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1

Photon wave function  

Microsoft Academic Search

Photon wave function is a controversial concept. Controversies stem from the fact that photon wave functions can not have all the properties of the Schroedinger wave functions of nonrelativistic wave mechanics. Insistence on those properties that, owing to peculiarities of photon dynamics, cannot be rendered, led some physicists to the extreme opinion that the photon wave function does not exist.

Iwo Bialynicki-Birula

2005-01-01

2

Photon wave functions  

Microsoft Academic Search

We argue that a photon wave function can be introduced if one is willing to redefine, in what we feel is a physically meaningful way, what one wishes to mean by such a wave function. The generation of a photon wave function by a spontaneously emitting atom is discussed.

J. E. Sipe

1995-01-01

3

Fully differential cross sections in single ionization of helium by ion impact: Assessing the role of correlated wave functions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We study the effect of final state dynamic correlation in single ionization of atoms by ion impact analyzing fully differential cross sections (FDCS). We use a distorted wave model where the final state is represented by a ?2 type correlated function, solution of a non-separable three body continuum Hamiltonian. This final state wave function partially includes the correlation of electron projectile and electron recoil relative motion as coupling terms of the wave equation. A comparison of fully differential results using this model with other theories and experimental data reveals that inclusion of dynamic correlation effects have little influence on FDCS, and do not contribute to a better description of available data in the case of electronic emission out-of scattering plane.

Ciappina, M. F.; Cravero, W. R.

2008-02-01

4

The photon wave function  

Microsoft Academic Search

We review and sharpen the concept of a photon wave function based on the quantum theory of light. We argue that a point-like atom serves as the archetype for both the creation and detection of photons. Spontaneous emission from atoms provides a spatially localized source of photon states that serves as a natural wave packet basis for quantum states of

A. Muthukrishnan; M. O. Scully; M. S. Zubairy

2005-01-01

5

[Heat waves: health impacts].  

PubMed

During the summer of 2003, record high temperatures were reported across Europe, causing thousands of casualties. Heat waves are sporadic recurrent events, characterised by intense and prolonged heat, associated with excess mortality and morbidity. The most frequent cause of death directly attributable to heat is heat stroke but heat waves are known to cause increases in all-cause mortality, specially circulatory and respiratory mortality. Epidemiological studies demonstrate excess casualties cluster in specific risk groups. The elderly, those with chronic medical conditions and the socially isolated are particularly vulnerable. Air conditioning is the strongest protective factor against heat-related disorders. Heat waves cause disease indirectly, by aggravating chronic disorders, and directly, by causing heat-related illnesses (HRI). Classic HRI include skin eruptions, heat cramps, heat syncope, heat exhaustion and heat stroke. Heat stroke is a medical emergency characterised by hyperthermia and central nervous system dysfunction. Treatment includes immediate cooling and support of organ-system function. Despite aggressive treatment, heat stroke is often fatal and permanent neurological damage is frequent in those who survive. Heat related illness and death are preventable through behavioural adaptations, such as use of air conditioning and increased fluid intake. Other adaptation measures include heat emergency warning systems and intervention plans and environmental heat stress reduction. Heat related mortality is expected to rise as a consequence of the increasing proportion of elderly persons, the growing urban population, and the anticipated increase in number and intensity of heat waves associated with global warming. Improvements in surveillance and response capability may limit the adverse health conditions of future heat waves. It is crucial that health professionals are prepared to recognise, prevent and treat HRI and learn to cooperate with local health agencies. PMID:16684487

Marto, Natália

2006-03-06

6

Wave Function Plotter Model  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Ejs Wave Function Plotter model displays a one-dimensional wave function u(x,t) depicting a disturbance at position x and time t. The disturbance can be mass density, pressure, or electric field depending on the physical context. The default wave function is sinusoidal but any other analytic function can be entered in the text box. The number of sampling points can also be changed. You can modify this simulation if you have Ejs installed by right-clicking within the plot and selecting âOpen Ejs Modelâ from the pop-up menu item. Ejs Wave Function Plotter model was created using the Easy Java Simulations (Ejs) modeling tool. It is distributed as a ready-to-run (compiled) Java archive. Double clicking the ejs_osc_chains_WaveFunctionPlotter.jar file will run the program if Java is installed. Ejs is a part of the Open Source Physics Project and is designed to make it easier to access, modify, and generate computer models. Additional Ejs models for Newtonian mechanics are available. They can be found by searching ComPADRE for Open Source Physics, OSP, or Ejs.

Christian, Wolfgang

2008-07-05

7

General analytical solution for elastic radial wave propagation and dynamic analysis of functionally graded thick hollow cylinders subjected to impact loading  

Microsoft Academic Search

An analytical method is proposed for the dynamic response analysis of functionally graded thick hollow cylinders under impact\\u000a loading. The wave motion equation is solved using an analytical method that is based on the composition of Bessel functions.\\u000a The mechanical properties are considered as power functions of the radius across the thickness of FG cylinder. The FG cylinder\\u000a is excited

Seyed Mahmoud Hosseini; Mohammad Hossein Abolbashari

2010-01-01

8

Wave function of the Universe  

Microsoft Academic Search

The quantum state of a spatially closed universe can be described by a wave function which is a functional on the geometries of compact three-manifolds and on the values of the matter fields on these manifolds. The wave function obeys the Wheeler-DeWitt second-order functional differential equation. We put forward a proposal for the wave function of the ''ground state'' or

J. B. Hartle; S. W. Hawking

1983-01-01

9

Wigner functions of s waves  

SciTech Connect

We derive explicit expressions for the Wigner function of wave functions in D dimensions which depend on the hyperradius--that is, of s waves. They are based either on the position or the momentum representation of the s wave. The corresponding Wigner function depends on three variables: the absolute value of the D-dimensional position and momentum vectors and the angle between them. We illustrate these expressions by calculating and discussing the Wigner functions of an elementary s wave and the energy eigenfunction of a free particle.

Dahl, J. P. [Chemical Physics, Department of Chemistry, Technical University of Denmark, DTU 207, DK-2800 Lyngby (Denmark); Institut fuer Quantenphysik, Universitaet Ulm, D-89069 Ulm (Germany); Varro, S. [Research Institute for Solid State Physics and Optics, H-1525 Budapest, P.O. Box 49, (Hungary); Institut fuer Quantenphysik, Universitaet Ulm, D-89069 Ulm (Germany); Wolf, A.; Schleich, W. P. [Institut fuer Quantenphysik, Universitaet Ulm, D-89069 Ulm (Germany)

2007-05-15

10

Wave-function functionals for the density  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We extend the idea of the constrained-search variational method for the construction of wave-function functionals ?[?] of functions ?. The search is constrained to those functions ? such that ?[?] reproduces the density ?(r) while simultaneously leading to an upper bound to the energy. The functionals are thereby normalized and automatically satisfy the electron-nucleus coalescence condition. The functionals ?[?] are also constructed to satisfy the electron-electron coalescence condition. The method is applied to the ground state of the helium atom to construct functionals ?[?] that reproduce the density as given by the Kinoshita correlated wave function. The expectation of single-particle operators W=?irin, n=-2,-1,1,2, W=?i?(ri) are exact, as must be the case. The expectations of the kinetic energy operator W=-(1)/(2)?i?i2, the two-particle operators W=?nun, n=-2,-1,1,2, where u=|ri-rj|, and the energy are accurate. We note that the construction of such functionals ?[?] is an application of the Levy-Lieb constrained-search definition of density functional theory. It is thereby possible to rigorously determine which functional ?[?] is closer to the true wave function.

Slamet, Marlina; Pan, Xiao-Yin; Sahni, Viraht

2011-11-01

11

Hydrogenic Wave Functions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This chapter summarizes the solutions of the one-electron nonrelativistic Schrödinger equation, and the one-electron relativistic Dirac equation, for the Coulomb potential. The standard notations and conventions used in the mathematics literature for special functions have been chosen in preference to the notations customarily used in the physics literature whenever there is a conflict. This has been done to facilitate the use of standard reference works such as Abramowitz and Stegun [9.1], the Bateman project [9.2,3], Gradshteyn and Ryzhik [9.4], Jahnke and Emde [9.5], Luke [9.6,7], Magnus, Oberhettinger, and Soni [9.8], Olver [9.9], Szego [9.10], and the new NIST Digital Library of Mathematical Functions project, which is preparing a hardcover update [9.11] of Abramowitz and Stegun [9.1] and an online digital library of mathematical functions [9.12]. The section on special functions contains many of the formulas which are needed to check the results quoted in the previous sections, together with a number of other useful formulas. Itincludes a brief introduction to asymptotic methods.

Hill, Robert

12

Multiphoton wave function after Kerr interaction  

Microsoft Academic Search

The multiphoton wave function after Kerr interaction is obtained analytically for an arbitrary photon number. The wave function is composed of two fundamental functions: the input mode function and the linear response function. The nonlinear effects appearing in this wave function are evaluated quantitatively, revealing the limitations of nonlinear quantum optics theories based on single-mode approximations.

Kazuki Koshino

2008-01-01

13

Wave-function functionals for the density  

SciTech Connect

We extend the idea of the constrained-search variational method for the construction of wave-function functionals {psi}[{chi}] of functions {chi}. The search is constrained to those functions {chi} such that {psi}[{chi}] reproduces the density {rho}(r) while simultaneously leading to an upper bound to the energy. The functionals are thereby normalized and automatically satisfy the electron-nucleus coalescence condition. The functionals {psi}[{chi}] are also constructed to satisfy the electron-electron coalescence condition. The method is applied to the ground state of the helium atom to construct functionals {psi}[{chi}] that reproduce the density as given by the Kinoshita correlated wave function. The expectation of single-particle operators W={Sigma}{sub i}r{sub i}{sup n}, n=-2,-1,1,2, W={Sigma}{sub i}{delta}(r{sub i}) are exact, as must be the case. The expectations of the kinetic energy operator W=-(1/2){Sigma}{sub i}{nabla}{sub i}{sup 2}, the two-particle operators W={Sigma}{sub n}u{sup n}, n=-2,-1,1,2, where u=|r{sub i}-r{sub j}|, and the energy are accurate. We note that the construction of such functionals {psi}[{chi}] is an application of the Levy-Lieb constrained-search definition of density functional theory. It is thereby possible to rigorously determine which functional {psi}[{chi}] is closer to the true wave function.

Slamet, Marlina; Pan Xiaoyin; Sahni, Viraht [Sacred Heart University, Fairfield, Connecticut 06825 (United States); Faculty of Science, Ningbo University, 315211 Ningbo (China); Brooklyn College and The Graduate School of the City University of New York, New York, New York 10016 (United States)

2011-11-15

14

Estimation of wave source position by using spherical wave function  

Microsoft Academic Search

Estimation of wave source position is important technique for searching unknown noise source in EMI and EMC measurement. In this paper a new estimation technique for searching the position of wave source is proposed by using spherical vector wave function and point matching method. In our method a few virtual boundaries are placed on surrounding space encompassed the unknown wave

Kuniyuki Motojima; Hiroyuki Sutoh

2009-01-01

15

Dirac wave functions in nuclear distorted-wave calculations  

SciTech Connect

A distorted-wave formulation of simple direct nuclear reactions, using Dirac wave functions, is presented. The resulting amplitude contains interior damping due to relativistic Darwin terms. The calculations are compared with standard Schroedinger results and significant differences are found.

Rost, E.; Shepard, J.R.; Murdock, D.

1982-08-16

16

Photon wave function and Zitterbewegung  

Microsoft Academic Search

In terms of a photon wave function corresponding to the (1,0)+(0,1) representation of the Lorentz group, the radiation and Coulomb fields within a source-free region can be described unitedly by a Lorentz-covariant Dirac-like equation. In our formalism, the relation between the positive- and negative-energy solutions of the Dirac-like equation corresponds to the duality between the electric and magnetic fields, rather

Zhi-Yong Wang; Cai-Dong Xiong; Qi Qiu

2009-01-01

17

Meson wave function from holographic approaches  

SciTech Connect

We discuss the light-front wave function for the valence quark state of mesons using the AdS/CFT correspondence. We consider two kinds of wave functions obtained in different holographic Soft-Wall approaches.

Vega, Alfredo; Schmidt, Ivan [Departamento de Fisica y Centro de Estudios Subatomicos, Universidad Tecnica Federico Santa Maria, Casilla 110-V, Valparaiso (Chile); Branz, Tanja; Gutsche, Thomas; Lyubovitskij, Valery E. [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Universitaet Tuebingen, Kepler Center for Astro and Particle Physics, Auf der Morgenstelle 14, D-72076 Tuebingen (Germany)

2010-08-04

18

Wave impact pressures on vertical cylinders  

Microsoft Academic Search

Laboratory measurements of the pressure distributions on surface-piercing vertical cylinders due to breaking waves are presented. Breaking waves are generated in a repeatable fashion under program control, and both vertical and azimuthal distributions of pressures were measured over many repeats of the experiments. Despite the repeatability of the controllable experimental conditions, it is found that the highest impact pressures are

D. Zhou; E. S. Chan; W. K. Melville

1991-01-01

19

The destructive impact of the rogue waves  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In our talk rogue waves at the ocean will be considered. By means of numerical modeling dangerous impact of rogue waves on the ships and oil rigs is calculated. Cases when these waves can bring in accident are considered. Using statistics of emergence of waves (see [1]-[2]), it is possible to estimate risks in each case. These results can be used for safety of the ships and oil rigs from rogue waves. References [1] V.E. Zakharov, A.I. Dyachenko, R.V. Shamin. How probability for freak wave formation can be found // THE EUROPEAN PHYSICAL JOURNAL - SPECIAL TOPICS Volume 185, Number 1, 113-124, DOI: 10.1140/epjst/e2010-01242-y [2] V.E. Zakharov, R.V. Shamin. Statistics of rogue waves in computer experiments // JETP Letters, 2012, V. 96, Issue 1, pp 66-69.

Shamin, Roman

2013-04-01

20

LOCAL RESONANCE INDUCED WAVE FUNCTIONAL MATERIALS  

Microsoft Academic Search

Wave functional materials denote a class of artificial materials that possess the ability to manipulate electromagnetic and elastic waves. Photonic and phononic crystals are examples of wave functional materials. In this talk, I start by introducing briefly the concept of Bragg scattering-based photonic and phononic crystals (1-6) that have been extensively studied during the past decade, followed by a description

Ping Sheng

21

Metastability and divergent wave functions  

SciTech Connect

Metastable states of quantum systems can be evaluated as complex-valued eigensolutions of the time-independent Schroedinger equation if complex boundary conditions are applied. Such resonance boundary conditions have been formulated in the early days of quantum mechanics but few calculations have actually been performed utilizing this concept because the corresponding wave functions diverge asymptotically. Recent advances in the computation of energies and widths of metastable states will be discussed when Siegert boundary conditions are applied in order to achieve the necessary analytic continuation onto the complex energy plane as well as schemes to sidestep the divergencies altogether. Examples including potential resonances and multiply excited electronic states of atoms and ions illustrate the wide applicability of this approach.

Winkler, P. [Univ. of Nevada, Reno, NV (United States)

1993-04-01

22

Impact produced stress waves in composites  

SciTech Connect

The Nonhomogenized Dynamic Method of Cells (NHDMOC) is used to study the propagation of stress waves through laminates. The accuracy of the theory is tested by applying it to a plate-impact experiment and checking its ability to resolve a propagation shock wave front. The theory is then compared to Lagrangian hydrodynamic calculations, where it is found that the NHDMOC consistently requires less fine spatial and temporal grids, and less artificial viscosity to control numerical noise. The theory is then used to treat the impact of an epoxy-graphite bilaminate. When the viscoelastic properties of the epoxy are accounted for, the theory agrees well with the experiment.

Clements, B.; Johnson, J.; Addessio, F.; Hixson, R.

1997-05-01

23

Modeling wave impact on salt marsh boundaries  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Wind-wave attack is the fundamental cause of erosion of salt marsh boundaries. Tidal forcing acts as a proxy determining at which elevation waves pound against the marsh edge and conditioning the propagation and transformation of wave trains as they move toward these boundaries. The objective of the present work is to evaluate, through analysis of the results of a numerical model, the effect of wave action on marsh boundaries as a function of tidal elevation and wave height for different edge configurations. In order to link numerical simulations to field conditions, the model inputs are based on topographical and hydrodynamical surveys conducted at a study site at the Virginia Coast Reserve (VCR), VA. Model results show that the wave thrust on the marsh scarp strongly depends on tidal level. The thrust increases with tidal elevation until the marsh is submerged and then rapidly decreases. The wave thrust is maximum for a vertical scarp and minimum for a terraced scarp. Similarly, wave energy dissipation is maximized just above the marsh platform elevation, when wave reflection is reduced and wave breaking occurs at the marsh edge.

Tonelli, Mara; Fagherazzi, Sergio; Petti, Marco

2010-09-01

24

On the Wave Function of the Photon  

Microsoft Academic Search

It is shown that the wave function of the photon is a very useful concept with interesting ramifi- cations. It plays a major role in bridging the gap between classical theory of electromagnetism and quantum electrodynamics. The photon wave function can also be used to construct a phase-space distribution for the photon (Wigner function) that describes the transport of radiation.

Iwo Bialynicki-Birula

25

Stress Wave Source Characterization: Impact, Fracture, and Sliding Friction  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Rapidly varying forces, such as those associated with impact, rapid crack propagation, and fault rupture, are sources of stress waves which propagate through a solid body. This dissertation investigates how properties of a stress wave source can be identified or constrained using measurements recorded at an array of sensor sites located far from the source. This methodology is often called the method of acoustic emission and is useful for structural health monitoring and the noninvasive study of material behavior such as friction and fracture. In this dissertation, laboratory measurements of 1--300 mm wavelength stress waves are obtained by means of piezoelectric sensors which detect high frequency (10 kHz--3MHz) motions of a specimen's surface, picometers to nanometers in amplitude. Then, stress wave source characterization techniques are used to study ball impact, drying shrinkage cracking in concrete, and the micromechanics of stick-slip friction of Poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) and rock/rock interfaces. In order to quantitatively relate recorded signals obtained with an array of sensors to a particular stress wave source, wave propagation effects and sensor distortions must be accounted for. This is achieved by modeling the physics of wave propagation and transduction as linear transfer functions. Wave propagation effects are precisely modeled by an elastodynamic Green's function, sensor distortion is characterized by an instrument response function, and the stress wave source is represented with a force moment tensor. These transfer function models are verified though calibration experiments which employ two different mechanical calibration sources: ball impact and glass capillary fracture. The suitability of the ball impact source model, based on Hertzian contact theory, is experimentally validated for small (˜1 mm) balls impacting massive plates composed of four different materials: aluminum, steel, glass, and PMMA. Using this transfer function approach and the two mechanical calibration sources, four types of piezoelectric sensors were calibrated: three commercially available sensors and the Glaser-type conical piezoelectric sensor, which was developed in the Glaser laboratory. The distorting effects of each sensor are modeled using autoregressive-moving average (ARMA) models, and because vital phase information is robustly incorporated into these models, they are useful for simulating or removing sensor-induced distortions, so that a displacement time history can be retrieved from recorded signals. The Glaser-type sensor was found to be very well modeled as a unidirectional displacement sensor which detects stress wave disturbances down to about 1 picometer in amplitude. Finally, the merits of a fully calibrated experimental system are demonstrated in a study of stress wave sources arising from sliding friction, and the relationship between those sources and earthquakes. A laboratory friction apparatus was built for this work which allows the micro-mechanisms of friction to be studied with stress wave analysis. Using an array of 14 Glaser-type sensors, and precise models of wave propagation effects and the sensor distortions, the physical origins of the stress wave sources are explored. Force-time functions and focal mechanisms are determined for discrete events found amid the "noise" of friction. These localized events are interpreted to be the rupture of micrometer-sized contacts, known as asperities. By comparing stress wave sources from stick-slip experiments on plastic/plastic and rock/rock interfaces, systematic differences were found. The rock interface produces very rapid (<1 microsecond) implosive forces indicative of brittle asperity failure and fault gouge formation, while rupture on the plastic interface releases only shear force and produces a source more similar to earthquakes commonly recorded in the field. The difference between the mechanisms is attributed to the vast differences in the hardness and melting temperatures of the two materials, which affect the distribution of asp

McLaskey, Gregory Christofer

26

The impact of heat waves on mortality  

PubMed Central

Background Heat waves have been linked with an increase in mortality, but the associated risk has been only partly characterized. Methods We examined this association by decomposing the risk for temperature into a “main effect” due to independent effects of daily high temperatures, and an “added” effect due to sustained duration of heat during waves, using data from 108 communities in USA during 1987-2000. We adopted different definitions of heat-wave days based on combinations of temperature thresholds and days of duration. The main effect was estimated through distributed lag non-linear functions of temperature, which account for non-linear delayed effects and short-time harvesting. We defined the main effect as the relative risk between the median city-specific temperature during heat-wave days and the 75th percentile of the year-round distribution. The added effect was defined first using a simple indicator, and then a function of consecutive heat-wave days. City-specific main and added effects were pooled through univariate and multivariate meta-analytic techniques. Results The added wave effect was small (0.2%-2.8% excess relative risk, depending on wave definition) compared with the main effect (4.9%-8.0%), and was apparent only after 4 consecutive heat wave days. Conclusions Most of the excess risk with heat waves in the USA can be simply summarized as the independent effects of individual days’ temperatures. A smaller added effect arises in heat waves lasting more than 4 days.

Gasparrini, Antonio; Armstrong, Ben

2012-01-01

27

Spatial wave functions of photon and electron  

Microsoft Academic Search

The quantum mechanical model of the photon and electron is considered. The photon is conceived of as a particle moving with the speed of light which is accompanied by the wave function of the photon spreading out with an infinite speed. The wave function of the electron is introduced in terms of virtual photons tied to the electron. A description

D. L. Khokhlov

2010-01-01

28

Physical meaning of the photon wave function  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recently, the author [Phys. Rev. A 49, 2839 (1994)] proposed a quantum-mechanical theory of a photon, in which negative energy states can be dismissed from physical photon states without causing any difficulties. In this Brief Report the physical meaning of a photon wave function is investigated more precisely. The interpretation of a photon wave function as a probability amplitude is

Toshio Inagaki

1998-01-01

29

Meson wave function from holographic models  

SciTech Connect

We consider the light-front wave function for the valence quark state of mesons using the AdS/CFT correspondence, as has been suggested by Brodsky and Teramond. Two kinds of wave functions, obtained in different holographic Soft-Wall models, are discussed.

Vega, Alfredo; Schmidt, Ivan [Departamento de Fisica y Centro de Estudios Subatomicos, Universidad Tecnica Federico Santa Maria, Casilla 110-V, Valparaiso (Chile); Branz, Tanja; Gutsche, Thomas; Lyubovitskij, Valery E. [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Universitaet Tuebingen, Kepler Center for Astro and Particle Physics, Auf der Morgenstelle 14, D-72076 Tuebingen (Germany)

2009-09-01

30

Exponentially self-similar impact ionization waves  

SciTech Connect

The existence of generalized self-similar solutions to the system of continuity and Poisson equations is analyzed for the problem of evolution of impact ionization waves (IIWs). It is shown that, for any physically reasonable electric-field dependence of the impact ionization coefficients, there exist only exponentially self-similar ('limiting') asymptotic solutions. These solutions describe IIWs whose spatial scales and propagation velocities increase exponentially with time. Conditions are found for the existence of plane, cylindrical, and spherical waves of this type; their structure is described; analytical relations between the key parameters are derived; and effects of recombination (or attachment) and tunnel ionization are analyzed. It is shown that these IIWs are intermediate asymptotics of numerical solutions to the corresponding Cauchy problems. The most important and interesting type of exponentially self-similar IIWs are streamers in a uniform electric field. The simplest comprehensive and explicit model describing their evolution is a spherical IIW.

Kyuregyan, A. S., E-mail: ask@vei.r [All-Russia Institute of Electrical Engineering (Russian Federation)

2010-04-15

31

Spatial wave functions of photon and electron  

SciTech Connect

The quantum mechanical model of the photon and electron is considered. The photon is conceived of as a particle moving with the speed of light which is accompanied by the wave function of the photon spreading out with an infinite speed. The wave function of the electron is introduced in terms of virtual photons tied to the electron. A description of electrostatic and magnetostatic interactions is given through the wave functions of electrons. The approach provides an explanation of the results of recent experiments measuring the speed of propagation of the bound magnetic field.

Khokhlov, D. L. [Sumy State University, R.-Korsakov St. 2, Sumy 40007 (Ukraine)

2010-12-01

32

On single nucleon wave functions in nuclei  

SciTech Connect

The strong and singular interaction between nucleons, makes the nuclear many body theory very complicated. Still, nuclei exhibit simple and regular features which are simply described by the shell model. Wave functions of individual nucleons may be considered just as model wave functions which bear little resemblance to the real ones. There is, however, experimental evidence for the reality of single nucleon wave functions. There is a simple method of constructing such wave functions for valence nucleons. It is shown that this method can be improved by considering the polarization of the core by the valence nucleon. This gives rise to some rearrangement energy which affects the single valence nucleon energy within the nucleus.

Talmi, Igal [Weizamnn Institute of Science, Rehovot 76100 (Israel)

2011-05-06

33

The Wave Function and Quantum Reality  

SciTech Connect

We investigate the meaning of the wave function by analyzing the mass and charge density distributions of a quantum system. According to protective measurement, a charged quantum system has effective mass and charge density distributing in space, proportional to the square of the absolute value of its wave function. In a realistic interpretation, the wave function of a quantum system can be taken as a description of either a physical field or the ergodic motion of a particle. The essential difference between a field and the ergodic motion of a particle lies in the property of simultaneity; a field exists throughout space simultaneously, whereas the ergodic motion of a particle exists throughout space in a time-divided way. If the wave function is a physical field, then the mass and charge density will be distributed in space simultaneously for a charged quantum system, and thus there will exist gravitational and electrostatic self-interactions of its wave function. This not only violates the superposition principle of quantum mechanics but also contradicts experimental observations. Thus the wave function cannot be a description of a physical field but be a description of the ergodic motion of a particle. For the later there is only a localized particle with mass and charge at every instant, and thus there will not exist any self-interaction for the wave function. It is further argued that the classical ergodic models, which assume continuous motion of particles, cannot be consistent with quantum mechanics. Based on the negative result, we suggest that the wave function is a description of the quantum motion of particles, which is random and discontinuous in nature. On this interpretation, the square of the absolute value of the wave function not only gives the probability of the particle being found in certain locations, but also gives the probability of the particle being there. The suggested new interpretation of the wave function provides a natural realistic alternative to the orthodox interpretation, and it also implies that the de Broglie-Bohm theory and many-worlds interpretation are wrong and the dynamical collapse theories are in the right direction by admitting wavefunction collapse.

Gao Shan [Unit for History and Philosophy of Science and Centre for Time, SOPHI, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia)

2011-03-28

34

Wave-Functions of Small Quantum Clusters  

Microsoft Academic Search

Clusters of sizes ranging from two to five atoms are studied by variational quantum Monte Carlo techniques. A general form of trial wave-function is developed for which the variational bias is considerably smaller than the statistical error of currently available diffusion Monte Carlo estimates. The trial functions are designed by a careful analysis of long - and short-range behavior as

Andrei M. Mushinski

1995-01-01

35

Mass criterion for wave controlled impact response of composite plates  

Microsoft Academic Search

Impact duration strongly influences the impact response of plates. Long impacts cause a quasi-static response influenced by the plate size and boundary conditions. Short impacts cause a response governed by wave propagation unaffected of plate size and boundary conditions. This paper shows that the response type is governed by the impactor–plate mass ratio and not by impact velocity and derives

R. Olsson

2000-01-01

36

Convergence of Expansions of Continuum Functions on Resonance Wave Functions.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The convergence of the expansions of the continuum wave function psisub(l)sup(+) (kx) and of the Green function Gsub(l)sup(+)(k, x, x') for x, x'in the interval (O, a) is studied. The resonance functions are solutions of the eigenvalue problem for the rad...

G. S. Kazacha

1984-01-01

37

Nonlinear wave function expansions : a progress report.  

SciTech Connect

Some recent progress is reported for a novel nonlinear expansion form for electronic wave functions. This expansion form is based on spin eigenfunctions using the Graphical Unitary Group Approach and the wave function is expanded in a basis of product functions, allowing application to closed and open shell systems and to ground and excited electronic states. Each product basis function is itself a multiconfigurational expansion that depends on a relatively small number of nonlinear parameters called arc factors. Efficient recursive procedures for the computation of reduced one- and two-particle density matrices, overlap matrix elements, and Hamiltonian matrix elements result in a very efficient computational procedure that is applicable to very large configuration state function (CSF) expansions. A new energy-based optimization approach is presented based on product function splitting and variational recombination. Convergence of both valence correlation energy and dynamical correlation energy with respect to the product function basis dimension is examined. A wave function analysis approach suitable for very large CSF expansions is presented based on Shavitt graph node density and arc density. Some new closed-form expressions for various Shavitt Graph and Auxiliary Pair Graph statistics are presented.

Shepard, R.; Minkoff, M.; Brozell, S. R.; Chemistry

2007-12-01

38

Optimization of nonlinear wave function parameters.  

SciTech Connect

An energy-based optimization method is presented for our recently developed nonlinear wave function expansion form for electronic wave functions. This expansion form is based on spin eigenfunctions, using the graphical unitary group approach (GUGA). The wave function is expanded in a basis of product functions, allowing application to closed-shell and open-shell systems and to ground and excited electronic states. Each product basis function is itself a multiconfigurational function that depends on a relatively small number of nonlinear parameters called arc factors. The energy-based optimization is formulated in terms of analytic arc factor gradients and orbital-level Hamiltonian matrices that correspond to a specific kind of uncontraction of each of the product basis functions. These orbital-level Hamiltonian matrices give an intuitive representation of the energy in terms of disjoint subsets of the arc factors, they provide for an efficient computation of gradients of the energy with respect to the arc factors, and they allow optimal arc factors to be determined in closed form for subspaces of the full variation problem. Timings for energy and arc factor gradient computations involving expansion spaces of > 10{sup 24} configuration state functions are reported. Preliminary convergence studies and molecular dissociation curves are presented for some small molecules.

Shepard, R.; Minkoff, M.; Chemistry

2006-01-01

39

Wave function shredding by sparse quantum barriers  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We discuss the quantum motion of a particle passing through /? potentials arranged with increasing sparseness. For infinitely many barriers we derive conditions, expressed in terms ergodicity of wave-function phases, which ensure the purely singularly continuous spectrum. For a finite number of barriers, this is shown to translate into the quantum irregular scattering with fluctuations in all scales.

Cheon, T.; Exner, P.; Šeba, P.

2000-11-01

40

Does consciousness really collapse the wave function?  

Microsoft Academic Search

An analysis has been performed of the theories and postulates advanced by von Neumann, London and Bauer, and Wigner, concerning the role that consciousness might play in the collapse of the wave function, which has become known as the measurement problem. This reveals that an error may have been made by them in the area of biology and its interface

Fred H. Thaheld

2005-01-01

41

QMC simulations using backflow correlated wave functions  

Microsoft Academic Search

An inhomogeneous backflow transformation for many-particle wave functions is presented and applied to electrons in atoms, molecules, and solids. Backflow transformations are compact parametrizations, by which we mean that the number of parameters required to retrieve a given fraction of the correlation energy increases only slowly with system size. We report variational and diffusion quantum Monte Carlo (VMC and DMC)

Richard Needs

2007-01-01

42

The Maxwell wave function of the photon  

Microsoft Academic Search

James Clerk Maxwell unknowingly discovered a correct relativistic, quantum theory for the light quantum, forty-three years before Einstein postulated the photon's existence. In this theory, the usual Maxwell field is the quantum wave function for a single photon. When the non-operator Maxwell field of a single photon is second quantized, the standard Dirac theory of quantum optics is obtained. Recently,

M. G. Raymer; Brian J. Smith

2006-01-01

43

Impact damage detection in composite structures using Lamb waves  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper is concerned with the detection of low velocity impact and the associated internal damage in composite structures using Lamb waves. Impact tests are carried out on a cross ply graphite epoxy plate using an instrumented impact testing system. The contact force and the surface motion caused by the impact load are recorded at several points on the plate surface away from the impact location and are analyzed based on theoretical simulations. The Lamb waves generated by the impact load and internal damage to the plate caused by it are shown to be highly effective tools for damage detection in laboratory specimens. Ultrasonic and impact tests are also conducted on a stiffened, woven composite panel in an effort to examine the propagation characteristics of ultrasonic waves in realistic composite structural components. Preliminary analysis of the recorded waveforms indicates that Lamb waves can be used to interrogate relatively large composite structures.

Mal, Ajit K.; Shih, Frank J.; Ricci, Fabrizio; Banerjee, Sauvik

2005-05-01

44

Laboratory study of plunging wave impacts on vertical cylinders  

Microsoft Academic Search

The characteristics of pressures associated with plunging wave impacts on a vertical cylinder are presented. Despite a high variability in the peak pressures, spatial distributions of the impact pressure time histories, both in the vertical direction and around the seaward front of the cylindrical surface, are found to vary systematically for a range of cylinder locations in the wave plunging

Eng-Soon Chan; Hin-Fatt Cheong; Boon-Cheng Tan

1995-01-01

45

Stream function solutions for steady water waves  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Two stream function solutions for steady two-dimensional water waves are reviewed. The algorithm developed by DALRYMPLE (1974, Proc. 6th Conf. Offshore Tech., pp. 843 856) and used by HUDSPETH and SLOTTA (1978, Proceedings of the American Society of Civil Engineers,104, 319 334) is compared with the algorithm developed by CHAPLIN (1980, Coastal Engineering,3, 179 205). By examining more closely the near-breaking wave conditions, it is shown that celerity does not increase monotonically with increasing dimensionless wave steepness. Numerical comparisons between the two algorithms indicate that the Dalrymple algorithm is more accurate for near-breaking waves and requires less computer programming effort. Neither algorithm appears to be able to predict breaking wave conditions as accurately as the COKELET (1977, Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London,A286, 183 230) algorithm. Numerical comparisons of the Dalrymple free surface error convergence criteria with the Chaplin significant figures convergence criteria indicate that the free surface error convergence criterion is more consistent for stream function representations.

Huang, Min-Chih; Hudspeth, Robert T.

46

Designing electron wave functions in assembled nanostructures  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We use the scanning tunneling microscope to not only to map electron wave functions but also to engineer them. By assembling nanostructures from individual atoms and molecules, we confine two-dimensional electronic states into closed electron resonators, or "quantum corrals". Precise control over the geometry of these structures allows electronic states to be tailored to suit particular experiments. Specifically, we design wave functions that enable studies of normally inaccessible quantum phases. First, we create pairs of quantum corrals with shapes drawn from contemporary mathematics. Exploiting special topological relationships between these structures, we retrieve internal quantum phase of electron wave functions without using interferometry. Second, we demonstrate that adding a single atom to a quantum corral can cause its electronic states to recombine into coherent superpositions. The real-space position of the additional atom controls abstract superposition phase angles, enabling arbitrary time-independent superpositions to be created. Third, we study geometric phase by creating a series of quantum corrals that traverse a closed path through a parameter space. Tracking the corral wave functions reveals a phase shift depending solely on the path taken, directly visualizing Berry's phase evolution in a quantum system. Finally, we extend beyond closed electron resonators and engineer wave functions in open nanostructures. We show that arbitrary patterns can be encoded into electronic states, creating a new form of holography on the nanoscale. We exhibit letters written in electron density rather than with atomic matter, and show that multiple letters may be simultaneously embedded at different energies in the same region of space. Because the wavelength of the electrons diminishes as energy is increased, this technique allows local information densities that exceed the conventionally assumed limit of 1 bit per atom. Taken together, the results in this thesis demonstrate unprecedented control of electron states in condensed matter and illuminate fundamental quantum phases that underlie systems ranging from coherent electronic devices to complex quantum materials.

Moon, Christopher Ryan

47

Impact detection using ultrasonic waves based on artificial immune system  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper presents a structural health monitoring system for judging structural condition of metallic plates by analyzing ultrasonic waves. Many critical accidents of structures like buildings and aircrafts are caused by small structural errors; cracks and loosened bolts etc. This is a reason why we need to detect little errors at an early stage. Moreover, to improve precision and to reduce cost for damage detection, it is necessary to build and update the database corresponding to environmental change. This study focuses our attention on the automatable structures, specifically, applying artificial immune system (AIS) algorithm to determine the structure safe or not. The AIS is a novelty computational detection algorithm inspired from biological defense system, which discriminates between self and non-self to reject nonself cells. Here, self is defined to be normal data patterns and non-self is abnormal data patterns. Furthermore, it is not only pattern recognition but also it has a storage function. In this study, a number of impact resistance experiments of duralumin plates, with normal structural condition and abnormal structural condition, are examined and ultrasonic waves are acquired by AE sensors on the surface of the aluminum plates. By accumulating several feature vectors of ultrasonic waves, a judging method, which can determine an abnormal wave as nonself, inspired from immune system is created. The results of the experiments show good performance of this method.

Okamoto, Keisuke; Mita, Akira

2009-03-01

48

Localized Single-Photon Wave Functions in Free Space  

Microsoft Academic Search

We solve the joint open problems of photon localization and single-photon wave functions in the context of spontaneous emission from an excited atom in free space. Our wave functions are well-defined members of a discrete orthonormal function set. Both the degree and shape of the localization are controlled by entanglement mapping onto the atom wave function, even though the atom

K. W. Chan; C. K. Law; J. H. Eberly

2002-01-01

49

Molecular Wave Functions and Inelastic Atomic Collisions  

Microsoft Academic Search

A theoretical interpretation is given of inelastic atomic collisions, especially violent cases where the atomic electron shells deeply interpenetrate. The basis set consists of a product of single-particle, hydrogen-molecular-ion orbital wave functions. The occurrence of large energy losses at critical internuclear distances can be seen as a result of the promotion of inner-shell electrons predicted by molecular-orbital (MO) theory. Energy

William Lichten

1967-01-01

50

How fast is the wave function collapse?  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Using complex quantum Hamilton-Jacobi formulation, a new kind of non-linear equations is proposed that have almost classical structure and extend the Schrödinger equation to describe the collapse of the wave function as a finite-time process. Experimental bounds on the collapse time are of order 0.1 ms to 0.1 ps and the areas where sensitive probes of the possible collapse dynamics can be done include Bose-Einstein condensates, ultracold neutrons or ultrafast optics.

Ignatiev, A. Yu

2013-02-01

51

Photon wave functions and quantum interference experiments  

Microsoft Academic Search

We present a general theory to describe two-photon interference, including a formal description of few photon intereference in terms of single-photon amplitudes. With this formalism, it is possible to describe both frequency entangled and separable two-photon interference in terms of single-photon wave functions. Using this description, we address issues related to the physical interpretation of two-photon interference experiments. We include

G. G. Lapaire; J. E. Sipe

2006-01-01

52

Wave function methods for fractional electrons  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Determining accurate chemical potentials is of considerable interest in various chemical and physical contexts: from small molecular charge-transfer complexes to bandgap in bulk materials such as semi-conductors. Chemical potentials are typically evaluated either by density functional theory, or, alternatively, by computationally more intensive Greens function based GW computations. To calculate chemical potentials, the ground state energy needs to be defined for fractional charges. We thus explore an extension of wave function theories to fractional charges, and investigate the ionization potential and electron affinity as the derivatives of the energy with respect to the electron number. The ultimate aim is to access the chemical potential of correlated wave function methods without the need of explicitly changing the numbers of electrons, making the approach readily applicable to bulk materials. We find that even though second order perturbation theory reduces the fractional charge error considerably compared to Hartree-Fock and standard density functionals, higher order perturbation theory is more accurate and coupled-cluster approaches are even more robust, provided the electrons are bound at the Hartree-Fock level. The success of post-HF approaches to improve over HF relies on two equally important aspects: the integer values are more accurate and the Coulomb correlation between the fractionally occupied orbital and all others improves the straight line behavior significantly as identified by a correction to Hartree-Fock. Our description of fractional electrons is also applicable to fractional spins, illustrating the ability of coupled-cluster singles and doubles to deal with two degenerate fractionally occupied orbitals, but its inadequacy for three and more fractional spins, which occur, for instance, for spherical atoms and when dissociating double bonds. Our approach explores the realm of typical wave function methods that are applied mostly in molecular chemistry, but become available to the solid state community and offer the advantage of an integrated approach: fundamental gap, relative energies, and optimal geometries can be obtained at the same level.

Steinmann, Stephan N.; Yang, Weitao

2013-08-01

53

Calculation of Morse Wave Functions with Programmable Deskton Calculators.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

It is very helpful for the student of electronic transitions in diatomic molecules to be able to visualize vibrational wave functions, probability distributions and the overlap of wave functions. As the result of recent advances in programmable calculator...

G. D. Brabson

1973-01-01

54

Impact of shear and curvature on surface gravity wave stress  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

It has been shown that surface gravity wave stress is sensitive to the low level wind profile shape. The simplest way of incorporating those effects in a theoretical model has been recently proposed, using a second order WKB approach, which leads to closed analytical formulae for the surface stress as a function of stability, low level wind and its two first derivatives (shear and curvature). In the present study, we assess the impact of those calculations on global scale gravity wave stress and the corresponding torque, using 6-hourly data from ERA-40 reanalysis, at full resolution. While the theory shows that linear wind shear leads to a reduced stress and curvature may lead to stress enhancement, the present results indicate that the latter effect is dominant. However, when one looks for regionally integrated stress fields for the large mountain ranges, where cancellation effects take place thorough time and space integration, the overall effect is one of drag enhancement in regions of dominant easterly flow, namely Antarctica and East Africa, leading to a slight reduction of the global westerly torque due to mountain waves. Drag enhancement due to wind profile curvature seems to be an important effect in Antarctic flow, where it accounts for a 50% increase in the mean regional torque, with implied consequences for the dynamics of the polar vortex.

Miranda, P. M. A.; Martins, J. P. A.; Teixeira, M. A. C.

2009-09-01

55

Electron Wave Function in Armchair Graphene Nanoribbons  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

By using analytical solution of a tight-binding model for armchair nanoribbons, it is confirmed that the solution represents the standing wave formed by intervalley scattering and that pseudospin is invariant under the scattering. The phase space of armchair nanoribbon which includes a single Dirac point is specified. By examining the effects of boundary perturbations on the wave function, we suggest that the existance of a strong boundary potential is inconsistent with the observation in a recent scanning tunneling microscopy. Some of the possible electron-density superstructure patterns near a step armchair edge located on top of graphite are presented. It is demonstrated that a selection rule for the G band in Raman spectroscopy at graphene edge can be most easily reproduced with the analytical solution.

Sasaki, Ken-ichi; Wakabayashi, Katsunori; Enoki, Toshiaki

2011-04-01

56

A Hammer-Impact, Aluminum, Shear-Wave Seismic Source  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Near-surface seismic surveys often employ hammer impacts to create seismic energy. Shear-wave surveys using horizontally polarized waves require horizontal hammer impacts against a rigid object (the source) that is coupled to the ground surface. I have designed, built, and tested a source made out of aluminum and equipped with spikes to improve coupling. The source is effective in a variety of settings, and it is relatively simple and inexpensive to build.

Haines, Seth S.

2007-01-01

57

Position Search Technique for Unknown Wave Sources Using Spherical Wave Function  

Microsoft Academic Search

Estimation of wave source position is important technique for searching unknown noise source in electromagnetic compatibility measurement. In this article, a new position search technique for unknown wave sources is proposed by using the spherical vector wave function and point-matching method. In this technique, a few virtual boundaries are placed on surrounding areas, which includes the unknown wave sources. In

Kuniyuki Motojima; Hiroyuki Sutou

2011-01-01

58

Wave functions of log-periodic oscillators  

SciTech Connect

We use the Lewis and Riesenfeld invariant method [J. Math. Phys. 10, 1458 (1969)] and a unitary transformation to obtain the exact Schroedinger wave functions for time-dependent harmonic oscillators exhibiting log-periodic-type behavior. For each oscillator we calculate the quantum fluctuations in the coordinate and momentum as well as the quantum correlations between the coordinate and momentum. We observe that the oscillator with m=m{sub 0}t/t{sub 0} and {omega}={omega}{sub 0}t{sub 0}/t, which exhibits an exact log-periodic oscillation, behaves as the harmonic oscillator with m and {omega} constant.

Bessa, V.; Guedes, I. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Ceara, Campus do Pici, Fortaleza, CE 60455-760 (Brazil)

2011-06-15

59

Comparison of wave structure functions for intensity profiles  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We give a list of available wave structure functions (WSFs) of a spherical wave, simultaneously providing some derivation details. The aim is to assess the impact of these WSFs on intensity profiles of various beams propagating in turbulence. For comparisons, coherent and partially coherent fundamental Gaussian, hyperbolic, sinusoidal and annular Gaussian beams are chosen. Comparisons are made by calculating the difference between the intensity profiles of the analytic solution that uses the normalized WSF with quadratic approximation and the intensity profiles obtained by numerically solving the quadruple extended Huygens-Fresnel integral containing other WSFs. The graphical results show that in general the differences arising from the use of different WSFs are not substantial. Such differences become much greater however toward the complete incoherence limit and at relatively higher structure constant values. Even then, at these extremes, the receiver intensity levels are much reduced, making such big differences immaterial.

Eyyubo?lu, H. T.

2009-03-01

60

Wave and Fracture Phenomena in Impacted Ceramics.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

An optical measuring technique in combination with high speed photography is provided to solve the problem of this contract, the investigation of wave and fracture phenomena in opaque ceramic materials. Surface disturbances caused by these mechanical even...

S. Winkler

1988-01-01

61

Towards an Accurate Wave Function for Positronium Hydride  

Microsoft Academic Search

A variational wave function for the ground state of positronium hydride is presented. The wave function is considerably more accurate than any previously reported. The only simplifications used are (a) only kinetic and Coulombic potential energy terms are included in the Hamiltonian, (b) the motion of the proton is ignored, and (c) the nucleus-positron distance is excluded from the wave

C. F. Lebeda; David M. Schrader

1969-01-01

62

Variational wave functions for homogenous Bose systems  

SciTech Connect

We study variational wave functions of the product form, factorizing according to the wave vectors k, for the ground state of a system of bosons interacting via positive pair interactions with a positive Fourier transform. Our trial functions are members of different orthonormal bases in Fock space. Each basis contains a quasiparticle vacuum state and states with an arbitrary finite number of quasiparticles. One of the bases is that of Valatin and Butler (VB), introduced fifty years ago and parametrized by an infinite set of variables determining Bogoliubov's canonical transformation for each k. In another case, inspired by Nozieres and Saint James the canonical transformation for k=0 is replaced by a shift in the creation/annihilation operators. For the VB basis we prove that the lowest energy is obtained in a state with {approx}{radical}(volume) quasiparticles in the zero mode. The number of k=0 physical particles is of the order of the volume and its fluctuation is anomalously large, resulting in an excess energy. The same fluctuation is normal in the second type of optimized bases, the minimum energy is smaller and is attained in a vacuum state. Associated quasiparticle theories and questions about the gap in their spectrum are also discussed.

Sueto, Andras [Research Institute for Solid State Physics and Optics, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, P. O. Box 49, H-1525 Budapest (Hungary); Szepfalusy, Peter [Research Institute for Solid State Physics and Optics, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, P. O. Box 49, H-1525 Budapest (Hungary); Department of Physics of Complex Systems, Eoetvoes University, H-1117 Budapest (Hungary)

2008-02-15

63

Impact of simulated heat waves on soybean physiology and yield  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

With increases in mean global temperatures and associated climate change, extreme temperature events are predicted to increase in both intensity and frequency. Despite the clearly documented negative public health impacts of heat waves, the impact on physiology and yields of key agricultural species...

64

Completeness of the Coulomb scattering wave functions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The completeness of the eigenfunctions of a self-adjoint Hamiltonian, which is the basic ingredient of quantum mechanics, plays an important role in nuclear reaction and nuclear-structure theory. Here we present the first formal proof of the completeness of the two-body Coulomb scattering wave functions for a repulsive unscreened Coulomb potential using Newton’s method (R. Newton, J. Math. Phys. 1, 319 (1960)). The proof allows us to claim that the eigenfunctions of the two-body Hamiltonian, with the potential given by the sum of the repulsive Coulomb plus short-range (nuclear) potentials, form a complete set. It also allows one to extend Berggren’s approach for the modification of the complete set of eigenfunctions by including the resonances for charged particles. We also demonstrate that the resonant Gamow functions with Coulomb tail can be regularized using Zel’dovich’s regularization method.

Mukhamedzhanov, A. M.; Akin, M.

2008-07-01

65

New summation rules for coulomb wave functions  

PubMed

Sums of products of the Coulomb wave functions over degenerate manifolds have been obtained in a closed form. These sums appear in many atomic and molecular problems. The sums have been obtained making use of the properties of the Coulomb Green's function G(r, r('),E), in the limit E-->E(n), where E(n) is the eigenenergy of the hydrogenlike atomic ion. The closed Hostler-Pratt form of G in the coordinate representation has been used. The sums calculated are a consequence of the n degeneracy of the Coulomb atomic energy levels. This itself, as is well known, follows from the four-dimensional symmetry of the Coulomb problem for the hydrogen atom. PMID:11015936

Chibisov; Ermolaev; Brouillard; Cherkani

2000-01-17

66

Second order distorted wave calculations for electron impact ionization processes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Electron impact ionization of atoms provides a fundamental test of the current understanding of atomic structure as well as our understanding of the three body problem. Triple differential cross sections (TDCS), measured in the coincidence experiment, provide the most sensitive test of the theory of electron impact ionization processes. It was found two decades ago that second-order effects were crucial in explaining both the positions and magnitudes of the binary and recoil peaks in the TDCS. However, the existing theoretical calculations of second-order amplitudes typically resort to simplifying approximations, such as the closure approximation or neglecting the real part of the Green's function, to make the calculation tractable. In this work, we have developed a second-order distorted wave (DWB2) theory for atomic ionization which does not make these approximations. The DWB2 theory has been used to calculate the TDCS for electron impact ionization of hydrogen. It is found that the DWB2 results are in good agreement with absolute experimental measurements for incident energy greater than 100 eV. We have also performed DWB2 calculations for electron impact ionization of helium with the residual ion left in the n=1 and 2 states at intermediate energies in coplanar asymmetric geometry. Both the neutral and ionic distorting potentials are employed for the projectile in the final state. It has been found that the DWB2 results with the ionic distorting potential are in better agreement with experiment for the case in which the residual ion is left in the excited states. We have also performed the calculations to check the validity of the closure approximation and the simplified Green's function approximation and found that these approximations are not accurate for non-coplanar geometry and low incident energies.

Chen, Zhangjin

67

Expansion of Continuum Functions on Resonance Wave Functions and Amplitudes. 2.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

To overcome difficulties with wave functions of continuum spectrum (for example, in a shell model with continuum) the pole expansion (by the Mittag-Leffler theorem) of wave functions, scattering amplitudes and the Green functions at positive energies are ...

