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1

Impact of 120-W 2-?m continuous wave laser vapoenucleation of the prostate on sexual function.  

PubMed

The objective of this work is to evaluate the impact of 120-W 2-?m continuous wave (cw) laser vapoenucleation of the prostate in patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) on sexual function. One hundred twenty-two consecutive patients with BPH were retrospectively collected in this study and were classified into two groups for surgical treatment with 2-?m cw laser vapoenucleation or transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP). International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF) and general assessment questions were completed before and 12 months after treatment to determine the impact on sexual function. A total of 33 patients (52.4%) in group 1 and 31 (52.5%) in group 2 reported various degrees of erectile dysfunction before surgery. Interestingly, an increase in IIEF-EF score by 2 points was reported by 16 (25.4%) and 14 (23.7%) patients, respectively, and mean EF score did show a marginal but not significant increase postoperatively in both group. Differences about orgasmic intercourse satisfaction, sexual desire domain, and overall satisfaction scores in each group were not significant between preoperative and postoperative, but there was a significant decrease in the orgasmic function domain score at 12 months postoperation in both groups (p?impact on sexual function. No significant erectile function improvement was observed after surgery, but these two techniques significantly lowered the IIEF orgasmic function domain and this was mainly caused by retrograde ejaculation. PMID:23828495

Wang, Yubin; Shao, Jinkai; Lu, Yongning; Lü, Yongan; Li, Xiaodong

2014-03-01

2

Wave Function Plotter Model  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Ejs Wave Function Plotter model displays a one-dimensional wave function u(x,t) depicting a disturbance at position x and time t. The disturbance can be mass density, pressure, or electric field depending on the physical context. The default wave function is sinusoidal but any other analytic function can be entered in the text box. The number of sampling points can also be changed. You can modify this simulation if you have Ejs installed by right-clicking within the plot and selecting âOpen Ejs Modelâ from the pop-up menu item. Ejs Wave Function Plotter model was created using the Easy Java Simulations (Ejs) modeling tool. It is distributed as a ready-to-run (compiled) Java archive. Double clicking the ejs_osc_chains_WaveFunctionPlotter.jar file will run the program if Java is installed. Ejs is a part of the Open Source Physics Project and is designed to make it easier to access, modify, and generate computer models. Additional Ejs models for Newtonian mechanics are available. They can be found by searching ComPADRE for Open Source Physics, OSP, or Ejs.

Christian, Wolfgang

2008-07-05

3

Comparing ab initio density-functional and wave function theories: The impact of correlation on the electronic density and the role of the correlation potential  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The framework of ab initio density-functional theory (DFT) has been introduced as a way to provide a seamless connection between the Kohn-Sham (KS) formulation of DFT and wave-function based ab initio approaches [R. J. Bartlett, I. Grabowski, S. Hirata, and S. Ivanov, J. Chem. Phys. 122, 034104 (2005)]. Recently, an analysis of the impact of dynamical correlation effects on the density of the neon atom was presented [K. Jankowski, K. Nowakowski, I. Grabowski, and J. Wasilewski, J. Chem. Phys. 130, 164102 (2009)], contrasting the behaviour for a variety of standard density functionals with that of ab initio approaches based on second-order Møller-Plesset (MP2) and coupled cluster theories at the singles-doubles (CCSD) and singles-doubles perturbative triples [CCSD(T)] levels. In the present work, we consider ab initio density functionals based on second-order many-body perturbation theory and coupled cluster perturbation theory in a similar manner, for a range of small atomic and molecular systems. For comparison, we also consider results obtained from MP2, CCSD, and CCSD(T) calculations. In addition to this density based analysis, we determine the KS correlation potentials corresponding to these densities and compare them with those obtained for a range of ab initio density functionals via the optimized effective potential method. The correlation energies, densities, and potentials calculated using ab initio DFT display a similar systematic behaviour to those derived from electronic densities calculated using ab initio wave function theories. In contrast, typical explicit density functionals for the correlation energy, such as VWN5 and LYP, do not show behaviour consistent with this picture of dynamical correlation, although they may provide some degree of correction for already erroneous explicitly density-dependent exchange-only functionals. The results presented here using orbital dependent ab initio density functionals show that they provide a treatment of exchange and correlation contributions within the KS framework that is more consistent with traditional ab initio wave function based methods.

