-generated surface acoustic waves reveal three collective vibrational modes that involve displacements and rotations of the microspheres, as well as interparticle and particle-substrate interactions. To identify the modes, we tune the interparticle stiffness, which shifts the frequency of the horizontal-rotational resonances while leaving the vertical resonance unaffected. From the measured contact resonance frequencies we determine both particle-substrate and interparticle contact stiffnesses and find that the former is an order of magnitude larger than the latter. This study paves the way for investigating complex contact-based dynamics of microscale granular crystals and yields a new approach to studying micro- to nanoscale contact mechanics in multiparticle networks. PMID:27232047

  8. Complex Contact-Based Dynamics of Microsphere Monolayers Revealed by Resonant Attenuation of Surface Acoustic Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiraiwa, M.; Abi Ghanem, M.; Wallen, S. P.; Khanolkar, A.; Maznev, A. A.; Boechler, N.

    2016-05-01

    Contact-based vibrations play an essential role in the dynamics of granular materials. Significant insights into vibrational granular dynamics have previously been obtained with reduced-dimensional systems containing macroscale particles. We study contact-based vibrations of a two-dimensional monolayer of micron-sized spheres on a solid substrate that forms a microscale granular crystal. Measurements of the resonant attenuation of laser-generated surface acoustic waves reveal three collective vibrational modes that involve displacements and rotations of the microspheres, as well as interparticle and particle-substrate interactions. To identify the modes, we tune the interparticle stiffness, which shifts the frequency of the horizontal-rotational resonances while leaving the vertical resonance unaffected. From the measured contact resonance frequencies we determine both particle-substrate and interparticle contact stiffnesses and find that the former is an order of magnitude larger than the latter. This study paves the way for investigating complex contact-based dynamics of microscale granular crystals and yields a new approach to studying micro- to nanoscale contact mechanics in multiparticle networks.

  9. Influence of pressure, temperature, and pore fluid on the frequency-dependent attenuation of elastic waves in Berea sandstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'hara, Stephen G.

    1985-07-01

    The effects of pore fluid, effective stress, pore fluid pressure, and temperature on the frequency dependence of elastic wave attenuation in Berea sandstone are interrelated in a series of systematic experiments. The attenuation of both the extensional and torsional modes of cylindrical samples of the sandstone is measured on the frequency range 3-30 kHz. To simulate conditions within the earth, the sandstone is subjected to confining stress to 70.0 MPa and temperature from 24.0 °C to 120.0 °C. Confining pressure and pore fluid pressure are varied independently. Data for two different pore fluids, brine and n-heptane, suggest that a scaling law exists for the pressure and temperature dependence of the attenuation in terms of the pore fluid. The logarithmic decrement of the sandstone is almost frequency independent in a vacuum evacuated sample, but shows a linear frequency dependence, once the sample is saturated. Extrapolation of this linear trend to low frequencies suggests that the decrement in fluid-filled sandstone is effectively frequency independent at seismic frequencies (<100 Hz). The frequency dependence becomes more pronounced as either the effective stress or the temperature is decreased. When the difference between the external stress on the sandstone and the pore fluid pressure is large, the attenuation depends only on the effective stress and is relatively temperature independent. But at low effective stress, the attenuation increases linearly with increasing pore fluid pressure and decreases linearly with increasing temperature. While a specific model is lacking, the attenuation process is apparently influenced most strongly by chemical processes at the pore fluid-matrix interface accompanied by subtle changes in the sandstone matrix dimensions.

  10. Seismic-Wave Attenuation and Source Excitation in La Paz-Los Cabos, Baja California Sur, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortega, R.; Gonzalez, M.

    2007-05-01

    We present results from a regional study of seismic-wave attenuation and source excitation from small- magnitude earthquakes recorded at distances from 6 to 180 km in the La Paz-Los Cabos region, at the south end of the Baja California Peninsula. Data were recorded using 32 strong-motion seismic stations from the La Paz network (LAP). A least squares regression separating the excitation, site, and propagation effects was carried out. We performed the analyses in the time and frequency domains, and we compared these results with results from a coda-normalization method. The propagation term was parameterized to represent a geometrical spreading function and a frequency-dependent Q(f) at a reference distance of 40 km. We estimated the regional attenuation by measuring the maximum amplitude of the S- or Lg-waves as a function of frequency, defining a continuous piecewise propagation term, D(r,f), after separating the excitation and site terms. Our results show that the attenuation is lower compared to that of central or northern Mexico. Recorded data were of remarkably good quality in spite of the fact that the strong-motion network recorded only small-size earthquake.

  11. Sensitivity of seismic measurements to frequency-dependent attenuation and upper mantle structure: An initial approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellis, C.; Holtzman, B.

    2014-07-01

    This study addresses the sensitivity of seismic attenuation measurements to dissipative mechanisms and structure in the Earth's upper mantle. The Andrade anelastic model fits experimental attenuation data with a mild power law frequency dependence and can be scaled from laboratory to Earth conditions. We incorporate this anelastic model into 400km 1-D thermal profiles of the upper mantle. These continuous-spectrum models are approximated by multiple relaxation mechanisms that are implemented within a finite-difference scheme to perform wave propagation simulations in 1-D domains. In two sets of numerical experiments, we evaluate the measurable signature of the intrinsic attenuation structure. The two sets are defined by thermal profiles with added step functions of temperature, varying in (i) amplitude and depth or (ii) amplitude and sharpness. The corresponding synthetic data are processed using both the conventional t* approach, i.e., a linear regression of the displacement frequency spectrum, and an alternative nonlinear fit to identify the integrated value of attenuation and its frequency dependence. The measured sensitivity patterns are analyzed to assess the effects of the anelastic model and its spatial distribution on seismic data (in the absence of scattering effects). We have two straightforward results: (1) the frequency dependence power law is recoverable from the measurements; (2) t* is sensitive to both the depth and the amplitude of the step, and it is insensitive to the sharpness of the step, in the 0.25 to 2 Hz band. There is much potential for gaining information about the upper mantle thermodynamic state from careful interpretation of attenuation.

  12. Measurement of the hot electron attenuation length of copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garramone, J. J.; Abel, J. R.; Sitnitsky, I. L.; Zhao, L.; Appelbaum, I.; LaBella, V. P.

    2010-02-01

    Ballistic electron emission microscopy is utilized to investigate the hot-electron scattering properties of Cu through Cu/Si(001) Schottky diodes. A Schottky barrier height of 0.64±0.02 eV and a hot-electron attenuation length of 33.4±2.9 nm are measured at a tip bias of 1.0 eV and a temperature of 80 K. The dependence of the attenuation length with tip bias is fit to a Fermi liquid model that allows extraction of the inelastic and elastic scattering components. This modeling indicates that elastic scattering due to defects, grain boundaries, and interfaces is the dominant scattering mechanism in this energy range.

  13. Phase velocity and attenuation predictions of waves in cancellous bone using an iterative effective medium approximation.

    PubMed

    Potsika, Vassiliki T; Protopappas, Vasilios C; Vavva, Maria G; Polyzos, Demosthenes; Fotiadis, Dimitrios I

    2013-01-01

    The quantitative determination of wave dispersion and attenuation in bone is an open research area as the factors responsible for ultrasound absorption and scattering in composite biological tissues have not been completely explained. In this study, we use the iterative effective medium approximation (IEMA) proposed in [1] so as to calculate phase velocity and attenuation in media with properties similar to those of cancellous bones. Calculations are performed for a frequency range of 0.4-0.8 MHz and for different inclusions' volume concentrations and sizes. Our numerical results are compared with previous experimental findings so as to assess the effectiveness of IEMA. It was made clear that attenuation and phase velocity estimations could provide supplementary information for cancellous bone characterization. PMID:24111396

  14. Radio Frequency (RF) Attenuation Measurements of the Space Shuttle Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scully, R. C.; Kent, B. M.; Kempf, D. R.; Johnk, R. T.

    2006-01-01

    Following the loss of Columbia, the Columbia Accident Investigation Board (CAIB) provided recommendations to be addressed prior to Return To Flight (RTF). As a part of CAIB Recommendation 3.4.1 - Ground Based Imagery, new C-band and X-band radars were added to the array of ground-based radars and cameras already in-situ at Kennedy Space Center. Because of higher power density considerations and new operating frequencies, the team of Subject Matter Experts (SMEs) assembled to investigate the technical details of introducing the new radars recommended a series of radio frequency (RF) attenuation tests be performed on the Space Shuttle vehicle to establish the attenuation of the vehicle outer mold line structure with respect to its external RF environment. Because of time and complex logistical constraints, it was decided to split the test into two separate efforts. The first of these would be accomplished with the assistance of the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL), performing RF attenuation measurements on the aft section of OV-103 (Discovery) while in-situ in Orbiter Processing Facility (OPF) 3, located at Kennedy Space Center. The second would be accomplished with the assistance of the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and the electromagnetic interference (EMI) laboratory out of the Naval Air Warfare Center, Patuxent River, Maryland (PAX River), performing RF attenuation measurements on OV-105 (Endeavour) in-situ inside the Space Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) hangar, also located at Kennedy Space Center. This paper provides a summary description of these efforts and their results.

  15. Study of wind speed attenuation at Kavaratti Island using land-based, offshore, and satellite measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joseph, Antony; Rivonkar, Pradhan; Balakrishnan Nair, T. M.

    2012-06-01

    The role of dense coconut palms in attenuating the wind speed at Kavaratti Island, which is located in the southeastern Arabian Sea, is examined based on land-based and offshore wind measurements (U10) using anchored-buoy-mounted and satellite-borne sensors (QuikSCAT scatterometer and TMI microwave imager) during an 8-year period (2000-2007). It is found that round the year monthly-mean wind speed measurements from the Port Control Tower (PCT) located within the coconut palm farm at the Kavaratti Island are weaker by 15-61% relative to those made from the nearby offshore region. Whereas wind speed attenuation at the island is ~15-40% in the mid-June to mid-October south-west monsoon period, it is ~41-61% during the rest of the year. Wind direction measurements from all the devices overlapped, except in March-April during which the buoy measurements deviated from the other measurements by ~20°. U10 wind speed measurements from PCT during the November 2009 tropical cyclone "Phyan" indicated approximately 50-80% attenuation relative to those from the seaward boundary of the island's lagoon (and therefore least influenced by the coconut palms). The observed wind speed attenuation can be understood through the theory of free turbulent flow jets embodied in the boundary-layer fluid dynamics, according to which both the axial and transverse components of the efflux of flows discharged through the inter-leaves porosity (orifice) undergo increasing attenuation in the downstream direction with increasing distance from the orifice. Thus, the observed wind speed attenuation at Kavaratti Island is attributable to the decline in wind energy transmission from the seaward boundary of the coconut palm farm with distance into the farm. Just like mangrove forests function as bio-shields against forces from oceanic waves and stormsurges through their large above-ground aerial root systems and standing crop, and thereby playing a distinctive role in ameliorating the effects of

  16. Flow velocity measurement with the nonlinear acoustic wave scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Didenkulov, Igor; Pronchatov-Rubtsov, Nikolay

    2015-10-28

    A problem of noninvasive measurement of liquid flow velocity arises in many practical applications. To this end the most often approach is the use of the linear Doppler technique. The Doppler frequency shift of signal scattered from the inhomogeneities distributed in a liquid relatively to the emitted frequency is proportional to the sound frequency and velocities of inhomogeneities. In the case of very slow flow one needs to use very high frequency sound. This approach fails in media with strong sound attenuation because acoustic wave attenuation increases with frequency and there is limit in increasing sound intensity, i.e. the cavitation threshold. Another approach which is considered in this paper is based on the method using the difference frequency Doppler Effect for flows with bubbles. This method is based on simultaneous action of two high-frequency primary acoustic waves with closed frequencies on bubbles and registration of the scattered by bubbles acoustic field at the difference frequency. The use of this method is interesting since the scattered difference frequency wave has much lower attenuation in a liquid. The theoretical consideration of the method is given in the paper. The experimental examples confirming the theoretical equations, as well as the ability of the method to be applied in medical diagnostics and in technical applications on measurement of flow velocities in liquids with strong sound attenuation is described. It is shown that the Doppler spectrum form depends on bubble concentration velocity distribution in the primary acoustic beams crossing zone that allows one to measure the flow velocity distribution.

  17. Flow velocity measurement with the nonlinear acoustic wave scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Didenkulov, Igor; Pronchatov-Rubtsov, Nikolay

    2015-10-01

    A problem of noninvasive measurement of liquid flow velocity arises in many practical applications. To this end the most often approach is the use of the linear Doppler technique. The Doppler frequency shift of signal scattered from the inhomogeneities distributed in a liquid relatively to the emitted frequency is proportional to the sound frequency and velocities of inhomogeneities. In the case of very slow flow one needs to use very high frequency sound. This approach fails in media with strong sound attenuation because acoustic wave attenuation increases with frequency and there is limit in increasing sound intensity, i.e. the cavitation threshold. Another approach which is considered in this paper is based on the method using the difference frequency Doppler Effect for flows with bubbles. This method is based on simultaneous action of two high-frequency primary acoustic waves with closed frequencies on bubbles and registration of the scattered by bubbles acoustic field at the difference frequency. The use of this method is interesting since the scattered difference frequency wave has much lower attenuation in a liquid. The theoretical consideration of the method is given in the paper. The experimental examples confirming the theoretical equations, as well as the ability of the method to be applied in medical diagnostics and in technical applications on measurement of flow velocities in liquids with strong sound attenuation is described. It is shown that the Doppler spectrum form depends on bubble concentration velocity distribution in the primary acoustic beams crossing zone that allows one to measure the flow velocity distribution.

  18. Rheological anisotropy of the Earth's mantle and attenuation of seismic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birger, B. I.

    2006-11-01

    The nonlinear integral (having memory) model previously proposed by the author for the description of the dislocation rheology of mantle rocks is generalized to the case of crystals with anisotropic rheology. The latter is caused by a large difference between the effective viscosities associated with dislocation glide and dislocation climb (in the crystallographic coordinate system, the dislocation glide governs simple shear, whereas the dislocation climb governs pure shear). Since the mantle is polycrystalline and crystal grains an order of a millimeter in size are oriented chaotically, anisotropy vanishes with volume averaging. However, convective flows in the mantle produce large strains and lead to a preferred orientation of grains and, thereby, anisotropy of the upper mantle. The lower mantle is dominated by diffusion rheology, which cannot cause anisotropy. The mantle rheological anisotropy gives rise to anisotropic attenuation of seismic waves. It is shown that the attenuation depends on the polarization and direction of seismic waves and on the parameters of the rheological model.

  19. Dislocation damping and anisotropic seismic wave attenuation in Earth's upper mantle.

    PubMed

    Farla, Robert J M; Jackson, Ian; Fitz Gerald, John D; Faul, Ulrich H; Zimmerman, Mark E

    2012-04-20

    Crystal defects form during tectonic deformation and are reactivated by the shear stress associated with passing seismic waves. Although these defects, known as dislocations, potentially contribute to the attenuation of seismic waves in Earth's upper mantle, evidence for dislocation damping from laboratory studies has been circumstantial. We experimentally determined the shear modulus and associated strain-energy dissipation in pre-deformed synthetic olivine aggregates under high pressures and temperatures. Enhanced high-temperature background dissipation occurred in specimens pre-deformed by dislocation creep in either compression or torsion, the enhancement being greater for prior deformation in torsion. These observations suggest the possibility of anisotropic attenuation in relatively coarse-grained rocks where olivine is or was deformed at relatively high stress by dislocation creep in Earth's upper mantle. PMID:22517856

  20. 40 CFR 211.206 - Methods for measurement of sound attenuation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Methods for measurement of sound attenuation. 211.206 Section 211.206 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... measurement of sound attenuation....

  1. 40 CFR 211.206 - Methods for measurement of sound attenuation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Methods for measurement of sound attenuation. 211.206 Section 211.206 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... measurement of sound attenuation....

  2. 40 CFR 211.206 - Methods for measurement of sound attenuation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Methods for measurement of sound attenuation. 211.206 Section 211.206 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... measurement of sound attenuation....

  3. 40 CFR 211.206 - Methods for measurement of sound attenuation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Methods for measurement of sound attenuation. 211.206 Section 211.206 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... measurement of sound attenuation....

  4. 40 CFR 211.206 - Methods for measurement of sound attenuation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Methods for measurement of sound attenuation. 211.206 Section 211.206 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... measurement of sound attenuation....

  5. Pore-Scale Modeling of Pore Structure Effects on P-Wave Scattering Attenuation in Dry Rocks

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tianyang; Qiu, Hao; Wang, Feifei

    2015-01-01

    Underground rocks usually have complex pore system with a variety of pore types and a wide range of pore size. The effects of pore structure on elastic wave attenuation cannot be neglected. We investigated the pore structure effects on P-wave scattering attenuation in dry rocks by pore-scale modeling based on the wave theory and the similarity principle. Our modeling results indicate that pore size, pore shape (such as aspect ratio), and pore density are important factors influencing P-wave scattering attenuation in porous rocks, and can explain the variation of scattering attenuation at the same porosity. From the perspective of scattering attenuation, porous rocks can safely suit to the long wavelength assumption when the ratio of wavelength to pore size is larger than 15. Under the long wavelength condition, the scattering attenuation coefficient increases as a power function as the pore density increases, and it increases exponentially with the increase in aspect ratio. For a certain porosity, rocks with smaller aspect ratio and/or larger pore size have stronger scattering attenuation. When the pore aspect ratio is larger than 0.5, the variation of scattering attenuation at the same porosity is dominantly caused by pore size and almost independent of the pore aspect ratio. These results lay a foundation for pore structure inversion from elastic wave responses in porous rocks. PMID:25961729

  6. Pore-scale modeling of pore structure effects on P-wave scattering attenuation in dry rocks.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zizhen; Wang, Ruihe; Li, Tianyang; Qiu, Hao; Wang, Feifei

    2015-01-01

    Underground rocks usually have complex pore system with a variety of pore types and a wide range of pore size. The effects of pore structure on elastic wave attenuation cannot be neglected. We investigated the pore structure effects on P-wave scattering attenuation in dry rocks by pore-scale modeling based on the wave theory and the similarity principle. Our modeling results indicate that pore size, pore shape (such as aspect ratio), and pore density are important factors influencing P-wave scattering attenuation in porous rocks, and can explain the variation of scattering attenuation at the same porosity. From the perspective of scattering attenuation, porous rocks can safely suit to the long wavelength assumption when the ratio of wavelength to pore size is larger than 15. Under the long wavelength condition, the scattering attenuation coefficient increases as a power function as the pore density increases, and it increases exponentially with the increase in aspect ratio. For a certain porosity, rocks with smaller aspect ratio and/or larger pore size have stronger scattering attenuation. When the pore aspect ratio is larger than 0.5, the variation of scattering attenuation at the same porosity is dominantly caused by pore size and almost independent of the pore aspect ratio. These results lay a foundation for pore structure inversion from elastic wave responses in porous rocks. PMID:25961729

  7. The wave equation with viscoelastic attenuation and its application in problems of shallow-sea acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, P. S.; Zakharenko, A. D.; Trofimov, M. Yu.

    2012-11-01

    A suitable tool for the simulation of low frequency acoustic pulse signals propagating in a shallow sea is the numerical integration of the nonstationary wave equation. The main feature of such simulation problems is that in this case the sound waves propagate in the geoacoustic waveguide formed by the upper layers of the bottom and the water column. By this reason, the correct dependence of the attenuation of sound waves in the bottom on their frequency must be taken into account. In this paper we obtain an integro-differential equation for the sound waves in the viscoelastic fluid, which allows to simulate the arbitrary dependence of acoustic wave attenuation on frequency in the time domain computations. The procedure of numerical solution of this equation based on its approximation by a system of differential equations is then considered and the methods of artificial limitation of computational domain are described. We also construct a simple finite-difference scheme for the proposed equation suitable for the numerical solution of nonstationary problems arising in the shallow-sea acoustics.

  8. Ocean Wave Measurement Using GPS Buoys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joodaki, G.; Nahavandchi, H.; Cheng, K.

    2013-09-01

    The observation of ocean wave parameters is necessary to improve forecasts of ocean wave conditions. In this paper, we investigate the viability of using a single GPS receiver to measure ocean-surface waves, and present a method to enhance the accuracy of the estimated wave parameters. The application of high-pass filtering to GPS data in conjunction with directional wave spectral theory is a core concept in this article. Laboratory experiments were conducted to test the viability and accuracy measurements of wave parameters made by a single GPS receiver buoy. These tests identified an error of less than 1% for the rotational arm measurement (wave height) and an error of 1% in verifications of the wave direction and wave period, and showed a 0.488 s bias; this is sufficiently accurate for many specific purposes. These results are based on the best cut-off frequency value derived in this study. A moored-sea GPS buoy on the Taiwanese coast was used to estimate the GPS-derived wave parameters. Our results indicate that data from a single GPS receiver, processed with the presented method to reduce the error of the estimated parameters, can provide measurements of ocean surface wave to reasonable accuracy.

  9. Estimates of ocean wave heights and attenuation in sea ice using the SAR wave mode on Sentinel-1A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ardhuin, Fabrice; Collard, Fabrice; Chapron, Bertrand; Girard-Ardhuin, Fanny; Guitton, Gilles; Mouche, Alexis; Stopa, Justin E.

    2015-04-01

    Swell evolution from the open ocean into sea ice is poorly understood, in particular the amplitude attenuation expected from scattering and dissipation. New synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data from Sentinel-1A wave mode reveal intriguing patterns of bright oscillating lines shaped like instant noodles. We investigate cases in which the oscillations are in the azimuth direction, around a straight line in the range direction. This observation is interpreted as the distortion by the SAR processing of crests from a first swell, due to the presence of a second swell. Since deviations from a straight line should be proportional to the orbital velocity toward the satellite, swell height can be estimated, from 1.5 to 5 m in the present case. The evolution of this 13 s period swell across the ice pack is consistent with an exponential attenuation on a length scale of 200 km.

  10. Estimates of ocean wave heights and attenuation in sea ice using the SAR wave mode on Sentinel-1A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ardhuin, Fabrice; Collard, Fabrice; Chapron, Bertrand; Girard-Ardhuin, Fanny; Guitton, Gilles; Mouche, Alexis; Stopa, Justin

    2015-04-01

    Swell evolution from the open ocean into sea ice is poorly understood, in particular the amplitude attenuation expected from scattering and dissipation. New synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data from Sentinel-1 wave mode reveal intriguing patterns of bright oscillating lines shaped like instant noodles. We investigate cases in which the oscillations are in the azimuth direction, around a straight line in the range direction. This observation is interpreted as the distortion by the SAR processing of crests from a first swell, due to the presence of a second swell. As deviations from a straight line should be proportional to the orbital velocity towards the satellite, swell height can be estimated, from 1.5 to 5 m in the present case. This evolution of this 13 s period swell across the ice pack is consistent with an exponential attenuation on a length scale of 200 km.

  11. Scattering versus intrinsic attenuation in the near surface: Measurements from permanent down-hole geophones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mangriotis, Maria-Daphne

    The study of attenuation, equivalently of the quality (Q) factor, in the near-surface has three main applications. Firstly, low Q values, which are fairly common in near-surface materials, aside from decreasing seismic energy, also distort the waveforms; treatment of this disturbance effect with inverse-Q filters requires reliable Q estimates. Secondly, attenuation is a seismic parameter which improves interpretation of seismograms, as it is correlated with lithological properties. Thirdly, establishing near-surface Q is important in assessing site effects on strong ground motion events in applications of earthquake modeling and seismic engineering design. In view of these applications, theoretical treatments of attenuation, as well as laboratory and field tests, aim at estimating Q as a function of frequency and strain level. To determine the applicability of using different types of Q measurements, laboratory vs. in-situ measurements, to predict Q behavior across the different frequency bands and strain-levels of interest, it is necessary to model and separate the attenuation mechanisms into scattering (heterogeneity of elastic properties causing energy to be redistributed in space) and intrinsic (energy absorption due to conversion to heat) components. The objective of the presented study was to separate scattering versus intrinsic attenuation in the near-surface from a shallow VSP experiment conducted in the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) facility using permanent down-hole geophones and a vertical impact source. Given that the VSP array was above the watertable, the Q characterization lies within the vadose zone. The first arrival of the vertically-incident transmitted P-wave was used to estimate the P-wave attenuation in the field data. Scattering attenuation estimates were established for a selected range of elastic models, which addressed both the effect of the variance of the elastic properties (density and velocity), as well as the effect of

  12. Meso-scale Computational Investigation of Shock-Wave Attenuation by Trailing Release Wave in Different Grades of Polyurea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grujicic, Mica; Snipes, J. S.; Ramaswami, S.; Yavari, R.; Ramasubramanian, M. K.

    2014-01-01

    Over the past several years, considerable research efforts have been made toward investigating polyurea, a segmented thermoplastic elastomer, and particularly its shock-mitigation capacity, i.e., an ability to attenuate and disperse shock-waves. These research efforts have clearly established that the shock-mitigation capacity of polyurea is closely related to its chemistry, processing route, and the resulting microstructure. Polyurea typically possesses a nano-segregated microstructure consisting of (high glass transition temperature, T g) hydrogen-bonded discrete hard domains and a (low T g) contiguous soft matrix. While the effect of polyurea microstructure on its shock-mitigation capacity is well-established, it is not presently clear what microstructure-dependent phenomena and processes control its shock-mitigation capacity. To help identify these phenomena and processes, meso-scale simulations of the formation of nano-segregated microstructure and its interaction with a leading shock-wave and a trailing release-wave is analyzed in the present work. The results obtained revealed that shock-induced hard-domain densification makes an important contribution to the superior shock-mitigation capacity of polyurea, and that the extent of densification is a sensitive function of the polyurea soft-segment molecular weight. In particular, the ability of release-waves to capture and neutralize shock-waves has been found to depend strongly on the extent of shock-induced hard-domain densification and, thus, on the polyurea soft-segment molecular weight.

  13. Surface-wave amplitude analysis for array data with non-linear waveform fitting: Toward high-resolution attenuation models of the upper mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamada, K.; Yoshizawa, K.

    2013-12-01

    Anelastic attenuation of seismic waves provides us with valuable information on temperature and water content in the Earth's mantle. While seismic velocity models have been investigated by many researchers, anelastic attenuation (or Q) models have yet to be investigated in detail mainly due to the intrinsic difficulties and uncertainties in the amplitude analysis of observed seismic waveforms. To increase the horizontal resolution of surface wave attenuation models on a regional scale, we have developed a new method of fully non-linear waveform fitting to measure inter-station phase velocities and amplitude ratios simultaneously, using the Neighborhood Algorithm (NA) as a global optimizer. Model parameter space (perturbations of phase speed and amplitude ratio) is explored to fit two observed waveforms on a common great-circle path by perturbing both phase and amplitude of the fundamental-mode surface waves. This method has been applied to observed waveform data of the USArray from 2007 to 2008, and a large-number of inter-station amplitude and phase speed data are corrected in a period range from 20 to 200 seconds. We have constructed preliminary phase speed and attenuation models using the observed phase and amplitude data, with careful considerations of the effects of elastic focusing and station correction factors for amplitude data. The phase velocity models indicate good correlation with the conventional tomographic results in North America on a large-scale; e.g., significant slow velocity anomaly in volcanic regions in the western United States. The preliminary results of surface-wave attenuation achieved a better variance reduction when the amplitude data are inverted for attenuation models in conjunction with corrections for receiver factors. We have also taken into account the amplitude correction for elastic focusing based on a geometrical ray theory, but its effects on the final model is somewhat limited and our attenuation model show anti

  14. Analysis of dispersion and attenuation of surface waves in poroelastic media in the exploration-seismic frequency band

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zhang, Y.; Xu, Y.; Xia, J.

    2011-01-01

    We analyse dispersion and attenuation of surface waves at free surfaces of possible vacuum/poroelastic media: permeable-'open pore', impermeable-'closed pore' and partially permeable boundaries, which have not been previously reported in detail by researchers, under different surface-permeable, viscous-damping, elastic and fluid-flowing conditions. Our discussion is focused on their characteristics in the exploration-seismic frequency band (a few through 200 Hz) for near-surface applications. We find two surface-wave modes exist, R1 waves for all conditions, and R2 waves for closed-pore and partially permeable conditions. For R1 waves, velocities disperse most under partially permeable conditions and least under the open-pore condition. High-coupling damping coefficients move the main dispersion frequency range to high frequencies. There is an f1 frequency dependence as a constant-Q model for attenuation at high frequencies. R1 waves for the open pore are most sensitive to elastic modulus variation, but least sensitive to tortuosities variation. R1 waves for partially permeable surface radiate as non-physical waves (Im(k) < 0) at low frequencies. For R2 waves, velocities are slightly lower than the bulk slow P2 waves. At low frequencies, both velocity and attenuation are diffusive of f1/2 frequency dependence, as P2 waves. It is found that for partially permeable surfaces, the attenuation displays -f1 frequency dependence as frequency increasing. High surface permeability, low-coupling damping coefficients, low Poisson's ratios, and low tortuosities increase the slope of the -f1 dependence. When the attenuation coefficients reach 0, R2 waves for partially permeable surface begin to radiate as non-physical waves. ?? 2011 The Authors Geophysical Journal International ?? 2011 RAS.

  15. INDIRECT MEASUREMENT OF BIOLOGICAL ACTIVITY TO MONITOR NATURAL ATTENUATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The remediation of ground water contamination by natural attenuation, specifically biodegradation, requires continual monitoring. This research is aimed at improving methods for evaluating the long-term performance of Monitored Natural Attenuation (MNA), specifically changes in ...

  16. S-wave attenuation structure beneath the northern Izu-Bonin arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Tsutomu; Obana, Koichiro; Kodaira, Shuichi

    2016-04-01

    To understand temperature structure or magma distribution in the crust and uppermost mantle, it is essential to know their attenuation structure. This study estimated the 3-D S-wave attenuation structure in the crust and uppermost mantle at the northern Izu-Bonin arc, taking into account the apparent attenuation due to multiple forward scattering. In the uppermost mantle, two areas of high seismic attenuation (high Q -1) imaged beneath the volcanic front were mostly colocated with low-velocity anomalies. This coincidence suggests that these high- Q -1 areas in low-velocity zones are the most likely candidates for high-temperature regions beneath volcanoes. The distribution of random inhomogeneities indicated the presence of three anomalies beneath the volcanic front: Two were in high- Q -1 areas but the third was in a moderate- Q -1 area, indicating a low correlation between random inhomogeneities and Q -1. All three anomalies of random inhomogeneities were rich in short-wavelength spectra. The most probable interpretation of such spectra is the presence of volcanic rock, which would be related to accumulated magma intrusion during episodes of volcanic activity. Therefore, the different distributions of Q -1 and random inhomogeneities imply that the positions of hot regions in the uppermost mantle beneath this arc have changed temporally; therefore, they may provide important constraints on the evolutionary processes of arc crust and volcanoes.

  17. Estimation of the intrinsic absorption and scattering attenuation in Northeastern Venezuela (Southeastern Caribbean) using coda waves

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ugalde, A.; Pujades, L.G.; Canas, J.A.; Villasenor, A.

    1998-01-01

    Northeastern Venezuela has been studied in terms of coda wave attenuation using seismograms from local earthquakes recorded by a temporary short-period seismic network. The studied area has been separated into two subregions in order to investigate lateral variations in the attenuation parameters. Coda-Q-1 (Q(c)-1) has been obtained using the single-scattering theory. The contribution of the intrinsic absorption (Q(i)-1) and scattering (Q(s)-1) to total attenuation (Q(t)-1) has been estimated by means of a multiple lapse time window method, based on the hypothesis of multiple isotropic scattering with uniform distribution of scatterers. Results show significant spatial variations of attenuation: the estimates for intermediate depth events and for shallow events present major differences. This fact may be related to different tectonic characteristics that may be due to the presence of the Lesser Antilles subduction zone, because the intermediate depth seismic zone may be coincident with the southern continuation of the subducting slab under the arc.

  18. Wave-speed dispersion associated with an attenuation obeying a frequency power law.

    PubMed

    Buckingham, Michael J

    2015-11-01

    An attenuation scaling as a power of frequency, |ω|(β), over an infinite bandwidth is neither analytic nor square-integrable, thus calling into question the application of the Kramers-Krönig dispersion relations for determining the frequency dependence of the associated phase speed. In this paper, three different approaches are developed, all of which return the dispersion formula for the wavenumber, K(ω). The first analysis relies on the properties of generalized functions and the causality requirement that the impulse response, k(t), the inverse Fourier transform of -iK(ω), must vanish for t < 0. Second, a wave equation is introduced that yields the phase-speed dispersion associated with a frequency-power-law attenuation. Finally, it is shown that, with minor modification, the Kramers-Krönig dispersion relations with no subtractions (the Plemelj formulas) do in fact hold for an attenuation scaling as |ω|(β), yielding the same dispersion formula as the other two derivations. From this dispersion formula, admissible values of the exponent β are established. Physically, the inadmissible values of β, which include all the integers, correspond to attenuation-dispersion pairs whose Fourier components cannot combine in such a way as to make the impulse response, k(t), vanish for t < 0. There is no upper or lower limit on the value that β may take. PMID:26627763

  19. Measurement of ultrasonic scattering attenuation in austenitic stainless steel welds: realistic input data for NDT numerical modeling.

    PubMed

    Ploix, Marie-Aude; Guy, Philippe; Chassignole, Bertrand; Moysan, Joseph; Corneloup, Gilles; El Guerjouma, Rachid

    2014-09-01

    Multipass welds made of 316L stainless steel are specific welds of the primary circuit of pressurized water reactors in nuclear power plants. Because of their strong heterogeneous and anisotropic nature due to grain growth during solidification, ultrasonic waves may be greatly deviated, split and attenuated. Thus, ultrasonic assessment of the structural integrity of such welds is quite complicated. Numerical codes exist that simulate ultrasonic propagation through such structures, but they require precise and realistic input data, as attenuation coefficients. This paper presents rigorous measurements of attenuation in austenitic weld as a function of grain orientation. In fact attenuation is here mainly caused by grain scattering. Measurements are based on the decomposition of experimental beams into plane-wave angular spectra and on the modeling of the ultrasonic propagation through the material. For this, the transmission coefficients are calculated for any incident plane wave on an anisotropic plate. Two different hypotheses on the welded material are tested: first it is considered as monoclinic, and then as triclinic. Results are analyzed, and validated through comparison to theoretical predictions of related literature. They underline the great importance of well-describing the anisotropic structure of austenitic welds for UT modeling issues. PMID:24759567

  20. A Split of Direction of Propagation and Attenuation of P Waves in the Po Valley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daminelli, R.; Tento, A.; Marcellini, A.

    2013-12-01

    On July 17, 2011 a ML 4.8 earthquake occurred in the PO valley at a 48 km epicentral distance from a seismic station located at Palazzo Te (Mantova). The station is situated on deep quaternary sediments: the uppermost layers are mainly composed of clay and silty clay with interbedded sands; the Robertson index is 1.4wave particle motion, that appears rather difficult to explain if we assume the homogeneity of the P waves (that means attenuation is scalar). Note that the degree of nonlinearity is very low given that the maximum strain can be roughly estimated as 10-5 on the basis of maximum ground velocity of the P wave train considered and the Vp. On the contrary we show that P wave particle motion can be fully (and easily) described by a Homogeneous Isotropic Linear Viscoelastic model (HILV). HILV, as in the 2009 Borcherdt formulation adopted here, allows two different directions of propagation and attenuation; in other words attenuation becomes a vector that is not necessarily parallel to the propagation vector. The results evidence that the incidence angle and the inhomogeneity angle (it is the angle between propagation and attenuation vectors and it is closely related to Q factor) are in good agreement with the geological conditions of the site. Finally, we observed that these results are very similar to the ones obtained when we analyzed two explosions recorded by a seismic station in Milano, also situated in the Po valley at some 140 km from Mantova (Marcellini & Tento, 2011). Borcherdt, R.D. (2009) 'Viscoelastic Waves in Layered Media', Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, United Kingdom, 305 pp. Marcellini, A. and A. Tento (2011) ' Explosive Sources Prove the Validity of Homogeneous Isotropic Linear Viscoelastic Models', BSSA, Vol. 101, No. 4, pp. 1576-1583.

  1. Radiometric observations of atmospheric attenuation at 20.6 and 31.65 GHz: The Wave Propagation Laboratory data base

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, Mark D.; Snider, J. B.; Westwater, E. R.

    1993-01-01

    The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Wave Propagation Laboratory (WPL) presently operates five dual-channel microwave radiometers, one triple-channel microwave radiometer, and one six-channel microwave radiometer. The dual-channel radiometers operate at frequencies of 20.6 or 23.87 GHz and 31.4 or 31.65 GHz. The triple-channel radiometer operates at 20.6, 31.65, and 90.0 GHz. The six-channel radiometer operates at frequencies of 20.6, 31.65, 52.85, 53.85, 55.45, and 58.8 GHz. Recent brightness temperature measurements and attenuation values from some of the above radiometers are presented. These radiometric measurements, taken in different locations throughout the world, have given WPL a diverse set of measurements under a variety of atmospheric conditions. We propose to do a more complete attenuation analysis on these measurements in the future. In addition, a new spinning reflector was installed recently for the dual-channel radiometer at the Platteville, Colorado site. This reflector will extend our measurement capabilities during precipating conditions. Locating the three-channel and portable dual-channel radiometers at or near Greeley, Colorado to support the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) program is discussed.

  2. Tracking accelerated aging of composites with ultrasonic attenuation measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Chinn, D.J.; Durbin, P.F.; Thomas, G.H.; Groves, S.E.

    1996-10-01

    Composite materials are steadily replacing traditional materials in many industries. For many carbon composite materials, particularly in aerospace applications, durability is a critical design parameter which must be accurately characterized. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Boeing Commercial Airplane Group have established a cooperative research and development agreement (CRADA) to assist in the high speed research program at Boeing. LLNL`s expertise in fiber composites, computer modeling, mechanical testing, chemical analysis and nondestructive evaluation (ND) will contribute to the study of advanced composite materials in commercial aerospace applications. Through thermo-mechanical experiments with periodic chemical analysis and nondestructive evaluation, the aging mechanisms in several continuous fiber polymer composites will be studied. Several measurement techniques are being studied for their correlation with aging. This paper describes through-transmission ultrasonic attenuation measurements of isothermally aged composite materials and their use as a tracking parameter for accelerated aging.

  3. Seismic attenuation: effects of interfacial impedance on wave-induced pressure diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Qiaomu; Müller, Tobias M.; Rubino, J. Germán

    2014-12-01

    Seismic attenuation and dispersion in layered sedimentary structures are often interpreted in terms of the classical White model for wave-induced pressure diffusion across the layers. However, this interlayer flow is severely dependent on the properties of the interface separating two layers. This interface behaviour can be described by a pressure jump boundary condition involving a non-vanishing interfacial impedance. In this paper, we incorporate the interfacial impedance into the White model by solving a boundary value problem in the framework of quasi-static poroelasticity. We show that the White model predictions for attenuation and dispersion substantially change. These changes can be attributed to petrophysically plausible scenarios such as imperfect hydraulic contacts or the presence of capillarity.

  4. Technological cost-reduction pathways for attenuator wave energy converters in the marine hydrokinetic environment.

    SciTech Connect

    Bull, Diana L; Ochs, Margaret Ellen

    2013-09-01

    This report considers and prioritizes the primary potential technical costreduction pathways for offshore wave activated body attenuators designed for ocean resources. This report focuses on technical research and development costreduction pathways related to the device technology rather than environmental monitoring or permitting opportunities. Three sources of information were used to understand current cost drivers and develop a prioritized list of potential costreduction pathways: a literature review of technical work related to attenuators, a reference device compiled from literature sources, and a webinar with each of three industry device developers. Data from these information sources were aggregated and prioritized with respect to the potential impact on the lifetime levelized cost of energy, the potential for progress, the potential for success, and the confidence in success. Results indicate the five most promising costreduction pathways include advanced controls, an optimized structural design, improved power conversion, planned maintenance scheduling, and an optimized device profile.

  5. Quantum nondemolition measurements. [by gravitational wave antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braginskii, V. B.; Vorontsov, Iu. I.; Thorne, K. S.

    1980-01-01

    The article describes new electronic techniques required for quantum nondemolition measurements and the theory underlying them. Consideration is given to resonant-bar gravitational-wave antennas. Position measurements are discussed along with energy measurements and back-action-evading measurements. Thermal noise in oscillators and amplifiers is outlined. Prospects for stroboscopic measurements are emphasized.

  6. Magellan radio occultation measurements of atmospheric waves on Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinson, David P.; Jenkins, J. M.