J. Bang F. A. Gareev M. H. Gizzatkulov S. A. Goncharov

1978-01-01

68

Energy partitioning in {sup 1}S-wave electron-impact ionization of atomic hydrogen  

SciTech Connect

Results of calculations of the integrated cross section and the energy distribution for ionization of ground-state hydrogen by {sup 1}S-wave electron impact are presented. The breakup amplitude is expressed as a volume integral that contains an approximate final-state wave function which accounts for postcollision dynamic screening. The error in this wave function is accounted for by the response function, which is represented on a real discrete (Sturmian) basis, with its physical branch specified by the arrow of time. It is found that the energy distribution is primarily convex for impact energies from about 2 to 10 eV above threshold, and primarily flat from about 10 to 20 eV above threshold. The shape of the energy distribution appears to reflect both the competition between escape and recapture, and the substantial postcollision exchange of energy between the electrons. A rough, nonclassical criterion for predicting the curvature of the energy distribution is derived.

Shakeshaft, Robin [Physics Department, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California 90089-0484 (United States)

2010-03-15

69

String wave function across a Kasner singularity  

SciTech Connect

A collision of orbifold planes in 11 dimensions has been proposed as an explanation of the hot big bang. When the two planes are close to each other, the winding membranes become the lightest modes of the theory, and can be effectively described in terms of fundamental strings in a ten-dimensional background. Near the brane collision, the 11-dimensional metric is a Euclidean space times a 1+1-dimensional Milne universe. However, one may expect small perturbations to lead into a more general Kasner background. In this paper we extend the previous classical analysis of winding membranes to Kasner backgrounds, and using the Hamiltonian equations, solve for the wave function of loops with circular symmetry. The evolution across the singularity is regular, and explained in terms of the excitement of higher oscillation modes. We also show there is finite particle production and unitarity is preserved.

Copeland, Edmund J.; Niz, Gustavo [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nottingham, University Park, Nottingham NG7 2RD (United Kingdom); Turok, Neil [Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics, 31 Caroline Street N, Waterloo, Ontario N2L2Y5 (Canada)

2010-06-15

70

Improved variational wave functions for simple quantum liquids  

Microsoft Academic Search

We review variational calculations with a Jastrow wave function and show they are inadequate to calculate the zero-temperature equation of state E(rho) for liquid helium. The importance of the Feynman-Cohen backflow around a moving particle is then discussed, and a variational wave function incorporating backflow is proposed. Results with this wave function are discussed for 3He, 4He and the v2

K. E. Schmidt; V. R. Pandharipande

1979-01-01

71

Physical measurements of breaking wave impact on a floating wave energy converter  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Marine energy converter must both efficiently extract energy in small to moderate seas and also successfully survive storms and potential collisions. Extreme loads on devices are therefore an important consideration in their design process. X-MED is a SuperGen UKCMER project and is a collaboration between the Universities of Manchester, Edinburgh and Plymouth and the Scottish Association for Marine Sciences. Its objective is to extend the knowledge of extreme loads due to waves, currents, flotsam and mammal impacts. Plymouth Universities contribution to the X-MED project involves measuring the loading and response of a taut moored floating body due to steep and breaking wave impacts, in both long crested and directional sea states. These measurements are then to be reproduced in STAR-CCM+, a commercial volume of fluid CFD solver, so as to develop techniques to predict the wave loading on wave energy converters. The measurements presented here were conducted in Plymouth Universities newly opened COAST laboratories 35m long, 15.5m wide and 3m deep ocean basin. A 0.5m diameter taut moored hemispherical buoy was used to represent a floating wave energy device or support structure. The changes in the buoys 6 degree of freedom motion and mooring loads are presented due to focused breaking wave impacts, with the breaking point of the wave changed relative to the buoy.

Hann, Martyn R.; Greaves, Deborah M.; Raby, Alison

2013-04-01

72

Trial wave functions for high-pressure metallic hydrogen  

Microsoft Academic Search

Many body trial wave functions are the key ingredient for accurate Quantum Monte Carlo estimates of total electronic energies in many electron systems. In the Coupled Electron-Ion Monte Carlo method, the accuracy of the trial function must be conjugated with the efficiency of its evaluation. We report recent progress in trial wave functions for metallic hydrogen implemented in the Coupled

Carlo Pierleoni; Kris T. Delaney; Miguel A. Morales; David M. Ceperley; Markus Holzmann

2008-01-01

73

Semiclassical approach to K shell ionization: hydrogenic wave functions  

Microsoft Academic Search

Proton induced K shell ionization cross sections in several elements were calculated. Semiclassical approximation with momentum space approach, hydrogenic wave functions and outer screening according to the prescription of Bethe was used. Comparison with other semiclassical and Dirac-Hartree-Slater [DHS] plane wave cross sections indicates that this type of screening — largely used in plane wave methods — implies a less

Ž. Šmit

1991-01-01

74

Photon wave functions, wave-packet quantization of light, and coherence theory  

Microsoft Academic Search

The monochromatic Dirac and polychromatic Titulaer Glauber quantized field theories (QFTs) of electromagnetism are derived from a photon-energy wave function in much the same way that one derives QFT for electrons, i.e., by quantization of a single-particle wave function. The photon wave function and its equation of motion are established from the Einstein energy momentum mass relation, assuming a local

Brian J. Smith; M. G. Raymer

2007-01-01

75

Photon wave functions, wave-packet quantization of light, and coherence theory  

Microsoft Academic Search

The monochromatic Dirac and polychromatic Titulaer–Glauber quantized field theories (QFTs) of electromagnetism are derived from a photon-energy wave function in much the same way that one derives QFT for electrons, i.e., by quantization of a single-particle wave function. The photon wave function and its equation of motion are established from the Einstein energy–momentum–mass relation, assuming a local energy density. This

Brian J. Smith; M. G. Raymer

2007-01-01

76

Shock Waves Impacting Composite Material Plates: The Mutual Interaction  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

High-performance, fiber-reinforced polymer composites have been extensively used in structural applications in the last 30 years because of their light weight combined with high specific stiffness and strength at a rather low cost. The automotive industry has adopted these materials in new designs of lightweight vehicles. The mechanical response and characterization of such materials under transient dynamic loading caused with shock impact induced by blast is not well understood. Air blast is associated with a fast traveling shock front with high pressure across followed by a decrease in pressure behind due to expansion waves. The time scales associated with the shock front are typically 103 faster than those involved in the expansion waves. Impingement of blast waves on structures can cause a reflection of the wave off the surface of the structure followed by a substantial transient aerodynamic load, which can cause significant deformation and damage of the structure. These can alter the overpressure, which is built behind the reflected shock. In addition, a complex aeroelastic interaction between the blast wave and the structure develops that can induce reverberation within an enclosure, which can cause substantial overpressure through multiple reflections of the wave. Numerical simulations of such interactions are quite challenging. They usually require coupled solvers for the flow and the structure. The present contribution provides a physics-based analysis of the phenomena involved, a critical review of existing computational techniques together with some recent results involving face-on impact of shock waves on thin composite plates.

Andreopoulos, Yiannis

2013-02-01

77

Hadronic wave function in quantum chromodynamics  

SciTech Connect

The underlying link between hadronic phenomena in quantum chromodynamics at large and small distance is the hadronic wavefunction. The theoretical and empirical constraints on the hadronic wave-function and hadronic structure functions; the predictions of perturbative QCD for the large transverse momentum tail of the Fock state infinite momentum wavefunction psi (k/sub perpendicular to i/,x/sub i/,s/sub i/); the valence Fock state meson wavefunctions from the meson decay; the evolution equations of the distribution amplitudes; and a simplified model for the basic wavefunctions are presented. In particular, a new type of low energy theorem is obtained for the pion wavefunction from the ..pi../sup 0/ ..-->.. ..gamma gamma... This result, together with the constraint on the valence wavefunction from the ..pi../sup 0/ ..-->.. ..mu nu.. decay, leads to the probability of finding the valence vertical bar q anti q > state. All these constraints allow construction of a possible model which describes hadronic wavefunctions, probability amplitudes, and distributions. Results are compared with data for form factors and the deep inelastic processes. This work represents a first attempt to construct a model of hadronic structure which is consistent with data and QCD at large and small distances.

Brodsky, S.J.; Huang, T.; Lepage, G.P.

1980-01-01

78

The effects of shock wave and quasi-traveling wave in the mechanical impact test  

Microsoft Academic Search

It is well-known that the numerical value is always larger than the measured value, amounting to many times, if we calculate\\u000a the stress of the specimen in the impulse test using the NASTRAN and ANSYS (N-A) software. We believe that the impact induces\\u000a shock wave or quasi-traveling wave in the specimen, which can qualitatively explain the discrepancy of the two

Mei Wu; ZhongFeng Sun; LuMei Zhang; Yong Chen; LinHong Ji

2010-01-01

79

Stress wave induced damage and fracture in impacted glasses  

Microsoft Academic Search

The conditions for crack nucleation under impact loading were investigated system- atically for four glasses which differ in their chemical composition, hardness and material den- sity. Edge-on impact experiments were carried out with blunt steel cylinders within the velocity range from 20 m\\/s to 1000 m\\/s. The propagation of shock waves, of primary and secondary cracks and crack systems and

H. Senf; E. Strassburger; H. Rothenhausler

1994-01-01

80

Pressure-shear stress wave analysis in plate impact experiments  

Microsoft Academic Search

Numerical results are presented for the combined longitudinal and shear wave propagation in an elastic-viscoplastic solid as it occurs in high strain-rate plate impact experiments. Special attention is paid to the initial stage of the impact experiment and the effects of the specimen thickness, elastic impedances of flyer-anvil plates, and viscoplastic properties of materials on the time to reach a

Wei Tong

1997-01-01

81

Impact of Fog on Electromagnetic Wave Propagation  

Microsoft Academic Search

This experiment was designed to explore the impact of fog on electromagnetic radiation, in particular microwaves and infrared light. For years law enforcement agencies have used microwave radiation (radar guns) to measure the speed of vehicles, and the last ten years has seen increased use of LIDAR, which uses 905-nm infrared radiation rather than microwaves. To evaulate the effect of

Jonathon Morris; Daniel Fleisch

2002-01-01

82

Six Impossible Things: Fractional Charge From Laughlin's Wave Function  

SciTech Connect

The Laughlin's wave function is found to be the zero-energy ground state of a {delta}-function Hamiltonian. The finite negative value of the ground state energy which is 91 per cent of Wigner value, can be obtained only when Coulomb correlations are introduced. The Laughlin's wave function is of short range and it overlaps with that of the exact wave functions of small (number of electrons 2 or 5) systems. (i) It is impossible to obtain fractional charge from Laughlin's wave function. (ii) It is impossible to prove that the Laughlin's wave function gives the ground state of the Coulomb Hamiltonian. (iii) It is impossible to have particle-hole symmetry in the Laughlin's wave function. (iv) It is impossible to derive the value of m in the Laughlin's wave function. The value of m in {psi}{sub m} can not be proved to be 3 or 5. (v) It is impossible to prove that the Laughlin's state is incompressible because the compressible states are also likely. (vi) It is impossible for the Laughlin's wave function to have spin. This effort is directed to explain the experimental data of quantum Hall effect in GaAs/AlGaAs.

Shrivastava, Keshav N. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur 50603 (Malaysia)

2010-12-23

83

Antipodal focusing of seismic waves after larger meteorite impacts  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We examine focusing of seismic waves at the antipode of large terrestrial meteorite impacts, using the Chicxulub impact as our case study. Numerical simulations are based on a spectral-element method, representing the impact as a Gaussian force in time and space. Simulating the impact as a point source at the surface of a spherically symmetric Earth model results in deceptively large peak displacements at the antipode. Earth's ellipticity, lateral heterogeneity and a spatially distributed source limit high-frequency waves from constructively interfering at the antipode, thereby reducing peak displacement by a factor of four. Nevertheless, for plausible impact parameters, we observe peak antipodal displacements of ˜ 4~m, dynamic stresses in excess of 15~bar, and strains of 2 ± 10-5 . While these values are significantly lower than prior estimates, mainly based on a point source in a spherically symmetric Earth model, wave interference en route to the antipode induces ``channels'' of peak stress that are 5~times greater than in surrounding areas. Underneath the antipode we observed ``chimneys'' of peak stress, strain and velocity, with peak values exceeding 50~bar, 10-5 and 0.1~m/s, respectively. Our results put quantitative constraints on the feasibility of impact-induced antipodal volcanism and seismicity, as well as mantle plume and hotspot formation.

Meschede, M.

2011-12-01

84

Exclusive processes of charmonium production and charmonium wave functions  

SciTech Connect

Results obtained by studying the properties of the leading-twist wave functions for the S- and P-wave states of charmonia are presented. Wave-function models that can be used to calculate various processes involving the production of these mesons were constructed on the basis of these investigations. Calculations for some exclusive processes of charmonium production were performed within the models in question.

Braguta, V. V., E-mail: braguta@mail.ru; Likhoded, A. K., E-mail: Anatolii.Likhoded@ihep.ru; Luchinsky, A. V., E-mail: Alexey.Luchinsky@ihep.ru [Institute for High Energy Physics (Russian Federation)

2012-01-15

85

Retarded Green's function of a Vainshtein system and Galileon waves  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Motivated by the desire to test modified gravity theories exhibiting the Vainshtein mechanism, we solve in various physically relevant limits, the retarded Galileon Green’s function (for the cubic theory) about a background sourced by a massive spherically symmetric static body. The static limit of our result will aid us, in a forthcoming paper, in understanding the impact of Galileon fields on the problem of motion in the solar system. In this paper, we employ this retarded Green’s function to investigate the emission of Galileon radiation generated by the motion of matter lying deep within the Vainshtein radius rv of the central object: acoustic waves vibrating on its surface, and the motion of compact bodies gravitationally bound to it. If ? is the typical wavelength of the emitted radiation, and r0 is the typical distance of the source from the central mass, with r0?rv, then, compared to its noninteracting massless scalar counterpart, we find that the Galileon radiation rate is suppressed by the ratio (rv/?)-3/2 at the monopole and dipole orders at high frequencies rv/??1. However, at high enough multipole order, the radiation rate is enhanced by powers of rv/r0. At low frequencies rv/??1, and when the motion is nonrelativistic, Galileon waves yield a comparable rate for the monopole and dipole terms, and are amplified by powers of the ratio rv/r0 for the higher multipoles.

Chu, Yi-Zen; Trodden, Mark

2013-01-01

86

Evidence for shock wave effect of meteoritic impact  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

There is material evidence for the existence of shock waves generated by meteoritic impact, as demonstrated by the pressure and temperature dependent formation processes that exist in the memory of constituent minerals. Stishovite of high-pressure type silica mineral can be observed to be a relict of the compression stage of shock impact. Almost all of the silica minerals evolved from shock impact phenomena are alpha-quartz crystals of a low-temperature type silica polymorph. By using precise measurements of cell parameters and the corresponding calculated density of the quartz crystal grains collected by an ultrasonic cutter method, shocked quartz grains can be interpreted as the principal relict of meteoritic impact from natural impact craters, artificial impact craters and Cretaceous-Tertiary boundary samples.

Miura, Y.

1991-03-01

87

Binding Energy Calculations Using the Molecular Orbital Wave Function.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The molecular orbital wave function is used in describing the 4 N-nuclei internal wave function. Using the variational technique the binding energies of the nuclei exp 12 C, exp 16 O, exp 20 Ne and exp 24 Mg are calculated using different Skyrm interactio...

M. Y. M. Hassan A. Rabie E. H. Ismail

1982-01-01

88

Natural orbital analysis of nonadiabatic Hâ\\/sup +\\/ wave functions  

Microsoft Academic Search

Previously determined nonadiabatic wave functions for Hâ\\/sup +\\/ (containing several hundred terms) are analyzed by using natural orbitals. This is the first time that the natural orbital concept has been applied to other than purely electronic wave functions. We find that the natural orbital expansion converges rapidly and that five or six terms are sufficient to reproduce the exact expectation

David M. Bishop; Lap M. Cheung

1979-01-01

89

Non-Sequential Behavior of the Wave Function  

Microsoft Academic Search

An experiment is presented in which the alleged progression of a photon's wave function is ``measured'' by a row of superposed atoms. The photon's wave function affects only one out of the atoms, regardless of its position within the row, thereby manifesting not only non-local but also non-sequential characteristics. It also turns out that, out of n atoms, each one

Shahar Dolev; Avshalom C. Elitzur

2001-01-01

90

Imaging a Molecular Orbital Wave Function Using High Harmonic Emission  

Microsoft Academic Search

Single-electron molecular orbital wave functions are mathematical constructs that are used to describe the multi-electron wave function of molecules. The highest lying orbitals are of particular interest since they are responsible for the chemical properties of molecules. To observe them change as molecular bonds are formed and broken is to observe the essence of chemistry. Yet single orbitals are difficult

David Villeneuve

2005-01-01

91

The small K ? component in the K* wave functions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We use a recently developed formalism which generalizes Weinberg's compositeness condition to partial waves higher than s -wave in order to determine the probability of having a K ? component in the K* wave function. A fit is made to the K ? phase shifts in p -wave, from where the coupling of K* to K ? and the K ? loop function are determined. These ingredients allow us to determine that the K* is a genuine state, different from a K ? component, in a proportion of about 80%.

Xiao, C. W.; Aceti, F.; Bayar, M.

2013-02-01

92

Electronic wave functions of quasiperiodic systems in momentum space  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In quasicrystalline tilings often multifractal electronic wave functions can be found. In order to obtain a better insight into their localization properties, we study the wave functions of quasiperiodic tilings in momentum space. The models are based on one-dimensional quasiperiodic chains, in which the atoms are coupled by weak and strong bonds aligned according to the metallic-mean sequences. The associated hypercubic tilings and labyrinth tilings in d dimensions are then constructed from the direct product of d such chains. The results show that each wave function is described by a hierarchy of wave vectors and is always dominated by a single wave vector which is directly related to the energy eigenvalue of the wave function. The corresponding spectral function of the systems shows a hierarchy of branches with different intensities. Each branch is a copy of the main branch containing the dominant wave vectors for each wave function. Using perturbation theory and a renormalization group approach, we determine the shape of the branches for the limit of weak and strong coupling.

Rolof, Sebastian; Thiem, Stefanie; Schreiber, Michael

2013-09-01

93

Impact of insomnia on future functioning of adolescents  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To examine the impact of insomnia among adolescents on somatic, interpersonal, and psychological functioning using data from a two-wave, prospective study. Methods: Subjects were adolescents 11–17 years of age sampled from managed care enrollment rosters in the United States. The baseline sample was 4175 and the follow-up sample a year later was 3136. Data were collected using computer-assisted personal

Robert E Roberts; Catherine Ramsay Roberts; Irene Ger Chen

2002-01-01

94

Sech wave packets, their Wigner functions and Bohmian trajectories  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The free particle non-relativistic Schrödinger evolution of a sech wave packet, and the corresponding Wigner function and Bohmian trajectories, are studied. The overall translation and dispersion dynamics are qualitatively similar to corresponding Gaussian wave packets, as is to be expected. On the other hand, certain bizarre and completely unexpected features are also observed, such as wave packet pinching and the instantaneous formation of infinitely many nodes, despite the apparent lack of an interference source.

Schiff, Jeremy; Poirier, Bill

2012-10-01

95

Optimized Perturbation Theory for Wave Functions of Quantum Systems  

SciTech Connect

The notion of the optimized perturbation, which has been successfully applied to energy eigenvalues, is generalized to treat wave functions of quantum systems. The key ingredient is to construct an envelope of a set of perturbative wave functions. This leads to a condition similar to that obtained from the principle of minimal sensitivity. Applications of the method to the quantum anharmonic oscillator and the double well potential show that uniformly valid wave functions with correct asymptotic behavior are obtained in the first-order optimized perturbation even for strong couplings. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

Hatsuda, T.; Tanaka, T. [Institute of Physics, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305 (Japan); Kunihiro, T. [Faculty of Science and Technology, Ryukoku University, Seta, Ohtsu, 520-21 (Japan)

1997-04-01

96

Proton Wave Functions in a Uniform Magnetic Field  

SciTech Connect

The wave function of the d-quark in the ground state of the proton, and how it is affected in the presence of a uniform background magnetic field is calculated in lattice QCD. We focus on the wave functions in the Landau and Coulomb gauges. When the quarks are annihilated at different lattice sites, we observe the formation of a scalar u-d diquark pair within the proton in the Landau gauge, which is not present in the Coulomb gauge. The overall distortion of the wave function under a very large magnetic field, as demanded by the quantisation conditions on the field, is quite small.

Roberts, Dale S.; Kamleh, Waseem; Leinweber, Derek B. [Special Research Centre for the Subatomic Structure of Matter and Department of Physics, University of Adelaide 5005 (Australia); Bowman, Patrick O. [Centre for Theoretical Chemistry and Physics and Institute of Natural Sciences, Massey University (Albany), Private Bag 102904, North Shore City 0745 (New Zealand)

2011-05-24

97

Boundary conditions on internal three-body wave functions  

SciTech Connect

For a three-body system, a quantum wave function {Psi}{sub m}{sup {ell}} with definite {ell} and m quantum numbers may be expressed in terms of an internal wave function {chi}{sub k}{sup {ell}} which is a function of three internal coordinates. This article provides necessary and sufficient constraints on {chi}{sub k}{sup {ell}} to ensure that the external wave function {Psi}{sub k}{sup {ell}} is analytic. These constraints effectively amount to boundary conditions on {chi}{sub k}{sup {ell}} and its derivatives at the boundary of the internal space. Such conditions find similarities in the (planar) two-body problem where the wave function (to lowest order) has the form r{sup |m|} at the origin. We expect the boundary conditions to prove useful for constructing singularity free three-body basis sets for the case of nonvanishing angular momentum.

Mitchell, Kevin A.; Littlejohn, Robert G.

1999-10-01

98

Nonstandard jump functions for radically symmetric shock waves  

SciTech Connect

Nonstandard analysis is applied to derive generalized jump functions for radially symmetric, one-dimensional, magnetogasdynamic shock waves. It is assumed that the shock wave jumps occur on infinitesimal intervals and the jump functions for the physical parameters occur smoothly across these intervals. Locally integrable predistributions of the Heaviside function are used to model the flow variables across a shock wave. The equations of motion expressed in nonconservative form are then applied to derive unambiguous relationships between the jump functions for the physical parameters for two families of self-similar flows. It is shown that the microstructures for these families of radially symmetric, magnetogasdynamic shock waves coincide in a nonstandard sense for a specified density jump function.

Baty, Roy S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tucker, Don H [UNIV OF UTAH; Stanescu, Dan [UNIV OF WYOMING

2008-01-01

99

Nonstandard jump functions for radially symmetric shock waves  

SciTech Connect

Nonstandard analysis is applied to derive generalized jump functions for radially symmetric, one-dimensional, magnetogasdynamic shock waves. It is assumed that the shock wave jumps occur on infinitesimal intervals, and the jump functions for the physical parameters occur smoothly across these intervals. Locally integrable predistributions of the Heaviside function are used to model the flow variables across a shock wave. The equations of motion expressed in nonconservative form are then applied to derive unambiguous relationships between the jump functions for the physical parameters for two families of self-similar flows. It is shown that the microstructures for these families of radially symmetric, magnetogasdynamic shock waves coincide in a nonstandard sense for a specified density jump function

Baty, Roy S.; Tucker, Don H.; Stanescu, Dan

2008-10-01

100

Probing [alpha]-particle wave functions using ([ital [rvec d  

Microsoft Academic Search

Wave functions of the [alpha] particle corresponding to different [ital S]- and [ital D]-state deuteron-deuteron overlaps, [l angle][ital dd][vert bar][alpha][r angle], were investigated using exact finite-range distorted-wave Born-approximation (DWBA) analyses of ([ital [rvec d

E. R. Crosson; S. K. Lemieux; E. J. Ludwig; W. J. Thompson; M. Bisenberger; R. Hertenberger; D. Hofer; H. Kader; P. Schiemenz; G. Graw; A. M. Eiro; F. D. Santos

1993-01-01

101

Simulations of Wave Propagation in the Jovian Atmosphere after SL9 Impact Events  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Our previous numerical investigations into Jovian impacts, including the Shoemaker Levy- 9 (SL9) event (Korycansky et al. 2006 ApJ 646. 642; Palotai et al. 2011 ApJ 731. 3), the 2009 bolide (Pond et al. 2012 ApJ 745. 113), and the ephemeral flashes caused by smaller impactors in 2010 and 2012 (Hueso et al. 2013; Submitted to A&A), have covered only up to approximately 3 to 30 seconds after impact. Here, we present further SL9 impacts extending to minutes after collision with Jupiter’s atmosphere, with a focus on the propagation of shock waves generated as a result of the impact events. Using a similar yet more efficient remapping method than previously presented (Pond et al. 2012; DPS 2012), we move our simulation results onto a larger computational grid, conserving quantities with minimal error. The Jovian atmosphere is extended as needed to accommodate the evolution of the features of the impact event. We restart the simulation, allowing the impact event to continue to progress to greater spatial extents and for longer times, but at lower resolutions. This remap-restart process can be implemented multiple times to achieve the spatial and temporal scales needed to investigate the observable effects of waves generated by the deposition of energy and momentum into the Jovian atmosphere by an SL9-like impactor. As before, we use the three-dimensional, parallel hydrodynamics code ZEUS-MP 2 (Hayes et al. 2006 ApJ.SS. 165. 188) to conduct our simulations. Wave characteristics are tracked throughout these simulations. Of particular interest are the wave speeds and wave positions in the atmosphere as a function of time. These properties are compared to the characteristics of the HST rings to see if shock wave behavior within one hour of impact is consistent with waves observed at one hour post-impact and beyond (Hammel et al. 1995 Science 267. 1288). This research was supported by National Science Foundation Grant AST-1109729 and NASA Planetary Atmospheres Program Grant NNX11AD87G.

Pond, Jarrad W.; Palotai, C.; Korycansky, D.; Harrington, J.

2013-10-01

102

Pediatric Kidney: Functional Outcome After Extracorporeal Shock Wave Lithotripsy  

Microsoft Academic Search

PurposeWe studied the efficacy, functional outcome and morphological changes following extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL*) of renal calculi in a pediatric population.*Dornier Medical Systems, Inc., Marietta, Georgia.

Mahesh C. Goel; Narender S. Baserge; R. V. Ramesh Babu; Sanjay Sinha; Rakesh Kapoor

1996-01-01

103

The photon transverse wave function and its measurement  

Microsoft Academic Search

We report on a technique to measure the photon transverse wave function in coordinate space using a photon-counting, parity-inverting Sagnac interferometer. We present measurements of a TEM10 Hermite-Gaussian beam

B. J. Smith; M. G. Raymer; Bryan Killett; K. Banaszek; I. A. Walmsley

2004-01-01

104

Yang-Mills wave functional in Coulomb gauge  

SciTech Connect

We investigate the dependence of the Yang-Mills wave functional in Coulomb gauge on the Faddeev-Popov determinant. We use a Gaussian wave functional multiplied by an arbitrary power of the Faddeev-Popov determinant. We show, that within the resummation of one-loop diagrams the stationary vacuum energy is independent of the power of the Faddeev-Popov determinant and, furthermore, the wave functional becomes field independent in the infrared, describing a stochastic vacuum. Our investigations show, that the infrared limit is rather robust against details of the variational Ansatz for the Yang-Mills wave functional. The infrared limit is exclusively determined by the divergence of the Faddeev-Popov determinant at the Gribov horizon.

Reinhardt, H.; Feuchter, C. [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Auf der Morgenstelle 14, D-72076 Tuebingen (Germany)

2005-05-15

105

Third-Order Coulomb Wave Function and Single Quantum Annihilation  

Microsoft Academic Search

An expression for the third-order Coulomb wave function, correct to order (alphaZ)3 for all momenta and energies, is derived. Using this wave function the total cross section for single-photon emission resulting from a positron annihilating with a K-shell electron (single quantum annihilation), valid to relative order (alphaZ)2, is calculated numerically. The results for lead are compared to the exact answer

C. O. Carroll; R. F. O'Connell

1963-01-01

106

Measurement of light-cone wave functions by diffractive dissociation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Diffractive dissociation of particles can be used to study their light-cone wave function. Results from Fermilab experiment E791 for diffractive dissociation of 500 GeV\\/c?? mesons into di-jets are presented. The results show that the |qq?? light-cone asymptotic wave function describes the data well for Q2 ? 10 (GeV\\/c)2 or more. Evidence for color transparency comes from a measurement of the

Daniel Ashery; Beverly Sackler

2000-01-01

107

B meson wave function from the B>gammalnu decay  

Microsoft Academic Search

We show that the leading-power B meson wave function can be extracted reliably from the photon energy spectrum of the B-->gammalnu decay up to O(1\\/m2b) and O(alpha2s) uncertainty, mb being the b quark mass and alphas the strong coupling constant. The O(1\\/mb) corrections from heavy-quark expansion can be absorbed into a redefined leading-power B meson wave function. The two-parton O(1\\/mb)

Yeo-Yie Charng; Hsiang-Nan Li

2005-01-01

108

Wave-function approach to dissipative processes in quantum optics  

Microsoft Academic Search

A novel treatment of dissipation of energy from a ``small'' quantum system to a reservoir is presented. We replace the usual master equation for the small-system density matrix by a wave-function evolution including a stochastic element. This wave-function approach provides new insight and it allows calculations on problems which would otherwise be exceedingly complicated. The approach is applied here to

Jean Dalibard; Yvan Castin; Klaus Mølmer

1992-01-01

109

The Maxwell wave function of the photon  

Microsoft Academic Search

James Clerk Maxwell unknowingly discovered a correct relativistic, quantum\\u000atheory for the light quantum, forty-three years before Einstein postulated the\\u000aphoton's existence. In this theory, the usual Maxwell field is the quantum wave\\u000afunction for a single photon. When the non-operator Maxwell field of a single\\u000aphoton is second quantized, the standard Dirac theory of quantum optics is\\u000aobtained. Recently,

M. G. Raymer; Brian J. Smith

2006-01-01

110

Functional Neuroanatomy of Human Slow Wave Sleep  

Microsoft Academic Search

The distribution of regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) was estimated during sleep and wakefulness by using H2 15 O positron emission tomography (PET) and statistical parametric mapping. A group analysis on 11 good sleepers (8 with steady slow wave sleep, SWS) showed a significant negative correla- tion between the occurrence of SWS and rCBF in dorsal pons and mesencephalon, thalami,

Pierre Maquet; Christian Degueldre; Guy Delfiore; Joel Aerts; Jean-Marie Peters; Georges Franck

1997-01-01

111

Novel and simple description for a smooth transition from ?-cluster wave functions to jj-coupling shell model wave functions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We propose an improved version of the antisymmetrized quasicluster model (AQCM) to describe a smooth transition from the ?-cluster wave function to the jj-coupling shell model wave function and apply it to the ground state of 12C. The cluster-shell transition in 12C is characterized in AQCM by only two parameters: R representing the distance between ? clusters and the center of mass and ? describing the break of ? clusters. The optimal AQCM wave function for the ground state of 12C is an intermediate state between the three-? cluster state and the shell model state with the p3/2 subshell closure configuration. The result is consistent with that of the antisymmetrized molecular dynamics (AMD), and the optimal AQCM wave function quantitatively agrees with the AMD one, although the number of degrees of freedom in AQCM is significantly fewer.

Suhara, Tadahiro; Itagaki, Naoyuki; Cseh, József; P?oszajczak, Marek

2013-05-01

112

Quantum Monte Carlo with coupled-cluster wave functions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We introduce a many-body method that combines two powerful many-body techniques, viz., quantum Monte Carlo and coupled cluster theory. Coupled cluster wave functions are introduced as importance functions in a Monte Carlo method designed for the configuration interaction framework to provide rigorous upper bounds to the ground-state energy. We benchmark our method on the homogeneous electron gas in momentum space. The importance function used is the coupled cluster doubles wave function. We show that the computational resources required in our method scale polynomially with system size. Our energy upper bounds are in very good agreement with previous calculations of similar accuracy, and they can be systematically improved by including higher order excitations in the coupled cluster wave function.

Roggero, Alessandro; Mukherjee, Abhishek; Pederiva, Francesco

2013-09-01

113

Matter Density and Relativistic Models of Wave Function Collapse  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Mathematical models for the stochastic evolution of wave functions that combine the unitary evolution according to the Schrödinger equation and the collapse postulate of quantum theory are well understood for non-relativistic quantum mechanics. Recently, there has been progress in making these models relativistic. But even with a fully relativistic law for the wave function evolution, a problem with relativity remains: Different Lorentz frames may yield conflicting values for the matter density at a space-time point. We propose here a relativistic law for the matter density function. According to our proposal, the matter density function at a space-time point x is obtained from the wave function ? on the past light cone of x by setting the i-th particle position in |?|2 equal to x, integrating over the other particle positions, and averaging over i. We show that the predictions that follow from this proposal agree with all known experimental facts.

Bedingham, Daniel; Dürr, Detlef; Ghirardi, GianCarlo; Goldstein, Sheldon; Tumulka, Roderich; Zanghì, Nino

2013-08-01

114

Climate impact response functions for terrestrial ecosystems  

Microsoft Academic Search

We introduce climate impact response functions as a means for summarizing and visualizing the responses of climate-sensitive sectors to changes in fundamental drivers of global climate change. In an inverse application, they allow the translation of thresholds for climate change impacts ('impact guard-rails') into constraints for climate and atmospheric composition parameters ('climate windows'). It thus becomes feasible to specify long-term

Hans-Martin Füssel; Jelle G. van Minnenb

2001-01-01

115

Climate Impact Response Functions for Terrestrial Ecosystems  

Microsoft Academic Search

We introduce climate impact response functions as a means for summarizing and visualizing the responses of climate-sensitive\\u000a sectors to changes in fundamental drivers of global climate change. In an inverse application, they allow the translation\\u000a of thresholds for climate change impacts (‘impact guard-rails’) into constraints for climate and atmospheric composition parameters\\u000a (‘climate windows’). It thus becomes feasible to specify long-term

Hans-Martin Füssel; Jelle G. van Minnen

2001-01-01

116

Wave impact loads: The role of the flip-through  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The impact of waves upon a vertical, rigid wall during sloshing is analyzed with specific focus on the modes that lead to the generation of a flip-through [M. J. Cooker and D. H. Peregrine, ``A model for breaking wave impact pressures,'' in Proceedings of the 22nd International Conference on Coastal Engineering (ASCE, Delft, 1990), Vol. 2, pp. 1473-1486]. Experimental data, based on a time-resolved particle image velocimetry technique and on a novel free-surface tracking method [M. Miozzi, ``Particle image velocimetry using feature tracking and Delaunay tessellation,'' in Proceedings of the 12th International Symposium on Applications of Laser Techniques to Fluid Mechanics (2004)], are used to characterize the details of the flip-through dynamics while wave loads are computed by integrating the experimental pressure distributions. Three different flip-through modes are observed and studied in dependence on the amount and modes of air trapping. No air entrapment characterizes a ``mode (a) flip-through,'' engulfment of a single, well-formed air bubble is typical of a ``mode (b)'' event, while the generation of a fine-scale air-water mixing occurs for a ``mode (c)'' event. Upward accelerations of the flip-through jet exceeding 1500 g have been measured and the generation/collapse process of a small air cavity is described in conjunction with the available pressure time histories. Predictions of the vertical pressure distributions made with the pressure-impulse model of Cooker and Peregrine [M. J. Cooker and D. H. Peregrine, ``Pressure-impulse theory for liquid impact problems,'' J. Fluid Mech. 297, 193 (1995)] show good agreement with the experimental data.

Lugni, C.; Brocchini, M.; Faltinsen, O. M.

2006-12-01

117

POINTWISE GREEN FUNCTION BOUNDS AND STABILITY OF COMBUSTION WAVES  

Microsoft Academic Search

Generalizing similar results for viscous shock and relaxation waves, we establish sharp pointwise Green function bounds and linearized and nonlinear stability for traveling wave solutions of an abstract viscous combustion model including both Majda's model and the full reacting compressible Navier-Stokes equations with artificial viscosity with general multi-species reaction and reaction-dependent equation of state, under the necessary condi- tions of

GREGORY LYNG; MOHAMMADREZA ROOFI; BENJAMIN TEXIER; KEVIN ZUMBRUN

2008-01-01

118

Inside looking out: Probing JIMWLK wave functions with BFKL calculations  

SciTech Connect

We investigate the relation between the eigenvalues and eigenfunctions of the Balitsky-Fadin-Kuraev-Lipatov (BFKL) and Jalilian-Marian-Iancu-McLerran-Weigert-Leonidov-Kovner (JIMWLK/KLWMIJ) Hamiltonians. We show that the eigenvalues of the BFKL Hamiltonians are also exact eigenvalues of the KLWMIJ (and JIMWLK) Hamiltonian, albeit corresponding to possibly non-normalizable eigenfunctions. The question whether a given eigenfunction of BFKL corresponds to a normalizable eigenfunction of KLWMIJ is rather complicated, except in some obvious cases, and requires independent investigation. As an example to illustrate this relation we concentrate on the color octet exchange in the framework of KLWMIJ Hamiltonian. We show that it corresponds to the reggeized gluon exchange of BFKL, and find first correction to the BFKL wave function, which has the meaning of the impact factor for shadowing correction to the Reggeized gluon. We also show that the bootstrap condition in the KLWMIJ framework is satisfied automatically and does not carry any additional information to that contained in the second quantized structure of the KLWMIJ Hamiltonian. This is an example of how the bootstrap condition inherent in the t-channel unitarity arises in the s-channel picture.

Altinoluk, Tolga; Kovner, Alex [Physics Department, University of Connecticut, 2152 Hillside Road, Storrs, Connecticut 06269 (United States); Levin, Eugene [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad Tecnica Federico Santa Maria, Avenida Espana 1680, Casilla 110-V, Valparaiso (Chile); Department of Particle Physics, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel)

2010-10-01

119

Elastic waves in homogeneous and layered transversely-isotropic media - Gaussian wave packets and Green functions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Plane-wave solutions of the elastodynamic equations of motion, which yield slowness and group-velocity diagrams, are presently discussed for transversely isotropic materials, using a coordinate-free approach. The propagation of Gaussian wave packets in unidirectional homogeneous and layered structures is then calculated for arbitrary layer orientations. The results are presented as time-domain wavefront snapshots. An integral representation of Green's functions is given for the transversely-isotropic medium, via spatial Fourier transforms apposite to diffraction tomography.

Spies, M.; Fellinger, P.; Langenberg, K. J.

120

Quantum Corral Wave-function Engineering  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present a theoretical method for the design and optimization of quantum corrals[1] with specific electronic properties. Taking advantage that spins are subject to a RKKY interaction that is directly controlled by the scattering of the quantum corral, we design corral structures that reproduce spin Hamiltonians with coupling constants determined a priori[2]. We solve exactly the bi-dimensional scattering problem for each corral configuration within the s-wave approximation[3] and subsequently the geometry of the quantum corral is optimized by means of simulated annealing[4] and genetic algorithms[5]. We demonstrate the possibility of automatic design of structures with complicated target electronic properties[6]. This work was performed under the auspices of the US Department of Energy by the University of California at the LLNL under contract no W-7405-Eng-48. [1] M. F. Crommie, C. P. Lutz and D. M. Eigler, Nature 403, 512 (2000) [2] D. P. DiVincenzo et al., Nature 408, 339 (2000) [3] G. A. Fiete and E. J. Heller, Rev. Mod. Phys. 75, 933 (2003) [4] M. R. A. T. N. Metropolis et al., J. Chem. Phys. 1087 (1953) [5] E. Aarts and J. K. Lenstra, eds. Local search in combinatorial problems (Princeton University Press, 1997) [6] A. A. Correa, F. Reboredo and C. Balseiro, Phys. Rev. B (in press).

Correa, Alfredo; Reboredo, Fernando; Balseiro, Carlos

2005-03-01

121

B meson wave function in kT factorization  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We study the asymptotic behavior of the B meson wave function in the framework of kT factorization theorem. We first construct a definition of the kT-dependent B meson wave function, which is free of light-cone divergences. Next-to-leading-order corrections are then calculated based on this definition. The treatment of different types of logarithms in the above corrections, including the Sudakov logarithms, and those depending on a renormalization scale and on an infrared regulator, is summarized. The criticism raised in the literature on our resummation formalism and Sudakov effect is responded. We show that the B meson wave function remains normalizable after taking into account renormalization-group evolution effects, contrary to the observation derived in the collinear factorization theorem.

Li, Hsiang-Nan; Liao, Huei-Shih

2004-10-01

122

B meson wave function in k{sub T} factorization  

SciTech Connect

We study the asymptotic behavior of the B meson wave function in the framework of k{sub T} factorization theorem. We first construct a definition of the k{sub T}-dependent B meson wave function, which is free of light-cone divergences. Next-to-leading-order corrections are then calculated based on this definition. The treatment of different types of logarithms in the above corrections, including the Sudakov logarithms, and those depending on a renormalization scale and on an infrared regulator, is summarized. The criticism raised in the literature on our resummation formalism and Sudakov effect is responded. We show that the B meson wave function remains normalizable after taking into account renormalization-group evolution effects, contrary to the observation derived in the collinear factorization theorem.

Li Hsiangnan [Institute of Physics, Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan 115 (China); Department of Physics, National Cheng-Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan 701 (China); Liao, Huei-Shih [Institute of Physics, Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan 115 (China)

2004-10-01

123

Multi-time scale simulation for impact systems: from wave propagation to rigid-body motion  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary  ?Impact response encompasses a variety of complicated dynamic effects including wave propagation, structural vibrations and\\u000a rigid-body motion. For efficient simulation of impact response with sufficient accuracy, the methods of wave propagation and\\u000a multibody systems should be combined. This paper deals with an adaptive simulation of impact response during the transition\\u000a from wave propagation to rigid-body motion. For modeling structural vibrations,

B. Hu; W. Schiehlen

2003-01-01

124

Wave-function recombination instability in cold-atom interferometers  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Cold-atom interferometers use guiding potentials that split the wave function of the Bose-Einstein condensate and then recombine it. We present a theoretical analysis of the wave-function recombination instability that is due to the weak nonlinearity of the condensate. It is most pronounced when the accumulated phase difference between the arms of the interferometer is close to an odd multiple of ? and consists in exponential amplification of the weak ground state mode by the strong first excited mode. The instability exists for both trapped-atom and beam interferometers.

Stickney, James A.; Zozulya, Alex A.

2002-11-01

125

Charmed quark component of the photon wave function  

Microsoft Academic Search

We determine the c-anti-c component of the photon wave function on the basis of (i) the data on the transitions e+ e- -> J\\/psi(3096), psi(3686), psi(4040), psi(4415), (ii) partial widths of the two-photon decays eta_{c0}(2979), chi_{c0}(3415), chi_{c2}(3556) -> gamma-gamma, and (iii) wave functions of the charmonium states obtained by solving the Bethe-Salpeter equation for the c-anti-c system. Using the obtained

V. V. Anisovich; L. G. Dakhno; V. N. Markov; V. A. Nikonov; A. V. Sarantsev

2005-01-01

126

Charmed quark component of the photon wave function  

Microsoft Academic Search

We determine the \\u000a $$c\\\\bar c$$\\u000a component of the photon wave function on the basis of (i) the data on the transitions e\\u000a +\\u000a e\\u000a ? ? J\\/?(3096), ?(3686), ?(4040), ?(4415), (ii) partial widths of the two-photon decays ?\\u000a \\u000a c0(2979), ?\\u000a \\u000a c0(3415), ?\\u000a \\u000a c2(3556) ? ??, and (iii) wave functions of the charmonium states obtained by solving the Bethe-Salpeter equation for

V. V. Anisovich; L. G. Dakhno; V. N. Markov; V. A. Nikonov; A. V. Sarantsev

2005-01-01

127

Many-body wave function in a dipole blockade configuration  

SciTech Connect

We report the results of simulations of the many atom wave function when a cold gas is excited to highly excited states. We simulated the many body wave function by direct numerical solution of Schroedinger's equation. We investigated the fraction of atoms excited and the correlation of excited atoms in the gas for different types of excitation when the blockade region was small compared to the sample size. We also investigated the blockade effect when the blockade region is comparable to the sample size to determine the sensitivity of this system and constraints for quantum information.

Robicheaux, F.; Hernandez, J. V. [Department of Physics, Auburn University, Alabama 36849-5311 (United States)

2005-12-15

128

Transverse instability of a plane front of fast impact ionization waves  

SciTech Connect

The transverse instability of a plane front of fast impact ionization waves in p{sup +}-n-n{sup +} semiconductor structures with a finite concentration of donors N in the n layer has been theoretically analyzed. It is assumed that the high velocity u of impact ionization waves is ensured owing to the avalanche multiplication of the uniform background of electrons and holes whose concentration {sigma}{sub b} ahead of the front is high enough for the continuum approximation to be applicable. The problem of the calculation of the growth rate s of a small harmonic perturbation with wavenumber k is reduced to the eigenvalue problem for a specific homogeneous Volterra equation of the second kind containing the sum of double and triple integrals of an unknown eigenfunction. This problem has been solved by the method of successive approximations. It has been shown that the function s(k) for small k values increases monotonically in agreement with the analytical theory reported in Thermal Engineering 58 (13), 1119 (2011), reaches a maximum s{sub M} at k = k{sub M}, then decreases, and becomes negative at k > k{sub 01}. This behavior of the function s(k) for short-wavelength perturbations is due to a decrease in the distortion of the field owing to a finite thickness of the space charge region of the front and 'smearing' of perturbation of concentrations owing to the transverse transport of charge carriers. The similarity laws for perturbations with k Greater-Than-Or-Equivalent-To k{sub M} have been established: at fixed {sigma}{sub b} values and the maximum field strength on the front E{sub 0M}, the growth rate s depends only on the ratio k/N and the boundary wavenumber k{sub 01} {proportional_to} N. The parameters s{sub M}, k{sub M}, and k{sub 01}, which determine the perturbation growth dynamics and the upper boundary of the instability region for impact ionization waves, have been presented as functions of E{sub 0M}. These dependences indicate that the model of a plane impact ionization wave is insufficient for describing the operation of avalanche voltage sharpers and that fronts of fast streamers in the continuum approximation should be stable with respect to transverse perturbations in agreement with the previously reported numerical simulation results. The results have been confirmed by the numerical simulation of the evolution of small harmonic perturbations of the steady-state plane impact ionization wave.

Kyuregyan, A. S., E-mail: ask@vei.ru [All-Russia Institute of Electrical Engineering (Russian Federation)

2012-05-15

129

Complete Reconstruction of the Wave Function of a Reacting Molecule by Four-Wave Mixing Spectroscopy  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Probing the real time dynamics of a reacting molecule remains one of the central challenges in chemistry. Here we show how the time-dependent wave function of an excited-state reacting molecule can be completely reconstructed from resonant coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy. The method assumes knowledge of the ground potential but not of any excited potential. The excited-state potential can in turn be constructed from the wave function. The formulation is general for polyatomics and applies to bound as well as dissociative excited potentials. We demonstrate the method on the Li2 molecule.

Avisar, David; Tannor, David J.

2011-04-01

130

Strategy for Time Dependent Quantum Mechanical Calculations Using a Gaussian Wave Packet Representation of the Wave Function.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

We develop methodology for performing time dependent quantum mechanical calculations by representing the wave function as a sum of Gaussian wave packets (GWP), each characterized by a set of parameters such as width, position, momentum and phase. The prob...

B. Jackson H. Metiu R. Heather S. I. Sawada

1985-01-01

131

Surface acoustic wave depth profiling of a functionally graded material  

SciTech Connect

The potential and limitations of Rayleigh wave spectroscopy to characterize the elastic depth profile of heterogeneous functional gradient materials are investigated by comparing simulations of the surface acoustic wave dispersion curves of different profile-spectrum pairs. This inverse problem is shown to be quite ill posed. The method is then applied to extract information on the depth structure of a glass-ceramic (alumina) functionally graded material from experimental data. The surface acoustic wave analysis suggests the presence of a uniform coating region consisting of a mixture of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and glass, with a sharp transition between the coating and the substrate. This is confirmed by scanning electron microscope with energy dispersive x-ray analysis.

Goossens, Jozefien; Leclaire, Philippe; Xu Xiaodong; Glorieux, Christ; Martinez, Loic; Sola, Antonella; Siligardi, Cristina; Cannillo, Valeria; Van der Donck, Tom; Celis, Jean-Pierre [Laboratorium voor Akoestiek en Thermische Fysica, Departement Natuurkunde en Sterrenkunde, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, PO 2416, Celestijnenlaan 200D, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Equipe Circuit Instrumentation et Modelisation en Electronique (ECIME) IUP GE, Universite de Cergy, Rue de Eragny, Neuville sur Oise, 95031 Cergy Pontoise Cedex (France); Dipartimento di Ingegneria dei Materiali e dell' Ambiente, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Via Vignolese 905, 41100 Modena (Italy); Departement Department of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering (MTM), Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, PO 2450, Kasteelpark Arenberg 44, B-3001 Heverlee (Belgium)

2007-09-01

132

Oblique propagation, wave particle interaction and particle distribution function  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Recent results from the Cluster mission have stimulated theoretical investigations and simulations to explain ion distribution functions observed in the quasi-perp bow shock. High-time resolution observations have revealed distributions of gyrating ions that are gyrophase-bunched. When not produced at the shock, such distributions are believed to be resulting from interactions between field-aligned beams and low frequency beamdriven waves . The Conventional models used to account for such distributions assume that the waves are purely transverse, and that they propagate parallel to the ambient magnetic eld. However observations indicate that these waves are propagating obliquely with respect to the ambient magnetic eld [Meziane et al., 2001]. A theoretical investigation of the non-relativistic wave-particle interaction in a background magnetic eld with the electromagnetic wave propagating obliquely has been addressed previously, resulting in a dynamical system describing the wave interaction with a single ion in the absence of dissipation mechanisms. [Hamza et al., 2005] This dynamical system has been numerically integrated to construct the ion distribution functions by seeding the particles with di erent initial conditions. We compute the particle orbits and simulate the time evolution of the distribution functions based on Liouville's theorem of phase space density conservation. It will be shown that the trapping which is due to the oblique propagation of the wave, gives an explanation for gyrophase-bunching and unstable distributions in velocity space which could trigger instabilities such as firehose and mirror. Therefore this exercise provide insights on the particle dynamics and onset of waves away from the shock. Meziane, K., C. Mazelle, R.P. Lin, D. LeQueau, D.E. Larson, G.K. Parks, R.P. Lepping (2001), Three dimensional observations of gyrating ions distributions far upstream from the Earth's bow shock and their association with low-frequency waves, J. Geophys. Res. 106, 5731 Hamza, A. M., K. Meziane, and C. Mazelle (2006), Oblique propagation and nonlinear wave particle processes, J. Geophys. Res., 111, A04104

Osmane, Adnane; Hamza, A. M.; Meziane, Karim

133

Interpreting the Quantum Wave Function in Terms of 'Interacting Faculties'  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this article we discuss the problem of finding an interpretation of quantum mechanics which provides an objective account of physical reality. In the first place we discuss the problem of interpretation and analyze the importance of such an objective account in physics. In this context we present the problems which arise when interpreting the quantum wave function within the

Christian de Ronde

2007-01-01

134

BETA DECAY THEORY USING EXACT ELECTRON RADIAL WAVE FUNCTIONS  

Microsoft Academic Search

A modified formulation of the theory of beta decay is presented, in ; which exact electron radial wave functions for an extended nuclear charge ; distribution are used. The resulting formulas are suitable for accurate ; application as well as for a qualitative demonstration of the features of beta ; decay. The connection between spectrum shape and electron polarization can

Buehring

1963-01-01

135

The Schrodinger Wave Functional and S-branes  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper we will consider the minisuperspace approach to S-branes dynamics in the Schrodinger picture description. Time-evolution of vacuum wave functional for quantum field theory on S-brane is studied. Open string pair produc- tion is calculated. The analysis of density matrix for mixed states is also performed.