Grabowski, Ireneusz; Teale, Andrew M.; ?miga, Szymon; Bartlett, Rodney J.

2011-09-01

4

Comparing ab initio density-functional and wave function theories: the impact of correlation on the electronic density and the role of the correlation potential.  

PubMed

The framework of ab initio density-functional theory (DFT) has been introduced as a way to provide a seamless connection between the Kohn-Sham (KS) formulation of DFT and wave-function based ab initio approaches [R. J. Bartlett, I. Grabowski, S. Hirata, and S. Ivanov, J. Chem. Phys. 122, 034104 (2005)]. Recently, an analysis of the impact of dynamical correlation effects on the density of the neon atom was presented [K. Jankowski, K. Nowakowski, I. Grabowski, and J. Wasilewski, J. Chem. Phys. 130, 164102 (2009)], contrasting the behaviour for a variety of standard density functionals with that of ab initio approaches based on second-order Møller-Plesset (MP2) and coupled cluster theories at the singles-doubles (CCSD) and singles-doubles perturbative triples [CCSD(T)] levels. In the present work, we consider ab initio density functionals based on second-order many-body perturbation theory and coupled cluster perturbation theory in a similar manner, for a range of small atomic and molecular systems. For comparison, we also consider results obtained from MP2, CCSD, and CCSD(T) calculations. In addition to this density based analysis, we determine the KS correlation potentials corresponding to these densities and compare them with those obtained for a range of ab initio density functionals via the optimized effective potential method. The correlation energies, densities, and potentials calculated using ab initio DFT display a similar systematic behaviour to those derived from electronic densities calculated using ab initio wave function theories. In contrast, typical explicit density functionals for the correlation energy, such as VWN5 and LYP, do not show behaviour consistent with this picture of dynamical correlation, although they may provide some degree of correction for already erroneous explicitly density-dependent exchange-only functionals. The results presented here using orbital dependent ab initio density functionals show that they provide a treatment of exchange and correlation contributions within the KS framework that is more consistent with traditional ab initio wave function based methods. PMID:21950854

Grabowski, Ireneusz; Teale, Andrew M; ?miga, Szymon; Bartlett, Rodney J

2011-09-21

5

Vortices in Atomic Wave Functions  

SciTech Connect

Vortices in atomic wave functions are shown to have observable consequences. It is shown that time-dependent electron wave functions in coordinate space go over to electron emission amplitudes in the limit that time becomes infinite. This relation between wave functions and emission amplitudes is called the imaging theorem. According to this theorem vortices in wave functions at small times when particles interact in a complex way appear as vortices in electron momentum distributions where they produce observable features. Conversely, some observable structures may be interpreted in terms of vortices no matter how they are seen or computed. We verify that previously unexplained features in (e,2e) triply differential cross sections can be interpreted in terms of vortices.

Macek, Joseph H [ORNL

2010-01-01

6

Analysis of superoscillatory wave functions  

Microsoft Academic Search

Surprisingly, differentiable functions are able to oscillate arbitrarily faster than their highest Fourier component would suggest. The phenomenon is called superoscillation. Recently, a practical method for calculating superoscillatory functions was presented and it was shown that superoscillatory quantum mechanical wave functions should exhibit a number of counter-intuitive physical effects. Following up on this work, we here present more general methods

Matt S. Calder; Achim Kempf

2005-01-01

7

Many-Electron Wave Functions  

Microsoft Academic Search

If it is possible to describe the state of an atom by the addition of several vectors, and if one assumes the wave function for any state of a configuration to be a linear combination of product functions for that configuration, then one can determine the coefficients in the linear combination by a simple method. Examples are given. The usual

James H. Bartlett

1931-01-01

8

Correlated electronic wave functions: Correlated and transcorrelated wave functions  

Microsoft Academic Search

The development of the transcorrelated Hamiltonian method (THM) by Boys and Handy seemed to imply that the determination of atomic and molecular wave functions and energies with full electronic correlation can be done with calculations which involve at worst only pseudo-six-dimensional integrals. We show that the THM equations of Boys and Handy are in fact only the first of a

M. W. C. Dharma-Wardana; François Grimaldi

1976-01-01

9

Expansion of Continuum Functions on Resonance Wave Functions and Amplitudes.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

To overcome difficulties encountered with wave functions of continuum spectrum (for example, in a shell model with continuum) the pole expansion (by the Mittag-Leffler theorem) of wave functions, scattering amplitudes and the Green functions with positive...