    1995-01-01

    Radio occultation experiments were conducted at Venus on three consecutive orbits of the Magellan spacecraft in October 1991. Each occultation occurred over the same topography (67 deg N, 127 deg E) and at the same local time (22 hr 5 min), but the data are sensitive to zonal variations because the atmosphere rotates significantly during one orbit. Through comparisons between observations and predictions of standard wave theory, we have demonstrated that small-scale oscillations in retrieved temperature profiles as well as scintillations in received signal intensity are caused by a spectrum of vertically propagating internal gravity waves. There is a strong similarity between the intensity scintillations observed here and previous measurements, which pertain to a wide range of locations and experiment dates. This implies that the same basic phenomenon underlies all the observations and hence that gravity waves are a persistent, global feature of Venus' atmosphere. We obtained a fairly complete characterization of a gravity wave that appears above the middle cloud in temperature measurements on all three orbits. The amplitude and vertical wavelength are about 4 K and 2.5 km respectively, at 65 km. A model for radiative damping implies that the wave intrinsic frequency is approximately 2 x 10(exp 4) rad/sec, the corresponding ratio between horizontal and vertical wavelengths is approximately 100. The wave is nearly stationary relative to the surface or the Sun. Radiative attenuation limits the wave amplitude at altitudes above approximately 65 km, leading to wave drag on the mean zonal winds of about +0.4 m/sec per day (eastward). The sign, magnitude, and location of this forcing suggest a possible role in explaining the decrease with height in the zonal wind speed that is believed to occur above the cloud tops. Temperature oscillations with larger vertical wavelengths (5-10 km) were also observed on all three orbits, but we are able unable to interpret these

  7. Lapse time dependence of coda wave attenuation in Central West Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akyol, Nihal

    2015-09-01

    The attenuation of coda waves has been inferred for Central West Turkey, which is characterized by a very complex tectonic evolution. The selected dataset is composed of 440 waveforms from 228 local earthquakes with a magnitude range of 2.9-4.9. The coda quality factor (Qc) was estimated for five central frequencies (fc = 1.5, 3, 5, 7, 10 Hz) and eight lapse times (tL, ranging from 25 to 60 s), based on the assumption of single isotropic scattering model. Estimated Qc values were strongly dependent on frequency and lapse time. The frequency dependence of Qc values for each lapse time was inferred from Qc(f) = Q0fn relationships. Q0 values change between 32.7 and 82.1, while n values changes between 0.91 and 0.79 for the lapse times of 25 and 60 s, respectively. The obtained low Q0 values show that the Central West Turkey region is characterized by a high seismic attenuation, in general. The whole region was divided into four subregions to examine spatial differences of attenuation characteristics. Obtained 1/Q0 and n values versus the lapse time for each subregion implies the tectonic complexity of the region. Lapse time dependencies of attenuation and n values were also examined for subdatasets from two different ranges of event depth (h < 10 km and h ≥ 10 km) and distance (r < 40 km and r ≥ 40 km). High attenuation and its high frequency dependence for long distances manifest the elevation of isotherms and increasing heterogeneity with depth. This could be associated with the extensional intra-continental plate setting, forming regional tectonics in the back-arc area.

  8. Attenuation of High Frequency P and S Waves in the Gujarat Region, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chopra, Sumer; Kumar, Dinesh; Rastogi, B. K.

    2011-05-01

    The local earthquake waveforms recorded on broadband seismograph network of Institute of Seismological Research in Gujarat, India have been analyzed to understand the attenuation of high frequency (2-25 Hz) P and S waves in the region. The frequency dependent relationships for quality factors for P ( Q P) and S ( Q S) waves have been obtained using the spectral ratio method for three regions namely, Kachchh, Saurashtra and Mainland Gujarat. The earthquakes recorded at nine stations of Kachchh, five stations of Saurashtra and one station in mainland Gujarat have been used for this analysis. The estimated relations for average Q P and Q S are: Q P = (105 ± 2) f 0.82 ± 0.01, Q S = (74 ± 2) f 1.06 ± 0.01 for Kachchh region; Q P = (148 ± 2) f 0.92 ± 0.01, Q S = (149 ± 14) f 1.43 ± 0.05 for Saurashtra region and Q P = (163 ± 7) f 0.77 ± 0.03, Q S = (118 ± 34) f 0.65 ± 0.14 for mainland Gujarat region. The low Q (<200) and high exponent of f (>0.5) as obtained from present analysis indicate the predominant seismic activities in the region. The lowest Q values obtained for the Kachchh region implies that the area is relatively more attenuative and heterogeneous than other two regions. A comparison between Q S estimated in this study and coda Q ( Qc) previously reported by others for Kachchh region shows that Q C > Q S for the frequency range of interest showing the enrichment of coda waves and the importance of scattering attenuation to the attenuation of S waves in the Kachchh region infested with faults and fractures. The Q S/ Q P ratio is found to be less than 1 for Kachchh and Mainland Gujarat regions and close to unity for Saurashtra region. This reflects the difference in the geological composition of rocks in the regions. The frequency dependent relations developed in this study could be used for the estimation of earthquake source parameters as well as for simulating the strong earthquake ground motions in the region.

  9. Measurements of seismic attenuation and transient fluid pressure in partially saturated Berea sandstone: evidence of fluid flow on the mesoscopic scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tisato, Nicola; Quintal, Beatriz

    2013-10-01

    A novel laboratory technique is proposed to investigate wave-induced fluid flow on the mesoscopic scale as a mechanism for seismic attenuation in partially saturated rocks. This technique combines measurements of seismic attenuation in the frequency range from 1 to 100 Hz with measurements of transient fluid pressure as a response of a step stress applied on top of the sample. We used a Berea sandstone sample partially saturated with water. The laboratory results suggest that wave-induced fluid flow on the mesoscopic scale is dominant in partially saturated samples. A 3-D numerical model representing the sample was used to verify the experimental results. Biot's equations of consolidation were solved with the finite-element method. Wave-induced fluid flow on the mesoscopic scale was the only attenuation mechanism accounted for in the numerical solution. The numerically calculated transient fluid pressure reproduced the laboratory data. Moreover, the numerically calculated attenuation, superposed to the frequency-independent matrix anelasticity, reproduced the attenuation measured in the laboratory in the partially saturated sample. This experimental-numerical fit demonstrates that wave-induced fluid flow on the mesoscopic scale and matrix anelasticity are the dominant mechanisms for seismic attenuation in partially saturated Berea sandstone.

  10. Effect of soil texture and excitation frequency on the propagation and attenuation of acoustic waves at saturated conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo, Wei-Cheng; Yeh, Chao-Lung; Jan, Chyan-Deng

    2008-08-01

    SummaryThe study of the propagation and dissipation of acoustic waves through a fluid-containing porous medium is crucial for the successful application of seismic methods to characterize subsurface hydrological properties. To gain a better understanding of changes in two important acoustic wave characteristics (speed and attenuation) due to the effect of soil texture and excitation frequency, a complex-valued dispersion relation obtained from the Biot theory of poroelasticity was solved numerically for eleven soil texture classes whose pore space is fully saturated by one of two very different fluids, air or water. Two modes of acoustic motion can be demonstrated to exist, known as the Biot fast and slow waves. Five lower excitation frequencies (100-500 Hz) were selected for numerical simulation, below which Darcy's law remains valid for describing porous media flow under wave perturbation. Numerical results show that in the frequency range we examined, the predicted phase speed of the Biot fast wave takes the same value as the Biot reference speed. The variation in speed is not obvious in a water-filled system, but becomes more significant in an air-filled system. When the pore fluid is water, an inverse linear relation exists between the phase speed of the Biot fast wave and porosity. An important physical parameter controlling its attenuation coefficient is intrinsic permeability, which renders a positive impact. A statistical analysis indicates that the attenuation coefficient of the Biot fast wave linearly increases with an increase in intrinsic permeability. In an air-saturated system, the phase speed of the Biot slow wave is found to be quadratically proportional to intrinsic permeability, whereas the attenuation coefficient of the Biot slow wave bears a quadratic relation with the inverse of intrinsic permeability. A study on the influence of pore fluid reveals that the Biot fast wave attenuates more in the water-saturated system than in the air

  11. Velocity and attenuation of scalar and elastic waves in random media: a spectral function approach.

    PubMed

    Calvet, Marie; Margerin, Ludovic

    2012-03-01

    This paper investigates the scattering of scalar and elastic waves in two-phase materials and single-mineral-cubic, hexagonal, orthorhombic-polycrystalline aggregates with randomly oriented grains. Based on the Dyson equation for the mean field, explicit expressions for the imaginary part of Green's function in the frequency-wavenumber domain (ω, p), also known as the spectral function, are derived. This approach allows the identification of propagating modes with their relative contribution, and the computation of both attenuation and phase velocity for each mode. The results should be valid from the Rayleigh (low-frequency) to the geometrical optics (high-frequency) regime. Comparisons with other approaches are presented for both scalar and elastic waves. PMID:22423683

  12. Coda wave attenuation parallel and perpendicular to the Mexican Pacific coast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novelo-Casanova, D. A.; Valdés-González, C.

    2000-10-01

    We calculated the quality factor, Qc, at frequencies from 6 to 24 Hz using coda waves of 97 aftershocks of the Petatlan, Mexico, earthquake (March 14, 1979; MS=7.6). The data were recorded parallel (between Acapulco and Playa Azul) and perpendicular (between Petatlan and Mexico City) to the coast. The results are the following: at 12 and 24 Hz there is no significant difference in the attenuation ( Qc-1) along the two paths; at 6 Hz, Qc-1 has a large scatter in both directions. This observation indicates strong site effects at this frequency; average Qc-1 is slightly higher between Petatlan-Acapulco (toward SE) than between Petatlan-Playa Azul (toward NW); and at high frequencies, Qc-1 remains essentially constant perpendicular to the coast. These results show that the large seismic wave amplifications in Mexico City are caused by shallow site effects.

  13. Attenuation of Higher Order Circumferential Thermoacoustic Waves in Viscous Fluid Lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, P. N.; Scarton, H. A.

    1996-06-01

    The acoustic waves propagation in viscous water, glycerin and air contained in a rigid wall, thermally insulated, infinite long, circular tube are studied using the exact three-dimensional thermal-fluid coupled equations for the vibrations in the n= 0, 1 circumferential modes. The first three axially symmetric modes at n= 0 and the first three non-axially symmetric modes at n= 1 are presented. The corresponding two-dimensional mode shapes are plotted so that the wave vibrations can be identified. It is found that the dispersion spectra, mode shapes and phase velocity dispersion plots of the three fluid mediums are very close. But the attenuation rates of glycerin and air are about 37 and 9 times higher than water, respectively.

  14. Point Measurement of Detonation Wave Speed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, F. K.; Gupta, N. K. M.; Wilson, D. R.

    Accurate determination of the speed of a detonation wave is important for studies of detonation phenomena. Different types of sensors that measure pressure, ion and flame have been used for this purpose.

  15. Beamwidth measurement of individual lithotripter shock waves

    PubMed Central

    Kreider, Wayne; Bailey, Michael R.; Ketterling, Jeffrey A.

    2009-01-01

    New lithotripters with narrower foci and higher peak pressures than the original Dornier HM3 electrohydraulic lithotripter have proven to be less effective and less safe. Hence, accurate measurements of the focal characteristics of lithotripter shock waves are important. The current technique for measuring beamwidth requires a collection of single-point measurements over multiple shock waves, thereby introducing error as a result of any shock-to-shock variability. This work reports on the construction of a hydrophone array sensor and on array measurements of individual lithotripter shock waves. Beamwidths for an electrohydraulic lithotripter with a broad-focus HM3-style reflector and a narrow-focus modified reflector were measured using both new and worn electrodes as well as two different electrical charging potentials. The array measured the waveform, beamwidth, and focal location of individual shock waves. The HM3-style reflector produced repeatable focal waveforms and beam profiles at an 18 kV charging potential with new and worn electrodes. Corresponding measurements suggest a narrower beamwidth than reported previously from averaged point measurements acquired under the same conditions. In addition, a lack of consistency in the measured beam profiles at 23 kV underscores the value of measuring individual shock waves. PMID:19206897

  16. Directional wave measurements using an autonomous vessel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hole, Lars R.; Fer, Ilker; Peddie, David

    2016-08-01

    An autonomous vessel, the Offshore Sensing Sailbuoy, was used for wave measurements near the Ekofisk oil platform complex in the North Sea (56.5º N, 3.2º E, operated by ConocoPhillips) from 6 to 20 November 2015. Being 100 % wind propelled, the Sailbuoy has two-way communication via the Iridium network and has the capability for missions of 6 months or more. It has previously been deployed in the Arctic, Norwegian Sea and the Gulf of Mexico, but the present study was the first test for wave measurements. During the campaign the Sailbuoy held position about 20 km northeast of Ekofisk (on the lee side) during rough conditions. Mean wind speed measured at Ekofisk during the campaign was 9.8 m/s, with a maximum of 20.4 m/s, with wind mostly from south and southwest. A Datawell MOSE G1000 GPS-based 2 Hz wave sensor was mounted on the Sailbuoy. Mean significant wave height (H s 1 min) measured was 3 m, whereas maximum H s was 6 m. Mean wave period was 7.7 s, while maximum wave height, H max, was 12.6 m. These measurements have been compared with non-directional Waverider observations at the Ekofisk complex. The agreement between the two data sets was very good, with a mean percent absolute error of 7 % and a linear correlation coefficient of 0.97. The wave frequency spectra measured by the two instruments compared very well, except for low H s (˜1 m), where the motion of the vessel seemed to influence the measurements. Nevertheless, the Sailbuoy performed well during this campaign, and results suggest that it is a suitable platform for wave measurements in a broad range of sea conditions.

  17. Reality and measurement of the wave function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unruh, W. G.

    1994-07-01

    Using a simple version of the model for the quantum measurement of a two-level system, the contention of Aharonov, Anandan, and Vaidman [Phys. Rev. A 47, 4616 (1993)] that one must in certain circumstances give the wave function an ontological as well as an epistemological significance is examined. I decide that their argument that the wave function of a system can be measured on a single system fails to establish the key point and that what they demonstrate is the ontological significance of certain operators in the theory, with the wave function playing its usual epistemological role.

  18. Stable harmonic multiplying gyrotron traveling-wave amplifier with distributed wall losses and attenuating severs

    SciTech Connect

    Yeh, Y. S.; Cheng, J. H.; Chen, L. K.; Hung, C. W.; Lo, C. Y.; Liao, C. W.

    2008-02-15

    Harmonic multiplying gyrotron traveling-wave amplifiers (gyro-TWTs) provide magnetic field reduction and frequency multiplication. However, spurious oscillations may reduce the amplification of the gyro-TWT. Most distributed-loss structures are stabilized in gyro-TWTs that operate at low beam currents. Attenuating severs are added to the interaction circuit of a distributed-loss gyro-TWT to prevent high beam currents that result in mode competition. This study proposes a Ka-band harmonic multiplying gyro-TWT, using distributed wall losses and attenuating severs, to improve the stability of the amplification and the performance of the amplifier. Simulation results reveal that the absolute instabilities are effectively suppressed by wall losses of the lossy and severed sections, especially in the low-k{sub z} and high-order modes. Meanwhile, the severed section, dividing an interaction circuit into several short sections, reduces the effective interaction lengths of the absolute instabilities. The stable harmonic multiplying gyro-TWT is predicted to yield a peak output power of 230 kW at 33.65 GHz with an efficiency of 30%, a saturated gain of 40 dB, and a 3 dB bandwidth of 0.8 GHz for a 60 kV, 13 A electron beam with an axial velocity spread of {delta}v{sub z}/v{sub z}=8%. The power/gain scaling and phase relation between the drive and the output waves are elucidated.

  19. Laser-generated shock wave attenuation aimed at microscale pyrotechnic device design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Hyeonju; Yoh, Jack J.

    2016-05-01

    To meet the rising demand for miniaturizing the pyrotechnic device that consists of donor/acceptor pair separated by a bulkhead or a thin gap, the shock initiation sensitivity in the microscale gap test configuration is investigated. For understanding the shock attenuation within a gap sample (304 stainless steel) thickness of 10˜800 μm, the laser-generated shock wave in water confinement is adopted. The shock properties are obtained from the free surface velocity by making use of a velocity interferometer system for any reflector (VISAR). Analytical models for plasma generation in a confined geometry and for evolution and decay of shock waves during the propagation are considered. The shape and amplitude of the laser-driven initial pressure load and its attenuation pattern in the gap are effectively controlled for targeting the microscale propagation distance and subsequent triggering pressure for the acceptor charge. The reported results are important in the precise controlling of the shock strength during the laser initiation of microscale pyrotechnic devices.

  20. Finite Difference Numerical Modeling of Gravito-Acoustic Wave Propagation in a Windy and Attenuating Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brissaud, Q.; Garcia, R.; Martin, R.; Komatitsch, D.

    2015-12-01

    The acoustic and gravity waves propagating in the planetary atmospheres have been studied intensively as markers of specific phenomena (tectonic events, explosions) or as contributors to the atmosphere dynamics. To get a better understanding of the physic behind these dynamic processes, both acoustic and gravity waves propagation should be modeled in an attenuating and windy 3D atmosphere from the ground to the upper thermosphere. Thus, In order to provide an efficient numerical tool at the regional or the global scale a high order finite difference time domain (FDTD) approach is proposed that relies on the linearized compressible Navier-Stokes equations (Landau 1959) with non constant physical parameters (density, viscosities and speed of sound) and background velocities (wind). One significant benefit from this code is its versatility. Indeed, it handles both acoustic and gravity waves in the same simulation that enables one to observe correlations between the two. Simulations will also be performed on 2D/3D realistic cases such as tsunamis in a full MSISE-00 atmosphere and gravity-wave generation through atmospheric explosions. Computations are validated by comparison to well-known analytical solutions based on dispersion relations in specific benchmark cases (atmospheric explosion and bottom displacement forcing).

  1. Broadband attenuation of Lamb waves through a periodic array of thin rectangular junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moiseyenko, Rayisa P.; Pennec, Yan; Marchal, Rémi; Bonello, Bernard; Djafari-Rouhani, Bahram

    2014-10-01

    We study theoretically subwavelength physical phenomena, such as resonant transmission and broadband sound shielding for Lamb waves propagating in an acoustic metamaterial made of a thin plate drilled with one or two row(s) of rectangular holes. The resonances and antiresonances of periodically arranged rectangular junctions separated by holes are investigated as a function of the geometrical parameters of the junctions. With one and two row(s) of holes, high frequency specific features in the transmission coefficient are explained in terms of a coupling of incident waves with both Fabry-Perot oscillations inside the junctions and induced surface acoustic waves between the homogeneous part of the plate and the row of holes. With two rows of holes, low frequency peaks and dips appear in the transmission spectrum. The choice of the distance between the two rows of holes allows the realization of a broadband low frequency acoustic shielding with attenuation over 99% for symmetric waves in a wide low frequency range and over 90% for antisymmetric ones. The origin of the transmission gap is discussed in terms of localized modes of the "H" element made by the junctions, connecting the two homogeneous parts of the plate.

  2. Finite-difference numerical modelling of gravitoacoustic wave propagation in a windy and attenuating atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brissaud, Quentin; Martin, Roland; Garcia, Raphaël F.; Komatitsch, Dimitri

    2016-07-01

    Acoustic and gravity waves propagating in planetary atmospheres have been studied intensively as markers of specific phenomena such as tectonic events or explosions or as contributors to atmosphere dynamics. To get a better understanding of the physics behind these dynamic processes, both acoustic and gravity waves propagation should be modelled in a 3-D attenuating and windy atmosphere extending from the ground to the upper thermosphere. Thus, in order to provide an efficient numerical tool at the regional or global scale, we introduce a finite difference in the time domain (FDTD) approach that relies on the linearized compressible Navier-Stokes equations with a background flow (wind). One significant benefit of such a method is its versatility because it handles both acoustic and gravity waves in the same simulation, which enables one to observe interactions between them. Simulations can be performed for 2-D or 3-D realistic cases such as tsunamis in a full MSISE-00 atmosphere or gravity-wave generation by atmospheric explosions. We validate the computations by comparing them to analytical solutions based on dispersion relations in specific benchmark cases: an atmospheric explosion, and a ground displacement forcing.

  3. Wave Measurements Using GPS Velocity Signals

    PubMed Central

    Doong, Dong-Jiing; Lee, Beng-Chun; Kao, Chia Chuen

    2011-01-01

    This study presents the idea of using GPS-output velocity signals to obtain wave measurement data. The application of the transformation from a velocity spectrum to a displacement spectrum in conjunction with the directional wave spectral theory are the core concepts in this study. Laboratory experiments were conducted to verify the accuracy of the inversed displacement of the surface of the sea. A GPS device was installed on a moored accelerometer buoy to verify the GPS-derived wave parameters. It was determined that loss or drifting of the GPS signal, as well as energy spikes occurring in the low frequency band led to erroneous measurements. Through the application of moving average skill and a process of frequency cut-off to the GPS output velocity, correlations between GPS-derived, and accelerometer buoy-measured significant wave heights and periods were both improved to 0.95. The GPS-derived one-dimensional and directional wave spectra were in agreement with the measurements. Despite the direction verification showing a 10° bias, this exercise still provided useful information with sufficient accuracy for a number of specific purposes. The results presented in this study indicate that using GPS output velocity is a reasonable alternative for the measurement of ocean waves. PMID:22346618

  4. Microwave and Millimeter Wave Characteristics and Attenuation of Clouds over some Malaysian Equatorial Stations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandeep, J. S.; Hassan, S. I. S.

    2008-03-01

    Based on radar range height indicator (RHI) measurements, cloud characteristics in relation to radiowave propagation over three locations in different geographical region in western Malaysia have been presented. It is seen that low cloud occurrence over these locations are quite significant. Cloud attenuation and noise temperature can result in serious degradation of telecommunication link performances. This paper presents cloud coverage in different months, 0°C isotherm height and cloud attenuation results at 12 GHz, 20 GHz, 36 GHz, 50 GHz, 70 GHz and 100 GHz over measurement site. The low level cloud over the measurement sites has been found to occur for many days and nights and particularly in the months of April to May and October to December. Such results are useful for satellite communication and remote sensing application in Malaysia.

  5. Physical Models of Seismic-Attenuation Measurements on Lab Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coulman, T. J.; Morozov, I. B.

    2012-12-01

    Seismic attenuation in Earth materials is often measured in the lab by using low-frequency forced oscillations or static creep experiments. The usual assumption in interpreting and even designing such experiments is the "viscoelastic" behavior of materials, i.e., their description by the notions of a Q-factor and material memory. However, this is not the only theoretical approach to internal friction, and it also involves several contradictions with conventional mechanics. From the viewpoint of mechanics, the frequency-dependent Q becomes a particularly enigmatic property attributed to the material. At the same time, the behavior of rock samples in seismic-attenuation experiments can be explained by a strictly mechanical approach. We use this approach to simulate such experiments analytically and numerically for a system of two cylinders consisting of a rock sample and elastic standard undergoing forced oscillations, and also for a single rock sample cylinder undergoing static creep. The system is subject to oscillatory compression or torsion, and the phase-lag between the sample and standard is measured. Unlike in the viscoelastic approach, a full Lagrangian formulation is considered, in which material anelasticity is described by parameters of "solid viscosity" and a dissipation function from which the constitutive equation is derived. Results show that this physical model of anelasticity predicts creep results very close to those obtained by using empirical Burger's bodies or Andrade laws. With nonlinear (non-Newtonian) solid viscosity, the system shows an almost instantaneous initial deformation followed by slow creep towards an equilibrium. For Aheim Dunite, the "rheologic" parameters of nonlinear viscosity are υ=0.79 and η=2.4 GPa-s. Phase-lag results for nonlinear viscosity show Q's slowly decreasing with frequency. To explain a Q increasing with frequency (which is often observed in the lab and in the field), one has to consider nonlinear viscosity with

  6. Shear wave speed and dispersion measurements using crawling wave chirps.

    PubMed

    Hah, Zaegyoo; Partin, Alexander; Parker, Kevin J

    2014-10-01

    This article demonstrates the measurement of shear wave speed and shear speed dispersion of biomaterials using a chirp signal that launches waves over a range of frequencies. A biomaterial is vibrated by two vibration sources that generate shear waves inside the medium, which is scanned by an ultrasound imaging system. Doppler processing of the acquired signal produces an image of the square of vibration amplitude that shows repetitive constructive and destructive interference patterns called "crawling waves." With a chirp vibration signal, successive Doppler frames are generated from different source frequencies. Collected frames generate a distinctive pattern which is used to calculate the shear speed and shear speed dispersion. A special reciprocal chirp is designed such that the equi-phase lines of a motion slice image are straight lines. Detailed analysis is provided to generate a closed-form solution for calculating the shear wave speed and the dispersion. Also several phantoms and an ex vivo human liver sample are scanned and the estimation results are presented. PMID:24658144

  7. Characteristics of the near-bottom suspended sediment field over the continental shelf off northern California based on optical attenuation measurements during STRESS and SMILE

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Trowbridge, J.H.; Butman, B.; Limeburner, R.

    1994-01-01

    Time-series measurements of current velocity, optical attenuation and surface wave intensity obtained during the Sediment Transport Events on Shelves and Slopes (STRESS) experiments, combined with shipboard measurements of conductivity, temperature and optical attenuation obtained during the Shelf Mixed Layer Experiment (SMILE), provide a description of the sediment concentration field over the central and outer shelf off northern California. The questions addressed are: (1) existence and characteristics of bottom nepheloid layers and their relationship to bottom mixed layers; (2) characteristics of temporal fluctuations in sediment concentration and their relationship to waves and currents; (3) spatial scales over which suspended sediment concentrations vary horizontally; and (4) vertical distribution of suspended sediment. ?? 1994.

  8. Closing the Gap on Measuring Heat Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perkins, S. E.; Alexander, L.

    2012-12-01

    Since the 4th IPCC assessment report, the scientific literature has established that anthropogenic climate change encompasses adverse changes in both mean climate conditions and extreme events, such as heat waves. Indeed, the affects of heat waves are felt across many different sectors, and have high economic, human, and physical impacts over many global regions. The spatial and monetary scale of heat wave impacts emphasizes the necessity of measuring and studying such events in an informative manner, which gives justice to the geographical region affected, the communities impacted, and the climatic fields involved. However, due to such wide interest in heat waves, their definition remains broad in describing a period of consecutive days where conditions are excessively hotter than normal. This has allowed for the employment of a plethora of metrics, which are usually unique to a given sector, or do not appropriately describe some of the important features of heat wave events. As such, it is difficult to ascertain a clear message regarding changes in heat waves, both in the observed record and in projections of future climate. This study addresses this issue by developing a multi-index, multi-aspect framework in which to measure heat waves. The methodology was constructed by assessing a wide range of heat wave and heat wave-related indices, both proposed and employed in the scientific literature. The broad implications of the occurrences, frequency and duration of heat waves and respective changes were also highly considered. The resulting indices measure three or more consecutive days where 1) maximum temperature exceeds the 90th percentile (TX90pct); 2) minimum temperature exceeds the 90th percentile (TN90pct); and 3) daily average temperature has a positive excess heat factor (EHF). The 90th percentiles from which TX90pct and TN90pct are calculated are based on 15-day windows for each calendar day, whereas the EHF is based upon two pre-calculated indices that

  9. Weak measurement and Bohmian conditional wave functions

    SciTech Connect

    Norsen, Travis; Struyve, Ward

    2014-11-15

    It was recently pointed out and demonstrated experimentally by Lundeen et al. that the wave function of a particle (more precisely, the wave function possessed by each member of an ensemble of identically-prepared particles) can be “directly measured” using weak measurement. Here it is shown that if this same technique is applied, with appropriate post-selection, to one particle from a perhaps entangled multi-particle system, the result is precisely the so-called “conditional wave function” of Bohmian mechanics. Thus, a plausibly operationalist method for defining the wave function of a quantum mechanical sub-system corresponds to the natural definition of a sub-system wave function which Bohmian mechanics uniquely makes possible. Similarly, a weak-measurement-based procedure for directly measuring a sub-system’s density matrix should yield, under appropriate circumstances, the Bohmian “conditional density matrix” as opposed to the standard reduced density matrix. Experimental arrangements to demonstrate this behavior–and also thereby reveal the non-local dependence of sub-system state functions on distant interventions–are suggested and discussed. - Highlights: • We study a “direct measurement” protocol for wave functions and density matrices. • Weakly measured states of entangled particles correspond to Bohmian conditional states. • Novel method of observing quantum non-locality is proposed.

  10. Using Kinect to Measure Wave Spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fong, J.; Loose, B.; Lovely, A.

    2012-12-01

    Gas exchange at the air-sea interface is enhanced by aqueous turbulence generated by capillary-gravity waves, affecting the absorption of atmospheric carbon dioxide by the ocean. The mean squared wave slope of these waves correlates strongly with the gas transfer velocity. To measure the energy in capillary-gravity waves, this project aims to use the Microsoft Xbox Kinect to measure the short period wave spectrum. Kinect is an input device for the Xbox 360 with an infrared laser and camera that can be used to map objects at high frequency and spatial resolution, similar to a LiDAR sensor. For air-sea gas exchange, we are interested in the short period gravity waves with a wavenumber of 40 to 100 radians per meter. We have successfully recorded data from Kinect at a sample rate of 30 Hz with 640x480 pixel resolution, consistent with the manufacturer specifications for its scanning capabilities. At 0.5 m distance from the surface, this yields a nominal resolution of approximately 0.7 mm with a theoretical vertical precision of 0.24 mm and a practical 1 σ noise level of 0.91 mm. We have found that Kinect has some limitations in its ability to detect the air-water interface. Clean water proved to be a weaker reflector for the Kinect IR source, whereas a relatively strong signal can be received for liquids with a high concentration of suspended solids. Colloids such as milk and Ca(OH)2 in water proved more suitable media from which height and wave spectra were detectable. Moreover, we will show results from monochromatic as well as wind-wave laboratory studies. With the wave field measurements from Kinect, gas transfer velocities at the air-sea interface can be determined.

  11. S wave attenuation and site effects in the region of Friuli, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro, Raúl R.; Pacor, Francesca; Sala, Alfio; Petrungaro, Carmine

    1996-10-01

    We used strong motion records from the 1976 Friuli earthquake (M 6.4) and 10 of the biggest aftershocks recorded by the National Accelerograph Network of the Electrical Power Company of Italy to estimate the quality factor Q of S waves in this region. The wide distance range of the recordings (10 < r < 190 km) permits us to analyze the spectral amplitude decay of the records using a nonparametric approach [e.g., Anderson and Quaas, 1988; Castro et al., 1990; Anderson, 1991]. We obtained attenuation functions for a set of 18 frequencies ranging between 0.4 and 25.0 Hz. The values of Q retrieved from the attenuation functions obtained follow the frequency-dependent relation Q = 20.4f. A test of the method was made using a second data set consisting of digital seismograms from the Friuli-Venezia Giulia Seismograph Network. In spite of the different size of the volume sampled by these data (10 < r < 131 km), the frequency dependence of Q obtained (Q = 16.1f0.92) is similar to that obtained with the strong motion data set. The near-surface attenuation was also estimated using the model proposed by Anderson and Hough [1984] and Anderson [1991]. We found that κ0 is smaller for the strong motion stations located on rock compared to stations located on either shallow or soft sediments. To estimate the site response of the strong motion stations, we corrected the spectral records for the attenuation effect and then inverted the corrected records to separate source and site effects using the inversion scheme proposed by Andrews [1986]. To verify the site amplification estimates obtained, we also calculated the transfer function of each site using Nakamura's [1989] method for S wave [e.g., Lermo and Chavez-García, 1993]. In general, the shapes of the site functions obtained with the inversion are consistent with the transfer functions obtained calculating the horizontal to vertical component ratio.

  12. Experimental measurements of seismic attenuation in microfracture sedimentary rock

    SciTech Connect

    Peacock, S.; McCann, C.; Sothcott, J.; Astin, T.R. . Research Inst. for Sedimentology)

    1994-09-01

    In a previous paper (Peacock et al., 1994), the authors related ultrasonic velocities in water-saturated Carrara Marble to crack densities in polished sections to verify Hudson's (1980, 1981, 1986) theory for velocities in cracked rock. They describe the empirical relationships between attenuation and crack density that they established during these experiments in the hope of clarifying the mechanism of attenuation in rocks with fluid-filled cracks. Relating seismic velocity and attenuation to crack density is important in predicting the productivity of fractured petroleum reservoirs such as the North Sea Brent Field. It also allows cracks to be used as stress indicators throughout the shallow crust (Crampin and Lovell, 1991).

  13. Body-wave Attenuation in the South-Central Region of the Gulf of California, México

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro, R. R.; Vidales-Basurto, C. A.; Huerta, C. I.; Sumy, D. F.; Gaherty, J. B.; Collins, J. A.

    2014-12-01

    We present results from a recent study of seismic attenuation of body waves in the south-central region of the Gulf of California (GoC) obtained using records from the Network of Autonomously Recording Seismographs of Baja California (NARS-Baja), from the CICESE's Broadband Seismological Network of the GoC (RESBAN), and from the Ocean Bottom Seismographs (OBS) deployed as part of the Sea of Cortez Ocean Bottom Array experiment (SCOOBA). We examine 27 well-located earthquakes that occurred from October 2005 to October 2006 with magnitudes (Mw) between 3.5 and 4.8. We estimated S-wave site effects by calculating horizontal to vertical spectral ratios and determined attenuation functions with a nonparametric model by inverting the observed spectral amplitudes of 21 frequencies between 0.13 and 12.59 Hz for the SCOOBA (OBS) stations and 19 frequencies between 0.16 and 7.94 Hz for NARS-Baja and RESBAN stations. We calculated the geometrical spreading and the attenuation (1/Q) factors for two distance intervals (10-120 km and 120-220 km, respectively) for each frequency considered. The estimates of Q obtained with the SCOOBA (OBS) records for the interval 10-120 km indicate that the P waves attenuate more than S waves (QP=34 f 0.82, QS=59 f 0.90) for frequencies between 0.6 and 12.6 Hz; while for the 120-220 km interval, where ray-paths travel deeper, S waves attenuate more than P waves (QP=117 f 0.44, QS=51 f 1.12). The estimates of Q obtained using NARS-Baja and RESBAN records, within 10-120 km, indicate that P waves attenuate more than S waves (QP=69 f 0.87, QS=176 f 0.61) at frequencies between 0.3 and 6.3 Hz; while at the 120-220 km distance interval S waves attenuate slightly more than P waves (QP=39 f 0.64, QS=48 f 0.37) at high frequencies (f > 3 Hz). These results, based on a unique OBS dataset, provide an indirect mean to constrain future models of the thermal structure beneth the GoC.

  14. Numerical simulation of electromagnetic wave attenuation in a nonequilibrium chemically reacting hypervelocity flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nusca, Michael Joseph, Jr.

    The effects of various gasdynamic phenomena on the attenuation of an electromagnetic wave propagating through the nonequilibrium chemically reacting air flow field generated by an aerodynamic body travelling at high velocity is investigated. The nonequilibrium flow field is assumed to consist of seven species including nitric oxide ions and free electrons. The ionization of oxygen and nitrogen atoms is ignored. The aerodynamic body considered is a blunt wedge. The nonequilibrium chemically reacting flow field around this body is numerically simulated using a computer code based on computational fluid dynamics. The computer code solves the Navier-Stokes equations including mass diffusion and heat transfer, using a time-marching, explicit Runge-Kutta scheme. A nonequilibrium air kinetics model consisting of seven species and twenty-eight reactions as well as an equilibrium air model consisting of the same seven species are used. The body surface boundaries are considered as adiabatic or isothermal walls, as well as fully-catalytic and non-catalytic surfaces. Both laminar and turbulent flows are considered; wall generated flow turbulence is simulated using an algebraic mixing length model. An electromagnetic wave is considered as originating from an antenna within the body and is effected by the free electrons in the chemically reacting flow. Analysis of the electromagnetics is performed separately from the fluid dynamic analysis using a series solution of Maxwell's equations valid for the propagation of a long-wavelength plane electromagnetic wave through a thin (i.e., in comparison to wavelength) inhomogeneous plasma layer. The plasma layer is the chemically reacting shock layer around the body. The Navier-Stokes equations are uncoupled from Maxwell's equations. The results of this computational study demonstrate for the first time and in a systematic fashion, the importance of several parameters including equilibrium chemistry, nonequilibrium chemical kinetics, the

  15. Seismic wave attenuation and dispersion due to wave-induced fluid flow in rocks with strong permeability fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Germán Rubino, J; Monachesi, Leonardo B; Müller, Tobias M; Guarracino, Luis; Holliger, Klaus

    2013-12-01

    Oscillatory fluid movements in heterogeneous porous rocks induced by seismic waves cause dissipation of wave field energy. The resulting seismic signature depends not only on the rock compressibility distribution, but also on a statistically averaged permeability. This so-called equivalent seismic permeability does not, however, coincide with the respective equivalent flow permeability. While this issue has been analyzed for one-dimensional (1D) media, the corresponding two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) cases remain unexplored. In this work, this topic is analyzed for 2D random medium realizations having strong permeability fluctuations. With this objective, oscillatory compressibility simulations based on the quasi-static poroelasticity equations are performed. Numerical analysis shows that strong permeability fluctuations diminish the magnitude of attenuation and velocity dispersion due to fluid flow, while the frequency range where these effects are significant gets broader. By comparing the acoustic responses obtained using different permeability averages, it is also shown that at very low frequencies the equivalent seismic permeability is similar to the equivalent flow permeability, while for very high frequencies this parameter approaches the arithmetic average of the permeability field. These seemingly generic findings have potentially important implications with regard to the estimation of equivalent flow permeability from seismic data. PMID:25669286

  16. Comparison of OLYMPUS beacon and radiometric attenuation measurements at Blacksburg, Virginia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snider, J. B.; Jacobson, M. D.; Beeler, R. H.; Hazen, D. A.

    1991-01-01

    Measurements of attenuation of the 20 and 30 GHz beacons onboard the OLYMPUS satellite are compared to simultaneous observations of atmospheric attenuation by a multichannel microwave radiometer along the same path. Departures from high correlation between the two measurements are believed to be related to differences in antenna beamwidths. Mean equivalent zenith attenuations derived from the slant path data are compared to zenith observations made at previous locations.

  17. Temperature dependence of shear wave attenuation in partially molten gabbronorite at seismic frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontaine, Fabrice R.; Ildefonse, Benoit; Bagdassarov, Nickolai S.

    2005-12-01

    Torsion oscillatory deformation experiments have been performed at high temperatures (600-1170°C) and over a wide range of low frequencies (20-2.10-3 Hz) on fine-grained gabbronorite samples from the Oman ophiolite in order to determine the shear wave attenuation as a function of temperature and melt fraction. The specimens have a small and uniform grain size (0.25-0.3 mm) and do not contain secondary, hydrated minerals. Measurements of internal friction (Q-1) were performed using a forced oscillatory torsion apparatus at small strains (~10-7), and with increasing small temperature steps to reduce thermal microcracking. The general dependence of Q-1 to frequency is Q-1~ω-α, where ω is the angular velocity of forced oscillations and α is an empirical exponent. Below the melting temperature (~1050°C), α has average values of ~0.15 at low frequency (<=0.5 Hz) and 0.06 at higher frequency. Above the melting temperature, α has average values of ~0.22 at low frequency and -0.02 at higher frequency. This frequency dependence of Q-1 is attributed to a viscoelastic behaviour due to the diffusion controlled grain boundary sliding, and partially to the squirt flow of the melt-phase wetting grain boundaries. The onset of melting is associated with a markedly higher Q-1 and a stronger dependence of Q-1 on temperature. The melt-related mechanical dissipation process could be a melt squirt flow. The characteristic frequency for the melt squirt flow is ωm~ 0.15-300 Hz when the melt pocket aspect ratio is ~10-3-10-2. Around the melting temperature the internal friction can be approximated by an experimental power law Q-1=A.[ω-1.d-1. exp(-Ea/RT)]α with α~ 0.08, A= 34.72s-αμm-α and Ea~ 873 kJmol-1.

  18. Systematic scanner variability of patient CT attenuation measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Judy, Philip F.; Nawfel, Richard D.; Silverman, Stuart G.

    2009-02-01

    CT numbers of the spleen, liver, and trachea air were measured from non-contrast images obtained from 4-channel and 64-channel scanners from the same vendor. Image sections of 1 mm and 5 mm were reconstructed using smooth and sharp kernels. For spleen and liver, no significant differences associated with the variations in kernels or slice thickness could be demonstrated. The increase of the number of channels from 4 to 64 lowered the spleen CT numbers from 53 HU to 43 HU (p <0.00001). The 4-channel spleen CT numbers slightly increased as function of patient size, while the 64-channel CT numbers decreased as function of patient size. Linear regressions predicted for 40-cm patients the spleen 64-channel CT values were 23 HU lower than 4-channel CT numbers. The smooth kernel, 4-channel trachea air CT numbers had mean of -1004 +/-4.8 HU and the 64-channel trachea air CT numbers had a mean of -989+/-4.5 HU. The patient-size dependencies suggest that the CT attenuation variation is associated with increased scatter in 64-channel MSCT. Using CT number to distinguish solid lesions from cysts or quantitative evaluation of COPD disease using CT images may be complicated by inconsistencies between CT scanners.

  19. High-power gyrotron traveling-wave amplifier with distributed wall losses and attenuating severs

    SciTech Connect

    Yeh, Y.S.; Shin, Y.Y.; You, Y.C.; Chen, L.K.