J. Klusoÿn

136

Photon wave function: A covariant formulation and equivalence with QED  

Microsoft Academic Search

We discuss the limits of the photon wave function (PWF) formalism, which is experiencing a revival these days as a result of new practical applications in photonics and quantum optics. We build a Dirac-like equation for the PWF written in a manifestly covariant form and show that, in the presence of charged matter fields, it reproduces the standard formulation of

Fabrizio Tamburini; Denise Vicino

2008-01-01

137

QCD Sum Rules for Pion Wave Function Revisited.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

We analyze new QCD sum rules for the pion wave function (WF) (phi)(sub (pi)) (x), obtained recently in the non-local vacuum condensates method for nondiagonal correlators, and suggest a new approach for extracting WF of (pi)-meson and the mass and WF of t...

A. P. Bakulev S. V. Mikhajlov

1994-01-01

138

Molecular Velocity Distribution Function Measurements in a Normal Shock Wave  

Microsoft Academic Search

Molecular velocity distribution functions have been measured throughout a normal, M = 1.59 helium shock wave that was formed in a low-density wind tunnel. The measurements were obtained by using the electron beam fluorescence technique. Throughout the shock transition, distributions of random velocities were observed from directions both parallel and perpendicular to the flow. Also, direct measurements were made of

E. P. Muntz; L. N. Harnett

1969-01-01

139

Monte Carlo wave-function method in quantum optics  

Microsoft Academic Search

We present a wave-function approach to the study of the evolution of a small system when it is coupled to a large reservoir. Fluctuations and dissipation originate in this approach from quantum jumps that occur randomly during the time evolution of the system. This approach can be applied to a wide class of relaxation operators in the Markovian regime, and

Klaus Mølmer; Yvan Castin; Jean Dalibard

1993-01-01

140

Gap Wave Propagation in Functionally Graded Piezoelectric Material Structures  

Microsoft Academic Search

Shear horizontal gap wave propagating between functionally graded piezoelectric material (FGPM) layer and a layered piezoelectric structure is investigated analytically. The electrically open conditions on strip surface are applied to solve this problem. The phase velocity can be numerically calculated for the electrically open case, with different thickness of the layer and wavenumber. The effect of the gradient variation about

Jianke Du; Kai Xian; Ji Wang

2007-01-01

141

Vector Meson Form Factors and Wave Functions from Holographic QCD  

SciTech Connect

Based on the holographic dual model of QCD, we study 2- and 3-point functions of vector currents and derive form factors as well as wave functions for the vector mesons. As a result, generalized vector-meson dominance representation for form factors is obtained with a very specific VMD pattern. The calculated electric radius of the rho-meson is shown to be in a good agreement with predictions from lattice QCD.

Hovhannes Grigoryan; Anatoly Radyushkin

2007-10-10

142

Estimation of significant wave height and wave height density function using satellite altimeter data  

Microsoft Academic Search

A technique for estimating the ocean surface roughness probability density function from satellite altimeter data is presented. Results from the application of the technique to Geos 3 altimeter data demonstrate its ability to detect both large-scale and small-scale structural deviations from the Gaussian distribution. Knowledge of the surface roughness probability density enables a direct computation of significant wave height. Significant

R. W. Priester; L. S. Miller

1979-01-01

143

Estimation of Significant Wave Height and Wave Height Density Function Using Satellite Altimeter Data  

Microsoft Academic Search

A technique for estimating the ocean surface roughness probability density function from satellite altimeter data is presented. Results from the application of the technique to Geos 3 altimeter data demonstrate its ability to detect both large-scale and small-scale structural deviations from the Gaussian distribution. Knowledge of the surface roughness probability density enables a direct computation of significant wave height. Significant

R. W. Priester; L. S. Miller

1979-01-01

144

USING PHOTON WAVE FUNCTION FOR THE TIME-DOMAIN ANALYSIS OF ELECTROMAGNETIC WAVE SCATTERING  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper, a generalized photon wave function (PWF) which is applicable to electromagnetic problems is introduced. The formulation treats the electromagnetics fields as quantum mechanical entities. The introduced PWF is especially useful for boundary- value problems. For instance,the reflection coefficient at a dielectric half space is calculated based on the concepts of PWF and quantum mechanics. With the proposed

Bahar Khadem-Hosseinieh; Y. Komijani; Reza Faraji-Dana; Mahmoud Shahabadi

2007-01-01

145

Eikonal approximation in AdS\\/CFT: Conformal partial waves and finite N four-point functions  

Microsoft Academic Search

We introduce the impact parameter representation for conformal field theory correlators of the form A??O1O2O1O2?. This representation is appropriate in the eikonal kinematical regime, and approximates the conformal partial wave decomposition in the limit of large spin and dimension of the exchanged primary. Using recent results on the two-point function ?O1O1?shock in the presence of a shock wave in anti-de

Lorenzo Cornalba; Miguel S. Costa; João Penedones; Ricardo Schiappa

2007-01-01

146

Critical Analysis of the Density Functional Theory Prediction of Enhanced Capillary Waves  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present a critical analysis of the density functional description for capillary wave fluctuations on free liquid surfaces. The proposal made by Mecke and Dietrich, [Phys. Rev. EPLEEE81063-651X 59, 6766 (1999)10.1103/PhysRevE.59.6766], to obtain the effective wave vector dependent surface tension, and their prediction of an enhanced regime of capillary waves at mesoscopic scales, has had a large impact including claims of experimental observation [Fradin , Nature (London)NATUAS0028-0836 403, 871 (2000)10.1038/35002533; Mora , Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-9007 90, 216101 (2003)10.1103/PhysRevLett.90.216101]. Our analysis shows that there is a qualitative problem in the convergence of the low q expansion used for that prediction, and that the assumed link between the equilibrium density functional description of the liquid surface and its capillary wave fluctuations leads always to the unphysical decrease of the surface tension for large wave vectors.

Tarazona, P.; Checa, R.; Chacón, E.

2007-11-01

147

The impact of the summer 2003 heat wave in Iberia: how should we measure it?  

Microsoft Academic Search

We present a new approach to improve the reliability of quantifying the impact of a heat wave on mortality rates. We show,\\u000a for the recent European summer 2003 heat wave, that the use of absolute maximum temperature values, or number of days above\\u000a a given threshold, can be misleading. Here, we have assessed the impact of the heat wave on

J. Díaz; R. García-Herrera; R. M. Trigo; C. Linares; M. A. Valente; J. M. De Miguel; E. Hernández

2006-01-01

148

Quantum Canonical Tensor Model and AN Exact Wave Function  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Tensor models in various forms are being studied as models of quantum gravity. Among them the canonical tensor model has a canonical pair of rank-three tensors as dynamical variables, and is a pure constraint system with first-class constraints. The Poisson algebra of the first-class constraints has structure functions, and provides an algebraically consistent way of discretizing the Dirac first-class constraint algebra for general relativity. This paper successfully formulates the Wheeler-DeWitt scheme of quantization of the canonical tensor model; the ordering of operators in the constraints is determined without ambiguity by imposing Hermiticity and covariance on the constraints, and the commutation algebra of constraints takes essentially the same form as the classical Poisson algebra, i.e. is first-class. Thus one could consistently obtain, at least locally in the configuration space, wave functions of "universe" by solving the partial differential equations representing the constraints, i.e. the Wheeler-DeWitt equations for the quantum canonical tensor model. The unique wave function for the simplest nontrivial case is exactly and globally obtained. Although this case is far from being realistic, the wave function has a few physically interesting features; it shows that locality is favored, and that there exists a locus of configurations with features of beginning of universe.

Sasakura, Naoki

2013-08-01

149

Resonating valence bond wave functions and classical interacting dimer models.  

PubMed

We relate properties of nearest-neighbor resonating valence-bond (NNRVB) wave functions for SU(g) spin systems on two-dimensional bipartite lattices to those of fully packed interacting classical dimer models on the same lattice. The interaction energy can be expressed as a sum of n-body potentials V(n), which are recursively determined from the NNRVB wave function on finite subgraphs of the original lattice. The magnitude of the n-body interaction V(n) (n>1) is of order O(g(-(n-1))) for small g(-1). The leading term is a two-body nearest-neighbor interaction V2(g) favoring two parallel dimers on elementary plaquettes. For SU(2) spins, using our calculated value of V2(g=2), we find that the long-distance behavior of the bond-energy correlation function is dominated by an oscillatory term that decays as 1/|r|? with ??1.22. This result is in remarkable quantitative agreement with earlier direct numerical studies of the corresponding wave function, which give ??1.20. PMID:23004328

Damle, Kedar; Dhar, Deepak; Ramola, Kabir

2012-06-15

150

Phases of Augmented Hadronic Light-Front Wave Functions  

SciTech Connect

It is an important question whether the final/initial state gluonic interactions which lead to naive-time-reversal-odd single-spin asymmetries and diffraction at leading twist can be associated in a definite way with the light-front wave function hadronic eigensolutions of QCD. We use light-front time-ordered perturbation theory to obtain augmented light-front wave functions which contain an imaginary phase which depends on the choice of advanced or retarded boundary condition for the gauge potential in light-cone gauge. We apply this formalism to the wave functions of the valence Fock states of nucleons and pions, and show how this illuminates the factorization properties of naive-time-reversal-odd transverse momentum dependent observables which arise from rescattering. In particular, one calculates the identical leading-twist Sivers function from the overlap of augmented light-front wavefunctions that one obtains from explicit calculations of the single-spin asymmetry in semi-inclusive deep inelastic lepton-polarized nucleon scattering where the required phases come from the final-state rescattering of the struck quark with the nucleon spectators.

Brodsky, Stanley J.; /SLAC; Pasquini, Barbara; /Pavia U. /INFN, Pavia; Xiao, Bo-Wen; /LBNL, NSD; Yuan, Feng; /LBNL, NSD /RIKEN BNL

2010-02-15

151

Electron number probability distributions for correlated wave functions.  

PubMed

Efficient formulas for computing the probability of finding exactly an integer number of electrons in an arbitrarily chosen volume are only known for single-determinant wave functions [E. Cances et al., Theor. Chem. Acc. 111, 373 (2004)]. In this article, an algebraic method is presented that extends these formulas to the case of multideterminant wave functions and any number of disjoint volumes. The derived expressions are applied to compute the probabilities within the atomic domains derived from the space partitioning based on the quantum theory of atoms in molecules. Results for a series of test molecules are presented, paying particular attention to the effects of electron correlation and of some numerical approximations on the computed probabilities. PMID:17362099

Francisco, E; Martín Pendás, A; Blanco, M A

2007-03-01

152

Interpreting the Quantum Wave Function in Terms of 'Interacting Faculties'  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this article we discuss the problem of finding an interpretation of\\u000aquantum mechanics which provides an objective account of physical reality. In\\u000athe first place we discuss the problem of interpretation and analyze the\\u000aimportance of such an objective account in physics. In this context we present\\u000athe problems which arise when interpreting the quantum wave function within the

Christian de Ronde

2007-01-01

153

Analytical wave functions for atomic quantum-defect theory  

Microsoft Academic Search

We present an exactly solvable effective potential that reproduces atomic spectra in the limit of exact quantum-defect theory, i.e., the limit in which, for a fixed l, the principal quantum number is modified by a constant: n*=n-delta(l). Transition probabilities for alkali atoms are calculated using the analytical wave functions obtained and agree well with accepted values. This allows us to

V. Alan Kostelecký; Michael Martin Nieto

1985-01-01

154

Energy-Dependent Potential and Normalization of Wave Function  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The problem of normalization related to energy-dependent potentials is examined in the context of the path integral approach, and a justification is given. As examples, the harmonic oscillator and the hydrogen atom (radial) where, respectively the frequency and the Coulomb's constant depend on energy, are considered and their propagators determined. From their spectral decomposition, we have found that the wave functions extracted are correctly normalized.

Benchikha, A.; Chetouani, L.

2013-06-01

155

Solutions of the Maxwell equations and photon wave functions  

Microsoft Academic Search

Properties of six-component electromagnetic field solutions of a matrix form of the Maxwell equations, analogous to the four-component solutions of the Dirac equation, are described. It is shown that the six-component equation, including sources, is invariant under Lorentz transformations. Complete sets of eigenfunctions of the Hamiltonian for the electromagnetic fields, which may be interpreted as photon wave functions, are given

Peter J. Mohr; Peter J

2010-01-01

156

Interaction between light and matter: a photon wave function approach  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Bialynicki-Birula-Sipe photon wave function formalism is extended to include the interaction between photons and continuous non-absorptive media. When the second quantization of this formalism is introduced, a new method for describing the quantum interactions between light and matter emerges. As an example of the application of the method, an expression for the quantum state of the twin photons generated

Pablo L. Saldanha; C. H. Monken

2011-01-01

157

Wave characteristics in functionally graded piezoelectric hollow cylinders  

Microsoft Academic Search

Based on linear three-dimensional piezoelasticity, the Legendre orthogonal polynomial series expansion approach is used for\\u000a determining the wave characteristics in hollow cylinders composed of the functionally graded piezoelectric materials (FGPM)\\u000a with open circuit. The displacement and electric potential components, expanded in a series of Legendre polynomials, are introduced\\u000a into the governing equations along with position-dependent material constants so that the

Yu Jiangong; Wu Bin; Chen Guoqiang

2009-01-01

158

The impact of heat waves on children's health: a systematic review.  

PubMed

Young children are thought to be particularly sensitive to heat waves, but relatively less research attention has been paid to this field to date. A systematic review was conducted to elucidate the relationship between heat waves and children's health. Literature published up to August 2012 were identified using the following MeSH terms and keywords: "heatwave", "heat wave", "child health", "morbidity", "hospital admission", "emergency department visit", "family practice", "primary health care", "death" and "mortality". Of the 628 publications identified, 12 met the selection criteria. The existing literature does not consistently suggest that mortality among children increases significantly during heat waves, even though infants were associated with more heat-related deaths. Exposure to heat waves in the perinatal period may pose a threat to children's health. Pediatric diseases or conditions associated with heat waves include renal disease, respiratory disease, electrolyte imbalance and fever. Future research should focus on how to develop a consistent definition of a heat wave from a children's health perspective, identifying the best measure of children's exposure to heat waves, exploring sensitive outcome measures to quantify the impact of heat waves on children, evaluating the possible impacts of heat waves on children's birth outcomes, and understanding the differences in vulnerability to heat waves among children of different ages and from different income countries. Projection of the children's disease burden caused by heat waves under climate change scenarios, and development of effective heat wave mitigation and adaptation strategies that incorporate other child protective health measures, are also strongly recommended. PMID:23525899

Xu, Zhiwei; Sheffield, Perry E; Su, Hong; Wang, Xiaoyu; Bi, Yan; Tong, Shilu

2013-03-23

159

The impact of heat waves on children's health: a systematic review  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Young children are thought to be particularly sensitive to heat waves, but relatively less research attention has been paid to this field to date. A systematic review was conducted to elucidate the relationship between heat waves and children's health. Literature published up to August 2012 were identified using the following MeSH terms and keywords: "heatwave", "heat wave", "child health", "morbidity", "hospital admission", "emergency department visit", "family practice", "primary health care", "death" and "mortality". Of the 628 publications identified, 12 met the selection criteria. The existing literature does not consistently suggest that mortality among children increases significantly during heat waves, even though infants were associated with more heat-related deaths. Exposure to heat waves in the perinatal period may pose a threat to children's health. Pediatric diseases or conditions associated with heat waves include renal disease, respiratory disease, electrolyte imbalance and fever. Future research should focus on how to develop a consistent definition of a heat wave from a children's health perspective, identifying the best measure of children's exposure to heat waves, exploring sensitive outcome measures to quantify the impact of heat waves on children, evaluating the possible impacts of heat waves on children's birth outcomes, and understanding the differences in vulnerability to heat waves among children of different ages and from different income countries. Projection of the children's disease burden caused by heat waves under climate change scenarios, and development of effective heat wave mitigation and adaptation strategies that incorporate other child protective health measures, are also strongly recommended.

Xu, Zhiwei; Sheffield, Perry E.; Su, Hong; Wang, Xiaoyu; Bi, Yan; Tong, Shilu

2013-03-01

160

Evaluation of wave impact loads on caisson breakwaters based on joint probability of impact maxima and rise times  

Microsoft Academic Search

When waves break against seawalls, vertical breakwaters, piers or jetties, they abruptly transfer their momentum into the structure. This energy transfer is always spectacular and perpetually unrepeatable but can also be very violent and affect the stability and the integrity of coastal structures. Over the last 15years, increasing awareness of wave-impact induced structural failures of maritime structures has emphasised the

Giovanni Cuomo; Rodolfo Piscopia; William Allsop

2011-01-01

161

Joint inversion of receiver function and surface wave dispersion observations  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We implement a method to invert jointly teleseismic P-wave receiver functions and surface wave group and phase velocities for a mutually consistent estimate of earth structure. Receiver functions are primarily sensitive to shear wave velocity contrasts and vertical traveltimes, and surface wave dispersion measurements are sensitive to vertical shear wave velocity averages. Their combination may bridge resolution gaps associated with each individual data set. We formulate a linearized shear velocity inversion that is solved using a damped least-squares scheme that incorporates a priori smoothness constraints for velocities in adjacent layers. The data sets are equalized for the number of data points and physical units in the inversion process. The combination of information produces a relatively simple model with a minimal number of sharp velocity contrasts. We illustrate the approach using noise-free and realistic noise simulations and conclude with an inversion of observations from the Saudi Arabian Shield. Inversion results for station SODA, located in the Arabian Shield, include a crust with a sharp gradient near the surface (shear velocity changing from 1.8 to 3.5kms-1 in 3km) underlain by a 5-km-thick layer with a shear velocity of 3.5kms-1 and a 27-km-thick layer with a shear velocity of 3.8kms-1, and an upper mantle with an average shear velocity of 4.7kms-1. The crust-mantle transition has a significant gradient, with velocity values varying from 3.8 to 4.7kms-1 between 35 and 40km depth. Our results are compatible with independent inversions for crustal structure using refraction data.

Julià, J.; Ammon, C. J.; Herrmann, R. B.; Correig, A. M.

2000-10-01

162

Improved variational many-body wave function in light nuclei  

SciTech Connect

We propose and implement a simple method for improving the variational wave function of a many-body system. We have obtained a significant improvement in the binding energies, wave functions, and variance for the light nuclei {sup 3}H, {sup 4}He, and {sup 6}Li, using the fully realistic Argonne (AV{sub 18}) two-body and Urbana-IX (UIX) three-body interactions. The energy of {sup 4}He was improved by about 0.2 MeV and the {sup 6}Li binding energy was increased by {approx_equal}1.7 MeV compared to earlier variational Monte Carlo results. The latter result demonstrates the significant progress achieved by our method, and detailed analyses of the improved results are given. With central interactions the results are found to be in agreement with the 'exact' calculations. Our study shows that the relative error in the many-body wave functions, compared to two-body pair correlations, increases rapidly at least proportionally to the number of pairs in the system. However, this error does not increase indefinitely since the pair interactions saturate owing to convergence of cluster expansion.

Usmani, Q. N.; Anwar, K. [Institute of Engineering Mathematics, University Malaysia Perlis (Malaysia); Singh, A. [Department of Physics, School of Technology, Kalinga Institute of Industrial Technology, Bhubaneswar 751 024 (India); Rawitscher, G. [Department of Physics, University of Connecticut, Storrs, Connecticut 06269-3046 (United States)

2009-09-15

163

Finite range distorted-wave Born approximation analysis of (p,t) reactions with a realistic triton wave function  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Exact finite range distorted-wave Born approximation analysis of the ground state reactions 208Pb(p,t)206Pb and 18O(p,t)16O are presented. The calculations are carried out using a realistic triton wave function comprising a spatially symmetric S and mixed symmetric S' and D states. The transfer interaction is treated consistently with the interaction used in obtaining the triton wave function. The use of a realistic wave function and transfer potential yields improved agreement between experimental and theoretical angular distributions. Calculations using the wave function of the transferred neutron pair suggest it is possible to explain both the absolute magnitude and shape of the angular distribution for these transitions. NUCLEAR REACTIONS (p,t), distorted-wave Born approximation analyses.

Werby, M. F.; Strayer, M. R.; Nagarajan, M. A.

1980-06-01

164

Gutzwiller-Jastrow wave functions for the 1/[ital r] Hubbard model  

SciTech Connect

In this work, we study the wave functions of the one-dimensional 1/[ital r] Hubbard model in the strong-interaction limit [ital U]=[infinity]. A set of Gutzwiller-Jastrow wave functions are shown to be eigenfunctions of the Hamiltonian. The entire excitation spectrum and the thermodynamics are also studied in terms of more generalized Jastrow wave functions. For the wave functions and integrability conditions at finite on-site energy, further investigations are needed.

Wang, D.F. (Joseph Henry Laboratories of Physics, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States)); Zhong, Q.F. (International School for Advanced Study, Via Beirut 4, 34014 Trieste (Italy)); Coleman, P. (Serin Physics Laboratory, Rutgers University, P. O. Box 849, Piscataway, New Jersey 08854 (United States))

1993-09-15

165

Pion and photon light-cone wave functions from the instanton vacuum  

Microsoft Academic Search

The leading-twist wave functions of the pion and the photon at a low normalization point are calculated in the effective low-energy theory derived from the instanton vacuum. The pion wave function is found to be close to the asymptotic one, consistent with the recent CLEO measurements. The photon wave function is nonzero at the end points. This different behavior is

V. Yu. Petrov; M. V. Polyakov; R. Ruskov; C. Weiss; K. Goeke

1999-01-01

166

Baryon wave functions and cross sections for photon annihilation to baryon pairs  

Microsoft Academic Search

The first few moments of the wave functions for Delta's and Omega are evaluated by QCD sum rules. Model wave functions are constructed based on these moments. Perturbative QCD predictions of cross sections for gammagamma --> Delta++Delta++ and gammagamma --> OmegaOmega are obtained by integrating the quark scattering amplitudes over these wave functions. The ratio of gammagamma --> Delta++Delta++ and

G. R. Farrar; H. Zhang; A. A. Ogloblin; I. R. Zhitnitsky

1989-01-01

167

A wave propagation model for the high velocity impact response of a composite sandwich panel  

Microsoft Academic Search

A solution methodology to predict the residual velocity of a hemispherical-nose cylindrical projectile impacting a composite sandwich panel at high velocity is presented. The term high velocity impact is used to describe impact scenarios where the projectile perforates the panel and exits with a residual velocity. The solution is derived from a wave propagation model involving deformation and failure of

Michelle S. Hoo Fatt; Dushyanth Sirivolu

2010-01-01

168

The impact energy of a moored tanker under the action of regular waves  

SciTech Connect

The influence that factors such as mooring line conditions, fender arrangements, dolphin arrangements, degree of ship loading, waves of long period, wave direction, and wind on the impact energy of a moored tanker were studied. Based on systematic test data, a semi-empirical formula was developed to calculate the impact energy of the moored ship on the berthing facilities under the action of regular waves. It was shown by experiment that this method is suitable for calculating the impact energy of moored ships of capacities as great as 200 X 10/sup 3/ t.

Yu-Cheng Li

1982-09-01

169

Spin-orbit interaction with nonlinear wave functions.  

SciTech Connect

The computation of the spin-orbit interaction is discussed for electronic wave functions expressed in the new nonlinear expansion form. This form is based on spin eigenfunctions using the graphical unitary group approach (GUGA). The nodes of a Shavitt graph in GUGA are connected by arcs, and a Configuration State Function (CSF) is represented as a walk along arcs from the vacuum node to a head node. The wave function is a linear combination of product functions each of which is a linear combination of all CSFs, wherein each CSF coefficient is a product of nonlinear arc factors. When the spin-orbit interaction is included the Shavitt graph is a union of single-headed Shavitt graphs each with the same total number of electrons and orbitals. Thus spin-orbit Shavitt graphs are multiheaded. For full-CI multiheaded Shavitt graphs, analytic expressions are presented for the number of walks, the number of nodes, the number of arcs, and the number of node pairs in the associated auxiliary pair graph.

Brozell, S. R.; Shepard, R.; Zhang, Z.; Stanford Univ.