J. Bang F. A. Gareev M. H. Gizzatkulov S. A. Goncharov

1978-01-01

10

Meson wave function from holographic approaches  

SciTech Connect

We discuss the light-front wave function for the valence quark state of mesons using the AdS/CFT correspondence. We consider two kinds of wave functions obtained in different holographic Soft-Wall approaches.

Vega, Alfredo; Schmidt, Ivan [Departamento de Fisica y Centro de Estudios Subatomicos, Universidad Tecnica Federico Santa Maria, Casilla 110-V, Valparaiso (Chile); Branz, Tanja; Gutsche, Thomas; Lyubovitskij, Valery E. [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Universitaet Tuebingen, Kepler Center for Astro and Particle Physics, Auf der Morgenstelle 14, D-72076 Tuebingen (Germany)

2010-08-04

11

The destructive impact of the rogue waves  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In our talk rogue waves at the ocean will be considered. By means of numerical modeling dangerous impact of rogue waves on the ships and oil rigs is calculated. Cases when these waves can bring in accident are considered. Using statistics of emergence of waves (see [1]-[2]), it is possible to estimate risks in each case. These results can be used for safety of the ships and oil rigs from rogue waves. References [1] V.E. Zakharov, A.I. Dyachenko, R.V. Shamin. How probability for freak wave formation can be found // THE EUROPEAN PHYSICAL JOURNAL - SPECIAL TOPICS Volume 185, Number 1, 113-124, DOI: 10.1140/epjst/e2010-01242-y [2] V.E. Zakharov, R.V. Shamin. Statistics of rogue waves in computer experiments // JETP Letters, 2012, V. 96, Issue 1, pp 66-69.

Shamin, Roman

2013-04-01

12

Precanonical quantization and the Schrödinger wave functional  

Microsoft Academic Search

A relation between the Schrödinger wave functional and the Clifford-valued wave function which appears in what we call precanonical quantization of fields and fulfills a Dirac-like generalized covariant Schrödinger equation on the space of field and space-time variables is discussed. The Schrödinger wave functional is argued to be the trace of the positive frequency part of the continual product over

Igor V. Kanatchikov

2001-01-01

13

Meson wave function from holographic models  

SciTech Connect

We consider the light-front wave function for the valence quark state of mesons using the AdS/CFT correspondence, as has been suggested by Brodsky and Teramond. Two kinds of wave functions, obtained in different holographic Soft-Wall models, are discussed.

Vega, Alfredo; Schmidt, Ivan [Departamento de Fisica y Centro de Estudios Subatomicos, Universidad Tecnica Federico Santa Maria, Casilla 110-V, Valparaiso (Chile); Branz, Tanja; Gutsche, Thomas; Lyubovitskij, Valery E. [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Universitaet Tuebingen, Kepler Center for Astro and Particle Physics, Auf der Morgenstelle 14, D-72076 Tuebingen (Germany)

2009-09-01

14

Electron Wave Functions in Metallic Potassium  

Microsoft Academic Search

Wave functions to order k2 are presented for electrons in metallic potassium. The calculation is an application of the cellular method. The potential was derived from a self-consistent field and contains exchange effects.

Joseph Callaway

1960-01-01

15

Designing electron wave functions in assembled nanostructures  

Microsoft Academic Search

We use the scanning tunneling microscope to not only to map electron wave functions but also to engineer them. By assembling nanostructures from individual atoms and molecules, we confine two-dimensional electronic states into closed electron resonators, or \\

Christopher Ryan Moon

2009-01-01

16

Electronic Wave Functions for Polyatomic Molecules  

Microsoft Academic Search

A one-electron basis set made from functions with exponential and Gaussian radial dependence is proposed for constructing many-electron, many-center, electronic wave functions. Appropriate mixtures of these two types may greatly simplify the evaluation of many-center, two electron integrals and in addition make possible an improved description of the molecular bond. Plane waves may also be added to the basis set