    2005-04-15

    Distributed-loss gyrotron traveling-wave amplifiers (gyro-TWTs) with high-gain, broadband, and millimeter-wave capabilities have been demonstrated. Most structures with distributed wall losses are stabilized in gyro-TWTs that operate at low beam currents. Attenuating severs are added to the interaction circuit of a distributed-loss gyro-TWT to prevent high beam currents that result in mode competition. Simulation results show that gyrotron backward-wave oscillations (gyro-BWOs) are not effectively suppressed by the lossy section; in contrast, the severed sections can effectively enhance the start-oscillation threshold of gyro-BWOs in the proposed gyro-TWT. Meanwhile, localized reflective oscillations seem not to occur in the gyro-TWT unless it operates at a high magnetic field or with a high interaction length. The stable gyro-TWT, operating in the low-loss TE{sub 01} mode, is predicted to yield a peak output power of 405 kW at 33 GHz with an efficiency of 20%, a saturated gain of 77 dB and a 3 dB bandwidth of 2.5 GHz for a 100 kV, 20 A electron beam with an axial velocity spread of {delta}v{sub z}/v{sub z}=5%.

  20. Attenuation, source parameters and site effects of SH waves in Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Shun-Chiang; Wen, Kuo-Liang

    2016-04-01

    Generalized inversion technique (GIT) (Castro et al., 1990) was used to derive SH-wave in the frequency range 0.2-25 Hz (interval 0.1 Hz). The inversion results can find attenuation characteristics, earthquake source parameters and site amplification functions. The characteristics of the site amplification are referred to horizontal-to-vertical (H/V) Fourier spectral ratios of microtremor for a referent rock site. The SH-wave from 28 earthquakes with magnitude ranging from ML 5 to 7, of 1319 earthquake records at 146 TSMIP strong motion stations in Jianan Plain, southwestern Taiwan are used in this analysis. The SH-wave quality factor Q(f) is estimated as 52.83f0.77 for 0.2<= f < =25 Hz. The stress drops can be found from source spectra by using the omega-square model. The results of site amplification are similar to horizontal-to-vertical spectral ratio of the microtremor which have clearly and similar predominant peaks.

  1. Frequency dependent attenuation characteristics of coda waves in the Northwestern Himalayan (India) region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Sushil; Singh, Priyamvada; Singh, Pitam; Biswal, Shubhasmita; Parija, Mahesh Prasad

    2016-03-01

    Digital seismogram data of 82 earthquakes from the Northwestern Himalayan (India) region recorded at different stations during 2004-2006 were analyzed to study the seismic coda wave attenuation characteristics in this region. We used 132 seismic observations from local earthquakes with a hypocentral distance <240 km and a magnitude range of 1.2-4.9 to study the coda QC using the single isotropic scattering model. These earthquakes were recorded at 20 temporary seismic stations installed in the Northwestern Himalayas (India) by the Wadia institute of Himalayan Geology, Dehradun. The QC values were estimated at 10 central frequencies: 1.5, 3, 5, 7, 9, 12, 16, 20, 24, and 28 Hz using starting lapse-times of 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, and 60 s and coda window-lengths of 10, 20, 30, 40, and 50 s. The QC fits the frequency dependent power-law, QC =Q0fn . For a 10 s lapse time with a 10-s coda window length QC = 47.42f1.012 and for a 50 s lapse time with a 50 s coda window length, QC = 204.1f0.934 . Q0 (QC at 1 Hz) varied from ∼47 for a 10 s lapse time and a 10 s window length, to ∼204 for a 50 s lapse time and a 50 s window length. An average frequency dependent power law fit for the study region may be given as QC = 116.716f0.9943 . The exponent of the frequency dependence law n ranged from 1.08 to 0.9, which correlates well with values obtained in other seismically and tectonically active and heterogeneous regions of the world. In our study region, QC increases both with respect to lapse time and frequency, i.e., the attenuation decreases as the quality factor is inversely proportional to attenuation. The low QC values or high attenuation at lower frequencies and high QC values or low attenuation at higher frequencies suggest that the heterogeneity decreases with increasing depth in our study region.

  2. Gamma ray attenuation coefficient measurement for neutron-absorbent materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jalali, Majid; Mohammadi, Ali

    2008-05-01

    The compounds Na 2B 4O 7, H 3BO 3, CdCl 2 and NaCl and their solutions attenuate gamma rays in addition to neutron absorption. These compounds are widely used in the shielding of neutron sources, reactor control and neutron converters. Mass attenuation coefficients of gamma related to the four compounds aforementioned, in energies 662, 778.9, 867.38, 964.1, 1085.9, 1173, 1212.9, 1299.1,1332 and 1408 keV, have been determined by the γ rays transmission method in a good geometry setup; also, these coefficients were calculated by MCNP code. A comparison between experiments, simulations and Xcom code has shown that the study has potential application for determining the attenuation coefficient of various compound materials. Experiment and computation show that H 3BO 3 with the lowest average Z has the highest gamma ray attenuation coefficient among the aforementioned compounds.

  3. The Attenuation of a Detonation Wave by an Aircraft Engine Axial Turbine Stage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanZante, Dale; Envia, Edmane; Turner, Mark G.

    2007-01-01

    A Constant Volume Combustion Cycle Engine concept consisting of a Pulse Detonation Combustor (PDC) followed by a conventional axial turbine was simulated numerically to determine the attenuation and reflection of a notional PDC pulse by the turbine. The multi-stage, time-accurate, turbomachinery solver TURBO was used to perform the calculation. The solution domain consisted of one notional detonation tube coupled to 5 vane passages and 8 rotor passages representing 1/8th of the annulus. The detonation tube was implemented as an initial value problem with the thermodynamic state of the tube contents, when the detonation wave is about to exit, provided by a 1D code. Pressure time history data from the numerical simulation was compared to experimental data from a similar configuration to verify that the simulation is giving reasonable results. Analysis of the pressure data showed a spectrally averaged attenuation of about 15 dB across the turbine stage. An evaluation of turbine performance is also presented.

  4. Attenuation Characteristics of Body-Waves for the Bilaspur Region of Himachal Lesser Himalaya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandana; Kumar, Ashwani; Gupta, S. C.

    2016-02-01

    The attenuation characteristics around Bilaspur region of the Himachal Lesser Himalaya have been estimated adopting extended-coda-normalization method, and using a data set of 41 local events (0.5 < M L ≤ 2.9) that occurred in the region from May 2013 to March 2014. The frequency-dependent relations governing the quality factors of P-waves ( Q α ) and S-waves ( Q β ) in the frequency range from 1.5 to 24 Hz are: ( Q α ) = (43 ± 4) f 1.30±0.04 and Q β = (79 ± 6) f 1.25±0.02. The average estimates of ( Q α ) and ( Q β ) are found to vary from 71 and 125 at 1.5 Hz to 2901 and 4243 at 24 Hz, respectively. The ( Q α ) and ( Q β ) estimates are compared to the similar estimates obtained for the other seismically active regions of the Himalaya. It is found that for the various Himalayan regions, the ( Q α ) estimates at 1 Hz vary between 22 (for the Kumaon Himalaya) and 97 (for the northwest Himalaya), whereas ( Q β ) estimates range between 63 (for the Garhwal Himalaya) and 127 (for the northwest Himalaya). For the Bilaspur region, the ( Q β )/( Q α ) ratio is greater than unity and varies between 1.84 and 1.45 in the frequency range from 1 to 24 Hz. The region-specific attenuation relations can be adopted for estimating earthquake source parameters, simulating strong ground motion and assessing seismic hazard for the Bilaspur region of Himachal Lesser Himalaya.

  5. Attenuation of laser generated ultrasound in steel at high temperatures; comparison of theory and experimental measurements.

    PubMed

    Kube, Christopher M

    2016-08-01

    This article reexamines some recently published laser ultrasound measurements of the longitudinal attenuation coefficient obtained during annealing of two steel samples (DP600 and S550). Theoretical attenuation models based on perturbation theory are compared to these experimental measurements. It is observed that the Rayleigh attenuation formulas provide the correct qualitative agreement, but overestimate the experimental values. The more general theoretical attenuation model considered here demonstrates strong quantitative agreement, which highlights the applicability of the model during real-time metal processing. PMID:27235777

  6. Measurements of two types of dilatational waves in an air-filled unconsolidated sand

    SciTech Connect

    Hickey, C.J.; Sabatier, J.M.

    1997-07-01

    This study consists of laboratory measurements of dilatational waves propagating through an air-filled unconsolidated sand. One excitation technique consists of a loudspeaker suspended in the air above the packing of sand. A second excitation technique uses a mechanical shaker in contact with the sand. The transmitted signals are received using microphones and geophones located at various depths within the sand. An interpretation based on measured phase speeds indicates that the transmitted energy from the suspended loudspeaker source is partitioned primarily but not exclusively into the type-II dilatational wave. This wave attenuates rapidly and is only detected at depths of less than about 15 cm for this particular sample. At the deeper depths the detected signal is associated with the type-I dilatational wave. The mechanical shaker produces only a type-I dilatational wave. Both the geophone and microphone sensors can detect both types of dilatational waves. {copyright} {ital 1997 Acoustical Society of America.}

  7. Attenuation of stress waves in single and multi-layered structures. [mitigation of elastic and plastic stress waves during spacecraft landing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, J. C. S.; Tsui, C. Y.

    1972-01-01

    Analytical and experimental studies were made of the attenuation of the stress waves during passage through single and multilayer structures. The investigation included studies on elastic and plastic stress wave propagation in the composites and those on shock mitigating material characteristics such as dynamic stress-strain relations and energy absorbing properties. The results of the studies are applied to methods for reducing the stresses imposed on a spacecraft during planetary or ocean landings.

  8. Measuring the frequency-dependent attenuation in lossy material using large time-bandwidth product ultrasound signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, Grant A.

    1999-06-01

    Broadband signals are commonly used in ultrasonic spectroscopy to measure the frequency dependent attenuation characteristics of lossy solid media. Compared to narrowband signals, broadband signals are preferred since they do not require tedious frequency scanning and extensive data reduction efforts. Typically these broadband signals take the form of a pulse. Although the spectral range of a pulse is wide, the spectral resolution is limited by the duration of the signal. By employing signals with large time- bandwidth-products, the overall accuracy and resolution of ultrasonic spectroscopy can be improved. Expressions for the interaction of longitudinal waves, with large time- bandwidth-product, and isotropic materials are developed. The approach is effective for evaluating material with signals optimized for a frequency resolution and range of interest, but can also be used when thin materials (wave-speed and attenuation can be determined when density and thickness are measured. Explicit account is made for diffraction corrections, multiple echo contributions, and interface scattering losses. The formalism is compared with the traditional analysis approach to illustrate the improved accuracy of the new technique, detailing where diffraction correction and multiple echo effects can become significant. Measured attenuation spectra are presented for common plastic materials as well as for a castable polyurethane commonly used in ultrasonic transducer fabrication.

  9. Optical fiber spectral attenuation measurement by using tunable laser sources to improve accuracy and uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seah, Chee Hwee; Zhang, Jing; Xiang, Ning

    2015-07-01

    With reference to the IEC 60793-1-140 international standard of optical fibre measurement methods and test procedures in attenuation, we studied the optical fibre attenuation measurement by cut-back method using tuneable lasers source. By using a power stabilised laser source, we measured the fibre attenuation in the wavelength range from 1270 nm to 1350nm and from 1520 nm to 1620 nm using `cut-back' technique. The power measurement before and after cut-back have better repeatability. Besides, the evaluation of the splicing losses before and after cut-back as well as the evaluation of effective refractive index (Neff) will improve the accuracy in calculating the fibre attenuation. Our method will improve accuracy and reduce uncertainties in the measurement and thus enable us to establish our own optical fibre spectral attenuation standard.

  10. A Simultaneous Multi-phase Approach to Determine P-wave and S-wave Attenuation of the Crust and Upper Mantle

    SciTech Connect

    Pasyanos, M E; Walter, W R; Matzel, E M

    2009-02-26

    We have generalized the methodology of our regional amplitude tomography from the Lg phase to the four primary regional phases (Pn, Pg, Sn, Lg). Differences in the geometrical spreading, source term, site term, and travel paths are accounted for, while event source parameters such as seismic moment are consistent among phases. In the process, we have developed the first regional attenuation model that uses the amplitudes of four regional phases to determine a comprehensive P-wave and S-wave attenuation model of the crust and upper mantle. When applied to an area encompassing the Middle East, eastern Europe, western Asia, south Asia, and northeast Africa for the 1-2 Hz passband, we find large differences in the attenuation of the lithosphere across the region. The tectonic Tethys collision zone has high attenuation, while stable outlying regions have low attenuation. While crust and mantle Q variations are often consistent, we do find several notable areas where they differ considerably, but are appropriate given the region's tectonic history. Lastly, the relative values of Qp and Qs indicate that scattering Q is likely the dominant source of attenuation in the crust at these frequencies.

  11. Study of stress waves in geomedia and effect of a soil cover layer on wave attenuation using a 1-D finite-difference method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhi-liang; Li, Yong-chi; Wang, J. G.

    2006-12-01

    The propagation and attenuation of blast-induced stress waves differs between geomedia such as rock or soil mass. This paper numerically studies the propagation and attenuation of blast-induced elastoplastic waves in deep geomedia by using a one-dimensional (1-D) finite-difference code. Firstly, the elastoplastic Cap models for rock and soil masses are introduced into the governing equations of spherical wave motion and a FORTRAN code based on the finite difference method is developed. Secondly, an underground spherical blast is simulated with this code and verified by software, RENEWTO. The propagation of stress-waves in rock and soil masses is numerically investigated, respectively. Finally, the effect of a soil cover layer on the attenuation of stress waves in the rear rock mass is studied. It is determined that large plastic deformation of geomedia can effectively dissipate the energy of stress-waves inward and the developed 1-D finite difference code coupled with elastoplastic Cap models is convenient and effective in the numerical simulations for underground spherical explosion.

  12. Imaging Lower Mantle Heterogeniety With Differential Dispersion and Attenuation of Core- Diffracted Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Euler, G. G.; Wysession, M. E.; Huhmann, B.

    2007-12-01

    We investigate global differential travel-time dispersion and attenuation of core-diffracted phases from large, deep earthquakes. This technique aids in constraining radial velocity structure at the core-mantle interface in a manner analogous to surface wave observables constraining upper mantle structure. We confirm that there is noticeable differential dispersion and attenuation caused by diffraction on a global basis for both Pdiff and Sdiff. Variations in differential dispersion and attenuation are observed with both geographic location and between Pdiff and Sdiff along the same azimuth suggesting lateral variations in Vp, Vs and Vp/Vs ratio in the lowermost mantle. We attempt to utilize dispersion and attenuation characteristics to put bounds on the magnitude and distribution of large-scale velocity perturbations in the lowermost mantle and draw comparisons to variations found in several 3D whole-mantle models. Our dataset consists of broadband records available from the IRIS DMC for deep (>180 km), large (>5.6 mb) teleseismic events. Preprocessing of the records includes deconvolution of the instrument response, rotation of horizontal components, filtering using a set of bandpass filters, and sample-rate decimation (5 sps). Relative arrival times and amplitudes are found by computing cross correlegrams in the frequency domain, detecting and removing poor recordings with cluster analysis, and iteratively converging on a stable low-variance solution with a weighted least-squares inversion while automatically remediating phase-skips utilizing a database of potential relative arrivals. Raypath-approximated corrections for reciever-side differences in ellipticity, mantle, and crust are applied for the derivation of phase velocites in the lowermost mantle as a function of azimuth and frequency. Following previous studies of diffracted signals, we limit our analysis to station pairs located in narrow azimuthal windows spread over a considerable distance while

  13. Estimating Attenuation Coefficients and P-Wave Velocities of the Shallow San Jacinto Fault Zone from Betsy Gunshots Data Recorded by a Spatially Dense Array with 1108 Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozakin, Yaman; Ben-Zion, Yehuda

    2016-04-01

    We estimate values of P wave velocity and P attenuation coefficients (QP) for the subsurface material at the Sage Brush Flat site along the Clark branch of the San Jacinto Fault Zone. The data are generated by 33 Betsy gunshots and recorded by a spatially dense array of 1108 vertical component geophones deployed in a rectangular grid that is approximately 600 m x 600 m. We automatically pick the arrival times of the seismic body waves from each explosion arriving at stations within 200 m. These measurements are used to derive an average velocity map with velocity values ranging from 500 m/s to 1250 m/s. We estimate the energy of the early P waves by squaring the amplitudes in a short window relative to the automatic picks. These energies are fitted to a decay function representing the geometrical spreading and intrinsic attenuation. By separating the stations into spatial bins and calculating attenuation values for each by linear regression, we construct a QP values map. Most of the QP values are in 5-20 range, which is consistent with other studies of shallow fault zone regions.

  14. An improvement in the VIRGO Super Attenuator for interferometric detection of gravitational waves: The use of a magnetic antispring

    SciTech Connect

    Braccini, S.; Bradaschia, C.; Cobal, M.; Del Fabbro, R.; Di Virgilio, A.; Flaminio, R.; Giazotto, A.; Kautzky, H.; Morganti, M.; Passuello, D. ); Calloni, E.; Di Fiore, L. ); Holloway, L.E. ); Montelatici, V. )

    1993-02-01

    We present a method of lowering below 2.5 Hz the vertical normal mode frequencies of the Pisa Super Attenuator by using permanent magnets which provide an antispring force. This method allows a more efficient suppression of the seismic noise decreasing the lower limit of the frequency region devoted to gravitational wave detection.

  15. Viscoacoustic wave form inversion of transmission data for velocity and attenuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Toshiki; Nihei, Kurt T.; Nakagawa, Seiji; Myer, Larry R.

    2004-06-01

    This study investigates the performance of a frequency domain viscoacoustic full wave form nonlinear inversion to obtain high resolution images of velocity and attenuation. An efficient frequency domain implementation is applied that consists of performing a series of single frequency inversions sweeping from low to high frequency. A cascaded inversion was adopted in which the real part of the velocity is first imaged using the phase information, then the quality factor (Q) is imaged using the amplitude information. Tests with synthetic data indicate that our approach yielded better images than the simultaneous determination of the real and imaginary parts of the complex velocity. The method is applied to laboratory data obtained in a water tank with suspended acrylic bars. Broadband 200 kHz data are obtained for a crosshole configuration with a computer-controlled scanning system and piezofilm source and detector. The velocity image produced by the full wave form inversion is compared to a curved ray travel time tomography velocity image, and was observed to possess higher resolution and more precise locations of the acrylic bars. The Q image shows a lower resolution than the velocity image, but recovers the correct Q for acrylic. This method can be applied for geophysical applications targeted to soil, unconsolidated rocks, and marine sediments and also nondestructive evaluation and medical applications.

  16. Seismoelectric Wave Measurements in Borehole Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J.; Hu, H.; Guan, W.

    2014-12-01

    An experimental system was built in the laboratory based on the electrokinetic theory, which contains a small scaled seismoelectric detector and a high resolution digitizer ( 1 MS/s, 22 bits ). The electrokinetic measurements are carried out with seismoelectric well logging technique in borehole models at high frequency (90 kHz), and the localized electrokinetic fields that accompany compressional wave, shear wave and Stoneley wave are clearly observed with monopole source in two sandstone models that are saturated by tap water. The magnitudes of these seismoelectric waves are in the range of 1-100 microvolt, which is useful for designing the seismoelectric logging instruments. The experimental results also show that the seismoelectric well logging signals are related to the permeability of borehole formations. Their amplitudes become larger in the high permeability model, which can be used to measure the permeability of rock formation although no such relationship has ever been provided in existing theories. We also made seismoelectric measurements in a lucite borehole model, but no observable seismoelectric signals were recorded by the electrode. This is not out of our expectation because the lucite formation is not porous and no electrokinetic conversion occurs in such material. However, the electric signal recorded in the Lucite borehole represents the background noise of our measurement system, which is less than 0.5 microvolt. This study verifies the feasibility of seismoelectric well logging, and also presents the range of seismoelectric signals in borehole saturated by tap water that is much closer to the condition of actual formation.

  17. Three-dimensional compressional wave attenuation tomography for the crust and uppermost mantle of northern and central California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, G.

    2013-12-01

    I present a frequency-independent three-dimensional (3D) compressional wave attenuation model (indicated by quality factor Qp) for the crust and uppermost mantle of northern and central California. The tomographic inversion used t* values measured from amplitude spectra of 80,988 P-wave arrivals of 3247 events recorded by 463 network stations through a 3D seismic velocity model. The model has a uniform horizontal grid spacing of 15 km and the vertical node intervals range between 2 and 10 km down to 45 km depth. The resulting Qp model provides an important complement to the existing regional-scale velocity models for interpreting structural heterogeneity and fluid saturation of rocks in the study area. In general, the Qp values increase with depth and agree with the surface geology at shallow depth layers. The most significant features observed in the Qp model are the high Qp values in the Sierra Nevada mountains and low Qp anomalies in the western fault zones. Low Qp values are also imaged in Owens Valley and Long Valley at shallow depths and the Mendocino fault zones in the lower crust. An overall contrast of Qp values across the fault is observed in the creeping, Parkfield and Cholame-Carrizo sections of the San Andreas Fault. Very high Qp anomalies are seen near and below the seismogenic zones at depths in several faults. A nice correlation between shallow Qp values and hear flow is also shown.

  18. Three-dimensional compressional wave attenuation tomography for the crust and uppermost mantle of Northern and central California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Guoqing

    2014-04-01

    I present a frequency-independent three-dimensional (3-D) compressional wave attenuation model (indicated by quality factor Qp) for the crust and uppermost mantle of Northern and central California. The tomographic inversion used t∗ values measured from amplitude spectra of 80,988 P wave arrivals of 3247 events recorded by 463 network stations through a 3-D seismic velocity model. The model has a uniform horizontal grid spacing of 15 km, and the vertical node intervals range between 2 and 10 km down to 45 km depth. In general, the resulting Qp values increase with depth and agree with the surface geology at shallow depth layers. The most significant features observed in the Qp model are the high Qp values in the Sierra Nevada mountains and low Qp anomalies in the western fault zones. Low Qp values are also imaged in Owens Valley and Long Valley at shallow depths and the Cape Mendocino region in the lower crust (˜25 km depth). An overall contrast of Qp values across the fault is observed in the creeping, Parkfield and Cholame-Carrizo sections of the San Andreas Fault. The new 3-D Qp model provides an important complement to the existing regional-scale velocity models for interpreting structural heterogeneity and fluid saturation of rocks in the study area.

  19. Assessment of Reinforced Concrete Surface Breaking Crack Using Rayleigh Wave Measurement

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Foo Wei; Chai, Hwa Kian; Lim, Kok Sing

    2016-01-01

    An improved single sided Rayleigh wave (R-wave) measurement was suggested to characterize surface breaking crack in steel reinforced concrete structures. Numerical simulations were performed to clarify the behavior of R-waves interacting with surface breaking crack with different depths and degrees of inclinations. Through analysis of simulation results, correlations between R-wave parameters of interest and crack characteristics (depth and degree of inclination) were obtained, which were then validated by experimental measurement of concrete specimens instigated with vertical and inclined artificial cracks of different depths. Wave parameters including velocity and amplitude attenuation for each case were studied. The correlations allowed us to estimate the depth and inclination of cracks measured experimentally with acceptable discrepancies, particularly for cracks which are relatively shallow and when the crack depth is smaller than the wavelength. PMID:26959028

  20. Fluid bulk velocity and attenuation measurements in non-Newtonian liquids using a dipstick sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cegla, F. B.; Cawley, P.; Lowe, M. J. S.

    2006-02-01

    This paper reports an evaluation of a method to measure acoustic fluid bulk properties in order to characterize the fluid. The method is based on a 'dipstick' that is inserted into the liquid of interest; a propagating interface wave, called the quasi-Scholte mode, is used to extract the necessary information. Quasi-Scholte mode measurements on four different silica-suspensions are compared to experiments in a conventional ultrasonic test cell. The results show that the liquid bulk velocity can accurately be retrieved by means of the new approach and errors range within the uncertainties imposed by the experimental setup (0.5%). Further bulk velocity measurements on distilled water and a 5% ethanol-distilled-water mixture over a range of temperatures illustrate that the method can successfully monitor small changes in velocity. The values of fluid attenuation measured by the two techniques agree well in their qualitative trends but quantitative differences of up to 20% are encountered. Errors in the measurements are believed to be mainly due to geometrical features of the current setup.

  1. Measurements of Ultrasonic Attenuation Properties of Mid-Gestational Fetal Pig Hearts

    PubMed Central

    Gibson, Allyson A.; Singh, Gautam K.; Hoffman, Joseph J.; Ludomirsky, Achiau; Holland, Mark R.

    2009-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to measure the relative attenuation properties of the left and right ventricles in fetal pig hearts and to compare the spatial variation in attenuation measurements with those observed in previously published backscatter measurements. Approximately 1.0 mm thick, short-axis slices of excised, formalin-fixed heart were examined from 15 mid-gestational fetal pigs using a 50-MHz single-element transducer. Measurements of the attenuation properties demonstrate regional differences in the left and right ventricular myocardium that appear consistent with the previously reported regional differences in apparent integrated backscatter measurements of the same fetal pig hearts. For regions of perpendicular insonification relative to the myofiber orientation, the right ventricular free wall showed larger values for the slope of the attenuation coefficient from 30–60 MHz (1.48 ± 0.22 dB/(cm•MHz) (mean ± SD (standard deviation)) and attenuation coefficient at 45 MHz (46.3 ± 7.3 dB/cm (mean ± SD)) than the left ventricular free wall (1.18 ± 0.24 dB/(cm•MHz) and 37.0 ± 7.9 dB/cm (mean ± SD) for slope of attenuation coefficient and attenuation coefficient at 45 MHz, respectively). This attenuation study supports the hypothesis that intrinsic differences in the myocardium of the left and right ventricles exist in fetal pig hearts at mid-gestation. PMID:18977067

  2. Correlation Attenuation Due to Measurement Error: A New Approach Using the Bootstrap Procedure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Padilla, Miguel A.; Veprinsky, Anna

    2012-01-01

    Issues with correlation attenuation due to measurement error are well documented. More than a century ago, Spearman proposed a correction for attenuation. However, this correction has seen very little use since it can potentially inflate the true correlation beyond one. In addition, very little confidence interval (CI) research has been done for…

  3. High Resolution of Crustal Seismic Wave Attenuation Tomography in Eastern Tibetan Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, X.; Sandvol, E. A.; Ni, J. F.; Hearn, T. M.; Chen, Y. J.; Shen, Y.

    2010-12-01

    We investigate the frequency dependent attenuation tomography of regional seismic phases Lg and Pg. The intrinsic attenuation of Lg and Pg is employed as an approximation of Qs and Qp in the crust and used as a constraint in interpretation of crustal geothermy, rheology and tectonics. We have generated tomographic images with the best resolution to observe structures as small as 100km2. We applied waveform data from 769 regional events and 222 stations of permanent or temporary networks including CDSN, INDEPTH-IV-ASCENT, NETS, Namche Barwa, and MIT-China within this region. We used a Reverse Two-station/event Method (RTM) to measure inter-station Q; this method theoretically eliminates any contributions from source excitation and site amplification from the estimation of path-based Q. The tomographic images with significant lateral variations in Q suggest a strong lateral variation in the geothermal and rheological properties of the Tibetan crust. The disadvantage of the Two-Station Method (TSM) is that the measurements is contaminated by site amplification terms, thus the RTM is a significant improvement in the methodology of measuring Q. Large-scale scattering is a significant contributor to Lg and Pg attenuation however, we suggest the patterns in our tomographic images suggest that the intrinsic attenuation is the dominant factor causing the observed Q anomalies. The most remarkable results in this study include that (1) a high Q zone bands around the eastern Himalayan syntaxis and even spreads to the entire three-river zone tectonically between the Indus-Yalu suture and the Bangong-Nujiang suture in the southeastern TP; (2) the TP has widespread low to middle Q values, except the mid-eastern Qiangtang terrane, east of the INDEPTH-III profile, with relatively middle to high Q values; (3) approximately along the Kunlun Fault system there is a nearly 1000km E-W very low Q band; (4) high Q values are observed widely in the Qaidam Basin, Tarim Basin, Sichuan Basin

  4. Teleseismic P wave spectra from USArray and implications for upper mantle attenuation and scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cafferky, Samantha; Schmandt, Brandon

    2015-10-01

    Teleseismic P wave amplitude spectra from deep earthquakes recorded by USArray are inverted for maps of upper mantle Δt* for multiple frequency bands within 0.08-2 Hz. All frequency bands show high Δt* regions in the southwestern U.S., southern Rocky Mountains, and Appalachian margin. Low Δt* is more common across the cratonic interior. Inversions with narrower frequency bands yield similar patterns, but greater Δt* magnitudes. Even the two standard deviation Δt* magnitude for the widest band is ˜2-7 times greater than predicted by global QS tomography or an anelastic olivine thermal model, suggesting that much of the Δt* signal is nonthermal in origin. Nonthermal contributions are further indicated by only a moderate correlation between Δt* and P travel times. Some geographic variations, such as high Δt* in parts of the cratonic interior with high mantle velocities and low heat flow, demonstrate that the influence of temperature is regionally overwhelmed. Transverse spectra are used to investigate the importance of scattering because they would receive no P energy in the absence of 3-D heterogeneity or anisotropy. Transverse to vertical (T/Z) spectral ratios for stations with high Δt* are higher and exhibit steeper increases with frequency compared to T/Z spectra for low Δt* stations. The large magnitude of Δt* estimates and the T/Z spectra are consistent with major contributions to Δt* from scattering. A weak positive correlation between intrinsic attenuation and apparent attenuation due to scattering may contribute to Δt* magnitude and the moderate correlation of Δt* with travel times.

  5. Distribution of attenuation in the Kaoiki, Hawaii, source volume estimated by inversion of P wave spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scherbaum, Frank; Wyss, Max

    1990-08-01

    A new method to simultaneously invert for Q structure and source parameters was used on a set of 635 microearthquakes (0.9 < M < 2.0) in the Kaoiki area of southern Hawaii. Approximately 2800 signals were analyzed which had been recorded by 6 short period vertical seismographs at epicentral distances of a few to 10 km. The hypocentral depths ranged from O to 14 km, with the bulk of the sources in the 7.5-10.5 km range. The hypothesis to be tested was that the source volume of the M = 6.6 Kaoiki main shock of November 16, 1983, may be heterogeneous in attenuation distribution. We assumed that the observed P wave displacement spectra could be modelled by a source spectrum with an ω-2 high-frequency decay, a single-layer resonance filler to account for local site resonances and whole path attenuation along the ray path. In a next step the attenuation factor Q was constrained by tomographically reconstructing the three-dimensional Q structure for the source region and using it as starting model for a nonlinear inversion of the corner frequency, the seismic moment M0, and a new Q value. This process was iterated until the results changed less than 0.1% and were accepted as final. The average Q was approximately constant and very low (105

  6. Effect of Viscous Cross Coupling between two Immiscible Fluids on Elastic Wave Propagation and Attenuation in Unsaturated Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo, WeiCheng; Lee, JheWei; Lee, ChengHaw

    2015-04-01

    A central issue in the theoretical treatment of a multiphase system is the proper mathematical description of momentum transfer across fluid-solid and fluid-fluid interfaces. Although recent studies have advanced our knowledge on modeling the coupling behavior between a porous framework and the fluids permeating it, the effect of viscous resistance caused by two-fluid flow on elastic wave behavior in unsaturated porous media still remains unaddressed. In the present study, we generalize the theory of dynamic poroelasticity to incorporate viscous cross coupling arising from the velocity difference between two adjacent fluids for examining the dynamic behavior of fluid flow in deformable porous media related to harmonic wave perturbation. The corresponding dispersion relations that characterize three compressional waves and one shear wave are precisely formulated, with the coefficients featuring all elasticity, inertial coupling, and viscous coupling parameters, for describing how wave number changes as excitation frequency is stipulated. To evaluate quantitatively this as-yet unknown effect, numerical simulations are implemented to solve the dispersion relations for Columbia fine sandy loam bearing an oil-water mixture with respect to three representative wave excitation frequencies. Our results show that the phase speed and attenuation coefficient of the third compressional wave which has the smallest speed is strongly sensitive to the presence of viscous cross coupling, as expected for this wave being attributed primarily to the out-of-phase motion of the two pore fluids. Viscous cross coupling also exerts an impact on the attenuation coefficient of the shear wave and the first compressional wave whose speed is greatest, which exhibits two opposite trends at different ranges of low and high water contents. A sensitivity analysis is further conducted to provide information on the importance of the coupling parameter, revealing that the effect becomes more

  7. Setting Time Measurement Using Ultrasonic Wave Reflection

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Chul-Woo; Suraneni, Prannoy; Popovics, John S.; Struble, Leslie J.

    2012-01-09

    Ultrasonic shear wave reflection was used to investigate setting times of cement pastes by measuring the reflection coefficient at the interface between hydrating cement pastes of varying water-to-cement ratio and an ultrasonic buffer material. Several different buffer materials were employed, and the choice of buffer was seen to strongly affect measurement sensitivity; high impact polystyrene showed the highest sensitivity to setting processes because it had the lowest acoustic impedance value. The results show that ultrasonic shear-wave reflection can be used successfully to monitor early setting processes of cement paste with good sensitivity when such a very low impedance buffer is employed. Criteria are proposed to define set times, and the resulting initial and final set times agreed broadly with those determined using the standard penetration resistance test.

  8. Wave dispersion and attenuation in viscoelastic isotropic media containing multiphase flow and its application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Lei; Yang, DingHui; Nie, JianXin

    2014-06-01

    In this paper, we introduce the complex modulus to express the viscoelasticity of a medium. According to the correspondence principle, the Biot-Squirt (BISQ) equations in the steady-state case are presented for the space-frequency domain described by solid displacements and fluid pressure in a homogeneous viscoelastic medium. The effective bulk modulus of a multiphase flow is computed by the Voigt formula, and the characteristic squirt-flow length is revised for the gas-included case. We then build a viscoelastic BISQ model containing a multiphase flow. Through using this model, wave dispersion and attenuation are studied in a medium with low porosity and low permeability. Furthermore, this model is applied to observed interwell seismic data. Analysis of these data reveals that the viscoelastic parameter tan δ is not a constant. Thus, we present a linear frequency-dependent function in the interwell seismic frequency range to express tan δ. This improves the fit between the observed data and theoretical results.

  9. Ocean Lidar Measurements of Beam Attenuation and a Roadmap to Accurate Phytoplankton Biomass Estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yongxiang; Behrenfeld, Mike; Hostetler, Chris; Pelon, Jacques; Trepte, Charles; Hair, John; Slade, Wayne; Cetinic, Ivona; Vaughan, Mark; Lu, Xiaomei; Zhai, Pengwang; Weimer, Carl; Winker, David; Verhappen, Carolus C.; Butler, Carolyn; Liu, Zhaoyan; Hunt, Bill; Omar, Ali; Rodier, Sharon; Lifermann, Anne; Josset, Damien; Hou, Weilin; MacDonnell, David; Rhew, Ray

    2016-06-01

    Beam attenuation coefficient, c, provides an important optical index of plankton standing stocks, such as phytoplankton biomass and total particulate carbon concentration. Unfortunately, c has proven difficult to quantify through remote sensing. Here, we introduce an innovative approach for estimating c using lidar depolarization measurements and diffuse attenuation coefficients from ocean color products or lidar measurements of Brillouin scattering. The new approach is based on a theoretical formula established from Monte Carlo simulations that links the depolarization ratio of sea water to the ratio of diffuse attenuation Kd and beam attenuation C (i.e., a multiple scattering factor). On July 17, 2014, the CALIPSO satellite was tilted 30° off-nadir for one nighttime orbit in order to minimize ocean surface backscatter and demonstrate the lidar ocean subsurface measurement concept from space. Depolarization ratios of ocean subsurface backscatter are measured accurately. Beam attenuation coefficients computed from the depolarization ratio measurements compare well with empirical estimates from ocean color measurements. We further verify the beam attenuation coefficient retrievals using aircraft-based high spectral resolution lidar (HSRL) data that are collocated with in-water optical measurements.

  10. Effect of viscous cross coupling between two immiscible fluids on elastic wave propagation and attenuation in unsaturated porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo, Wei-Cheng; Yeh, Chao-Lung; Lee, Jhe-Wei

    2015-09-01

    A central issue in the theoretical treatment of a multiphase system is the proper mathematical description of momentum transfer across fluid-solid and fluid-fluid interfaces. Although recent studies have advanced our knowledge on modeling the coupling behavior between a porous framework and the fluids permeating it, the effect of viscous resistance caused by two-fluid flow on elastic wave behavior in unsaturated porous media still remains elusive. In the present study, the theoretical model developed for describing immiscible two-phase fluid flows in a deformable porous medium related to harmonic wave perturbation is generalized to account for viscous cross coupling due to relative velocity between two adjacent fluids. The corresponding dispersion relations whose coefficients feature all elasticity, inertial-drag, and viscous-drag parameters are then precisely formulated, in a physical context characterizing three compressional waves and one shear wave. To evaluate quantitatively this as-yet unknown effect, numerical calculations are conducted to solve the dispersion relations for Columbia fine sandy loam bearing an oil-water mixture as a function of water saturation and excitation frequency. Our results show that the phase speed and attenuation coefficient of the P3 wave which has the smallest speed is strongly sensitive to the presence of viscous cross coupling, as expected since this wave is attributed primarily to the out-of-phase motion of the two pore fluids. Viscous cross coupling also exerts an impact on the attenuation coefficient of the shear wave and the P1 wave whose speed is greatest, which exhibits two opposite trends at different ranges of low and high water contents. Relative differences in these wave attributes are principally independent of excitation frequency. A sensitivity analysis is carried out to assess how changes in viscous cross coupling affect these differences, revealing that some of them become more significant as viscous cross

  11. Attenuation of elastic waves in bentonite and monitoring of radioactive waste repositories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biryukov, A.; Tisato, N.; Grasselli, G.

    2016-04-01

    Deep geological repositories, isolated from the geosphere by an engineered bentonite barrier, are currently considered the safest solution for high-level radioactive waste (HLRW) disposal. As the physical conditions and properties of the bentonite barrier are anticipated to change with time, seismic tomography was suggested as a viable technique to monitor the physical state and integrity of the barrier and to timely detect any unforeseen failure. To do so, the seismic monitoring system needs to be optimized, and this can be achieved by conducting numerical simulations of wave propagation in the repository geometry. Previous studies treated bentonite as an elastic medium, whereas recent experimental investigations indicate its pronounced viscoelastic behaviour. The aims of this contribution are (i) to numerically estimate the effective attenuation of bentonite as a function of temperature T and water content Wc, so that synthetic data can accurately reproduce experimental traces and (ii) assess the feasibility and limitation of the HLRW repository monitoring by simulating the propagation of sonic waves in a realistic repository geometry. A finite difference method was utilized to simulate the wave propagation in experimental and repository setups. First, the input of the viscoelastic model was varied to achieve a match between experimental and numerical traces. The routine was repeated for several values of Wc and T, so that quality factors Qp(Wc, T) and Qs(Wc, T) were obtained. Then, the full-scale monitoring procedure was simulated for six scenarios, representing the evolution of bentonite's physical state. The estimated Qp and Qs exhibited a minimum at Wc = 20 per cent and higher sensitivity to Wc, rather than T, suggesting that pronounced inelasticity of the clay has to be taken into account in geophysical modelling and analysis. The repository-model traces confirm that active seismic monitoring is, in principle, capable of depicting physical changes in the

  12. Computer signal processing for ultrasonic attenuation and velocity measurements for material property characterizations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vary, A.

    1979-01-01

    Instrumentation and computer programming concepts that were developed for ultrasonic materials characterization are described. Methods that facilitate velocity and attenuation measurements are outlined. The apparatus described is based on a broadband, buffered contact probe using a pulse-echo approach for simultaneously measuring velocity and attenuation. Instrumentation, specimen condition, and signal acquisition and acceptance criteria are discussed. Typical results with some representative materials are presented.

  13. Non-contact sound velocities and attenuation measurements of several ceramics at elevated temperatures.

    PubMed

    Singh, K J; Matsuda, Y; Hattori, K; Nakano, H; Nagai, S

    2003-01-01

    Laser ultrasonic technique has been employed to carry out the sound velocities and attenuation measurements as a function of temperature in alumina, two kinds of silicon nitride and partially stabilized zirconia (PSZ) samples. Accuracy of the laser technique used has been checked in terms of the diffraction effect and reproducibility of the results. Results of attenuation at room temperature have been compared with quartz transducer technique. In PSZ, velocity behavior has become non-linear and also, a peak in attenuation has been observed around 500 degrees C. In one of the silicon nitride sample, which uses glassy sintering agent, attenuation has shown a sharp peak around 950 degrees C. Interestingly, when the experiment was repeated from 800 to 1000 degrees C, this anomalous attenuation peak has disappeared, leaving a background increasing towards higher temperatures. PMID:12464408

  14. Lidar Measurements Supporting the Ocular Hazard Distance Calculation Using Atmospheric Attenuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gustafsson, K. Ove S.; Persson, Rolf; Gustafsson, Frank; Berglund, Folke; Hedborg, Julia; Malmquist, Jonas

    2016-06-01

    A series of lidar measurements has been performed at the Vidsel Test Range, Vidsel, situated in the inland of the very northern part of Sweden, as a part of an assessment of reducing the laser hazard distance using atmospheric attenuation within the calculations of nominal ocular hazard distance (NOHD). The question was "How low is the atmospheric attenuation as function of height in this area, using a wavelength of 1064 nm?" The work included building a ground based backscatter lidar, performing a series of measurements and analyzing the results. The measurements were performed during June to November, 2014, with the objective to measure at clear air and good weather situations. The lidar measurements at 1064 nm showed a very low atmospheric attenuation as a function of height to altitudes of at least 10 km at several occasions. The lowest limit of backscatter coefficient possible to measure with this instrument is 0.3·10-7 m-1 sr-1. Assuming a lidar ratio varying between 30 - 100 sr, this was leading to an extinction coefficient of about 0.9 - 3·10-6 m-1. The atmospheric attenuation reduces the laser hazard distance with about 50 - 56 % depending on the lidar ratio. A recommendation is to monitor the atmospheric attenuation at the occasions when the method to the reduced laser hazard distance using atmospheric attenuation is used.