2007-12-01

170

Propagation of impact-induced shock waves in porous sandstone using mesoscale modeling  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Abstract-Generation and propagation of shock <span class="hlt">waves</span> by meteorite <span class="hlt">impact</span> is significantly affected by material properties such as porosity, water content, and strength. The objective of this work was to quantify processes related to the shock-induced compaction of pore space by numerical modeling, and compare the results with data obtained in the framework of the Multidisciplinary Experimental and Modeling <span class="hlt">Impact</span> Research Network (MEMIN) <span class="hlt">impact</span> experiments. We use mesoscale models resolving the collapse of individual pores to validate macroscopic (homogenized) approaches describing the bulk behavior of porous and water-saturated materials in large-scale models of crater formation, and to quantify localized shock amplification as a result of pore space crushing. We carried out a suite of numerical models of planar shock <span class="hlt">wave</span> propagation through a well-defined area (the "sample") of porous and/or water-saturated material. The porous sample is either represented by a homogeneous unit where porosity is treated as a state variable (macroscale model) and water content by an equation of state for mixed material (ANEOS) or by a defined number of individually resolved pores (mesoscale model). We varied porosity and water content and measured thermodynamic parameters such as shock <span class="hlt">wave</span> velocity and particle velocity on meso- and macroscales in separate simulations. The mesoscale models provide additional data on the heterogeneous distribution of peak shock pressures as a consequence of the complex superposition of reflecting rarefaction <span class="hlt">waves</span> and shock <span class="hlt">waves</span> originating from the crushing of pores. We quantify the bulk effect of porosity, the reduction in shock pressure, in terms of Hugoniot data as a <span class="hlt">function</span> of porosity, water content, and strength of a quartzite matrix. We find a good agreement between meso-, macroscale models and Hugoniot data from shock experiments. We also propose a combination of a porosity compaction model (?-? model) that was previously only used for porous materials and the ANEOS for water-saturated quartzite (all pore space is filled with water) to describe the behavior of partially water-saturated material during shock compression. Localized amplification of shock pressures results from pore collapse and can reach as much as four times the average shock pressure in the porous sample. This may explain the often observed localized high shock pressure phases next to more or less unshocked grains in impactites and meteorites.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">GÜLdemeister, Nicole; WÜNnemann, Kai; Durr, Nathanael; Hiermaier, Stefan</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">171</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5873973"> <span id="translatedtitle">Proton-<span class="hlt">impact</span> excitation of helium to the n = 2 sublevels in the distorted-<span class="hlt">wave</span> Born approximation</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Differential and total cross sections for proton-<span class="hlt">impact</span> excitation of helium to the n = 2 sublevels are calculated in the distorted-<span class="hlt">wave</span> Born approximation. Many-parameter correlated <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> are used to describe the helium atom. A comparison with recent theories and experimental measurements is made. The present calculations for differential cross sections for the n = 2 substates yield good agreement with the measured values of Park et al. and Kvale et al. and the multistate eikonal calculations of Flannery and McCann.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Khurana, I.; Srivastava, R.; Tripathi, A.N.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1986-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">172</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1986PhRvA..33.3074K"> <span id="translatedtitle">Proton-<span class="hlt">impact</span> excitation of helium to the n = 2 sublevels in the distorted-<span class="hlt">wave</span> Born approximation</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Differential and total cross sections for proton-<span class="hlt">impact</span> excitation of helium to the n = 2 sublevels are calculated in the distorted-<span class="hlt">wave</span> Born approximation. Many-parameter correlated <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> are used to describe the helium atom. A comparison with recent theories and experimental measurements is made. The present calculations for differential cross sections for the n = 2 substates yield good agreement with the measured values of Park et al. (1978) and Kvale et al. (1985) and the multistate eikonal calculations of Flannery and McCann (1974).</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Khurana, I.; Srivastava, R.; Tripathi, A. N.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1986-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">173</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.agu.org/journals/jc/v085/iC09/JC085iC09p04957/JC085iC09p04957.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Ocean <span class="hlt">Wave</span>-Radar Modulation Transfer <span class="hlt">Functions</span> From the West Coast Experiment</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Short gravity-capillary <span class="hlt">waves</span>, the equilibrium, or the steady state excitations of the ocean surface are modulated by longer ocean <span class="hlt">waves</span>. These short <span class="hlt">waves</span> are the predominant microwave scatterers on the ocean surface under many viewing conditions so that the modulation is readily measured with CW Doppler radar used as a two-scale <span class="hlt">wave</span> probe. Modulation transfer <span class="hlt">functions</span> (the ratio of the</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">J. W. Wright; W. J. Plant; W. C. Keller; W. L. Jones</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1980-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">174</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.springerlink.com/index/l2477476103t16h8.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Heat <span class="hlt">Wave</span> Hazards: An Overview of Heat <span class="hlt">Wave</span> <span class="hlt">Impacts</span> in Canada</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Extreme heat events are natural hazards affecting Canada and many other regions of the world. This paper presents an overview of the issues involved in defining heat <span class="hlt">waves</span> and harmful hot weather events, followed by a spatial and historical overview of heat <span class="hlt">waves</span> across Canada, and an assessment of heat <span class="hlt">wave</span> adaptation potential in selected cities. The Prairies, Southern Ontario,</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Karen E. Smoyer-Tomic; Robyn Kuhn; Alana Hudson</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">175</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/20976479"> <span id="translatedtitle">Electron-<span class="hlt">impact</span> ionization of highly excited hydrogenlike ions in a collinear s-<span class="hlt">wave</span> model</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We report results from collinear time-dependent close-coupling (TDCC), distorted-<span class="hlt">wave</span> (DW), and R matrix with pseudostates calculations for the electron-<span class="hlt">impact</span> ionization of H-like ions up to Z=6 within an s-<span class="hlt">wave</span> model. We compare the results of these calculations with those from a collinear classical trajectory Monte Carlo calculation to investigate the correspondence between the quantal and classical ionization probabilities as the principal quantum number of the initial state increases. In these model calculations, the electron-electron interaction is represented by the collinear s-<span class="hlt">wave</span> potential given by 1/(r{sub 1}+r{sub 2}). We study the ionization probability from the ground state and highly excited states up to n=25 as a <span class="hlt">function</span> of incident energy and the charge of the ion. We show that the fully quantal ionization probability converges to the classical results rapidly for hydrogen. The higher ion stages exhibit much slower convergence with respect to n. We observed good agreement between the DW and TDCC for the n range we have considered for B{sup 4+}. For hydrogen, we found fairly good agreement between the DW and TDCC for the ground state, but the worsening disagreement with increasing n. There is reasonable agreement between the results from the R-matrix calculations and the results from the TDCC calculations confirming the convergence of the TDCC results.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Topcu, T.; Pindzola, M. S.; Robicheaux, F. [Department of Physics, Auburn University, Alabama 36849-5311 (United States); Ballance, C. P.; Griffin, D. C. [Department of Physics, Rollins College, Winter Park, Florida 32789 (United States)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-12-15</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">176</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2006PhRvA..74f2708T"> <span id="translatedtitle">Electron-<span class="hlt">impact</span> ionization of highly excited hydrogenlike ions in a collinear s -<span class="hlt">wave</span> model</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We report results from collinear time-dependent close-coupling (TDCC), distorted-<span class="hlt">wave</span> (DW), and R matrix with pseudostates calculations for the electron-<span class="hlt">impact</span> ionization of H-like ions up to Z=6 within an s -<span class="hlt">wave</span> model. We compare the results of these calculations with those from a collinear classical trajectory Monte Carlo calculation to investigate the correspondence between the quantal and classical ionization probabilities as the principal quantum number of the initial state increases. In these model calculations, the electron-electron interaction is represented by the collinear s -<span class="hlt">wave</span> potential given by 1/(r1+r2) . We study the ionization probability from the ground state and highly excited states up to n=25 as a <span class="hlt">function</span> of incident energy and the charge of the ion. We show that the fully quantal ionization probability converges to the classical results rapidly for hydrogen. The higher ion stages exhibit much slower convergence with respect to n . We observed good agreement between the DW and TDCC for the n range we have considered for B4+ . For hydrogen, we found fairly good agreement between the DW and TDCC for the ground state, but the worsening disagreement with increasing n . There is reasonable agreement between the results from the R -matrix calculations and the results from the TDCC calculations confirming the convergence of the TDCC results.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Topçu, T.; Pindzola, M. S.; Ballance, C. P.; Griffin, D. C.; Robicheaux, F.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">177</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/6408726"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Impact</span> of a coupled ocean <span class="hlt">wave</span>–tide–circulation system on coastal modeling</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The <span class="hlt">impact</span> of a coupled ocean <span class="hlt">wave</span>–tide–circulation system on coastal modeling for wind <span class="hlt">waves</span>, oceanic circulation, and water-mass simulation is investigated by coupling of two well-tested models: the third-generation <span class="hlt">wave</span> model (WAVEWATCH-II) and the Princeton ocean model (POM). In this study, several numerical experiments in the Yellow and East China Sea (YECS) are performed for the ideal winter case and</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Il-Ju Moon</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">178</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=ADA531115"> <span id="translatedtitle">Factors Affecting Energy Absorption of a Plate during Shock <span class="hlt">Wave</span> <span class="hlt">Impact</span> Using a Damage Material Model.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This thesis examines the influences of five factors on the strain energy at failure of metallic alloy plates during a shock <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">impact</span>. The five factors are material type, initial damage, boundary conditions, plate thickness, and plate temperature. The f...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Z. K. Crosby</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">179</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/20777101"> <span id="translatedtitle">Detecting Topological Order in a Ground State <span class="hlt">Wave</span> <span class="hlt">Function</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A large class of topological orders can be understood and classified using the string-net condensation picture. These topological orders can be characterized by a set of data (N,d{sub i},F{sub lmn}{sup ijk},{delta}{sub ijk}). We describe a way to detect this kind of topological order using only the ground state <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span>. The method involves computing a quantity called the 'topological entropy' which directly measures the total quantum dimension D=id{sub i}{sup 2}.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Levin, Michael; Wen Xiaogang [Department of Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-03-24</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">180</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21437923"> <span id="translatedtitle">Resonance <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> located at the Stark saddle point</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We calculate quantum-mechanically exact <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> of resonances in spectra of the hydrogen atom in crossed external fields and prove the existence of long-lived decaying quantum states localized at the Stark saddle point. A spectrum of ground and excited states reproducing the nodal patterns expected from simple quadratic and cubic expansions of the potential in the vicinity of the saddle point can be identified. The results demonstrate the presence of resonances in the vicinity of the saddle predicted by simple approximations.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Cartarius, Holger; Main, Joerg; Losch, Thorsten; Wunner, Guenter [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik 1, Universitaet Stuttgart, D-70550 Stuttgart (Germany)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-06-15</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" 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showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">181</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/666148"> <span id="translatedtitle">Amplitude modulation of atomic <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span>. Final report</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The major theoretical advance has been to show that one can modulate Rydberg <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> using either of two methods: (1) the amplitude modulation technique which depends on autoionization to deplete part of the <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span>, or (2) a phase modulation method, which uses a change in the core potential to create a localized phase shift in the <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span>. Essentially, these two methods can both be seen as using the core potential to change the Rydberg <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span>, using the imaginary part of the potential to do amplitude modulation, or using the real part of the potential to do phase modulation. This work will be published as the authors acquire experimental results which show the differences between the two methods. One of the results of this theoretical study is that the initial proposal to study Barium 6snd states had a significant flaw. Neither the autoionization time, nor the quantum defect shifts are very large in these cases. This means that the modulation is relatively small. This shows itself primarily in the difficulty of seeing significant population redistribution into different 6snd states. The authors intend to correct this in the next funding cycle either: (a) by using the more quickly decaying Ba 6pnf states to modulate 6snd states, or (b) by using Sr 5 snd states, as outlined in this report. Their first, low power experiments are complete. These experiments have used two pulses to do a temporal version of the Ramsey separated oscillatory fields excitation. The two pulses are generated by passing the single pulse through a Michelson-Morley interferometer, which is computer controlled to sweep one arm through 2.5 {micro}m in steps of 10 nm. The second pulse`s excitation interferes with that of the first pulse, and so the total excitation has a sinusoidal variation (with a time period equal to the optical period) on top of a constant background. The amplitude of the total variation should decay at half of the rate decay rate of the autoionizing state, so this produces a time-resolved measurement of the very rapid autoionization decay. Although this does not yet show that the atom stores modulations in the bound coherent state, it does demonstrate that the atom can be excited to an autoionizing state with high efficiency, and then brought back to a bound state at a later time. The second set of experiments takes the previous work to the strong coupling regime.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">NONE</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1998-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">182</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012PhRvD..86a4012A"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> of composite hadron states and relationship to couplings of scattering amplitudes for general partial <span class="hlt">waves</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In this paper we present the connection between scattering amplitudes in momentum space and <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> in coordinate space, generalizing previous work done for s-<span class="hlt">waves</span> to any partial <span class="hlt">wave</span>. The relationship to the <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> of the residues of the scattering amplitudes at the pole of bound states or resonances is investigated in detail. A sum rule obtained for the couplings provides a generalization to coupled channels, any partial <span class="hlt">wave</span> and bound or resonance states, of Weinberg’s compositeness condition, which was only valid for weakly bound states in one channel and s-<span class="hlt">wave</span>. An example, requiring only experimental data, is shown for the ? meson indicating that it is not a composite particle of ?? and KK¯ but something else.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Aceti, F.; Oset, E.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">183</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/3909481"> <span id="translatedtitle">The <span class="hlt">impact</span> of heat <span class="hlt">waves</span> and cold spells on mortality rates in the Dutch population</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">We conducted the study described in this paper to investigate the <span class="hlt">impact</span> of ambient temperature on mortality in the Netherlands during 1979-1997, the <span class="hlt">impact</span> of heat <span class="hlt">waves</span> and cold spells on mortality in particular, and the possibility of any heat <span class="hlt">wave</span>- or cold spell-induced forward dis- placement of mortality. We found a V-like relationship between mortality and temperature, with an</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Maud M. T. E. Huynen; P Martens; Dieneke Schram; Matty P. Weijenberg; Anton E. Kunst</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2001-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">184</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/26120908"> <span id="translatedtitle">A compliant-hull concept for planning craft <span class="hlt">wave-impact</span> shock reduction</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The subject of this paper is analysis of high-speed planing-craft <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">impact</span>, with the inclusion of hull-surface compliance. The analysis methods were extended in an effort to develop compliant-surface technology for <span class="hlt">wave-impact</span> shock reduction. The practical outcome of this work, along with experimental cylinder drop-test evaluations, have been reported previously. The overall technology developed is composed of compliant plates over</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">William S. Vorus</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">185</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.as.miami.edu/geography/research/climatology/Shanghai%20HHWS_IJB.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Heat <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">impacts</span> on mortality in Shanghai, 1998 and 2003</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">A variety of research has linked extreme heat to heightened levels of daily mortality and, not surprisingly, heat <span class="hlt">waves</span> both in 1998 and in 2003 all led to elevated mortality in Shanghai, China. While the heat <span class="hlt">waves</span> in the two years were similar in meteorological character, elevated mortality was much more pronounced during the 1998 event, but it remains unclear</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Jianguo Tan; Youfei Zheng; Guixiang Song; Laurence S. Kalkstein; Adam J. Kalkstein; Xu Tang</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">186</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/18092580"> <span id="translatedtitle">The <span class="hlt">Wave</span> <span class="hlt">Function</span> of the Lyman-Alpha Photon Part I. The <span class="hlt">Wave</span> <span class="hlt">Function</span> in the Angular and Linear Momentum Representations</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">To the best of the writer?s knowledge no one has given the <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> of a photon emitted in an atomic, molecular, or nuclear transition. In the present paper we derive the <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> in the angular momentum and linear momentum representations for the photon emitted by a non-relativistic hydrogen atom, when the electron of the atom falls from the</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">H. E. Moses</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2002-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">187</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.seislab.cn/Uploadfiles/200741516564_CL_2005JB003665.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">A <span class="hlt">wave</span> equation migration method for receiver <span class="hlt">function</span> imaging: 1. Theory</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">A <span class="hlt">wave</span> equation-based poststack depth migration method is proposed to image the Earth's internal structure using teleseismic receiver <span class="hlt">functions</span>. By utilizing a frequency <span class="hlt">wave</span> number domain one-way phase screen propagator for <span class="hlt">wave</span> field extrapolation in the migration scheme, common conversion point (CCP) stacked receiver <span class="hlt">functions</span> are backward propagated to construct a subsurface structural image. The phase screen propagator migration method</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ling Chen; Lianxing Wen; Tianyu Zheng</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">188</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.cwp.mines.edu/Meetings/Project07/cwppaper12.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Extracting the Green's <span class="hlt">function</span> of attenuating heterogeneous acoustic media from uncorrelated <span class="hlt">waves</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Green's <span class="hlt">function</span> of acoustic or elastic <span class="hlt">wave</span> propagation can, for loss-less media, be retrieved by correlating the <span class="hlt">wave</span> field that is excited by random sources and is recorded at two locations. Here the generalization of this idea to attenuating acoustic <span class="hlt">waves</span> in an inhomogeneous medium is addressed, and it is shown that the Green's <span class="hlt">function</span> can be retrieved from</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Roel Snieder</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">189</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007AGUFM.T13C1476L"> <span id="translatedtitle">Insights Into Caribbean Lithospheric Structure From S <span class="hlt">Wave</span> Receiver <span class="hlt">Functions</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">BOLIVAR (Broadband Ocean-Land Investigation of Venezuela and the Antilles arc Region) was aimed at investigating the interplay between the lithospheric and asthenospheric mantle of the Caribbean and the South America plates. The oblique collision of the Caribbean plate migrating eastwards has created a complicated deformation zone with strike-slip, compressional and extensional structures along the Caribbean and South America boundary. Earlier results with P receiver <span class="hlt">functions</span> revealed strong variations in crustal thickness ranging from 15 km beneath the Caribbean Sea to 55 km beneath Venezuela. However, one of the fundamental questions not yet resolved concerns the thickness of the lithosphere in this region. Using the S <span class="hlt">wave</span> receiver <span class="hlt">function</span> technique, we analyzed seismograms from some 100 events at epicentral distances of 55-125 degree. The seismograms were rotated and deconvolved to isolate S-to-P conversions from the incident S <span class="hlt">wave</span>. These were subsequently stacked after their respective conversion points and mapped into the subsurface. A strong negative phase is associated with the S-to-P conversion from the base of the lithosphere. Analysis of these data is ongoing, but we expect to see large variation in lithospheric thickness as the BOLIVAR array spans the transition from the Caribbean with OBS stations to the interior of South America (Guyana Shield).</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Landes, M.; Pavlis, G. L.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">190</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013SPIE.8749E..0QM"> <span id="translatedtitle">A choice of <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> in the making of time</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Atomic clocks exchanging signals serve as a background against which to measure the motion of objects on or near the Earth. The background of clocks and signals requires feedback involving computation, both internal to each clock and for regulating relations between clocks. Feedback within a clock responds to a flow of measured outcomes which, by quantum theory, are unpredictable. The steering of atomic clocks in response to unpredictable occurrences of outcomes depends on a <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span>, and the choice of this <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> requires an assumption underivable in any logic consistent with quantum theory—another form of unpredictability. Currently backgrounds for motion, for example used in the Global Positioning System, consist of one or another (physical) reference frame as a realization of a (mathematical) reference system that consists of a spacetime coordinate chart with a specified metric tensor field—a structure that expresses neither the unpredictability inherent in atomic clocks nor the feedback by which one deals with this unpredictability. Without requiring the assumption of a metric tensor or even a spacetime, here we introduce a novel type of reference system consisting of the records and criteria resident in real-time computers that mediate feedback, a reference system that, by expressing feedback, structures the unpredictables in a background of motion. The criteria for clock adjustment are discussed. Trade-offs involved in these criteria call for adjusting a background in response to the motion of the objects tracked.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Myers, John M.; Madjid, F. Hadi</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">191</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008PhRvA..78e2116T"> <span id="translatedtitle">Photon <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span>: A covariant formulation and equivalence with QED</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We discuss the limits of the photon <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> (PWF) formalism, which is experiencing a revival these days as a result of new practical applications in photonics and quantum optics. We build a Dirac-like equation for the PWF written in a manifestly covariant form and show that, in the presence of charged matter fields, it reproduces the standard formulation of (classical) electrodynamics. This shows that attempts to construct a full quantum theory of interacting photons (mutually or interacting with matter) based on the so-called photon <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> approach can lead only to results already described by standard quantum electrodynamics (QED). The PWF formalism can then be used only to provide an easier description of some particular situations—for example, the propagation of free photons or photons propagating in a medium as described in Bialynicki-Birula [in Progress in Optics, edited by E. Wolf (Elsevier, Amsterdam, 1996), pp. 245-294] especially when the photon number remains fixed in time but not to replace QED in toto.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Tamburini, F.; Vicino, D.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">192</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.agu.org/journals/jc/jc1012/2009JC006090/2009JC006090.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Coupling of surge and <span class="hlt">waves</span> for an Ivan-like hurricane <span class="hlt">impacting</span> the Tampa Bay, Florida region</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The interactions between <span class="hlt">waves</span> and storm surge are investigated using an unstructured grid, coupled <span class="hlt">wave</span>-surge model forced by a hypothetical Ivan-like hurricane <span class="hlt">impacting</span> the Tampa Bay, Florida region. The <span class="hlt">waves</span> derived from the unstructured version of the third-generation <span class="hlt">wave</span> model simulating <span class="hlt">waves</span> nearshore. The surge derives from the unstructured Finite-Volume Coastal Ocean Model, to which <span class="hlt">wave</span>-induced forces (based on radiation</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Yong Huang; Robert H. Weisberg; Lianyuan Zheng</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">193</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22104538"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Impact</span> of propagating and standing <span class="hlt">waves</span> on cavitation appearance.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Standing <span class="hlt">waves</span> play a significant role in the appearance of cavitation phenomena. The goal of this study was to investigate the effect that the relation between standing and propagating <span class="hlt">waves</span> in a focused field has on acoustic bubble cloud formation. Measurements of the cavitation signals were performed on five different configurations of a hemispheric phased array transducer (230 kHz) representing a wide range of relations between propagating and standing <span class="hlt">waves</span>. The results show that configurations with a larger propagating component induce bubble clouds at lower pressures than configurations with a larger standing component. PMID:22104538</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kenis, Alexander M; Grinfeld, Javier; Zadicario, Eyal; Vitek, Shuki</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-11-21</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">194</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/51081644"> <span id="translatedtitle">An Inversion Method of Significant <span class="hlt">Wave</span> Height Based on Radial Basis <span class="hlt">Function</span> Neural Network</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">In view of the question that traditional significant <span class="hlt">wave</span> height inversion method of ocean <span class="hlt">wave</span> don't have high precision and its applicable scope is limited, a significant <span class="hlt">wave</span> height inversion method based on radial basis <span class="hlt">function</span> neural network is proposed. Assume significant <span class="hlt">wave</span> height has a linear relationship with the radar image signal-to-noise ratio's square root, radial basis <span class="hlt">function</span> neural</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Liqiang Liu; Zhichao Fan; Chunyan Tao; Yuntao Dai</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">195</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2006AIPC..820.1328K"> <span id="translatedtitle">Study of <span class="hlt">Impact</span> Excited Elastic <span class="hlt">Waves</span> in Concrete by Scanning Laser Vibrometry</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Laser vibrometer based contactless measurements of elastic <span class="hlt">wave</span> fields at the surface of a concrete block excited by a mechanical <span class="hlt">impact</span> are presented. Numerical simulations of the same situation provide wavefront snapshots, which show very good agreement in nearly all of the essential features of the measured <span class="hlt">wave</span> modes. The simulation results are displayed additionally along cross sections through the volume which helps to clarify the origin of displacement fields at the surfaces. Only shear and Rayleigh <span class="hlt">wave</span> modes could be identified both in experiment and simulation. Obviously the longitudinal <span class="hlt">wave</span> modes are too weak to be visible in the present snapshot images with the intensity scales used. This dominance of shear and Rayleigh <span class="hlt">waves</span> is one of the reasons for a great deal of difficulties the <span class="hlt">impact</span> echo method suffers from.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Köhler, B.; Schubert, F.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">196</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012GeoRL..3912602G"> <span id="translatedtitle">Does direct <span class="hlt">impact</span> of SST on short wind <span class="hlt">waves</span> matter for scatterometry?</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Scatterometer radar backscatter depends on the relationship linking surface stress and surface roughness. SST can alter the growth rate of centimeter-scale <span class="hlt">waves</span> through its <span class="hlt">impact</span> on air and water density and water viscosity. This SST-dependency has not been included in the standard Geophysical Model <span class="hlt">Functions</span>. This study uses a radar imaging model to evaluate this SST-dependence and compares the results to observations from QuikScat Ku-band and ASCAT C-band scatterometers. A SST correction could raise wind speeds by up to 0.2 ms-1 in the storm track region of the Southern Ocean for C-band scatterometers. For the higher frequency Ku-band scatterometers, a SST-induced reduction up to 0.4 ms-1 is predicted south of 60°S, where SST is cold and winds are moderate.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Grodsky, Semyon A.; Kudryavtsev, Vladimir N.; Bentamy, Abderrahim; Carton, James A.; Chapron, Bertrand</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">197</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013JGRA..118.5039B"> <span id="translatedtitle">Magnetospheric electron-velocity-distribution <span class="hlt">function</span> information from <span class="hlt">wave</span> observations</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The electron-velocity-distribution <span class="hlt">function</span> was determined to be highly non-Maxwellian and more appropriate to a kappa distribution, with ? ? 2.0, near magnetic midnight in the low-latitude magnetosphere just outside a stable plasmasphere during extremely quiet geomagnetic conditions. The kappa results were based on sounder-stimulated Qn plasma resonances using the Radio Plasma Imager (RPI) on the IMAGE satellite; the state of the plasmasphere was determined from IMAGE/EUV observations. The Qn resonances correspond to the maximum frequencies of Bernstein-mode <span class="hlt">waves</span> that are observed between the harmonics of the electron cyclotron frequency in the frequency domain above the upper-hybrid frequency. Here we present the results of a parametric investigation that included suprathermal electrons in the electron-velocity-distribution <span class="hlt">function</span> used in the plasma-<span class="hlt">wave</span> dispersion equation to calculate the Qn frequencies for a range of kappa and fpe/fce values for Qn resonances from Q1 to Q9. The Qn frequencies were also calculated using a Maxwellian distribution, and they were found to be greater than those calculated using a kappa distribution with the frequency differences increasing with increasing n for a fixed ? and with decreasing ? for a fixed n. The calculated fQn values have been incorporated into the RPI BinBrowser software providing a powerful tool for rapidly obtaining information on the nature of the magnetospheric electron-velocity-distribution <span class="hlt">function</span> and the electron number density Ne. This capability enabled accurate (within a few percent) in situ Ne determinations to be made along the outbound orbital track as IMAGE moved away from the plasmapause. The extremely quiet geomagnetic conditions allowed IMAGE/EUV-extracted counts to be compared with the RPI-determined orbital-track Ne profile. The comparisons revealed remarkably similar Ne structures.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Benson, Robert F.; ViñAs, Adolfo F.; Osherovich, Vladimir A.; Fainberg, Joseph; Purser, Carola M.; Adrian, Mark L.; Galkin, Ivan A.; Reinisch, Bodo W.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-08-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">198</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/26491476"> <span id="translatedtitle">Measurement of stress <span class="hlt">wave</span> asymmetries in hypervelocity projectile <span class="hlt">impact</span> experiments</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Asymmetries in both structure and ejecta are observed around a number of craters on planetary surfaces. Similar asymmetries have been documented for hypervelocity <span class="hlt">impact</span> experiments. Such asymmetries arise from the stress front developed around oblique <span class="hlt">impacts</span>. The onset angle for asymmetric stress distributions indicates that geologic asymmetries should be present in a significant fraction of <span class="hlt">impact</span> structures.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Jason M. Dahl; Peter H. Schultz</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2001-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">199</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012cosp...39.1367N"> <span id="translatedtitle">ASTROD-GW and its Gravitational-<span class="hlt">Wave</span> Response <span class="hlt">Function</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">ASTROD-GW is an optimization of ASTROD to focus on the goal of detection of GWs. The mission orbits of the 3 spacecraft forming a nearly equilateral triangular array are chosen to be near the Sun-Earth Lagrange points L3, L4 and L5. The 3 spacecraft range interferometrically with one another with arm length about 260 million kilometers. With 52 times longer in arm length compared to that of LISA, the strain detection sensitivity is 52 times better toward larger wavelength. The scientific aim is focused for gravitational <span class="hlt">wave</span> detection at low frequency. The science goals include detection of GWs from MBHs, and Extreme-Mass-Ratio Black Hole Inspirals (EMRI), and using these observations to find the evolution of the equation of state of dark energy and to explore the co-evolution of massive black holes with galaxies. In this paper we give an overview of orbit design, time delay interferometry, payload selection and mission requirements for ASTROD-GW, and calculate its gravitational-<span class="hlt">wave</span> response <span class="hlt">function</span>.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ni, Wei-Tou</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">200</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013ChOE...27..283X"> <span id="translatedtitle">Study on far field <span class="hlt">wave</span> patterns and their characteristics of Havelock form green <span class="hlt">function</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A new mathematical integral representation including five integrals about the far field <span class="hlt">wave</span> shape <span class="hlt">function</span> of Havelock form translating-pulsating source is obtained by performing variable substitution. Constant-phase curves and propagation <span class="hlt">wave</span> patterns are investigated by applying stationary phase analysis method to the new representation. Some findings are summarized as follows: (1) when 0< ? <0.25 (where ? is the Strouhal number), three types of stationary phase curves corresponding to three propagation <span class="hlt">wave</span> patterns such as fan <span class="hlt">wave</span> pattern, inner V and outer V <span class="hlt">wave</span> patterns, are found in the integral representation. (2) When ?>0.25, besides three types of <span class="hlt">wave</span> patterns such as a ring-faning <span class="hlt">wave</span> pattern, a fan <span class="hlt">wave</span> pattern and an inner V <span class="hlt">wave</span> pattern, a new one called parallel <span class="hlt">wave</span> pattern is also found which not only exists in the integrals about the ring-fan <span class="hlt">wave</span> and fan <span class="hlt">wave</span>, but also in the integrals whose interval is [0, ?] In addition, Characteristics about these parallel <span class="hlt">waves</span> such as mathematical expressions, existence conditions, propagation directions and <span class="hlt">wave</span> lengths are obtained, and cancellation relationships between these parallel <span class="hlt">waves</span> are stated, which certificates the fact that there are no parallel <span class="hlt">waves</span> existing in the far field.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Xu, Yong; Dong, Wen-cai; Xiao, Wen-bin</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' 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href="#">12</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#">13</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#">14</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#">15</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#">16</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#">17</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#">18</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#">19</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#">20</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">201</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21544647"> <span id="translatedtitle">Probing dissociative molecular dications by mapping vibrational <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We present high-resolution photoelectron-Auger-electron coincidence spectra of methane (CH{sub 4}). Since the vibrational structure in the photoelectron spectrum is resolved, the Auger spectra corresponding to different vibrational levels can be separated. The seven final states of CH{sub 4}{sup 2+} are either dissociative or metastable, but in any case are populated in a repulsive part of their potential-energy curve via the Auger decay. The Auger line shapes can therefore be obtained by mapping the vibrational <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> of the core-hole state into energy space. We have implemented this connection in the data analysis. By simultaneously fitting the different Auger spectra, detailed information on the energies of the dicationic states and their repulsive potential-energy curves is derived.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Puettner, R.; Sekushin, V.; Kaindl, G. [Institut fuer Experimentalphysik, Freie Universitaet Berlin, Arnimallee 14, D-14195 Berlin-Dahlem (Germany); Arion, T.; Lischke, T.; Mucke, M.; Hergenhahn, U. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, Boltzmannstrasse 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Foerstel, M. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, Boltzmannstrasse 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Bradshaw, A. M. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, Boltzmannstrasse 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Fritz-Haber-Institut der Max-Planck-Gesellschaft, Faradayweg 4-6, D-14195 Berlin (Germany)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-04-15</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">202</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/466852"> <span id="translatedtitle">Finite temperature <span class="hlt">wave-function</span> renormalization, a comparative analysis</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We compare two competing theories regarding finite temperature <span class="hlt">wave-function</span> corrections for the process H {r_arrow} e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} and for n + {nu} {r_arrow} p + e{sup {minus}} and related processes of interest for primordial nucleosynthesis. Although the two methods are distinct (as shown in H {r_arrow} e{sup +}e{sup {minus}}) they yield the same finite temperature correction for all n {r_arrow} p and p {r_arrow} n processes. Both methods yield an increase in the He/H ratio of 0.01% due to finite temperature renormalization rather than a decrease of 0.16% as previously predicted. 6 refs., 3 figs.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Chapman, I.A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1996-12-31</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">203</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/1042058"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Impact</span> of Phase Transitions on P <span class="hlt">Wave</span> Velocities</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In regions where a high pressure phase is in equilibrium with a low pressure phase, the bulk modulus defined by the P-V relationship is greatly reduced. Here we evaluate the effect of such transitions on the P <span class="hlt">wave</span> velocity. A model, where cation diffusion is the rate limiting factor, is used to project laboratory data to the conditions of a seismic <span class="hlt">wave</span> propagating in the two-phase region. We demonstrate that for the minimum expected effect there is a significant reduction of the seismic velocity, as large as 10% over a narrow depth range.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">D Weidner; L Li</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-12-31</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">204</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/1019980"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Impact</span> of Phase Transitions on P <span class="hlt">Wave</span> Velocities</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In regions where a high pressure phase is in equilibrium with a low pressure phase, the bulk modulus defined by the P-V relationship is greatly reduced. Here we evaluate the effect of such transitions on the P <span class="hlt">wave</span> velocity. A model, where cation diffusion is the rate limiting factor, is used to project laboratory data to the conditions of a seismic <span class="hlt">wave</span> propagating in the two-phase region. We demonstrate that for the minimum expected effect there is a significant reduction of the seismic velocity, as large as 10% over a narrow depth range.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Weidner, D.; Li, L</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">205</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8354759"> <span id="translatedtitle">Propagation of shock <span class="hlt">waves</span> in elastic solids caused by cavitation microjet <span class="hlt">impact</span>. II: Application in extracorporeal shock <span class="hlt">wave</span> lithotripsy.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">To better understand the mechanism of stone fragmentation during extracorporeal shock <span class="hlt">wave</span> lithotripsy (ESWL), the model developed in Part I [P. Zhong and C.J. Chuong, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 94, 19-28 (1993)] is applied to study cavitation microjet impingement and its resultant shock <span class="hlt">wave</span> propagation in renal calculi. <span class="hlt">Impact</span> pressure at the stone boundary and stress, strain at the propagating shock fronts in the stone were calculated for typical ESWL loading conditions. At the anterior surface of the stone, the jet induced compressive stress can vary from 0.82 approximately 4 times that of the water hammer pressure depending on the contact angles; whereas the jet-induced shear stress can achieve its maximum, with a magnitude of 30% approximately 54% of the water hammer pressure, near the detachment of the longitudinal (or P) <span class="hlt">wave</span> in the solid. Comparison of model predictions with material failure strengths of renal calculi suggests that jet <span class="hlt">impact</span> can lead to stone surface erosion by combined compressive and shear loadings at the jet <span class="hlt">impacting</span> surface, and spalling failure by tensile forces at the distal surface of the stone. Comparing responses from four different stone types suggests that cystine is the most difficult stone to fragment in ESWL, as observed from clinical experience. PMID:8354759</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Zhong, P; Chuong, C J; Preminger, G M</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1993-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">206</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21513269"> <span id="translatedtitle">Variational Approach to Yang-Mills Theory with non-Gaussian <span class="hlt">Wave</span> <span class="hlt">Functionals</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A general method for treating non-Gaussian <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functionals</span> in quantum field theory is presented and applied to the Hamiltonian approach to Yang-Mills theory in Coulomb gauge in order to include a three-gluon kernel in the exponential of the vacuum <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functional</span>. The three-gluon vertex is calculated using the propagators found in the variational approach with a Gaussian trial <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functional</span> as input.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Campagnari, Davide R.; Reinhardt, Hugo [Institut fuer theoretische Physik, Universitaet Tuebingen, Auf der Morgenstelle 14, 72076 Tuebingen (Germany)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-05-23</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">207</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/55236792"> <span id="translatedtitle">Double photoionization of helium: Use of a correlated two-electron continuum <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">A correlated two-electron continuum <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> satisfying the correct asymptotic boundary condition is used to calculate double-photoionization cross sections. It is built up as a product of three two-body Coulomb continua. As a highly correlated ground-state <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> is employed, the present results serve as a critical test of the two-electron continuum <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> on this double process. For all</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">M. A. Kornberg; J. E. Miraglia</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1993-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">208</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6443336"> <span id="translatedtitle">Reduced local energy as a criterion for the accuracy of Hartree--Fock <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The reduced local energy concept is applied to assess the local accuracy of Hartree--Fock <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span>. The method is illustrated by application to all the Clementi and Roetti's <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> for the helium atom and to the first row of the helium isoelectronic series. The use of the reduced local energy as a means for improvement of expectation values is discussed. Application to the five term helium <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> of Clementi and Clementi and Roetti is considered.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">King, F.W.; LeGore, M.A.; Kelly, M.K.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1981-07-15</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">209</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1988LPICo.673...21B"> <span id="translatedtitle">Sedimentological effects of tsunamis, with particular reference to <span class="hlt">impact</span>-generated and volcanogenic <span class="hlt">waves</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Impulse-generated <span class="hlt">waves</span> (tsunamis) may be produced, at varying scales and global recurrence intervals (RI), by several processes. Meteorite-water <span class="hlt">impacts</span> will produce tsunamis, and asteroid-scale <span class="hlt">impacts</span> with associated mega-tsunamis may occur. A bolide-water <span class="hlt">impact</span> would undoubtedly produce a major tsunami, whose sedimentological effects should be recognizable. Even a bolide-land <span class="hlt">impact</span> might trigger major submarine landslides and thus tsunamis. In all posulated scenarios for the K/T boundary event, then, tsunamis are expected, and where to look for them must be determined, and how to distinguish deposits from different tsunamis. Also, because tsunamis decrease in height as they move away from their source, the proximal effects will differ by perhaps orders of magnitude from distal effects. Data on the characteristics of tsunamis at their origin are scarce. Some observations exist for tsunamis generated by thermonuclear explosions and for seismogenic tsunamis, and experimental work was conducted on <span class="hlt">impact</span>-generated tsunamis. All tsunamis of interest have <span class="hlt">wave</span>-lengths of 0(100) km and thus behave as shallow-water <span class="hlt">waves</span> in all ocean depths. Typical <span class="hlt">wave</span> periods are 0(10 to 100) minutes. The effect of these tsunamis can be estimated in the marine and coastal realm by calculating boundary shear stresses (expressed as U*, the shear velocity). An event layer at the K/T boundary in Texas occurs in mid-shelf muds. Only a large, long-period <span class="hlt">wave</span> with a <span class="hlt">wave</span> height of 0(50) m, is deemed sufficient to have produced this layer. Such <span class="hlt">wave</span> heights imply a nearby volcanic explosion on the scale of Krakatau or larger, or a nearby submarine landslide also of great size, or a bolide-water <span class="hlt">impact</span> in the ocean.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Bourgeois, Joanne; Wiberg, Patricia L.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">210</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22484031"> <span id="translatedtitle">Rosuvastatin improves pulse <span class="hlt">wave</span> reflection by restoring endothelial <span class="hlt">function</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">One of the major indicators of intact endothelial <span class="hlt">function</span> is basal nitric oxide (NO) activity. Further, it seems to be likely that statin therapy exerts beneficial effects on vascular <span class="hlt">function</span>, at least in part via an improvement of NO bioavailability. In the present double-blind crossover study 29 hypercholesterolemic patients were randomly assigned to receive rosuvastatin and placebo for 42days. Pulse <span class="hlt">wave</span> analysis was assessed after 30min of rest (baseline) and after infusion of N(G)-monomethyl-l-arginine (l-NMMA) at the end of 42days treatment period. The magnitude of the increase in central augmentation index (cAIx) in response to inhibition of NO synthase (NOS) by l-NMMA is indicative of basal NO activity. CAIx was significantly lower (18.3±10 versus 21.9±12%, p=0.027) with rosuvastatin compared to placebo. There was no increment of cAIx in response to l-NMMA in placebo group. In contrast, cAIx increased significantly in response to l-NMMA (20.5±11 versus 25.7±10mm Hg, p=0.001) in rosuvastatin group. The percentage of increase of cAIx tended to be more pronounced after treatment with rosuvastatin compared to placebo (53.7±92 versus 14.1±36%, p=0.087). Pulse pressure amplification (PPA) improved (1.31±0.2 versus 1.26±0.2%, p=0.016) after rosuvastatin compared to placebo. Regression analyses revealed that both LDL-cholesterol and CRP-levels are independent determinants of basal NO activity improvement, which itself is an independent determinant of vascular <span class="hlt">function</span>, expressed by an improvement of pulse <span class="hlt">wave</span> reflection and PPA. In this placebo controlled study, treatment with rosuvastatin improved vascular and endothelial <span class="hlt">function</span>. Determinants for improved NO production in patients with hypercholesterolemia were the achieved levels of LDL-cholesterol and CRP. Overall, in patients without CV disease, rosuvastatin exerted beneficially effect on vascular dysfunction, one of the earliest manifestation of atherosclerosis. PMID:22484031</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ott, C; Schneider, M P; Schlaich, M P; Schmieder, R E</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-03-29</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">211</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/54631035"> <span id="translatedtitle">Can gravity <span class="hlt">waves</span> significantly <span class="hlt">impact</span> PSC occurrence in the Antarctic?</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">A combination of POAM III aerosol extinction and CHAMP RO temperature measurements are used to examine the role of atmospheric gravity <span class="hlt">waves</span> in the formation of Antarctic Polar Stratospheric Clouds (PSCs). POAM III aerosol extinction observations and quality flag information are used to identify Polar Stratospheric Clouds using an unsupervised clustering algorithm. A PSC proxy, derived by thresholding Met Office</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">A. J. McDonald; S. E. George; R. M. Woollands</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">212</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.atmos-chem-phys.org/9/8825/2009/acp-9-8825-2009.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Do gravity <span class="hlt">waves</span> significantly <span class="hlt">impact</span> PSC occurrence in the Antarctic?</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">A combination of POAM III aerosol extinction and CHAMP RO temperature measurements are used to ex- amine the role of atmospheric gravity <span class="hlt">waves</span> in the formation of Antarctic Polar Stratospheric Clouds (PSCs). POAM III aerosol extinction observations and quality flag information are used to identify Polar Stratospheric Clouds using an un- supervised clustering algorithm. A PSC proxy, derived by thresholding</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">A. J. McDonald; S. E. George; R. M. Woollands</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">213</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21039502"> <span id="translatedtitle">About Essence of the <span class="hlt">Wave</span> <span class="hlt">Function</span> on Atomic Level and in Superconductors</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> was proposed for description of quantum phenomena on the atomic level. But now it is well known that quantum phenomena are observed not only on atomic level and the <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> is used for description of macroscopic quantum phenomena, such as superconductivity. The essence of the <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> on level elementary particles was and is the subject of heated argument among founders of quantum mechanics and other physicists. This essence seems more clear in superconductor. But impossibility of probabilistic interpretation of <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> in this case results to obvious contradiction of quantum principles with some fundamental principles of physics.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Nikulov, A. V. [Institute of Microelectronics Technology and High Purity Materials, Russian Academy of Sciences, 142432 Chernogolovka, Moscow District (Russian Federation)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-12-03</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">214</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24070284"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> for time-dependent harmonically confined electrons in a time-dependent electric field.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The many-body <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> of a system of interacting particles confined by a time-dependent harmonic potential and perturbed by a time-dependent spatially homogeneous electric field is derived via the Feynman path-integral method. The <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> is comprised of a phase factor times the solution to the unperturbed time-dependent Schro?dinger equation with the latter being translated by a time-dependent value that satisfies the classical driven equation of motion. The <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> reduces to that of the Harmonic Potential Theorem <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> for the case of the time-independent harmonic confining potential. PMID:24070284</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Li, Yu-Qi; Pan, Xiao-Yin; Sahni, Viraht</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-09-21</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">215</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013JChPh.139k4301L"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> for time-dependent harmonically confined electrons in a time-dependent electric field</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The many-body <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> of a system of interacting particles confined by a time-dependent harmonic potential and perturbed by a time-dependent spatially homogeneous electric field is derived via the Feynman path-integral method. The <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> is comprised of a phase factor times the solution to the unperturbed time-dependent Schrödinger equation with the latter being translated by a time-dependent value that satisfies the classical driven equation of motion. The <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> reduces to that of the Harmonic Potential Theorem <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> for the case of the time-independent harmonic confining potential.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Li, Yu-Qi; Pan, Xiao-Yin; Sahni, Viraht</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">216</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/58607090"> <span id="translatedtitle">Eikonal Approximation in AdS\\/CFT: Conformal Partial <span class="hlt">Waves</span> and Finite N Four-Point <span class="hlt">Functions</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">We introduce the <span class="hlt">impact</span>-parameter representation for conformal field theory correlators of the form A ~ < O_1 O_2 O_1 O_2 >. This representation is appropriate in the eikonal kinematical regime, and approximates the conformal partial-<span class="hlt">wave</span> decomposition in the limit of large spin and dimension of the exchanged primary. Using recent results on the two-point <span class="hlt">function</span> < O_1 O_1 >_{shock} in</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">L Cornalba; M S Costa; J Penedones; R Schiappa</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">217</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21541610"> <span id="translatedtitle">Higher twist parton distributions from light-cone <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We explore the possibility to construct higher-twist parton distributions in a nucleon at some low reference scale from convolution integrals of the light-cone <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> (WFs). To this end we introduce simple models for the four-particle nucleon WFs involving three valence quarks and a gluon with total orbital momentum zero, and estimate their normalization (WF at the origin) using QCD sum rules. We demonstrate that these WFs provide one with a reasonable description of both polarized and unpolarized parton densities at large values of the Bjorken variable x{>=}0.5. Twist-three parton distributions are then constructed as convolution integrals of qqqg and the usual three-quark WFs. The cases of the polarized structure <span class="hlt">function</span> g{sub 2}(x,Q{sup 2}) and single transverse spin asymmetries are considered in detail. We find that the so-called gluon pole contribution to twist-three distributions relevant for single spin asymmetry vanishes in this model, but is generated perturbatively at higher scales by the evolution, in the spirit of Glueck-Reya-Vogt parton distributions.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Braun, V. M.; Lautenschlager, T.; Pirnay, B. [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Universitaet Regensburg, D-93040 Regensburg (Germany); Manashov, A. N. [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Universitaet Regensburg, D-93040 Regensburg (Germany); Department of Theoretical Physics, St. Petersburg State University 199034, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">218</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011PhRvD..83i4023B"> <span id="translatedtitle">Higher twist parton distributions from light-cone <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We explore the possibility to construct higher-twist parton distributions in a nucleon at some low reference scale from convolution integrals of the light-cone <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> (WFs). To this end we introduce simple models for the four-particle nucleon WFs involving three valence quarks and a gluon with total orbital momentum zero, and estimate their normalization (WF at the origin) using QCD sum rules. We demonstrate that these WFs provide one with a reasonable description of both polarized and unpolarized parton densities at large values of the Bjorken variable x?0.5. Twist-three parton distributions are then constructed as convolution integrals of qqqg and the usual three-quark WFs. The cases of the polarized structure <span class="hlt">function</span> g2(x,Q2) and single transverse spin asymmetries are considered in detail. We find that the so-called gluon pole contribution to twist-three distributions relevant for single spin asymmetry vanishes in this model, but is generated perturbatively at higher scales by the evolution, in the spirit of Glück-Reya-Vogt parton distributions.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Braun, V. M.; Lautenschlager, T.; Manashov, A. N.; Pirnay, B.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">219</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.iemss.org/iemss2002/proceedings/pdf/volume%20tre/318_fuessel.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">The ICLIPS <span class="hlt">Impacts</span> Tool: Presenting climate <span class="hlt">impact</span> response <span class="hlt">functions</span> for integrated assessments of climate change</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The ICLIPS model is an integrated assessment model of climate change that links global climate change with regional <span class="hlt">impacts</span> and mitigation efforts by integrating components from different disciplines and various spatial scales. Its reduced-form <span class="hlt">impact</span> module consists of climate <span class="hlt">impact</span> response <span class="hlt">functions</span> (CIRFs) that depict the regional sensitivity of selected climate-sensitive <span class="hlt">impact</span> sectors to changes in important climatic and atmospheric</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hans-Martin Fussel</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">220</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21254401"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Impact</span> of cosmic neutrinos on the gravitational-<span class="hlt">wave</span> background</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We obtain the equation governing the evolution of the cosmological gravitational-<span class="hlt">wave</span> background, accounting for the presence of cosmic neutrinos, up to second order in perturbation theory. In particular, we focus on the epoch during radiation dominance, after neutrino decoupling, when neutrinos yield a relevant contribution to the total energy density and behave as collisionless ultrarelativistic particles. Besides recovering the standard damping effect due to neutrinos, a new source term for gravitational <span class="hlt">waves</span> is shown to arise from the neutrino anisotropic stress tensor. The importance of such a source term, so far completely disregarded in the literature, is related to the high velocity dispersion of neutrinos in the considered epoch; its computation requires solving the full second-order Boltzmann equation for collisionless neutrinos.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Mangilli, Anna; Bartolo, Nicola; Matarrese, Sabino; Riotto, Antonio [Institute of Space Sciences (CSIC-IEEC) Campus UAB, Torre C5 parell 2. Bellaterra (Barcelona) (Spain); Dipartimento di Fisica 'Galileo Galilei', Universita di Padova, via Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica 'Galileo Galilei', Universita di Padova (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Padova, via Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Padova, via Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy); CERN, Theory Division, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-10-15</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img 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</div> </div> </div><!-- page_11 div --> <div id="page_12" class="hiddenDiv"> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' href="#">4</a> <a onClick='return 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href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">221</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1040697"> <span id="translatedtitle">Covariant nucleon <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> with S, D, and P-state components</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Expressions for the nucleon <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> in the covariant spectator theory (CST) are derived. The nucleon is described as a system with a off-mass-shell constituent quark, free to interact with an external probe, and two spectator constituent quarks on their mass shell. Integrating over the internal momentum of the on-mass-shell quark pair allows us to derive an effective nucleon <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> that can be written only in terms of the quark and diquark (quark-pair) variables. The derived nucleon <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> includes contributions from S, P and D-<span class="hlt">waves</span>.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Franz Gross, G. Ramalho, M. T. Pena</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">222</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/30379218"> <span id="translatedtitle">Lung <span class="hlt">function</span> tests and a `vertical' P <span class="hlt">wave</span> axis in the electrocardiogram</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Chapman, T. T. (1974).Thorax, 29, 106-109. Lung <span class="hlt">function</span> tests and a `vertical' P <span class="hlt">wave</span> axis in the electrocardiogram. The relationship between a vertical P <span class="hlt">wave</span> axis and impaired lung <span class="hlt">function</span> was studied in 1,144 patients with chronic non-specific lung disease. There was a significant relationship between a vertical P <span class="hlt">wave</span> axis and reduction in forced expiratory volume (FEV1), FEV1 as</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">T. T. Chapman</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1974-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">223</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/52951871"> <span id="translatedtitle">Nucleon-nucleon short-range <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> and hard bremsstrahlung pp-->ppgamma</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Various opportunities to investigate the short-range NN <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> are discussed, having in mind, in particular, the quark degrees of freedom. It is shown that hard bremsstrahlung in the process pp-->ppgamma at proton beam energies of 350-500 MeV discriminates efficiently pp-<span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> with the short-range nodes in S and P <span class="hlt">waves</span> that correspond to the Moscow potential of the NN</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">N. A. Khokhlov; V. A. Knyr; V. G. Neudatchin; A. M. Shirokov</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2000-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">224</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/20875704"> <span id="translatedtitle">Failure <span class="hlt">Wave</span> in DEDF and Soda-Lime Glass during Rod <span class="hlt">Impact</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Investigations of glass by planar, and classical and symmetric Taylor <span class="hlt">impact</span> experiments reveal that failure <span class="hlt">wave</span> velocity vF depends on <span class="hlt">impact</span> velocity, geometry, and type of glass. vF typically increases with <span class="hlt">impact</span> velocity vP to between cS and cL or to {radical}2cS (shear and longitudinal <span class="hlt">wave</span> velocity). This paper reports initial results of an investigation of failure <span class="hlt">waves</span> associated with gold rod <span class="hlt">impact</span> on high-density (DEDF) glass and soda-lime glass. Data are obtained by visualizing simultaneously the failure propagation in the glass with a high-speed camera and the rod penetration velocity u with flash radiography. Results for DEDF glass are reported for vP between 1.2 and 2.0 km/s, those for soda-lime glass with vP {approx_equal}1.3 km/s. It is shown that vF > u, and that in the case of DEDF glass vF/u decreases from ; 1.38 to 1.13 with increasing vp. In addition, several Taylor tests were performed. For both DEDF and soda-lime glass the vF-values, found here as well as vF- data reported in the literature, reveal that--for equal pressures--the failure <span class="hlt">wave</span> velocities determined from Taylor tests or planar-<span class="hlt">impact</span> tests are distinctly greater than those observed during steady-state rod penetration.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Orphal, D. L. [International Research Associates, Inc., 4450 Black Avenue, Pleasanton, CA 94566 (United States); Behner, Th.; Hohler, V. [Fraunhofer Institut fuer Kurzzeitdynamik (Ernst-Mach Institut), Eckerstr. 4, 79104 Freiburg (Germany); Anderson, C. E. Jr. [Southwest Research Institute, 6220 Culebra Road, San Antonio, TX 78228-0510 (United States); Templeton, D. W. [U. S. Army RDECOM-TACOM, AMST-TR-R, Warren, MI 48397 (United States)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-07-28</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">225</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/eimsapi.dispdetail?deid=95909"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">IMPACTS</span> OF URBANIZATION ON WATERSHED HYDROLOGIC <span class="hlt">FUNCTION</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Although urbanization has a major <span class="hlt">impact</span> on watershed hydrology, there have not been studies to quantify basic hydrological relationships that are altered by the addition of impervious surfaces. The USDA-ARS and USEPA-ORD-NRMRL have initiated a pilot program to study the <span class="hlt">impacts</span>...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">226</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/Publications.htm?seq_no_115=142660"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">IMPACTS</span> OF URBANIZATION ON WATERSHED HYDROLOGIC <span class="hlt">FUNCTION</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/services/TekTran.htm">Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Although urbanization has a major <span class="hlt">impact</span> on watershed hydrology, there have not been studies to quantify basic hydrological relationships are altered by the addition of impervious surfaces. The USDA-ARS and USEPA-ORD-NRMRL have initiated a pilot program to study the <span class="hlt">impacts</span> of different extents and...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">227</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013AnPhy.337..143C"> <span id="translatedtitle">Dynamical model for longitudinal <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> in light-front holographic QCD</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We construct a Schrödinger-like equation for the longitudinal <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> of a meson in the valence qq¯ sector, based on the 't Hooft model for large-N two-dimensional QCD, and combine this with the usual transverse equation from light-front holographic QCD, to obtain a model for mesons with massive quarks. The computed <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> are compared with the <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> ansatz of Brodsky and de Téramond and used to compute decay constants and parton distribution <span class="hlt">functions</span>. The basis <span class="hlt">functions</span> used to solve the longitudinal equation may be useful for more general calculations of meson states in QCD.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Chabysheva, Sophia S.; Hiller, John R.