Leland C. Allen

1959-01-01

17

The Wave Function and Quantum Reality  

SciTech Connect

We investigate the meaning of the wave function by analyzing the mass and charge density distributions of a quantum system. According to protective measurement, a charged quantum system has effective mass and charge density distributing in space, proportional to the square of the absolute value of its wave function. In a realistic interpretation, the wave function of a quantum system can be taken as a description of either a physical field or the ergodic motion of a particle. The essential difference between a field and the ergodic motion of a particle lies in the property of simultaneity; a field exists throughout space simultaneously, whereas the ergodic motion of a particle exists throughout space in a time-divided way. If the wave function is a physical field, then the mass and charge density will be distributed in space simultaneously for a charged quantum system, and thus there will exist gravitational and electrostatic self-interactions of its wave function. This not only violates the superposition principle of quantum mechanics but also contradicts experimental observations. Thus the wave function cannot be a description of a physical field but be a description of the ergodic motion of a particle. For the later there is only a localized particle with mass and charge at every instant, and thus there will not exist any self-interaction for the wave function. It is further argued that the classical ergodic models, which assume continuous motion of particles, cannot be consistent with quantum mechanics. Based on the negative result, we suggest that the wave function is a description of the quantum motion of particles, which is random and discontinuous in nature. On this interpretation, the square of the absolute value of the wave function not only gives the probability of the particle being found in certain locations, but also gives the probability of the particle being there. The suggested new interpretation of the wave function provides a natural realistic alternative to the orthodox interpretation, and it also implies that the de Broglie-Bohm theory and many-worlds interpretation are wrong and the dynamical collapse theories are in the right direction by admitting wavefunction collapse.

Gao Shan [Unit for History and Philosophy of Science and Centre for Time, SOPHI, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia)

2011-03-28

18

Functional methods for waves in random media  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Some basic ideas in functional methods for waves in random media are illustrated through a simple random differential equation. These methods are then generalized to solve certain random parabolic equations via an exponential representation given by the Feynman-Kac formula. It is shown that these functional methods are applicable to a number of problems in random wave propagation. They include the forward-scattering approximation in Gaussian white-noise media; the solution of the optical beam propagation problem by a phase-integral method; the high-frequency scattering by bounded random media; and a derivation of approximate moment equations from the functional integral representation.

Chow, P. L.

1981-01-01

19

Functional methods for waves in random media  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Some basic ideas in functional methods for waves in random media are illustrated through a simple random differential equation. These methods are then generalized to solve certain random parabolic equations via an exponential representation given by the Feynman-Kac formula. It is shown that these functional methods are applicable to a number of problems in random wave propagation. They include the forward-scattering approximation in Gaussian white-noise media; the solution of the optical beam propagation problem by a phase-integral method; the high-frequency scattering by bounded random media, and a derivation of approximate moment equations from the functional integral representation.

Chow, P. L.

1981-01-01

20

Pairing phase transitions in nuclear wave functions  

SciTech Connect

The exact solution of the nuclear shell model is used for studying the phase transition from superfluid to normal Fermi-liquid as a function of the pairing strength, excitation energy (or temperature), nuclear spin and the presence of other types of residual interactions. The phase transition in a finite system is seen through the change of properties of individual wave functions.

Horoi, Mihai [Department of Physics, Central Michigan University, Mount Pleasant, Michigan 48859 (United States); Zelevinsky, Vladimir [Department of Physics and Astronomy and National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824-1321 (United States)

2007-05-15

21

New microscopic wave function of ?-condensation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We explain how to treat a microscopic wave function of ?-condensation taking a 3 ?-nucleus as a typical example. The wave function has been originally proposed ten years before by Horiuchi, Röpke, Schuck and the present author (Phys. Rev. Lett., 2001, 87: 192501). The microscopic model, which fully takes into account the Pauli principle between all the constituent nucleons, effective internucleon forces and the Coulomb force, can play an important role in reproducing an ?-gas nature thanks to ?-condensation as an excited state of ?-like nuclei. An essential point of the wave function is to describe their ground state simultaneously. We study its typical features by giving an analytical formula of the norm kernel and the kernel concerning the one-body operator for 3 ?-condensation.