  15. Thermoreflectance temperature measurement with millimeter wave

    SciTech Connect

    Pradere, C. Caumes, J.-P.; BenKhemis, S.; Palomo, E.; Batsale, J.-C.; Pernot, G.; Dilhaire, S.

    2014-06-15

    GigaHertz (GHz) thermoreflectance technique is developed to measure the transient temperature of metal and semiconductor materials located behind an opaque surface. The principle is based on the synchronous detection, using a commercial THz pyrometer, of a modulated millimeter wave (at 110 GHz) reflected by the sample hidden behind a shield layer. Measurements were performed on aluminum, copper, and silicon bulks hidden by a 5 cm thick Teflon plate. We report the first measurement of the thermoreflectance coefficient which exhibits a value 100 times higher at 2.8 mm radiation than those measured at visible wavelengths for both metallic and semiconductor materials. This giant thermoreflectance coefficient κ, close to 10{sup −3} K{sup −1} versus 10{sup −5} K{sup −1} for the visible domain, is very promising for future thermoreflectance applications.

  16. Preparation, Characterization, and Millimeter Wave Attenuation of Carbon Fibers Coated with Ni-Cu-P and Ni-Co-P Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Mingquan; Li, Zhitao; Wang, Chen; Han, Aijun

    2015-12-01

    Composite carbon fibers (CFs) coated with Ni-X-P (X = Cu, Co, none) alloys were prepared by electroless plating. The morphology, crystal structure, elemental composition, and millimeter wave (MMW) attenuation performance of the alloy-coated CFs were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffractometry, energy-dispersive spectrometry, and microwave attenuation. CFs were coated with a layer of alloy particles. The P content in the Ni-Cu-P or Ni-Co-P-coated alloy was lower than that in the Ni-P alloy, and coating alloy Ni-P was amorphous. Coating alloys exhibited crystal characteristics after Cu or Co introduction. MMW-attenuation performance of alloy-coated CFs showed that the 3 and 8 mm wave-attenuation effects of CF/Ni-Cu-P and CF/Ni-Co-P were better than those of CF/Ni-P and CFs. The 8 mm wave-attenuation values and their increases were larger than those of the 3 mm wave. The MMW-attenuation performance is attributable to the alloy bulk resistivity and P content. The 3 mm wave-attenuation effects of wavelength-coated CF samples were slightly larger than those of the half wavelength samples. An optimal weight gain value existed for the MMW-attenuation performance of alloy-coated CFs.

  17. Polarimetric X-band weather radar measurements in the tropics: radome and rain attenuation correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneebeli, M.; Sakuragi, J.; Biscaro, T.; Angelis, C. F.; Carvalho da Costa, I.; Morales, C.; Baldini, L.; Machado, L. A. T.

    2012-09-01

    A polarimetric X-band radar has been deployed during one month (April 2011) for a field campaign in Fortaleza, Brazil, together with three additional laser disdrometers. The disdrometers are capable of measuring the raindrop size distributions (DSDs), hence making it possible to forward-model theoretical polarimetric X-band radar observables at the point where the instruments are located. This set-up allows to thoroughly test the accuracy of the X-band radar measurements as well as the algorithms that are used to correct the radar data for radome and rain attenuation. For the campaign in Fortaleza it was found that radome attenuation dominantly affects the measurements. With an algorithm that is based on the self-consistency of the polarimetric observables, the radome induced reflectivity offset was estimated. Offset corrected measurements were then further corrected for rain attenuation with two different schemes. The performance of the post-processing steps was analyzed by comparing the data with disdrometer-inferred polarimetric variables that were measured at a distance of 20 km from the radar. Radome attenuation reached values up to 14 dB which was found to be consistent with an empirical radome attenuation vs. rain intensity relation that was previously developed for the same radar type. In contrast to previous work, our results suggest that radome attenuation should be estimated individually for every view direction of the radar in order to obtain homogenous reflectivity fields.

  18. Ultrasound attenuation measurements using a reference phantom with sound speed mismatch.

    PubMed

    Nam, Kibo; Rosado-Mendez, Ivan M; Rubert, Nicholas C; Madsen, Ernest L; Zagzebski, James A; Hall, Timothy J

    2011-10-01

    Ultrasonic attenuation may be measured accurately with clinical systems and array transducers by using reference phantom methods (RPM) to account for diffraction and other system dependencies on echo signals. Assumptions with the RPM are that the speeds of sound in the sample (c(sam)) and in the reference medium (c(ref)) are the same and that they match the speed assumed in the system beamformer (c(bf)). This work assesses the accuracy of attenuation measurements by the RPM when these assumptions are not met. Attenuation was measured for two homogeneous phantoms, one with a speed of sound of 1500 m/s and the other with a sound speed of 1580 m/s. Both have an attenuation coefficient approximately equal to that of the reference, in which the speed of sound is 1540 m/s. Echo signals from the samples and the reference were acquired from a Siemens S2000 scanner with a 9L4 linear array transducer. Separate acquisitions were obtained with c(bf) at its default value of 1540 m/s and when it was set at values matching the speeds of sound of the phantoms. Simulations were also performed using conditions matching those of the experiment. RPM-measured attenuation coefficients exhibited spatially-dependent biases when c(sam) differed from c(df) and c(ref). Mean errors of 19% were seen for simulated data, with the maximum errors in attenuation measurements occurring for regions of interest near the transmit focus. Biases were minimized (mean error with simulated data was 5.6%) using c(bf) that matched c(sam) and assuring that power spectra used for attenuation computations in the sample are from precisely the same depth as those from the reference. Setting the transmit focus well beyond the depth range used to compute attenuation values minimized the bias. PMID:22518955

  19. Measurement of breast-tissue x-ray attenuation by spectral mammography: solid lesions.

    PubMed

    Fredenberg, Erik; Kilburn-Toppin, Fleur; Willsher, Paula; Moa, Elin; Danielsson, Mats; Dance, David R; Young, Kenneth C; Wallis, Matthew G

    2016-04-01

    Knowledge of x-ray attenuation is essential for developing and evaluating x-ray imaging technologies. For instance, techniques to distinguish between cysts and solid tumours at mammography screening would be highly desirable to reduce recalls, but the development requires knowledge of the x-ray attenuation for cysts and tumours. We have previously measured the attenuation of cyst fluid using photon-counting spectral mammography. Data on x-ray attenuation for solid breast lesions are available in the literature, but cover a relatively wide range, likely caused by natural spread between samples, random measurement errors, and different experimental conditions. In this study, we have adapted a previously developed spectral method to measure the linear attenuation of solid breast lesions. A total of 56 malignant and 5 benign lesions were included in the study. The samples were placed in a holder that allowed for thickness measurement. Spectral (energy-resolved) images of the samples were acquired and the image signal was mapped to equivalent thicknesses of two known reference materials, which can be used to derive the x-ray attenuation as a function of energy. The spread in equivalent material thicknesses was relatively large between samples, which is likely to be caused mainly by natural variation and only to a minor extent by random measurement errors and sample inhomogeneity. No significant difference in attenuation was found between benign and malignant solid lesions. The separation between cyst-fluid and tumour attenuation was, however, significant, which suggests it may be possible to distinguish cystic from solid breast lesions, and the results lay the groundwork for a clinical trial. In addition, the study adds a relatively large sample set to the published data and may contribute to a reduction in the overall uncertainty in the literature. PMID:26961507

  20. Measurement of breast-tissue x-ray attenuation by spectral mammography: solid lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fredenberg, Erik; Kilburn-Toppin, Fleur; Willsher, Paula; Moa, Elin; Danielsson, Mats; Dance, David R.; Young, Kenneth C.; Wallis, Matthew G.

    2016-04-01

    Knowledge of x-ray attenuation is essential for developing and evaluating x-ray imaging technologies. For instance, techniques to distinguish between cysts and solid tumours at mammography screening would be highly desirable to reduce recalls, but the development requires knowledge of the x-ray attenuation for cysts and tumours. We have previously measured the attenuation of cyst fluid using photon-counting spectral mammography. Data on x-ray attenuation for solid breast lesions are available in the literature, but cover a relatively wide range, likely caused by natural spread between samples, random measurement errors, and different experimental conditions. In this study, we have adapted a previously developed spectral method to measure the linear attenuation of solid breast lesions. A total of 56 malignant and 5 benign lesions were included in the study. The samples were placed in a holder that allowed for thickness measurement. Spectral (energy-resolved) images of the samples were acquired and the image signal was mapped to equivalent thicknesses of two known reference materials, which can be used to derive the x-ray attenuation as a function of energy. The spread in equivalent material thicknesses was relatively large between samples, which is likely to be caused mainly by natural variation and only to a minor extent by random measurement errors and sample inhomogeneity. No significant difference in attenuation was found between benign and malignant solid lesions. The separation between cyst-fluid and tumour attenuation was, however, significant, which suggests it may be possible to distinguish cystic from solid breast lesions, and the results lay the groundwork for a clinical trial. In addition, the study adds a relatively large sample set to the published data and may contribute to a reduction in the overall uncertainty in the literature.

  1. In situ acoustic and laboratory ultrasonic sound speed and attenuation measured in heterogeneous soft seabed sediments: Eel River shelf, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gorgas, T.J.; Wilkens, R.H.; Fu, S.S.; Neil, Frazer L.; Richardson, M.D.; Briggs, K.B.; Lee, H.

    2002-01-01

    We compared in situ and laboratory velocity and attenuation values measured in seafloor sediments from the shallow water delta of the Eel River, California. This region receives a substantial volume of fluvial sediment that is discharged annually onto the shelf. Additionally, a high input of fluvial sediments during storms generates flood deposits that are characterized by thin beds of variable grain-sizes between the 40- and 90-m isobaths. The main objectives of this study were (1) to investigate signatures of seafloor processes on geoacoustic and physical properties, and (2) to evaluate differences between geoacoustic parameters measured in situ at acoustic (7.5 kHz) and in the laboratory at ultrasonic (400 kHz) frequencies. The in situ acoustic measurements were conducted between 60 and 100 m of water depth. Wet-bulk density and porosity profiles were obtained to 1.15 m below seafloor (m bsf) using gravity cores of the mostly cohesive fine-grained sediments across- and along-shelf. Physical and geoacoustic properties from six selected sites obtained on the Eel margin revealed the following. (1) Sound speed and wet-bulk density strongly correlated in most cases. (2) Sediment compaction with depth generally led to increased sound speed and density, while porosity and in situ attenuation values decreased. (3) Sound speed was higher in coarser- than in finer-grained sediments, on a maximum average by 80 m s-1. (4) In coarse-grained sediments sound speed was higher in the laboratory (1560 m s-1) than in situ (1520 m s-1). In contrast, average ultrasonic and in situ sound speed in fine-grained sediments showed only little differences (both approximately 1480 m s-1). (5) Greater attenuation was commonly measured in the laboratory (0.4 and 0.8 dB m-1 kHz-1) than in situ (0.02 and 0.65 dB m-1 kHz-1), and remained almost constant below 0.4 m bsf. We attributed discrepancies between laboratory ultrasonic and in situ acoustic measurements to a frequency dependence of

  2. Improvements to the methods used to measure bubble attenuation using an underwater acoustical resonator.

    PubMed

    Czerski, Helen; Vagle, Svein; Farmer, David M; Hall-Patch, Nick

    2011-11-01

    Active acoustic techniques are commonly used to measure oceanic bubble size distributions, by inverting the bulk acoustical properties of the water (usually the attenuation) to infer the bubble population. Acoustical resonators have previously been used to determine attenuation over a wide range of frequencies (10-200 kHz) in a single measurement, corresponding to the simultaneous measurement of a wide range of bubble sizes (20-300 μm radii). However, there is now also considerable interest in acquiring measurements of bubbles with radii smaller than 16 μm, since these are thought to be important for ocean optics and as tracers for near-surface flow. To extend the bubble population measurement to smaller radii, it is necessary to extend the attenuation measurements to higher frequencies. Although the principles of resonator operation do not change as the frequency increases, the assumptions previously made during the spectral analysis may no longer be valid. In order to improve the methods used to calculate attenuation from acoustical resonator outputs, a more complete analysis of the resonator operation is presented here than has been published previously. This approach allows for robust attenuation measurements over a much wider frequency range and enables accurate measurements from lower-quality spectral peaks. PMID:22088016

  3. Accurate and efficient modeling of global seismic wave propagation for an attenuative Earth model including the center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toyokuni, Genti; Takenaka, Hiroshi

    2012-06-01

    We propose a method for modeling global seismic wave propagation through an attenuative Earth model including the center. This method enables accurate and efficient computations since it is based on the 2.5-D approach, which solves wave equations only on a 2-D cross section of the whole Earth and can correctly model 3-D geometrical spreading. We extend a numerical scheme for the elastic waves in spherical coordinates using the finite-difference method (FDM), to solve the viscoelastodynamic equation. For computation of realistic seismic wave propagation, incorporation of anelastic attenuation is crucial. Since the nature of Earth material is both elastic solid and viscous fluid, we should solve stress-strain relations of viscoelastic material, including attenuative structures. These relations represent the stress as a convolution integral in time, which has had difficulty treating viscoelasticity in time-domain computation such as the FDM. However, we now have a method using so-called memory variables, invented in the 1980s, followed by improvements in Cartesian coordinates. Arbitrary values of the quality factor (Q) can be incorporated into the wave equation via an array of Zener bodies. We also introduce the multi-domain, an FD grid of several layers with different grid spacings, into our FDM scheme. This allows wider lateral grid spacings with depth, so as not to perturb the FD stability criterion around the Earth center. In addition, we propose a technique to avoid the singularity problem of the wave equation in spherical coordinates at the Earth center. We develop a scheme to calculate wavefield variables on this point, based on linear interpolation for the velocity-stress, staggered-grid FDM. This scheme is validated through a comparison of synthetic seismograms with those obtained by the Direct Solution Method for a spherically symmetric Earth model, showing excellent accuracy for our FDM scheme. As a numerical example, we apply the method to simulate seismic

  4. Ultrasonic attenuation in pearlitic steel.

    PubMed

    Du, Hualong; Turner, Joseph A

    2014-03-01

    Expressions for the attenuation coefficients of longitudinal and transverse ultrasonic waves are developed for steel with pearlitic microstructure. This type of lamellar duplex microstructure influences attenuation because of the lamellar spacing. In addition, longitudinal attenuation measurements were conducted using an unfocused transducer with 10 MHz central frequency on the cross section of a quenched railroad wheel sample. The dependence of longitudinal attenuation on the pearlite microstructure is observed from the changes of longitudinal attenuation from the quenched tread surface to deeper locations. The results show that the attenuation value is lowest and relatively constant within the quench depth, then increases linearly. The experimental results demonstrate a reasonable agreement with results from the theoretical model. Ultrasonic attenuation provides an important non-destructive method to evaluate duplex microstructure within grains which can be implemented for quality control in conjunction with other manufacturing processes. PMID:24268679

  5. Pressure measurements of nonplanar stress waves

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, G.H.; Charest, J.A.

    1981-01-01

    Measuring the pressure of non-planar stress waves using thin piezo-resistive gages requires correcting for induced strain parallel to the sensing elements. A technique has been developed that permits such measurements, making use of a dual element gage. One element, Manganin, is sensitive to stress both parallel and perpendicular to the sensing element; the other element, Constantan, is primarily sensitive to stress parallel to the sensing element. The change in resistance in the Constantan element is thereby used to correct for the strain effect parallel to the Manganin element axis. Individual and combined Manganin and Constantan elements were subjected to controlled gas gun impact tests in the pressure and strain ranges of 0 to 50 kbar and 0 to 7%, respectively. From planar wave tests, the piezoresistivity of Constantan was found to be positive but negligible in comparison with Manganin. From combined stress and strain environments, the compression and tension strain factors of Constantan were found to be constant and equal to 2.06. The strain factors of Manganin were found to increase from 1.2 to 2.0 asymptotically in the range of 0 to 3% strain. It was experimentally demonstrated that, because of the closeness of their strain factors, the Manganin-Constantan dual element gage could be used in the differential recording mode to yield pressure directly. In this mode the gage is a strain compensating gage. Analytical techniques have also been developed for more accurate strain compensation.

  6. The effect of methane hydrate morphology and water saturation on seismic wave attenuation in sand under shallow sub-seafloor conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Best, Angus I.; Priest, Jeffrey A.; Clayton, Christopher R. I.; Rees, Emily V. L.

    2013-04-01

    A better understanding of seismic wave attenuation in hydrate-bearing sediments is needed for the improved geophysical quantification of seafloor methane hydrates, important for climate change, geohazard and economic resource assessment. Hence, we conducted a series of small strain (<10-6), seismic frequency (50-550 Hz), laboratory resonant column experiments on synthetic methane hydrate-bearing sands under excess-water seafloor conditions. The results show a complex dependence of P- and S-wave attenuation on hydrate saturation and morphology. P- and S-wave attenuation in excess-water hydrate-bearing sand is much higher than in excess-gas hydrate-bearing sand and increases with hydrate saturation between 0 and 0.44 (the experimental range). Theoretical modelling suggests that load-bearing hydrate is an important cause of heightened attenuation for both P- and S-waves in gas and water saturated sands, while pore-filling hydrate also contributes significantly to P-wave attenuation in water saturated sands. A squirt flow attenuation mechanism, related to microporous hydrate and low aspect ratio pores at the interface between sand grains and hydrate, is thought to be responsible for the heightened levels of attenuation in hydrate-bearing sands at low hydrate saturations (<0.44).

  7. Geodynamic Environment by Satellite Geodesy, Seismic Attenuation and S-wave Splitting. Example from Vrancea Seismogenic Zone, SE Carpathians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mocanu, Victor; Russo, Raymond; Ambrosius, Boudewijn

    2010-05-01

    In the Vrancea seismogenic zone (SE Carpathians), where very strong earthquakes (Mw > 7) are reported several times a century, the seismotectonics is very complex. It develops beneath the contact between the Moldavian East European Platform, the Scythian Platform, and the Moesian Platform, to the east and southeast, and terranes of the Transylvania Basin lying within the Carpathian arc. Several hypothesis have been considered by scientists in order to explain the clustered foci of crustal and intermediate events (as deep as 200 km). However, until now, there is no tectonic scenario which could explain all geological and geophysical observations. We try to integrate long-term permanent and campaign GPS outcomes with contributions from seismic attenuation and S-wave splitting results. GPS contributions mainly refer to determination of velocity vectors. 15 campaigns and seven permanent stations are being used in order to determine the detailed kinematics of an area characterized by very small velocities (1-2 mm/y), bringing the satellite technique to almost its limit. The results suggest a counterclockwise mantle flow around the Vrancea seismogenic zone, which is a high velocity body developed in an almost vertical position, developing deeper than 200 km. This results is also supported by seismic attenuation studies. We found that models like delamination and subduction could be supported by seismic attenuation studies in this zone. The delamination model implies strong upwelling and horizontal inflow of asthenosphere into the gap between the delaminating and remnant lithosphere. The other model implies downwelling and perhaps lateral-horizontal inflow along the slab detachment or tear. The models imply different distributions of density and rheological properties associated with the different lithosphere - asthenosphere structures. We use the ratio of spectral amplitudes of P and S waves from vertical and transverse seismograms to estimate the S to P ratio in the

  8. Torsional ultrasonic wave based level measurement system

    DOEpatents

    Holcomb, David E.; Kisner, Roger A.

    2012-07-10

    A level measurement system suitable for use in a high temperature and pressure environment to measure the level of coolant fluid within the environment, the system including a volume of coolant fluid located in a coolant region of the high temperature and pressure environment and having a level therein; an ultrasonic waveguide blade that is positioned within the desired coolant region of the high temperature and pressure environment; a magnetostrictive electrical assembly located within the high temperature and pressure environment and configured to operate in the environment and cooperate with the waveguide blade to launch and receive ultrasonic waves; and an external signal processing system located outside of the high temperature and pressure environment and configured for communicating with the electrical assembly located within the high temperature and pressure environment.

  9. Elastic wave propagation and attenuation in a double-porosity dual-permeability medium

    SciTech Connect

    Berryman, J.G.; Wang, H.F.

    1998-10-12

    To account for large-volume low-permeability storage porosity and low-volume high-permeability fracture/crack porosity in oil and gas reservoirs, phenomenological equations for the poroelastic behavior of a double porosity medium have been formulated and the coefficients in these linear equations identified. The generalization from a single porosity model increases the number of independent inertial coefficients from three to six, the number of independent drag coefficients from three to six, and the number of independent stress-strain coefficients from three to six for an isotropic applied stress and assumed isotropy of the medium. The analysis leading to physical interpretations of the inertial and drag coefficients is relatively straightforward, whereas that for the stress-strain coefficients is more tedious. In a quasistatic analysis, the physical interpretations are based upon considerations of extremes in both spatial and temporal scales. The limit of very short times is the one most relevant for wave propagation, and in this case both matrix porosity and fractures are expected to behave in an undrained fashion, although our analysis makes no assumptions in this regard. For the very long times more relevant for reservoir drawdown, the double porosity medium behaves as an equivalent single porosity medium. At the macroscopic spatial level, the pertinent parameters (such as the total compressibility) may be determined by appropriate field tests. At the mesoscopic scale pertinent parameters of the rock matrix can be determined directly through laboratory measurements on core, and the compressibility can be measured for a single fracture. We show explicitly how to generalize the quasistatic results to incorporate wave propagation effects and how effects that are usually attributed to squirt flow under partially saturated conditions can be explained alternatively in terms of the double-porosity model. The result is therefore a theory that generalizes, but is

  10. In situ measurements of velocity dispersion and attenuation in New Jersey Shelf sediments.

    PubMed

    Turgut, Altan; Yamamoto, Tokuo

    2008-09-01

    The existence of acoustic velocity dispersion and frequency dependence of attenuation in marine sediments is investigated using in situ measurements from a wideband acoustic probe system during the Shallow Water 2006 experiment. Direct-path pulse propagation measurements show evidence of velocity dispersion within the 10-80 kHz frequency band at two silty-sand sites on the New Jersey Shelf. The measured attenuation in dB/m shows linear frequency dependency within the 10-80 kHz frequency band. The measured velocity dispersion and attenuation curves are in good agreement with those predicted by an extended Biot theory [Yamamoto and Turgut, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 83, 1744-1751 (1988)] for sediments with a distribution of pore sizes. PMID:19045553

  11. Temperature Measurements of the Low-Attenuation Radiographic Ice Ball During CT-Guided Renal Cryoablation

    SciTech Connect

    Permpongkosol, Sompol; Link, Richard E.; Kavoussi, Louis R.; Solomon, Stephen B.

    2008-01-15

    During renal cryoablation a low-attenuation area on CT develops around the cryoprobe. Knowledge of the temperature of the growing low-attenuation area can guide therapy and ensure lethal temperatures. Herein, we report thermocouple results and correlating CT images during the development of the low-attenuation 'radiographic ice ball.' Five patients who underwent percutaneous CT-guided renal cryoablation were identified who had thermocouples inserted and serial intraprocedural CT images that included images with thermocouple measurements of 0{sup o} and sub-0{sup o}C. Thermocouples had been percutaneously placed just beyond the edge of the tumors either to ensure adequate cooling or to ensure safety to adjacent critical structures. Renal cryotherapy under CT guidance produced a growing low-attenuation area corresponding to the radiographic ice ball. When the thermocouple measured 0{sup o}C, CT images showed the thermocouple tip at the edge of the low-attenuation ice ball. At lower temperatures the tip was within the low-attenuation ice ball. We conclude that knowledge of the temperature at the ice ball edge during cryoablation can be used to predict the extent of tissue necrosis and thus provide an estimate of cryotherapy effectiveness during the procedure. Further work is necessary to establish a firm relationship between the thermal conditions and the zone of damage.

  12. Change in Seismic Attenuation of the Nojima Fault Zone Measured Using Spectral Ratios from Borehole Seismometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kano, Y.; Tadokoro, K.; Nishigami, K.; Mori, J.

    2006-12-01

    We measured the seismic attenuation of the rock mass surrounding the Nojima fault, Japan, by estimating the P-wave quality factor, Qp, using spectral ratios derived from a multi-depth (800 m and 1800 m) seismometer array. We detected an increase of Qp in 2003-2006 compared to 1999-2000. Following the 1995 Kobe earthquake, the project "Fault Zone Probe" drilled three boreholes to depths of 500 m, 800 m, 1800 m, in Toshima, along the southern part of the Nojima fault. The 1800-m borehole was reported to reach the fault surface. One seismometer (TOS1) was installed at the bottom of the 800-m borehole in 1996 and another (TOS2) at the bottom of 1800-m borehole in 1997. The sampling rate of the seismometers is 100 Hz. The slope of the spectral ratios for the two stations plotted on a linear-log plot is -π t^{*}, where t^{*} is the travel time divided by the Qp for the path difference between the stations. For the estimation of Qp, we used events recorded by both TOS1 and TOS2 for periods of 1999-2000 and 2003-2006. To improve the signal-to-noise ratio of the spectral ratios, we first calculated spectra ratios between TOS1 and TOS2 for each event and averaged the values over the earthquakes for each period. We used the events that occurred within 10 km from TOS2, and the numbers of events are 74 for 1999-2000 and 105 for 2003-2006. Magnitudes of the events range from M0.5 to M3.1. The average value of Qp for 1999-2000 increased significantly compared to 2003-2006. The attenuation of rock mass surrounding the fault in 2003-2006 is smaller than that in 1999-2000, which suggests that the fault zone became stiffer after the earthquake. At the Nojima fault, permeability measured by repeated pumping tests decreased with time from the Kobe earthquake, infering the closure of cracks and a fault healing process occurred The increase of Qp is another piece of evidence for the healing process of the Nojima fault zone. u.ac.jp/~kano/

  13. Wave buoy measurements at the Antarctic sea ice edge compared with an enhanced ECMWF WAM: Progress towards global waves-in-ice modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doble, Martin J.; Bidlot, Jean-Raymond

    2013-10-01

    The breakup of pack ice in the Weddell Sea is examined with respect to a single wave buoy, frozen into the pack ice six months earlier, and the ECMWF WAM model. The pack ice broke up around the buoy on 14th September 2000 as large amplitude storm waves approached the ice edge at the buoy's location. The WAM model is modified to allow waves to propagate into the ice cover, in contrast to the operational scheme which sets wave energy to zero at ice concentrations over 30%. A simple, lookup-table-based, wave scattering attenuation scheme is then added and is combined with a sea ice drag attenuation parameterisation. WAM results at the location of the buoy are compared to the observations over a two-month period straddling the breakup. The modified WAM scheme generally reproduces the significant wave height, wave period and spectral characteristics measured by the buoy, though the model does not yet have any concept of floe breaking and re-freezing, assuming only that the ice cover is broken if the concentration is less than 80%. The simplistic nature of these modifications is designed to allow operational implementation, to eventually provide a global assessment of the wave-influenced ice zone.

  14. Lidar measurement as support to the ocular hazard distance calculation using atmospheric attenuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gustafsson, K. Ove S.; Persson, Rolf; Gustafsson, Frank; Berglund, Folke; Malmquist, Jonas

    2015-10-01

    The reduction of the laser hazard distance range using atmospheric attenuation has been tested with series of lidar measurements accomplished at the Vidsel Test Range, Vidsel, Sweden. The objective was to find situations with low level of aerosol backscatter during this campaign, with the implications of low extinction coefficient, since the lowest atmospheric attenuation gives the highest ocular hazards. The work included building a ground based backscatter lidar, performing a series of measurements and analyzing the results. The measurements were performed during the period June to November, 2014. The results of lidar measurements showed at several occasions' very low atmospheric attenuation as a function of height to an altitude of at least 10 km. The lowest limit of aerosol backscatter coefficient possible to measure with this instrument is less than 0.3•10-7 m-1 sr-1. Assuming an aerosol lidar ratio between 30 - 100 sr this leads to an aerosol extinction coefficient of about 0.9 - 3•10-6 m-1. Using a designator laser as an example with wavelength 1064 nm, power 0.180 W, pulse length 15 ns, PRF 11.5 Hz, exposure time of 10 sec and beam divergence of 0.08 mrad, it will have a NOHD of 48 km. With the measured aerosol attenuation and by assuming a molecule extinction coefficient to be 5•10-6 m-1 (calculated using MODTRAN (Ontar Corp.) assuming no aerosol) the laser hazard distance will be reduced with 51 - 58 %, depending on the lidar ratio assumption. The conclusion from the work is; reducing of the laser hazard distance using atmospheric attenuation within the NOHD calculations is possible but should be combined with measurements of the attenuation.

  15. Deep-Ocean Measurements of Tsunami Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabinovich, Alexander B.; Eblé, Marie C.

    2015-12-01

    Deep-ocean tsunami measurements play a major role in understanding the physics of tsunami wave generation and propagation, and in improving the effectiveness of tsunami warning systems. This paper provides an overview of the history of tsunami recording in the open ocean from the earliest days, approximately 50 years ago, to the present day. Modern tsunami monitoring systems such as the self-contained Deep-ocean Assessment and Reporting of Tsunamis and innovative cabled sensing networks, including, but not limited to, the Japanese bottom cable projects and the NEPTUNE-Canada geophysical bottom observatory, are highlighted. The specific peculiarities of seafloor longwave observations in the deep ocean are discussed and compared with observations recorded in coastal regions. Tsunami detection in bottom pressure observations is exemplified through analysis of distant (22,000 km from the source) records of the 2004 Sumatra tsunami in the northeastern Pacific.

  16. The role of the reflection coefficient in precision measurement of ultrasonic attenuation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Generazio, E. R.

    1984-01-01

    Ultrasonic attenuation measurements using contact, pulse-echo techniques are sensitive to surface roughness and couplant thickness variations. This can reduce considerable inaccuracies in the measurement of the attenuation coefficient for broadband pulses. Inaccuracies arise from variations in the reflection coefficient at the buffer-couplant-sample interface. The reflection coefficient is examined as a function of the surface roughness and corresponding couplant thickness variations. Interrelations with ultrasonic frequency are illustrated. Reliable attenuation measurements are obtained only when the frequency dependence of the reflection coefficient is incorporated in signal analysis. Data are given for nickel 200 samples and a silicon nitride ceramic bar having surface roughness variations in the 0.3 to 3.0 microns range for signal bandwidths in the 50 to 100 MHz range.

  17. The role of the reflection coefficient in precision measurement of ultrasonic attenuation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Generazio, E. R.

    1985-01-01

    Ultrasonic attenuation measurements using contact, pulse-echo techniques are sensitive to surface roughness and couplant thickness variations. This can reduce considerable inaccuracies in the measurement of the attenuation coefficient for broadband pulses. Inaccuracies arise from variations in the reflection coefficient at the buffer-couplant-sample interface. The reflection coefficient is examined as a function of the surface roughness and corresponding couplant thickness variations. Interrelations with ultrasonic frequency are illustrated. Reliable attenuation measurements are obtained only when the frequency dependence of the reflection coefficient is incorporated in signal analysis. Data are given for nickel 200 samples and a silicon nitride ceramic bar having surface roughness variations in the 0.3 to 3.0 microns range for signal bandwidths in the 50 to 100 MHz range.

  18. Synergistic measurements of ocean winds and waves from SAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Biao; Li, Xiaofeng; Perrie, William; He, Yijun

    2015-09-01

    In this study we present a synergistic method to retrieve both ocean surface wave and wind fields from spaceborne quad-polarization (QP) synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imaging mode data. This algorithm integrates QP-SAR wind vector retrieval model and the wave retrieval model, with consideration to the nonlinear mapping relationship between ocean wave spectra and SAR image spectra, in order to synergistically retrieve wind fields and wave directional spectra. The method does not require a priori information on the sea state. It combines the observed VV-polarized SAR image spectra with the retrieved wind vectors from the VH-polarized SAR image, to estimate the wind-generated wave directional spectra. The differences between the observed SAR spectra and optimal SAR image spectra associated with the wind waves are interpreted as the contributions from the swell waves. The retrieved ocean wave spectra are used to estimate the integrated spectral wave parameters such as significant wave heights, wavelengths, wave directions and wave periods. The wind and wave parameters retrieved by QP-SAR are validated against those measured by the National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) directional wave buoys under different sea states. The validation results show that the QP-SAR SAR has potential to simultaneously measure the ocean surface waves and wind fields from space.

  19. The contribution of activated processes to Q. [stress corrosion cracking in seismic wave attenuation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spetzler, H. A.; Getting, I. C.; Swanson, P. L.

    1980-01-01

    The possible role of activated processes in seismic attenuation is investigated. In this study, a solid is modeled by a parallel and series configuration of dashpots and springs. The contribution of stress and temperature activated processes to the long term dissipative behavior of this system is analyzed. Data from brittle rock deformation experiments suggest that one such process, stress corrosion cracking, may make a significant contribution to the attenuation factor, Q, especially for long period oscillations under significant tectonic stress.

  20. Photogrammetric Measurements of CEV Airbag Landing Attenuation Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrows, Danny A.; Burner, Alpheus W.; Berry, Felecia C.; Dismond, Harriett R.; Cate, Kenneth H.

    2008-01-01

    High-speed photogrammetric measurements are being used to assess the impact dynamics of the Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV) for ground landing contingency upon return to earth. Test articles representative of the Orion capsule are dropped at the NASA Langley Landing and Impact Research (LandIR) Facility onto a sand/clay mixture representative of a dry lakebed from elevations as high as 62 feet (18.9 meters). Two different types of test articles have been evaluated: (1) half-scale metal shell models utilized to establish baseline impact dynamics and soil characterization, and (2) geometric full-scale drop models with shock-absorbing airbags which are being evaluated for their ability to cushion the impact of the Orion CEV with the earth s surface. This paper describes the application of the photogrammetric measurement technique and provides drop model trajectory and impact data that indicate the performance of the photogrammetric measurement system.

  1. Measurement of the linear attenuation coefficients of breast tissues by synchrotron radiation computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, R. C.; Longo, R.; Rigon, L.; Zanconati, F.; De Pellegrin, A.; Arfelli, F.; Dreossi, D.; Menk, R.-H.; Vallazza, E.; Xiao, T. Q.; Castelli, E.

    2010-09-01

    The measurement of the linear attenuation coefficients of breast tissues is of fundamental importance in the field of breast x-ray diagnostic imaging. Different groups have evaluated the linear attenuation coefficients of breast tissues by carrying out direct attenuation measurements in which the specimens were thin and selected as homogeneous as possible. Here, we use monochromatic and high-intensity synchrotron radiation computed tomography (SR CT) to evaluate the linear attenuation coefficients of surgical breast tissues in the energy range from 15 to 26.5 keV. X-ray detection is performed by a custom digital silicon micro-strip device, developed in the framework of the PICASSO INFN experiment. Twenty-three human surgical breast samples were selected for SR CT and histological study. Six of them underwent CT, both as fresh tissue and after formalin fixation, while the remaining 17 were imaged only as formalin-fixed tissues. Our results for fat and fibrous tissues are in good agreement with the published values. However, in contrast to the published data, our measurements show no significant differences between fibrous and tumor tissues. Moreover, our results for fresh and formalin-fixed tissues demonstrate a reduction of the linear attenuation coefficient for fibrous and tumor tissues after fixation.

  2. A technique for measuring velocity and attenuation of ultrasound in liquid foams.

    PubMed

    Pierre, J; Elias, F; Leroy, V

    2013-02-01

    We describe an experimental setup specifically designed for measuring the ultrasonic transmission through liquid foams, over a broad range of frequencies (60-600kHz). The question of determining the ultrasonic properties of the foam (density, phase velocity and attenuation) from the transmission measurements is addressed. An inversion method is proposed, tested on synthetic data, and applied to a liquid foam at different times during the coarsening. The ultrasonic velocity and attenuation are found to be very sensitive to the foam bubble sizes, suggesting that a spectroscopy technique could be developed for liquid foams. PMID:23168271

  3. Modeling and experiment of the suspended seismometer concept for attenuating the contribution of tilt motion in horizontal measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matichard, F.; Evans, M.; Mittleman, R.; MacInnis, M.; Biscans, S.; Dooley, K. L.; Sohier, H.; Lauriero, A.; Paris, H.; Koch, J.; Knothe, P.; Carbajo, A.; Dufort, C.

    2016-06-01

    Tilt-horizontal coupling in inertial sensors limits the performance of active isolation systems such as those used in gravitational wave detectors. Inertial rotation sensors can be used to subtract the tilt component from the signal produced by horizontal inertial sensors, but such techniques are often limited by the sensor noise of the tilt measurement. A different approach is to mechanically filter the tilt transmitted to the horizontal inertial sensor, as discussed in this article. This technique does not require an auxiliary rotation sensor and can produce a lower noise measurement. The concept investigated uses a mechanical suspension to isolate the inertial sensor from input tilt. Modeling and simulations show that such a configuration can be used to adequately attenuate the tilt transmitted to the instrument, while maintaining translation sensitivity in the frequency band of interest. The analysis is supported by experimental results showing that this approach is a viable solution to overcome the tilt problem in the field of active inertial isolation.

  4. Spatial changes of seismic attenuation and multiscale geological heterogeneity in the Baikal rift and surroundings from analysis of coda waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobrynina, Anna A.; Sankov, Vladimir A.; Chechelnitsky, Vladimir V.; Déverchère, Jacques

    2016-04-01

    The Baikal rift system is undergoing an active tectonic deformation expressed by a high level of seismic activity. This deformation leads to physical and mechanical changes of crustal properties which can be investigated by the seismic quality factor and its frequency dependence. Using a single backscattering model, a seismic quality-factor (QC), a frequency parameter (n) and an attenuation coefficient (δ) have been estimated by analyzing coda waves of 274 local earthquakes of the Baikal rift system for nineteen lapse time windows (W) from 10 to 100 s every 5 s and for six central frequencies (0.3, 0.75, 1.5, 3, 6 and 12 Hz). The average QC value increases with the frequency and lapse time window from 46 ± 52 (at 0.75 Hz) to 502 ± 109 (at 12 Hz) for W = 10 s and from 114 ± 49 (at 0.3 Hz) to 1865 ± 679 (at 12 Hz) for W = 100 s. The values of QC(f) and δ were estimated for the whole Baikal rift system and for separate tectonic blocks: the stable Siberian Platform, main rift basins, spurs and uplifts. Along the rift system, the Q0-value (QC-factor at the frequency f = 1 Hz) varies within 72-109 and the frequency parameter n ranges from 0.87 to 1.22, whereas Q0 is 134 and n is 0.48 for the stable Siberian Platform. Vertical variations of attenuation reveal that sharp changes of δ and n are confined to the velocity discontinuities. The comparison of lateral variations of seismic wave attenuation and geological and geophysical characteristics of the Baikal rift system shows that attenuation is correlated with both seismic activity and heat flow and in a lesser degree with the surface fault density and the age of the crust. Seismic wave attenuation found across the main shear zones of the south-western Baikal rift (Main Sayan strike-slip fault zone and Tunka, Obruchev and Primorsky normal faults) is increased by more than 25-60% compared to the neighboring areas.

  5. Toward Improved Methods of Estimating Attenuation, Phase and Group velocity of surface waves observed on Shallow Seismic Records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diallo, M. S.; Holschneider, M.; Kulesh, M.; Scherbaum, F.; Ohrnberger, M.; Lück, E.

    2004-05-01

    This contribution is concerned with the estimate of attenuation and dispersion characteristics of surface waves observed on a shallow seismic record. The analysis is based on a initial parameterization of the phase and attenuation functions which are then estimated by minimizing a properly defined merit function. To minimize the effect of random noise on the estimates of dispersion and attenuation we use cross-correlations (in Fourier domain) of preselected traces from some region of interest along the survey line. These cross-correlations are then expressed in terms of the parameterized attenuation and phase functions and the auto-correlation of the so-called source trace or reference trace. Cross-corelation that enter the optimization are selected so as to provide an average estimate of both the attenuation function and the phase (group) velocity of the area under investigation. The advantage of the method over the standard two stations method using Fourier technique is that uncertainties related to the phase unwrapping and the estimate of the number of 2π cycle skip in the phase phase are eliminated. However when mutliple modes arrival are observed, its become merely impossible to obtain reliable estimate the dipsersion curves for the different modes using optimization method alone. To circumvent this limitations we using the presented approach in conjunction with the wavelet propagation operator (Kulesh et al., 2003) which allows the application of band pass filtering in (ω -t) domain, to select a particular mode for the minimization. Also by expressing the cost function in the wavelet domain the optimization can be performed either with respect to the phase, the modulus of the transform or a combination of both. This flexibility in the design of the cost function provides an additional mean of constraining the optimization results. Results from the application of this dispersion and attenuation analysis method are shown for both synthetic and real 2D shallow

  6. Investigation of the tone-burst tube for duct lining attenuation measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soffel, A. R.; Morrow, P. F.