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">228</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/53100844"> <span id="translatedtitle">Expansion of Positive Energy Coulomb <span class="hlt">Wave</span> <span class="hlt">Functions</span> in Powers of the Energy</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The non-relativistic <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> (in spherical polar coordinates) for a charged particle in a Coulomb field is expressed in a form suitable for problems in which the particle has a small positive energy. This formulation amounts to expanding the radial part of the <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> in powers of the energy E and is achieved by simple algebraic manipulation of power</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">J. G. Beckerley</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1945-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">229</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/19194250"> <span id="translatedtitle">Variational calculations for solid and liquid 4He with a ``shadow'' <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">A new class of trial <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> is introduced to compute variationally the ground-state energy of solid 4He. This <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> is symmetric under particle exchange, translationally invariant, and does not require the a priori introduction of a crystal lattice. It gives a lower energy than and has properties comparable with those given by previous calculations in which atoms are</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Silvio Vitiello; Karl Runge; M. H. Kalos</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1988-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">230</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/55265849"> <span id="translatedtitle">Value of the Dirac-Coulomb <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> at the origin</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">In several perturbative calculations, such as the Lamb shift and decay of positronium into two photons, it is necessary to calculate the <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> of the S state, or the first derivative of the P state, etc. at the origin. This value diverges for the Dirac-Coulomb <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span>. A method suggested by Bethe and Salpeter is used and the result</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">M. K. F. Wong</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1987-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">231</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/53022946"> <span id="translatedtitle">Weak Equivalence Principle and Propagation of the <span class="hlt">Wave</span> <span class="hlt">Function</span> in Quantum Mechanics</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The propagation of the <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> of a particle is characterised by a group and a phase velocity. The group velocity is associated with the particle's classical velocity, which is always smaller than the speed of light, and the phase velocity is associated with the propagation speed of the <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> phase and is treated as being unphysical, since its</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Clovis Jacinto de Matos</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">232</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/18625784"> <span id="translatedtitle">Measurement of the photon light-cone <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> by diffractive dissociation</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The measurement of the pion light-cone <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> is revisited and results\\u000afor the Gegenbauer coefficients are presented. Mesurements of the photon\\u000aelectromagnetic and hadronic <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> are described and results are\\u000apresented.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Daniel Ashery</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">233</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/60157790"> <span id="translatedtitle">Condensate <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> and elementary excitations of bosonic polar molecules: Beyond the first Born approximation</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">We investigate the condensate <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> and elementary excitations of strongly interacting bosonic polar molecules in a harmonic trap, treating the scattering amplitude beyond the standard first Born approximation (FBA). By using an appropriate trial <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> in the variational method, effects of the leading-order correction beyond the FBA have been investigated and shown to be significantly enhanced when the</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">C.-C. Huang; W.-C. Wu; D.-W. Wang</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">234</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/56378316"> <span id="translatedtitle">Imaging Electron <span class="hlt">Wave</span> <span class="hlt">Functions</span> of Quantized Energy Levels in Carbon Nanotubes</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Carbon nanotubes provide a unique system to study one-dimensional quantization phenomena. Scanning tunneling microscopy is used to observe the electronic <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> that correspond to quantized energy levels in short metallic carbon nanotubes. Discrete electron <span class="hlt">waves</span> are apparent from periodic oscillations in the differential conductance as a <span class="hlt">function</span> of the position along the tube axis, with a period that differs</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Liesbeth C. Venema; Jeroen W. G. Wildoer; Jorg W. Janssen; Sander J. Tans; Hinne L. J. Temminck Tuinstra; Leo P. Kouwenhoven; Cees Dekker</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1999-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">235</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010ApPhL..97g2104M"> <span id="translatedtitle">Experimental determination of <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> spread in Si inversion layers</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We have experimentally determined the extent of <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> spread TQM in Si inversion layers on (100)-oriented surface in metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFETs) using the back gate bias sensitivity of front gate threshold voltage of planar fully depleted silicon-on-insulator (SOI) MOSFETs. We show that the sum of TQM for large positive and negative F is an electrically determined value of the SOI thickness TSI. We find that the electric field dependence of TQM for electrons and holes is given by TQM~F-0.4 and F-0.6, respectively, at high electric fields with TQM being larger for holes at a given F. Larger TQM for holes can be explained by the fact that holes have a smaller effective mass along the confinement direction than electrons in (100) Si. The field dependences of TQM are, however, not consistent with the results of variational calculations that assume single-subband occupancy and predict TQM~F-1/3. The discrepancy likely indicates that the effects of multiple-subband occupation are significant at room temperature, especially for holes.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Majumdar, Amlan</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-08-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">236</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/1024266"> <span id="translatedtitle">Antisymmetric <span class="hlt">Wave</span> <span class="hlt">Functions</span> for Mixed Fermion States and Energy Convexity</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We develop the formal basis for the study of independent collections of internally interacting many-particle systems, defined as systems associated with non-overlapping coordinate spaces. We show how ensembles or mixed states of independent many-Fermion systems in their ground states can be described by pure states and give rise to <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> that are antisymmetric with respect to interchange of particle coordinates (and spin). This is achieved by defining an ensemble Hilbert space whose coordinate representation consists of the tensor sum, rather than product, of the coordinates of the systems in the ensemble. As a demonstration of the power of this new formalism, and under the assumptions of a positive interparticle interaction and a corresponding energy that is extensive in the number of particle pairs (pair extensive), we prove the convexity relation, $E_v[N-1]+E_v[N+1]\\ge 2E_v[N]$, where $E_v[N]$ denotes the total ground state energy of $N$ electrons under an external potential, $v({\\bf r})$.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Gonis, Antonios [ORNL; Zhang, Xiaoguang [ORNL; Nicholson, Don M [ORNL; Stocks, George Malcolm [ORNL</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">237</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23652409"> <span id="translatedtitle">Quantum anti-Zeno effect without <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> reduction.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We study the measurement-induced enhancement of the spontaneous decay for a two-level subsystem, where measurements are treated as couplings between the excited state and an auxiliary state rather than the von Neumann's <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> reduction. The photon radiated in a fast decay of the atom, from the auxiliary state to the excited state, triggers a quasi-measurement, as opposed to a projection measurement. Our use of the term "quasi-measurement" refers to a "coupling-based measurement". Such frequent quasi-measurements result in an exponential decay of the survival probability of atomic initial state with a photon emission following each quasi-measurement. Our calculations show that the effective decay rate is of the same form as the one based on projection measurements. The survival probability of the atomic initial state obtained by tracing over all the photon states is equivalent to that of the atomic initial state with a photon emission following each quasi-measurement. PMID:23652409</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ai, Qing; Xu, Dazhi; Yi, Su; Kofman, A G; Sun, C P; Nori, Franco</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">238</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/50431021"> <span id="translatedtitle">The one- and two-photon transverse <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span>: theory and experiment</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">We present a method to characterize one- and two-photon transverse <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> in coordinate space. Measurements of transverse Wigner <span class="hlt">functions</span> for one- and two-photon states from a spontaneous parametric down conversion source are being made.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">B. J. Smith; B. Killett; A. Nahlik; M. G. Raymer; K. Banaszek; I. A. Walmsley</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">239</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/56046356"> <span id="translatedtitle">Correction of the integral transmission <span class="hlt">function</span> for long-<span class="hlt">wave</span> radiation</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">An effort is made to correct the integral transmision <span class="hlt">function</span> for long-<span class="hlt">wave</span> radiation through atmospheric water vapor and carbon dioxide. It is noted that the corrected <span class="hlt">function</span> can be used in models of climate and general circulation.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">E. L. Podol'Skaia; I. G. Rivin</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1988-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">240</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2006APS..DPPCP1103H"> <span id="translatedtitle">Ion distribution <span class="hlt">function</span> perturbations due to propagating Alfven <span class="hlt">waves</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A number of mechanisms for ion heating in the fast solar wind have been proposed. For example, the ions could be directly heated by ion-cyclotron damping of Alfven <span class="hlt">waves</span> or counter-propagating, low-frequency, Alfven <span class="hlt">waves</span> could generate a turbulent cascade that heats ions by exciting higher frequency <span class="hlt">waves</span> that then damp on the ions. In this preliminary study, we report measurements of shear Alfven <span class="hlt">wave</span> propagation and damping at <span class="hlt">wave</span> frequencies near the ion cyclotron frequency. The low amplitude <span class="hlt">waves</span> are excited by a steady state loop antenna immersed in high-density, argon and helium, helicon source plasmas. The propagating <span class="hlt">waves</span> were detected with an absolutely calibrated magnetic pick up coil located 30 cm downstream from the launching antenna. The experiments were conducted in the West Virginia University HELIX (Hot hELIcon eXperiment) device. In argon plasma, perturbations of the ion velocity space distribution due to the Alfven <span class="hlt">wave</span> are measured with laser induced fluorescence and compared to theoretical predictions.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Houshmandyar, Saeid; Scime, Earl; Compton, Chris</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" 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onClick='return showDiv("page_6");' href="#">6</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_7");' href="#">7</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_8");' href="#">8</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_9");' href="#">9</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_10");' href="#">10</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#">11</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#">12</a> <a style="font-weight: bold;">13</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#">14</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#">15</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#">16</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#">17</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#">18</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#">19</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#">20</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">241</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/20775252"> <span id="translatedtitle">Hadronic Spectra and Light-Front <span class="hlt">Wave</span> <span class="hlt">Functions</span> in Holographic QCD</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We show how the string amplitude {phi}(z) defined on the fifth dimension in AdS{sub 5} space can be precisely mapped to the light-front <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> of hadrons in physical space-time. We find an exact correspondence between the holographic variable z and an <span class="hlt">impact</span> variable {zeta}, which represents the measure of transverse separation of the constituents within the hadrons. In addition, we derive effective four dimensional Schroedinger equations for the bound states of massless quarks and gluons which exactly reproduce the anti-de Sitter conformal field theory results and give a realistic description of the light-quark meson and baryon spectrum as well as the form factors for spacelike Q{sup 2}. Only one parameter which sets the mass scale, {lambda}{sub QCD}, is introduced.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Brodsky, Stanley J. [Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94309 (United States); Teramond, Guy F. de [Universidad de Costa Rica, San Jose (Costa Rica)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-05-26</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">242</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16803163"> <span id="translatedtitle">Hadronic spectra and light-front <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> in holographic QCD.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We show how the string amplitude phi(z) defined on the fifth dimension in AdS5 space can be precisely mapped to the light-front <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> of hadrons in physical space-time. We find an exact correspondence between the holographic variable z and an <span class="hlt">impact</span> variable zeta, which represents the measure of transverse separation of the constituents within the hadrons. In addition, we derive effective four dimensional Schrödinger equations for the bound states of massless quarks and gluons which exactly reproduce the anti-de Sitter conformal field theory results and give a realistic description of the light-quark meson and baryon spectrum as well as the form factors for space-like Q2. Only one parameter which sets the mass scale, lambda(QCD), is introduced. PMID:16803163</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Brodsky, Stanley J; de Téramond, Guy F</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-05-22</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">243</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011GeoJI.187..529M"> <span id="translatedtitle">Antipodal focusing of seismic <span class="hlt">waves</span> due to large meteorite <span class="hlt">impacts</span> on Earth</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We examine focusing of seismic <span class="hlt">waves</span> at the antipode of large terrestrial meteorite <span class="hlt">impacts</span>, using the Chicxulub <span class="hlt">impact</span> as our case study. Numerical simulations are based on a spectral-element method, representing the <span class="hlt">impact</span> as a Gaussian force in time and space. Simulating the <span class="hlt">impact</span> as a point source at the surface of a spherically symmetric earth model results in deceptively large peak displacements at the antipode. Earth's ellipticity, lateral heterogeneity and a spatially distributed source limit high-frequency <span class="hlt">waves</span> from constructively interfering at the antipode, thereby reducing peak displacement by a factor of 4. Nevertheless, for plausible <span class="hlt">impact</span> parameters, we observe peak antipodal displacements of ˜4 m, dynamic stresses in excess of 15 bar, and strains of 2 × 10-5 . Although these values are significantly lower than prior estimates, mainly based on a point source in a spherically symmetric earth model, <span class="hlt">wave</span> interference en route to the antipode induces 'channels' of peak stress that are five times greater than in surrounding areas. Underneath the antipode, we observed 'chimneys' of peak stress, strain and velocity, with peak values exceeding 50 bar, 10-5 and 0.1 m s-1, respectively. Our results put quantitative constraints on the feasibility of <span class="hlt">impact</span>-induced antipodal volcanism and seismicity, as well as mantle plume and hotspot formation.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Meschede, Matthias A.; Myhrvold, Conor L.; Tromp, Jeroen</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">244</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/18132628"> <span id="translatedtitle">An investigation of the compressibility of sandy soil under <span class="hlt">impact-wave</span> loading</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The systematic experimental study of the mechanical properties of soft soils under blast loading was begun at the end of the 1950's (see, for example [i-6]). However, in almost all publications the maximum measured pressure did not exceed 75 MPa. The properties of sand under <span class="hlt">impact-wave</span> loading in the region of large pressures was studied in [2, 4]. Lagunov and</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">N. N. Gerdyukov; A. G. Ioilev; A. D. Kovtun; Yu. M. Makarov; S. A. Novikov</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1993-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">245</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/57385596"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Impact</span> of Sleep Position on Stone Clearance after Shock <span class="hlt">Wave</span> Lithotripsy in Renal Calculi</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Objectives: We evaluated the <span class="hlt">impact</span> of sleep position on the effectiveness of shock <span class="hlt">wave</span> lithotripsy (SWL) in renal calculi. Patients and Methods: Patients (n = 120) with a single radiopaque renal stone who were candidates for SWL were enrolled. For studying patients’ position during sleep, a novel sleep position recorder was designed. Group 1 (n = 60) consisted of patients</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Seyed Amir Mohsen Ziaee; Seyed Reza Hosseini; Amir H. Kashi; Mohammad Samzadeh</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">246</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/6380105"> <span id="translatedtitle">Europe's 2003 heat <span class="hlt">wave</span>: a satellite view of <span class="hlt">impacts</span> and land–atmosphere feedbacks</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">ABSTRACT A combination of satellite imagery, meteorological station data, and the NCEP\\/NCAR reanalysis has been used to explore the spatial and temporal evolution of the 2003 heat <span class="hlt">wave</span> in France, with focus on understanding the <span class="hlt">impacts</span> and feedbacks at the land surface. Vegetation was severely affected across the study area, especially in a swath across central France that corresponds,to the</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Benjamin F. Zaitchik; Alison K. Macalady; Laurent R. Bonneau; Ronald B. Smith</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">247</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/18651237"> <span id="translatedtitle">Elastic <span class="hlt">waves</span> in a short cylinder, <span class="hlt">impacted</span> by a thin bar</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The <span class="hlt">wave</span> motion resulting from the elastic <span class="hlt">impact</span> of a semi-infinite steel bar on an aluminium cylinder, of much larger diameter but of finite length, were studied experimentally and numerically. First the strains were measured at different points on the cylinder surface by using semiconductor strain gauges. Subsequently the experimental situation was simulated numerically with a dynamic finite element program</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">L. Guex; W. Janach</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1980-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">248</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/51395962"> <span id="translatedtitle">Crack detection in a wheel end spindle using <span class="hlt">wave</span> propagation via modal <span class="hlt">impacts</span> and piezo actuation</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">This research demonstrates two methodologies for detecting cracks in a metal spindle housed deep within a vehicle wheel end assembly. First, modal <span class="hlt">impacts</span> are imposed on the hub of the wheel in the longitudinal direction to produce broadband elastic <span class="hlt">wave</span> excitation spectra out to 7000 Hz. The response data on the flange is collected using 3000 Hz bandwidth accelerometers. It</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Spencer Ackers; Ronald Evans; Timothy Johnson; Harold Kess; Jonathan White; Douglas E. Adams; Pam Brown</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">249</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/39197354"> <span id="translatedtitle">Geographical differences on the mortality <span class="hlt">impact</span> of heat <span class="hlt">waves</span> in Europe</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Climate change is potentially the biggest global health threat in the 21st century. Deaths related with heat <span class="hlt">waves</span> and spread of infectious diseases will be part of the menace though the major <span class="hlt">impact</span> will be caused by malnutrition, diarrhea and extreme climate events. Consequently, loss of healthy life years as a result of global climate change is predicted to be</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Jordi Sunyer</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">250</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/842991"> <span id="translatedtitle">Electron-<span class="hlt">impact</span> excitation-autoionization of helium in the S-<span class="hlt">wave</span> limit</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Excitation of the autoionizing states of helium by electron <span class="hlt">impact</span> is shown in calculations in the s-<span class="hlt">wave</span> limit to leave a clear signature in the singly differential cross section for the (e,2e) process. It is suggested that such behavior should be seen generally in (e,2e) experiments on atoms that measure the single differential cross section.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Horner, Daniel A.; McCurdy, C. William; Rescigno, Thomas N.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">251</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013IJBm..tmp..120Z"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Impact</span> of heat <span class="hlt">waves</span> on mortality in Croatia</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The aim of this work was to determine the criteria for heat loads associated with an increase in mortality in different climatic regions of Croatia. The relationship between heat stress and mortality was analysed for the period 1983-2008. The input series is excess mortality defined as the deviations of mortality from expected values determined by means of a Gaussian filter of 183 days. The assessment of the thermal environment was performed by means of physiologically equivalent temperature (PET). The curve depicting the relationship between mortality and temperature has a U shape, with increased mortality in both the cold and warm parts of the scale but more pronounced in the warm part. The threshold temperature for increased mortality was determined using a scatter plot and fitting data by means of moving average of mortality; the latter is defined as the temperature at which excess mortality becomes significant. The values are higher in the continental part of Croatia than at the coast due to the refreshing influence of the sea during the day. The same analysis on a monthly basis shows that at the beginning of the warm season increased mortality occurs at a lower temperature compared with later on in the summer, and the difference is up to 15 °C between August and April. The increase in mortality is highest during the first 3-5 days and after that it decreases and falls below the expected value. Long-lasting heat <span class="hlt">waves</span> present an increased risk, but in very long heat <span class="hlt">waves</span> the increase in mortality is reduced due to mortality displacement.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Zaninovi?, Ksenija; Matzarakis, Andreas</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">252</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/1013121"> <span id="translatedtitle">Covariant spectator theory of $np$ scattering:\\\\ Effective range expansions and relativistic deuteron <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We present the effective range expansions for the 1S0 and 3S1 scattering phase shifts, and the relativistic deuteron <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> that accompany our recent high precision fits (with \\chi^2/N{data} \\simeq 1) to the 2007 world np data below 350 MeV. The <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> are expanded in a series of analytical <span class="hlt">functions</span> (with the correct asymptotic behavior at both large and small arguments) that can be Fourier-transformed from momentum to coordinate space and are convenient to use in any application. A fortran subroutine to compute these <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> can be obtained from the authors.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Franz Gross, Alfred Stadler</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">253</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2005PhDT.......283P"> <span id="translatedtitle">Asymptotic scattering <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> for three charged particles and astrophysical capture processes</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The asymptotic behavior of the <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> of three charged particles has been investigated. There are two different types of three-body scattering <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span>. The first type of scattering <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> evolves from the incident three-body <span class="hlt">wave</span> of three charged particles in the continuum. The second type of scattering <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> evolves from the initial two-body incident <span class="hlt">wave</span>. In this work the asymptotic three-body incident <span class="hlt">wave</span> has been derived in the asymptotic regions where two particles are close to each other and far away from the third particle. This <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> satisfies the Schrodinger equation up to terms O(1/ r3a ), where rhoalpha is the distance between the center of mass of two particles and the third particle. The derived asymptotic three-body incident <span class="hlt">wave</span> transforms smoothly into Redmond's asymptotic incident <span class="hlt">wave</span> in the asymptotic region where all three particles are well separated. For the scattering <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> of the second type the asymptotic three-body scattered <span class="hlt">wave</span> has been derived in all the asymptotic regions. In the asymptotic region where all three particles well separated, the derived asymptotic scattered <span class="hlt">wave</span> coincides with the Peterkop asymptotic <span class="hlt">wave</span>. In the asymptotic regions where two particles are close to each other and far away from the third one, this is a new expression which is free of the logarithmically diverging phase factors that appeared in the Peterkop approach. The derived asymptotic scattered <span class="hlt">wave</span> resolves a long-standing phase-amplitude ambiguity. Based on these results the expressions for the exact prior and post breakup amplitudes have been obtained. The post breakup amplitude for charged particles has not been known and has been derived for the first time directly from the prior form. It turns out that the post form of the breakup amplitude is given by a surface integral in the six dimensional hyperspace, rather than a volume integral, with the transition operator expressed in terms of the interaction potentials. We also show how to derive a generalized distorted-<span class="hlt">wave</span>-Born approximation amplitude (DWBA) from the exact prior form of the breakup amplitude. It is impossible to derive the DWBA amplitude from the post form. The three-body Coulomb incident <span class="hlt">wave</span> is used to calculate the reaction rates of 7Be (ep, e)8B and 7Be(pp, p)8 B nonradiative triple collisions in stellar environments.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Pirlepesov, Fakhriddin</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">254</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/20786717"> <span id="translatedtitle">Leading asymptotic terms of the three-body Coulomb scattering <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The asymptotic <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> derived by Alt and Mukhamedzhanov [Phys. Rev. A47, 2004 (1993)] and Mukhamedzhanov and Lieber [Phys. Rev. A54, 3078 (1996)] has been refined in the region where the pair ({beta},{gamma}) remains close to each other while the third particle {alpha} is far away from them ({rho}{sub {alpha}}{yields}{infinity},r{sub {alpha}}/{rho}{sub {alpha}}{yields}0). The improved <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> satisfies the Schroedinger equation up to the terms of order O(1/{rho}{sub {alpha}}{sup 3}), provides the leading asymptotic terms of the three-body scattering <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> with Coulomb interactions, and gives further insight into the continuum behavior of the three-charged-particle <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span>, and helps to obtain the 3{yields}3 scattered <span class="hlt">wave</span>. This opens up further ways of solving and analyzing the three-body Schroedinger equation by numerical means.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Mukhamedzhanov, A. M.; Pirlepesov, F. [Cyclotron Institute, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States); Kadyrov, A. S. [Centre for Atomic, Molecular and Surface Physics, Division of Science and Engineering, Murdoch University, Perth 6150 (Australia)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-01-15</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">255</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012EGUGA..14.1497V"> <span id="translatedtitle">A stochastic model for predicting future ocean <span class="hlt">wave</span> climate and potential <span class="hlt">impact</span> on ship environmental loads</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This presentation will present a stochastic model in space and time for significant <span class="hlt">wave</span> height; a Bayesian hierarchical space-time model. The model consists of different components in a hierarchical manner including in particular a component for modelling the contribution from long-term trends in the <span class="hlt">wave</span> climate. This Bayesian hierarchical space-time model allows modelling of complex dependence structures in space and time and incorporation of physical features and prior knowledge, yet at the same time remains intuitive and easily interpreted. Including a trend component in the model is a novel feature, and different model alternatives for estimating long-term trends in the <span class="hlt">wave</span> climate are explored. Such trends might be a result of climate change, or it may be a sign of long-term natural variability. Either way, such trends will influence the environmental hazards to ocean going ships in the future. The presented model is fitted to significant <span class="hlt">wave</span> height data for monthly maxima over an area in the North Atlantic ocean, and aims at describing the temporal and spatial variability of the data over a period of more than 44 years for the chosen area. In particular, the model identifies long-term trends present in the data. It is demonstrated that the models predicts an increasing expected trend in the monthly maximum significant <span class="hlt">wave</span> height. If such trends are to persist, it means that the <span class="hlt">wave</span> climate are expected to become rougher in the future, implying a rougher operating environment for ships and other marine structures. Extrapolations of the estimated expected trends are made in order to obtain future projections of the North Atlantic <span class="hlt">wave</span> climate towards the year 2100. Subsequently, it will be explored how the results from the model can be linked to structural loads and response calculations, i.e. how to take expected future trends into account in the calculations. Using the conditional modelling approach, the projected expected increases in significant <span class="hlt">wave</span> height are incorporated by modifying the joint distribution of significant <span class="hlt">wave</span> height and <span class="hlt">wave</span> period. In turn, this implies modified environmental contour lines used in the load calculations. The potential <span class="hlt">impact</span> of the estimated long-term trends of significant <span class="hlt">wave</span> height on the <span class="hlt">wave</span>-induced structural loads of an oil tanker will be discussed and illustrated by an example. It is found that the potential <span class="hlt">impact</span> is not negligible and this might introduce additional hazards to future ship operations unless adequate measures are taken in design or operation.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Vanem, E.; Bitner-Gregersen, E. M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">256</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010JMEP...19.1058N"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Impact</span> Energy of <span class="hlt">Functionally</span> Graded Steels in Crack Arrester Configuration</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Charpy <span class="hlt">impact</span> energy of <span class="hlt">functionally</span> graded steels produced by electroslag remelting composed of graded ferrite and austenite layers together with bainite or martensite intermediate layer in the form of crack arrester configuration has been investigated. The results obtained in the present study indicate that the notch tip position with respect to bainite or martensite layer significantly affects the <span class="hlt">impact</span> energy. The closer the notch tip to the tougher layer, the higher the <span class="hlt">impact</span> energy of the composite due to increment of energy absorbed by plastic deformation zone ahead of the notch and vice versa. Empirical relationships have been determined to correlate the <span class="hlt">impact</span> energy of <span class="hlt">functionally</span> graded steels to the morphology of layers.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Nazari, A.; Aghazadeh Mohandesi, J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">257</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.springerlink.com/index/p302434q0n247120.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Green <span class="hlt">functions</span> for plane <span class="hlt">wave</span> scattering on single nonspherical particles</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Elastic plane <span class="hlt">wave</span> scattering of electromagnetic <span class="hlt">waves</span> on three-dimensional structures is a basic physical interaction process\\u000a which is of great importance in many practical applications. One may think of measurements in technical and medical diagnostics\\u000a as well as in remote sensing of our Earth’s atmosphere, for example. During the last decades, not at least due to the possibilities\\u000a of modern</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Tom Rother</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">258</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/18127327"> <span id="translatedtitle">A simple model of the classical Zitterbewegung : Photon <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">We propose a simple classical model of the zitterbewegung. In this model spin is proportional to the velocity of the particle,\\u000a the component parallel top is constant and the orthogonal components are oscillating with2p frequency. The quantization of the system gives <span class="hlt">wave</span> equations for spin,0, 1\\/2, 1, 3\\/2,…, etc. respectively. These equations are convenient for massless particles. The <span class="hlt">wave</span> equation</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Nuri Ünal</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1997-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">259</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013CNSNS..18..915B"> <span id="translatedtitle">Cnoidal and snoidal <span class="hlt">wave</span> solutions to coupled nonlinear <span class="hlt">wave</span> equations by the extended Jacobi's elliptic <span class="hlt">function</span> method</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This paper studies two nonlinear coupled evolution equations. They are the Zakharov equation and the Davey-Stewartson equation. These equations are studied by the aid of Jacobi's elliptic <span class="hlt">function</span> expansion method and exact periodic solutions are extracted. In addition, the Zakharov equation with power law nonlinearity is solved by traveling <span class="hlt">wave</span> hypothesis.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Bhrawy, A. H.; Abdelkawy, M. A.; Biswas, Anjan</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">260</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3176557"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Impact</span> of Stone Removal on Renal <span class="hlt">Function</span>: A Review</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Stone removal can improve renal <span class="hlt">function</span> by eradicating obstruction and, in certain cases, an underlying infection. Stone-removing procedures, however, may negatively <span class="hlt">impact</span> <span class="hlt">functional</span> integrity. Many things may <span class="hlt">impact</span> the latter, including the procedures used, the methods of assessing <span class="hlt">function</span>, the time when these assessments are made, the occurrence of complications, the baseline condition of the kidney, and patient-related factors. In the majority of cases, little significant <span class="hlt">functional</span> impairment occurs. However, there are gaps in our knowledge of this subject, including the cumulative effects of multiple procedures violating the renal parenchyma and long-term <span class="hlt">functional</span> outcomes.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Wood, Kyle; Keys, Tristan; Mufarrij, Patrick; Assimos, Dean G</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" 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onClick='return showDiv("page_6");' href="#">6</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_7");' href="#">7</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_8");' href="#">8</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_9");' href="#">9</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_10");' href="#">10</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#">11</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#">12</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#">13</a> <a style="font-weight: bold;">14</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#">15</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#">16</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#">17</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#">18</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#">19</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#">20</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">261</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/20787175"> <span id="translatedtitle">Addendum to 'Time-dependent variational principle with constraints for parametrized <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span>'</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The sensitivity analysis for the time-dependent variational principle (TDVP) with constraints for parametrized <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> [K. Ohta, Phys. Rev. A 70, 022503 (2004)] is investigated to assess the geodesic deviation caused by external parameters. The constraints for the sensitivity <span class="hlt">functions</span>, inherited from the TDVP, are dealt with their consistency conditions. As an example of the sensitivity analysis, the geodesic deviation in the neighborhood of stationary states is investigated for general <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span>.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ohta, Katsuhisa [Department of Applied Chemistry, Muroran Institute of Technology, Muroran, Hokkaido 050-8585 (Japan)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-04-15</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">262</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.springerlink.com/index/f1px124527241420.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Hartle–Hawking <span class="hlt">Wave-Function</span> for Flux Compactifications: the Entropic Principle</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">We argue that the topological string partition <span class="hlt">function</span>, which has been known to correspond to a <span class="hlt">wave-function</span>, can be interpreted\\u000a as an exact “<span class="hlt">wave-function</span> of the universe” in the mini-superspace sector of physical superstring theory. This realizes the\\u000a idea of Hartle and Hawking in the context of string theory, including all loop quantum corrections. The mini-superspace approximation\\u000a is justified as</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hirosi Ooguri; Cumrun Vafa; Erik Verlinde</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">263</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3659130"> <span id="translatedtitle">What is the <span class="hlt">impact</span> of electromagnetic <span class="hlt">waves</span> on epileptic seizures?</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Background The effects of electromagnetic <span class="hlt">waves</span> (EMWs) on humans and their relationship with various disorders have been investigated. We aimed to investigate the effects of exposure to different frequencies of EMWs in various durations in a mouse epilepsy model induced by pentylenetetrazole (PTZ). Material/Methods A total of 180 4-week-old male mice weighing 25–30 g were used in this study. Each experimental group consisted of 10 mice. They were exposed to 900, 700, 500, 300, and 100 MHz EMWs for 20 hours, 12 hours and 2 hours. Following electromagnetic radiation exposure, 60 mg/kg of PTZ was injected intraperitoneally to all mice. Each control was also injected with PTZ without any exposure to EMW. The latency of initial seizure and most severe seizure onset were compared with controls. Results The shortest initial seizure latency was noted in the 12-hour group, followed by the 700 MHz. The mean initial seizure latencies in the 2-hour EMW exposed group was significantly shorter compared to that in the 12- and 20-hour groups. There was no significant difference between 12- and 20-hour EMW exposed groups. There was a significant difference between control and 2- and 10-hour EMW exposed groups. No statistically significant differences were noted in mean latencies of the most severe seizure latency, following 20-, 12-, and 2- hour EMW exposed groups and control groups. Conclusions Our findings suggest that acute exposure to EMW may facilitate epileptic seizures, which may be independent of EMW exposure time. This information might be important for patients with epilepsy. Further studies are needed.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Cinar, Nilgun; Sahin, Sevki; Erdinc, Oguz O.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">264</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010CoTPh..54..647O"> <span id="translatedtitle">GENERAL: A Direct Calculation of First-Order <span class="hlt">Wave</span> <span class="hlt">Function</span> of Helium</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We develop a simple analytic calculation for the first order <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> of helium in a model in which nuclear charge screening is caused by repulsive coulomb interaction. The perturbation term, first-order correlation energy, and first-order <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> are divided into two components, one component associated with the repulsive coulomb interaction and the other proportional to magnetic shielding. The resulting first-order <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> are applied to calculate second-order energies within the model. We find that the second-order energies are independent of the nuclear charge screening constant in the unperturbed Hamiltonian with a central coulomb potential.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Otieno Ndinya, Boniface; Akeyo Omolo, Joseph</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">265</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2004PhRvD..70k4502B"> <span id="translatedtitle">Small-x behavior of light-cone <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> in transverse lattice gauge theory</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We study the behavior of light-cone <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span>, in coarse transverse lattice gauge theory, when one or more parton light-cone momenta are small. This probes the limit of hadron structure at large and small Bjorken x. Finite-energy boundary conditions on boundstates allow one to derive the analytic form of <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> in this region. This leads to simple, universal predictions for the behavior of quark generalized parton distributions near their endpoints. For the first few meson <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> at large Nc, we give the simplest ansatz that incorporates all the boundary conditions.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Bratt, J.; Dalley, S.; van de Sande, B.; Watson, E. M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">266</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1987PhRvB..35.9529S"> <span id="translatedtitle">Critical electronic <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> on quasiperiodic lattices: Exact calculation of fractal measures</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We examine two <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> which have recently been found for electrons in quasiperiodic systems, and which can be shown to satisfy an exact self-similarity relation-closely related to the self-similarity of the quasiperiodic lattice itself. The first <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> is for the ground state of an electron on a two-dimensional Penrose lattice, and the second is for the center of the spectrum of the Hamiltonian for an electron on a one-dimensional Fibonacci lattice. We calculate exactly the fractal measure of the singularities of these <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span>, as reflected in the exponent ?(?), defined by J||x||<=R||?(x)||?~R?(?). .AE</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Sutherland, Bill</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1987-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">267</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013JChPh.139g4113T"> <span id="translatedtitle">Lossless compression of <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> information using matrix factorization: A ``gzip'' for quantum chemistry</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We propose the use of the singular value decomposition to decrease the storage required for <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> information. The specific case considered is determinantal full configuration interaction, but the same technique is readily applicable to truncated configuration interaction and coupled-cluster calculations of various types; as we discuss this is a reformulation of approximate methods that have been in use for some time, but our approach eliminates those approximations. Numerical examples support the contention that considerable compression of the <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> is possible without significant loss of accuracy: as expected a considerable amount of the information contained in the full CI <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> is redundant.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Taylor, Peter R.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-08-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">268</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21503670"> <span id="translatedtitle">Non-Gaussian <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functionals</span> in Coulomb gauge Yang-Mills theory</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A general method to treat non-Gaussian vacuum <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functionals</span> in the Hamiltonian formulation of a quantum field theory is presented. By means of Dyson-Schwinger techniques, the static Green <span class="hlt">functions</span> are expressed in terms of the kernels arising in the Taylor expansion of the exponent of the vacuum <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functional</span>. These kernels are then determined by minimizing the vacuum expectation value of the Hamiltonian. The method is applied to Yang-Mills theory in Coulomb gauge, using a vacuum <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functional</span> whose exponent contains up to quartic terms in the gauge field. An estimate of the cubic and quartic interaction kernels is given using as input the gluon and ghost propagators found with a Gaussian <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functional</span>.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Campagnari, Davide R.; Reinhardt, Hugo [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Universitaet Tuebingen, Auf der Morgenstelle 14, 72076 Tuebingen (Germany)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-11-15</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">269</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013PhRvD..88a4036A"> <span id="translatedtitle">Asymptotic behavior of Nambu-Bethe-Salpeter <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> for multiparticles in quantum field theories</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We derive asymptotic behaviors of the Nambu-Bethe-Salpeter (NBS) <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> at large space separations for systems with more than two particles in quantum field theories. To deal with n particles in the center-of-mass frame coherently, we introduce the Jacobi coordinates of n particles and then combine their 3(n-1) coordinates into the one spherical coordinate in D=3(n-1) dimensions. We parametrize the on-shell T matrix for n scalar particles at low energy using the unitarity constraint of the S matrix. We then express asymptotic behaviors of the NBS <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> for n particles at low energy in terms of parameters of the T matrix and show that the NBS <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> carries information of the T matrix such as phase shifts and mixing angles of the n-particle system in its own asymptotic behavior, so that the NBS <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> can be considered as the scattering <span class="hlt">wave</span> of n particles in quantum mechanics. This property is one of the essential ingredients of the HAL QCD scheme to define “potential” from the NBS <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> in quantum field theories such as QCD. Our results, together with an extension to systems with spin 1/2 particles, justify the HAL QCD’s definition of potentials for three or more nucleons (or baryons) in terms of the NBS <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span>.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Aoki, Sinya; Ishii, Noriyoshi; Doi, Takumi; Ikeda, Yoichi; Inoue, Takashi</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">270</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1996BAMS...77.1497C"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Impacts</span> and Responses to the 1995 Heat <span class="hlt">Wave</span>: A Call to Action.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The short but intense heat <span class="hlt">wave</span> in mid-July 1995 caused 830 deaths nationally, with 525 of these deaths in Chicago. Many of the dead were elderly. and the event raised great concern over why it happened. Assessment of causes for the heat <span class="hlt">wave</span>-related deaths in Chicago revealed many factors were at fault, including an inadequate local heat <span class="hlt">wave</span> warning system, power failures, questionable death assessments, inadequate ambulance service and hospital facilities, the heat island, an aging population, and the inability of many persons to properly ventilate their residences due to fear of crime or a lack of resources for fans or air conditioning. Heat-related deaths appear to be on the increase in the United States. Heat-related deaths greatly exceed those caused by other life-threatening weather conditions. Analysis of the <span class="hlt">impacts</span> and responses to this heat <span class="hlt">wave</span> reveals a need to 1) define the heat island conditions during heat <span class="hlt">waves</span> for all major cities is a means to improve forecasts of threatening conditions, 2) develop a nationally uniform means for classifying heat-related deaths, 3) improve warning systems that are designed around local conditions of large cities, and 4) increase research on the meteorological and climatological aspects of heat stress and heat <span class="hlt">waves</span>.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Changnon, Stanley A.; Kunkel, Kenneth E.; Reinke, Beth C.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1996-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">271</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/18092581"> <span id="translatedtitle">The <span class="hlt">Wave</span> <span class="hlt">Function</span> of the Lyman-Alpha Photon Part II. The Shape, Position, and Trajectory of the Photon</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">In Part I of the present paper we derived the <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> of the Lyman-$ \\\\alpha $ photon in both the linear and angular momentum bases using relativistic concepts for the photon <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span>. In the present paper, Part II, we derive two $ \\\\vec{X} $-representations. In the first we assume one-particle theory for the photon <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> and the</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">H. E. Moses</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2002-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">272</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=ADA475734"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Impact</span> of Breast Cancer on Adolescent <span class="hlt">Function</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The primary aim of this study was to test a theoretically derived predictive model of adolescent <span class="hlt">functioning</span> to maternal breast cancer. Standardized questionnaires with well-established validity and reliability were used to measure 6 theoretical concepts ...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">F. M. Lewis</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">273</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010avh..confE...7K"> <span id="translatedtitle">The 1994 heat <span class="hlt">wave</span> in South Korea: mortality <span class="hlt">impacts</span> and recurrence probability in a changing climate</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The study deals with mortality <span class="hlt">impacts</span> of the July-August 1994 heat <span class="hlt">wave</span> in the population of South Korea, including the megacity of Seoul (with the population exceeding 10 million for the city and 20 million for the metropolitan area), and estimates recurrence probability of the heat <span class="hlt">wave</span> in a changing climate in terms of simulations of daily temperature series with a stochastic model. The 1994 heat <span class="hlt">wave</span> is found exceptional with respect to both climatological characteristics and the mortality effects: significantly elevated mortality occurred in all population groups, including children up to 14 years of age, and the total death toll exceeded 3000 in the Korean population, which ranks the 1994 heat <span class="hlt">wave</span> among the worst weather-related disasters in East Asia. The estimate represents net excess mortality as no mortality displacement effect appeared. A comparison with other documented natural disasters shows that the death toll of the heat <span class="hlt">wave</span> was much higher than those of the most disastrous floodings and typhoons over Korean Peninsula in the 20th century. The mortality response was stronger in males than females although males are found to be less vulnerable during average heat <span class="hlt">waves</span>. A climatological analysis reveals that the July-August 1994 heat <span class="hlt">wave</span> might be considered an extremely rare event with a return period in the order of hundreds of years if stationarity of temperature time series is assumed. However, under a more realistic assumption of gradual warming related to climate change, recurrence probability of an event analogous to the 1994 heat <span class="hlt">wave</span> sharply rises for near-future time horizons. If warming of 0.04°C/year is assumed over 2001-2060, the recurrence interval of a very long spell of days with temperature exceeding a high threshold (as in the 1994 heat <span class="hlt">wave</span>) is estimated to decrease to around 40 (10) years in the 2021-2030 (2041-2050) decade. This emphasizes the need for setting up an efficient heat-watch-warning system in this area in order to reduce human mortality <span class="hlt">impacts</span> of heat <span class="hlt">waves</span>.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kysely, J.; Kim, J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">274</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/428195"> <span id="translatedtitle">Green`s <span class="hlt">function</span> implementation of common-offset, <span class="hlt">wave</span>-equation migration</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Common-offset migration is extremely important in the context of migration velocity analysis (MVA) since it generates geologically interpretable migrated images. However, only a <span class="hlt">wave</span>-equation-based migration handles multipathing of energy in contrast to the popular Kirchhoff migration with first-arrival traveltimes. The authors have combined the superior treatment of multipathing of energy by <span class="hlt">wave</span>-equation-based migration with the advantages of the common-offset domain for MVA by implementing <span class="hlt">wave</span>-equation migration algorithms via the use of finite-difference Green`s <span class="hlt">functions</span>. With this technique, the authors are able to apply <span class="hlt">wave</span>-equation migration in measurement configurations that are usually considered to be of the realm of Kirchhoff migration. In particular, <span class="hlt">wave</span>-equation migration of common offset sections becomes feasible. The application of the <span class="hlt">wave</span>-equation, common-offset migration algorithm to the Marmousi data set confirms the large increase in interpretability of individual migrated sections, for about twice the cost of standard <span class="hlt">wave</span>-equation common-shot migration. The implementation of <span class="hlt">wave</span>-equation migration via the Green`s <span class="hlt">functions</span> is based on wavefield extrapolation via paraxial one-way <span class="hlt">wave</span> equations. For these equations, theoretical results allow one to perform exact inverse extrapolation of wavefields.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ehinger, A.; Lailly, P. [Institut Francais du Petrole, Pau (France); Marfurt, K.J. [Amoco Production Co., Tulsa, OK (United States)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1996-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">275</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23883370"> <span id="translatedtitle">The <span class="hlt">impact</span> of cranioplasty on neurological <span class="hlt">function</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Abstract Objectives. To assess changes in neurological <span class="hlt">function</span> after cranioplasty. Methods. <span class="hlt">Functional</span> and neurocognitive assessments including activities of daily living assessment, <span class="hlt">functional</span> independence measure (FIM) and the Cognitive assessment report (COGNISTAT) were conducted on all patients within 72 h before and 7 days after cranioplasty. A change in the total FIM score of 2 points was taken to be clinically significant. Results. Assessments were performed on 25 patients. The <span class="hlt">functional</span> status was unchanged in eighteen patients (72%), four patients (16%) demonstrated a significant improvement and three patients (12%) deteriorated significantly. Those with deterioration after cranioplasty had some forms of complications including pneumocephalus or seizure. After excluding the three patients who had immediate medical or surgical complications after surgery, there was a mild overall improvement in the mean FIM score (2.1, 95% confidence interval 0.1-4.3, p = 0.049), mainly due to an improvement in their motor <span class="hlt">function</span>. Conclusions. A small but significant number of patients appear to improve clinically following cranioplasty. The so-called syndrome of the trephined may be more common than had been previously appreciated. PMID:23883370</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Honeybul, Stephen; Janzen, Courtney; Kruger, Kate; Ho, Kwok M</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-07-25</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">276</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=AD878762"> <span id="translatedtitle">Introduction to Symmetry of <span class="hlt">Wave</span> <span class="hlt">Functions</span> in Crystals and Brillouin Zones.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A brief review of simple elements of crystal theory is given. This is followed by an introduction, in detail, to the study of the symmetry properties of crystalline <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span>. Simple ideas of group theory are used throughout. (Author)</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">L. F. Libelo</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1970-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">277</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20365055"> <span id="translatedtitle">Asymptotic-boundary-layer method for unstable trajectories: semiclassical expansions for individual scar <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We extend the asymptotic boundary layer (ABL) method, originally developed for stable resonator modes, to the description of individual <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> localized around unstable periodic orbits. The formalism applies to the description of scar states in fully or partially chaotic quantum systems, and also allows for the presence of smooth and sharp potentials, as well as magnetic fields. We argue that the separatrix <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> provides the largest contribution to the scars on a single <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span>. This agrees with earlier results on the <span class="hlt">wave-function</span> asymptotics and on the quantization condition of the scar states. Predictions of the ABL formalism are compared with the exact numerical solution for a strip resonator with a parabolic confinement potential and a magnetic field. PMID:20365055</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Vagov, A; Schomerus, H; Zalipaev, V V</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-11-03</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">278</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=nuclear+AND+cross+AND+section&id=EJ133505"> <span id="translatedtitle">Variation in Differential and Total Cross Sections Due to Different Radial <span class="hlt">Wave</span> <span class="hlt">Functions</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Three sets of analytical <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> are used to calculate the Na (3s---3p) transition differential and total electron excitation cross sections by Born approximations. Results show expected large variations in values. (Author/CP)</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Williamson, W., Jr.; Greene, T.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1976-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">279</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008IJTP...47..193H"> <span id="translatedtitle">The Variation of Financial Arbitrage via the Use of an Information <span class="hlt">Wave</span> <span class="hlt">Function</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We define an ‘information <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span>’, ?( q). We underline the role of risk-neutral probabilities in financial non-arbitrage. We argue how a change in the probabilities based on ?( q) can induce arbitrage.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Haven, Emmanuel</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">280</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=%22schrodinger%22&pg=5&id=EJ215015"> <span id="translatedtitle">Continuity Conditions on Schrodinger <span class="hlt">Wave</span> <span class="hlt">Functions</span> at Discontinuities of the Potential.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">|Several standard arguments which attempt to show that the <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> and its derivative must be continuous across jump discontinuities of the potential are reviewed and their defects discussed. (Author/HM)|</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Branson, David</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1979-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return 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<a onClick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#">11</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#">12</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#">13</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#">14</a> <a style="font-weight: bold;">15</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#">16</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#">17</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#">18</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#">19</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#">20</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">281</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2135701"> <span id="translatedtitle">AN EXPERIMENTAL STUDY OF SHOCK <span class="hlt">WAVES</span> RESULTING FROM THE <span class="hlt">IMPACT</span> OF HIGH VELOCITY MISSILES ON ANIMAL TISSUES</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The spark shadowgram method of studying shock <span class="hlt">waves</span> is described. It has been used to investigate the properties of such <span class="hlt">waves</span> produced by the <span class="hlt">impact</span> of a high velocity missile on the surface of water. The method can be adapted for study of behavior of shock <span class="hlt">waves</span> in tissue by placing the tissue on a water surface or immersing it in water. Spark shadowgrams then reveal <span class="hlt">waves</span> passing from tissue to water or reflected from tissue surfaces. Reflection and transmission of shock <span class="hlt">waves</span> from muscle, liver, stomach, and intestinal wall are compared with reflection from non-living surfaces such as gelatin gel, steel, plexiglas, cork, and air. Because of its heterogeneous structure, <span class="hlt">waves</span> transmitted by tissue are dispersed and appear as a series of wavelets. When the accoustical impedance (density x <span class="hlt">wave</span> velocity) of a medium is less than that in which the <span class="hlt">wave</span> is moving, reflection will occur with inversion of the <span class="hlt">wave</span>; i.e., a high pressure <span class="hlt">wave</span> will become a low pressure <span class="hlt">wave</span>. This inversion occurs at an air surface and is illustrated by shadowgrams of reflection from stomach wall, from a segment of colon filled with gas, and from air-filled rubber balloons. Bone (human skull and beef ribs) shows good reflection and some transmission of shock <span class="hlt">waves</span>. When steel is directly hit by a missile, clearly visible elastic <span class="hlt">waves</span> pass from metal to water, but a similar direct hit on bone does not result in elastic <span class="hlt">waves</span> strong enough to be detected by a spark shadowgram.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Harvey, E. Newton; McMillen, J. Howard</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1947-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">282</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012ZaMP...63..249Y"> <span id="translatedtitle">Properties of traveling <span class="hlt">waves</span> for integrodifference equations with nonmonotone growth <span class="hlt">functions</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In this paper, we will establish some new properties of traveling <span class="hlt">waves</span> for integrodifference equations with the nonmonotone growth <span class="hlt">functions</span>. More precisely, for c ? c *, we show that either {limlimits_{?rightarrow+infty} ?(?)=u*} or {0 < liminflimits_{? rightarrow + infty} ?(?) < u* < limsup limits_{?rightarrow+infty}?(?)? b,} that is, the <span class="hlt">wave</span> converges to the positive equilibrium or oscillates about it at +?. Sufficient conditions can assure that both results will arise. We can also obtain that any traveling <span class="hlt">wave</span> with <span class="hlt">wave</span> speed c > c* possesses exponential decay at -?. These results can be well applied to three types of growth <span class="hlt">functions</span> arising from population biology. By choosing suitable parameter numbers, we can obtain the existence of oscillating <span class="hlt">waves</span>. Our analytic results are consistent with some numerical simulations in Kot (J Math Biol 30:413-436, 1992), Li et al. (J Math Biol 58:323-338, 2009) and complement some known ones.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Yu, Zhi-Xian; Yuan, Rong</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">283</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21611722"> <span id="translatedtitle">Analysis of Real Ship Rolling Dynamics under <span class="hlt">Wave</span> Excitement Force Composed of Sums of Cosine <span class="hlt">Functions</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The ship motion equation with a cosine <span class="hlt">wave</span> excitement force describes the slip moments in regular <span class="hlt">waves</span>. A new kind of <span class="hlt">wave</span> excitement force model, with the form as sums of cosine <span class="hlt">functions</span> was proposed to describe ship rolling in irregular <span class="hlt">waves</span>. Ship rolling time series were obtained by solving the ship motion equation with the fourth-order-Runger-Kutta method. These rolling time series were synthetically analyzed with methods of phase-space track, power spectrum, primary component analysis, and the largest Lyapunove exponent. Simulation results show that ship rolling presents some chaotic characteristic when the <span class="hlt">wave</span> excitement force was applied by sums of cosine <span class="hlt">functions</span>. The result well explains the course of ship rolling's chaotic mechanism and is useful for ship hydrodynamic study.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Zhang, Y. S. [Department of Scientific Research, Dalian Naval Academy, Dalian 116018 (China); Cai, F. [Department of Navigation, Dalian Naval Academy, Dalian 116018 (China); Xu, W. M. [Department of Hydrography and Cartography, Dalian Naval Academy, Dalian 116018 (China)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-09-28</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">284</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.springerlink.com/index/r154r1x8281g401g.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Three-Parameter <span class="hlt">Wave</span> <span class="hlt">Functions</span> for ns 2 -Orbitals in Alkali—Metal Negative Ions</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">A three-parameter variational <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> is used to describe the binding energy of alkali—metal negative ions using a two-electron system in the ns2-state. Each electron is described by a modified screened hydrogenic <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> involving two free screening parameters denoted by c and a in addition to the core-screened nuclear charge, \\u000a$$\\\\mathop {\\\\text{Z}}\\\\limits^{\\\\text{*}}$$\\u000a. The model is applied to lithium,</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">M. A. Abbadi; I. I. Al-Qasir; J. M. Khalifeh</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">285</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/22462816"> <span id="translatedtitle">A physical interpretation of the cusp conditions for molecular <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The cusp conditions for the Coulomb- and Correlation-cusp of molecular <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> are derived directly in integrated form from the Schrödinger equation. For the Coulomb-cusp the slope of the <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> at nucleus a is given by the directional derivative \\u000a$$ - \\\\left( {\\\\frac{1}{\\\\psi }\\\\frac{{\\\\partial \\\\psi }}{{\\\\partial r1\\\\alpha }}} \\\\right)_{r1\\\\alpha = 0} = Z_\\\\alpha + d \\\\cdot \\\\cos \\\\vartheta _1</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">W. A. Bingel</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1967-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">286</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22093410"> <span id="translatedtitle">Convergence of repeated quantum nondemolition measurements and <span class="hlt">wave-function</span> collapse</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Motivated by recent experiments on quantum trapped fields, we give a rigorous proof that repeated indirect quantum nondemolition (QND) measurements converge to the collapse of the <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> as predicted by the postulates of quantum mechanics for direct measurements. We also relate the rate of convergence toward the collapsed <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> to the relative entropy of each indirect measurement, a result which makes contact with information theory.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Bauer, Michel [Institut de Physique Theorique de Saclay, CEA-Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Laboratoire de Physique Theorique de l'Ecole Normale Superieure, CNRS/ENS, Ecole Normale Superieure, 24 rue Lhomond, F-75005 Paris (France); Bernard, Denis [Laboratoire de Physique Theorique de l'Ecole Normale Superieure, CNRS/ENS, Ecole Normale Superieure, 24 rue Lhomond, F-75005 Paris (France)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-10-15</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">287</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/18915043"> <span id="translatedtitle">Cancellation of the divergence of the <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> at the origin in leptonic decay rates</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> at the origin is an important factor in the leptonic decay rate of (QQ¯) states, since the rate is proportional to the square of its value. However, relativistic <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> for the color-Coulomb potential diverge at the origin. In this paper, we consider the QED version of this problem: the O(alpha) corrections to the decay &-->e+e-. After</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Jerome Malenfant</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1987-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">288</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/55489154"> <span id="translatedtitle">Off-Shell Photon Longitudinal Light-Cone <span class="hlt">Wave</span> <span class="hlt">Function</span> at Leading Twist</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The leading twist longitudinal virtual photon light-cone <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span>, varphigamma||(u, P2), is calculated within the framework of the low-energy effective theory arising from the instanton model of QCD vacuum. Corresponding to the non-perturbative effects at low-energy scale, a suitable regularization scale T is fixed by analysing the differential behavior of the photon <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> on the internal transverse momentum cut-off</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kai Zhu; Jueping Liu; Ran Yu</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">289</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.springerlink.com/index/07202618t8182xww.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Off-shell photon light-cone <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> with odd chirality</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">.  Based on a more reasonable simulation method for dealing with the ?