Tohsaki, Akihiro

2011-09-01

22

Spectroscopic measurement of an atomic wave function  

SciTech Connect

We present a simple spectroscopic method based on Autler-Townes spectroscopy to determine the center-of-mass atomic wave function. The detection of spontaneously emitted photons from a three-level atom, in which two upper levels are driven by a classical standing light, yields information about the position and momentum distribution of the atom [A. M. Herkommer, W. P. Schleich, and M. S. Zubairy, J. Mod. Opt. 44, 2507 (1997)]. In this paper, we show that both the amplitude and phase information of the center-of-mass atomic wave function can be obtained from these distributions after a series of conditional measurements on the atom and the emitted photon.

Kapale, Kishore T. [Institute for Quantum Studies, and Department of Physics, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843-4242 (United States); Qamar, Shahid [Institute for Quantum Studies, and Department of Physics, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843-4242 (United States); Department of Physics and Applied Mathematics, Pakistan Institute of Engineering and Applied Science, Nilore, Islamabad (Pakistan); Zubairy, M. Suhail [Institute for Quantum Studies, and Department of Physics, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843-4242 (United States); Department of Electronics, Quaid-i-Azam University, Islamabad (Pakistan)

2003-02-01

23

Process characterization with Monte Carlo wave functions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present an efficient method to simulate a quantum process subject to dissipation and noise. To describe the effect on any input state we evolve Monte Carlo wave functions for a principal and ancilla system, prepared initially in an entangled state. In analogy to experimental process tomography, the simulated propagator for the system density matrix is conveniently described by a process ? matrix - directly determined from the stochastic state vectors. Our method significantly reduces the computational complexity compared with standard theoretical characterization methods. It also delivers an upper bound on the trace distance between the ideal and simulated process based on the evolution of only a single wave function of the entangled system.

Gulliksen, J.; Rao, D. D. Bhaktavatsala; Mølmer, K.

2013-11-01

24

Semiclassical wave functions for open quantum billiards.  

PubMed

We present a semiclassical approximation to the scattering wave function ?(r,k) for an open quantum billiard, which is based on the reconstruction of the Feynman path integral. We demonstrate its remarkable numerical accuracy for the open rectangular billiard and show that the convergence of the semiclassical wave function to the full quantum state is controlled by the mean path length or equivalently the dwell time for a given scattering state. In the numerical implementation a cutoff length in the maximum path length or, equivalently, a maximum dwell time ?(max) included implies a finite energy resolution ?E~?(max)(-1). Possible applications include leaky billiards and systems with decoherence present. PMID:24032910

Lackner, Fabian; B?ezinová, Iva; Burgdörfer, Joachim; Libisch, Florian

2013-08-01

25

Semiclassical wave functions for open quantum billiards  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present a semiclassical approximation to the scattering wave function ?(r,k) for an open quantum billiard, which is based on the reconstruction of the Feynman path integral. We demonstrate its remarkable numerical accuracy for the open rectangular billiard and show that the convergence of the semiclassical wave function to the full quantum state is controlled by the mean path length or equivalently the dwell time for a given scattering state. In the numerical implementation a cutoff length in the maximum path length or, equivalently, a maximum dwell time ?max included implies a finite energy resolution ?E˜?max-1. Possible applications include leaky billiards and systems with decoherence present.

Lackner, Fabian; B?ezinová, Iva; Burgdörfer, Joachim; Libisch, Florian

2013-08-01

26

The influence of air and scale on wave impact pressures  

Microsoft Academic Search

Both laboratory and field tests that are described provide new information on the characteristics of wave impacts. Laboratory drop tests conducted using seawater and freshwater demonstrate that maximum impact pressures and rise times are influenced by both the level of aeration and the violence of the impact. A relationship is derived which enables the reduction in impact pressure caused by

G. N. Bullock; A. R. Crawford; P. J. Henson; M. J. A. Walkden; P. A. D. Bird

2001-01-01

27

Multifractal wave functions of simple quantum maps.  