    1972-01-01

    The tone burst technique makes practical the laboratory evaluation of potential inlet and discharge duct treatments. Tone burst apparatus requires only simple machined parts and standard components. Small, simply made, lining samples are quickly and easily installed in the system. Two small electromagnetric loudspeaker drivers produce peak sound pressure level of over 166 db in the 3-square-inch sample duct. Air pump available in most laboratories can produce air flows of over plus and minus Mach 0.3 in the sample duct. The technique uses short shaped pulses of sound propagated down a progressive wave tube containing the sample duct. The peak pressure level output of the treated duct is compared with the peak pressure level output of a substituted reference duct. The difference between the levels is the attenuation or insertion loss of the treated duct. Evaluations of resonant absorber linings by the tone burst technique check attenuation values predicted by empirical formulas based on full scale ducts.

  7. Attenuation and Shock Waves in Linear Hereditary Viscoelastic Media; Strick-Mainardi, Jeffreys-Lomnitz-Strick and Andrade Creep Compliances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanyga, Andrzej

    2014-09-01

    Dispersion, attenuation and wavefronts in a class of linear viscoelastic media proposed by Strick and Mainardi (Geophys J R Astr Soc 69:415-429, 1982) and a related class of models due to Lomnitz, Jeffreys and Strick are studied by a new method due to the author. Unlike the previously studied explicit models of relaxation modulus or creep compliance, these two classes support propagation of discontinuities. Due to an extension made by Strick, either of these two classes of models comprise both viscoelastic solids and fluids. We also discuss the Andrade viscoelastic media. The Andrade media do not support discontinuity waves and exhibit the pedestal effect.

  8. Measuring the speed of cosmological gravitational waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raveri, Marco; Baccigalupi, Carlo; Silvestri, Alessandra; Zhou, Shuang-Yong

    2015-03-01

    In general relativity gravitational waves propagate at the speed of light; however, in alternative theories of gravity that might not be the case. We investigate the effects of a modified speed of gravity, cT2, on the B modes of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropy in polarization. We find that a departure from the light speed value would leave a characteristic imprint on the BB spectrum part induced by tensors, manifesting as a shift in the angular scale of its peaks which allows us to constrain cT without any significant degeneracy with other cosmological parameters. We derive constraints from current data and forecast the accuracy with which cT will be measured by the next generation CMB satellites. In the former case, using the available Planck and BICEP2 data sets, we obtain cT2=1.30 ±0.79 and cT2<2.85 at 95% C.L. by assuming a power law primordial tensor power spectrum and cT2<2.33 at 95% C.L. if the running of the spectral index is allowed. More interestingly, in the latter case we find future CMB satellites capable of constraining cT2 at percent level, comparable with bounds from binary pulsar measurements, largely due to the absence of degeneracy with other cosmological parameters.

  9. Scattering attenuation, dispersion and reflection of SH waves in two-dimensional elastic media with densely distributed cracks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murai, Yoshio

    2007-01-01

    We compute the synthetic seismograms of multiply scattered SH waves in 2-D elastic media with densely distributed parallel cracks. We assume randomly distributed cracks in a rectangular-bounded region, which simulate a cracked zone. The crack surfaces are assumed to be stress-free. When the incident wavelength is longer than the crack size, the delay in the arrival of the primary wave is observed at stations beyond the cracked zone and the amplitude of the primary wave is amplified in the cracked zone in the synthetic seismograms. This is because the cracked zone behaves as a low velocity and soft material to the incident long-wavelength wave due to the crack distribution. When the half-wavelength of the incident wave is shorter than the crack length, the scattered waves are clearly observed in the synthetic seismograms and the amplitude of the primary wave is largely attenuated beyond the cracked zone. The calculated attenuation coefficient Q-1 of the primary wave is directly proportional to the crack density in the range of νa2 <= 0.1, where ν and a are the number density and half the length of cracks, respectively. This is consistent with that obtained by a stochastic analysis based on Foldy's approximation. A periodic distribution of cracks in a zone is considered as an utterly different model in order to investigate the effect of spatial distributions on the attenuation and dispersion of seismic waves. When cracks are distributed densely, the values of Q-1 for the periodic crack distribution appear to differ from those for the random distribution of cracks in the low wavenumber range. This suggests that the effect of multiple interactions among densely distributed cracks depends on not only the density but also the spatial distribution of cracks at low wavenumbers. The calculated phase velocity of the primary wave is consistent with that from the stochastic analysis in the range of νa2 <= 0.1 and does not depend on the spatial distribution of cracks. This

  10. Ocean waves. [remote sensing microwave measurement methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartsch, N.; Vogel, M.; Kjelaas, A. G.; Parr, H.; Thomas, J.; Valenzuela, G.; Williams, P. D. L.; Shemdin, O. H.

    1978-01-01

    Ocean wave data can be obtained from such active microwave probe techniques as monostatic HF and VHF, bistatic HF, HF synthetic aperture radar, altimeters, satellite and airborne synthetic aperture radar, carrier wave or pulsed dual-frequency radars, and coastal surveillance radar. Approaches to texture analysis of ocean wave imagery are discussed, with attention given to transform techniques or spatial frequency analysis, and the analysis of second-order gray level statistics. In addition, recommendations are made for further work on the modulation of short gravity waves by longer waves as a function of wind speed and wave direction, and the derivation of transfer functions for the ocean response of dual-frequency radars.

  11. Millimeter wave propagation measurements from an orbiting earth satellite.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ippolito, L. J.

    1973-01-01

    Major results of the millimeter wave propagation measurements conducted with the ATS-5 satellite are reviewed. The impact of these results on millimeter wave communications systems design is outlined. Advanced millimeter wave flight experiments currently under development for the ATS-F satellite are also discussed, and their main characteristics are summarized.

  12. Accuracy of Satellite-Measured Wave Heights in the Australian Region for Wave Power Applications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meath, Sian E.; Aye, Lu; Haritos, Nicholas

    2008-01-01

    This article focuses on the accuracy of satellite data, which may then be used in wave power applications. The satellite data are compared to data from wave buoys, which are currently considered to be the most accurate of the devices available for measuring wave characteristics. This article presents an analysis of satellite- (Topex/Poseidon) and…

  13. On the excess attenuation of sound in the atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deloach, R.

    1975-01-01

    The attenuation suffered by an acoustic plane wave propagating from an elevated source to the ground, in excess of absorption losses, was studied. Reported discrepancies between attenuation measurements made in the field and theories which only account for absorption losses are discussed. It was concluded that the scattering of sound by turbulence results in a nonnegligible contribution to the total attenuation.

  14. Attenuation distance of low frequency waves upstream of the pre-dawn bow shock: GEOTAIL and ISEE 3 comparison

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sugiyama, T.; Terasawa, T.; Kawano, H.; Yamamoto, T.; Kokubun, S.; Frank, L. A.; Ackerson, K.; Tsurutani, B. T.

    1995-01-01

    We have made a statistical study of the spatial distribution of low frequency waves (approx. 0.01-0.1 Hz) in the region upstream of the pre-dawn to dawn side bow shock (-50 Re less than X less than 15 Re) using both GEOTAIL and international sun earth explorer 3 (ISEE-3) magnetometer data. We have found that the wave amplitude dependence on D and X(sub s), where D is the distance from the bow shock and X(sub s) the x-coordinate position of shock foot point of the IMF, can be described by a functional form of A exp (X(sub s)/L(sub X)-D/L(sub D), with the characteristic attenuation distances, L(sub X) = 62 +/- 12 Re and L(sub D) = 59 +/- 38 Re.

  15. Velocity dispersion and attenuation in granular marine sediments: comparison of measurements with predictions using acoustic models.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Masao

    2011-06-01

    The large velocity dispersion recently reported could be explained by a gap stiffness model incorporated into the Biot model (the BIMGS model) proposed by the author. However, at high frequencies, some measured results have been reported for negative velocity dispersion and attenuation proportional to the first to fourth power of frequency. In this study, first, it is shown that the results of velocity dispersion and attenuation calculated using the BIMGS model are consistent with the results measured in two kinds of water-saturated sands with different grain sizes, except in the high-frequency range. Then, the velocity dispersion and attenuation in six kinds of water-saturated glass beads and four kinds of water-saturated silica sands with different grain sizes are measured in the frequency ranges of 80-140 and 300-700 kHz. The measured results are compared with those calculated using the BIMGS model plus some acoustic models. It is shown that the velocity dispersion and attenuation are well predicted by using the BIMGS model in the range of kd ≤ 0.5 (k: wavenumber in water, d: grain diameter) and by using the BIMGS model plus multiple scattering effects in the range of kd ≥ 0.5 in which negative velocity dispersion appears. PMID:21682381

  16. Measured Attenuation of Coplanar Waveguide on CMOS Grade Silicon Substrates with Polyimide Interface Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponchak, G. E.; Katehi, L. P. B.

    2000-01-01

    The measured propagation constant of a coplanar waveguide on CMOS grade silicon with a polyimide interface layer is presented, It is shown that the transmission line can have an attenuation comparable to other transmission lines on Si substrates if the proper polyimide thickness is used.

  17. The feasibility of ranking material fracture toughness by ultrasonic attenuation measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vary, A.

    1975-01-01

    A preliminary study was conducted to assess the feasibility of ultrasonically ranking material fracture toughness. Specimens of two grades of maraging steel for which fracture toughness values were measured were subjected to ultrasonic probing. The slope of the attenuation coefficient versus frequency curve was empirically correlated with the plane strain fracture toughness value for each grade of steel.

  18. The feasibility of ranking material fracture toughness by ultrasonic attenuation measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vary, A.

    1975-01-01

    A preliminary study was conducted to assess the feasibility of ultrasonically ranking material fracture toughness. Specimens of two grades of maraging steel for which fracture toughness values were measured were subjected to ultrasonic probing. The slope of the attenuation coefficient vs frequency curve was empirically correlated with the plane strain fracture toughness value for each grade of steel.

  19. Attenuation of transverse waves by using a metamaterial beam with lateral local resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Hsin-Haou; Lin, Chi-Kuang; Tan, Kwek-Tze

    2016-08-01

    This study numerically and experimentally investigated the wave propagation and vibrational behavior of a metamaterial beam with lateral local resonators. A two-dimensional simplified analytical model was proposed for feasibly and accurately capturing the in-plane dispersion behavior, which can be used for the initial design. The out-of-plane wave motions, however, required advanced three-dimensional (3D) modeling. Through experimental validations, 3D finite element simulations were demonstrated to be suitable for advanced design and analysis. This study provided a basis for designing metabeams for transverse wave mitigation. The proposed concept can be further extended to 3D metamaterial plates for wave and vibrational mitigation applications.

  20. Measurement and fitting techniques for the assessment of material nonlinearity using nonlinear Rayleigh waves

    SciTech Connect

    Torello, David; Kim, Jin-Yeon; Qu, Jianmin; Jacobs, Laurence J.

    2015-03-31

    This research considers the effects of diffraction, attenuation, and the nonlinearity of generating sources on measurements of nonlinear ultrasonic Rayleigh wave propagation. A new theoretical framework for correcting measurements made with air-coupled and contact piezoelectric receivers for the aforementioned effects is provided based on analytical models and experimental considerations. A method for extracting the nonlinearity parameter β{sub 11} is proposed based on a nonlinear least squares curve-fitting algorithm that is tailored for Rayleigh wave measurements. Quantitative experiments are conducted to confirm the predictions for the nonlinearity of the piezoelectric source and to demonstrate the effectiveness of the curve-fitting procedure. These experiments are conducted on aluminum 2024 and 7075 specimens and a β{sub 11}{sup 7075}/β{sub 11}{sup 2024} measure of 1.363 agrees well with previous literature and earlier work.

  1. Measurement and fitting techniques for the assessment of material nonlinearity using nonlinear Rayleigh waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torello, David; Kim, Jin-Yeon; Qu, Jianmin; Jacobs, Laurence J.

    2015-03-01

    This research considers the effects of diffraction, attenuation, and the nonlinearity of generating sources on measurements of nonlinear ultrasonic Rayleigh wave propagation. A new theoretical framework for correcting measurements made with air-coupled and contact piezoelectric receivers for the aforementioned effects is provided based on analytical models and experimental considerations. A method for extracting the nonlinearity parameter β11 is proposed based on a nonlinear least squares curve-fitting algorithm that is tailored for Rayleigh wave measurements. Quantitative experiments are conducted to confirm the predictions for the nonlinearity of the piezoelectric source and to demonstrate the effectiveness of the curve-fitting procedure. These experiments are conducted on aluminum 2024 and 7075 specimens and a β117075/β112024 measure of 1.363 agrees well with previous literature and earlier work.

  2. New method to measure the attenuation of hadrons in extensive air showers

    SciTech Connect

    Apel, W. D.; Badea, F.; Bekk, K.; Bozdog, H.; Daumiller, K.; Doll, P.; Engel, R.; Engler, J.; Finger, M.; Gils, H. J.; Haungs, A.; Heck, D.; Huege, T.; Isar, P. G.; Klages, H. O.; Mathes, H. J.; Mayer, H. J.; Milke, J.; Nehls, S.; Oehlschlaeger, J.

    2009-07-15

    Extensive air showers are generated through interactions of high-energy cosmic rays impinging the Earth's atmosphere. A new method is described to infer the attenuation of hadrons in air showers. The numbers of electrons and muons, registered with the scintillator array of the KASCADE experiment, are used to estimate the energy of the shower inducing primary particle. A large hadron calorimeter is used to measure the hadronic energy reaching observation level. The ratio of energy reaching ground level to the energy of the primary particle is used to derive an attenuation length of hadrons in air showers. In the energy range from 10{sup 6} to 3x10{sup 7} GeV the attenuation length obtained increases from 170 to 210 g/cm{sup 2}. The experimental results are compared to predictions of simulations based on contemporary high-energy interaction models.

  3. New method to measure the attenuation of hadrons in extensive air showers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apel, W. D.; Arteaga, J. C.; Badea, F.; Bekk, K.; Bertaina, M.; Blümer, J.; Bozdog, H.; Brancus, I. M.; Brüggemann, M.; Buchholz, P.; Cantoni, E.; Chiavassa, A.; Cossavella, F.; Daumiller, K.; de Souza, V.; di Pierro, F.; Doll, P.; Engel, R.; Engler, J.; Finger, M.; Fuhrmann, D.; Ghia, P. L.; Gils, H. J.; Glasstetter, R.; Grupen, C.; Haungs, A.; Heck, D.; Hildebrand, D.; Hörandel, J. R.; Huege, T.; Isar, P. G.; Kampert, K.-H.; Kang, D.; Kickelbick, D.; Klages, H. O.; Kolotaev, Y.; Łuczak, P.; Mathes, H. J.; Mayer, H. J.; Milke, J.; Mitrica, B.; Morello, C.; Navarra, G.; Nehls, S.; Oehlschläger, J.; Ostapchenko, S.; Over, S.; Petcu, M.; Pierog, T.; Rebel, H.; Roth, M.; Schieler, H.; Schröder, F.; Sima, O.; Stümpert, M.; Toma, G.; Trinchero, G. C.; Ulrich, H.; van Buren, J.; Walkowiak, W.; Weindl, A.; Wochele, J.; Wommer, M.; Zabierowski, J.

    2009-07-01

    Extensive air showers are generated through interactions of high-energy cosmic rays impinging the Earth’s atmosphere. A new method is described to infer the attenuation of hadrons in air showers. The numbers of electrons and muons, registered with the scintillator array of the KASCADE experiment, are used to estimate the energy of the shower inducing primary particle. A large hadron calorimeter is used to measure the hadronic energy reaching observation level. The ratio of energy reaching ground level to the energy of the primary particle is used to derive an attenuation length of hadrons in air showers. In the energy range from 106 to 3×107GeV the attenuation length obtained increases from 170 to 210g/cm2. The experimental results are compared to predictions of simulations based on contemporary high-energy interaction models.

  4. Finite-difference numerical modelling of gravito-acoustic wave propagation in a windy and attenuating atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brissaud, Quentin; Martin, Roland; Garcia, Raphaël F.; Komatitsch, Dimitri

    2016-04-01

    Acoustic and gravity waves propagating in planetary atmospheres have been studied intensively as markers of specific phenomena such as tectonic events or explosions or as contributors to atmosphere dynamics. To get a better understanding of the physics behind these dynamic processes, both acoustic and gravity waves propagation should be modelled in a 3D attenuating and windy atmosphere extending from the ground to the upper thermosphere. Thus, in order to provide an efficient numerical tool at the regional or global scale we introduce a finite difference in the time domain (FDTD) approach that relies on the linearized compressible Navier-Stokes equations with a background flow (wind). One significant benefit of such a method is its versatility because it handles both acoustic and gravity waves in the same simulation, which enables one to observe interactions between them. Simulations can be performed for 2D or 3D realistic cases such as tsunamis in a full MSISE-00 atmosphere or gravity-wave generation by atmospheric explosions. We validate the computations by comparing them to analytical solutions based on dispersion relations in specific benchmark cases: an atmospheric explosion, and a ground displacement forcing.

  5. Seismic velocities and attenuation from borehole measurements near the Parkfield prediction zone, Central California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gibbs, James F.; Roth, Edward F.

    1989-01-01

    Shear (S)- and compressional (P)- wave velocities were measured to a depth of 195 m in a borehole near the San Andreas fault where a recurrence of a moderate Parkfield earthquake is predicted. S-wave velocities determined from orthogonal directions of the S-wave source show velocity differences of approximately 20 percent. An average shear-wave Q of 4 was determined in relatively unconsolidated sands and gravels of the Paso Robles Formation in the depth interval 57.5-102.5 m.

  6. Wave-front measurement errors from restricted concentric subdomains.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, K A; Geary, K

    2001-09-01

    In interferometry and optical testing, system wave-front measurements that are analyzed on a restricted subdomain of the full pupil can include predictable systematic errors. In nearly all cases, the measured rms wave-front error and the magnitudes of the individual aberration polynomial coefficients underestimate the wave-front error magnitudes present in the full-pupil domain. We present an analytic method to determine the relationships between the coefficients of aberration polynomials defined on the full-pupil domain and those defined on a restricted concentric subdomain. In this way, systematic wave-front measurement errors introduced by subregion selection are investigated. Using vector and matrix representations for the wave-front aberration coefficients, we generalize the method to the study of arbitrary input wave fronts and subdomain sizes. While wave-front measurements on a restricted subdomain are insufficient for predicting the wave front of the full-pupil domain, studying the relationship between known full-pupil wave fronts and subdomain wave fronts allows us to set subdomain size limits for arbitrary measurement fidelity. PMID:11551047

  7. The influence of cortical end-plate on broadband ultrasound attenuation measurements at the human calcaneus using scanning confocal ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Yi; Lin, Wei; Qin, Yi-Xian

    2005-09-01

    Quantitative ultrasound (QUS) assessment, including broadband ultrasound attenuation (BUA), is an efficient technique for assessing bone quality in various statuses, e.g., osteoporosis. While assessing trabecular bone loss is essential to bone quality, the existence of cortical bone can substantially reduce the accuracy of BUA measurement. In this study, we developed an approach to quantify the influence of the cortical end-plate in the QUS on 18 cadaver calcanei using both analytical and experimental analyses. A simplified cortical-trabecular-cortical sandwich model has been developed for simulation of wave propagations. Results show that the cortical end-plate has a significant effect on BUA (yielding 8.5+/-3.6 dB/MHz in cortical bone alone), approximately 15% of the BUA value over the whole bone BUA measurement (54.1+/-20.1 dB/MHz). The phenomenon has been predicted by the developed analytical model with a high correlation (r2=0.63,p<0.0001). The data have suggested that the mechanism of the BUA attributed to the cortical end-plate is primarily due to the ultrasonic wave transmission and reflection within the cortical layers. Therefore, the influence of the cortical end-plate in BUA can be quantified and incorporated into the QUS assessment for bone quality, which may provide insight into BUA measurement for accurate diagnosis of bone diseases.

  8. Correlation techniques and measurements of wave-height statistics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guthart, H.; Taylor, W. C.; Graf, K. A.; Douglas, D. G.

    1972-01-01

    Statistical measurements of wave height fluctuations have been made in a wind wave tank. The power spectral density function of temporal wave height fluctuations evidenced second-harmonic components and an f to the minus 5th power law decay beyond the second harmonic. The observations of second harmonic effects agreed very well with a theoretical prediction. From the wave statistics, surface drift currents were inferred and compared to experimental measurements with satisfactory agreement. Measurements were made of the two dimensional correlation coefficient at 15 deg increments in angle with respect to the wind vector. An estimate of the two-dimensional spatial power spectral density function was also made.

  9. Acoustic Measurement of Surface Wave Damping by a Meniscus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michel, Guillaume; Pétrélis, François; Fauve, Stéphan

    2016-04-01

    We investigate the reflection of gravity-capillary surface waves by a plane vertical barrier. The size of the meniscus is found to strongly affect reflection: the energy of the reflected wave with a pinned contact line is around twice the one corresponding to a fully developed meniscus. To perform these measurements, a new experimental setup similar to an acousto-optic modulator is developed and offers a simple way to measure the amplitude, frequency and direction of propagation of surface waves.

  10. Estimation of effective x-ray tissue attenuation differences for volumetric breast density measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Biao; Ruth, Chris; Jing, Zhenxue; Ren, Baorui; Smith, Andrew; Kshirsagar, Ashwini

    2014-03-01

    Breast density has been identified to be a risk factor of developing breast cancer and an indicator of lesion diagnostic obstruction due to masking effect. Volumetric density measurement evaluates fibro-glandular volume, breast volume, and breast volume density measures that have potential advantages over area density measurement in risk assessment. One class of volume density computing methods is based on the finding of the relative fibro-glandular tissue attenuation with regards to the reference fat tissue, and the estimation of the effective x-ray tissue attenuation differences between the fibro-glandular and fat tissue is key to volumetric breast density computing. We have modeled the effective attenuation difference as a function of actual x-ray skin entrance spectrum, breast thickness, fibro-glandular tissue thickness distribution, and detector efficiency. Compared to other approaches, our method has threefold advantages: (1) avoids the system calibration-based creation of effective attenuation differences which may introduce tedious calibrations for each imaging system and may not reflect the spectrum change and scatter induced overestimation or underestimation of breast density; (2) obtains the system specific separate and differential attenuation values of fibroglandular and fat for each mammographic image; and (3) further reduces the impact of breast thickness accuracy to volumetric breast density. A quantitative breast volume phantom with a set of equivalent fibro-glandular thicknesses has been used to evaluate the volume breast density measurement with the proposed method. The experimental results have shown that the method has significantly improved the accuracy of estimating breast density.

  11. Dual shear wave induced laser speckle contrast signal and the improvement in shear wave speed measurement

    PubMed Central

    Li, Sinan; Cheng, Yi; Eckersley, Robert J; Elson, Daniel S; Tang, Meng-Xing

    2015-01-01

    Shear wave speed is quantitatively related to tissue viscoelasticity. Previously we reported shear wave tracking at centimetre depths in a turbid optical medium using laser speckle contrast detection. Shear wave progression modulates displacement of optical scatterers and therefore modulates photon phase and changes the laser speckle patterns. Time-resolved charge-coupled device (CCD)-based speckle contrast analysis was used to track shear waves and measure the time-of-flight of shear waves for speed measurement. In this manuscript, we report a new observation of the laser speckle contrast difference signal for dual shear waves. A modulation of CCD speckle contrast difference was observed and simulation reproduces the modulation pattern, suggesting its origin. Both experimental and simulation results show that the dual shear wave approach generates an improved definition of temporal features in the time-of-flight optical signal and an improved signal to noise ratio with a standard deviation less than 50% that of individual shear waves. Results also show that dual shear waves can correct the bias of shear wave speed measurement caused by shear wave reflections from elastic boundaries. PMID:26114021

  12. Quantitative measurement of permeabilization of living cells by terahertz attenuated total reflection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grognot, Marianne; Gallot, Guilhem

    2015-09-01

    Using Attenuated Total Reflection imaging technique in the terahertz domain, we demonstrate non-invasive, non-staining real time measurements of cytoplasm leakage during permeabilization of epithelial cells by saponin. The terahertz signal is mostly sensitive to the intracellular protein concentration in the cells, in a very good agreement with standard bicinchoninic acid protein measurements. It opens the way to in situ real time dynamics of protein content and permeabilization in live cells.

  13. Pn wave geometrical spreading and attenuation in Northeast China and the Korean Peninsula constrained by observations from North Korean nuclear explosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Lian-Feng; Xie, Xiao-Bi; Tian, Bao-Feng; Chen, Qi-Fu; Hao, Tian-Yao; Yao, Zhen-Xing

    2015-11-01

    We investigate the geometric spreading and attenuation of seismic Pn waves in Northeast China and the Korean Peninsula. A high-quality broadband Pn wave data set generated by North Korean nuclear tests is used to constrain the parameters of a frequency-dependent log-quadratic geometric spreading function and a power law Pn Q model. The geometric spreading function and apparent Pn wave Q are obtained for Northeast China and the Korean Peninsula between 2.0 and 10.0 Hz. Using the two-station amplitude ratios of the Pn spectra and correcting them with the known spreading function, we remove the contributions of the source and crust from the apparent Pn Q and retrieve the P wave attenuation information along the pure upper mantle path. We then use both Pn amplitudes and amplitude ratios in a tomographic approach to obtain the upper mantle P wave attenuation in the studied area. The Pn wave spectra observed in China are compared with those recorded in Japan, and the result reveals that the high-frequency Pn signal across the oceanic path attenuated faster compared with those through the continental path.

  14. Measurement techniques for millimeter wave substrate mounted MMW antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gouker, M. A.; Campbell, D. P.; Gallagher, J. J.

    1986-01-01

    An overview of measurement techniques for millimeter wave substrate mounted antennas is presented. Scattering and pickup of the millimeter wave radiation on the low frequency leads is a significant problem in these measurements. Methods to reduce these effects are discussed, and preliminary work on dipole antennas at 230 GHz is presented.

  15. Variation of coda wave attenuation in the Alborz region and central Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahimi, H.; Motaghi, K.; Mukhopadhyay, S.; Hamzehloo, H.

    2010-06-01

    More than 340 earthquakes recorded by the Institute of Geophysics, University of Tehran (IGUT) short period stations from 1996 to 2004 were analysed to estimate the S-coda attenuation in the Alborz region, the northern part of the Alpine-Himalayan orogen in western Asia, and in central Iran, which is the foreland of this orogen. The coda quality factor, Qc, was estimated using the single backscattering model in frequency bands of 1-25 Hz. In this research, lateral and depth variation of Qc in the Alborz region and central Iran are studied. It is observed that in the Alborz region there is absence of significant lateral variation in Qc. The average frequency relation for this region is Qc = 79 +/- 2f1.07+/-0.08. Two anomalous high-attenuation areas in central Iran are recognized around the stations LAS and RAZ. The average frequency relation for central Iran excluding the values of these two stations is Qc = 94 +/- 2f0.97+/-0.12. To investigate the attenuation variation with depth, Qc value was calculated for 14 lapse times (25, 30, 35,... 90s) for two data sets having epicentral distance range R < 100 km (data set 1) and 100 < R < 200 km (data set 2) in each area. It is observed that Qc increases with depth. However, the rate of increase of Qc with depth is not uniform in our study area. Beneath central Iran the rate of increase of Qc is greater at depths less than 100 km compared to that at larger depths indicating the existence of a high attenuation anomalous structure under the lithosphere of central Iran. In addition, below ~180 km, the Qc value does not vary much with depth under both study areas, indicating the presence of a transparent mantle under them.

  16. Attenuated direct and scattered wave propagation on simulated land mobile satellite service paths in the presence of trees

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Richard L.; Estus, Robert

    1988-01-01

    Measurements were made of direct path with no trees, attenuated direct, and tree scattered signal levels at 1.3 GHz. Signals were received in two small groves of mixed hardwood trees. In the groves studied, average total signal levels were about 13 dB below adjacent no-trees locations, with attenuated direct signal levels about 14.6 dB below the no-trees case and scattered signals about 17.3 dB below the no-trees case. A simple model for land mobile satellite service (LMSS) propagation in groves of trees is proposed. The model assumes a constant scattered signal contribution at 17 dB below no-trees levels added to an attenuated direct signal which varies, depending on the number and density of trees in the direct path. When total signal levels are strong, the attenuated direct signal dominates. When total signal levels are more than 15 dB below no-trees levels, the scattered signals dominate.

  17. Effect of duct shape, Mach number, and lining construction on measured suppressor attenuation and comparison with theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olsen, W. A.; Krejsa, E. A.; Coats, J. W.

    1972-01-01

    Noise attenuation was measured for several types of cylindrical suppressors that use a duct lining composed of honeycomb cells covered with a perforated plate. The experimental technique used gave attenuation data that were repeatable and free of noise floors and other sources of error. The suppressor length, the effective acoustic diameter, suppressor shape and flow velocity were varied. The agreement among the attenuation data and two widely used analytical models was generally satisfactory. Changes were also made in the construction of the acoustic lining to measure their effect on attenuation. One of these produced a very broadband muffler.

  18. Determination of rain rate from a spaceborne radar using measurements of total attenuation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meneghini, R.; Eckerman, J.; Atlas, D.

    1981-01-01

    Studies shows that path-integrated rain rates can be determined by means of a direct measurement of attenuation. For ground based radars this is done by measuring the backscattering cross section of a fixed target in the presence and absence of rain along the radar beam. A ratio of the two measurements yields a factor proportional to the attenuation from which the average rain rate is deduced. The technique is extended to spaceborne radars by choosing the ground as reference target. The technique is also generalized so that both the average and range-profiled rain rates are determined. The accuracies of the resulting estimates are evaluated for a narrow beam radar located on a low earth orbiting satellite.

  19. Digital measurements of LF radio wave absorption in the lower ionosphere and inferred gravity wave activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lastovicka, J.; Boska, J.; Buresova, D.

    1993-10-01

    Low frequency (LF) radio wave absorption in the lower ionosphere has been measured at Pruhonice (approximately 50 deg N) since 1957. A new digital computer-controlled measuring-recording-processing system was introduced in 1988. The A3 method of radio wave absorption measurement, the measuring equipment used for the digital measurements at 270 kHz, is briefly described. The digital nighttime LF A3 measurements allow the use of absorption data for studying and monitoring the gravity wave activity in the upper middle atmosphere in the period range 10 min-3(2) hours. The resulting gravity wave spectra are as expected even though their shapes vary. Individual period bands sometimes exhibit a similar general pattern of variability in gravity wave activity (winter 1990), while in other intervals we observe a shift of gravity wave energy from one period band to another (winter 1991). No strong, pronounced and consistent response to strong geomagnetic storms and midwinter stratospheric warming is found. An apparent seasonal variation with winter minima observed in shorter-period gravity wave activity is an artefact of the changing length of the night. There is no significant seasonal variation of gravity wave activity in the analysed data. The method is very cheap -- the results are a by-product of measurements made for ionospheric purposes.

  20. Improvement of photon correlation spectroscopy method for measuring nanoparticle size by using attenuated total reflectance.

    PubMed

    Krishtop, Victor; Doronin, Ivan; Okishev, Konstantin

    2012-11-01

    Photon correlation spectroscopy is an effective method for measuring nanoparticle sizes and has several advantages over alternative methods. However, this method suffers from a disadvantage in that its measuring accuracy reduces in the presence of convective flows of fluid containing nanoparticles. In this paper, we propose a scheme based on attenuated total reflectance in order to reduce the influence of convection currents. The autocorrelation function for the light-scattering intensity was found for this case, and it was shown that this method afforded a significant decrease in the time required to measure the particle sizes and an increase in the measuring accuracy. PMID:23187387

  1. Filter Paper: Solution to High Self-Attenuation Corrections in HEPA Filter Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Oberer, R.B.; Harold, N.B.; Gunn, C.A.; Brummett, M.; Chaing, L.G.

    2005-10-01

    An 8 by 8 by 6 inch High Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) filter was measured as part of a uranium holdup survey in June of 2005 as it has been routinely measured every two months since 1998. Although the survey relies on gross gamma count measurements, this was one of a few measurements that had been converted to a quantitative measurement in 1998. The measurement was analyzed using the traditional Generalized Geometry Holdup (GGH) approach, using HMS3 software, with an area calibration and self-attenuation corrected with an empirical correction factor of 1.06. A result of 172 grams of {sup 235}U was reported. The actual quantity of {sup 235}U in the filter was approximately 1700g. Because of this unusually large discrepancy, the measurement of HEPA filters will be discussed. Various techniques for measuring HEPA filters will be described using the measurement of a 24 by 24 by 12 inch HEPA filter as an example. A new method to correct for self attenuation will be proposed for this measurement Following the discussion of the 24 by 24 by 12 inch HEPA filter, the measurement of the 8 by 8 by 6 inch will be discussed in detail.

  2. Terahertz reflection response measurement using a phonon polariton wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Hayato; Katayama, Kenji; Shen, Qing; Toyoda, Taro; Nelson, Keith A.

    2009-03-01

    We developed a new technique for the measurement of terahertz reflection responses utilizing a propagating phonon polariton wave. Frequency tunable phonon polariton waves were generated by the recently developed continuously variable spatial frequency transient grating method [K. Katayama, H. Inoue, H. Sugiya, Q. Shen, T. Taro, and K. A. Nelson, Appl. Phys. Lett. 92, 031906 (2008)]. The phonon polariton wave traveled in a ferroelectric crystal in an in-plane direction with an inclined angle of 26°, and the wave reflected at the crystal edge where a sample was positioned. The reflected polariton wave was detected by the same method as that used for the generation of the polariton waves. By comparing the reflection intensities in the presence and absence of the sample, reflectivity of the polariton wave was calculated, and the refractive index and absorption in the terahertz region were obtained.

  3. Retardation Measurements of Infrared PVA Wave plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Y.; Z, H.; W, D.; D, Y.; Z, Z.; S, J.

    The wave plate made of Polyvinyl Alcohol PVA plastic film has several advantages such as its lower cost and insensitivity to temperature and incidence angle so it has been used in the Solar Multi-Channel Telescope SMCT in China But the important parameter retardations of PVA wave plates in the near infrared wavelength have never been provided In this paper a convenient and high precise instrument to get the retardations of discrete wavelengths or a continuous function of wavelength in near infrared is developed In this method the retardations of wave plates have been determined through calculating the maximum and minimum of light intensity The instrument error has been shown Additionally we can get the continuous direction of wavelength retardations in the ultraviolet visible or infrared spectral in another way

  4. Time-domain comparisons of power law attenuation in causal and noncausal time-fractional wave equations.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xiaofeng; McGough, Robert J

    2016-05-01

    The attenuation of ultrasound propagating in human tissue follows a power law with respect to frequency that is modeled by several different causal and noncausal fractional partial differential equations. To demonstrate some of the similarities and differences that are observed in three related time-fractional partial differential equations, time-domain Green's functions are calculated numerically for the power law wave equation, the Szabo wave equation, and for the Caputo wave equation. These Green's functions are evaluated for water with a power law exponent of y = 2, breast with a power law exponent of y = 1.5, and liver with a power law exponent of y = 1.139. Simulation results show that the noncausal features of the numerically calculated time-domain response are only evident very close to the source and that these causal and noncausal time-domain Green's functions converge to the same result away from the source. When noncausal time-domain Green's functions are convolved with a short pulse, no evidence of noncausal behavior remains in the time-domain, which suggests that these causal and noncausal time-fractional models are equally effective for these numerical calculations. PMID:27250193

  5. Effect of atmospheric attenuation on temperature measurements made using IR scanning systems.

    PubMed

    Sheahen, T P

    1983-04-01

    The atmosphere attenuates IR radiation in certain frequency bands even at distances as short as 1 m. Within the 3-5-microm range used by many IR thermographic systems, H20 and CO2 absorb a finite fraction of the source radiation. To achieve reliable quantitative IR thermography, it is necessary to correct the received signal for this attenuation. This paper develops a simple model and presents numerical calculations of the attenuation expected at a few meters distance for one typical thermographic imaging system. (The extension to other equipment could easily be done by substituting different numerical data for the detector response.) The attenuation factors due to CO2 and H20 are 6 and 8%, respectively, at a 10-m range. A wide variety of target temperature and ambient humidity conditions were examined; representative curves selected from this output are presented. Because of the importance of precise IR measurements for industrial applications, the effect of varying CO2 concentrations was also studied. PMID:18195922

  6. Hot Electron Attenuation Length Measurements of Cu and Ag using BEEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garramone, John; Abel, Joseph; Sitnitsky, Ilona; Zhao, Lai; Appelbaum, Ian; Labella, Vincent

    2010-03-01

    33.4˜2.9 nm 1.0 eV Understanding electron transport and scattering in nanoscale Cu and Ag structures is important for modern integrated circuit technology and futuristic applications such as spintronics and hydrogen sensing footnotetextHuang et al., Rev. Lett. 99 177209 (2007)^,footnotetextNienhaus et at., Appl. Phys. Lett. 74 4046 (1999). In this study we will report on hot electron attenuation length measurements of nanometer thick films of Cu and Ag on the Si substrate utilizing ballistic electron emission microscopy (BEEM). BEEM is a three terminal scanning tunneling microcopy (STM) based technique where electrons are injected from a STM tip into a grounded metal base of a Schottky diode. The electrons that transverse the metal overlayer and surmount the Schottky barrier are measured as the BEEM current by a backside contact to the semiconductor. The attenuation length is extracted by measuring the falloff in BEEM current as a function of metal film thickness. The hot electron attenuation length for Cu of is measured at a tip bias of and a temperature of 80 K. Results for Ag will also be presented as well as models used to extract the relative contribution of elastic and inelastic electron scattering in the metal films as a function of electron energy.

  7. Analysis of Measured and Simulated Supraglottal Acoustic Waves.

    PubMed

    Fraile, Rubén; Evdokimova, Vera V; Evgrafova, Karina V; Godino-Llorente, Juan I; Skrelin, Pavel A

    2016-09-01

    To date, although much attention has been paid to the estimation and modeling of the voice source (ie, the glottal airflow volume velocity), the measurement and characterization of the supraglottal pressure wave have been much less studied. Some previous results have unveiled that the supraglottal pressure wave has some spectral resonances similar to those of the voice pressure wave. This makes the supraglottal wave partially intelligible. Although the explanation for such effect seems to be clearly related to the reflected pressure wave traveling upstream along the vocal tract, the influence that nonlinear source-filter interaction has on it is not as clear. This article provides an insight into this issue by comparing the acoustic analyses of measured and simulated supraglottal and voice waves. Simulations have been performed using a high-dimensional discrete vocal fold model. Results of such comparative analysis indicate that spectral resonances in the supraglottal wave are mainly caused by the regressive pressure wave that travels upstream along the vocal tract and not by source-tract interaction. On the contrary and according to simulation results, source-tract interaction has a role in the loss of intelligibility that happens in the supraglottal wave with respect to the voice wave. This loss of intelligibility mainly corresponds to spectral differences for frequencies above 1500 Hz. PMID:26377510

  8. Acoustic speed and attenuation coefficient in sheep aorta measured at 5-9 MHz.

    PubMed

    Fraser, Katharine H; Poepping, Tamie L; McNeilly, Alan; Megson, Ian L; Hoskins, Peter R

    2006-06-01

    B-mode ultrasound (US) images from blood vessels in vivo differ significantly from vascular flow phantom images. Phantoms with acoustic properties more closely matched to those of in vivo arteries may give better images. A method was developed for measuring the speed and attenuation coefficient of US over the range 5 to 9 MHz in samples of sheep aorta using a pulse-echo technique. The times-of-flight method was used with envelope functions to identify the reference points. The method was tested with samples of tissue-mimicking material of known acoustic properties. The tissue samples were stored in Krebs physiologic buffer solution and measured over a range of temperatures. At 37 degrees C, the acoustic speed and attenuation coefficient as a function of frequency in MHz were 1600 +/- 50 ms(-1) and 1.5 +/- 4f(0.94 +/- 1.3) dB cm(-1), respectively. PMID:16785018

  9. IWA : an analysis program for isentropic wave measurements.

    SciTech Connect

    Ao, Tommy

    2009-02-01

    IWA (Isentropic Wave Analysis) is a program for analyzing velocity profiles of isentropic compression experiments. IWA applies incremental impedance matching correction to measured velocity profiles to obtain in-situ particle velocity profiles for Lagrangian wave analysis. From the in-situ velocity profiles, material properties such as wave velocities, stress, strain, strain rate, and strength are calculated. The program can be run in any current version of MATLAB (2008a or later) or as a Windows XP executable.