-parameter characterizing the pole form for the form factor\\u000a (the Fourier transform of the instanton zero mode), and a unified way for regularizing the integrals appearing in the expressions\\u000a of the light-cone photon <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span>, the transverse photon <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> \\u000a \\u000a (u, P\\u000a 2) at the leading twist with the</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ran Yu; Jueping Liu; Kai Zhu</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">290</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/18212367"> <span id="translatedtitle">Two-body photodisintegration of 3He with realistic bound-state <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Total and differential cross sections for two-body photodisintegration of 3He have been recalculated using realistic bound-state <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span>. Contrary to previous calculations we find neither any unusual structure in the energy distributions nor any distinct signature of D-state components in the bound-state <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> for photon energies omega <= 35 MeV. Final-state interactions and, possibly, meson exchange currents increase the</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">S. Aufleger; D. Drechsel</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1981-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">291</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/55342668"> <span id="translatedtitle">Quantum-nondemolition measurements using dissipative atom-field coupling: Monte Carlo <span class="hlt">wave-function</span> approach</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">A continuous quantum-nondemolition measurement scheme that is based on intensity dependent atomic scattering in three-state systems is analyzed. The proposed scheme measures the number of photons in an optical cavity mode by observing the scattering rate of the atomic medium. The time evolution of the coupled atom-field system is analyzed using the Monte Carlo <span class="hlt">wave-function</span> approach. The <span class="hlt">wave-function</span> collapse occurs</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1993-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">292</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/18949245"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> and optical cross sections associated with deep centers in semiconductors</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Analytical impurity <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> associated with deep levels in semiconductors (e.g., GaAs:O, GaP:O) are calculated, using a pseudopotential scheme in which a realistic and convergent model is employed to represent the host-crystal band structure and the impurity potentials. The effects determining the form of the <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> are studied with a view to establishing a relationship between the position of</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">M. Jaros</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1977-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">293</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/19152520"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> and two-electron probability distributions of the Hooke's-law atom and helium</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Hooke's-law atom (hookium) provides an exactly soluble model for a two-electron atom in which the nuclear-electron Coulombic attraction has been replaced by a harmonic one. Starting from the known exact position-space <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> for the ground state of hookium, we present the momentum-space <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span>. We also look at the intracules, two-electron probability distributions, for hookium in position, momentum,</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Darragh P. ONeill; Peter M. W. Gill</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">294</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/12507653"> <span id="translatedtitle">Imaging Electron <span class="hlt">Wave</span> <span class="hlt">Functions</span> of Quantized Energy Levels in Carbon Nanotubes</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Carbon nanotubes provide a unique system to study one-dimensional\\u000aquantization phenomena. Scanning tunneling microscopy is used to observe the\\u000aelectronic <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> that correspond to quantized energy levels in short\\u000ametallic carbon nanotubes. Discrete electron <span class="hlt">waves</span> are apparent from periodic\\u000aoscillations in the differential conductance as a <span class="hlt">function</span> of the position\\u000aalong the tube axis, with a period that differs</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Liesbeth C. Venema; Jeroen W. G. Wildoer; Jorg W. Janssen; Sander J. Tans; Leo P. Kouwenhoven; Cees Dekker</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1999-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">295</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.springerlink.com/index/u2l38j53u31w1566.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">A Variational <span class="hlt">Wave</span> <span class="hlt">Function</span> for 2p2-Orbitals in Atomic Negative Ions</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">A variational <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> is used to describe the binding energy of atomic negative ions using a two-electron system in the 2p2-state. Each electron is described by a modified screened hydrogenic <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> involving two free screening parameters denoted by c and a. The model is applied to hydrogen, helium, lithium, and boron anions, where the optimum values of the</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">M. A. Abbadi; N. M. Bani-Hani; J. M. Khalifeh</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2001-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">296</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://people.ischool.berkeley.edu/~nakov/selected_papers_list/nakov_RANLP01.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Weight <span class="hlt">functions</span> <span class="hlt">impact</span> on LSA performance</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">This paper presents experimental results of usage of LSA for analysis of English literature texts. Several preliminary transformations of the frequency text-document matrix with different weight <span class="hlt">functions</span> are tested on the basis of control subsets. Additional clustering based on correlation matrix is applied in order to reveal the latent structure. The algorithm creates a shaded form matrix via singular values</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Preslav Nakov; Antonia Popova; Plamen Mateev</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2001-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">297</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/50854499"> <span id="translatedtitle">A method of locating leaky <span class="hlt">wave</span> poles of spectral Green's <span class="hlt">functions</span> for a layered medium by consecutive frequency perturbation</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">In this paper, based on the frequency-varied relationship between surface <span class="hlt">wave</span> poles and leaky <span class="hlt">wave</span> poles of spectral Green's <span class="hlt">functions</span> for a layered medium, a new method for fast locating the leaky <span class="hlt">wave</span> poles at the given operating frequency is established. This method locates the leaky <span class="hlt">wave</span> poles at the given operating frequency by consecutive frequency perturbations with the surface</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Zhe Song; Kai-Lai Zheng; Hou-Xing Zhou; Jun Hu; Wei Hong</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">298</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21020636"> <span id="translatedtitle">Relativistic plane-<span class="hlt">wave</span> Born theory and its application to electron-<span class="hlt">impact</span> excitation</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">An exact treatment of the relativistic plane-<span class="hlt">wave</span> Born (RPWB) cross section for electron-<span class="hlt">impact</span> excitation is provided for an arbitrary atom or ion. This result represents an improvement over the cross section obtained from the widely used Bethe high-energy theory developed in the 1930s. The results obtained from this RPWB approach can be applied to a broad class of problems in fundamental electron-<span class="hlt">impact</span> scattering theory. As an illustration, the approach is used to approximate the high-l, partial-<span class="hlt">wave</span> contribution in more accurate calculations of the excitation cross section, a problem which has been lacking a fully relativistic treatment for more than 20 years.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Fontes, Christopher J.; Zhang Honglin [Applied Physics Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-10-15</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">299</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20637066"> <span id="translatedtitle">Geographical differences on the mortality <span class="hlt">impact</span> of heat <span class="hlt">waves</span> in Europe.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Climate change is potentially the biggest global health threat in the 21st century. Deaths related with heat <span class="hlt">waves</span> and spread of infectious diseases will be part of the menace though the major <span class="hlt">impact</span> will be caused by malnutrition, diarrhea and extreme climate events. Consequently, loss of healthy life years as a result of global climate change is predicted to be 500 times greater in poor African populations than in European populations. However, the increase of more than 2 degrees C of average temperature will result in a negative health <span class="hlt">impact</span> in all regions, the potential benefits of a warmer temperature being negatively compensated, heat <span class="hlt">waves</span> being one of the largest climate change threats in the developed world. PMID:20637066</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Sunyer, Jordi</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-07-16</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">300</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010JGRC..11512036T"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Impact</span> of nonlinear energy transfer on the <span class="hlt">wave</span> field in Pacific hindcast experiments</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We investigated the <span class="hlt">impact</span> of nonlinear energy transfer (Snl) on <span class="hlt">wave</span> fields by performing hindcast experiments for the Pacific Ocean. Specifically, we evaluated model performance using SRIAM, which was developed to accurately reproduce Snl with lower computational cost than more rigorous algorithms. The model results were compared to in situ <span class="hlt">wave</span> parameters as well as results from another model employing the widely used discrete interaction approximation method (DIA). Comparison of the model results with buoy observations revealed a negligible difference between SRIAM and DIA for significant <span class="hlt">wave</span> heights. However, the difference for the peak period was quite pronounced, especially around the tropical Pacific, where a persistent bias in peak frequency was improved by using SRIAM. This study also highlights the <span class="hlt">impact</span> of source terms on spectral shape under a realistic model setting. Detailed analysis of spectral shape indicated that SRIAM can quantitatively capture the overshoot phenomena around the spectral peak during <span class="hlt">wave</span> growth. In addition, Snl played a major role in maintaining the equilibrium range; it reacted to changes in the net external sources to cancel out the total source term. These results show that the magnitude of high-frequency dissipation controls the spectral tail exponent and that the balanced net external source is responsible for the reproduction of the f-4 power law behavior in the equilibrium range.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Tamura, Hitoshi; Waseda, Takuji; Miyazawa, Yasumasa</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" 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onClick='return showDiv("page_6");' href="#">6</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_7");' href="#">7</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_8");' href="#">8</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_9");' href="#">9</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_10");' href="#">10</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#">11</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#">12</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#">13</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#">14</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#">15</a> <a style="font-weight: bold;">16</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#">17</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#">18</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#">19</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#">20</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">301</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/20800141"> <span id="translatedtitle">Analyses of Third Order Bose-Einstein Correlation by Means of Coulomb <span class="hlt">Wave</span> <span class="hlt">Function</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In order to include a correction by the Coulomb interaction in Bose-Einstein correlation (BEC), the <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> for the Coulomb scattering were introduced in the quantum optical approach to BEC in the previous work. If we formulate the amplitude written by Coulomb <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> according to the diagram for BEC in the plane <span class="hlt">wave</span> formulation, the formula for 3{pi} -BEC becomes simpler than that of our previous work. We re-analyze the raw data of 3{pi} -BEC by NA44 and STAR Collaborations by this formula. Results are compared with the previous ones.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Biyajima, Minoru [Department of Physics, Shinshu University, Matsumoto, 390-8621 (Japan); Mizoguchi, Takuya [Toba National College of Maritime Technology, Toba 517-8501 (Japan); Suzuki, Naomichi [Department of Comprehensive Management, Matsumoto University, Matsumoto 390-1295 (Japan)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-04-11</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">302</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1994SPIE.2275...21R"> <span id="translatedtitle">Millimeter-<span class="hlt">wave</span> nondestructive evaluation of glass fiber/epoxy composites subjected to <span class="hlt">impact</span> fatigue</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The useful life of a glass fiber/epoxy composite subjected to <span class="hlt">impact</span> fatigue loading is an important issue in the future design of numerous industrial components. Lifetime predictions have been a problem particularly due to the difficulties encountered in monitoring damage accumulation in composites. It is hypothesized that there is a build up of micro damage, such as matrix micro-cracks and micro-delaminations, even though there is no apparent change in material compliance. A critical level is finally reached at which time the properties of the composite begin to fall and compliance change is evident. In this study the apparent compliance change and the type of damage accumulation is investigated. To measure the compliance change, a test unit was developed that uses a dynamic load measuring system. The load cell measures the load throughout each <span class="hlt">impact</span> pulse and the compliance and energy absorbed by the specimen is then related to the recorded curve. Initially no change in the <span class="hlt">impact</span> pulse was apparent; however, after a finite number of cycles the peak load and area under each <span class="hlt">impact</span> pulse drop, indicating an increase in compliance. Unfortunately, the <span class="hlt">impact</span> load does not provide information on the form and degree of damage. Thus, millimeter <span class="hlt">wave</span> nondestructive investigation is used, in conjunction with <span class="hlt">impact</span> fatigue tests, to examine microstructural aspects of damage initiation and growth. The millimeter <span class="hlt">wave</span> scanning technique results in detectable damage growth throughout the <span class="hlt">impact</span> fatigue test. Damage size and growth patterns specific to composites are obvious, and after significant damage can be related to the observable macro damage. Continued development of these investigative techniques promises to enhance the ability of detecting defects and damage growth in fiber reinforced composite materials as well as improving the understanding of <span class="hlt">impact</span> fatigue initiation in these complex materials.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Radford, Donald W.; Ganchev, Stoyan I.; Qaddoumi, Nasser; Beauregard, Guy; Zoughi, Reza</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1994-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">303</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/54649144"> <span id="translatedtitle">Current state of acoustic <span class="hlt">wave</span> propagation modelling and its use in the estimation of <span class="hlt">impact</span> on marine mammals</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Underwater acoustic <span class="hlt">wave</span> propagation modelling has matured into a sophisticated and reliable forecasting tool for predicting the acoustic noise footprints of geophysical exploration activities. Computational methods such as Parabolic Equation solutions of the <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> can account for all aspects of acoustic propagation including diffraction, mode stripping, and compressional and shear <span class="hlt">wave</span> transmission in the seabed substrate. Given sufficient knowledge</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">R. Racca; D. Hannay; S. Carr</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">304</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010EGUGA..1212307A"> <span id="translatedtitle">Multicriteria analysis to evaluate <span class="hlt">wave</span> energy converters based on their environmental <span class="hlt">impact</span>: an Italian case study</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The exploitation of renewable energy resources is fast becoming a key objective in many countries. Countries with coastlines have particularly valuable renewable energy resources in the form of tides, currents, <span class="hlt">waves</span> and offshore wind. Due to the visual <span class="hlt">impact</span> of siting large numbers of energy generating devices (eg. wind turbines) in terrestrial landscapes, considerable attention is now being directed towards coastal waters. Due to their environmental sensitivity, the selection of the most adequate location for these systems is a critical factor. Multi-criteria analysis allows to consider a wide variety of key characteristics (e.g. water depth, distance to shore, distance to the electric grid in land, geology, environmental <span class="hlt">impact</span>) that may be converted into a numerical index of suitability for different WEC devices to different locations. So identifying the best alternative between an offshore or a onshore device may be specifically treated as a multicriteria problem. Special enphasisi should be given in the multicriteria analysis to the environmental <span class="hlt">impact</span> issues. The <span class="hlt">wave</span> energy prospective in the Italian seas is relatively low if compared to the other European countries faced to the ocean. Based on the <span class="hlt">wave</span> climate, the Alghero site, (NW Sardinia, Italy) is one of the most interesting sites for the <span class="hlt">wave</span> energy perspective (about 10 kW/m). Alghero site is characterized by a high level of marine biodiversity. In 2002 the area northern to Alghero harbour (Capo Caccia-Isola Piana) was established a Marine Protected Area (MPA). It could be discussed for this site how to choose between the onshore/offshore WEC alternative. An offshore device like <span class="hlt">Wave</span> Dragon (http://www.wavedragon.net/) installed at -65m depth (width=300m and length=170 m) may approximately produce about 3.6 GWh/y with a total cost of about 9,000,000 €. On the other hand, an onshore device like SSG (http://waveenergy.no/), employed as crown wall for a vertical breakwater to enlarge the present harbour protection, and installed at -10m depth (length=300 m) may produce about 2.7 GWh/y with a total costs of about 12,000,000 €, where only the 50% of the amount are the costs of the SSG device. Obviously the environmental <span class="hlt">impact</span> of the two solutions is quite different. Aim of this study is to provide a multicriteria decision support framework to evaluate the best WEC typology and location in the perspective of the environmental cost-benefit analysis. The general environmental aspects generated by <span class="hlt">wave</span> power projects will be described. Colonisation patterns and biofouling will be discussed with particular reference to changes of the seabed and alterations due to new substrates. In addition, <span class="hlt">impacts</span> for fish, fishery and marine mammals will be also considered. We suggest that <span class="hlt">wave</span> power projects should be evaluated also on the basis of their environmental <span class="hlt">impacts</span> in the perspective of the Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA) analysis, as implemented by the European Commission (SEA Directive 2001/42/EC). The early incorporation of the environmental aspects involved in the evaluation of <span class="hlt">wave</span> power projects will give the opportunity for early mitigations or design modifications, most likely making <span class="hlt">wave</span> projects more acceptable in the long run and more suitable for the marine environment.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Azzellino, Arianna; Contestabile, Pasquale; Lanfredi, Caterina; Vicinanza, Diego</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">305</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2627866"> <span id="translatedtitle">The 2006 California Heat <span class="hlt">Wave</span>: <span class="hlt">Impacts</span> on Hospitalizations and Emergency Department Visits</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Background Climate models project that heat <span class="hlt">waves</span> will increase in frequency and severity. Despite many studies of mortality from heat <span class="hlt">waves</span>, few studies have examined morbidity. Objectives In this study we investigated whether any age or race/ethnicity groups experienced increased hospitalizations and emergency department (ED) visits overall or for selected illnesses during the 2006 California heat <span class="hlt">wave</span>. Methods We aggregated county-level hospitalizations and ED visits for all causes and for 10 cause groups into six geographic regions of California. We calculated excess morbidity and rate ratios (RRs) during the heat <span class="hlt">wave</span> (15 July to 1 August 2006) and compared these data with those of a reference period (8–14 July and 12–22 August 2006). Results During the heat <span class="hlt">wave</span>, 16,166 excess ED visits and 1,182 excess hospitalizations occurred statewide. ED visits for heat-related causes increased across the state [RR = 6.30; 95% confidence interval (CI), 5.67–7.01], especially in the Central Coast region, which includes San Francisco. Children (0–4 years of age) and the elderly (? 65 years of age) were at greatest risk. ED visits also showed significant increases for acute renal failure, cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, electrolyte imbalance, and nephritis. We observed significantly elevated RRs for hospitalizations for heat-related illnesses (RR = 10.15; 95% CI, 7.79–13.43), acute renal failure, electrolyte imbalance, and nephritis. Conclusions The 2006 California heat <span class="hlt">wave</span> had a substantial effect on morbidity, including regions with relatively modest temperatures. This suggests that population acclimatization and adaptive capacity influenced risk. By better understanding these <span class="hlt">impacts</span> and population vulnerabilities, local communities can improve heat <span class="hlt">wave</span> preparedness to cope with a globally warming future.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Knowlton, Kim; Rotkin-Ellman, Miriam; King, Galatea; Margolis, Helene G.; Smith, Daniel; Solomon, Gina; Trent, Roger; English, Paul</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">306</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/55019758"> <span id="translatedtitle">Absolute ionisation <span class="hlt">functions</span> for electron <span class="hlt">impact</span> with barium</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Absolute ionisation <span class="hlt">functions</span> sigma n+(E)(n=1,2,3,4) and the total ionisation <span class="hlt">function</span> sigma tot(E) for electron <span class="hlt">impact</span> with barium have been determined for energies up to 600 eV. Modified crossed-beam techniques were applied using the excitation <span class="hlt">function</span> of the light from the resonance transition as a reference standard for the cross sections. A time-of-flight device was used to separate ions with different</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">J.-M. Dettmann; F. Karstensen</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1982-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">307</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/43800"> <span id="translatedtitle">Grassmannians, Nonlinear <span class="hlt">Wave</span> Equations and Generalized Schur <span class="hlt">Functions</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">A set of <span class="hlt">functions</span> is introduced which generalizes the famous Schur polynomials and their connection to Grasmannian manifolds. These <span class="hlt">functions</span> are shown to provide a new method of constructing solutions to the KP hierarchy of nonlinear partial differential equations. Specifically, just as the Schur polynomials are used to expand tau-<span class="hlt">functions</span> as a sum, it is shown that it is natural</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Alex Kasman</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1998-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">308</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/7011899"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Impact</span> of ozone depletion on immune <span class="hlt">function</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Depletion of stratospheric ozone is expected to lead to an increase in the amount of UV-B radiation present in sunlight. In addition to its well known ability to cause skin cancer, UV-B radiation has been shown to alter the immune system. The immune system is the body's primary defense mechanism against infectious diseases and protects against the development of certain types of cancer. Any impairment of immune <span class="hlt">function</span> may jeopardize health by increasing susceptibility to infectious diseases, increasing the severity of infections, or delaying recovery for infections. In addition, impaired immune <span class="hlt">function</span> can increase the incidence of certain cancers, particularly cancers of the skin. Research carried out with laboratory animals over the past 15 years has demonstrated that exposure of the skin to UV-B radiation can suppress certain types of immune responses. These include rejection of UV-induced skin cancers and melanomas, contact allergy reactions to chemicals, delayed-type hypersensitivity responses to microbial and other antigens, and phagocytosis and elimination of certain bacteria from lymphoid tissues. Recent studies with mycobacterial infection of mice demonstrated that exposure to UV-B radiation decreased the delayed hypersensitivity response to mycobacterial antigens and increased the severity of infection. In humans, UV-B radiation has also been shown to impair the contact allergy response. These studies demonstrate that UV radiation can decrease immune responses in humans and laboratory and raise the possibility that increased exposure to UV-B radiation could adversely affect human health by increasing the incidence or severity of certain infectious diseases.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Jeevan, A.; Kripke, M.L. (Univ. of Texas, Houston, TX (United States). Dept. of Immunology)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1993-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">309</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23005556"> <span id="translatedtitle">Mathieu <span class="hlt">function</span> solutions for photoacoustic <span class="hlt">waves</span> in sinusoidal one-dimensional structures.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The photoacoustic effect for a one-dimensional structure, the sound speed of which varies sinusoidally in space, is shown to be governed by an inhomogeneous Mathieu equation with the forcing term dependent on the spatial and temporal properties of the exciting optical radiation. New orthogonality relations, traveling <span class="hlt">wave</span> Mathieu <span class="hlt">functions</span>, and solutions to the inhomogeneous Mathieu equation are found, which are used to determine the character of photoacoustic <span class="hlt">waves</span> in infinite and finite length phononic structures. Floquet solutions to the Mathieu equation give the positions of the band gaps, the damping of the acoustic <span class="hlt">waves</span> within the band gaps, and the dispersion relation for photoacoustic <span class="hlt">waves</span>. The solutions to the Mathieu equation give the photoacoustic response of the structure, show the space equivalent of subharmonic generation and acoustic confinement when <span class="hlt">waves</span> are excited within band gaps. PMID:23005556</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Wu, Binbin; Diebold, Gerald J</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-07-23</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">310</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012PhyS...85b5302L"> <span id="translatedtitle">Molecular distorted-<span class="hlt">wave</span> Born approximation for ionization of H2 by electron <span class="hlt">impact</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The molecular distorted-<span class="hlt">wave</span> Born approximation is proposed to study the (e, 2e) reaction for H2 targets. The <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> of the incoming and outgoing electrons are obtained by solving the Lippmann-Schwinger equations, and the T-matrix in the Lippmann-Schwinger equations is calculated in a momentum space static-exchange-optical model. Triple differential cross sections are computed for incident energies of 100 and 250 eV in coplanar asymmetric geometry. Comparison of the present calculated results with the available experimental data in the literature reveals that there is good agreement.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Liu, Junbo; Liu, Dejun; Zhou, Yajun</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">311</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23384832"> <span id="translatedtitle">The <span class="hlt">impact</span> of uterine artery embolization on ovarian <span class="hlt">function</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Soon after the introduction of uterine artery embolization (UAE) as a treatment for fibroid tumors, questions arose regarding its potential <span class="hlt">impact</span> on ovarian <span class="hlt">function</span>. The onset of amenorrhea caused by ovarian failure after UAE was reported, and occlusion of ovarian arterial supply via uterine-arterial communications was suspected as the mechanism. Despite that, premature induction of menopause after UAE remains very infrequent. Perhaps of greater concern is a subclinical diminution of ovarian <span class="hlt">functional</span> reserve. Data from randomized trials and prospective case series suggest that degradation of ovarian <span class="hlt">function</span> may occur after UAE, but is concentrated in women older than age 45 years, with little evidence of an <span class="hlt">impact</span> in women younger than 40 years of age. This review is intended to summarize current knowledge regarding the <span class="hlt">impact</span> of UAE on ovarian reserve and the induction of menopause. PMID:23384832</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kaump, Geoffrey R; Spies, James B</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-02-04</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">312</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010IJMPB..24.3489C"> <span id="translatedtitle">Analytic <span class="hlt">Wave</span> <span class="hlt">Functions</span> for the Half-Filled Lowest Landau Level</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We consider a two-dimensional strongly correlated electronic system in a strong perpendicular magnetic field at half-filling of the lowest Landau level (LLL). We seek to build a <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> that, by construction, lies entirely in the Hilbert space of the LLL. Quite generally, a <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> of this nature can be built as a linear combination of all possible Slater determinants formed by using the complete set of single-electron states that belong to the LLL. However, due to the vast number of Slater determinant states required to form such basis <span class="hlt">functions</span>, the expansion is impractical for any but the smallest systems. Thus, in practice, the expansion must be truncated to a small number of Slater determinants. Among many possible LLL Slater determinant states, we note a particular special class of such <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> in which electrons occupy either only even, or only odd angular momentum states. We focus on such a class of <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> and obtain analytic expressions for various quantities of interest. Results seem to suggest that these special <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span>, while interesting and physically appealing, are unlikely to be a very good approximation for the exact ground state at half-filling factor. The overall quality of the description can be improved by including other additional LLL Slater determinant states. It is during this process that we identify another special family of suitable LLL Slater determinant states to be used in an enlarged expansion.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ciftja, Orion</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">313</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21389174"> <span id="translatedtitle">Effect of single-particle splitting in the exact <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> of the isovectorial pairing Hamiltonian</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The structure of the exact <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> of the isovectorial pairing Hamiltonian with nondegenerate single-particle levels is discussed. The way that the single-particle splittings break the quartet condensate solution found for N=Z nuclei in a single degenerate level is established. After a brief review of the exact solution, the structure of the <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> is analyzed and some particular cases are considered where a clear interpretation of the <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> emerges. An expression for the exact <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> in terms of the isospin triplet of pair creators is given. The ground-state <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> is analyzed as a <span class="hlt">function</span> of pairing strength, for a system of four protons and four neutrons. For small and large values of the pairing strength a dominance of two-pair (quartets) scalar couplings is found, whereas for intermediate values enhancements of the nonscalar couplings are obtained. A correlation of these enhancements with the creation of Cooper-like pairs is observed.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Lerma H, S. [Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Fisica e Inteligencia Artificial, Universidad Veracruzana, Lomas del Estadio s/n, 91000, Xalapa, Ver. (Mexico)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-07-15</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">314</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://dx.doi.org/10.1130/G19678.1"> <span id="translatedtitle">Shock-<span class="hlt">wave</span>-induced fracturing of calcareous nannofossils from the Chesapeake Bay <span class="hlt">impact</span> crater</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Fractured calcareous nannofossils of the genus Discoaster from synimpact sediments within the Chesapeake Bay <span class="hlt">impact</span> crater demonstrate that other petrographic shock indicators exist for the cratering process in addition to quartz minerals. Evidence for shock-induced taphonomy includes marginal fracturing of rosette-shaped Discoaster species into pentagonal shapes and pressure- and temperature-induced dissolution of ray tips and edges of discoasters. Rotational deformation of individual crystallites may be the mechanism that produces the fracture pattern. Shock-<span class="hlt">wave</span>-fractured calcareous nannofossils were recovered from synimpact matrix material representing tsunami or resurge sedimentation that followed <span class="hlt">impact</span>. Samples taken from cohesive clasts within the crater rubble show no evidence of shock-induced fracturing. The data presented here support growing evidence that microfossils can be used to determine the intensity and timing of wet-<span class="hlt">impact</span> cratering.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Self-Trail, J. M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">315</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21410404"> <span id="translatedtitle">Kinetic Theory for Distribution <span class="hlt">Functions</span> of <span class="hlt">Wave</span>-Particle Interactions in Plasmas</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The evolution of a charged particle distribution <span class="hlt">function</span> under the influence of coherent electromagnetic <span class="hlt">waves</span> in a plasma is determined from kinetic theory. For coherent <span class="hlt">waves</span>, the dynamical phase space of particles is an inhomogeneous mix of chaotic and regular orbits. The persistence of long time correlations between the particle motion and the phase of the <span class="hlt">waves</span> invalidates any simplifying Markovian or statistical assumptions--the basis for usual quasilinear theories. The generalized formalism in this Letter leads to a hierarchy of evolution equations for the reduced distribution <span class="hlt">function</span>. The evolution operators, in contrast to the quasilinear theories, are time dependent and nonsingular and include the rich phase space dynamics of particles interacting with coherent <span class="hlt">waves</span>.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kominis, Y.; Hizanidis, K. [School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, National Technical University of Athens, Association EURATOM-Hellenic Republic, Zographou GR-15773 (Greece); Ram, A. K. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-06-11</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">316</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2002cosp...34E.301T"> <span id="translatedtitle">Radio-<span class="hlt">wave</span> emission due to hypervelocity <span class="hlt">impacts</span> and its correlation with optical observations</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This paper describes the most interesting phenomena of radio-<span class="hlt">wave</span> emission due to hypervelocity <span class="hlt">impacts</span>. A projectile of polycarbonate with 1.1 g weight was accelerated by a rail gun to 3.8 km/sec, and hit two targets which are a 2 mm thick aluminum plate upstream and a 45 mm diameter aluminum column downstream, respectively. The projectile first breaks wires to give a triggering signal to a data recorder, then penetrates the aluminum plate, and finally hit the column, The emitted radio-<span class="hlt">waves</span> propagate through the chamber window, and are received by antennas at each frequency band. The receivers in 22 GHz- and 2 GHz-bands consist of a low noise amplifier, a mixer, a local oscillator and an IF amplifier , respectively. The receiver in 1 MHz-band is a simple RF amplifier. The outputs of all receivers are fed to a data recorder which is actually a high-speed digital oscilloscope with a large amount of memory. The radio-<span class="hlt">waves</span> were successfully recorded in 22 GHz-band with 500 MHz bandwidth, in 2 GHz-band with 300 MHz bandwidth, and in 1MHz-band. The waveforms in 22 GHz- and 2 GHz-bands coincide well each other, and are composed of two groups of sharp impulses with a separation of about 20 micro seconds. The width of an impulse is less than 2 n sec. which is the resolution limit of the data recorder. We carried out optical observations using an ultra-high speed camera simultaneously through another window of the chamber. The time interval between scenes is 2 micro sec. We can see a faint light of the projectile before the first <span class="hlt">impact</span> to the plate, and then a brilliant gas exploding backward from the plate and forward to the column. After hitting the column target, the brilliant gas flows to the chamber wall and is reflected back to make a mixture with dark gas in the chamber. Excellent correlation between radio-<span class="hlt">wave</span> emission and the observed optical phenomena was obtained in the experiment. It is easily conceived that the radio-<span class="hlt">waves</span> consist of quite a wide frequency spectrum because of the spiky waveforms. The emission of the radio-<span class="hlt">waves</span> is delayed from the optical events by several micro seconds. The optical phenomena are said to be mostly attributed to Bremstrahlung. The radio-<span class="hlt">wave</span> phenomena are esteemed to be partially due to Bremstrahlung, but mainly due to other causes such as the heating effects of the targets or energy release from broken lattices of the targets.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Takano, T.; Maki, K.; Yamori, A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">317</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=television+AND+women&pg=5&id=EJ684314"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Functional</span> Adult Literacy and Empowerment of Women: <span class="hlt">Impact</span> of a <span class="hlt">Functional</span> Literacy Program in Turkey</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">|This study addresses the <span class="hlt">impact</span> of <span class="hlt">functional</span> adult literacy on the empowerment of women in the absence of formal schooling. It examines whether the effects of <span class="hlt">functional</span> literacy are exclusively content specific or whether there are gains going beyond the obvious benefits and extending to other spheres of everyday <span class="hlt">functioning</span>, such as…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kagitcibasi, Cigdem; Goksen, Fatos; Gulgoz, Sami</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">318</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21419509"> <span id="translatedtitle">Covariant spectator theory of np scattering: Effective range expansions and relativistic deuteron <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We present the effective range expansions for the {sup 1}S{sub 0} and {sup 3}S{sub 1} scattering phase shifts, and the relativistic deuteron <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> that accompany our recent high precision fits (with {chi}{sup 2}/N{sub data{approx_equal}}1) to the 2007 world np data below 350 MeV. The <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> are expanded in a series of analytical <span class="hlt">functions</span> (with the correct asymptotic behavior at both large and small arguments) that can be Fourier-transformed from momentum to coordinate space and are convenient to use in any application. A fortran subroutine to compute these <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> can be obtained from the authors.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Gross, Franz; Stadler, Alfred [College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, Virginia 23185 (United States) and Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, Virginia 23606 (United States); Centro de Fisica Nuclear da Universidade de Lisboa, P-1649-003 Lisboa (Portugal) and Departamento de Fisica da Universidade de Evora, P-7000-671 Evora (Portugal)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-09-15</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">319</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1996PhRvB..53.9697H"> <span id="translatedtitle">Quantum group, Bethe ansatz equations, and Bloch <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> in magnetic fields</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> for a two-dimensional Bloch electron in uniform magnetic fields at the mid-band points are studied by exploiting a connection to the quantum group Uq(sl2): A linear combination of its generators gives the Hamiltonian. We apply both analytic and numerical methods to obtain and analyze the <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span>, by solving the <span class="hlt">functional</span> Bethe ansatz equations first proposed by Wiegmann and Zabrodin on the basis of the above observation. The semiclassical case with the flux per plaquette ?=1/Q is analyzed in detail, by exploring a structure of the Bethe ansatz equations. We also reveal the multifractal structure of the solutions to Bethe ansatz equations and corresponding <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> when ? is irrational, such as the golden or silver mean.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hatsugai, Yasuhiro; Kohmoto, Mahito; Wu, Yong-Shi</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1996-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">320</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21513268"> <span id="translatedtitle">Lattice studies of ground state <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functionals</span> for Yang-Mills theory in Coulomb gauge</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Yang-Mills theory in Coulomb gauge has the remarkable property that Gauss' law can be resolved exactly which allows to apply familiar concepts from quantum mechanics. However, the exact form of the vacuum <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functional</span> is still unknown. We study Creutz ratios and low order Green <span class="hlt">functions</span> of a discretised lattice version of two candidates for the vacuum <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functional</span>: the infrared limit of the Greensite-Olejnik approach (which amounts to a dimensionally reduced form of Yang-Mills theory), and the Gaussian <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functional</span>. In both cases, we also investigate the existence of center vortices and their influence on the infrared properties of the models. Our findings are compared with recent lattice data obtained in full Yang-Mills theory.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Quandt, Markus; Burgio, Giuseppe; Reinhardt, Hugo [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Universitaet Tuebingen, Auf der Morgenstelle 14, D-72076 Tuebingen (Germany)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-05-23</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" 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showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">321</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/55445861"> <span id="translatedtitle">Interaction of chemical bonds: Strictly localized <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> in orthogonal basis</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">A second-quantized theory is presented with the aim to study the nature and interactions of well-localizable chemical bonds in molecules. The basis set is partitioned by assigning each basis <span class="hlt">function</span> to a chemical bond possessing two electrons. The Schrödinger equation within each limited basis subset is solved exactly for each bond, leading to correlated, strictly localized, intrabond <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span>. The</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Péter R. Surján</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1984-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">322</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/13057248"> <span id="translatedtitle">Localization of multiphoton ionization\\/dissociation resonance <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> in AC fields</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Although it has been proved before J. Chem. Phys. 101, 9716 1995 that the complex scaled photoionizingrphotodissociating resonances are associated with square integrable <span class="hlt">functions</span> only when the time-dependent Hamiltonian is represented . in the velocity or acceleration gauges , it is proved here that in the length gauge a narrow . resonance <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> and not a broad one! may</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Nimrod Moiseyev</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1997-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">323</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/12704513"> <span id="translatedtitle">A description of the target <span class="hlt">wave-function</span> encoded in the source terms</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">We argue that the gauge invariant source terms in the formalism of the Color Glass Condensate (CGC) should properly describe the target <span class="hlt">wave-function</span> if the microscopic structure is concerned in the regime where the parton distribution is not quite dense. The quantum property of color charge density is incorporated in the quantum weight <span class="hlt">function</span> defined with the source terms. We</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kenji Fukushima</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">324</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/58607089"> <span id="translatedtitle">Eikonal Approximation in AdS\\/CFT:From Shock <span class="hlt">Waves</span> to Four-Point <span class="hlt">Functions</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">We initiate a program to generalize the standard eikonal approximation to compute amplitudes in Anti-de Sitter spacetimes. Inspired by the shock <span class="hlt">wave</span> derivation of the eikonal amplitude in flat space, we study the two-point <span class="hlt">function</span> E ~ < O_1 O_1 >_{shock} in the presence of a shock <span class="hlt">wave</span> in Anti-de Sitter, where O_1 is a scalar primary operator in the</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">L Cornalba; R Schiappa; Miguel S Costa; Joao Penedones</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">325</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/12838373"> <span id="translatedtitle">Eikonal approximation in AdS\\/CFT: from shock <span class="hlt">waves</span> to four-point <span class="hlt">functions</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">We initiate a program to generalize the standard eikonal approximation to compute amplitudes in Anti-de Sitter spacetimes. Inspired by the shock <span class="hlt">wave</span> derivation of the eikonal amplitude in flat space, we study the two-point <span class="hlt">function</span> Script E ~ langleScript O1Script O1rangleshock in the presence of a shock <span class="hlt">wave</span> in Anti-de Sitter, where Script O1 is a scalar primary operator in</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Lorenzo Cornalba; Miguel S. Costa; João Penedones; Ricardo Schiappa</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">326</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/53718611"> <span id="translatedtitle">The Nature of Magnetospheric Electron Velocity Distribution <span class="hlt">Functions</span> from <span class="hlt">Wave</span> Observations</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">It is often assumed, as a first approximation, that the electron velocity distribution <span class="hlt">function</span> is Maxwellian when calculating the dispersion of magnetospheric plasma <span class="hlt">waves</span>. Data from the relaxation sounder on the GEOS-1 satellite were used to relate natural emissions between the harmonics of the electron cyclotron frequency fce, often referred to as ``(n+1\\/2)fce'' <span class="hlt">waves</span>, to sounder-stimulated plasma resonances (known as</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">R. F. Benson; A. F. Vinas; V. A. Osherovich; J. Fainberg; C. M. Purser</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">327</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/53302633"> <span id="translatedtitle">Probing alpha-particle <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> using (d-->,alpha) reactions</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> of the alpha particle corresponding to different S- and D-state deuteron-deuteron overlaps, , were investigated using exact finite-range distorted-<span class="hlt">wave</span> Born-approximation (DWBA) analyses of (d-->,alpha) reactions. Cross sections, vector, and tensor-analyzing powers were measured for (d-->,alpha) reactions populating the lowest Jpi=7+ state in 56Co at bombarding energies Ed of 16 and 22 MeV, the lowest 7+ state in 48Sc</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">E. R. Crosson; S. K. Lemieux; E. J. Ludwig; W. J. Thompson; M. Bisenberger; R. Hertenberger; D. Hofer; H. Kader; P. Schiemenz; G. Graw; A. M. Eiró; F. D. Santos</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1993-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">328</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/27658160"> <span id="translatedtitle">Weak Equivalence Principle and Propagation of the <span class="hlt">Wave</span> <span class="hlt">Function</span> in Quantum Mechanics</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The propagation of the <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> of a particle is characterised by a\\u000agroup and a phase velocity. The group velocity is associated with the\\u000aparticle's classical velocity, which is always smaller than the speed of light,\\u000aand the phase velocity is associated with the propagation speed of the <span class="hlt">wave</span>\\u000afunction phase and is treated as being unphysical, since its</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Clovis Jacinto de Matos</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">329</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6903575"> <span id="translatedtitle">Integration contours for the no-boundary <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> of the universe</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In the no-boundary proposal for the initial conditions of a closed cosmology, the <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> of the universe is the integral of exp(-action) over a contour of four-geometries and matter-field configurations on compact manifolds having only that boundary necessary to specify the arguments of the <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span>. There is no satisfactory covariant Hamiltonian quantum mechanics of closed cosmologies from which the contour may be derived, as there would be for defining the ground states of asymptotically flat spacetimes. No compelling prescription, such as the conformal rotation for asymptotically flat spacetimes, has been advanced. In this paper it is argued that the contour of integration can be constrained by simple physical considerations: (1) the integral defining the <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> should converge; (2) the <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> should satisfy the constraints implementing diffeomorphism invariance; (3) classical spacetime when the universe is large should be a prediction; (4) the correct field theory in curved spacetime should be reproduced in this spacetime; (5) to the extent that wormholes make the cosmological constant dependent on initial conditions the <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> should predict its vanishing.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Halliwell, J.J. (Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (USA)); Hartle, J.B. (Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (USA))</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1990-03-15</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">330</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5455690"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Wave-function</span> formalisms in the channel coupling array theory of many-body scattering</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Wave-function</span> formalisms corresponding to different channel coupling array transition operators of many-body scattering theory are derived and discussed. The Kouri-Levin transition operators are seen to be in typical Lippmann-Schwinger form and allow for the introduction of <span class="hlt">wave-function</span> components in a particularly straightforward way. The Baer-Kouri transition operators are not in the Lippmann-Schwinger form and an alternate procedure is used to derive their corresponding <span class="hlt">wave-function</span> components. In the three-body case, the Kouri-Levin operators T/sub j/k obtained from the Faddeev-Lovelace choice of channel coupling array are seen to lead to precisely the Faddeev <span class="hlt">wave-function</span> components. The Baer-Kouri operators are shown to lead to <span class="hlt">wave-function</span> components obeying inhomogeneous equations. These inhomogeneous equations are used to give an alternate explanation of the nonunitary amplitudes obtained in recent calculations based on approximate forms of the Baer-Kouri operators.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Levin, F.S.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1980-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">331</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010AGUFMEP24A..06L"> <span id="translatedtitle">Analysis of the erosion of marsh boundaries produced by wind-<span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">impact</span> in a shallow tidal basin</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Salt-marsh ecosystems play a crucial role in the eco-geomorphological evolution of intertidal areas acting as a fundamental buffer against the <span class="hlt">impacts</span> of coastal storms, filtering nutrients and pollutants from tidal waters, and providing critical habitats for rare vegetation species and essential nursery areas for fishes and crustaceans. Recent observations of marsh degradation worldwide highlight the importance to improve our understanding of the chief processes responsible for their deterioration. The erosion of marsh boundaries produced by wind-<span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">impact</span> on the marsh edge is generally agreed to be the most important process driving marsh degradation and disappearance. We have studied long-term changes of salt-marsh boundaries in the Venice Lagoon based on the analysis of sequential aerial photographs, dating from 1955, 1970, and 2002, coupled with modelling of local wind-<span class="hlt">wave</span> dynamics by way of a point <span class="hlt">wave</span> model. We have observed that a positive correlation exists between rates of marsh-boundary retreat, established by the analysis of sequential aerial photographs, and the averaged power of the <span class="hlt">impacting</span> wind <span class="hlt">waves</span>, computed through the <span class="hlt">wave</span> model. We have also carried out a dimensional analysis which suggests the existence of a linear relationship between the eroded volume of marsh sediment and the averaged <span class="hlt">wave</span> power. Annually eroded volumes of marsh sediment, determined on the basis of remote sensed data and bathymetric survey, plotted versus the computed averaged power of the <span class="hlt">impacting</span> wind <span class="hlt">waves</span> support the existence of such a relationship.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Lanzoni, S.; Santalucia, M.; D'Alpaos, A.; Marani, M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">332</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21011231"> <span id="translatedtitle">Electron-<span class="hlt">impact</span> ionization of diatomic molecules using a configuration-average distorted-<span class="hlt">wave</span> method</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Electron-<span class="hlt">impact</span> ionization cross sections for diatomic molecules are calculated in a configuration-average distorted-<span class="hlt">wave</span> method. Core bound orbitals for the molecular ion are calculated using a single-configuration self-consistent-field method based on a linear combination of Slater-type orbitals. The core bound orbitals are then transformed onto a two-dimensional (r,{theta}) numerical lattice from which a Hartree potential with local exchange is constructed. The single-particle Schroedinger equation is then solved for the valence bound orbital and continuum distorted-<span class="hlt">wave</span> orbitals with S-matrix boundary conditions. Total cross section results for H{sub 2} and N{sub 2} are compared with those from semiempirical calculations and experimental measurements.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Pindzola, M. S.; Robicheaux, F.; Colgan, J.; Ballance, C. P. [Department of Physics, Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama 36849 (United States); Theoretical Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Department of Physics, Rollins College, Winter Park, Florida 32789 (United States)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-07-15</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">333</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/53217417"> <span id="translatedtitle">Riemann zeta <span class="hlt">function</span> from <span class="hlt">wave</span>-packet dynamics</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">We show that the time evolution of a thermal phase state of an anharmonic oscillator with logarithmic energy spectrum is intimately connected to the generalized Riemann zeta <span class="hlt">function</span> zeta(s,a). Indeed, the autocorrelation <span class="hlt">function</span> at a time t is determined by zeta(sigma+itau,a), where sigma is governed by the temperature of the thermal phase state and tau is proportional to t. We</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">R. Mack; J. P. Dahl; H. Moya-Cessa; W. T. Strunz; R. Walser; W. P. Schleich</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">334</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008JSV...313..171G"> <span id="translatedtitle">Shock <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">impact</span> on monolithic and composite material plates: The preferential aeroelastic response</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">An experimental investigation was carried out to determine the aeroelastic response of thin flat plates during face-on <span class="hlt">impact</span> with planar shock <span class="hlt">waves</span>. The experiments were performed in a large-scale shock tube research facility, which had a working section of 12? in diameter and a length of 80 ft. One aluminum plate, one stainless steal plate and several composite plates were tested in the present investigation. Miniature semi-conductor strain-gauges of high-frequency response were employed to measure locally the strain on the exterior side of the plates and high-frequency response pressure transducers were used to measure time-dependent wall and total pressure. Due to the elastic deformation of the plates and their reverberation, strong acoustic <span class="hlt">waves</span> were generated on the external side of the <span class="hlt">impact</span> which carry a significant signature of the plates’ properties. Composite plates were found to suppress several of the modes of the <span class="hlt">wave</span> patterns while metallic ones demonstrate a rich variety of interacting modes. The amplitude of the excited acoustic <span class="hlt">waves</span>, however, was higher in the case of composite plates than in the case of steel plates. The frequency content of the strain signals on the surface of composite plates was not always the same with the content of the surface acceleration measured in free vibration experiments. Calculations by using a coupled system of equations between the fluid and solid phases of monolithic materials provided predictions in good agreement with the measured values of modal frequencies. These theoretical results were also in agreement with the classical modal analysis results by using the Poisson Kirchoff theory for thin plates under axisymmetric or non-axisymmetric conditions.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Gong, Minwei; Andreopoulos, Yiannis</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">335</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/35515651"> <span id="translatedtitle">Trichotillomania: <span class="hlt">impact</span> on psychosocial <span class="hlt">functioning</span> and quality of life</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">This study explored the <span class="hlt">impact</span> of hair pulling on psychosocial <span class="hlt">functioning</span> for patients diagnosed with trichotillomania (TTM; n=28). TTM patients were compared to age and gender-matched groups of psychiatric patients without TTM (n=28) and nonpsychiatric control volunteers (NC, n=28) on measures of psychological distress, <span class="hlt">functioning</span>\\/quality of life, and self-esteem. Results indicated that TTM patients reported more severe psychosocial impairments than</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Gretchen J. Diefenbach; David F. Tolin; Scott Hannan; Johanna Crocetto; Patrick Worhunsky</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">336</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23116805"> <span id="translatedtitle">Assessment of <span class="hlt">impact</span> factors on shear <span class="hlt">wave</span> based liver stiffness measurement.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Shear <span class="hlt">wave</span> based ultrasound elastographies have been implemented as non-invasive methods for quantitative assessment of liver stiffness. Nonetheless, there are only a few studies that have investigated <span class="hlt">impact</span> factors on liver stiffness measurement (LSM). Moreover, standard examination protocols for LSM are still lacking in clinical practice. Our study aimed to assess the <span class="hlt">impact</span> factors on LSM to establish its standard examination protocols in clinical practice. We applied shear <span class="hlt">wave</span> based elastography point quantification (ElastPQ) in 21 healthy individuals to determine the <span class="hlt">impact</span> of liver location (segments I-VIII), breathing phase (end-inspiration and end-expiration), probe position (sub-costal and inter-costal position) and examiner on LSM. Additional studies in 175 healthy individuals were also performed to determine the influence of gender and age on liver stiffness. We found significant <span class="hlt">impact</span> of liver location on LSM, while the liver segment V displayed the lowest coefficient of variation (CV 21%). The liver stiffness at the end-expiration was significantly higher than that at the end-inspiration (P=2.1E-05). The liver stiffness was 8% higher in men than in women (3.8 ± 0.7 kPa vs. 3.5 ± 0.4 kPa, P=0.0168). In contrast, the liver stiffness was comparable in the different probe positions, examiners and age groups (P>0.05). In conclusion, this study reveals significant <span class="hlt">impact</span> from liver location, breathing phase and gender on LSM, while furthermore strengthening the necessity for the development of standard examination protocols on LSM. PMID:23116805</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ling, Wenwu; Lu, Qiang; Quan, Jierong; Ma, Lin; Luo, Yan</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-10-30</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">337</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007AGUFM.T13E1632O"> <span id="translatedtitle">Imaging of P and S <span class="hlt">wave</span> velocity structure beneath the Kii Peninsula in central Japan by combined analyses of P and S <span class="hlt">wave</span> receiver <span class="hlt">functions</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Philippine Sea Plate (PHP) is subducting beneath the Kii Peninsula in central Japan, which generates great interplate earthquakes and low-frequency earthquakes there. It is important to closely investigate where such events occur around the PHP. Therefore we need to estimate the detailed configurations of the PHP and the Moho. Traditionally, we have so far used P <span class="hlt">wave</span> radial receiver <span class="hlt">function</span> (RF) to investigate S <span class="hlt">wave</span> velocity structure by detecting P to S converted <span class="hlt">wave</span> at seismic velocity discontinuities. In this study, we investigated P and S <span class="hlt">wave</span> velocity structure also by detecting multiply-reflected P <span class="hlt">wave</span> between surface and discontinuities. In the analyses, we used vertical RFs instead of auto-correlation and cross-correlation analyses. Additionally, we analyzed S <span class="hlt">wave</span> RF of S to P and ScS to P converted <span class="hlt">waves</span> to enhance reliability of P <span class="hlt">wave</span> velocity structure. In this study, we used a dense seismic array that is located across the Kii Peninsula in southwest Japan from north to south. The array consists of 13 short-period seismic stations with around 5 km spacing. We used near earthquakes for detecting ScSp <span class="hlt">wave</span> and teleseismic earthquakes for other <span class="hlt">waves</span>. We analyzed multiply- reflected P <span class="hlt">waves</span> by employing vertical RFs. In deconvolution, we first stacked vertical components of P <span class="hlt">waves</span> observed at all array stations for each teleseismic event to remove local effects and improve S/N ratio. Then, we used the waveform portion with duration of 5 seconds after the P <span class="hlt">wave</span> arrival. In addition, we analyzed Sp and ScSp <span class="hlt">waves</span> by use of S <span class="hlt">wave</span> RFs that are vertical components deconvolved by radial ones. In deconvolution, we used extended-time multi-taper RF estimation (Shibutani et al., 2006) instead of traditional water level methods. In the P <span class="hlt">wave</span> RF analyses, we have investigated S <span class="hlt">wave</span> structure by detecting Ps <span class="hlt">waves</span>, and additionally we could investigate P <span class="hlt">wave</span> structure by detecting multiply reflected P <span class="hlt">waves</span>, Sp and ScSp phases. In the result of investigating P <span class="hlt">wave</span> structure, we confirmed the phases reflected or converted at the Moho. However, we could not confirm the phase from PHP. Further newly-devised analyses would be needed to reveal the deep P and S <span class="hlt">wave</span> structure.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ogawa, K.; Hirahara, K.; Shibutani, T.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">338</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/44362905"> <span id="translatedtitle">The Ecology of Seamounts: Structure, <span class="hlt">Function</span>, and Human <span class="hlt">Impacts</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">In this review of seamount ecology, we address a number of key scientific issues concerning the structure and <span class="hlt">function</span> of benthic communities, human <span class="hlt">impacts</span>, and seamount management and conservation. We consider whether community composition and diversity differ between seamounts and continental slopes, how important dispersal capabilities are in seamount connectivity, what environmental factors drive species composition and diversity, whether seamounts</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Malcolm R. Clark; Ashley A. Rowden; Thomas Schlacher; Alan Williams; Mireille Consalvey; Karen I. Stocks; Alex D. Rogers; Timothy D. O'Hara; Martin White; Timothy M. Shank; Jason M. Hall-Spencer</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">339</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/51574119"> <span id="translatedtitle">The <span class="hlt">impact</span> of soil degradation on soil <span class="hlt">functioning</span> in Europe</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The European Commission has presented in September 2006 its Thematic Strategy for Soil Protection.The Thematic Strategy for Soil Protection consists of a Communication from the Commission to the other European Institutions, a proposal for a framework Directive (a European law), and an <span class="hlt">Impact</span> Assessment. The Communication (COM(2006) 231) sets the frame. It defines the relevant soil <span class="hlt">functions</span> for Europe and</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Luca Montanarella</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">340</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21249723"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> of [70,1{sup -}] baryons in the 1/N{sub c} expansion</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Much work has been devoted to the study of nonstrange baryons belonging to the [70,1{sup -}] multiplet in the framework of the 1/N{sub c} expansion. Using group theoretical arguments here we examine the relation between the exact <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> and the approximate one, customarily used in applications where the system is separated into a ground state core and an excited quark. We show that the exact and approximate <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> globally give similar results for all of the mass operators presented in this work. However, we find that the inclusion of operators acting separately on the core and on the excited quark deteriorates the fit and leads to unsatisfactory values for the coefficients which encode the quark dynamics. Much better results are obtained when we include operators acting on the whole system, both for the exact and the approximate <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span>.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Matagne, N.; Stancu, Fl. [University of Liege, Institute of Physics B5, Sart Tilman, B-4000 Liege 1 (Belgium)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return 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<a onClick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#">11</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#">12</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#">13</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#">14</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#">15</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#">16</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#">17</a> <a style="font-weight: bold;">18</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#">19</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#">20</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">341</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21068059"> <span id="translatedtitle">Interpreting scattering <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> in the presence of energy-dependent interactions</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In scattering theory, the squared relative <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> |{phi}(q,r)|{sup 2} is often interpreted as a weight, due to final-state interactions, describing the probability enhancement for emission with asymptotic relative momentum q. An equivalence relation also links the integral of the squared <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> over all coordinate space to the density of states. This relation, which plays an important role in understanding two-particle correlation phenomenology, is altered for the case where the potential is energy dependent, as is assumed in various forms of reaction theory. Here, the modification to the equivalence relation is derived, and it is shown that the squared <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> should be augmented by a additional factor if it is to represent the emission enhancement for final-state interactions. Examples with relativistic vector interactions, e.g., the Coulomb interaction, are presented.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Pratt, Scott [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824-1321 (United States)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-01-15</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">342</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013JPhCS.410a2127K"> <span id="translatedtitle">Exact <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> of bound ?- for calculating ordinary muon capture rates</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The goal of the present contribution is twofold: (i) To compute exact <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> for a muon bound in the extended Coulomb potential of a muonic atom by solving the Dirac equation within the context of genetic algorithms and neural network techniques using experimental finite-size charge-densities for the attracting nucleus. (ii) To calculate partial and total rates of the ordinary muon capture in various muonic atoms. In contrast to the majority of previous realistic calculations for ?--capture rates, in our present work we utilize the above mentioned exact <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> for a muon orbiting at the Is and 2p atomic orbits. The required many-body nuclear <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> are obtained by diagonalizing the eigenvalue problem of the quasi-particle random phase approximation (QRPA).</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kardaras, I. S.; Stavrou, V. N.; Tsoulos, I. G.; Kosmas, T. S.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">343</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011PhRvB..84t5308B"> <span id="translatedtitle">Extracting the density profile of an electronic <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> in a quantum dot</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We use a model of a one-dimensional nanowire quantum dot to demonstrate the feasibility of a scanning probe microscope (SPM) imaging technique that can extract both the energy of an electron state and the amplitude of its <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> using a single instrument. This imaging technique can probe electrons that are buried beneath the surface of a low-dimensional semiconductor structure and provide valuable information for the design of quantum devices. A conducting SPM tip, acting as a movable gate, measures the energy of an electron state using Coulomb blockade spectroscopy. When the tip is close to the nanowire dot, it dents the <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> ?(x) of the quantum state, changing the electron's energy by an amount proportional to |?(x)|2. By recording the change in energy as the SPM tip is moved along the length of the dot, the density profile of the electronic <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> can be found along the length of the quantum dot.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Boyd, Erin E.; Westervelt, Robert M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">344</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/20640047"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> and two-electron probability distributions of the Hooke's-law atom and helium</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Hooke's-law atom (hookium) provides an exactly soluble model for a two-electron atom in which the nuclear-electron Coulombic attraction has been replaced by a harmonic one. Starting from the known exact position-space <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> for the ground state of hookium, we present the momentum-space <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span>. We also look at the intracules, two-electron probability distributions, for hookium in position, momentum, and phase space. These are compared with the Hartree-Fock results and the Coulomb holes (the difference between the exact and Hartree-Fock intracules) in position, momentum, and phase space are examined. We then compare these results with analogous results for the ground state of helium using a simple, explicitly correlated <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span>.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">O'Neill, Darragh P.; Gill, Peter M. W. [School of Chemistry, University of Nottingham, Nottingham NG7 2RD, (United Kingdom)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-08-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">345</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013JPhCS.437a2018F"> <span id="translatedtitle">The <span class="hlt">wave-function</span> description of the electromagnetic field</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">For an arbitrary electromagnetic field, we define a prepotential S, which is a complex-valued <span class="hlt">function</span> of spacetime. The prepotential is a modification of the two scalar potential <span class="hlt">functions</span> introduced by E. T. Whittaker. The prepotential is Lorentz covariant under a spin half representation. For a moving charge and any observer, we obtain a complex dimensionless scalar. The prepotential is a <span class="hlt">function</span> of this dimensionless scalar. The prepotential S of an arbitrary electromagnetic field is described as an integral over the charges generating the field. The Faraday vector at each point may be derived from S by a convolution of the differential operator with the alpha matrices of Dirac. Some explicit examples will be calculated. We also present the Maxwell equations for the prepotential.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Friedman, Yaakov</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">346</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://rses.anu.edu.au/~nick/teachdoc/papers/Ozalaybey_etal_RF_SW_BSSA1997.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Shear-<span class="hlt">Wave</span> Velocity Structure in the Northern Basin and Range Province from the Combined Analysis of Receiver <span class="hlt">Functions</span> and Surface <span class="hlt">Waves</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">A new method based on the joint inversion of receiver <span class="hlt">functions</span> and surface-<span class="hlt">wave</span> phase velocities results in well-determined shear-velocity structures that are consistent with the compressional-<span class="hlt">wave</span> structure, gravity, heat flow, and elevation data in the northern Basin and Range. This new inversion method takes advantage of average-velocity information present in the surface-<span class="hlt">wave</span> method and differential velocity information contained in the</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Serdar Ozalaybey; Martha K. Savage; Anne F. Sheehan; John N. Louie; James N. Brune</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1997-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">347</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23415107"> <span id="translatedtitle">Distorted <span class="hlt">wave</span> calculations for electron loss process induced by bare ion <span class="hlt">impact</span> on biological targets.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Distorted <span class="hlt">wave</span> models are employed to investigate the electron loss process induced by bare ions on biological targets. The two main reactions which contribute to this process, namely, the single electron ionization as well as the single electron capture are here studied. In order to further assess the validity of the theoretical descriptions used, the influence of particular mechanisms are studied, like dynamic screening for the case of electron ionization and energy deposition on the target by the <span class="hlt">impacting</span> projectile for the electron capture one. Results are compared with existing experimental data. PMID:23415107</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Monti, J M; Tachino, C A; Hanssen, J; Fojón, O A; Galassi, M E; Champion, C; Rivarola, R D</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-16</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">348</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007AIPC..894.1332K"> <span id="translatedtitle">Elastic <span class="hlt">Wave</span> Propagation in Complex Systems - The Interaction of <span class="hlt">Waves</span> with In-Homogeneities in <span class="hlt">Impact</span> Echo Testing Studied by Modelling and by Scanning Laser Vibrometry</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Laser vibrometer based contactless measurements of elastic <span class="hlt">wave</span> fields at the surface of a concrete block excited by a mechanical <span class="hlt">impact</span> are presented. The interaction of the <span class="hlt">waves</span> with a grouted duct is investigated. Numerical simulations of the same situation provide wavefront snapshots, which show similarities with the measurements concerning the primary <span class="hlt">wave</span> field but also significant differences with regard to the <span class="hlt">wave</span>-duct interaction. The latter result shows that the assumption of a perfectly bonded interface between duct wall and concrete matrix, as used in the simulation, is not realized in practice. It is assumed that this weak bonding significantly contributes to the detectability of grouted ducts and to the non-detectability of injection faults inside these ducts.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Köhler, B.; Schubert, F.; Haupt, L.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">349</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/48055055"> <span id="translatedtitle">Modified double-base propellants: Combustion <span class="hlt">wave</span> parameters and burning rate response <span class="hlt">functions</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The burning rates of modified double-base propellant at various pressures and initial temperatures were determined. The sensitivities\\u000a of the combustion <span class="hlt">wave</span> characteristics to the pressure and initial temperature were obtained. The <span class="hlt">functions</span> of response of\\u000a the burning rate to oscillatory pressure were calculated. Three types of response <span class="hlt">functions</span> were identified. The errors in\\u000a determination of these <span class="hlt">functions</span> were estimated.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">A. A. Zenin; S. V. Finyakov</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">350</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://mukamel.ps.uci.edu/publications/pdfs/119.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Nonlinear response <span class="hlt">function</span> for time-domain and frequency-domain four-<span class="hlt">wave</span> mixing</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">A unified theory of time-domain and frequency-domain four-<span class="hlt">wave</span> mixing processes, which is based on the nonlinear response <span class="hlt">function</span> R(t 3 , t 2, t), is developed. The response <span class="hlt">function</span> is expressed in terms of the four-point correlation <span class="hlt">function</span> of the dipole operator F(r 1 , T2, T3, 4) and is evaluated explicitly for a stochastic model of line broadening that</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Shaul Mukamel; Roger F. Loring</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1986-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">351</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/52922849"> <span id="translatedtitle">Extracting the Green <span class="hlt">Function</span> Between two Stations From Coda <span class="hlt">Waves</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The imaging of the Earth crust often requires active experiments since natural sources implied numerous uncertainties concerning location, origin time and propagation effects outside of the region of interest. We propose to extract the Green <span class="hlt">function</span> between two seismic stations where earthquake codas are recorded. We make use of the same principle that was applied in helioseismology and recently in</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">A. Paul; M. Campillo</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2001-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">352</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/56213358"> <span id="translatedtitle">Estimation Of The Green <span class="hlt">Function</span> From Diffuse Coda <span class="hlt">Waves</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">We investigate the conjecture that the correlation of coda records of regional earth- quakes between two stations may provide the Green <span class="hlt">function</span> between these two sta- tions. This technique has been used extensively in helioseismology to retrieve the acoustic structure of the sun from cross-correlations of acoustic doppler measure- ments. It was also very efficient to measure the acoustic Green</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">M. Campillo; A. Paul</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2002-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">353</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1877827"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Impact</span> of hemodialysis on P-<span class="hlt">wave</span> amplitude, duration, and dispersion</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a frequent arrhythmia in patients undergoing hemodialysis (HD). P <span class="hlt">wave</span> duration (PWdu) and P <span class="hlt">wave</span> dispersion (PWdi) have been shown to be predictors of emerging AF in different clinical conditions. We sought to study the <span class="hlt">impact</span> of HD on PWdu, PWdi, and P <span class="hlt">wave</span> amplitude in a cohort of patients undergoing HD. Seventeen patients (8 men, 31±10 years) were studied. Echocardiography parameters, the sum of the amplitude of P <span class="hlt">waves</span> in all 12 ECG leads (SP), mean PWdu, and PWdi, along with a host of other parameters (body weight, heart rate, electrolytes and hemoglobin/hematochrit) were measured 1/2h, before and after, HD. SP increased (11.8±3.9 vs 15.3±4.0 mm, p = 0.004), mean PWdu remained stable (82.7±11.1 vs 81.6±10.5 ms, p = 0.606), PWdi decreased (51.7±19.1 vs 41.7±19.1 ms, p = 0.03), and left atrial dimension decreased (37.96±3.90 vs 30.62±3.38 mm, p = 0.0001), after HD. The change in PWdi correlated with fluid removed by HD (r = -0.55, p = 0.022). Re-measurements of P-<span class="hlt">wave</span> parameters in a random group of 11 of the 17 patients revealed augmented SP (p = 0.01), and stable mean PWdu (p = 0.36), and PWdi (p = 0.31), after HD. Fluid removed by HD leads to an increase in SP, a stable mean PWdu, and decrease (or stability on re-measurement in a subgroup of patients) in PWdi. Stability of PWdu may be due to the effects of augmentation of the P-<span class="hlt">wave</span> amplitude and the reduction of the left atrial volume, cancelling each other. Variability of PWdi may stem from the occasional impossibility to measure PWdu (or measure it correctly) in minute P-<span class="hlt">waves</span> in certain ECG leads, which in turn profoundly affects the PWdi.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Drighil, Abdenasser; Madias, John E; Mosalami, Hanane El; Badaoui, Nadia El; Mouine, Bahija; Fadili, Wafae; Ramdani, Beenyouness; Bennis, Ahmed</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">354</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17538700"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Impact</span> of hemodialysis on P-<span class="hlt">wave</span> amplitude, duration, and dispersion.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a frequent arrhythmia in patients undergoing hemodialysis (HD). P <span class="hlt">wave</span> duration (PWdu) and P <span class="hlt">wave</span> dispersion (PWdi) have been shown to be predictors of emerging AF in different clinical conditions. We sought to study the <span class="hlt">impact</span> of HD on PWdu, PWdi, and P <span class="hlt">wave</span> amplitude in a cohort of patients undergoing HD. Seventeen patients (8 men, 31+/-10 years) were studied. Echocardiography parameters, the sum of the amplitude of P <span class="hlt">waves</span> in all 12 ECG leads (SP), mean PWdu, and PWdi, along with a host of other parameters (body weight, heart rate, electrolytes and hemoglobin/hematochrit) were measured 1/2h, before and after, HD. SP increased (11.8+/-3.9 vs 15.3+/-4.0 mm, p = 0.004), mean PWdu remained stable (82.7+/-11.1 vs 81.6+/-10.5 ms, p = 0.606), PWdi decreased (51.7+/-19.1 vs 41.7+/-19.1 ms, p = 0.03), and left atrial dimension decreased (37.96+/-3.90 vs 30.62+/-3.38 mm, p = 0.0001), after HD. The change in PWdi correlated with fluid removed by HD (r = -0.55, p = 0.022). Re-measurements of P-<span class="hlt">wave</span> parameters in a random group of 11 of the 17 patients revealed augmented SP (p = 0.01), and stable mean PWdu (p = 0.36), and PWdi (p = 0.31), after HD. Fluid removed by HD leads to an increase in SP, a stable mean PWdu, and decrease (or stability on re-measurement in a subgroup of patients) in PWdi. Stability of PWdu may be due to the effects of augmentation of the P-<span class="hlt">wave</span> amplitude and the reduction of the left atrial volume, cancelling each other. Variability of PWdi may stem from the occasional impossibility to measure PWdu (or measure it correctly) in minute P-<span class="hlt">waves</span> in certain ECG leads, which in turn profoundly affects the PWdi. PMID:17538700</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Drighil, Abdenasser; Madias, John E; El Mosalami, Hanane; El Badaoui, Nadia; Mouine, Bahija; Fadili, Wafae; Ramdani, Beenyouness; Bennis, Ahmed</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">355</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21180208"> <span id="translatedtitle">Clustering Properties and Model <span class="hlt">Wave</span> <span class="hlt">Functions</span> for Non-Abelian Fractional Quantum Hall Quasielectrons</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We present model <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> for quasielectron (as opposed to quasihole) excitations of the unitary Z{sub k} parafermion sequence (Laughlin, Moore-Read, or Read-Rezayi) of fractional quantum Hall states. We uniquely define these states through two generalized clustering conditions: they vanish when either a cluster of k+2 electrons is put together or when two clusters of k+1 electrons are formed at different positions. For Abelian fractional quantum Hall states (k=1), our construction reproduces the Jain quasielectron <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> and elucidates the difference between the Jain and Laughlin quasielectrons.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Bernevig, B. Andrei [Princeton Center for Theoretical Physics, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States); Department of Physics, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States); Haldane, F. D. M. [Department of Physics, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-02-13</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">356</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21408686"> <span id="translatedtitle">Condensate <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> and elementary excitations of bosonic polar molecules: Beyond the first Born approximation</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We investigate the condensate <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> and elementary excitations of strongly interacting bosonic polar molecules in a harmonic trap, treating the scattering amplitude beyond the standard first Born approximation (FBA). By using an appropriate trial <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> in the variational method, effects of the leading-order correction beyond the FBA have been investigated and shown to be significantly enhanced when the system is close to the phase boundary of collapse. How such a leading-order effect of going beyond the FBA can be observed in a realistic experiment is also discussed.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Huang, C.-C.; Wu, W.-C. [Department of Physics, National Taiwan Normal University, Taipei 11650, Taiwan (China); Wang, D.-W. [Physics Department, National Tsing-Hua University, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China); Physics Division, National Center for Theoretical Sciences, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-04-15</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">357</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/56274112"> <span id="translatedtitle">Probing alpha-particle <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> by (d,alpha) tensor analyzing powers</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Components of alpha-particle <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> corresponding to d-d configurations are used to predict analyzing powers in the (d,alpha) reaction. Tensor analyzing powers, especially Axx, are shown to clearly distinguish between <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> generated by different realistic nucleon-nucleon interactions. Data for the 58Ni(d,alpha)56Co reaction to the 7+ stretched-nucleon-orbital state at 2.283-MeV excitation in 56Co, measured with 22-MeV deuterons, are compared to</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">E. R. Crosson; R. K. Das; S. K. Lemieux; E. J. Ludwig; W. J. Thompson; M. Bisenberger; R. Hertenberger; D. Hofer; H. Kader; P. Schiemenz; G. Graw; A. M. Eiró; F. D. Santos</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1992-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">358</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009PhRvL.102f6802B"> <span id="translatedtitle">Clustering Properties and Model <span class="hlt">Wave</span> <span class="hlt">Functions</span> for Non-Abelian Fractional Quantum Hall Quasielectrons</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We present model <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> for quasielectron (as opposed to quasihole) excitations of the unitary Zk parafermion sequence (Laughlin, Moore-Read, or Read-Rezayi) of fractional quantum Hall states. We uniquely define these states through two generalized clustering conditions: they vanish when either a cluster of k+2 electrons is put together or when two clusters of k+1 electrons are formed at different positions. For Abelian fractional quantum Hall states (k=1), our construction reproduces the Jain quasielectron <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> and elucidates the difference between the Jain and Laughlin quasielectrons.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Bernevig, B. Andrei; Haldane, F. D. M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">359</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010PhRvA..81d3629H"> <span id="translatedtitle">Condensate <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> and elementary excitations of bosonic polar molecules: Beyond the first Born approximation</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We investigate the condensate <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> and elementary excitations of strongly interacting bosonic polar molecules in a harmonic trap, treating the scattering amplitude beyond the standard first Born approximation (FBA). By using an appropriate trial <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> in the variational method, effects of the leading-order correction beyond the FBA have been investigated and shown to be significantly enhanced when the system is close to the phase boundary of collapse. How such a leading-order effect of going beyond the FBA can be observed in a realistic experiment is also discussed.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Huang, Chao-Chun; Wang, Daw-Wei; Wu, Wen-Chin</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">360</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21596553"> <span id="translatedtitle">Technical aspects of the evaluation of the overlap of Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Several technical aspects concerning the evaluation of the overlap between two mean-field <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> of the Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov type are discussed. The limit when several orbitals become fully occupied is derived as well as the formula to reduce the dimensionality of the problem when exactly empty orbitals are present. The formalism is also extended to deal with different bases for each of the <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span>. Several practical results concerning the evaluation of pfaffians, as well as the canonical decomposition of norm overlaps, are also discussed in the Appendices.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Robledo, L. M. [Departamento Fisica Teorica, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, E-28049 Madrid (Spain)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-07-15</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return 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<a onClick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#">11</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#">12</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#">13</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#">14</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#">15</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#">16</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#">17</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#">18</a> <a style="font-weight: bold;">19</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#">20</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">361</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21450950"> <span id="translatedtitle">A KINETIC ALFVEN <span class="hlt">WAVE</span> AND THE PROTON DISTRIBUTION <span class="hlt">FUNCTION</span> IN THE FAST SOLAR WIND</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Using one-dimensional test particle simulations, the effect of a kinetic Alfven <span class="hlt">wave</span> on the velocity distribution <span class="hlt">function</span> (VDF) of protons in the collisionless solar wind is investigated. We first use linear Vlasov theory to numerically obtain the property of a kinetic Alfven <span class="hlt">wave</span> (the <span class="hlt">wave</span> propagates in the direction almost perpendicular to the background magnetic field). We then numerically simulate how the <span class="hlt">wave</span> will shape the proton VDF. It is found that Landau resonance may be able to generate two components in the initially Maxwellian proton VDF: a tenuous beam component along the direction of the background magnetic field and a core component. The streaming speed of the beam relative to the core proton component is about 1.2-1.3 Alfven speed.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Li Xing [Institute of Mathematics and Physics, Aberystwyth University, SY23 3GG (United Kingdom); Lu Quanming [School of Earth and Space Sciences, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China); Chen Yao; Li Bo; Xia Lidong [Shandong Provincial Key Laboratory of Optical Astronomy and Solar-Terrestrial Environment, School of Space Science and Physics, Shandong University at Weihai, Weihai 264209 (China)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-08-20</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">362</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3278761"> <span id="translatedtitle">SNPdbe: constructing an nsSNP <span class="hlt">functional</span> <span class="hlt">impacts</span> database</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Summary: Many existing databases annotate experimentally characterized single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Each non-synonymous SNP (nsSNP) changes one amino acid in the gene product (single amino acid substitution;SAAS). This change can either affect protein <span class="hlt">function</span> or be neutral in that respect. Most polymorphisms lack experimental annotation of their <span class="hlt">functional</span> <span class="hlt">impact</span>. Here, we introduce SNPdbe—SNP database of effects, with predictions of computationally annotated <span class="hlt">functional</span> <span class="hlt">impacts</span> of SNPs. Database entries represent nsSNPs in dbSNP and 1000 Genomes collection, as well as variants from UniProt and PMD. SAASs come from >2600 organisms; ‘human’ being the most prevalent. The <span class="hlt">impact</span> of each SAAS on protein <span class="hlt">function</span> is predicted using the SNAP and SIFT algorithms and augmented with experimentally derived <span class="hlt">function</span>/structure information and disease associations from PMD, OMIM and UniProt. SNPdbe is consistently updated and easily augmented with new sources of information. The database is available as an MySQL dump and via a web front end that allows searches with any combination of organism names, sequences and mutation IDs. Availability: http://www.rostlab.org/services/snpdbe Contact: schaefer@rostlab.org; snpdbe@rostlab.org</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Schaefer, Christian; Meier, Alice; Rost, Burkhard; Bromberg, Yana</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">363</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/18999502"> <span id="translatedtitle">k.p theory of energy bands, <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span>, and optical selection rules in strained tetrahedral semiconductors</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">This paper examines an eight-band k.p theory of strained semiconductors yielding energy bands, <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span>, and momentum matrices. Only if the symmetry of the strained crystal is accounted for in all terms of the Hamiltonian, a consistent definition and calculation of the momentum matrix becomes possible. The band structure and <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> are nonanalytical <span class="hlt">functions</span> of strain and crystal momentum.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">P. Enders; A. Bärwolff; M. Woerner; D. Suisky</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1995-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">364</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/48937980"> <span id="translatedtitle">Duration and fetch-limited growth <span class="hlt">functions</span> of wind-generated <span class="hlt">waves</span> parameterized with three different scaling wind velocities</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Under steady wind forcing, <span class="hlt">wave</span> development follows the duration- and fetch-limited growth laws. These growth <span class="hlt">functions</span> are used extensively to obtain the sea state information when only limited observations of the environmental variables are available. Validation and verification of <span class="hlt">wave</span> models also employ numerical experiments of duration- and fetch-limited <span class="hlt">wave</span> growth as benchmark tests. The reference wind speed reported in</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Paul A. Hwang</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">365</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/52596062"> <span id="translatedtitle">Extracting the Green's <span class="hlt">function</span> out of ambient noise and one explicit explanation based on a <span class="hlt">wave</span> field division method</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">We cross-correlate 10 hours of ambient noise data recorded by station pairs and stack to extract the Green's <span class="hlt">function</span> between two stations. Based on particle motion analysis, the dominant signals on correlated seismograms are Rayleigh <span class="hlt">waves</span> on vertical and radial components and Love <span class="hlt">waves</span> on transverse components. SH <span class="hlt">waves</span> are also clear enough to be identified on most of transverse</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">C. Liang; C. A. Langston</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">366</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013SPIE.8619E..2BK"> <span id="translatedtitle">Basis <span class="hlt">functions</span> for solution of non-homogeneous <span class="hlt">wave</span> equation</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In this note we extend the Differential Transfer Matrix Method (DTMM) for a second-order linear ordinary differential equation to the complex plane. This is achieved by separation of real and imaginary parts, and then forming a system of equations having a rank twice the size of the real-valued problem. The method discussed in this paper also successfully removes the problem of dealing with essential singularities, which was present in the earlier formulations. Then we simplify the result for real-valued problems and obtain a new set of basis <span class="hlt">functions</span>, which may be used instead of the WKB solutions. These basis <span class="hlt">functions</span> not only satisfy the initial conditions perfectly, but also, may approach the turning points without the divergent behavior, which is observed in WKB solutions. Finally, an analytical transformation in the form of a matrix exponential is presented for improving the accuracy of solutions.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Khorasani, Sina; Karimi, Farhad</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">367</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/19219238"> <span id="translatedtitle">Exact <span class="hlt">Wave</span> <span class="hlt">Functions</span> in a Noncommutative Field Theory</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">We consider the nonrelativistic field theory with a quartic interaction on a\\u000anoncommutative plane. We compute the four point scattering amplitude within\\u000aperturbative analysis to all orders and identify the beta <span class="hlt">function</span> and the\\u000arunning of the coupling constant. Since the theory admits an equivalent\\u000adescription via the N particle Schrodinger equation, we regain the scattering\\u000aamplitude by finding an</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Dongsu Bak; Sung Ku Kim; Kwang-Sup Soh; Jae Hyung Yee</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2000-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">368</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1767948"> <span id="translatedtitle">Quantification of regional left ventricular <span class="hlt">function</span> in Q <span class="hlt">wave</span> and non-Q <span class="hlt">wave</span> dysfunctional regions by tissue Doppler imaging in patients with ischaemic cardiomyopathy</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Objective: To quantify regional left ventricular (LV) <span class="hlt">function</span> and contractile reserve in Q <span class="hlt">wave</span> and non-Q <span class="hlt">wave</span> regions in patients with previous myocardial infarction. Design: An observational study. Setting: Tertiary care centre. Patients: 81 patients with previous myocardial infarction and depressed LV <span class="hlt">function</span>. Interventions: All patients underwent surface ECG at rest and pulsed <span class="hlt">wave</span> tissue Doppler imaging at rest and during low dose dobutamine infusion. The left ventricle was divided into four major regions (anterior, inferoposterior, septal, and lateral). Severely hypokinetic, akinetic, and dyskinetic regions on two dimensional echocardiography at rest were considered dysfunctional. Main outcome measures: Regional myocardial systolic velocity (Vs) at rest and the change in Vs during low dose dobutamine infusion (?Vs) in dysfunctional regions with and without Q <span class="hlt">waves</span> on surface ECG. Results: 220 (69%) regions were dysfunctional; 60 of these regions corresponded to Q <span class="hlt">waves</span> and 160 were not related to Q <span class="hlt">waves</span>. Vs and ?Vs were lower in dysfunctional than in non-dysfunctional regions (mean (SD) Vs 6.2 (1.9) cm/s v 7.1 (1.7) cm/s (p < 0.001), and ?Vs 1.9 (1.9) cm/s v 2.6 (2.5) cm/s (p = 0.009), respectively). There were no significant differences in Vs and ?Vs among dysfunctional regions with and without Q <span class="hlt">waves</span> (Q <span class="hlt">wave</span> regions: Vs 6.2 (1.8) cm/s, ?Vs 1.6 (2.2) cm/s; non-Q <span class="hlt">wave</span> regions: Vs 6.3 (1.9) cm/s, ?Vs 2.0 (2.0) cm/s). Conclusions: Quantitative pulsed <span class="hlt">wave</span> tissue Doppler demonstrated that, among dysfunctional regions, Q <span class="hlt">waves</span> on the ECG do not indicate more severe dysfunction, and myocardial contractile reserve is comparable in Q <span class="hlt">wave</span> and non-Q <span class="hlt">wave</span> dysfunctional myocardium.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Bountioukos, M; Schinkel, A F L; Bax, J J; Rizzello, V; Rambaldi, R; Vourvouri, E C; Roelandt, J R T C; Poldermans, D</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">369</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/15011418"> <span id="translatedtitle">Probability Density <span class="hlt">Function</span> for <span class="hlt">Waves</span> Propagating in a Straight PEC Rough Wall Tunnel</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The probability density <span class="hlt">function</span> for <span class="hlt">wave</span> propagating in a straight perfect electrical conductor (PEC) rough wall tunnel is deduced from the mathematical models of the random electromagnetic fields. The field propagating in caves or tunnels is a complex-valued Gaussian random processing by the Central Limit Theorem. The probability density <span class="hlt">function</span> for single modal field amplitude in such structure is Ricean. Since both expected value and standard deviation of this field depend only on radial position, the probability density <span class="hlt">function</span>, which gives what is the power distribution, is a radially dependent <span class="hlt">function</span>. The radio channel places fundamental limitations on the performance of wireless communication systems in tunnels and caves. The transmission path between the transmitter and receiver can vary from a simple direct line of sight to one that is severely obstructed by rough walls and corners. Unlike wired channels that are stationary and predictable, radio channels can be extremely random and difficult to analyze. In fact, modeling the radio channel has historically been one of the more challenging parts of any radio system design; this is often done using statistical methods. In this contribution, we present the most important statistic property, the field probability density <span class="hlt">function</span>, of <span class="hlt">wave</span> propagating in a straight PEC rough wall tunnel. This work only studies the simplest case--PEC boundary which is not the real world but the methods and conclusions developed herein are applicable to real world problems which the boundary is dielectric. The mechanisms behind electromagnetic <span class="hlt">wave</span> propagation in caves or tunnels are diverse, but can generally be attributed to reflection, diffraction, and scattering. Because of the multiple reflections from rough walls, the electromagnetic <span class="hlt">waves</span> travel along different paths of varying lengths. The interactions between these <span class="hlt">waves</span> cause multipath fading at any location, and the strengths of the <span class="hlt">waves</span> decrease as the distance between the transmitter and receiver increases.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Pao, H</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-11-08</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">370</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2004AIPC..700..118K"> <span id="translatedtitle">A Green's <span class="hlt">Function</span> Boundary Element Method for SH-<span class="hlt">Wave</span> Scattering in an Elastic Layer</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This paper concerns a boundary element method (BEM) for 2D SH-<span class="hlt">wave</span> scattering in an elastic layer sandwiched by two half spaces. The BEM is based on the integral equation having a Green's <span class="hlt">function</span> for a layer as its integral kernel. Since the Green's <span class="hlt">function</span> satisfies the interface conditions, numerical integration in the BEM is necessary only on the surface of scattering objects, thus the computational memory can be saved greatly. On the other hand, numerical evaluation of the Green's <span class="hlt">function</span> is critical and burdensome. In this paper, a hybrid ray-mode representation of the Green's <span class="hlt">function</span> given by Kamel is employed. Numerical aspects of the representation are discussed in some detail, and the BEM code with the Green's <span class="hlt">function</span> is developed thereafter. As a numerical example, SH-<span class="hlt">wave</span> scattering by a cavity in a layer is considered. Some numerical results to investigate the interaction between the cavity and layer interfaces are presented.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kimoto, K.; Hirose, S.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">371</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21335911"> <span id="translatedtitle">Single scattering estimates for the scintillation <span class="hlt">function</span> of <span class="hlt">waves</span> in random media</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The energy density of high frequency <span class="hlt">waves</span> propagating in highly oscillatory random media is well approximated by solutions of deterministic kinetic models. The scintillation <span class="hlt">function</span> determines the statistical instability of the kinetic solution. This paper analyzes the single scattering term in the scintillation <span class="hlt">function</span>. This is the term of the scintillation <span class="hlt">function</span> that is linear in the power spectrum of the random fluctuations. We show that the structure of the scintillation <span class="hlt">function</span> is already quite complicated in this simplified setting. It strongly depends on the singularity of the initial conditions for the <span class="hlt">wave</span> field and on the correlation properties of the random medium. We obtain limiting expressions for the scintillation <span class="hlt">function</span> as the correlation length of the random medium tends to zero.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Bal, Guillaume; Langmore, Ian [Department of Applied Physics and Applied Mathematics, Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 (United States); Pinaud, Olivier [CNRS, UMR 5208 Institut Camille Jordan/ISTIL, Universite de Lyon, Universite Lyon 1, Batiment du Doyen Jean Braconnier, 43, Blvd. du 11 Novembre 1918, F - 69622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-02-15</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">372</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2005PhRvA..71e2701P"> <span id="translatedtitle">Symmetry properties of the S matrix in a fully relativistic distorted-<span class="hlt">wave</span> treatment of electron-<span class="hlt">impact</span> ionization</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The symmetry properties of the S matrix in a fully relativistic distorted-<span class="hlt">wave</span> treatment of electron-<span class="hlt">impact</span> ionization are investigated. It is shown that the square modulus of the scattering matrix element in which the spin states of all four electrons are determined is not invariant under the reversal of the direction of alignment of all spins. The largest of two contributions to this noninvariance originates from the relativistic modifications of the continuum <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> induced by the distorting potential of the target atom. A second smaller contribution is manifested on reducing the eight-dimensional matrix elements of the QED covariant propagator to purely spatial two-electron integrals. The triple differential cross section (TDCS) exhibits a spin asymmetry unless the entire scattering process occurs in a single plane. There will be a difference in the TDCS between an (e,2e) event in which the initial beam is polarized parallel or antiparallel with respect to the beam direction even if the target is unpolarized and the final spin states are not determined. The TDCS will remain unchanged if, in addition to reversal of the direction of spin alignment, one appropriate momentum component of one of the two outgoing electrons is reversed.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Pyper, N. C.; Kampp, Marco; Whelan, Colm T.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">373</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009ECSS...82..426L"> <span id="translatedtitle">Artificial reef effect and fouling <span class="hlt">impacts</span> on offshore <span class="hlt">wave</span> power foundations and buoys - a pilot study</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Little is known about the effects of offshore energy installations on the marine environment, and further research could assist in minimizing environmental risks as well as in enhancing potential positive effects on the marine environment. While biofouling on marine energy conversion devices on one hand has the potential to be an engineering concern, these structures can also affect biodiversity by <span class="hlt">functioning</span> as artificial reefs. The Lysekil Project is a test park for <span class="hlt">wave</span> power located at the Swedish west coast. Here, buoys acting as point absorbers on the surface are connected to generators anchored on concrete foundations on the seabed. In this study we investigated the colonisation of foundations by invertebrates and fish, as well as fouling assemblages on buoys. We examined the influence of surface orientation of the <span class="hlt">wave</span> power foundations on epibenthic colonisation, and made observations of habitat use by fish and crustaceans during three years of submergence. We also examined fouling assemblages on buoys and calculated the effects of biofouling on the energy absorption of the <span class="hlt">wave</span> power buoys. On foundations we demonstrated a succession in colonisation over time with a higher degree of coverage on vertical surfaces. Buoys were dominated by the blue mussel Mytilus edulis. Calculations indicated that biofouling have no significant effect in the energy absorption on a buoy working as a point absorber. This study is the first structured investigation on marine organisms associated with <span class="hlt">wave</span> power devices.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Langhamer, Olivia; Wilhelmsson, Dan; Engström, Jens</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">374</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010JGRD..11516213J"> <span id="translatedtitle">Composite analysis of dust <span class="hlt">impacts</span> on African easterly <span class="hlt">waves</span> in the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer era</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This study examines the synoptic scale <span class="hlt">impacts</span> of African dust on easterly <span class="hlt">waves</span> in the tropical northeast Atlantic. Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer aerosol optical depth (AOD), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration products, and National Center for Environmental Prediction reanalysis fields in the Atlantic main hurricane development region (MDR) form the basis for statistical analysis of a limited set of cases objectively selected for the 2000-2008 hurricane seasons when thresholds are exceeded for sea surface temperature (SST), easterly wind shear, cyclonic vorticity, and upward motion. After ranking African easterly <span class="hlt">waves</span> by AOD, the top (dusty) and bottom (clean) cases are studied as composite differences. African dust and subsidence cause temperatures to warm ˜3°C in the 700 hPa layer, while SSTs cause temperatures to cool, stabilizing the atmosphere. Increased AOD and strong (10 m s-1) 600 hPa easterly winds limit cloud efficiency through shear and oversupply of condensation nuclei. Vertical section composites demonstrate that warm dry subsident air coincides with the African dust plume in the latitudes 18°N-30°N. Hurricane reanalysis data indicate that higher AOD in the MDR reduces chances for the intensification of African easterly <span class="hlt">waves</span>.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Jury, Mark R.; Santiago, Myrna J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-08-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">375</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2004JGRB..109.3303B"> <span id="translatedtitle">Green's <span class="hlt">functions</span>, source signatures, and the normalization of teleseismic <span class="hlt">wave</span> fields</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We examine the canonical source/Green's <span class="hlt">function</span> separation problem in the context of teleseismic P <span class="hlt">wave</span> scattering from receiver-side crust and upper mantle structure. Conventional "receiver <span class="hlt">function</span>" analysis affords a leading order approximation to the S component of the Green's <span class="hlt">function</span> but provides no information on P-to-P scattering. We demonstrate that an improved estimate of the three-dimensional Earth's Green's <span class="hlt">function</span>, including scattered P contributions, can be achieved through consideration of its theoretical spectral properties. Under conditions typical of the real Earth the P component of the Green's <span class="hlt">function</span> is shown to be minimum phase. This behavior is responsible for the success of receiver <span class="hlt">functions</span> in mantle studies. The minimum-phase property is used here to normalize the source signature on P <span class="hlt">wave</span> seismograms, thereby facilitating implementation of multichannel, multicomponent deconvolution of both Green's <span class="hlt">function</span> and source signature within the log spectral domain. Examples using both synthetic simulations and seismograms recorded on the Canadian National Seismograph Network illustrate the recovery of accurate and reproducible estimates of the P <span class="hlt">wave</span> Green's <span class="hlt">function</span>. Our approach can be adapted to a range of source-receiver configurations. In particular, it may prove useful in the recovery of compressional properties beneath portable, field arrays where calibration is provided by nearby, permanent installations.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Bostock, M. G.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">376</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012PhRvB..86k5120B"> <span id="translatedtitle">Implications of the two nodal domains conjecture for ground state fermionic <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The nodes of many-body <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> are mathematical objects important in many different fields of physics. They are at the heart of the quantum Monte Carlo methods but outside this field their properties are neither widely known nor studied. In recent years a conjecture, already proven to be true in several important cases, has been put forward related to the nodes of the fermionic ground state of a many-body system, namely that there is a single nodal hypersurface that divides configuration space into only two connected domains. While this is obviously relevant to the fixed node diffusion Monte Carlo method, its repercussions have ramifications in various fields of physics as diverse as density <span class="hlt">functional</span> theory or Feynman and Cohen's backflow <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> formulation. To illustrate this we explicitly show that, even if we knew the exact Kohn-Sham exchange correlation <span class="hlt">functional</span>, there are systems for which we would obtain the exact ground state energy and density but a <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> quite different from the exact one. This paradox is only apparent since the Hohenberg-Kohn theorem relates the energy directly to the density and the <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> is not guaranteed to be close to the exact one. The aim of this paper is to stimulate the investigation of the properties of the nodes of many-body <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> in different fields of physics. Furthermore, we explicitly show that this conjecture is related to the phenomenon of avoided nodal crossing but it is not necessarily caused by electron correlation, as sometimes has been suggested in the literature. We explicitly build a many-body uncorrelated example whose nodal structure shows the same phenomenon.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Bressanini, Dario</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">377</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17230250"> <span id="translatedtitle">Theoretical <span class="hlt">wave</span> structure <span class="hlt">function</span> when the effect of the outer scale is significant.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The <span class="hlt">wave</span> structure <span class="hlt">function</span> (WSF) for a plane <span class="hlt">wave</span>, calculated from the basic Rytov theory, is usually expressed as 6.88(r/r(0))(5/3), but this does not include the effect of a finite outer scale (or of a nonzero inner scale) of turbulence. When separation distance r is only 5% of the outer scale, this expression overpredicts the WSF by a factor of approximately 2. Accurate evaluations of the Rytov formulas are given for the WSFs of plane and spherical <span class="hlt">waves</span> in Kolmogorov and von Karman turbulence and for the structure <span class="hlt">function</span> of the atmosphere's index of refraction. Simple formulas make the results easy to use. PMID:17230250</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Lucke, Robert L; Young, Cynthia Y</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">378</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013JAP...113m3501T"> <span id="translatedtitle">Thermal-<span class="hlt">wave</span> fields in solid wedges using the Green <span class="hlt">function</span> method: Theory and experiment</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In this work, we establish a theoretical model for a cylindrical rod of radius R with opening angle ? illuminated by a modulated incident beam. The model uses the Green <span class="hlt">function</span> method in cylindrical coordinates. An analytical expression for the Green <span class="hlt">function</span> and thermal-<span class="hlt">wave</span> field in such a solid is presented. The theory is validated in the limit of reducing the arbitrary wedge geometrical structure to simpler geometries. For acute angle wedges, it is shown that the thermal-<span class="hlt">wave</span> field near the edge exhibits confinement behavior and increased amplitude compared to a flat (reference) solid with ? = ?. For obtuse angle wedges, it is shown that the opposite is true and relaxation of confinement occurs leading to lower amplitude thermal-<span class="hlt">wave</span> fields. The theory provides a basis for quantitative thermophysical characterization of wedge-shaped objects and it is tested using an AISI 304 steel wedge and photothermal radiometry detection.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Tai, Rui; Zhang, Jie; Wang, Chinhua; Mandelis, Andreas</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">379</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17249862"> <span id="translatedtitle">Using an r-dependent Gaussian width in calculations of the globally uniform semiclassical <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The globally uniform semiclassical <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> expresses the solution to the time independent Schrodinger equation in terms of fixed width Gaussian <span class="hlt">wave</span> packets traveling along a set of trajectories. There is a globally uniform <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> (GUWF) for each value of the Gaussian width parameter gamma. Numerical data show that a small Gaussian width is needed in some regions to obtain accurate results, while a broad Gaussian width provides better results in other regions. Since there is a semiclassically valid GUWF for every positive value of gamma, it is reasonable to employ the GUWF corresponding to a Gaussian width that provides good results at each value of r. A criterion for the r dependent choice of gamma is proposed and tested on one and two dimensional model problems. The results show that the use of an r dependent gamma in the GUWF results in improved accuracy for the model problems considered. PMID:17249862</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Herman, Michael F; Sergeev, Alexey</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-01-21</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">380</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013EGUGA..15.3438S"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Impact</span> of Anthropogenic Land Cover Change on Heat <span class="hlt">Waves</span> : the summer 2003 as a testbed.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In this study we investigate the two-way interactions of vegetation and climate on regional scales. a comparison is performed to assess the <span class="hlt">impact</span> for the anomalous year 2003 of a potential vegetation distribution where human influence is suppressed to a simulation with a current vegetation distribution via a modelling approach. Main processes which contribute to these differences are analysed. Both simulations are performed with the help of the modelling platform MORCE which comprises a coupled version of the atmospheric model WRF and the dynamic vegetation model ORCHIDEE. The first run was conducted using a potential vegetation map, the second used a current vegetation map. The simulation domain in the Mediterranean region has been chosen for its important climate sensitivity to surface conditions in summer. It is at the same time the location of maximal observed temperature anomalies during the heat <span class="hlt">waves</span> 2003. Currently summer temperature changes induced by land cover modification is yet unclear at these latitudes. The differences in vegetation cover correspond to conversion of agricultural land use to natural grassland and forest and can be compared to a reforestation of about 45% of the domains surface. By replacing the agricultural vegetation by a mixture of forests and prairies, the mean capacity of photosynthetic activity is reduced due to increased stomatal resistance and smaller LAI. The exceptional meteorological conditions in 2003 enhance development of the cover of vegetation in both simulations and result in great photosynthetic activity and transpiration. The simulation with current vegetation cover (CUR) is colder during the first heat <span class="hlt">wave</span> in June due to large evapotranspiration of the agricultural plants. Plants start to get limited in soil moisture in July. Vegetation in CUR is most affected and starts welting. In this circumstances the simulation without human <span class="hlt">impact</span> on land cover plays out its advantage of greater heat resilience on the long term. During the second heat <span class="hlt">wave</span> in August the repartition of turbulent heat fluxes .</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Stéfanon, Marc; Schindler, Solveig; Drobinski, Philippe; de Noblet-Ducoudré, Nathalie; D'Andrea, Fabio</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span 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</span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">381</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2006AGUSMOS42A..04R"> <span id="translatedtitle">Current state of acoustic <span class="hlt">wave</span> propagation modelling and its use in the estimation of <span class="hlt">impact</span> on marine mammals</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Underwater acoustic <span class="hlt">wave</span> propagation modelling has matured into a sophisticated and reliable forecasting tool for predicting the acoustic noise footprints of geophysical exploration activities. Computational methods such as Parabolic Equation solutions of the <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> can account for all aspects of acoustic propagation including diffraction, mode stripping, and compressional and shear <span class="hlt">wave</span> transmission in the seabed substrate. Given sufficient knowledge of the acousto-physical properties of the water column and the seabed, it is possible to estimate the acoustic transmission loss for individual sound frequencies and hence the overall attenuation of a spectrally described source at any range. In combination with numerical models that provide reliable estimates of the acoustic pulse properties and spatial pattern of the sound emission from any design of airgun array, <span class="hlt">wave</span> propagation modelling provides the means to fully characterize the ensonification of an area without need for experimental measurement, allowing the potential <span class="hlt">impact</span> on the marine environment of a planned operation to be studied in advance of physical deployment of the equipment. In this presentation we provide an overview of the current state of acoustic propagation modelling methods with particular emphasis on full noise footprint estimation, whereby the acoustic propagation model is automatically run along multiple traverses to cover the region of interest to a desired spatial resolution. The prediction of sound level footprints, however, is only a step in the process of estimating the acoustic <span class="hlt">impact</span> on sea life and especially marine mammals. The interaction between the sound and the subject is also influenced by the subject's frequency-dependent auditory sensitivity relative to the frequency content of the sounds to which it is exposed. Much experimental work has been performed recently to measure frequency- dependent auditory thresholds (audiograms) for many marine mammal species. The degree to which sounds are audible to a subject can be quantified by subtracting the audiogram thresholds, in decibels, from the respective frequency-dependent band levels of the sounds prior to summing the band levels. This approach is exactly analogous to the use of frequency weighting schemes commonly employed for assessment of noise <span class="hlt">impact</span> on humans. The degree of <span class="hlt">impact</span> is also dependent on the behavioural response to the detected noise. The process may be modelled in a static fashion whereby the statistical distribution density of a certain species in an area is intersected with the acoustic footprint of an operation at a given reaction threshold level to yield the number of subjects that can be potentially affected. Another modelling approach considers instead a dynamic scenario of the population, whereby subjects are probabilistically positioned in the region of interest and the modelled acoustic field is mapped at each subject location. In this approach the behavioural reaction of the subject, such as avoidance of sounds above a certain level, is also taken into account. Here we review some prominent approaches to sound-subject interaction modelling and discuss their merits and weaknesses, the assumptions on which they rely, and where future developments may lead in the numerical estimation of the acoustic <span class="hlt">impact</span> of a geophysical operation on a species.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Racca, R.; Hannay, D.; Carr, S.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">382</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013TMP...176.1087L"> <span id="translatedtitle">"Electron ping-pong" on a one-dimensional lattice: Multiple reflections of the <span class="hlt">wave</span> packet and capture of the <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> by an acceptor</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Considering the problem of multiple reflections of a <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> from the ends of a lattice, we observe an interesting phenomenon: the <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> amplitude is concentrated on the impurity center after reflections. The solution obtained by expanding the total <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> a(t) on the impurity center in the partial amplitudes ak(t), whose contributions become essential only after the kth reflection from the lattice end, seems to agree very well with the results of numerical modeling. We solve the problem of the capture of the <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> by an acceptor. The obtained results can be used to explain experimental data on charge transfer in artificial oligonucleotides and polypeptides. We find expressions for the electron capture probability in some limit cases, which can be considered estimates of the quantum output of the charge transport.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Likhachev, V. N.; Astakhova, T. Yu.; Vinogradov, G. A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-08-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">383</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013JGRC..118..346M"> <span id="translatedtitle">The 2002/2003 El Niño: Equatorial <span class="hlt">waves</span> sequence and their <span class="hlt">impact</span> on sea surface temperature</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><title type="main">AbstractThe recent decades have experienced changes in the characteristics of the El Niño phenomenon, with in particular an increased occurrence of so-called Modoki or Central Pacific El Niños. Here the 2002/2003 El Niño, characterized as a Central Pacific El Niño, is studied from an Ocean General Circulation Model simulation. The focus is on the sequence of equatorial <span class="hlt">waves</span> and their <span class="hlt">impact</span> on zonal and vertical advection. The <span class="hlt">wave</span> amplitude according to the most energetic baroclinic modes are first estimated, which allows inferring the sequence of the intraseasonal equatorial Kelvin (IKW) and Rossby (IRW) <span class="hlt">waves</span>. It is shown that energetic downwelling IKWs, forced in the western-central Pacific, crossed the equatorial Pacific. Reflections of IKWs into IRWs onto the zonally varying thermocline and eastern boundary are also observed. A simplified heat budget of the surface layer is then carried out to infer the dominant processes at work during the evolution of this event focusing on the <span class="hlt">wave</span>-induced advection terms. The results indicate that the warming phase (April-November 2002) is mainly controlled by zonal advection of mean temperature (accounted for by IKWs and locally wind-driven current) and by vertical advection in the eastern Pacific. The cooling phase (December 2002 to April 2003) is dominated by a reduction in solar radiation and the IRW-induced zonal advection of mean temperature respectively in the central and eastern equatorial Pacific. The recharge-discharge process is also showed to be at work with the recharge (discharge) process operating mainly through the second (first) baroclinic mode.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Mosquera-VáSquez, K.; Dewitte, B.; Illig, S.; Takahashi, K.; Garric, G.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">384</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23376499"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Functional</span> connectivity between brain areas estimated by analysis of gamma <span class="hlt">waves</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The goal of this study is to investigate <span class="hlt">functional</span> connectivity between different brain regions by analyzing the temporal relationship of the maxima of gamma <span class="hlt">waves</span> recorded in multiple brain areas. Local field potentials were recorded from motor cortex, hippocampus, entorhinal cortex and piriform cortex of rats. Gamma activity was filtered and separated into two bands; high (65-90Hz) and low (30-55Hz) gamma. Maxima for gamma activity <span class="hlt">waves</span> were detected and <span class="hlt">functional</span> connectivity between different brain regions was determined using Shannon entropy for perievent histograms for each pair channels. Significant Shannon entropy values were reported as connectivity factors. We defined a connectivity matrix based the connectivity factors between different regions. We found that maxima of low and high frequency gamma occur in strong temporal relationship between some brain areas, indicating the existence of <span class="hlt">functional</span> connections between these areas. The spatial pattern of <span class="hlt">functional</span> connections between brain areas was different for slow <span class="hlt">wave</span> sleep and waking states. However for each behavioral state in the same animal the pattern of <span class="hlt">functional</span> connections was stable over time within 30min of continuous analysis and over a 5 day period. With the same electrode montage the pattern of <span class="hlt">functional</span> connectivity varied from one subject to another. Analysis of the temporal relationship of maxima of gamma <span class="hlt">waves</span> between various brain areas could be a useful tool for investigation of <span class="hlt">functional</span> connections between these brain areas. This approach could be applied for analysis of <span class="hlt">functional</span> alterations occurring in these connections during different behavioral tasks and during processes related to learning and memory. The specificity in the connectivity pattern from one subject to another can be explained by the existence of unique <span class="hlt">functional</span> networks for each subject. PMID:23376499</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kheiri, Farshad; Bragin, Anatol; Engel, Jerome</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-31</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">385</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2003PhRvB..68m4510C"> <span id="translatedtitle">Short-time-evolved <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> for solving quantum many-body problems</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The exact ground state of a strongly interacting quantum many-body system can be obtained by evolving a trial state with finite overlap with the ground state to infinite imaginary time. In many cases, since the convergence is exponential, the system converges essentially to the exact ground state in a relatively short time. Thus a short-time evolved <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> can be an excellent approximation to the exact ground state. Such a short-time-evolved <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> can be obtained by factorizing, or splitting, the evolution operator to high order. However, for the imaginary time Schrödinger equation, which contains an irreversible diffusion kernel, all coefficients, or time steps, must be positive. (Negative time steps would require evolving the diffusion process backward in time, which is impossible.) Heretofore, only second-order factorization schemes can have all positive coefficients, but without further iterations, these cannot be used to evolve the system long enough to be close to the exact ground state. In this work, we use a newly discovered fourth-order positive factorization scheme which requires knowing both the potential and its gradient. We show that the resulting fourth-order <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> alone, without further iterations, gives an excellent description of strongly interacting quantum systems such as liquid 4He, comparable to the best variational results in the literature. This suggests that such a fourth-order <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> can be used to study the ground state of diverse quantum many-body systems, including Bose-Einstein condensates and Fermi systems.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ciftja, Orion; Chin, Siu A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">386</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/54826147"> <span id="translatedtitle">Effects of <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> modifications on calculated H bond C and C tbond C stretching frequencies</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Two-level factorial design (FD) and principal component (PC) models are used to determine the effects of <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> modifications on calculated H bond C and C tbond C harmonic stretching frequencies for the H bond C tbond CH, H bond C tbond CF, H bond C tbond CCl, H bond C tbond CCCH, H bond C tbond CCN and H</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kelson C. Lopes; Wallace D. Fragoso; Mozart N. Ramos; Arquimedes M. Pereira; Regiane C. M. U. Araújo</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">387</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2006PhRvB..74b4423T"> <span id="translatedtitle">Exact two-holon <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> in the Kuramoto-Yokoyama model</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We construct the explicit two-holon eigenstates of the SU(2) Kuramoto-Yokoyama model at the level of explicit <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span>. We derive the exact energies and obtain the individual holon momenta, which are quantized according to the half-Fermi statistics of the holons.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Thomale, Ronny; Schuricht, Dirk; Greiter, Martin</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">388</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/53088219"> <span id="translatedtitle">Does consciousness really collapse the <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span>? A possible objective biophysical resolution of the measurement problem</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">An analysis has been performed of the theories and postulates advanced by von Neumann, London and Bauer, and Wigner, concerning the role that consciousness might play in the collapse of the <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span>, which has become known as the measurement problem. This reveals that an error may have been made by them in the area of biology and its interface</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Fred H. Thaheld</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">389</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1984PhLB..148..251P"> <span id="translatedtitle">Are three transition charge densities sufficient to test IBM <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span>?</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">It is pointed out that the lack of a linear relation between three 01+ --> 2i+ transition densities in electron scattering, which was interpreted as evidence for the inadequacy of IBM-1 <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span>, is not in contradiction with IBM-1 for a microscopically derived form of quadrupole transition operator, which leads to a four-level relation.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Paar, V.; Kyrchev, G.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1984-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">390</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/26958920"> <span id="translatedtitle">Analysis of Thermoelastic <span class="hlt">Waves</span> in <span class="hlt">Functionally</span> Graded Hollow Spheres Based on the Green-Lindsay Theory</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">In this article, the Green–Lindsay theory of thermoelasticity is employed to study the thermoelastic response of <span class="hlt">functionally</span> graded hollow spheres. This generalized coupled thermoelasticity theory admits the second sound phenomena and depicts a finite speed for temperature <span class="hlt">wave</span> propagation. The materials of the hollow sphere are assumed to be graded through its thickness in the radial direction while a symmetric</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">A. Bagri; M. R. Eslami</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">391</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/54654025"> <span id="translatedtitle">Asymptotic Properties of the <span class="hlt">Wave</span> <span class="hlt">Function</span> for a Bound Nonrelativistic Three-Body System</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">BS>The asymptotic properties of a Schrodinger <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> that ; represents the bound ground state of a system of three interacting particles are ; examined. It is assumed that the interaction can be described by a static ; potential that is the sum of three two-body potentials and one three-body ; potential, where the potentials have the property that if</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">E. Leo Slaggie; Eyvind H. Wichmann</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1962-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">392</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/27344983"> <span id="translatedtitle">Normal and abnormal cylindrical vector <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> and some important conversion relations</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The normal and abnormal cylindrical vector <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> are constructed. Some important conversion relations in circular,\\u000a elliptic and parabolic cylindrical coordinate systems are discussed in detail, where the result in circular cylindrical coordinate\\u000a system is the same as the one given by the author (1984).</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Li Zhijian; Zhou Xuesong</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1989-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">393</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/32037754"> <span id="translatedtitle">Treatment of Renal Stones in a Solitary <span class="hlt">Functioning</span> Kidney with Extracorporeal Shock <span class="hlt">Wave</span> Lithotripsy</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Forty extracorporeal shock <span class="hlt">wave</span> lithotripsy (ESWL) sessions were performed in the treatment of 36 stones in 22 solitary <span class="hlt">functioning</span> kidneys between October 1990 and October 1991. We inserted a double-J catheter in all patients preoperatively and no serious obstruction such as stone street formation was observed after treatments. Following ESWL therapy, at the end of 3 months follow-up, 14 patients</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Giray Karalezli; Ziya Müftüoglu; Kemal Sarica; Sezai Yaman; Talat Yurdakul; Erol Özdiler</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1993-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">394</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/18379372"> <span id="translatedtitle">Piecewise continuous distribution <span class="hlt">function</span> method in the theory of <span class="hlt">wave</span> disturbances of inhomogeneous gas</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The system of hydrodynamic-type equations for a stratified gas in gravity field is derived from BGK equation by method of piecewise continuous distribution <span class="hlt">function</span>. The obtained system of the equations generalizes the Navier–Stokes one at arbitrary Knudsen numbers. The problem of a <span class="hlt">wave</span> disturbance propagation in a rarefied gas is explored. The verification of the model is made for a</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">D. A. Vereshchagin; S. B. Leble; M. A. Solovchuk</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">395</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/55873620"> <span id="translatedtitle">Piecewise continuous distribution <span class="hlt">function</span> method in the theory of <span class="hlt">wave</span> disturbances of inhomogeneous gas</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The system of hydrodynamic-type equations for a stratified gas in gravity field is derived from BGK equation by method of piecewise continuous distribution <span class="hlt">function</span>. The obtained system of the equations generalizes the Navier Stokes one at arbitrary Knudsen numbers. The problem of a <span class="hlt">wave</span> disturbance propagation in a rarefied gas is explored. The verification of the model is made for</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">D. A. Vereshchagin; S. B. Leble; M. A. Solovchuk</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">396</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/310910"> <span id="translatedtitle">Orthogonal vector basis <span class="hlt">functions</span> for time domain finite element solution of the vector <span class="hlt">wave</span> equation</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In this paper we consider the solution of the vector <span class="hlt">wave</span> equation by a discrete time vector finite element method. The popular linear edge basis <span class="hlt">functions</span> are augmented such that the resulting capacitance matrix is diagonal, resulting in an explicit method. The accuracy and efficiency of the method is investigated via computer experiments.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">White, D.A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1997-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">397</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ee.bgu.ac.il/~censor/IEEE-conferences/IEEE-2008-invariance.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">RELATIVISTIC INVARIANCE OF DISPERSION-RELATIONS AND THEIR ASSOCIATED <span class="hlt">WAVE</span>-OPERATORS AND GREEN-<span class="hlt">FUNCTIONS</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Identifying invariance properties helps in simplifying calculations and consolidating concepts. Presently the Special Relativistic invariance of dispersion relations and their associated scalar <span class="hlt">wave</span> operators is investigated for general dispersive homogeneous linear media. Invariance properties of the four-dimensional Fourier- transform integrals is demonstrated, from which the invariance of the scalar Green- <span class="hlt">function</span> is inferred. Dispersion relations and the associated group velocities</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Dan Censor</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">398</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/Publications.htm?seq_no_115=133044"> <span id="translatedtitle">NO EFFECT OF HYDRODYNAMIC SHOCK <span class="hlt">WAVE</span> ON PROTEIN <span class="hlt">FUNCTIONALITY</span> OF BEEF MUSCLE</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/services/TekTran.htm">Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The protein <span class="hlt">functionality</span> of meat proteins after treatment with hydrodynamic shock <span class="hlt">wave</span> was determined. Frankfurters (cooked to 71 deg C) were evaluated for cooking yield, CIE L*a*b*, nitrosylhemochrome, Texture Profile Analysis (hardness, cohesiveness), and stress and strain (torsion testing). Comp...