  10. Spatiotemporal measurement of surfactant distribution on gravity-capillary waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strickland, Stephen; Shearer, Michael; Daniels, Karen

    2015-11-01

    Materials adsorbed to the surface of a fluid - for instance, crude oil, biogenic slicks, or industrial/medical surfactants - will move in response to surface waves. Due to the difficulty of non-invasive measurement of the spatial distribution of a molecular monolayer, little is known about the dynamics that couple the surface waves and the evolving density field. We report measurements of the spatiotemporal dynamics of the density field of an insoluble surfactant driven by gravity-capillary waves in a shallow cylindrical container. Standing Faraday waves and traveling waves generated by the meniscus are superimposed to create a non-trivial surfactant density field. We measure both the height field of the surface using moire-imaging and the density field of the surfactant via the fluorescence of NBD-tagged phosphatidylcholine. Through phase-averaging stroboscopically-acquired images of the density field, we determine that the surfactant accumulates on the leading edge of the traveling meniscus waves and in the troughs of the standing Faraday waves. We fit the spatiotemporal variations in the two fields and report measurements of the wavenumbers as well as a temporal phase shift between the two fields. These measurements suggest that longitudinal waves contribute to the dynamics. Funded by NSF grant DMS-0968258.

  11. Measurement of photon mass attenuation coefficients of plutonium from 60 to 2615 keV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rettschlag, M.; Berndt, R.; Mortreau, P.

    2007-11-01

    Measurements have been made to determine plutonium photon mass attenuation coefficients by using a collimated-beam transmission method in the energy range from 60 to 2615 keV. These experimental results were compared with previous experimental and theoretical data. Good agreements are observed in the 240-800 keV energy range, whereas differences up to maximum 10% are observed out of these limits.

  12. Development of far infrared attenuation to measure electron densities in cw pin discharge lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Babcock, R. V.

    1977-01-01

    A two beam attenuation technique was devised to measure electron densities 10 to the 9th power to 10 to the 11th power cm/3 resolved to 1 cm, in a near atmospheric COFFEE laser discharge, using 496 micrometer and 1,220 micrometer radiations from CH3F, optically pumped by a CO2 laser. A far infrared generator was developed which was suitable except for a periodic intensity variation in FIR output deriving from frequency variation of the pump radiation.

  13. Local temperature variation measurement by anti-Stokes luminescence in attenuated total reflection geometry.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Ken; Togawa, Ryotaro; Fujimura, Ryushi; Kajikawa, Kotaro

    2016-08-22

    Strong temperature dependence of anti-Stokes luminescence intensity from Rhodamine 101 is used to probe local temperature variation at a surface region in the attenuated total reflection geometry (ATR), when heating with laser light. In this method, the measured region can be limited by observing evanescent luminescence. The near-field depth (penetration depth) was changed by the observation angle θout of the evanescent luminescence and the spatial temperature variation was observed. PMID:27557182

  14. CTS attenuation and cross-polarization measurements at 11.7 GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vogel, W. J.; Straiton, A. W.

    1977-01-01

    The results of data obtained 80 days preceding the solar eclipse shutdown of the CTS 11.7 GHz righthand circularly polarized beacon transmitter are presented. Attenuation and cross polarization isolation were measured. It was determined that depolarization presents a serious limitation to satellite system reliability when frequency reuse by polarization diversity is employed. A 27 db isolation margin would reduce reliability below 99.95%. For the same percentage the required fade margin was below 3 db.

  15. Prediction of attenuation of the 28 GHz COMSTAR beacon signal using radar and measured rain drop spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldhirsh, J.

    1977-01-01

    Disdrometer measurements and radar reflectivity measurements were injected into a computer program to estimate the path attenuation of the signal. Predicted attenuations when compared with the directly measured ones showed generally good correlation on a case by case basis and very good agreement statistically. The utility of using radar in conjunction with disdrometer measurements for predicting fade events and long term fade distributions associated with earth-satellite telecommunications is demonstrated.

  16. Sparse signal reconstruction from polychromatic X-ray CT measurements via mass attenuation discretization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Renliang; Dogandžić, Aleksandar

    2014-02-01

    We propose a method for reconstructing sparse images from polychromatic x-ray computed tomography (ct) measurements via mass attenuation coefficient discretization. The material of the inspected object and the incident spectrum are assumed to be unknown. We rewrite the Lambert-Beer's law in terms of integral expressions of mass attenuation and discretize the resulting integrals. We then present a penalized constrained least-squares optimization approach for reconstructing the underlying object from log-domain measurements, where an active set approach is employed to estimate incident energy density parameters and the nonnegativity and sparsity of the image density map are imposed using negative-energy and smooth ℓ1-norm penalty terms. We propose a two-step scheme for refining the mass attenuation discretization grid by using higher sampling rate over the range with higher photon energy, and eliminating the discretization points that have little effect on accuracy of the forward projection model. This refinement allows us to successfully handle the characteristic lines (Dirac impulses) in the incident energy density spectrum. We compare the proposed method with the standard filtered backprojection, which ignores the polychromatic nature of the measurements and sparsity of the image density map. Numerical simulations using both realistic simulated and real x-ray ct data are presented.

  17. Sparse signal reconstruction from polychromatic X-ray CT measurements via mass attenuation discretization

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, Renliang; Dogandžić, Aleksandar

    2014-02-18

    We propose a method for reconstructing sparse images from polychromatic x-ray computed tomography (ct) measurements via mass attenuation coefficient discretization. The material of the inspected object and the incident spectrum are assumed to be unknown. We rewrite the Lambert-Beer’s law in terms of integral expressions of mass attenuation and discretize the resulting integrals. We then present a penalized constrained least-squares optimization approach for reconstructing the underlying object from log-domain measurements, where an active set approach is employed to estimate incident energy density parameters and the nonnegativity and sparsity of the image density map are imposed using negative-energy and smooth ℓ{sub 1}-norm penalty terms. We propose a two-step scheme for refining the mass attenuation discretization grid by using higher sampling rate over the range with higher photon energy, and eliminating the discretization points that have little effect on accuracy of the forward projection model. This refinement allows us to successfully handle the characteristic lines (Dirac impulses) in the incident energy density spectrum. We compare the proposed method with the standard filtered backprojection, which ignores the polychromatic nature of the measurements and sparsity of the image density map. Numerical simulations using both realistic simulated and real x-ray ct data are presented.

  18. Broadband high-frequency measurement of ultrasonic attenuation of tissues and liquids.

    PubMed

    Bauer-Marschallinger, Johannes; Berer, Thomas; Grun, Hubert; Roitner, Heinz; Reitinger, Bernhard; Burgholzer, Peter

    2012-12-01

    The ongoing expansion of the frequency range used for ultrasonic imaging requires increasing attention to the acoustic attenuation of biomaterials. This work presents a novel method for measuring the attenuation of tissue and liquids in vitro on the basis of single transmission measurements. Ultrasound was generated by short laser pulses directed onto a silicon wafer. In addition, unfocused piezoelectric transducers with a center frequency of 50 MHz were used to detect and emit ultrasound. The laser ultrasound method produces signals with a peak frequency of 30 MHz. In comparison to piezoelectric generation, pulse laser excitation provides approximately 4 times higher amplitudes and 20% larger bandwidth. By using two excitation methods in succession, the attenuation parameters of porcine fat samples with thicknesses in the range of 1.5 to 20 mm could be determined quantitatively within a total frequency range of 5 to 45 MHz. The setup for liquid measurements was tested on samples of human blood and olive oil. Our results are in good agreement with reports in literature. PMID:23221212

  19. Measurement of light attenuation extends the application of suspended sediment monitoring in rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, A. O.; Davies-Colley, R. J.; Elliott, A. H.

    2015-03-01

    Turbidity is often monitored continuously as a proxy for suspended sediment in catchment sediment load studies, but is less often applied to measuring optical `loads' as they affect water quality in downstream waters. We added measurements of visual clarity, from which light (beam) attenuation can be estimated, to auto-sampler monitoring over storm events in tributary rivers of the Kaipara Harbour, a large barrier enclosed estuary complex in northern New Zealand. This paper presents, for the first time, evidence of the mutual relationships between turbidity, total suspended sediment (TSS), and visual clarity, from water samples collected under event flow conditions. The mutual relationships between turbidity, TSS and visual clarity for our monitoring sites were fairly close over about three orders of magnitude (TSS ranging from about 1-1000 mg L-1). Our results show that visual clarity (and hence light attenuation) can be predicted from turbidity, at least as precisely as more traditional predictions of TSS from turbidity. The estimation of light attenuation and corresponding load estimates from visual clarity measurements, for relatively little marginal extra effort, extends the environmental relevance and application of suspended sediment monitoring.

  20. Modelling of wave propagation and attenuation in the Osaka sedimentary basin, western Japan, during the 2013 Awaji Island earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asano, Kimiyuki; Sekiguchi, Haruko; Iwata, Tomotaka; Yoshimi, Masayuki; Hayashida, Takumi; Saomoto, Hidetaka; Horikawa, Haruo

    2016-03-01

    On 2013 April 13, an inland earthquake of Mw 5.8 occurred in Awaji Island, which forms the western boundary of the Osaka sedimentary basin in western Japan. The strong ground motion data were collected from more than 100 stations within the basin and it was found that in the Osaka Plain, the pseudo velocity response spectra at a period of around 6.5 s were significantly larger than at other stations of similar epicentral distance outside the basin. The ground motion lasted longer than 3 min in the Osaka Plain where its bedrock depth spatially varies from approximately 1 to 2 km. We modelled long-period (higher than 2 s) ground motions excited by this earthquake, using the finite difference method assuming a point source, to validate the present velocity structure model and to obtain better constraint of the attenuation factor of the sedimentary part of the basin. The effect of attenuation in the simulation was included in the form of Q(f) = Q0(f/f0), where Q0 at a reference frequency f0 was given by a function of the S-wave velocity, Q0 = αVS. We searched for appropriate Q0 values by changing α for a fixed value of f0 = 0.2 Hz. It was found that values of α from 0.2 to 0.5 fitted the observations reasonably well, but that the value of α = 0.3 performed best. Good agreement between the observed and simulated velocity waveforms was obtained for most stations within the Osaka Basin in terms of both amplitude and ground motion duration. However, underestimation of the pseudo velocity response spectra in the period range of 5-7 s was recognized in the central part of the Osaka Plain, which was caused by the inadequate modelling of later phases or wave packets in this period range observed approximately 2 min after the direct S-wave arrival. We analysed this observed later phase and concluded that it was a Love wave originating from the direction of the east coast of Awaji Island.

  1. Testing THEMIS wave measurements against the cold plasma theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taubenschuss, Ulrich; Santolik, Ondrej; Le Contel, Olivier; Bonnell, John

    2016-04-01

    The THEMIS (Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms) mission records a multitude of electromagnetic waves inside Earth's magnetosphere and provides data in the form of high-resolution electric and magnetic waveforms. We use multi-component measurements of whistler mode waves and test them against the theory of wave propagation in a cold plasma. The measured ratio cB/E (c is speed of light in vacuum, B is magnetic wave amplitude, E is electric wave amplitude) is compared to the same quantity calculated from cold plasma theory over linearized Faraday's law. The aim of this study is to get estimates for measurement uncertainties, especially with regard to the electric field and the cold plasma density, as well as evaluating the validity of cold plasma theory inside Earth's radiation belts.

  2. Extraordinary views of ordinary galaxies: Multiwavelength measures of star formation and attenuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Benjamin D.

    2008-01-01

    The meaningful comparison of models of galaxy evolution to observations is critically dependent on the accurate treatment of dust attenuation. To investigate dust absorption and emission in galaxies we have assembled a sample of ~1000 galaxies from the ultrviolet (UV) through the Infrared (IR) by the GALEX, SDSS, and Spitzer observatories. The ratio of IR to UV emission (IRX) is used to constrain the dust attenuation in galaxies. We consider this measure in optically red galaxies making several simplfying assumptions we estimate the fraction of IR emission due to the heating of by old stars to be as much as 99%. We use the 4000Å break as a robust and useful, though coarse, indicator of star formation history (SFH). Dust attenuation and star formation history (SFH) are the dominant factors affecting the color of galaxies. We explore the empirical relation between SFH, attenuation, and color (especially the UV color) for a wide range of galaxies, including early types. This relation is compared to models that separately predict the effects of dust and SFH on color. We perform fits to the relation between SFH, attenuation, and color, which links the production of starlight and its absorption by dust to the subsequent reemmision of the absorbed light in the IR. Galaxy models that self-consistently treat dust absorption and emission as well as stellar populations will need to reproduce these fitted relations in the low-redshift universe. We construct estimates of dust attenuation and star formation rate (SFR) from the UV and IR photmetry and compare them to optical indicators, including the SFR b of Brinchmann et al. (2004). We find that there is a significant trend of the ratio of SFR b to the IR+UV luminosity with D n (4000) that cannot be explained as due to the additional IR emission from dust heatred by old stars. We find that the dust attenuation inferred from the ratio of optical emission lines is ~ 2-3 times higher than that inferred from IRX for a wide range

  3. Stiffness matrix determination of composite materials using lamb wave group velocity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Putkis, O.; Croxford, A. J.

    2013-04-01

    The use of Lamb waves in Non-Destructive Evaluation (NDE) and Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) is gaining popularity due to their ability to travel long distances without significant attenuation, therefore offering large area inspections with a small number of sensors. The design of a Lamb-wave-based NDE/SHM system for composite materials is more complicated than for metallic materials due to the directional dependence of Lamb wave propagation characteristics such as dispersion and group velocity. Propagation parameters can be theoretically predicted from known material properties, specifically the stiffness matrix and density. However, in practice it is difficult to obtain the stiffness matrix of a particular material or structure with high accuracy, hence introducing errors in theoretical predictions and inaccuracies in the resulting propagation parameters. Measured Lamb wave phase velocities can be used to infer the stiffness matrix, but the measurements are limited to the principal directions due to the steering effect (different propagation directions of phase and corresponding group velocities). This paper proposes determination of the stiffness matrix from the measured group velocities, which can be unambiguously measured in any direction. A highly anisotropic carbon-fibre-reinforced polymer plate is chosen for the study. The influence of different stiffness matrix elements on the directional group velocity profile is investigated. Thermodynamic Simulated Annealing (TSA) is used as a tool for inverse, multi variable inference of the stiffness matrix. A good estimation is achieved for particular matrix elements.

  4. Unsteady Heat-Flux Measurements of Second-Mode Instability Waves in a Hypersonic Boundary Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kergerise, Michael A.; Rufer, Shann J.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we report on the application of the atomic layer thermopile (ALTP) heat- flux sensor to the measurement of laminar-to-turbulent transition in a hypersonic flat plate boundary layer. The centerline of the flat-plate model was instrumented with a streamwise array of ALTP sensors and the flat-plate model was exposed to a Mach 6 freestream over a range of unit Reynolds numbers. Here, we observed an unstable band of frequencies that are associated with second-mode instability waves in the laminar boundary layer that forms on the flat-plate surface. The measured frequencies, group velocities, phase speeds, and wavelengths of these instability waves are in agreement with data previously reported in the literature. Heat flux time series, and the Morlet-wavelet transforms of them, revealed the wave-packet nature of the second-mode instability waves. In addition, a laser-based radiative heating system was developed to measure the frequency response functions (FRF) of the ALTP sensors used in the wind tunnel test. These measurements were used to assess the stability of the sensor FRFs over time and to correct spectral estimates for any attenuation caused by the finite sensor bandwidth.

  5. Measurement of Oblique Impact-generated Shear Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dahl, J. M.; Schultz, P. H.

    2001-01-01

    Experimental strain measurements reveal that oblique impacts can generate shear waves with displacements as large as those in the P-wave. Large oblique impacts may thus be more efficient sources of surface disruption than vertical impacts. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  6. Measurement of ocean wave spectra using polarimetric AIRSAR data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuler, D. L.

    1993-01-01

    A polarimetric technique for improving the visibility of waves, whose propagation direction has an azimuthal component, in RAR (real aperture radar) or SAR (synthetic aperture radar) images has been investigated. The technique shows promise as a means of producing more accurate 2-D polarimetric RAR ocean wave spectra. For SAR applications domination by velocity-bunching effects may limit its usefulness to long ocean swell. A modification of this technique involving measurement of polarization signature modulations in the image is useful for detecting waves in SAR images and, potentially, estimating RMS wave slopes.

  7. Surface wave attenuation in the shallow subsurface from multichannel-multishot seismic data: a new approach for detecting fractures and lithological discontinuities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeda, Tatsunori; Tsuji, Takeshi

    2016-07-01

    Surface wave analysis generally neglects amplitude information, instead using phase information to delineate near-surface S-wave velocity structures. To effectively characterize subsurface heterogeneities from amplitude information, we propose a method of estimating lateral variation of attenuation coefficients of surface waves from multichannel-multishot (multifold) seismic data. We extend the concept of the common midpoint cross-correlation method, used for phase velocity estimation, to the analysis of attenuation coefficients. Our numerical experiments demonstrated that when used together, attenuation coefficients and phase velocities could characterize a lithological boundary as well as fracture zone. We applied the proposed method to multifold seismic reflection data acquired in Shikoku Island, Japan. We clearly observed abrupt changes in lateral variation of estimated attenuation coefficients around fault locations associated with a lithological boundary and with well-developed fractures, whereas phase velocity results could detect only the lithological boundary. Our study demonstrated that simultaneous interpretation of attenuation coefficients and phase velocities has the potential to distinguish localized fractures from lithological boundaries.

  8. Direct Measurement of Wave Kernels in Time-Distance Helioseismology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duvall, T. L., Jr.

    2006-01-01

    Solar f-mode waves are surface-gravity waves which propagate horizontally in a thin layer near the photosphere with a dispersion relation approximately that of deep water waves. At the power maximum near 3 mHz, the wavelength of 5 Mm is large enough for various wave scattering properties to be observable. Gizon and Birch (2002,ApJ,571,966)h ave calculated kernels, in the Born approximation, for the sensitivity of wave travel times to local changes in damping rate and source strength. In this work, using isolated small magnetic features as approximate point-sourc'e scatterers, such a kernel has been measured. The observed kernel contains similar features to a theoretical damping kernel but not for a source kernel. A full understanding of the effect of small magnetic features on the waves will require more detailed modeling.

  9. Heterogeneities of the field of short-period shear wave attenuation in the lithosphere of Central Asia and their relationship with seismicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopnichev, Yu. F.; Sokolova, I. N.

    2011-03-01

    The characteristics of the short-period shear wave attenuation field in the lithosphere of the Turanian Plate, West Tien Shan, Pamir, and Hindu Kush have been studied. The method based on analysis of the logarithm of the ratio between maximal amplitudes of Sn and Pn waves ( Sn/ Pn parameter) has been applied. More than 400 records of earthquakes, obtained at distances of ˜400-1000 km from the AAK digital station, have been processed. It has been found that relatively weak attenuation is observed in the regions of the West Tien Shan and Pamir. The largest area of strong attenuation is located in the region of the Afghan-Tadjik Depression adjacent to Hindu Kush. A wide band of low Sn/ Pn parameter values, stretched northeastwards, has been distinguished. Along with the analogous band of strong attenuation, distinguished before in the regions of Central Tien Shan and Dzungaria, it is the continuation of the largest Chaman Fault, which stretches 850 km along the boundary of the Indian Plate. Source zones of strong earthquakes with M ≥ 7.0 that occurred in the first half of 20th century correspond to relatively weak attenuation. Areas of high attenuation, where strong seismic events have not occurred for the last 110 years, are outlined. Analogously to other seismoactive regions, it is supposed that these areas are related to preparation of strong earthquakes.

  10. Shear wave attenuation estimated from the spectral decay rate in the vicinity of the Petropavlovsk station, Kamchatka

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gusev, A. A.; Guseva, E. M.

    2016-07-01

    The parameters of S-wave attenuation (the total effect of absorption and scattering) near the Petropavlovsk (PET) station in Kamchatka were estimated by means of the spectral method through an original procedure. The spectral method typically analyzes the changes with distance of the shape of spectra of the acceleration records assuming that the acceleration spectrum at the earthquake source is flat. In reality, this assumption is violated: the source acceleration spectra often have a high-frequency cutoff (the source-controlled f max) which limits the spectral working bandwidth. Ignoring this phenomenon not only leads to a broad scatter of the individual estimates but also causes systematic errors in the form of overestimation of losses. In the approach applied in the present study, we primarily estimated the frequency of the mentioned high-frequency cutoff and then constructed the loss estimates only within the frequency range where the source spectrum is approximately flat. The shape of the source spectrum was preliminarily assessed by the approximate loss compensation technique. For this purpose, we used the tentative attenuation estimates which are close to the final ones. The difference in the logarithms of the spectral amplitudes at the edges of the working bandwidth is the input for calculating the attenuation. We used the digital accelerograms from the PET station, with 80 samples per second digitization rate, and based on them, we calculated the averaged spectrum of the S-waves as the root mean square along two horizontal components. Our analysis incorporates 384 spectra from the local earthquakes with M = 4-6.5 at the hypocentral distances ranging from 80 to 220 km. By applying the nonlinear least-square method, we found the following parameters of the loss model: the Q-factor Q 0 = 156 ± 33 at frequency f = 1 Hz for the distance interval r = 0-100 km; the exponent in the power-law relationship describing the growth of the Q-factor with frequency,

  11. Estimation of Complex-Valued Stiffness Using Acoustic Waves Measured with Magnetic Resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliphant, Travis E.; Ehman, Richard L.; Greenleaf, James F.

    Tissue stiffness can be a useful indicator of diseased tissue. Noninvasive quantitation of the mechanical properties of tissue could improve early detection of such pathology. A method for detecting displacement from propagating shear waves using a phase-contrast MRI technique has been developed previously. In this chapter the principles behind the measurement technique are reviewed, and the mechanical properties that can be determined from the displacement data are investigated for isotropic materials. An algebraic inversion approach useful for piece-wise homogeneous materials is described in detail for the general isotropic case, which is then specialized to incompressible materials as a model for tissue. Results of the inversion approach are presented for an experimental phantom and in-vivo breast tumor. These results show that the technique can be used to obtain shear-wave speed and attenuation in regions where there is sufficient signal-to-noise ratio in the displacement and its second spatial derivatives. The sensitivity to noise is higher in the attenuation estimates than in the shear-wave speed estimates.

  12. Volumetric measurements of a spatially growing dust acoustic wave

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Jeremiah D.

    2012-11-15

    In this study, tomographic particle image velocimetry (tomo-PIV) techniques are used to make volumetric measurements of the dust acoustic wave (DAW) in a weakly coupled dusty plasma system in an argon, dc glow discharge plasma. These tomo-PIV measurements provide the first instantaneous volumetric measurement of a naturally occurring propagating DAW. These measurements reveal over the measured volume that the measured wave mode propagates in all three spatial dimensional and exhibits the same spatial growth rate and wavelength in each spatial direction.

  13. Ocean Wave Separation Using CEEMD-Wavelet in GPS Wave Measurement

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Junjie; He, Xiufeng; Ferreira, Vagner G.

    2015-01-01

    Monitoring ocean waves plays a crucial role in, for example, coastal environmental and protection studies. Traditional methods for measuring ocean waves are based on ultrasonic sensors and accelerometers. However, the Global Positioning System (GPS) has been introduced recently and has the advantage of being smaller, less expensive, and not requiring calibration in comparison with the traditional methods. Therefore, for accurately measuring ocean waves using GPS, further research on the separation of the wave signals from the vertical GPS-mounted carrier displacements is still necessary. In order to contribute to this topic, we present a novel method that combines complementary ensemble empirical mode decomposition (CEEMD) with a wavelet threshold denoising model (i.e., CEEMD-Wavelet). This method seeks to extract wave signals with less residual noise and without losing useful information. Compared with the wave parameters derived from the moving average skill, high pass filter and wave gauge, the results show that the accuracy of the wave parameters for the proposed method was improved with errors of about 2 cm and 0.2 s for mean wave height and mean period, respectively, verifying the validity of the proposed method. PMID:26262620

  14. Measurements of atmospheric attenuation at ultrasonic frequencies and the significance for echolocation by bats.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, B D; Simmons, J A

    1982-03-01

    The absorption of sound propagating through the atmosphere under laboratory conditions of 25 degrees C and 50% relative humidity was measured at frequencies from 30 to 200 kHz. The attenuating effect on the passage of ultrasonic sounds through air ranged from 0.7 dB/m at 30 kHz. These measurements confirm theoretical expectations and earlier observations that atmospheric attenuation is progressively more severe at higher frequencies and that the atmosphere acts as a low-pass filter for conducting sounds in the frequency range used for echolocation by bats. Different species of bats use different portions of this range of frequencies, and bats emitting sonar signals predominantly above 100 kHz encounter especially severe attenuation of over 3 dB/m. With the greatly restricted operating distances for echolocation at such high frequencies, bats using these higher frequencies must be under compelling ecological pressures of a higher priority than long-range detection of targets. PMID:7085967

  15. Shock propagation and attenuation in Green River oil shale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grady, D. E.

    2014-05-01

    Shock waves produced by planar impact of thin plates onto samples of oil shale are monitored with time-resolved velocity interferometer diagnostics. Peak shock stresses are below the Hugoniot elastic limit. Stress wave measurements at successive sample thickness are analysed to determine the experimental shock energy attenuation with propagation distance. Shock attenuation is attributed to stress wave scattering at planes of oil shale kerogen within the shale matrix. Wave scattering from planar defects are evaluated from a shock physics perspective and a scattering model is constructed that sensibly reproduces the experimental observation of shock energy attenuation.

  16. X-ray attenuation of adipose breast tissue: in-vitro and in-vivo measurements using spectral imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fredenberg, Erik; Erhard, Klaus; Berggren, Karl; Dance, David R.; Young, Kenneth C.; Cederström, Björn; Johansson, Henrik; Lundqvist, Mats; Moa, Elin; Homan, Hanno; Willsher, Paula; Kilburn-Toppin, Fleur; Wallis, Matthew

    2015-03-01

    The development of new x-ray imaging techniques often requires prior knowledge of tissue attenuation, but the sources of such information are sparse. We have measured the attenuation of adipose breast tissue using spectral imaging, in vitro and in vivo. For the in-vitro measurement, fixed samples of adipose breast tissue were imaged on a spectral mammography system, and the energy-dependent x-ray attenuation was measured in terms of equivalent thicknesses of aluminum and poly-methyl methacrylate (PMMA). For the in-vivo measurement, a similar procedure was applied on a number of spectral screening mammograms. The results of the two measurements agreed well and were consistent with published attenuation data and with measurements on tissue-equivalent material.

  17. Altimeter height measurement error introduced by the presence of variable cloud and rain attenuation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monaldo, F. M.; Goldhirsh, J.; Walsh, E. J.

    1986-01-01

    It has recently been recognized that spatially inhomogeneous clouds and rain can substantially affect the height precision obtainable from a spaceborne radar altimeter system. Through computer simulation, it has been found that typical levels of cloud and rain intensities and associated spatial variabilities may degrade altimeter precision at 13.5 GHz and, in particular, cause severe degradation at 35 GHz. This degradation in precision is a result of radar signature distortion caused by variable attenuation over the beam limited altimeter footprint. Because attenuation effects increase with frequency, imprecision caused by them will significantly impact on the frequency selection of future altimeters. In this paper the degradation of altimeter precision introduced by idealized cloud and rain configurations as well as for a realistic rain configuration as measured with a ground based radar is examined.

  18. Altimeter height measurement errors introduced by the presence of variable cloud and rain attenuation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monaldo, F. M.; Goldhirsh, J.; Walsh, E. J.

    1984-01-01

    It has recently been recognized that spatially inhomogeneous clouds and rain can substantially affect the height precision obtainable from a spaceborne radar altimeter system. Through computer simulation, it has been found that typical levels of cloud and rain intensities and associated spatial variabilities may degrade altimeter precision at 13.5 GHz and, in particular, cause severe degradation at 35 GHz. This degradation in precision is a result of radar signature distortion caused by variable attenuation over the beam limited altimeter footprint. Because attenuation effects increase with frequency, imprecision caused by them will significantly impact on the frequency selection of future altimeters. In this paper the degradation of altimeter precision introduced by idealized cloud and rain configurations as well as for a realistic rain configuration as measured with a ground based radar is examined.

  19. Spinal axis irradiation with electrons: Measurements of attenuation by the spinal processes

    SciTech Connect

    Muller-Runkel, R.; Vijayakumar, S.

    1986-07-01

    Electrons may be used beneficially for spinal axis irradiation in medulloblastoma children to avoid some of the long-term sequelae induced by megavoltage photons. However, the attenuation by the intervening bone ought to be considered. Three-dimensional computer treatment planning with inhomogeneity correction for electron beams is not yet generally available, and alternate methods are needed to evaluate the attenuation by the complex bony structure of the spine. Here, we present our experimental data showing the alteration in the electron isodoses due to the intervening spinous processes. Film dosimetric measurements were made in the vertebral columns obtained from autopsies of a goat, a dog, and a child. Our results show that electron beam therapy for the spinal axis is a viable option.

  20. Measuring Ultrasonic Shear-Wave Velocity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nummelin, J.

    1983-01-01

    New technique improves accuracy of measurements of ultrasonic shearwave velocity. Technique eliminates need to measure incident sound angle. Technique contains groove in which steel sphere is placed. Sphere act as reference point for measuring path lengths and propagation times. Velocity measurements are within 1 percent of published data.

  1. An Empirical Assessment of Exposure Measurement Error and Effect Attenuation in Bipollutant Epidemiologic Models

    PubMed Central

    Baxter, Lisa K.; Chang, Howard H.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Using multipollutant models to understand combined health effects of exposure to multiple pollutants is becoming more common. However, complex relationships between pollutants and differing degrees of exposure error across pollutants can make health effect estimates from multipollutant models difficult to interpret. Objectives: We aimed to quantify relationships between multiple pollutants and their associated exposure errors across metrics of exposure and to use empirical values to evaluate potential attenuation of coefficients in epidemiologic models. Methods: We used three daily exposure metrics (central-site measurements, air quality model estimates, and population exposure model estimates) for 193 ZIP codes in the Atlanta, Georgia, metropolitan area from 1999 through 2002 for PM2.5 and its components (EC and SO4), as well as O3, CO, and NOx, to construct three types of exposure error: δspatial (comparing air quality model estimates to central-site measurements), δpopulation (comparing population exposure model estimates to air quality model estimates), and δtotal (comparing population exposure model estimates to central-site measurements). We compared exposure metrics and exposure errors within and across pollutants and derived attenuation factors (ratio of observed to true coefficient for pollutant of interest) for single- and bipollutant model coefficients. Results: Pollutant concentrations and their exposure errors were moderately to highly correlated (typically, > 0.5), especially for CO, NOx, and EC (i.e., “local” pollutants); correlations differed across exposure metrics and types of exposure error. Spatial variability was evident, with variance of exposure error for local pollutants ranging from 0.25 to 0.83 for δspatial and δtotal. The attenuation of model coefficients in single- and bipollutant epidemiologic models relative to the true value differed across types of exposure error, pollutants, and space. Conclusions: Under a

  2. An inexpensive instrument for measuring wave exposure and water velocity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Figurski, J.D.; Malone, D.; Lacy, J.R.; Denny, M.

    2011-01-01

    Ocean waves drive a wide variety of nearshore physical processes, structuring entire ecosystems through their direct and indirect effects on the settlement, behavior, and survivorship of marine organisms. However, wave exposure remains difficult and expensive to measure. Here, we report on an inexpensive and easily constructed instrument for measuring wave-induced water velocities. The underwater relative swell kinetics instrument (URSKI) is a subsurface float tethered by a short (<1 m) line to the seafloor. Contained within the float is an accelerometer that records the tilt of the float in response to passing waves. During two field trials totaling 358 h, we confirmed the accuracy and precision of URSKI measurements through comparison to velocities measured by an in situ acoustic Doppler velocimeter and those predicted by a standard swell model, and we evaluated how the dimensions of the devices, its buoyancy, and sampling frequency can be modified for use in a variety of environments.

  3. Laser probe for measuring 2-D wave slope spectra of ocean capillary waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palm, C. S.; Anderson, R. C.; Reece, A. M.

    1977-01-01

    A laser-optical instrument for use in determining the two-dimensional wave-slope spectrum of ocean capillary waves is described. The instrument measures up to a 35-deg tip angle of the surface normal by measuring the position of a refracted laser beam directed vertically upward through a water surface. A telescope, a continuous two-dimensional Schottky barrier photodiode, and a pair of analog dividers render the signals independent of water height and insensitive to laser-beam intensity fluctuations. Calibration is performed entirely in the laboratory before field use. Sample records and wave-slope spectra are shown for one-dimensional wave-tank tests and for two-dimensional ocean tests. These are presented along with comparison spectra for calm and choppy water conditions. A mechanical wave follower was used to adjust the instrument position in the presence of large ocean swell and tides.

  4. Ultrasonic database development for the acoustic inspection device: the velocity-attenuation measurement system (VAMS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz, Aaron A.; Burghard, Brion J.; Valencia, Juan D.; Samuel, Todd J.

    2004-07-01

    The inspection of sealed containers is a critical task for personnel charged with enforcing government policies, maintaining public safety, and ensuring national security. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has developed a portable, handheld acoustic inspection device (AID) that provides non-invasive container interrogation and material identification capabilities. The AID technology has been deployed worldwide and user"s are providing feedback and requesting additional capabilities and functionality. Recently, PNNL has developed a laboratory-based system for automated, ultrasonic characterization of fluids to support database development for the AID. Using pulse-echo ultrasound, ultrasonic pulses are launched into a container or bulk-solid commodity. The return echoes from these pulses are analyzed in terms of time-of-flight and frequency content (as a function of temperature) to extract physical property measurements (acoustic velocity and attenuation) of the material under test. These measured values are then compared to a tailored database of materials and fluids property data acquired using the Velocity-Attenuation Measurement System (VAMS). This bench-top platform acquires key ultrasonic property measurements as a function of temperature and frequency. This paper describes the technical basis for operation of the VAMS, recent enhancements to the measurement algorithms for both the VAMS and AID technologies, and new measurement data from laboratory testing and performance demonstration activities. Applications for homeland security and counterterrorism, law enforcement, drug-interdiction and fuel transportation compliance activities will be discussed.

  5. New lifetime measurements in the stable semimagic Sn isotopes using the Doppler-shift attenuation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jungclaus, A.; Walker, J.; Leske, J.; Speidel, K.-H.; Stuchbery, A. E.; East, M.; Boutachkov, P.; Cederkäll, J.; Doornenbal, P.; Egido, J. L.; Ekström, A.; Gerl, J.; Gernhäuser, R.; Goel, N.; Górska, M.; Kojouharov, I.; Maier-Komor, P.; Modamio, V.; Naqvi, F.; Pietralla, N.; Pietri, S.; Prokopowicz, W.; Schaffner, H.; Schwengner, R.; Wollersheim, H.-J.

    2011-09-01

    Precise measurements of lifetimes in the picosecond range of excited states in the stable even-A Sn isotopes 112,114,116,122Sn have been performed using the Doppler shift attenuation technique. For the first excited 2+ states in 112Sn, 114Sn and 116Sn the E2 transition strengths deduced from the measured lifetimes are in disagreement with the previously adopted values. They indicate a shallow minimum at N = 66 in contrast to the maximum at mid-shell predicted by modern shell model calculations.

  6. Method of determining ultrasonic attenuation of tissue using reflective tomographic reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Flax, S. W.; Glover, G. H.

    1984-10-09

    Ultrasonic wave attenuation is determined for a plurality of limited volumes of tissue comprising a body under examination by directing ultrasonic waves through each limited volume along a plurality of vectors, determining a measure of attenuation of the limited volume by detecting the frequency shift of reflections of the ultrasonic wave along each vector, and averaging the attenuation of each limited volume from each vector intersecting the limited volume.

  7. Acoustic Measurement of Surface Wave Damping by a Meniscus.

    PubMed

    Michel, Guillaume; Pétrélis, François; Fauve, Stéphan

    2016-04-29

    We investigate the reflection of gravity-capillary surface waves by a plane vertical barrier. The size of the meniscus is found to strongly affect reflection: the energy of the reflected wave with a pinned contact line is around twice the one corresponding to a fully developed meniscus. To perform these measurements, a new experimental setup similar to an acousto-optic modulator is developed and offers a simple way to measure the amplitude, frequency and direction of propagation of surface waves. PMID:27176523

  8. Measurements of Inertial Limit Alfven Wave Dispersion for Finite Perpendicular Wave Number

    SciTech Connect

    Kletzing, C. A.; Thuecks, D. J.; Skiff, F.; Bounds, S. R.; Vincena, S.

    2010-03-05

    Measurements of the dispersion relation for shear Alfven waves as a function of perpendicular wave number are reported for the inertial regime for which V{sub A}>V{sub Te}. The parallel phase velocity and damping are determined as k{sub perpendicular} varies and the measurements are compared to theoretical predictions. The comparison shows that the best agreement between theory and experiment is achieved for a fully complex plasma dispersion relation which includes the effects of electron collisions.

  9. Comparing shear-wave velocity profiles inverted from multichannel surface wave with borehole measurements

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Xia, J.; Miller, R.D.; Park, C.B.; Hunter, J.A.; Harris, J.B.; Ivanov, J.

    2002-01-01

    Recent field tests illustrate the accuracy and consistency of calculating near-surface shear (S)-wave velocities using multichannel analysis of surface waves (MASW). S-wave velocity profiles (S-wave velocity vs. depth) derived from MASW compared favorably to direct borehole measurements at sites in Kansas, British Columbia, and Wyoming. Effects of changing the total number of recording channels, sampling interval, source offset, and receiver spacing on the inverted S-wave velocity were studied at a test site in Lawrence, Kansas. On the average, the difference between MASW calculated Vs and borehole measured Vs in eight wells along the Fraser River in Vancouver, Canada was less than 15%. One of the eight wells was a blind test well with the calculated overall difference between MASW and borehole measurements less than 9%. No systematic differences were observed in derived Vs values from any of the eight test sites. Surface wave analysis performed on surface data from Wyoming provided S-wave velocities in near-surface materials. Velocity profiles from MASW were confirmed by measurements based on suspension log analysis. ?? 2002 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. High frequency measurement of P- and S-wave velocities on crystalline rock massif surface - methodology of measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilhelm, Jan; Slavík, Lubomír

    2014-05-01

    For the purpose of non-destructive monitoring of rock properties in the underground excavation it is possible to perform repeated high-accuracy P- and S-wave velocity measurements. This contribution deals with preliminary results gained during the preparation of micro-seismic long-term monitoring system. The field velocity measurements were made by pulse-transmission technique directly on the rock outcrop (granite) in Bedrichov gallery (northern Bohemia). The gallery at the experimental site was excavated using TBM (Tunnel Boring Machine) and it is used for drinking water supply, which is conveyed in a pipe. The stable measuring system and its automatic operation lead to the use of piezoceramic transducers both as a seismic source and as a receiver. The length of measuring base at gallery wall was from 0.5 to 3 meters. Different transducer coupling possibilities were tested namely with regard of repeatability of velocity determination. The arrangement of measuring system on the surface of the rock massif causes better sensitivity of S-transducers for P-wave measurement compared with the P-transducers. Similarly P-transducers were found more suitable for S-wave velocity determination then P-transducers. The frequency dependent attenuation of fresh rock massif results in limited frequency content of registered seismic signals. It was found that at the distance between the seismic source and receiver from 0.5 m the frequency components above 40 kHz are significantly attenuated. Therefore for the excitation of seismic wave 100 kHz transducers are most suitable. The limited frequency range should be also taken into account for the shape of electric impulse used for exciting of piezoceramic transducer. The spike pulse generates broad-band seismic signal, short in the time domain. However its energy after low-pass filtration in the rock is significantly lower than the energy of seismic signal generated by square wave pulse. Acknowledgments: This work was partially

  11. Precision Ultrasonic Wave Measurements With Simple Equipment

    PubMed Central

    Fick, Steven E.; Palmer, C. Harvey

    2001-01-01

    We describe the design and construction of a relatively simple, inexpensive laser interferometer system for accurate measurements of ultrasonic surface displacement waveforms in reasonably friendly environments. We show how analysis of a single waveform can provide both the calibration constant required for absolute measurements and an estimate of the uncertainty of these measurements. We demonstrate the performance of this interferometer by measuring ultrasonic waveforms generated by a novel conical-element ultrasonic transducer.