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">399</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/18980603"> <span id="translatedtitle">Electronic properties of the Penrose lattice. I. Energy spectrum and <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The electronic structure of the two-dimensional Penrose lattice is studied by numerical diagonalization of a tight-binding Hamiltonian for finite systems with up to 3571 sites. We have analyzed the smoothness of the energy spectrum and localization behavior of the <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> by level statistics and a generalized participation ratio. The results show that the energy spectrum contains a singular part,</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hirokazu Tsunetsugu; Takeo Fujiwara; Kazuo Ueda; Tetsuji Tokihiro</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1991-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">400</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/19118930"> <span id="translatedtitle">Photon <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> and the exact electromagnetic matrix elements for hydrogenic atoms</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">After reviewing th eproperties of the photon considered as a quantized ; particle of zero mass, positive energy, and unit spin, the expansion of the ; unquantized and quantized electromagnetic fields and vector and scalar potentials ; in terms of the photon <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> and creation and destruction operators in ; reviewed and extended. The most e use of the</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Harry Moses</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1973-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return 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<a onClick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#">11</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#">12</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#">13</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#">14</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#">15</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#">16</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#">17</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#">18</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#">19</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#">20</a> <a style="font-weight: bold;">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">401</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/53827462"> <span id="translatedtitle">Photon <span class="hlt">Wave</span> <span class="hlt">Functions</span> and the Exact Electromagnetic Matrix Elements for Hydrogenic Atoms</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">After reviewing the properties of the photon considered as a quantized particle of zero mass, positive energy, and unit spin, the expansion of the unquantized and quantized electromagnetic fields and vector and scalar potentials in terms of the photon <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> and creation and destruction operators is reviewed and extended. The most general vector and scalar potentials are obtained through</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Harry E. Moses</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1973-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">402</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/54262681"> <span id="translatedtitle">Theory of vibrationally mediated photodissociation of HOOH - Delocalized tails in a localized <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The vibrationally mediated photodissociation (VMP) of hydrogen peroxide is modeled. The two-photon VMP process proceeds via a highly vibrationally excited state on the ground electronic surface and affords a unique view of the dynamics in the high-energy region of the potential energy surface. In a local mode basis set, the third OH stretch overtone <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> is calculated using the</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Daniel T. Colbert; Edwin L. Sibert III</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1991-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">403</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/12385231"> <span id="translatedtitle">Coulomb <span class="hlt">Wave</span> <span class="hlt">Function</span> DVR: Application to Atomic Systems in Strong Laser Fields</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">We present an efficient and accurate grid method for solving the time-dependent Schrodinger equation of atomic systems interacting with intense laser pulses. As usual, the angular part of the <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> is expanded in terms of spherical harmonics. Instead of the usual finite difference (FD) scheme, the radial coordinate is discretized using the discrete variable representation which is constructed from</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Liang-You Peng; Anthony F. Starace</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">404</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/27641329"> <span id="translatedtitle">Complete-graph tensor network states: a new fermionic <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> ansatz for molecules</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">We present a class of tensor network states specifically designed to capture the electron correlation within a molecule of arbitrary structure. In this ansatz, the electronic <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> is represented by a complete-graph tensor network (CGTN) ansatz, which implements an efficient reduction of the number of variational parameters by breaking down the complexity of the high-dimensional coefficient tensor of a</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Konrad H. Marti; Bela Bauer; Markus Reiher; Matthias Troyer; Frank Verstraete</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">405</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23345171"> <span id="translatedtitle">Adjustment of Born-Oppenheimer electronic <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> to simplify close coupling calculations.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Technical problems connected with use of the Born-Oppenheimer clamped-nuclei approximation to generate electronic <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span>, potential energy surfaces (PES), and associated properties are discussed. A computational procedure for adjusting the phases of the <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span>, as well as their order when potential crossings occur, is presented which is based on the calculation of overlaps between sets of molecular orbitals and configuration interaction eigenfunctions obtained at neighboring nuclear conformations. This approach has significant advantages for theoretical treatments describing atomic collisions and photo-dissociation processes by means of ab initio PES, electronic transition moments, and nonadiabatic radial and rotational coupling matrix elements. It ensures that the electronic <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> are continuous over the entire range of nuclear conformations considered, thereby greatly simplifying the process of obtaining the above quantities from the results of single-point Born-Oppenheimer calculations. The overlap results are also used to define a diabatic transformation of the <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> obtained for conical intersections that greatly simplifies the computation of off-diagonal matrix elements by eliminating the need for complex phase factors. PMID:23345171</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Buenker, Robert J; Liebermann, Heinz-Peter; Zhang, Yu; Wu, Yong; Yan, Lingling; Liu, Chunhua; Qu, Yizhi; Wang, Jianguo</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-23</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">406</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/53999574"> <span id="translatedtitle">Exact <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> and coherent states of a damped driven harmonic oscillator</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">For a damped harmonic oscillator forced by a time-dependent field, the exact <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> is obtained by three different methods: (i) path integral, (ii) second quantization, and (iii) dynamical invariant. The explicit form of the dynamical invariant involves a solution to a corresponding auxiliary equation. The coherent states, defined as eigenstates of a new destruction operator, form a nonorthogonal, overcomplete</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">H. G. Oh; H. R. Lee; Thomas F. George; C. I. Um</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1989-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">407</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/52263822"> <span id="translatedtitle">Exact <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> and coherent states of a damped driven harmonic oscillator</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">For a damped oscillator forced by a time-dependent field, the exact <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> is obtained by three different methods: (1) Path-integral, (2) Second quantization and (3) Dynamical invariant. The explicit form of the dynamical invariant involves a solution to a corresponding auxiliary equation. The coherent states, defined as eigenstates of a new destruction operator, form a nonorthogonal, over complete set</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">H. G. Oh; H. R. Lee; Thomas F. George; C. I. Um</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1989-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">408</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=%22schrodinger%22&pg=4&id=EJ237412"> <span id="translatedtitle">Alternative Form of the Hydrogenic <span class="hlt">Wave</span> <span class="hlt">Functions</span> for an Extended, Uniformly Charged Nucleus.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">|Presented are forms of harmonic oscillator attraction and Coulomb <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> which can be explicitly constructed and which lead to numerical results for the energy eigenvalues and eigenfunctions of the atomic system. The Schrodinger equation and its solution and specific cases of muonic atoms illustrating numerical calculations are included.…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ley-Koo, E.; And Others</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1980-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">409</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/27003998"> <span id="translatedtitle">Propagation of Love <span class="hlt">waves</span> in a smart <span class="hlt">functionally</span> graded piezoelectric composite structure</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">In this paper, the propagation behavior of Love <span class="hlt">waves</span> in a smart <span class="hlt">functionally</span> graded piezoelectric structure is analyzed. The smart structure consists of three layers, in which the piezoelectric plate serves as the upper layer accompanied by a sandwiched graded layer and a metal substrate. In the graded layer, all the parameters and the elastic modulus are respectively assumed to</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">J Liu; X S Cao; Z K Wang</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">410</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011PhRvB..84k5443T"> <span id="translatedtitle">Stabilized scattering <span class="hlt">wave-function</span> calculations using the Lippmann-Schwinger equation for long conductor systems</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We present an improvement of the Lippmann-Schwinger equation method, which calculates electron-scattering <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> of a nanoscale conductor suspended between a pair of electrodes. The improvement eliminates the numerical collapse which frequently occurs while solving the Lippmann-Schwinger equation for long conductor systems and originates from evanescent <span class="hlt">wave</span> components of the retarded Green’s <span class="hlt">function</span> of the Lippmann-Schwinger equation. We introduce regularization and ratio expression into the Green’s <span class="hlt">function</span> matrix and discover that the resultant Green’s <span class="hlt">function</span> does not suffer from the numerical collapse without increasing computational cost. As a performance test, we carry out electron transport calculations of Al monoatomic linear chains with a length of up to 75.6 bohrs. The numerical test demonstrates that the improved Lippmann-Schwinger equation method is applicable to long conductor systems with no numerical collapse and adequate computational accuracy.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Tsukamoto, Shigeru; Egami, Yoshiyuki; Hirose, Kikuji; Blügel, Stefan</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">411</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2003EAEJA.....3803S"> <span id="translatedtitle">Comparison of the <span class="hlt">impact</span> of wind <span class="hlt">waves</span> and fast ferries wash in the Tallinn Bay, Gulf of Finland</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The area between the Estonian and Finnish capitals, Tallinn and Helsinki, apparently has the heaviest fast ferry traffic among the open sea areas of the Baltic Sea. Nearly 70 crossings of the gulf take place daily during the high season. It is generally believed that ship wash is negligible in the open sea areas where natural <span class="hlt">waves</span> are frequently much higher than the wash. This assumption is indeed true for coasts exposed to high tidal <span class="hlt">waves</span> or open to dominating wind directions. However, the Tallinn Bay has a relatively mild local <span class="hlt">wave</span> regime owing to a specific combination of its shape and the local wind regime. The tidal currents are negligible, and wind <span class="hlt">waves</span> and local currents are responsible for near-bottom velocities in the area in question. These velocities mostly are moderate and only in extreme cases exceed 20 cm/s at the depths of 10-20. Several coastal regions are particularly favourably sheltered from high <span class="hlt">waves</span> and may be vulnerable with respect to the abrupt increase of the anthropogenic <span class="hlt">wave</span> activity. Comparison of local wind <span class="hlt">wave</span> climate with direct ship <span class="hlt">wave</span> measurements shows that in the coastal zone of the bay the mean energy of ship <span class="hlt">waves</span> is 7-10% from the bulk <span class="hlt">wave</span> energy and <span class="hlt">wave</span>-induced energy flux as high as 40% from the bulk energy flux. The annual maximum of significant wind <span class="hlt">wave</span> heights is frequently <1.5 m whereas <span class="hlt">wave</span> periods do not exceed 5-6 s. The <span class="hlt">wave</span> climate has significant annual variation, with relatively calm spring and summer season. The periods of the highest components of ship wash generally exceed these of wind <span class="hlt">waves</span> and frequently are as long as 10-15 s. The ship <span class="hlt">wave</span> heights frequently are about 1 m and cause unusually high near-bottom velocities at the depths of 5-20 m. This means that the wake of fast ferries is a new forcing component of vital <span class="hlt">impact</span> on the local ecosystem. It may cause considerable intensification of beach processes and have significant influence on the aquatic wildlife. In particular, this <span class="hlt">wave</span> component apparently dominates during the relatively calm high navigation season (April-September) when the biological productivity is at its seasonal maximum. In addition to the direct effect upon fish and benthic plants it may cause considerable intensification of beach processes. The reduced water transparency, besides the effects of direct mechanical disturbances, may have a suppressing feedback to the bottom vegetation. Another potential mechanical effect of ship <span class="hlt">waves</span> is the enhancement of vertical mixing along the ship lane that may intensify the eutrophication effects due to the transport of nutrients into the euphotic layer.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Soomere, T.; Rannat, K.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">412</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2003JFM...496..313J"> <span id="translatedtitle">Random fields of water surface <span class="hlt">waves</span> using Wiener Hermite <span class="hlt">functional</span> series expansions</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Random motions of irrotational gravity water surface <span class="hlt">waves</span> on deep water are formulated using the so-called Wiener Hermite <span class="hlt">functional</span> series expansion, based on the ‘ideal random process’, i.e. the white noise. Such a procedure is known to differ fundamentally from moment expansions such as Gram Charlier or Edgeworth series. The applications concern ‘free <span class="hlt">waves</span>’ which are homogeneous in the horizontal plane and stationary in time. Starting from the basic hydrodynamic equation and boundary conditions, the general procedure for obtaining the equations for the deterministic kernels is described. First, the expansion is carried out with no approximation of the hydrodynamic equations but the expansion is limited to the first order. This defines the Gaussian part of the <span class="hlt">wave</span> field. As expected, the nonlinearity of the hydrodynamic equations has effects on the dispersion relation through explicit frequency and acceleration terms whose physical interpretations are discussed. No attempt is made to solve the highly complicated coupled nonlinear integral kernels equations. Instead, Dirac kernel <span class="hlt">functions</span> are chosen à priori as an approach to a narrowband random <span class="hlt">wave</span> field. In this case, the nonlinearity is found to be characterized by a ‘statistical <span class="hlt">wave</span> steepness’ having an upper limit value of order 0.42. As a second example, a non-Gaussian field is determined on the basis of the hydrodynamic equations truncated at second order in the <span class="hlt">wave</span> amplitude. In the case of Dirac first-order kernels, the second-order nonlinear effect results in the generation of the second harmonic of the fundamental <span class="hlt">wave</span> component. The ratio between the energy levels of these two components is found to compare well with standard results from laboratory experiments.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Joelson, Maminirina; Ramamonjiarisoa, Alfred</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">413</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/901524"> <span id="translatedtitle">Multi-<span class="hlt">functional</span> Nanowire Evanescent <span class="hlt">Wave</span> Optical Sensors</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Controlling the flow of photons through a fluidic media withsubwavelength optics is a major step towards the development of on-chipphotonic sensors. Central to this idea will be designing amulti-<span class="hlt">functional</span> nanomaterial that can efficiently trap, route anddeliver light to various sensing channels, filters and detectors on aphotonic chip. Semiconductor nanowire waveguides offer an exceptionalsolution to the confinement of optical energy in solution and can bedirectly integrated into microfluidic devices. Here we demonstrate anovel optical sensing platform that utilizes the evanescent field of atin dioxide single crystalline waveguide to perform a wide array ofspectroscopic analyses including absorption, fluorescence and surfaceenhanced Raman on sub-picoliter probe volumes. Since the same waveguidecavity can transmit both broadband and monochromatic light it allowsmultiple modes of detection to be carried out on the same analyte. Tomove beyond less chemical specific optical techniques such as absorptionand fluorescence we exploit the amplified electric field around silvernanocubes to enhance the vibronic signatures of molecules present in theevanescent field. With excellent chemical resilience to strong acidicconditions, the waveguides can be completely cleaned from the attachedmetal nanoparticles making the devices fully reusable. These results openup the possibility of engineering self-contained, multiplexed photonicsensors that detect and identify chemical species in complex biologicaland environmental systems.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Sirbuly, Donald J.; Tao, Andrea; Law, Matt; Fan, Rong; Yang,Peidong</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-10-18</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">414</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8406976"> <span id="translatedtitle">Electromagnetic <span class="hlt">wave</span> emitting products and "Kikoh" potentiate human leukocyte <span class="hlt">functions</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Tourmaline (electric stone, a type of granite stone), common granite stone, ceramic disks, hot spring water and human palmar energy (called "Kikoh" in Japan and China), all which emit electromagnetic radiation in the far infrared region (wavelength 4-14 microns). These materials were thus examined for effects on human leukocyte activity and on lipid peroxidation of unsaturated fatty acids. It was revealed that these materials significantly increased intracellular calcium ion concentration, phagocytosis, and generation of reactive oxygen species in neutrophils, and the blastogenetic response of lymphocytes to mitogens. Chemotactic activity by neutrophils was also enhanced by exposure to tourmaline and the palm of "Kikohshi" i.e., a person who heals professionally by the laying on of hands. Despite the increase in reactive oxygen species generated by neutrophils, lipid peroxidation from unsaturated fatty acid was markedly inhibited by these four materials. The results suggest that materials emitting electromagnetic radiation in the far infrared range, which are widely used in Japan for cosmetic, therapeutic, and preservative purposes, appear capable of potentiating leukocyte <span class="hlt">functions</span> without promoting oxidative injury. PMID:8406976</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Niwa, Y; Iizawa, O; Ishimoto, K; Jiang, X; Kanoh, T</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1993-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">415</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1993IJBm...37..133N"> <span id="translatedtitle">Electromagnetic <span class="hlt">wave</span> emitting products and ``Kikoh'' potentiate human leukocyte <span class="hlt">functions</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Tourmaline (electric stone, a type of granite stone), common granite stone, ceramic disks, hot spring water and human palmar energy (called “Kikoh” in Japan and China), all which emit electromagnetic radiation in the far infrared region (wavelength 4 14 µm). These materials were thus examined for effects on human leukocyte activity and on lipid peroxidation of unsaturated fatty acids. It was revealed that these materials significantly increased intracellular calcium ion concentration, phagocytosis, and generation of reactive oxygen species in neutrophils, and the blastogenetic response of lymphocytes to mitogens. Chemotactic activity by neutrophils was also enhanced by exposure to tourmaline and the palm of “Kikohshi” i.e., a person who heals professionally by the laying on of hands. Despite the increase in reactive oxygen species generated by neutrophils, lipid peroxidation from unsaturated fatty acid was markedly inhibited by these four materials. The results suggest that materials emitting electromagnetic radiation in the far infrared range, which are widely used in Japan for cosmetic, therapeutic, and preservative purposes, appear capable of potentiating leukocyte <span class="hlt">functions</span> without promoting oxidative injury.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Niwa, Yukie; Iizawa, Osamu; Ishimoto, Koichi; Jiang, Xiaoxia; Kanoh, Tadashi</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1993-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">416</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.springerlink.com/index/y6w71u54023w3955.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Lap-Band <span class="hlt">Impact</span> on the <span class="hlt">Function</span> of the Esophagus</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Background  The laparoscopic adjustable gastric band (LAGB) has been widely used to treat morbid obesity. There is conflicting data on\\u000a its long-term effect on esophageal <span class="hlt">function</span>. Our aim was to assess the long-term <span class="hlt">impact</span> of the LAGB on esophageal motility\\u000a and pH-metry in patients who had LAGB who had normal and abnormal esophageal <span class="hlt">function</span> at baseline.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  Consecutive patients referred for bariatric</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Zoi Gamagaris; Carlie Patterson; Verity Schaye; Fritz Francois; Morris Traube; Christine J. Fielding; George A. Fielding; Allison Heekoung Youn; Elizabeth H. Weinshel</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">417</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013ApPhL.103g1106P"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Impact</span> of in-plane spread of <span class="hlt">wave</span> vectors on spin Hall effect of light around Brewster's angle</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We theoretically and experimentally demonstrate that displacements induced by the spin Hall effect of light are determined by not only the out-plane but also the in-plane spreads of <span class="hlt">wave</span> vectors when a P-polarized Gaussian beam reflected from an air-glass interface around the Brewster's angle. The decisive <span class="hlt">impacts</span> of the <span class="hlt">wave</span> vector spreads are manifested in the dramatic changes of the reflected light intensity distribution when the polarization or the incident angle of the incident beam slightly varies. The experimental displacement data agree well with the theoretical prediction by taking into account of the in-plane spread of <span class="hlt">wave</span>-vectors.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Pan, Meng-Meng; Li, Yan; Ren, Jin-Li; Wang, Bo; Xiao, Yun-Feng; Yang, Hong; Gong, Qihuang</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-08-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">418</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/204204"> <span id="translatedtitle">De Broglie wavelets versus Schroedinger <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span>: A ribbon model approach to quantum theory and the mechanisms of quantum interference</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">As an alternative to better physical explanations of the mechanisms of quantum interference and the origins of uncertainty broadening, a linear hopping model is proposed with ``color-varying`` dynamics to reflect fast exchange between time-reversed states. Intricate relations between this model, particle-<span class="hlt">wave</span> dualism, and relativity are discussed. The <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> is shown to possess dual characteristics of a stable, localized ``soliton-like`` de Broglie wavelet and a delocalized, interfering Schroedinger carrier <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span>.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Tang, Jau</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1996-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">419</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2006AIPC..845..892S"> <span id="translatedtitle">High-Speed Photographic Study of <span class="hlt">Wave</span> Propagation and <span class="hlt">Impact</span> Damage in Fused Silica and AlON Using the Edge-On <span class="hlt">Impact</span> (EOI) Method</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">An Edge-on <span class="hlt">Impact</span> (EOI) technique, developed at the Ernst-Mach-Institute (EMI), coupled with a Cranz-Schardin high-speed camera, has been successfully utilized to visualize dynamic fracture in many brittle materials. In a typical test, the projectile strikes one edge of a specimen and damage formation and fracture propagation is recorded during the first 20 ?s after <span class="hlt">impact</span>. In the present study, stress <span class="hlt">waves</span> and damage propagation in fused silica and AlON were examined by means of two modified Edge-on <span class="hlt">Impact</span> arrangements. In one arrangement, fracture propagation was observed simultaneously in side and top views of the specimens by means of two Cranz-Schardin cameras. In another arrangement, the photographic technique was modified by placing the specimen between crossed polarizers and using the photo-elastic effect to visualize the stress <span class="hlt">waves</span>. Pairs of <span class="hlt">impact</span> tests at approximately equivalent velocities were carried out in transmitted plane (shadowgraphs) and crossed polarized light.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Strassburger, E.; Patel, P.; McCauley, J. W.; Templeton, D. W.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">420</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5449110"> <span id="translatedtitle">Distorted-<span class="hlt">wave</span>-approximation cross sections for excitation of the b/sup 3/. sigma. /sup +//sub u/ and B/sup 1/. sigma. /sup +//sub u/ states of H/sub 2/ by low-energy-electron <span class="hlt">impact</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Distorted-<span class="hlt">wave</span>-approximation calculations are reported for the excitation of the b/sup 3/..sigma../sup +//sub u/ and B/sup 1/..sigma../sup +//sub u/ states of H/sub 2/ by electron <span class="hlt">impact</span>. A discrete-basis-set method is used to obtain the electron-molecule continuum <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span>. Differential and integrated cross sections are presented from near threshold up to 60-eV electron <span class="hlt">impact</span> energy. Comparison is made with other theoretical results and experimental data.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Fliflet, A.W.; McKoy, V.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1980-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a 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title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">421</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011JDDE...23..903L"> <span id="translatedtitle">Traveling <span class="hlt">Wave</span> Solutions for a Predator-Prey System With Sigmoidal Response <span class="hlt">Function</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We study the existence of traveling <span class="hlt">wave</span> solutions for a diffusive predator-prey system. The system considered in this paper is governed by a Sigmoidal response <span class="hlt">function</span> which is more general than those studied previously. Our method is an improvement to the original method introduced in the work of Dunbar \\cite{Dunbar1,Dunbar2}. A bounded Wazewski set is used in this work while unbounded Wazewski sets were used in \\cite{Dunbar1,Dunbar2}. The existence of traveling <span class="hlt">wave</span> solutions connecting two equilibria is established by using the original Wazewski's theorem which is much simpler than the extended version in Dunbar's work.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Lin, Xiaobiao; Weng, Peixuan; Wu, Chufen</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">422</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010PhRvE..81f6202B"> <span id="translatedtitle">Computation of the drift velocity of spiral <span class="hlt">waves</span> using response <span class="hlt">functions</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Rotating spiral <span class="hlt">waves</span> are a form of self-organization observed in spatially extended systems of physical, chemical, and biological nature. In the presence of a small perturbation, the spiral <span class="hlt">wave’s</span> center of rotation and fiducial phase may change over time, i.e., the spiral <span class="hlt">wave</span> drifts. In linear approximation, the velocity of the drift is proportional to the convolution of the perturbation with the spiral’s response <span class="hlt">functions</span>, which are the eigenfunctions of the adjoint linearized operator corresponding to the critical eigenvalues ?=0,±i? . Here, we demonstrate that the response <span class="hlt">functions</span> give quantitatively accurate prediction of the drift velocities due to a variety of perturbations: a time dependent, periodic perturbation (inducing resonant drift); a rotational symmetry-breaking perturbation (inducing electrophoretic drift); and a translational symmetry-breaking perturbation (inhomogeneity induced drift) including drift due to a gradient, stepwise, and localized inhomogeneity. We predict the drift velocities using the response <span class="hlt">functions</span> in FitzHugh-Nagumo and Barkley models, and compare them with the velocities obtained in direct numerical simulations. In all cases good quantitative agreement is demonstrated.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Biktasheva, I. V.; Barkley, D.; Biktashev, V. N.; Foulkes, A. J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">423</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/13199466"> <span id="translatedtitle">Vibrational structure theory: new vibrational <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> methods for calculation of anharmonic vibrational energies and vibrational contributions to molecular properties</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">A number of recently developed theoretical methods for the calculation of vibrational energies and <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> are reviewed. Methods for constructing the appropriate quantum mechanical Hamilton operator are briefly described before reviewing a particular branch of theoretical methods for solving the nuclear Schrodinger equation. The main focus is on <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> methods using the vibrational self-consistent field (VSCF) as starting</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ove Christiansen</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">424</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/20699192"> <span id="translatedtitle">Analytic solution of the Schroedinger equation for the Coulomb-plus-linear potential. I. The <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We solve the Schroedinger equation for a quark-antiquark system interacting via a Coulomb-plus-linear potential, and obtain the <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> as power series, with their coefficients given in terms of the combinatorics <span class="hlt">functions</span>.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Plante, Guillaume; Antippa, Adel F. [Physics Department, Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 (United States); Departement de Physique, Universite du Quebec a Trois-Rivieres, Trois-Rivieres, Quebec, G9A 5H7 (Canada)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">425</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013GeoJI.tmp..458V"> <span id="translatedtitle">Generalized minimum-phase relations for memory <span class="hlt">functions</span> associated with <span class="hlt">wave</span> phenomena</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Memory <span class="hlt">functions</span> occur as temporal convolution operators in governing equations of <span class="hlt">wave</span> propagation and generally account for the instantaneous and non-instantaneous responses of a medium. The specific memory <span class="hlt">function</span> that is causal and stable, and the inverse of which is causal and stable as well, is conventionally referred to as a minimum-phase (MP) <span class="hlt">function</span>. Its amplitude and phase spectra are not independent, but related through MP-relations; that is, Kramers-Kronig relations between the amplitude and phase spectra. In this paper, we derive generalized MP-relations for a memory <span class="hlt">function</span> that does not necessarily meet the stability requirements; such <span class="hlt">functions</span> are often encountered in the geophysical context. We still address the <span class="hlt">function</span> as MP because its phase spectrum exhibits minimum group delay, like that of a conventional MP <span class="hlt">function</span>. We successfully tested the derived relations for the well-known Maxwell, Kelvin-Voigt and Zener compressibility models used in acoustics/elastodynamics, the dynamic permeability used in poroelasticity and the electrokinetic coefficient used in coupled acoustics and electromagnetics. In these fields, the derived relations can be applied for the determining the involved memory <span class="hlt">function</span> using numerical or laboratory experiments; only the amplitude or the phase spectrum needs to be measured and the other can be calculated. The relations also have applications in effective-medium theory and for any other <span class="hlt">wave</span> phenomenon that employs memory <span class="hlt">functions</span>.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">van Dalen, Karel N.; Slob, Evert; Schoemaker, Christiaan</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">426</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2005JChPh.123t4314G"> <span id="translatedtitle">Distorted <span class="hlt">wave</span> Born and three-body distorted <span class="hlt">wave</span> Born approximation calculations of the fully differential cross section for electron-<span class="hlt">impact</span> ionization of nitrogen molecules</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Currently there are no reliable theoretical approaches for calculating fully differential cross sections (FDCSs) for low-energy electron-<span class="hlt">impact</span> ionization of large molecules. We have recently proposed the orientation-averaged molecular orbital (OAMO) for calculating cross sections averaged over molecular orientations. In this paper, we use the OAMO to calculate distorted <span class="hlt">wave</span> Born approximation (DWBA) and molecular three-body distorted <span class="hlt">wave</span> (M3DW) Born approximation FDCS for electron-<span class="hlt">impact</span> ionization of the nitrogen molecule. Both coplanar symmetric and asymmetric FDCSs are investigated in the energy range of 35.6-400 eV. By comparing with the experimental data, we found that the M3DW is reasonably accurate in this energy range. We also found that the postcollision interaction plays a sufficiently important role and that the DWBA is not reliable.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Gao, Junfang; Madison, D. H.; Peacher, J. L.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">427</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3469023"> <span id="translatedtitle">Serum Uric Acid Level and Diverse <span class="hlt">Impacts</span> on Regional Arterial Stiffness and <span class="hlt">Wave</span> Reflection</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Background: Both increased arterial stiffness and hyperuricaemia are associated with elevated cardiovascular risks. Little is known about the relations of serum uric acid (UA) level to regional arterial stiffness and <span class="hlt">wave</span> reflection. The aim of the study was to investigate the gender-specific association of serum UA and indices of arterial <span class="hlt">function</span> in a community-based investigation in China. Methods: Cross-sectional data from 2374 adults (mean age 58.24 years) who underwent routine laboratory tests, regional pulse <span class="hlt">wave</span> velocity (PWV) and pulse <span class="hlt">wave</span> analysis measurements were analyzed in a gender-specific manner. None of the participants had atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease, chronic renal failure, systemic inflammatory disease, gout, or were under treatment which would affect serum UA level. Results: Men had higher serum UA level than women. Subjects with hyperuricaemia had significantly higher carotid-ankle PWV in both genders (P< 0.05), and the carotid-femoral PWV (PWVc-f) was higher in women (P< 0.001) while the augmentation index was marginally lower in men (P = 0.049). Multiple regression analysis showed that serum UA was an independent determinant only for PWVc-f in women (? = 0.104, P = 0.027) when adjusted for atherogenic confounders. No other independent relationship was found between UA level and other surrogates of arterial stiffness. Conclusions: Serum UA levels are associated with alterations in systemic arterial stiffness that differ in men and women. Women might be more susceptible to large vascular damage associated with hyperuricaemia.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Bian, Suyan; Guo, Hongyang; Ye, Ping; Luo, Leiming; Wu, Hongmei; Xiao, Wenkai</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">428</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20924572"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Impact</span> of shock <span class="hlt">wave</span> lithotripsy on heart rate variability in patients with urolithiasis.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The physiological response of the cardiac autonomic nervous system during shock <span class="hlt">wave</span> lithotripsy (SWL) remains unclear. Heart rate variability (HRV) is an index of cardiac autonomic balance. This study aimed to analyze HRV during SWL in patients with urolithiasis. Electrocardiograms of patients who underwent SWL were obtained. Recordings were obtained before and after SWL. For each time point, the recordings were obtained continuously for 6 min, after which R <span class="hlt">wave</span>-to-R <span class="hlt">wave</span> (RR) intervals were extracted. The time digital sequence derived from RR intervals was the HRV signal. Time-domain analysis revealed that the mean of RR intervals (MRR) and standard deviation of normal beat-to-normal beat (NN) intervals (SDNN), but not the square root of the mean squared difference of successive NNs (RMSSD) or triangular interpolation of NN intervals (TINN), significantly increased during SWL. The increase in SDNN persisted after SWL but MRR returned to the initial level. Frequency-domain analysis revealed that very low frequency (VLF), low frequency (LF), and LF/high frequency (HF) ratio significantly increased after SWL, while there was no statistically significant difference in HF. Thus, the patients had significantly high MRR and SDNN during SWL and significantly high SDNN, VLF, LF, and LF/HF ratio after SWL. SWL could alter the <span class="hlt">functioning</span> of the cardiac autonomic nervous system, resulting in reduction in sympathetic activity and increase in parasympathetic activity. Further studies with larger samples are required to confirm these findings and understand the underlying mechanisms. PMID:20924572</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Lin, Wu-Chou; Ho, Chien-Yi; Chen, Yung-Hsiang; Chen, I-Cheng; Chen, Huey-Yi; Tsai, Fuu-Jen; Shen, Jui-Lung; Man, Samantha Shan; Huang, Po-Hsun; Chen, Yuh-Lien; Man, Kee-Ming; Chen, Wen-Chi</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-10-06</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">429</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011CMMPh..51..455B"> <span id="translatedtitle">On a special <span class="hlt">function</span> used in the description of electromagnetic surface <span class="hlt">waves</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The tangential component of the electric field of a surface <span class="hlt">wave</span> at any distance from the transmitting antenna lying in the interface plane of two homogeneous media can be represented in terms of a <span class="hlt">function</span> of two complex variables ?( q,?) for arbitrary parameters of the interface. In this paper, representations of the <span class="hlt">function</span> ?( q,?) in the form of series are given that allow one to quickly calculate the values of ?( q,?) and to investigate the analytic properties of this <span class="hlt">function</span>. The dependence of the field of the surface <span class="hlt">wave</span> on time is determined using the inverse Laplace transform, where the path of integration is chosen in such a way that the integrand rapidly decreases at infinity, which drastically improves the computation speed compared with the method based on the Fourier transform.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Bezrukova, E. G.; Rudenchik, E. A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">430</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15896284"> <span id="translatedtitle">Trichotillomania: <span class="hlt">impact</span> on psychosocial <span class="hlt">functioning</span> and quality of life.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This study explored the <span class="hlt">impact</span> of hair pulling on psychosocial <span class="hlt">functioning</span> for patients diagnosed with trichotillomania (TTM; n = 28). TTM patients were compared to age and gender-matched groups of psychiatric patients without TTM (n = 28) and nonpsychiatric control volunteers (NC, n = 28) on measures of psychological distress, <span class="hlt">functioning</span>/quality of life, and self-esteem. Results indicated that TTM patients reported more severe psychosocial impairments than did NC volunteers; however, these differences were mediated by differences in level of depression. Regression analyses indicated significant relationships between some measures of psychosocial <span class="hlt">functioning</span> and severity of hair pulling, independent of level of depression. Finally, an interview of the <span class="hlt">impact</span> of hair pulling on 6 domains of daily <span class="hlt">functioning</span> (negative affect/negative self-evaluations, grooming, recreational activities, social interaction, work/housework productivity, and physical health) indicated common and wide-ranging impairments for both lifetime and current (i.e., past week) ratings. These results highlight the importance of promoting and improving resources for the clinical care of TTM patients, and provide some directions for clinicians to enhance assessment of interference caused by TTM. PMID:15896284</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Diefenbach, Gretchen J; Tolin, David F; Hannan, Scott; Crocetto, Johanna; Worhunsky, Patrick</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">431</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/244625"> <span id="translatedtitle">Heavy quark fragmentation <span class="hlt">functions</span> for D-<span class="hlt">wave</span> quarkonium and charmed beauty mesons</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">At the large transverse momentum region, the production of heavy-heavy bound-states such as charmonium, bottomonium, and {anti b}c mesons in high energy e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} and hadronic collisions is dominated by parton fragmentation. The authors calculate the heavy quark fragmentation <span class="hlt">functions</span> into the D-<span class="hlt">wave</span> quarkonium and {anti b}c mesons to leading order in the strong coupling constant and in the non-relativistic expansion. In the {anti b}c meson case, one set of its D-<span class="hlt">wave</span> states is expected to lie below the open flavor threshold. The total fragmentation probability for a {anti b} antiquark to split into the D-<span class="hlt">wave</span> {anti b}c mesons is about 2 {times} 10{sup {minus}5}, which implies that only 2% of the total pseudo-scalar ground state B{sub c} comes from the cascades of these orbitally excited states.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Cheung, K. [Texas Univ., Austin, TX (United States). Center for Particle Physics; Yuan, T.C. [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States). Davis Inst. for High Energy Physics</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1995-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">432</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23714123"> <span id="translatedtitle">Reliability assessment of different plate theories for elastic <span class="hlt">wave</span> propagation analysis in <span class="hlt">functionally</span> graded plates.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The importance of elastic <span class="hlt">wave</span> propagation problem in plates arises from the application of ultrasonic elastic <span class="hlt">waves</span> in non-destructive evaluation of plate-like structures. However, precise study and analysis of acoustic guided <span class="hlt">waves</span> especially in non-homogeneous waveguides such as <span class="hlt">functionally</span> graded plates are so complicated that exact elastodynamic methods are rarely employed in practical applications. Thus, the simple approximate plate theories have attracted much interest for the calculation of <span class="hlt">wave</span> fields in FGM plates. Therefore, in the current research, the classical plate theory (CPT), first-order shear deformation theory (FSDT) and third-order shear deformation theory (TSDT) are used to obtain the transient responses of flexural <span class="hlt">waves</span> in FGM plates subjected to transverse impulsive loadings. Moreover, comparing the results with those based on a well recognized hybrid numerical method (HNM), we examine the accuracy of the plate theories for several plates of various thicknesses under excitations of different frequencies. The material properties of the plate are assumed to vary across the plate thickness according to a simple power-law distribution in terms of volume fractions of constituents. In all analyses, spatial Fourier transform together with modal analysis are applied to compute displacement responses of the plates. A comparison of the results demonstrates the reliability ranges of the approximate plate theories for elastic <span class="hlt">wave</span> propagation analysis in FGM plates. Furthermore, based on various examples, it is shown that whenever the plate theories are used within the appropriate ranges of plate thickness and frequency content, solution process in <span class="hlt">wave</span> number-time domain based on modal analysis approach is not only sufficient but also efficient for finding the transient waveforms in FGM plates. PMID:23714123</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Mehrkash, Milad; Azhari, Mojtaba; Mirdamadi, Hamid Reza</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-05-09</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">433</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/20639760"> <span id="translatedtitle">Variational calculation of positron-atom scattering using configuration-interaction-type <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Kohn variational method is used with a configuration-interaction (CI)-type <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> to determine the phase shifts and Z{sub eff} for positron-copper scattering. The method is first tested for positron-hydrogen scattering and it is found to give phase shifts and Z{sub eff} within 1-2% of the best previous calculations. Although the phase shift for Cu converged more slowly with L{sub max} (the maximum angular momentum of the electron and positron orbitals included in the short-range basis), it was still possible to get reliable estimates of the phase shifts by including orbitals with l{<=}18 and the use of an extrapolation technique. Calculation of Z{sub eff} was more problematic since the convergence of Z{sub eff} with respect to L{sub max} was very slow. Despite the uncertainties, it was clear that the p-<span class="hlt">wave</span> phase shift was showing signs of forming a shape resonance at about 0.5 eV incident energy. This resulted in a p-<span class="hlt">wave</span> contribution to Z{sub eff} that was larger than that of the s <span class="hlt">wave</span> for k{>=}0.1a{sub 0}{sup -1}. Speculative calculations based upon a model potential suggest that a p-<span class="hlt">wave</span> shape resonance centered at thermal energies, e.g., about 0.025 eV, could result in a thermally averaged Z{sub eff} exceeding 10,000.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Bromley, M.W.J.; Mitroy, J. [Faculty of SITE, Northern Territory University, Darwin, Northern Territory 0909 (Australia)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">434</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008Ocgy...48....7P"> <span id="translatedtitle">Testing and verifying the wind <span class="hlt">wave</span> model with an optimized source <span class="hlt">function</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">With the purpose of revealing the actual advantages of the new source <span class="hlt">function</span> that was earlier proposed in [5] for use in numerical wind <span class="hlt">wave</span> models, its testing and verification was carried out by means of modification of the WAM (Cycle-4) model. The verification was performed on the basis of a comparison of the results of <span class="hlt">wave</span> simulation for a given wind field with the buoy observation data obtained in three oceanic regions. In the Barents Sea, this kind of comparison was made for <span class="hlt">wave</span> observations from a single buoy with an interval of 6 hours for a period of 3 years. In two regions of the North Atlantic, the comparison was performed for 3 buoys in both regions for observation periods of 30 days with an interval of 1 hour. Estimations of the simulation accuracy were obtained for a series of wind <span class="hlt">wave</span> parameters, and they were compared with the original and modified WAM model. Advantages of the modified model consisting of the enhancement of the calculation speed by 20-25% and a 1.5- to 2-fold increase in the simulation accuracy for the significant <span class="hlt">wave</span> height and the mean period were proved.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Polnikov, V. G.; Dymov, V. I.; Pasechnik, T. A.; Lavrenov, I. V.; Abuzyarov, Z. K.; Sannasiraj, S. A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">435</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009ems..confE.148A"> <span id="translatedtitle">Spatial <span class="hlt">impacts</span> of heat <span class="hlt">waves</span> in mortality. Evaluating current risks and future threats</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Impacts</span> of heat <span class="hlt">waves</span> in morbidity and mortality are largely known. Climate Change is expected to increase the climate health <span class="hlt">impacts</span> in summer while the winter will be probably favored. The health <span class="hlt">impacts</span> of extreme thermal events are mainly studied at a national or regional level, considering macro or mesoscale thermal features. But it can be assumed that local variations in mortality must exist, associated, in one hand, with local climatic differences, due to features such as land use and urbanization and, in other hand, with vulnerability factors (depending on demographic and socioeconomic characteristics of populations). A model of hazard - vulnerability - risk was developed, to analyze the spatial variations of mortality in extreme thermal events, at the level of city district, in the Lisbon metropolitan area (Portugal). In that model, risk is considered as the product of hazard and vulnerability. Daily mortality data by sex, age and cause of death was supplied by the Health National Authority. The research is yet on-going. In our model, hazard is represented mainly by temperature and air pollution (the influence of other atmospheric variables that affect the human energy balance, such as solar radiation and wind speed should be tested too). Small scale variation of meteorological features, in extreme thermal events, were simulated with a Regional Atmospheric Model (Brazilian Regional Atmospheric Modeling System) and the results were validated and calibrated using observation data from an urban network of termo-higrometers placed in sites with different urban characteristics. Vulnerability is a result on personal sensitivity and exposure. Personal sensitivity is assessed considering individual constitutional and demographic factors as well as socio, cultural and economic variables. Daily mobility determines the population exposure to heat. Since many of these variables are redundant, a set of indicators, including a multiple deprivation index, was used. A first step consists in the modelling of the current relationship between hazard factors, vulnerability and mortality with the aim to explain the variations in mortality, at the city-district scale. In a second step, changes in hazard and vulnerability factors will be simulated. In the changes in meteorological conditions, IPCC and SIAM II scenarios were considered, as well as previsions of urban development and land use changes in the studied area. Demographic and socioeconomic changes should be simulated too. The pretended result with this risk assessment methodology is a prevision of future <span class="hlt">impacts</span> (intensity and patterns) of the heat <span class="hlt">waves</span> on mortality.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Andrade, H.; Canario, P.; Nogueira, H.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">436</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2003JFM...490....1H"> <span id="translatedtitle">Shock <span class="hlt">wave</span> formation in droplet <span class="hlt">impact</span> on a rigid surface: lateral liquid motion and multiple <span class="hlt">wave</span> structure in the contact line region</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The early phase of high-speed liquid droplet <span class="hlt">impact</span> on a rigid wall is characterized by compressibility effects through the creation of a shock <span class="hlt">wave</span> attached to the contact area periphery. Initially, the area of compressed liquid is assumed to be bounded by the shock envelope, which propagates both laterally and upwardly into the bulk of the liquid. In this paper, an analytical model accounting for the lateral liquid motion in the compressed area is developed and compared to the axisymmetric numerical solution of the inviscid (Euler) flow equations. It is shown that the often employed assumption that the compressed area is separated from the liquid bulk by a single shock <span class="hlt">wave</span> attached to the contact line breaks down and results in an anomaly. This anomaly emerges prior to the time when the shock <span class="hlt">wave</span> departs from the contact line, initiating lateral liquid jetting. In order to remove this anomaly, the analytical model presented in this paper proposes the transition from a single to a multiple <span class="hlt">wave</span> structure in the contact line region, prior to jetting eruption. The occurrence of this more complex multiple <span class="hlt">wave</span> structure is also supported by the numerical results.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Haller, K. K.; Poulikakos, D.; Ventikos, Y.; Monkewitz, P.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">437</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010cosp...38.1265S"> <span id="translatedtitle">The <span class="hlt">impact</span> of solar thermal tides on the propagation and dissipation of gravity <span class="hlt">waves</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Gravity <span class="hlt">waves</span> (GWs) and thermal tides are important phenomena in middle-atmosphere dy-namics. Breaking GWs have a major <span class="hlt">impact</span> on the mean circulation in the middle atmosphere (MA). Due to the limitations in computational power most complex MA circulation models have to incorporate the effect of unresolved GWs via an efficient parametrization. Typically, these are of vertical column type and ignore horizontal and temporal variations in the background fields. However, highly transient tidal perturbations are always present and dominate diurnal variations in the MA through which the GWs propagate. Even in studies of the interaction between GWs and these thermal tides, a possibly important aspect of tidal dynamics, columnar parametrizations of GWs have been applied which do not account for the time dependence of thermal tides. A ray tracing technique is used to illuminate the <span class="hlt">impact</span> of horizontal gradients of the back-ground (including the tides) and its time dependence on the propagation and dissipation of GWs. It is shown that tidal transience leads to a modulation of the absolute, or sometimes called ground-based, frequency of slowly propagating GWs. Due to large tidal wind variations in the upper mesosphere most parts of the assumed GW spectrum are slowed down in critical layer type regions. Then, the combined action of horizontal <span class="hlt">wave</span> number refraction and fre-quency modulation induce changes in the horizontal phase speed which may exceed the initial phase speed by orders of magnitude. The phase speed variations have the tendency to follow the shape of the tidal background wind. This effect leads to less critical layer filtering of GWs and therefore decreased periodic background flow forcing due to momentum flux divergences as compared to a classical vertical column parametrization of instantaneously adjusting GW trains.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Senf, Fabian; Achatz, Ulrich</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">438</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2006SPIE.6177..104A"> <span id="translatedtitle">Crack detection in a wheel end spindle using <span class="hlt">wave</span> propagation via modal <span class="hlt">impacts</span> and piezo actuation</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This research demonstrates two methodologies for detecting cracks in a metal spindle housed deep within a vehicle wheel end assembly. First, modal <span class="hlt">impacts</span> are imposed on the hub of the wheel in the longitudinal direction to produce broadband elastic <span class="hlt">wave</span> excitation spectra out to 7000 Hz. The response data on the flange is collected using 3000 Hz bandwidth accelerometers. It is shown using frequency response analysis that the crack produces a filter, which amplifies the elastic response of the surrounding components of the wheel assembly. Experiments on wheel assemblies mounted on the vehicle with the vehicle lifted off the ground are performed to demonstrate that the modal <span class="hlt">impact</span> method can be used to nondestructively evaluate cracks of varying depths despite sources of variability such as the half shaft angular position relative to the non-rotating spindle. Second, an automatic piezo-stack actuator is utilized to excite the wheel hub with a swept sine signal extending from 20 kHz. Accelerometers are then utilized to measure the response on the flange. It is demonstrated using frequency response analysis that the crack filters <span class="hlt">waves</span> traveling from the hub to the flange. A simple finite element model is used to interpret the experimental results. Challenges discussed include variability from assembly to assembly, the variability in each assembly, and the high amount of damping present in each assembly due to the transmission gearing, lubricant, and other components in the wheel end. A two-channel measurement system with a graphical user interface for detecting cracks was also developed and a procedure was created to ensure that operators properly perform the test.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ackers, Spencer; Evans, Ronald; Johnson, Timothy; Kess, Harold; White, Jonathan; Adams, Douglas E.; Brown, Pam</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">439</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ije.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/reprint/37/2/309.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Has the <span class="hlt">impact</span> of heat <span class="hlt">waves</span> on mortality changed in France since the European heat <span class="hlt">wave</span> of summer 2003? A study of the 2006 heat <span class="hlt">wave</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Results During the 2006 heat <span class="hlt">wave</span> (from 11 to 28 July), about 2065 excess deaths occurred in France. Considering the observed temperatures and with the hypothesis that heat-related mortality had not changed since 2003, 6452 excess deaths were predicted for the period. The observed mortality during the 2006 heat <span class="hlt">wave</span> was thus markedly less than the expected mortality (? 4400</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">A Fouillet; G Rey; V Wagner; K Laaidi; P Empereur-Bissonnet; A Le Tertre; P Frayssinet; P Bessemoulin; F Laurent; P De Crouy-Chanel; E Jougla; D Hemon</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">440</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2006IJMPB..20.3279M"> <span id="translatedtitle">On the Origin of d-<span class="hlt">WAVE</span> Pair <span class="hlt">Functions</span> in HIGH-Tc Superconductivity</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We argue that the usual Hubbard's model produces only s-<span class="hlt">wave</span> pairing <span class="hlt">functions</span> and, even then, only at unphysically large values of the lumped parameter J?4t2/U. It follows that a reliable theory of high-Tc superconductivity has to include additional features if it is to reproduce the d-<span class="hlt">wave</span> gap. We test the effects of an alternating potential caused by a charge stripe, on the ground state of the Hubbard model in strong-coupling. If we "fine tune" we do find the d-<span class="hlt">waves</span>. However, a better-formulated version of a three-band model yields a sturdier theory of pair formation in high-Tc superconductivity. The coupling constant g1=t2/V factors out, hence it serves only to establish the unit of energy; the underlying Hamiltonian is universal. We outline the principal properties of this model, including the intimate relation between charge-density stripes and the d-<span class="hlt">wave</span> pair <span class="hlt">function</span>, its rejection of 45° stripes (checkerboard pattern), and other concerns.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Mattis, Daniel C.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" 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<a onClick='return showDiv("page_6");' href="#">6</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_7");' href="#">7</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_8");' href="#">8</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_9");' href="#">9</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_10");' href="#">10</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#">11</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#">12</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#">13</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#">14</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#">15</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#">16</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#">17</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#">18</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#">19</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#">20</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a style="font-weight: bold;">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">441</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012PhRvA..85c4504K"> <span id="translatedtitle">Protonic structure of CH3OH described by electroprotonic <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The electroprotonic ground-state <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> of CH3OH is calculated beyond the Born-Oppenheimer (BO) approximation using multiconfiguration <span class="hlt">wave-function</span> theory for a system composed of electrons and protons. A CH3OH molecule is treated as a quasidiatomic molecule in which orbitals for both electrons and protons are described in a laboratory fixed cylindrical coordinate system with C and O atoms being fixed on the z axis. The probability density of the four protons shows that the C atom is surrounded by three protons and the O atom by one proton, and that the dihedral angle of the O-H bond axis with respect to one of the C-H bond axes becomes 180?, exhibiting appropriately the conformational correlation between the two <span class="hlt">functional</span> groups. The optimized spatial configuration of the protons was found to be in good agreement with that obtained by the standard BO-based electronic structure calculation. The non-BO electroprotonic <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> introduced here afford the basis for describing ultrafast hydrogen migration in hydrocarbon molecules in an intense laser field.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kato, Tsuyoshi; Yamanouchi, Kaoru</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">442</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011JMP....52g3515B"> <span id="translatedtitle">Coulomb singularities in scattering <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> of spin-orbit-coupled states</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We report on our analysis of the Coulomb singularity problem in the frame of the coupled channel scattering theory including spin-orbit interaction. We assume that the coupling between the partial <span class="hlt">wave</span> components involves orbital angular momenta such that ?l = 0, +/-2. In these conditions, the two radial <span class="hlt">functions</span>, components of a partial <span class="hlt">wave</span> associated to two values of the angular momentum l, satisfy a system of two second-order ordinary differential equations. We examine the difficulties arising in the analysis of the behavior of the regular solutions near the origin because of this coupling. First, we demonstrate that for a singularity of the first kind in the potential, one of the solutions is not amenable to a power series expansion. The use of the Lippmann-Schwinger equations confirms this fact: a logarithmic divergence arises at the second iteration. To overcome this difficulty, we introduce two auxilliary <span class="hlt">functions</span> which, together with the two radial <span class="hlt">functions</span>, satisfy a system of four first-order differential equations. The reduction of the order of the differential system enables us to use a matrix-based approach, which generalizes the standard Frobenius method. We illustrate our analysis with numerical calculations of coupled scattering <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> in a solid-state system.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Bogdanski, P.; Ouerdane, H.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">443</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012JChPh.136t4704L"> <span id="translatedtitle">One-particle correlation <span class="hlt">function</span> in evanescent <span class="hlt">wave</span> dynamic light scattering</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In order to interpret measured intensity autocorrelation <span class="hlt">functions</span> obtained in evanescent <span class="hlt">wave</span> scattering, their initial decay rates have been analyzed recently [P. Holmqvist, J. K. G. Dhont, and P. R. Lang, Phys. Rev. E 74, 021402 (2006); B. Cichocki, E. Wajnryb, J. Blawzdziewicz, J. K. G. Dhont, and P. R. Lang, J. Chem. Phys. 132, 074704 (2010); J. W. Swan and J. F. Brady, ibid. 135, 014701 (2011)]. A theoretical analysis of the longer time dependence of evanescent <span class="hlt">wave</span> autocorrelation <span class="hlt">functions</span>, beyond the initial decay, is still lacking. In this paper we present such an analysis for very dilute suspensions of spherical colloids. We present simulation results, a comparison to cumulant expansions, and experiments. An efficient simulation method is developed which takes advantage of the particular mathematical structure of the time-evolution equation of the probability density <span class="hlt">function</span> of the position coordinate of the colloidal sphere. The computer simulation results are compared with analytic, first and second order cumulant expansions. The only available analytical result for the full time dependence of evanescent <span class="hlt">wave</span> autocorrelation <span class="hlt">functions</span> [K. H. Lan, N. Ostrowsky, and D. Sornette, Phys. Rev. Lett. 57, 17 (1986)], that neglects hydrodynamic interactions between the colloidal spheres and the wall, is shown to be quite inaccurate. Experimental results are presented and compared to the simulations and cumulant expansions.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Lisicki, Maciej; Cichocki, Bogdan; Dhont, Jan K. G.; Lang, Peter R.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">444</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012APS..MARQ35003C"> <span id="translatedtitle">Density-on-<span class="hlt">wave-function</span> mapping beyond the Hohenberg-Kohn theorem</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Density-<span class="hlt">functional</span> theory is based on the Hohenberg-Kohn theorem, establishing a one-on-one mapping between ground-state densities and <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span>. That theorem does not, however, make a direct statement on whether two <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> that are in some sense close are mapped on two densities that are also close, and vice versa. In this work, a metric is defined that allows to quantify the meaning of ``close'' in the preceding sentence. This metric stratifies Hilbert space into concentric spheres on which maximum and minimum distances between states can be defined and geometrically interpreted. Numerical calculations for the Helium atom, Hooke's atom and a lattice Hamiltonian show that the mapping between densities and ground states, which is highly complex and nonlocal in the coordinate description, in metric space becomes a monotonic and nearly linear mapping of vicinities onto vicinities. In this sense, the density-on-<span class="hlt">wave-function</span> mapping is not only simpler than expected; it is as simple as it could be. [4pt] I. D'Amico, J. P. Coe, V. V. Franca, and K. Capelle, Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 050401 (2011) and Phys. Rev. Lett. 107, 188902 (2011). See also E. Artacho, Phys. Rev. Lett. 107, 188901 (2011).</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Capelle, Klaus</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">445</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008AGUFMSA43A1562P"> <span id="translatedtitle">The Transfer <span class="hlt">Function</span> Model (TFM) as a Tool for Simulating Gravity <span class="hlt">Wave</span> Phenomena in the Mesosphere</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Transfer <span class="hlt">Function</span> Model (TFM) is semi-analytical and linear, and it is designed to describe the acoustic gravity <span class="hlt">waves</span> (GW) propagating over the globe and from the ground to 600 km under the influence of vertical temperature variations. <span class="hlt">Wave</span> interactions with the flow are not accounted for. With an expansion in terms of frequency-dependent spherical harmonics, the time consuming vertical integration of the conservation equations is reduced to computing the transfer <span class="hlt">function</span> (TF). (The applied lower and upper boundary conditions assure that spurious <span class="hlt">wave</span> reflections will not occur.) The TF describes the dynamical properties of the medium divorced from the complexities of the temporal and horizontal variations of the excitation source. Given the TF, the atmospheric response to a chosen source is then obtained in short order to simulate the GW propagating through the atmosphere over the globe. In the past, this model has been applied to study auroral processes, which produce distinct <span class="hlt">wave</span> phenomena such as: (1) standing lamb modes that propagate horizontally in the viscous medium of the thermosphere, (2) <span class="hlt">waves</span> generated in the auroral oval that experience geometric amplification propagating to the pole where constructive interference generates secondary <span class="hlt">waves</span> that propagate equatorward, (3) ducted modes propagating through the middle atmosphere that leak back into the thermosphere, and (4) GWs reflected from the Earth's surface that reach the thermosphere in a narrow propagation cone. Well-defined spectral features characterize these <span class="hlt">wave</span> modes in the TF to provide analytical understanding. We propose the TFM as a tool for simulating GW in the mesosphere and in particular the features observed in Polar Mesospheric Clouds (PMC). With present-day computers, it takes less than one hour to compute the TF, so that there is virtually no practical limitation on the source configurations that can be applied and tested in the lower atmosphere. And there is no limitation on the temporal and spatial resolutions the model simulations can provide. We shall discuss the concept and organization of the TFM and present samples of GW simulations that illustrate the capabilities of the model and its user interface. We shall discuss in particular the <span class="hlt">waves</span> that leak into the mesopause from the thermosphere above and propagate into the region from tropospheric weather systems below.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Porter, H.; Mayr, H.; Moore, J.; Wilson, S.; Armaly, A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">446</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/27004296"> <span id="translatedtitle">Monitoring the distributed <span class="hlt">impact</span> <span class="hlt">wave</span> on a concrete slab due to the traffic based on polarization dependence on stimulated Brillouin scattering</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">For the first time to our knowledge, distributed <span class="hlt">impact</span> <span class="hlt">waves</span> due to the highway traffic on concrete slabs reinforced with FRP bars are monitored in real time using stimulated Brillouin scattering. The <span class="hlt">impact</span> <span class="hlt">wave</span> is caused by the traffic passing on the highway pavement at high speed (>100 km h-1), which induced pressure on the concrete slabs, and in turn</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Xiaoyi Bao; Chunshu Zhang; Wenhai Li; M. Eisa; S. El-Gamal; B. Benmokrane</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">447</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/48170498"> <span id="translatedtitle">Climate <span class="hlt">Impact</span> Response <span class="hlt">Functions</span> as <span class="hlt">Impact</span> Tools in the Tolerable Windows Approach</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">A critical issue for policymakers in defining mitigationstrategies for climate change is the availability ofappropriate evaluation tools. The development of climate impactresponse <span class="hlt">functions</span> (CIRFs) is our reaction to this challenge.CIRFs depict the response of selected climate-sensitive impactsectors across a wide range of plausible futures. They consist ofa limited number of climate-change-related dimensions andsensitivities of sector-specific <span class="hlt">impact</span> models. The concept ofCIRFs</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">H.-M. Füssel; F. L. Toth; J. G. van Minnen; F. Kaspar</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">448</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/60605149"> <span id="translatedtitle">Optimization of magnetically accelerated, ultra-high velocity aluminum flyer plates for use in plate <span class="hlt">impact</span>, shock <span class="hlt">wave</span> experiments</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The intense magnetic field produced by the 20 MA Z accelerator is used as an impulsive pressure source to accelerate metal flyer plates to high velocity for the purpose of performing plate <span class="hlt">impact</span>, shock <span class="hlt">wave</span> experiments. This capability has been significantly enhanced by the recently developed pulse shaping capability of Z, which enables tailoring the rise time to peak current</p> <div class="credit