  12. Phase change measurement, and speed of sound and attenuation determination, from underwater acoustic panel tests.

    PubMed

    Piquette, Jean C; Paolero, Anthony E

    2003-03-01

    A technique for measuring the change in phase produced by the insertion of a panel between a projector and receiver is described. Presented also is a procedure for determining the phase speed and attenuation of the panel material. Although the methods were developed over the frequency decade 10-100 kHz, they are not limited to that band. It was observed that a "settling time" of approximately 20 min is required to obtain reproducible phase measurements if the experiment is disturbed even slightly. For example, rotating the panel 10 degrees, then immediately returning to the original position, causes the observed phases to differ by up to 10 deg from those obtained prior to the disturbance. These differences are distributed randomly across frequency. Temperature stabilization within the medium as well as the material is also required before measurements can take place. After the stated 20 min settling time, however, the phases return to the values obtained prior to rotation, or after temperature stabilization, to within +/- 1/2 deg. The sound speed and attenuation determination technique employs least-squares fitting of a causal model to the measurements. Four (or fewer) adjusted parameters accommodate the measurements over the stated frequency decade, even for samples that exhibit significant dispersion. The sound speed is typically determined to an accuracy of +/- 30 m/s, as judged from a propagation-of-error calculation. This model assumes single-layered panels. PMID:12656386

  13. Low energy photon attenuation measurements of hydrophilic materials for tissue equivalent phantoms.

    PubMed

    Farquharson, M J; Spyrou, N M; al-Bahri, J; Highgate, D J

    1995-08-01

    The object of the study was to measure the linear attenuation coefficients of hydrophilic materials with the aim of investigating their suitability as tissue equivalent materials. Hydrophilic materials are used in the ophthalmic industry for the manufacture of soft contact lenses. Hydrophilic materials have the trade name "Biogel" and are commonly known as hydrogels. Two types of hydrophilic material were tested, ED4C (72% water uptake by weight) and EDIS (60% water uptake by weight). The measurements were obtained using gamma-ray photons of energy 59.5 keV, and x-ray photons of energies 44.23 and 17.44 keV. Measurements were made for material types ED4C and EDIS in both the dry and fully hydrated state. Measurements were also made on powdered samples of ED4C at different hydration levels using a photon energy of 17.44 keV and powdered samples of EDIS at different hydration levels using a photon energy of 59.5 keV. The precision of the measurements was approx. 1%. It was found that material ED4C has linear attenuation coefficients that closely match those of the calculated values for soft tissue across the range of energies used. PMID:7633393

  14. Study of EMIC wave excitation using direct ion measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, Kyungguk; Liu, Kaijun; Bonnell, John W.; Breneman, Aaron W.; Denton, Richard E.; Funsten, Herbert O.; Jahn, Jöerg-Micha; Kletzing, Craig A.; Kurth, William S.; Larsen, Brian A.; Reeves, Geoffrey D.; Spence, Harlan E.; Wygant, John R.

    2015-04-01

    With data from Van Allen Probes, we investigate electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) wave excitation using simultaneously observed ion distributions. Strong He band waves occurred while the spacecraft was moving through an enhanced density region. We extract from helium, oxygen, proton, and electron mass spectrometer measurement the velocity distributions of warm heavy ions as well as anisotropic energetic protons that drive wave growth through the ion cyclotron instability. Fitting the measured ion fluxes to multiple sinm-type distribution functions, we find that the observed ions make up about 15% of the total ions, but about 85% of them are still missing. By making legitimate estimates of the unseen cold (below ˜2 eV) ion composition from cutoff frequencies suggested by the observed wave spectrum, a series of linear instability analyses and hybrid simulations are carried out. The simulated waves generally vary as predicted by linear theory. They are more sensitive to the cold O+ concentration than the cold He+ concentration. Increasing the cold O+ concentration weakens the He band waves but enhances the O band waves. Finally, the exact cold ion composition is suggested to be in a range when the simulated wave spectrum best matches the observed one.

  15. Influence of bubble size and thermal dissipation on compressive wave attenuation in liquid foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monloubou, M.; Saint-Jalmes, A.; Dollet, B.; Cantat, I.

    2015-11-01

    Acoustic or blast wave absorption by liquid foams is especially efficient and bubble size or liquid fraction optimization is an important challenge in this context. A resonant behavior of foams has recently been observed, but the main local dissipative process is still unknown. In this paper, we evidence the thermal origin of the dissipation, with an optimal bubble size close to the thermal boundary layer thickness. Using a shock tube, we produce typical pressure variation at time scales of the order of the millisecond, which propagates in the foam in linear and slightly nonlinear regimes.

  16. Rotary antenna attenuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickinson, R. M.; Hardy, J. C.

    1969-01-01

    Radio frequency attenuator, having negligible insertion loss at minimum attenuation, can be used for making precise antenna gain measurements. It is small in size compared to a rotary-vane attenuator.

  17. Effect of decay on ultrasonic velocity and attenuation measurements in wood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGovern, Megan; Senalik, Adam; Chen, George; Beall, Frank C.; Reis, Henrique

    2011-04-01

    Loblolly pine (Pinus taeda) wood cube specimens were exposed to Gloeophyllum fungus (Gloeophyllum trabeum) for increasing periods of time ranging from one week to twelve weeks. The corresponding mass of each of these specimens was recorded before and after they were subjected to the controlled decay. Using X-ray computed tomography (CT) the specimens' corresponding mass loss due to decay and corresponding densities were calculated. For each of the three principal material directions of these specimens with controlled decay, ultrasonic longitudinal and (polarized) shear velocity measurements along with the corresponding attenuation measurements are presented. The measurements were carried out using longitudinal and shear ultrasonic transducers with a center frequency of 100 kHz. A steel delay line was used because of the relative small size of the wooden specimens relative to the used wavelengths. Waveform averaging was used along with the phase-slope method to measure velocities. It was observed that the velocities increase with increasing frequency and decrease with increasing amount of decay, while the corresponding attenuations increase with increasing frequency and with amount of decay.

  18. Attenuation of the S+Lg+Surface Wave Group out to 600 km in Northeastern North America: A Baseline Study?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boatwright, J.; Seekins, L. C.

    2009-12-01

    We analyze the S+Lg+surface wave groups radiated out to 600 km by four moderate (4 ≤ M ≤ 5) earthquakes in Quebec, New York, and Maine: the 1997 Cap Rouge, 2002 Ausable Forks, 2005 Rivière du Loup, and 2006 Bar Harbor earthquakes. The raypaths predominately sample the Appalacian Province, and the crustal velocity structure is roughly homogeneous across the study area. We compute spectra using 20-60 s windows of the horizontal broadband components. We restrict our analysis to hard-rock (Vs > 1500 m/s) and soft-rock (Vs > 700 m/s) sites, avoiding resonant sedimentary sites; we model site amplification using average 1D impedance functions (Boore and Joyner, 1997). We use ro = 50 km instead of ro = 100 km for the crossover distance in the Street et al. (1975) function for geometrical spreading: this distance adjusts the corrected spectra at 10 s to the moment tensor estimates. This simple correction scheme allows us to regress for Q directly as a function of frequency: the source spectral shape is entirely unconstrained. Fitting a Qo f q function to the Q estimates from 0.2 to 25 Hz yields Q = 410 f 0.5 for a group velocity of 3.5 km/s. This attenuation is stronger than the Lg attenuation of 650 f 0.36 obtained by Erickson et al. (2004). The Q estimates are consistent for individual events. For f > 20 Hz, the Q estimates increase more rapidly than f 0.5: this deviation from the Qo f q form appears characteristic. To gauge how these Q estimates depend on the distance limit, we will rerun the analysis using broadband data out to 1000 km, adding 30% more recordings to the dataset.

  19. Multifrequency measurements of core-diffracted P waves (Pdiff) for global waveform tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseini, Kasra; Sigloch, Karin

    2015-10-01

    The lower third of the mantle is sampled extensively by body waves that diffract around the earth's core (Pdiff and Sdiff phases), which could deliver highly resolved tomographic images of this poorly understood region. But core-diffracted waves-especially Pdiff waves-are not often used in tomography because they are difficult to model adequately. Our aim is to make core-diffracted body waves usable for global waveform tomography, across their entire frequency range. Here we present the data processing part of this effort. A method is demonstrated that routinely calculates finite-frequency traveltimes of Pdiff waves by cross-correlating large quantities of waveform data with synthetic seismograms, in frequency passbands ranging from 30.0 to 2.7 s dominant period. Green's functions for 1857 earthquakes, typically comprising thousands of seismograms, are calculated by theoretically exact wave propagation through a spherically symmetric earth model, up to 1 Hz dominant period. Out of 418 226 candidates, 165 651 (39.6 per cent) source-receiver pairs yielded at least one successful passband measurement of a Pdiff traveltime anomaly, for a total of 479 559 traveltimes in the eight passbands considered. Measurements of teleseismic P waves yielded 448 178 usable source-receiver paths from 613 057 candidates (73.1 per cent success rate), for a total of 2 306 755 usable teleseismic dT in eight passbands. Observed and predicted characteristics of Pdiff traveltimes are discussed and compared to teleseismic P for this very large data set. Pdiff measurements are noise-limited due to severe wave attenuation with epicentral distance and frequency. Measurement success drops from 40-60 per cent at 80° distance, to 5-10 per cent at 140°. Frequency has a 2-3 times stronger influence on measurement success for Pdiff than for P. The fewest usable dT measurements are obtained in the microseismic noise band, whereas the fewest usable teleseismic P measurements occur at the highest

  20. Development of a 3D finite element model evaluating air-coupled ultrasonic measurements of nonlinear Rayleigh waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uhrig, Matthias P.; Kim, Jin-Yeon; Jacobs, Laurence J.

    2016-02-01

    This research presents a 3D numerical finite element (FE) model which, previously developed, precisely simulates non-contact, air-coupled measurements of nonlinear Rayleigh wave propagation. The commercial FE-solver ABAQUS is used to perform the simulations. First, frequency dependent pressure wave attenuation is investigated numerically to reconstruct the sound pressure distribution along the active surface of the non-contact receiver. Second, constitutive law and excitation source properties are optimized to match nonlinear ultrasonic experimental data. Finally, the FE-model data are fit with analytical solutions showing a good agreement and thus, indicating the significance of the study performed.

  1. The criteria for measuring average density by x-ray attenuation: The role of spatial resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, W.

    1999-07-29

    It is well known that the attenuation of X-rays as they pass through a material can be used to quantify the amount of matter in their path. This is the basis for the gamma ray densitometer which can measure the amount of material on a moving conveyor belt. It is also the rationale for using X-rays for medical imaging as the attenuation can discriminate between tissue of different density and composition, yielding images of great diagnostic utility. Spatial resolution is obviously important with regard to detecting small features. However, it is less obvious that it plays an important role in obtaining quantitative information from the X-ray transmission data since the spatial resolution of the instrument can affect the accuracy of those measurements. This problem is particularly severe in the case of computed tomography where the accuracy of the reconstruction is dependent on the accuracy of the initial projection data. It should be noted that spatial resolution is not a concern for the case where the material is uniform. Here uniform is defined by small variations related to either the scale size of the resolution element in the detector, or to the size of a collimated X-ray beam. However, if the material has non-homogeneous composition or changes in density on the scale size of the systems spatial resolution, then there can be effects that will compromise the transmission data before it is acquired and these errors can not be corrected by any subsequent data processing. A method is presented for computing the density measurement error which parameterizes the effect in terms of the actual modulation on the face of the detector and the attenuation in the material. For cases like stacks of lead plates the errors can exceed 80%.

  2. Airborne microwave Doppler measurements of ocean wave directional spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plant, W. J.; Keller, W. C.; Reeves, A. B.; Uliana, E. A.; Johnson, J. W.

    1987-01-01

    A technique is presented for measuring ocean wave directional spectra from aircraft using microwave Doppler radar. The technique involves backscattering coherent microwave radiation from a patch of sea surface which is small compared to dominant ocean wavelengths in the antenna look direction, and large compared to these lengths in the perpendicular (azimuthal) direction. The mean Doppler shift of the return signal measured over short time intervals is proportional to the mean sea surface velocity of the illuminated patch. Variable sea surface velocities induced by wave motion therefore produce time-varying Doppler shifts in the received signal. The large azimuthal dimension of the patch implies that these variations must be produced by surface waves traveling near the horizontal antenna look direction thus allowing determination of the direction of wave travel. Linear wave theory is used to convert the measured velocities into ocean wave spectral densities. Spectra measured simultaneously with this technique and two laser profilometers, and nearly simultaneous with this technique and two laser profilometers, and nearly simultaneous with a surface buoy, are presented. Applications and limitations of this airborne Doppler technique are discussed.

  3. Q-structure beneath the north and central Indian Ocean from the inversion of observed Love and Rayleigh wave attenuation data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, D. D.

    The fundamental-mode Love and Rayleigh waves generated by 57 earthquakes which occurred in the north and central Indian Ocean (extending to 40°S) and recorded at Indian seismograph and other WWSSN stations such as HOW, SHL, VIS, MDR, HYB, KOD, CHG, TRD, POO, BOM, GOA, NDI, NIL and QUE are analysed. Love and Rayleigh wave attenuation coefficients are estimated at periods of 15-100 s using the spectral amplitude of these waves for 98 different paths across the Bay of Bengal Fan, the Arabian Fan, and the north and central Indian Ocean. The large standard deviations observed in the surface wave attenuation coefficients may be a result of regional variation of the attenuative properties of the crust and upper mantle beneath these regions. Love wave attenuation coefficients are found to vary from 0.000 03 to 0.000 45 km -1 for the Bay of Bengal Fan; from 0.000 03 to 0.000 85 km -1 for the Arabian Fan; and from 0.000 03 to 0.000 35 km -1 for the north and central Indian Ocean. Similarly, Rayleigh wave attenuation coefficients vary from 0.000 03 to 0.0004 km -1 for the Bay of Bengal Fan; from 0.000 06 to 0.0007 km -1 for the Arabian Fan; and from 0.000 03 to 0.0007 km -1 for the north and central Indian Ocean. Backus and Gilbert inversion theory is applied to these surface wave attenuation data to obtain average Q-1 models for the crust and upper mantle beneath the Bay of Bengal, the Arabian Fan, and the north and central Indian Ocean. Inversion of Love and Rayleigh wave attenuation data shows a high-attenuation zone centred at a depth of > 120 km ( Qβ ≈ 125) for the Bay of Bengal Fan. Similarly, a high-attenuation zone ( Qβ ≈ 40-70) occurs at a depth of 60-160 km for the Arabian Fan at 100-160 km ( Qβ ≈ 115) for the Indian Ocean off Ninetyeast Ridge, and at 80-160 km ( Qβ ≈ 80) for the Indian Ocean across the Ninetyeast Ridge. The Qβ-1 models show a lithosphere thickness of 120 km beneath the Bay of Bengal Fan. Similarly, lithosphere thickness of 70, 100 and

  4. Modeling and experiment of the suspended seismometer concept for attenuating the contribution of tilt motion in horizontal measurements.

    PubMed

    Matichard, F; Evans, M; Mittleman, R; MacInnis, M; Biscans, S; Dooley, K L; Sohier, H; Lauriero, A; Paris, H; Koch, J; Knothe, P; Carbajo, A; Dufort, C

    2016-06-01

    Tilt-horizontal coupling in inertial sensors limits the performance of active isolation systems such as those used in gravitational wave detectors. Inertial rotation sensors can be used to subtract the tilt component from the signal produced by horizontal inertial sensors, but such techniques are often limited by the sensor noise of the tilt measurement. A different approach is to mechanically filter the tilt transmitted to the horizontal inertial sensor, as discussed in this article. This technique does not require an auxiliary rotation sensor and can produce a lower noise measurement. The concept investigated uses a mechanical suspension to isolate the inertial sensor from input tilt. Modeling and simulations show that such a configuration can be used to adequately attenuate the tilt transmitted to the instrument, while maintaining translation sensitivity in the frequency band of interest. The analysis is supported by experimental results showing that this approach is a viable solution to overcome the tilt problem in the field of active inertial isolation. PMID:27370484

  5. An arbitrary high-order Discontinuous Galerkin method for elastic waves on unstructured meshes - III. Viscoelastic attenuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Käser, Martin; Dumbser, Michael; de la Puente, Josep; Igel, Heiner

    2007-01-01

    We present a new numerical method to solve the heterogeneous anelastic, seismic wave equations with arbitrary high order accuracy in space and time on 3-D unstructured tetrahedral meshes. Using the velocity-stress formulation provides a linear hyperbolic system of equations with source terms that is completed by additional equations for the anelastic functions including the strain history of the material. These additional equations result from the rheological model of the generalized Maxwell body and permit the incorporation of realistic attenuation properties of viscoelastic material accounting for the behaviour of elastic solids and viscous fluids. The proposed method combines the Discontinuous Galerkin (DG) finite element (FE) method with the ADER approach using Arbitrary high order DERivatives for flux calculations. The DG approach, in contrast to classical FE methods, uses a piecewise polynomial approximation of the numerical solution which allows for discontinuities at element interfaces. Therefore, the well-established theory of numerical fluxes across element interfaces obtained by the solution of Riemann problems can be applied as in the finite volume framework. The main idea of the ADER time integration approach is a Taylor expansion in time in which all time derivatives are replaced by space derivatives using the so-called Cauchy-Kovalewski procedure which makes extensive use of the governing PDE. Due to the ADER time integration technique the same approximation order in space and time is achieved automatically and the method is a one-step scheme advancing the solution for one time step without intermediate stages. To this end, we introduce a new unrolled recursive algorithm for efficiently computing the Cauchy-Kovalewski procedure by making use of the sparsity of the system matrices. The numerical convergence analysis demonstrates that the new schemes provide very high order accuracy even on unstructured tetrahedral meshes while computational cost and

  6. Density and atomic number measurements with spectral x-ray attenuation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heismann, B. J.; Leppert, J.; Stierstorfer, K.

    2003-08-01

    X-ray attenuation measurements are widely used in medical and industrial applications. The usual results are one- to three-dimensional representations of the attenuation coefficient μ(r). In this paper, we present the ρZ projection algorithm for obtaining the density ρ(r) and atomic number Z(r) with an energy-resolving x-ray method. As input data the algorithm uses at least two measurements μ1,μ2,… with different spectral weightings of the source spectrum S(E) and/or detector sensitivity D(E). Analytically, ρ is a function of μ1-cμ2, c=const, and Z is a function of μ1/μ2. The full numerical treatment yields ρ(μ1,μ2) and Z(μ1,μ2) with S(E) and D(E) as commutative parametric functions. We tested the method with dual-energy computed tomography measurements of an organic sample and a set of chemical solutions with predefined ρ and Z. The resulting images show ρ and Z as complementary information: The density ρ reflects the morphology of the objects, whereas the atomic number Z=number of electrons/atom describes the material distribution. For our experimental setup we obtain an absolute precision of 0.1 for Z and 20 mg/cm3 for ρ. The ρZ projection can potentially lead to these classes of quantitative information for various scientific, industrial, and medical applications.

  7. Full Wave Analysis of RF Signal Attenuation in a Lossy Cave using a High Order Time Domain Vector Finite Element Method

    SciTech Connect

    Pingenot, J; Rieben, R; White, D

    2004-12-06

    We present a computational study of signal propagation and attenuation of a 200 MHz dipole antenna in a cave environment. The cave is modeled as a straight and lossy random rough wall. To simulate a broad frequency band, the full wave Maxwell equations are solved directly in the time domain via a high order vector finite element discretization using the massively parallel CEM code EMSolve. The simulation is performed for a series of random meshes in order to generate statistical data for the propagation and attenuation properties of the cave environment. Results for the power spectral density and phase of the electric field vector components are presented and discussed.

  8. Surprisingly low frequency attenuation effects in long tubes when measuring turbulent fluxes at tall towers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibrom, Andreas; Brændholt, Andreas; Pilegaard, Kim

    2016-04-01

    The eddy covariance technique relies on the fast and accurate measurement of gas concentration fluctuations. While for some gasses robust and compact sensors are available, measurement of, e.g., non CO2 greenhouse gas fluxes is often performed with sensitive equipment that cannot be run on a tower without massively disturbing the wind field. To measure CO and N2O fluxes, we installed an eddy covariance system at a 125 m mast, where the gas analyser was kept in a laboratory close to the tower and the sampling was performed using a 150 m long tube with a gas intake at 96 m height. We investigated the frequency attenuation and the time lag of the N2O and CO concentration measurements with a concentration step experiment. The results showed surprisingly high cut-off frequencies (close to 2 Hz) and small low-pass filter induced time lags (< 0.3 s), which were similar for CO and N2O. The results indicate that the concentration signal was hardly biased during the ca 10 s travel through the tube. Due to the larger turbulence time scales at large measurement heights the low-pass correction was for the majority of the measurements < 5%. For water vapour the tube attenuation was massive, which had, however, a positive effect by reducing both the water vapour dilution correction and the cross sensitivity effects on the N2O and CO flux measurements. Here we present the set-up of the concentration step change experiment and its results and compare them with recently developed theories for the behaviour of gases in turbulent tube flows.

  9. DE-1 measurements of AKR wave directions. [auroral kilometric radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calvert, W.

    1985-01-01

    In addition to its wave rotation sense, the direction of auroral kilometric radiation (AKR) can also be measured with the plasma wave instrument on Dynamics Explorer 1, from the relative phase of the signals received by its orthogonal electric dipole antennas. By this method, which differs in principle from the previous spin-null method for measuring wave directions, it has been found possible to pinpoint the AKR source by triangulation, using measurements from different points along the DE-1 orbit. The resulting apparent source, in one instance, seemed to occupy a well-defined auroral-zone invariant magnetic latitude and showed the expected increase of altitude with decreasing frequency. An analysis of the method also confirmed the validity of the previous rotation sense measurements.

  10. Electric field vector measurements in a surface ionization wave discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldberg, Benjamin M.; Böhm, Patrick S.; Czarnetzki, Uwe; Adamovich, Igor V.; Lempert, Walter R.

    2015-10-01

    This work presents the results of time-resolved electric field vector measurements in a short pulse duration (60 ns full width at half maximum), surface ionization wave discharge in hydrogen using a picosecond four-wave mixing technique. Electric field vector components are measured separately, using pump and Stokes beams linearly polarized in the horizontal and vertical planes, and a polarizer placed in front of the infrared detector. The time-resolved electric field vector is measured at three different locations across the discharge gap, and for three different heights above the alumina ceramic dielectric surface, ~100, 600, and 1100 μm (total of nine different locations). The results show that after breakdown, the discharge develops as an ionization wave propagating along the dielectric surface at an average speed of 1 mm ns-1. The surface ionization wave forms near the high voltage electrode, close to the dielectric surface (~100 μm). The wave front is characterized by significant overshoot of both vertical and horizontal electric field vector components. Behind the wave front, the vertical field component is rapidly reduced. As the wave propagates along the dielectric surface, it also extends further away from the dielectric surface, up to ~1 mm near the grounded electrode. The horizontal field component behind the wave front remains quite significant, to sustain the electron current toward the high voltage electrode. After the wave reaches the grounded electrode, the horizontal field component experiences a secondary rise in the quasi-dc discharge, where it sustains the current along the near-surface plasma sheet. The measurement results indicate presence of a cathode layer formed near the grounded electrode with significant cathode voltage fall, ≈3 kV, due to high current density in the discharge. The peak reduced electric field in the surface ionization wave is 85-95 Td, consistent with dc breakdown field estimated from the Paschen curve for

  11. Long-Term Change of Sound Wave Propagation Attenuation Due to the Effects of Ocean Acidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gotoh, S.; Tsuchiya, T.; Hiyoshi, Y.

    2014-12-01

    In recent years, the concentration of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere is increasing due to global warming. And, the ocean acidification advances because this melts into seawater, pH decrease in seawater are concerned. The sound wave to propagate seawater, pH is known to affect absorption loss (α) by chemical buffer effects of the seawater. However, conventionally, α has not been investigated much in the calculation of pH. Therefore, when calculating the propagation distance in the sonar equation, pH =8~8.1 (Weak alkaline) are used empirically. Therefore we used an actual value of pH of 30 years from 1984 in the sea near the Japan, and investigated change over the years of absorption loss (α) at some frequency. As a result, we found that α value decreases gradually in the past 30 years, as high-latitude decreases. Further, the future, assuming that ocean acidification is more advanced, and to simulate a change of the absorption loss and propagation loss in end of this century using the pH value reported from the "Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change" (IPCC). As a result, it was just suggested that α decreased more in the end of this century and affected the submarine detection. In addition, in recent years, we examined the effects of noise that offshore wind power construction proceeds in each country emits gives to the underwater sound. As a result, in the end of this century, an underwater noise increases about 17%, and underwater sound environmental degradation of the sea is concerned.

  12. Comparison of Instantaneous Frequency Scaling from Rain Attenuation and Optical Disdrometer Measurements at K/Q bands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nessel, James; Zemba, Michael; Luini, Lorenzo; Riva, Carlo

    2015-01-01

    Rain attenuation is strongly dependent on the rain rate, but also on the rain drop size distribution (DSD). Typically, models utilize an average drop size distribution, such as those developed by Laws and Parsons, or Marshall and Palmer. However, individual rain events may possess drop size distributions which could be significantly different from the average and will impact, for example, fade mitigation techniques which utilize channel performance estimates from a signal at a different frequency. Therefore, a good understanding of the characteristics and variability of the raindrop size distribution is extremely important in predicting rain attenuation and instantaneous frequency scaling parameters on an event-toevent basis. Since June 2014, NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) and the Politecnico di Milano (POLIMI) have measured the attenuation due to rain in Milan, Italy, on the 20/40 GHz beacon signal broadcast from the Alphasat TDP#5 Aldo Paraboni Q/V-band Payload. Concomitant with these measurements are the measurements of drop size distribution and rain rate utilizing a Thies Clima laser precipitation monitor (disdrometer). In this paper, we discuss the comparison of the predicted rain attenuation at 20 and 40 GHz derived from the drop size distribution data with the measured rain attenuation. The results are compared on statistical and real-time bases. We will investigate the performance of the rain attenuation model, instantaneous frequency scaling, and the distribution of the scaling factor. Further, seasonal rain characteristics will be analysed.

  13. Seismic attenuation anisotropy in reservoir sedimentary rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Best, A.I.

    1994-12-31

    Seismic attenuation is a fundamental property of reservoir sedimentary rocks; it is strongly related to reservoir permeability. Knowledge of its variation with lithology, with burial depth, and with wave propagation direction is vital for understanding the attenuation mechanism. Given this information, realistic theoretical models may be constructed for predicting attenuation, and hence permeability, over a wide frequency range. Accurate ultrasonic attenuation measurements were made in the laboratory over a range of effective pressures on sandstone samples with different amounts of humic organic matter. The organic matter formed fine laminations along the bedding planes of the sandstones. The results show that the sandstones are highly attenuating at 5 MPa mainly because of the presence of grain contact microcracks giving rise to squirt flow; at 40 MPa, when most of the microcracks are closed, the clean sandstones are poorly attenuating, but the organic-rich sandstones remain highly attenuating. It is postulated that the compliant organic matter is responsible for causing squirt flow at high and at low pressures. The results also show that the maximum attenuation occurs when the particle motion of the propagating wave is perpendicular to the planes of the organic matter laminations. These results are consistent with the squirt flow theory of Akbar et al (1993) for compressional waves.

  14. Measurements of radiated elastic wave energy from dynamic tensile cracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boler, Frances M.

    1990-01-01

    The role of fracture-velocity, microstructure, and fracture-energy barriers in elastic wave radiation during a dynamic fracture was investigated in experiments in which dynamic tensile cracks of two fracture cofigurations of double cantilever beam geometry were propagating in glass samples. The first, referred to as primary fracture, consisted of fractures of intact glass specimens; the second configuration, referred to as secondary fracture, consisted of a refracture of primary fracture specimens which were rebonded with an intermittent pattern of adhesive to produce variations in fracture surface energy along the crack path. For primary fracture cases, measurable elastic waves were generated in 31 percent of the 16 fracture events observed; the condition for radiation of measurable waves appears to be a local abrupt change in the fracture path direction, such as occurs when the fracture intersects a surface flaw. For secondary fractures, 100 percent of events showed measurable elastic waves; in these fractures, the ratio of radiated elastic wave energy in the measured component to fracture surface energy was 10 times greater than for primary fracture.

  15. Feasibility of hydromagnetic wave measurements on space shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcpherron, R. L.

    1974-01-01

    The feasibility of using a hydromagnetic wave sensor on the space shuttles was investigated. It was found that although existing sensors are inadequate in terms of resolution, dynamic range, and frequency range, they can be modified to make the necessary measurements. It is shown that since the sensor cannot be mounted on the shuttle itself because of high levels of magnetic noise, a free subsatellite that can be positioned and stabilized may be used for locating the hydromagnetic wave sensor. Other results show that studies of long period waves would require either an array of sensors in shuttle orbit or a long-term mapping of the crustal anomalies, and that effective wave studies would require at least two variably spaced sensors in shuttle orbit and one ground station.

  16. A Nonlinear Theory for Predicting the Effects of Unsteady Laminar, Turbulent, or Transitional Boundary Layers on the Attenuation of Shock Waves in a Shock Tube with Experimental Comparison

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trimpi, Robert L.; Cohen, Nathaniel B.

    1961-01-01

    The linearized attenuation theory of NACA Technical Note 3375 is modified in the following manner: (a) an unsteady compressible local skin-friction coefficient is employed rather than the equivalent steady-flow incompressible coefficient; (b) a nonlinear approach is used to permit application of the theory to large attenuations; and (c) transition effects are considered. Curves are presented for predicting attenuation for a shock pressure ratio up to 20 and a range of shock-tube Reynolds numbers. Comparison of theory and experimental data for shock-wave strengths between 1.5 and 10 over a wide range of Reynolds numbers shows good agreement with the nonlinear theory evaluated for a transition Reynolds number of 2.5 X 10(exp 5).

  17. Magnetic pitch angle measurements on text using laser-enhanced attenuation of a Li beam

    SciTech Connect

    West, W.P.; McChesney, J.; Thomas, M.K.; Yang, X.Z.

    1990-09-01

    The polarization of the {pi} component of the Zeeman split Li2P-2S transition allows a direct spectroscopic measurement of the local magnetic pitch angle. Li atoms are injected radially into TEXT as a 95 keV beam, and the intensity of the transmitted beam is detected. A polarization-modulated, cavity-dumped dye laser, tuned into resonance with the {pi} line, is injected collinearly with the beam. Laser excitation of the beam results in an enhanced beam attenuation. Time-resolved detection of the transmitted Li beam allows determination of the local magnetic pitch angle. Details of the system and results of recent measurements will be discussed. (3 refs.)

  18. Precision Measurements with Matter-wave Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erickson, Christopher; Christensen, Dan; Washburn, Matthew; Archibald, James; van Zjill, Marshall; Birrell, Jeremiah; Burdett, Adam; Durfee, Dallin

    2007-06-01

    We will discuss progress on a neutral-calcium beam interferometer which is nearing completion. We will also present a proposal to measure electric and magnetic fields with extreme precision using a slow ion interferometer. The calcium interferometer utilizes a thermal beam for simplicity and high atom flux. Doppler shifts will be reduced using a novel alignment scheme for the Ramsey beams using precision prisms. The ion interferometer will utilize a slow beam of strontium-87 ions created by photon-ionizing a slow atomic beam. The ions will interact with three sets of laser beams which will drive stimulated Raman transitions. The proposed device will be used to search for variations from Coulomb's inverse-square law and a possible photon rest mass with a precision which is several orders of magnitude better than previous laboratory experiments.

  19. Ultrasonic metal sheet thickness measurement without prior wave speed calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixon, S.; Petcher, P. A.; Fan, Y.; Maisey, D.; Nickolds, P.

    2013-11-01

    Conventional ultrasonic mensuration of sample thickness from one side only requires the bulk wave reverberation time and a calibration speed. This speed changes with temperature, stress, and microstructure, limiting thickness measurement accuracy. Often, only one side of a sample is accessible, making in situ calibration impossible. Non-contact ultrasound can generate multiple shear horizontal guided wave modes on one side of a metal plate. Measuring propagation times of each mode at different transducer separations, allows sheet thickness to be calculated to better than 1% accuracy for sheets of at least 1.5 mm thickness, without any calibration.

  20. Evaluation of multilayered pavement structures from measurements of surface waves

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ryden, N.; Lowe, M.J.S.; Cawley, P.; Park, C.B.

    2006-01-01

    A method is presented for evaluating the thickness and stiffness of multilayered pavement structures from guided waves measured at the surface. Data is collected with a light hammer as the source and an accelerometer as receiver, generating a synthetic receiver array. The top layer properties are evaluated with a Lamb wave analysis. Multiple layers are evaluated by matching a theoretical phase velocity spectrum to the measured spectrum. So far the method has been applied to the testing of pavements, but it may also be applicable in other fields such as ultrasonic testing of coated materials. ?? 2006 American Institute of Physics.

  1. Wavenumber prediction and measurement of axisymmetric waves in buried fluid-filled pipes: Inclusion of shear coupling at a lubricated pipe/soil interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muggleton, J. M.; Yan, J.

    2013-03-01

    Acoustic methods have been widely used to detect water leaks in buried fluid-filled pipes, and these technologies also have the potential to locate buried pipes and cables. Relatively predictable for metal pipes, there is considerably more uncertainty with plastic pipes, as the wave propagation behaviour becomes highly coupled between the pipe wall, the contained fluid and surrounding medium. Based on the fully three-dimensional effect of the surrounding soil, pipe equations for n=0 axisymmetric wave motion are derived for a buried, fluid-filled pipe. The characteristics of propagation and attenuation are analysed for two n=0 waves, the s=1 wave and s=2 wave, which correspond to a predominantly fluid-borne wave and a compressional wave predominantly in the shell, respectively. At the pipe/soil interface, two extreme cases may be considered in order to investigate the effects of shear coupling: the "slip" condition representing lubricated contact; and the "no slip" condition representing compact contact. Here, the "slip" case is considered, for which, at low frequencies, analytical expressions can be derived for the two wavenumbers, corresponding to the s=1 and s=2 waves. These are both then compared with the situations in which there is no surrounding soil and in which the pipe is surrounded by fluid only, which cannot support shear. It is found that the predominant effect of shear at the pipe/soil interface is to add stiffness along with damping due to radiation. For the fluid-dominated wave, this causes the wavespeed to increase and increases the wave attenuation. For the shell-dominated wave there is little effect on the wavespeed but a marked increase in wave attenuation. Comparison with experimental measurements confirms the theoretical findings.

  2. S-wave attenuation in northeastern Sonora, Mexico, near the faults that ruptured during the earthquake of 3 May 1887 Mw 7.5.

    PubMed

    Villalobos-Escobar, Gina P; Castro, Raúl R

    2014-01-01

    We used a new data set of relocated earthquakes recorded by the Seismic Network of Northeastern Sonora, Mexico (RESNES) to characterize the attenuation of S-waves in the fault zone of the 1887 Sonora earthquake (M w 7.5). We determined spectral attenuation functions for hypocentral distances (r) between 10 and 140 km using a nonparametric approach and found that in this fault zone the spectral amplitudes decay slower with distance at low frequencies (f < 4 Hz) compared to those reported in previous studies in the region using more distant recordings. The attenuation functions obtained for 23 frequencies (0.4 ≤ f ≤ 63.1 Hz) permit us estimating the average quality factor Q S  = (141 ± 1.1 )f ((0.74 ± 0.04)) and a geometrical spreading term G(r) = 1/r (0.21). The values of Q estimated for S-wave paths traveling along the fault system that rupture during the 1887 event, in the north-south direction, are considerably lower than the average Q estimated using source-station paths from multiple stations and directions. These results indicate that near the fault zone S waves attenuate considerably more than at regional scale, particularly at low frequencies. This may be the result of strong scattering near the faults due to the fractured upper crust and higher intrinsic attenuation due to stress concentration near the faults. PMID:25674476

  3. Spatio-Temporal Measurements of Short Wind Water Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rocholz, Roland; Jähne, Bernd

    2010-05-01

    Spatio-temporal measurements of wind-driven short-gravity capillary waves are reported for a wide range of experimental conditions, including wind, rain and surface slicks. The experiments were conducted in the Hamburg linear wind/wave flume in cooperation with the Institute of Oceanography at the University of Hamburg, Germany. Both components of the slope field were measured optically at a fetch of 14.4 m using a color imaging slope gauge (CISG) with a footprint of 223 x 104 mm and a resolution of 0.7 mm. The instrument was improved versus earlier versions (Jähne and Riemer (1990), Klinke (1992)) to achieve a sampling rate of 312.5 Hz, which now allows for the computation of 3D wavenumber-frequency spectra (see Rocholz (2008)). This made it possible to distinguish waves traveling in and against wind direction, which proved useful to distinguish wind waves from ring waves caused by rain drop impacts. Using a new calibration method it was possible to correct for the intrinsic nonlinearities of the instrument in the slope range up to ±1. In addition, the Modulation Transfer Function (MTF) was measured and employed for the restoration of the spectral amplitudes for wavenumbers in the range from 60 to 2300 rad/m. The spectra for pure wind conditions are generally consistent with previous measurements. But, the shape of the saturation spectra in the vicinity of k~1000 rad/m (i.e. pure capillary waves) stands in contradiction to former investigations where a sharp spectral cutoff (k^(-2) or k^(-3)) is commonly reported (e.g. Jähne and Riemer (1990)). This cutoff is reproduced by almost all semi-empirical models of the energy flux in the capillary range (e.g. Kudryavtsev et al. (1999), Apel (1994)). However, the new MTF corrected spectra show only a gentle decrease (between k^(-0.5) and k^(-1)) for k > 1000 rad/m. Therefore the question for the relative importance of different dissipation mechanisms might need a new assessment. References: J. R. Apel. An improved

  4. Properties of material in the submillimeter wave region (instrumentation and measurement of index of refraction)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lally, J.; Meister, R.

    1983-01-01

    The Properties of Materials in the Submillimeter Wave Region study was initiated to instrument a system and to make measurements of the complex index of refraction in the wavelength region between 0.1 to 1.0 millimeters. While refractive index data is available for a number of solids and liquids there still exists a need for an additional systematic study of dielectric properties to add to the existing data, to consider the accuracy of the existing data, and to extend measurements in this wavelength region for other selected mateials. The materials chosen for consideration would be those with useful thermal, mechanical, and electrical characteristics. The data is necessary for development of optical components which, for example, include beamsplitters, attenuators, lenses, grids, all useful for development of instrumentation in this relatively unexploited portion of the spectrum.

  5. Measurements of mass attenuation coefficient, effective atomic number and electron density of some amino acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kore, Prashant S.; Pawar, Pravina P.

    2014-05-01

    The mass attenuation coefficients of some amino acids, such as DL-aspartic acid-LR(C4H7NO4), L-glutamine (C4H10N2O3), creatine monohydrate LR(C4H9N3O2H2O), creatinine hydrochloride (C4H7N3O·HCl) L-asparagine monohydrate(C4H9N3O2H2O), L-methionine LR(C5H11NO2S), were measured at 122, 356, 511, 662, 1170, 1275 and 1330 keV photon energies using a well-collimated narrow beam good geometry set-up. The gamma-rays were detected using NaI (Tl) scintillation detection system with a resolution of 0.101785 at 662 keV. The attenuation coefficient data were then used to obtain the effective atomic numbers (Zeff), and effective electron densities (Neff) of amino acids. It was observed that the effective atomic number (Zeff) and effective electron densities (Neff) initially decrease and tend to be almost constant as a function of gamma-ray energy. Zeff and Neff experimental values showed good agreement with the theoretical values with less than 1% error for amino acids.

  6. Spatio-temporal variations in the structure of the attenuation field of the S-wave in the region of Nevada nuclear test site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopnichev, Yu. F.; Sokolova, I. N.; Sokolov, K. N.

    2013-11-01

    The characteristics of the attenuation field of short-period shear waves in the region of Nevada nuclear test site (NNTS) are studied. The seismograms of underground nuclear explosions (UNEs) and earthquakes recorded by three seismic stations in 1975-2012 at the epicentral distances of up to 1000 km are processed by the methods based on the analysis of the amplitude ratios of Sn to Pn and Lg to Pg waves, as well as the S-coda envelopes for close events. It is shown that the structure of the attenuation field in the Earth's crust and upper mantle in the NNTS region experienced significant temporal variations during the interval of nuclear operations. The strongest variations were associated with UNEs conducted in the Pahute Mesa area, which held about two-thirds of the most intense explosions. Our data indicate that temporal variations in the structure of the attenuation field are related to the migration of deep fluids. A comparison of the general characteristics of the attenuation field in the regions of the three large nuclear test sites is presented.

  7. New data on seismic wave attenuation in the lithosphere and upper mantle of the northeastern flank of the Baikal rift system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobrynina, A. A.; Sankov, V. A.; Chechelnitsky, V. V.

    2016-05-01

    The investigation data on seismic wave attenuation in the lithosphere and upper mantle of the northeastern flank of the Baikal rift system obtained with a seismic coda envelope and sliding window are considered. Eleven local districts were described by one-dimensional attenuation models characterized by alternation of high and low attenuation layers, which are consistent with the results obtained previously by Yu.F. Kopnichev for the southwestern flank of the Baikal rift system [9]. The subcrust of the lithosphere contains a thin layer with high attenuation of seismic waves likely related to higher heterogeneity (fragmentation) and occurrence of fluids. The lithosphere basement depth varies from 100-120 km in the west within the Baikal folded area to 120-140 km in the east within the Siberian Platform. It is concluded that there are two asthenosphere layers. Based on specific features of the lithosphere and upper mantle structure, it can be assumed that they were subject to gradual modification involving fluidization processes and partial melting in the Late Cenozoic extension under the influence of distant tectogenesis sources.

  8. Global Attenuation Model of the Upper Mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adenis, A.; Debayle, E.; Ricard, Y. R.

    2015-12-01

    We present a three-dimensional shear attenuation model based on a massive surface wave data-set (372,629 Rayleigh waveforms analysed in the period range 50-300s by Debayle and Ricard, 2012). For each seismogram, this approach yields depth-dependent path average models of shear velocity and quality factor, and a set of fundamental and higher-mode dispersion and attenuation curves. We combine these attenuation measurements in a tomographic inversion after a careful rejection of the noisy data. We first remove data likely to be biased by a poor knowledge of the source. Then we assume that waves corresponding to events having close epicenters and recorded at the same station sample the same elastic and anelastic structure, we cluster the corresponding rays and average the attenuation measurements. Logarithms of the attenuations are regionalized using the non-linear east square formalism of Tarantola and Valette (1982), resulting in attenuation tomographic maps between 50s and 300s. After a first inversion, outlyers are rejected and a second inversion yields a moderate variance reduction of about 20%. We correct the attenuation curves for focusing effect using the linearized ray theory of Woodhouse and Wong (1986). Accounting for focussing effects allows building tomographic maps with variance reductions reaching 40%. In the period range 120-200s, the root mean square of the model perturbations increases from about 5% to 20%. Our 3-D attenuation models present strong agreement with surface tectonics at period lower than 200s. Areas of low attenuation are located under continents and areas of high attenuation are associated with oceans. Surprisingly, although mid oceanic ridges are located in attenuating regions, their signature, even if enhanced by focusing corrections, remains weaker than in the shear velocity models. Synthetic tests suggests that regularisation contributes to damp the attenuation signature of ridges, which could therefore be underestimated.

  9. Yttrium-90 attenuation measurements before and after maximum entropy image restoration

    SciTech Connect

    Kallergi, M.; Abernathy, M.J.; Li, H.D.

    1994-05-01

    Quantitative measurement of Yttrium-90, a pure beta emitter, is important for in-vivo management of antibody therapy. Gamma camera imaging of bromsstrahlung radiation poses significant problems, as compared to single photon detection, due to the enhanced scattering and photon penetration effects, and poor conversion efficiency which results in a poor signal-to-noise ratio. For the first time a maximum entropy neural network is proposed for image resolution restoration. It is based on the system MTF, but it voids the common inverse problem associated with both the Wiener and Metz filters. The critical requirement for quantitative measurements is the calculation of an effective attenuation coefficient that is reasonably stable with various source sizes and regions-of-interest (ROI`s) that fully enclose the images of the sources. We have demonstrated that stable image restoration can be obtained for Yttrium-90 with various source sizes and with varying depths in water tanks of 20 cm in depth. Measurements were made using a single-head gamma camera equipped with a high-energy collimator. This yielded effective attenuation coefficients of 0.124 cm{sup -1} and 0.129 cm{sup -1} for the raw images and restored images, respectively. The results for two spherical sources of 3.5 cm I.D. and 6.0 cm I.D. were within {plus_minus}5.07% and {plus_minus}8.84% for the raw and enhanced images, respectively. These results were obtained for ROI`s twice the physical size of each source. In conclusion, the results suggest that sources of varying size, at varying depths in an idealized water phantom, can be imaged with improved resolution using the maximum entropy filter. This filter should permit improved identification of tumors during therapeutic treatment protocols and allow an estimation of the total radiation accumulation in the tumor or in critical organ systems.

  10. A large amplitude orographic wave event - measurements vs ECMWF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehard, Benedikt; Kaifler, Bernd; Kaifler, Natalie; Dörnbrack, Andreas; Gisinger, Sonja; Wagner, Johannes; Rapp, Markus

    2016-04-01

    During the DEEPWAVE campaign a large amplitude orographic wave event occurred over New Zealand around 1st of August 2014. This event was recorded in the troposphere, stratosphere and mesosphere by a ground-based Rayleigh lidar and radiosoundings on the leeward side of the mountains. The presented case is characterized by an intense cross mountain flow over the Southern Alps of New Zealand, which excited the large amplitude mountain waves. The interaction of both the polar jet and the subtropical jet created a unique meteorological condition which allowed for an almost unhindered propagation of the mountain waves into the stratosphere. Resulting in the largest stratospheric gravity wave response observed during the DEEPWAVE campaign. In the upper stratosphere wave breaking was observed. We assess the validity of ECMWF IFS (integrated forecast system) analyses and forecasts during this event by comparing the ECMWF data to the ground-based lidar, radiosonde and satellite measurements as well as mesoscale simulations conducted with the WRF model. In this study, a detailed focus is put on the gravity waves resolved by ECMWF.

  11. Simplified two media method: a modified approach for measuring linear attenuation coefficient of odd shaped archaeological samples of unknown thickness.

    PubMed

    Sidhu, Baltej Singh; Dhaliwal, A S; Mann, K S; Kahlon, K S

    2011-10-01

    Linear attenuation coefficients of regular as well as irregular shaped archaeological samples of FaLG (flyash-lime-gypsum) of unknown thickness have been measured employing 'simplified two media' method. Seven different liquid materials plus air have been used as media to measure attenuation coefficient of these samples. Obtained results have been compared with those for regular shaped samples. Experimental values have also been compared with theoretical values calculated from FFAST and XCOM. A good agreement has been observed between experimental and theoretical values. Present measurements employing 'simplified two media' method have been reported for the first time for checking its validation and reliability. PMID:21727010

  12. Non-contact ultrasonic spectroscopy measurement of elastic constants and ultrasonic attenuation

    SciTech Connect

    Schwarz, R.B.; Kuokkala, V.T.; Srinivasan, S.; Visscher, W.M.

    1991-01-01

    We have developed an ultrasonic spectroscopy method for measuring the elastic constants of solids in hostile environments and over a broad temperature regime. The sample is cut as a rectangular parallelepiped, approximately 1 mm{sup 3} in volume. One or two of the sample surfaces are coated with a thin film of a magnetostrictive material such as nickel. The sample is placed coaxially with two solenoids. One solenoid is used to generate an AC magnetic field of small amplitude which stretches the films. By sweeping the frequency of this field, the sample is excited successively into its various mechanical resonance modes. The second solenoid detects the mechanical resonances. The elastic constants are then deduced from the spectrum of mechanical resonances measured at constant temperature. The internal friction is deduced from the width of the resonance peaks. Because the technique is strictly non-contact (the sample may be encapsulated in a fused silica tube), it is deal for measuring elastic constants in hostile environments or under controlled atmospheres. In its present version the system allows us to measure the elastic constants and ultrasonic attenuation of a given sample between 80 and 100 K. The operation of the system is exemplified by measurements on amorphous Ni{sub 80}P{sub 20} and crystalline Ti{sub 60}Cr{sub 40}. 17 refs., 6 figs.

  13. Broadband ultrasound attenuation imaging: influence of location of region of measurement.

    PubMed

    Damilakis, J; Papadakis, A; Perisinakis, K; Gourtsoyiannis, N

    2001-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the effect of three different regions of interest (ROIs) varying in size and shape on broadband ultrasound attenuation (BUA) measurements of the calcaneus. Two hundred and sixty-five postmenopausal Caucasian women participated in this study. In 43 women osteoporotic fractures were documented on spinal radiographs. Bone mineral density (BMD) measurements of the lumbar spine and the femur were made using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. BUA measurements were obtained at a circular ROI automatically determined by the imaging system (ROIc), at a manually traced irregular ROI encompassing the posterior part of the calcaneus (ROIi), and at an anatomical square ROI located in the posterior part of the calcaneus (ROIs). Reproducibility was better in ROIc than in ROIi and ROIs. High correlations were found between BUA measurements with ROIc and ROIs (r = 0.981, P < 0.0001) as well as between those with ROIc and ROIi (r = 0.965, P < 0.0001). There were no significant differences between the correlations of BUA with axial BMD at ROIc compared with ROIi and ROIs. No significant difference was found between the areas under the ROC curve at ROIi, ROIc, and ROIs for women with fractures. The results show that superior reproducibility makes ROIc the most appropriate region of BUA measurement in a comparison with ROIi and ROIs. PMID:11471598

  14. Survey of Temperature Measurement Techniques For Studying Underwater Shock Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danehy, Paul M.; Alderfer, David W.

    2004-01-01

    Several optical methods for measuring temperature near underwater shock waves are reviewed and compared. The relative merits of the different techniques are compared, considering accuracy, precision, ease of use, applicable temperature range, maturity, spatial resolution, and whether or not special additives are required.

  15. Electrical instrument measures position and velocity of shock waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dannenberg, R. E.; Humphry, D. E.

    1971-01-01

    Instrument employs a sensor consisting of twin-electrode probe mounted in shock tube wall, with small dc voltage impressed across electrodes. Power supply, amplifier, and gate pulse generator complete the system. Instrument provides data for construction of wave diagrams, as well as measurement of shock velocity.

  16. A short-pulse K(a)-band instrumentation radar for foliage attenuation measurements.

    PubMed

    Puranen, Mikko; Eskelinen, Pekka

    2008-10-01

    A portable K(a)-band instrumentation radar for foliage attenuation measurements has been designed. It uses direct dielectric resonator oscillator multiplier pulse modulation giving a half power pulse width of 17 ns. The dual conversion scalar receiver utilizes either a digital storage oscilloscope in envelope detection format or a special gated comparator arrangement providing 1 m resolution and associated led seven segment display for data analysis. The calibrated dynamic range is better than 37 dB with an equivalent noise floor of 0.005 dBsm at 25 m test range distance. First experiments indicate an effective beamwidth close to 1 degree. The total weight is below 5 kg and the unit can be mounted on a conventional photographic tripod. Power is supplied from a 12 V/6 A h sealed lead acid battery giving an operating time in excess of 10 h. PMID:19044750

  17. Measurement of sound speed vs. depth in South Pole ice: pressure waves and shear waves

    SciTech Connect

    IceCube Collaboration; Klein, Spencer

    2009-06-04

    We have measured the speed of both pressure waves and shear waves as a function of depth between 80 and 500 m depth in South Pole ice with better than 1% precision. The measurements were made using the South Pole Acoustic Test Setup (SPATS), an array of transmitters and sensors deployed in the ice at the South Pole in order to measure the acoustic properties relevant to acoustic detection of astrophysical neutrinos. The transmitters and sensors use piezoceramics operating at {approx}5-25 kHz. Between 200 m and 500 m depth, the measured profile is consistent with zero variation of the sound speed with depth, resulting in zero refraction, for both pressure and shear waves. We also performed a complementary study featuring an explosive signal propagating vertically from 50 to 2250 m depth, from which we determined a value for the pressure wave speed consistent with that determined for shallower depths, higher frequencies, and horizontal propagation with the SPATS sensors. The sound speed profile presented here can be used to achieve good acoustic source position and emission time reconstruction in general, and neutrino direction and energy reconstruction in particular. The reconstructed quantities could also help separate neutrino signals from background.

  18. The Influence of Water on Seismic Wave Speeds and Attenuation in the Upper Mantle: an update from the Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cline, C. J., II; David, E. C.; Jackson, I.; Faul, U.; Berry, A.

    2015-12-01

    A fine-grained synthetic olivine (Fo90) polycrystal, doped with ~0.04 wt. % TiO2, has been prepared with ~70 wt. ppm H2O accommodated in the remarkably stable Ti-clinohumite defect typical of natural olivines from the Earth's generally water-undersaturated upper mantle (Berry et al., 2005). A precision-ground specimen of this material, sleeved in Pt tubing within a mild-steel jacket, was tested in torsional forced oscillation at seismic frequencies (mHz-Hz) and temperatures to 1200 °C, under 200 MPa confining pressure. The shear modulus was observed to decrease systematically with increasing oscillation period and temperature, accompanied by monotonically increasing dissipation, which are characteristic of absorption band or high-temperature-background behaviour. In a previous preliminary report, the new data were compared with the model of Jackson and Faul (Phys. Earth Planet. Interiors, 2010) for a suite of essentially anhydrous Ti-free olivine polycrystals, evaluated at the 25 μm grain size of the hydrous titaniferous olivine specimen, showing that the latter is vastly more dissipative than its anhydrous equivalent (by an order of magnitude at 1200 °C) and correspondingly lower in shear modulus. The results of additional experiments now better constrain the mechanical behaviour of the enclosing Pt sleeve and allow direct comparison with data for an anhydrous titaniferous olivine of comparable grain size. The latest results confirm a very strong influence of water on seismic wave attenuation, even under the water-undersaturated conditions expected to prevail in the Earth's upper mantle.

  19. Dual frequency scatterometer measurement of ocean wave height

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, J. W.; Jones, W. L.; Swift, C. T.; Grantham, W. L.; Weissman, D. E.

    1975-01-01

    A technique for remotely measuring wave height averaged over an area of the sea surface was developed and verified with a series of aircraft flight experiments. The measurement concept involves the cross correlation of the amplitude fluctuations of two monochromatic reflected signals with variable frequency separation. The signal reflected by the randomly distributed specular points on the surface is observed in the backscatter direction at nadir incidence angle. The measured correlation coefficient is equal to the square of the magnitude of the characteristic function of the specular point height from which RMS wave height can be determined. The flight scatterometer operates at 13.9 GHz and 13.9 - delta f GHz with a maximum delta f of 40 MHz. Measurements were conducted for low and moderate sea states at altitudes of 2, 5, and 10 thousand feet. The experimental results agree with the predicted decorrelation with frequency separation and with off-nadir incidence angle.

  20. Measurements on wave propagation characteristics of spiraling electron beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, A.; Getty, W. D.

    1976-01-01

    Dispersion characteristics of cyclotron-harmonic waves propagating on a neutralized spiraling electron beam immersed in a uniform axial magnetic field are studied experimentally. The experimental setup consisted of a vacuum system, an electron-gun corkscrew assembly which produces a 110-eV beam with the desired delta-function velocity distribution, a measurement region where a microwave signal is injected onto the beam to measure wavelengths, and a velocity analyzer for measuring the axial electron velocity. Results of wavelength measurements made at beam currents of 0.15, 1.0, and 2.0 mA are compared with calculated values, and undesirable effects produced by increasing the beam current are discussed. It is concluded that a suitable electron beam for studies of cyclotron-harmonic waves can be generated by the corkscrew device.

  1. Inter-laboratory comparison of wave velocity measures.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waite, William F.; Santamarina, J.C.; Rydzy, M.; Chong, S.H.; Grozic, J.L.H.; Hester, K.; Howard, J.; Kneafsey, T.J.; Lee, J.Y.; Nakagawa, S.; Priest, J.; Reese, E.; Koh, H.; Sloan, E.D.; Sultaniya, A.

    2011-01-01

     This paper presents an eight-laboratory comparison of compressional and shear wave velocities measured in F110 Ottawa sand. The study was run to quantify the physical property variations one should expect in heterogeneous, multiphase porous materials by separately quantifying the variability inherent in the measurement techniques themselves. Comparative tests were run in which the sand was dry, water-saturated, partially water-saturated, partially ice-saturated and partially hydrate-saturated. Each test illustrates a collection of effects that can be classified as inducing either specimen-based or measurement-based variability. The most significant variability is due to void ratio variations between samples. Heterogeneous pore-fill distributions and differences in measurement techniques also contribute to the observed variability, underscoring the need to provide detailed sample preparation and system calibration information when reporting wave velocities in porous media. 

  2. Arterial compliance probe for local blood pulse wave velocity measurement.

    PubMed

    Nabeel, P M; Joseph, Jayaraj; Sivaprakasam, Mohanasankar

    2015-08-01

    Arterial compliance and vessel wall dynamics are significant in vascular diagnosis. We present the design of arterial compliance probes for measurement of local pulse wave velocity (PWV). Two designs of compliance probe are discussed, viz (a) a magnetic plethysmograph (MPG) based probe, and (b) a photoplethysmograph (PPG) based probe. The ability of the local PWV probes to consistently capture carotid blood pulse waves is verified by in-vivo trials on few volunteers. The probes could reliably perform repeatable measurements of local PWV from carotid artery along small artery sections less than 20 mm. Further, correlation between the measured values of local PWV using probes and various measures of blood pressure (BP) was also investigated. The study indicates that such arterial compliance probes have strong potential in cuff less BP monitoring. PMID:26737589

  3. Measurement of Attenuation with Airborne and Ground-Based Radar in Convective Storms Over Land and Its Microphysical Implications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tian, Lin; Heymsfield, G. M.; Srivastava, R. C.; Starr, D. OC. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Observations by the airborne X-band Doppler radar (EDOP) and the NCAR S-band polarimetric (S-POL) radar from two field experiments are used to evaluate the Surface ref'ercnce technique (SRT) for measuring the path integrated attenuation (PIA) and to study attenuation in deep convective storms. The EDOP, flying at an altitude of 20 km, uses a nadir beam and a forward pointing beam. It is found that over land, the surface scattering cross-section is highly variable at nadir incidence but relatively stable at forward incidence. It is concluded that measurement by the forward beam provides a viable technique for measuring PIA using the SRT. Vertical profiles of peak attenuation coefficient are derived in vxo deep convective storms by the dual-wavelength method. Using the measured Doppler velocity, the reflectivities at. the two wavelengths, the differential reflectivity and the estimated attenuation coefficients, it is shown that: supercooled drops and dry ice particles probably co-existed above the melting level in regions of updraft, that water-coated partially melted ice particles probably contributed to high attenuation below the melting level, and that the data are not readil explained in terms of a gamma function raindrop size distribution.

  4. Measurement of Attenuation with Airborne and Ground-Based Radar in Convective Storms Over Land Its Microphysical Implications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tian, Lin; Heymsfield, G. M.; Srivastava, R. C.; O'C.Starr, D. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Observations by the airborne X-band Doppler radar (EDOP) and the NCAR S-band polarimetric (S-Pol) radar from two field experiments are used to evaluate the surface reference technique (SRT) for measuring the path integrated attenuation (PIA) and to study attenuation in deep convective storms. The EDOP, flying at an altitude of 20 km, uses a nadir beam and a forward pointing beam. It is found that over land, the surface scattering cross-section is highly variable at nadir incidence but relatively stable at forward incidence. It is concluded that measurement by the forward beam provides a viable technique for measuring PIA using the SRT. Vertical profiles of peak attenuation coefficient are derived in two deep convective storms by the dual-wavelength method. Using the measured Doppler velocity, the reflectivities at the two wavelengths, the differential reflectivity and the estimated attenuation coefficients, it is shown that: supercooled drops and (dry) ice particles probably co-existed above the melting level in regions of updraft, that water-coated partially melted ice particles probably contributed to high attenuation below the melting level.

  5. Multipath Effects on Phase Measurements with Continuous Terahertz Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cordes, A. H.; Albarracin, M. G.; Thomas, D. H.; von der Weid, J. P.

    2016-05-01

    We evaluate the effect of multipath waves on terahertz phase measurements due to multiple reflections between the transmitter antenna and the sample. We show that the phase shift introduced by the sample will be biased by a value which depends on the sample position in the terahertz path. We show how to remove the bias and use the technique in the measurement of the index of refraction of Mylar at 194.4 GHz.

  6. Phase Velocity Method for Guided Wave Measurements in Composite Plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno, E.; Galarza, N.; Rubio, B.; Otero, J. A.

    Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer is a well-recognized material for aeronautic applications. Its plane structure has been widely used where anisotropic characteristics should be evaluated with flaw detection. A phase velocity method of ultrasonic guided waves based on a pitch-catch configuration is presented for this purpose. Both shear vertical (SV) and shear horizontal (SH) have been studied. For SV (Lamb waves) the measurements were done at different frequencies in order to evaluate the geometrical dispersion and elastic constants. The results for SV are discussed with an orthotropic elastic model. Finally experiments with lamination flaws are presented.

  7. Dual differential interferometer for measurements of broadband surface acoustic waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, T. M.; Claus, R. O.

    1981-01-01

    A simple duel interferometer which uses two pairs of orthogonally polarized optical beams to measure both the amplitude and direction of propagation of broadband ultrasonic surface waves is described. Each pair of focused laser probe beams is used in a separate wideband differential interferometer to independently detect the component of surface wave motion along one direction on the surface. By combining the two output signals corresponding to both components, the two dimensional surface profile and its variation as a function of time is determined.

  8. A self-zeroing capacitance probe for water wave measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Long, Steven R.

    1992-01-01

    The wave probe developed at the Air-Sea Interaction Research Facility was designed to measure the surface elevation fluctuations of water waves. Design criteria included being linear in response, self-zeroing to the mean water level, having multiple operating ranges so that the instrument's maximum output could be matched to the maximum surface elevation over varying conditions, and be as noise-free as possible. The purpose of this publication is to provide a detailed description of the design and construction of this probe.

  9. Field measurements and modeling of attenuation from near-surface bubbles for frequencies 1-20 kHz.

    PubMed

    Dahl, Peter H; Choi, Jee Woong; Williams, Neil J; Graber, Hans C

    2008-09-01

    Measurements of excess attenuation from near-surface bubbles from the Shallow Water '06 experiment are reported. These are transmission measurements made over the frequency range 1-20 kHz, and they demonstrate a frequency, grazing angle, and wind speed dependence in attenuation. Data modeling points to bubble void fractions of order 10(-6) in effect for wind speeds 10-13 m/s. Simultaneous measures of wind speed made within 1.5 and 11 km of the open water experimental location differed by 2 m/s in their respective 30 min average; this has cautionary implications for empirical models for bubble attenuation that are a strong function of wind speed. PMID:19045560

  10. Measurement of Organics Using Three FTIR Techniques: Absorption, Attenuated Total Reflectance, and Diffuse Reflectance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gebel, M. E.; Kaleuati, M. A.; Finlayson-Pitts, B. J.

    2003-06-01

    This paper describes an undergraduate junior- and senior-level instrumental analysis experiment that uses three infrared analysis techniques: conventional transmission spectroscopy, attenuated total reflection (ATR) spectroscopy, and diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS). Using transmission spectroscopy, methyl t-butyl ether, MTBE, in a state-supplied certification gasoline was measured to be 11.3 ± 0.4 % (v/v, 2s), in agreement with the stated MTBE content of 10.9% (v/v). Measurements were also carried out on various brands of commercial gasoline and MTBE was found to vary from 9.2 to 12.2% (v/v). ATR was used to measure the ethanol content of different brands of vodka, which ranged from 36 to 40 % (v/v) in agreement with the labeled concentration of 40% (v/v). This part of the experiment highlights the significant advantages of using ATR for the analysis of aqueous solutions that cannot be carried out using normal transmission spectroscopy. Finally, DRIFTS measurements were made of total hydrocarbons in six soil samples. The results ranged from below the detection limit of 120 ppm (w/w) for soil from a path at a residential home to 915 ppm (w/w) for a sample from the center planter of a gas station. This part of the experiment illustrates the advantages of using DRIFTS to analyze solids compared to making pellets or mulls. This experiment is carried out during one seven-hour laboratory period.

  11. Significance of Wave-Particle Interaction Analyzer for direct measurement of nonlinear wave-particle interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katoh, Y.; Kitahara, M.; Kojima, H.; Omura, Y.; Kasahara, S.; Hirahara, M.; Miyoshi, Y.; Seki, K.; Asamura, K.; Takashima, T.

    2012-12-01

    We study the statistical significance of the Wave Particle Interaction Analyzer (WPIA) for measurement of the energy transfer process between energetic electrons and whistler-mode chorus emissions in the Earth's inner magnetosphere. The WPIA measures a relative phase angle between the wave vector and velocity vector of each particle and computes an inner product W(t), while W(t) is equivalent to the variation of the kinetic energy of energetic electrons interacting with plasma waves. The WPIA measurements will be realized by the Software-type WPIA in the SPRINT-B/ERG satellite mission. In the present study, we evaluate the feasibility of WPIA by applying the WPIA analysis to the simulation results on whistler-mode chorus generation. We compute W(t) of a wave electric field observed at a fixed point assumed in the simulation system and a velocity vector of each energetic electron passing through the assumed point. By integrating W(t) in time, we obtain significant values of W_{int} in the kinetic energy and pitch angle ranges as expected from the evolution of chorus emissions in the simulation result. The statistical significance of the obtained W_{int} is evaluated by calculating the standard deviation σ_W of W_{int}. We show that W_{int} greater than σ_W is obtained in the velocity phase space corresponding to the wave generation and acceleration of relativistic electrons. We conduct another analysis of a distribution of energetic electrons in the wave phase space using the same dataset of the simulation results. We clarify that the deviation of the distribution in the wave phase space is found in the velocity phase space corresponding to the large W_{int} values, which is consistent with formation of nonlinear resonant currents assumed in the generation mechanism of chorus emissions. The present study suggests that the statistical significance of the WPIA can be evaluated by calculating σ_W of W_{int}, and reveals the feasibility of the WPIA, which will be on

  12. A standing-wave flow measurement system for small diameter pipes using long acoustic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikpe, E. S.; Scarrott, G.; Weight, J. P.; Grattan, K. T. V.

    1993-09-01

    An exploratory investigation, using laboratory fabricated acoustic components, of standing-wave flow measurement techniques for liquids and gases in pipes of diameter up to about 25 mm was undertaken, using long acoustic waves. The results show a linear sensitivity based on the ``sing-around'' technique, often associated with contrapropagating time-of-flight flowmeters. A repeatability test at a volume flow rate of 1.5 l per minute indicates that, within the 95% confidence limit, only 5% of the readings will lie outside the range of 1.1-1.9 l per minute. The transducer used in the above investigation comprises a section of the pipe wall which acts as part of a resonating transmitter or detector of long waves in a fluid. The measurement cell is closed and generates a known standing-wave pattern. The results obtained suggest that, in the future, the initial accuracy obtained in this study can be significantly enhanced with further improvements to the transducers, the measurement cell, the electronics, and test procedures, on which work is continuing, to produce a device competitive with those using other technologies.

  13. Optimization of satellite altimeter and wave height measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dooley, R. P.; Brooks, L. W.

    1979-01-01

    Two techniques for simultaneously estimating altitude, ocean wave height, and signal-to-noise ratio from the GEOS-C satellite altimeter data are described. One technique was based on maximum likelihood estimation, MLE, and the other on minimum mean square error estimation, MMSE. Performance was determined by comparing the variance and bias of each technique with the variance and bias of the smoothed output from the Geos altimeter tracker. Ocean wave height tracking performance for the MLE and MMSE algorithms was measured by comparing the variance and bias of the wave height estimates with that of the expression for the return waveform obtained by a fit to the average output of the 16 waveform sampling gates.

  14. Capillary wave measurements on helically-supported capillary channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandurwala, Fahim; Thiessen, David

    2010-10-01

    NASA is considering power generation by the Rankine cycle to save weight on long-duration manned missions to the moon or Mars. Phase separation technology is critical to this process in microgravity. Arrays of capillary channels might be useful for filtering liquid drops from a flowing vapor. The efficiency of droplet capture by a helically-supported capillary channel is being studied. A droplet impinging on the channel launches capillary waves that propagate down the channel helping to dissipate some of the drop's kinetic energy. High-speed video of the channel combined with image processing allows for measurement of the amplitude and speed of the wave packets. Increasing the pitch of the support structure decreases the wave speed. An understanding of the dynamic response of the channel to drop impact is a first step in predicting drop-capture efficiency.

  15. Estimation of patient attenuation factor for iodine-131 based on direct dose rate measurements from radioiodine therapy patients.

    PubMed

    Soliman, Khaled; Alenezi, Ahmed

    2015-02-01

    The aim of the study was to measure the actual dose at 1 m from the patients per unit activity with the aim of providing a more accurate prediction of the dose levels around radioiodine patients in the hospital, as well as to compare our results with the literature. In this work the demonstration of a patient body tissue attenuation factor is verified by comparing the dose rates measured from the patients with those measured from the unshielded radioiodine capsules immediately after administration of the radioactivity. The normalized dose rate per unit activity is therefore proposed as an operational quantity that can be used to predict exposure rates to staff and patients' relatives. The average dose rate measured from our patient per unit activity was 38.4±11.8 μSv/h/GBq. The calculated attenuation correction factor based on our measurements was 0.55±0.17. The calculated dose rate from a radioiodine therapy patient should normally include a factor accounting for patient body tissue attenuation and scatter. The attenuation factor is currently neglected and not applied in operational radiation protection. Realistic estimation of radiation dose levels from radioiodine therapy patients when properly performed will reduce the operational cost and optimize institutional radiation protection practice. It is recommended to include patient attenuation factors in risk assessment exercises - in particular, when accurate estimates of total effective doses to exposed individuals are required when direct measurements are not possible. The information provided about patient attenuation might benefit radiation protection specialists and regulators. PMID:25279710

  16. A revision factor to the Cutshall self-attenuation correction in (210)Pb gamma-spectrometry measurements.

    PubMed

    Jodłowski, Paweł

    2016-03-01

    The Cutshall transmission method of determination of self-attenuation correction in (210)Pb measurements by gamma-spectrometry gives the results burdened with errors of up to 10%. The author proposes introducing into the Cutshall correction Cs,Cuts an additional revision factor CCs,Cuts to eliminate errors. The proposed formula of the revision factor describes the CCs,Cuts value depending on the experimentally obtained Cs,Cuts correction. Formula holds true in wide ranges of the measurement geometries and linear attenuation coefficients of both the standard and the sample. PMID:26702546

  17. Measurement of Rain Induced Attenuation over a Line of Sight Link Operating at 28.75 GHz at Amritsar (INDIA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Parshotam; Hudiara, I. S.; Singh, M. L.

    2009-08-01

    The need of higher bandwidth systems has led the system designer to shift into higher frequency region. But working at these high frequency regions is not that easy. The paper presents results of the measurements of rain induced attenuation of a LOS link operating at 28.75 GHz at Amritsar (31°36' N 74° 52' E) for a single event that occurred on the 15th Nov., 2004. The results have been compared with those of ITU-R Model. It is observed that there is a significant difference between the attenuation levels measured and those predicted by using ITU-R model.

  18. Preliminary measurements of thermal effects in the dust acoustic wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Jeremiah

    2009-11-01

    A complex (dusty) plasma (CDP) is a four-component system composed of ions, electrons, neutral particles and charged microparticles. The presence of the microparticles gives rise to new plasma phenomena, including collective modes such as the dust acoustic wave. Recent measurements of the dispersion relationship of this wave mode [E. Thomas, Jr., et. al., Phys. Plasmas 14, 123701 (2007), J.D. Williams, et. al., Phys. Plasmas 15, 043704 (2008)] have shown that, over a range of neutral gas pressures, it is necessary to include thermal effects to accurately fit the measured dispersion relations. In this work, initial measurements of the dispersion relation in a new dusty plasma experiment, the Wittenberg University DUsty Plasma Experiment (WUDUPE), will be presented. In particular, the dependence of the kinetic dust temperature on the neutral gas pressure will be presented.

  19. Dynamics and constituent measurements with the Waves Michelson Interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, W. E.; Wang, D. Y.; Kowalski, M.; Gault, W. A.; Bell, A.

    The Waves Michelson Interferometer WaMI is an imaging Michelson interferometer designed to provide altitude profiles of wind temperature ozone atomic oxygen and density from the stratopause to the lower thermosphere This is accomplished through simultaneous measurements of the Doppler shifts line widths and irradiance of emission lines in airglow emissions O2 IR atmospheric band OH and O 1S These measurements are crucial to an understanding the behaviour of the upper stratosphere and mesosphere and its role in the middle atmosphere Observations in this region are complicated by observational issues and subtleties in the dynamical forcings Amplitudes of gravity waves and tides are substantial and as a result temperatures and winds exhibit strong variability In addition vertical and horizontal displacements associated with these waves are significant so that the interpretation of constituent signatures becomes difficult By providing simultaneous profiles of a number of quantities of dynamical interest WaMI has the potential to resolve a number of these observational issues and to provide insights into the dynamics and constituent transport in this region These measurements would be most valuable if they were part of a multiple satellite mission tentatively termed the D-Train D for dynamics each satellite of which sampled a different local time In this talk the measurement and inversion approach being developed for WaMI is described The importance of these measurements for interpreting the behaviour of the atmosphere in the upper stratosphere and

  20. Hydrometeor Size Distribution Measurements by Imaging the Attenuation of a Laser Spot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lane, John

    2013-01-01

    The optical extinction of a laser due to scattering of particles is a well-known phenomenon. In a laboratory environment, this physical principle is known as the Beer-Lambert law, and is often used to measure the concentration of scattering particles in a fluid or gas. This method has been experimentally shown to be a usable means to measure the dust density from a rocket plume interaction with the lunar surface. Using the same principles and experimental arrangement, this technique can be applied to hydrometeor size distributions, and for launch-pad operations, specifically as a passive hail detection and measurement system. Calibration of a hail monitoring system is a difficult process. In the past, it has required comparison to another means of measuring hydrometeor size and density. Using a technique recently developed for estimating the density of surface dust dispersed during a rocket landing, measuring the extinction of a laser passing through hail (or dust in the rocket case) yields an estimate of the second moment of the particle cloud, and hydrometeor size distribution in the terrestrial meteorological case. With the exception of disdrometers, instruments that measure rain and hail fall make indirect measurements of the drop-size distribution. Instruments that scatter microwaves off of hydrometeors, such as the WSR-88D (Weather Surveillance Radar 88 Doppler), vertical wind profilers, and microwave disdrometers, measure the sixth moment of the drop size distribution (DSD). By projecting a laser onto a target, changes in brightness of the laser spot against the target background during rain and hail yield a measurement of the DSD's second moment by way of the Beer-Lambert law. In order to detect the laser attenuation within the 8-bit resolution of most camera image arrays, a minimum path length is required. Depending on the intensity of the hail fall rate for moderate to heavy rainfall, a laser path length of 100 m is sufficient to measure variations in

  1. The precise measurement of the attenuation coefficients of various IR optical materials applicable to immersion grating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaji, Sayumi; Sarugaku, Yuki; Ikeda, Yuji; Kobayashi, Naoto; Nakanishi, Kenshi; Kondo, Sohei; Yasui, Chikako; Kawakita, Hideyo

    2014-07-01

    Immersion grating is a next-generation diffraction grating which has the immersed the diffraction surface in an optical material with high refractive index of n > 2, and can provide higher spectral resolution than a classical reflective grating. Our group is developing various immersion gratings from the near- to mid-infrared region (Ikeda et al.1, 2, 3, 4, Sarugaku et al.5, and Sukegawa et al.6). The internal attenuation αatt of the candidate materials is especially very important to achieve the high efficiency immersion gratings used for astronomical applications. Nevertheless, because there are few available data as αatt < 0.01cm-1 in the infrared region, except for measurements of CVD-ZnSe, CVD-ZnS, and single-crystal Si in the short near-infrared region reported by Ikeda et al.7, we cannot select suitable materials as an immersion grating in an aimed wavelength range. Therefore, we measure the attenuation coefficients of CdTe, CdZnTe, Ge, Si, ZnSe, and ZnS that could be applicable to immersion gratings. We used an originally developed optical unit attached to a commercial FTIR which covers the wide wavelength range from 1.3μm to 28μm. This measurement system achieves the high accuracy of (triangle)αatt ~ 0.01cm-1. As a result, high-resistivity single-crystal CdZnTe, single-crystal Ge, single-crystal Si, CVD-ZnSe, and CVD-ZnS show αatt < 0.01cm-1 at the wavelength range of 5.5 - 19.0μm, 2.0 - 10.5μm, 1.3 - 5.4μm, 1.7 - 13.2μm, and 1.9 - 9.2μm, respectively. This indicates that these materials are good candidates for high efficiency immersion grating covering those wavelength ranges. We plan to make similar measurement under the cryogenic condition as T <= 10K for the infrared, especially mid-infrared applications.

  2. Laboratory measurements of compressional and shear wave speeds through methane hydrate

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waite, W.F.; Helgerud, M.B.; Nur, A.; Pinkston, J.C.; Stern, L.A.; Kirby, S.H.; Durham, W.B.

    2000-01-01

    Simultaneous measurements of compressional and shear wave speeds through polycrystalline methane hydrate have been made. Methane hydrate, grown directly in a wave speed measurement chamber, was uniaxially compacted to a final porosity below 2%. At 277 K, the compacted material had a compressional wave speed of 3650 ?? 50 m/s. The shear wave speed, measured simultaneously, was 1890 ?? 30 m/s. From these wave speed measurements, we derive V(p)/V(s), Poisson's ratio, bulk, shear, and Young's moduli.

  3. Acoustic measurements of a liquefied cohesive sediment bed under waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosquera, R.; Groposo, V.; Pedocchi, F.

    2014-04-01

    In this article the response of a cohesive sediment deposit under the action of water waves is studied with the help of laboratory experiments and an analytical model. Under the same regular wave condition three different bed responses were observed depending on the degree of consolidation of the deposit: no bed motion, bed motion of the upper layer after the action of the first waves, and massive bed motion after several waves. The kinematic of the upper 3 cm of the deposit were measured with an ultrasound acoustic profiler, while the pore-water pressure inside the bed was simultaneously measured using several pore pressure sensors. A poro-elastic model was developed to interpret the experimental observations. The model showed that the amplitude of the shear stress increased down into the bed. Then it is possible that the lower layers of the deposit experience plastic deformations, while the upper layers present just elastic deformations. Since plastic deformations in the lower layers are necessary for pore pressure build-up, the analytical model was used to interpret the experimental results and to state that liquefaction of a self consolidated cohesive sediment bed would only occur if the bed yield stress falls within the range defined by the amplitude of the shear stress inside the bed.

  4. Human Pulse Wave Measurement by MEMS Electret Condenser Microphone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nomura, Shusaku; Hanasaka, Yasushi; Ishiguro, Tadashi; Ogawa, Hiroshi

    A micro Electret Condenser Microphone (ECM) fabricated by Micro Electro Mechanical System (MEMS) technology was employed as a novel apparatus for human pulse wave measurement. Since ECM frequency response characteristic, i.e. sensitivity, logically maintains a constant level at lower than the resonance frequency (stiffness control), the slightest pressure difference at around 1.0Hz generated by human pulse wave is expected to detect by MEMS-ECM. As a result of the verification of frequency response of MEMS-ECM, it was found that -20dB/dec of reduction in the sensitivity around 1.0Hz was engendered by a high input-impedance amplifier, i.e. the field effect transistor (FET), mounted near MEMS chip for amplifying tiny ECM signal. Therefore, MEMS-ECM is assumed to be equivalent with a differentiation circuit at around human pulse frequency. Introducing compensation circuit, human pulse wave was successfully obtained. In addition, the radial and ulnar artery tracing, and pulse wave velocity measurement at forearm were demonstrated; as illustrating a possible application of this micro device.

  5. Rapid miniature fiber optic pressure sensors for blast wave measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Xiaotian; Wu, Nan; Tian, Ye; Niezrecki, Christopher; Chen, Julie; Wang, Xingwei

    2013-02-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a serious potential threat to soldiers who are exposed to explosions. Since the pathophysiology of TBI associated with a blast wave is not clearly defined, it is crucial to have a sensing system to accurately quantify the blast wave dynamics. This paper presents an ultra-fast fiber optic pressure sensor based on Fabry-Perot (FP) interferometric principle that is capable of measuring the rapid pressure changes in a blast event. The blast event in the experiment was generated by a starter pistol blank firing at close range, which produced a more realistic wave profile compared to using compressed air driven shock tubes. To the authors' knowledge, it is also the first study to utilize fiber optic pressure sensors to measure the ballistics shock wave of a pistol firing. The results illustrated that the fiber optic pressure sensor has a rise time of 200 ns which demonstrated that the sensor has ability to capture the dynamic pressure transient during a blast event. Moreover, the resonant frequency of the sensor was determined to be 4.11 MHz, which agrees well with the specific designed value.

  6. Determination of gamma-ray self-attenuation correction in environmental samples by combining transmission measurements and Monte Carlo simulations.

    PubMed

    Šoštarić, Marko; Babić, Dinko; Petrinec, Branko; Zgorelec, Željka

    2016-07-01

    We develop a simple and widely applicable method for determining the self-attenuation correction in gamma-ray spectrometry on environmental samples. The method relies on measurements of the transmission of photons over the matrices of a calibration standard and an analysed sample. Results of this experiment are used in subsequent Monte Carlo simulations in which we first determine the linear attenuation coefficients (μ) of the two matrices and then the self-attenuation correction for the analysed sample. The method is validated by reproducing, over a wide energy range, the literature data for the μ of water. We demonstrate the use of the method on a sample of sand, for which we find that the correction is considerable below ~400keV, where many naturally occurring radionuclides emit gamma rays. At the lowest inspected energy (~60keV), one measures an activity that is by a factor of ~1.8 smaller than its true value. PMID:27157125

  7. In-situ Attenuation Corrections for Radiation Force Measurements of High Frequency Ultrasound With a Conical Target.

    PubMed

    Fick, Steven E; Ruggles, Dorea

    2006-01-01

    Radiation force balance (RFB) measurements of time-averaged, spatially-integrated ultrasound power transmitted into a reflectionless water load are based on measurements of the power received by the RFB target. When conical targets are used to intercept the output of collimated, circularly symmetric ultrasound sources operating at frequencies above a few megahertz, the correction for in-situ attenuation is significant, and differs significantly from predictions for idealized circumstances. Empirical attenuation correction factors for a 45° (half-angle) absorptive conical RFB target have been determined for 24 frequencies covering the 5 MHz to 30 MHz range. They agree well with previously unpublished attenuation calibration factors determined in 1994 for a similar target. PMID:27274946

  8. An Analysis of Fundamental Mode Surface Wave Amplitude Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schardong, L.; Ferreira, A. M.; van Heijst, H. J.; Ritsema, J.

    2014-12-01

    Seismic tomography is a powerful tool to decipher the Earth's interior structure at various scales. Traveltimes of seismic waves are widely used to build velocity models, whereas amplitudes are still only seldomly accounted for. This mainly results from our limited ability to separate the vari