PubMed

We study numerically multifractal properties of two models of one-dimensional quantum maps: a map with pseudointegrable dynamics and intermediate spectral statistics and a map with an Anderson-like transition recently implemented with cold atoms. Using extensive numerical simulations, we compute the multifractal exponents of quantum wave functions and study their properties, with the help of two different numerical methods used for classical multifractal systems (box-counting and wavelet methods). We compare the results of the two methods over a wide range of values. We show that the wave functions of the Anderson map display a multifractal behavior similar to eigenfunctions of the three-dimensional Anderson transition but of a weaker type. Wave functions of the intermediate map share some common properties with eigenfunctions at the Anderson transition (two sets of multifractal exponents, with similar asymptotic behavior), but other properties are markedly different (large linear regime for multifractal exponents even for strong multifractality, different distributions of moments of wave functions, and absence of symmetry of the exponents). Our results thus indicate that the intermediate map presents original properties, different from certain characteristics of the Anderson transition derived from the nonlinear sigma model. We also discuss the importance of finite-size effects. PMID:21230364

Martin, John; García-Mata, Ignacio; Giraud, Olivier; Georgeot, Bertrand

2010-10-01

28

Multifractal wave functions of simple quantum maps  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We study numerically multifractal properties of two models of one-dimensional quantum maps: a map with pseudointegrable dynamics and intermediate spectral statistics and a map with an Anderson-like transition recently implemented with cold atoms. Using extensive numerical simulations, we compute the multifractal exponents of quantum wave functions and study their properties, with the help of two different numerical methods used for classical multifractal systems (box-counting and wavelet methods). We compare the results of the two methods over a wide range of values. We show that the wave functions of the Anderson map display a multifractal behavior similar to eigenfunctions of the three-dimensional Anderson transition but of a weaker type. Wave functions of the intermediate map share some common properties with eigenfunctions at the Anderson transition (two sets of multifractal exponents, with similar asymptotic behavior), but other properties are markedly different (large linear regime for multifractal exponents even for strong multifractality, different distributions of moments of wave functions, and absence of symmetry of the exponents). Our results thus indicate that the intermediate map presents original properties, different from certain characteristics of the Anderson transition derived from the nonlinear sigma model. We also discuss the importance of finite-size effects.

Martin, John; García-Mata, Ignacio; Giraud, Olivier; Georgeot, Bertrand

2010-10-01

29

Impact detection using ultrasonic waves based on artificial immune system  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper presents a structural health monitoring system for judging structural condition of metallic plates by analyzing ultrasonic waves. Many critical accidents of structures like buildings and aircrafts are caused by small structural errors; cracks and loosened bolts etc. This is a reason why we need to detect little errors at an early stage. Moreover, to improve precision and to reduce cost for damage detection, it is necessary to build and update the database corresponding to environmental change. This study focuses our attention on the automatable structures, specifically, applying artificial immune system (AIS) algorithm to determine the structure safe or not. The AIS is a novelty computational detection algorithm inspired from biological defense system, which discriminates between self and non-self to reject nonself cells. Here, self is defined to be normal data patterns and non-self is abnormal data patterns. Furthermore, it is not only pattern recognition but also it has a storage function. In this study, a number of impact resistance experiments of duralumin plates, with normal structural condition and abnormal structural condition, are examined and ultrasonic waves are acquired by AE sensors on the surface of the aluminum plates. By accumulating several feature vectors of ultrasonic waves, a judging method, which can determine an abnormal wave as nonself, inspired from immune system is created. The results of the experiments show good performance of this method.

Okamoto, Keisuke; Mita, Akira

2009-03-01

30

Wave function microscopy of quasibound atomic states.  

PubMed

In the 1980s Demkov, Kondratovich, and Ostrovsky and Kondratovich and Ostrovsky proposed an experiment based on the projection of slow electrons emitted by a photoionized atom onto a position-sensitive detector. In the case of resonant excitation, they predicted that the spatial electron distribution on the detector should represent nothing else but a magnified image of the projection of a quasibound electronic state. By exciting lithium atoms in the presence of a static electric field, we present in this Letter the first experimental photoionization wave function microscopy images where signatures of quasibound states are evident. Characteristic resonant features, such as (i) the abrupt change of the number of wave function nodes across a resonance and (ii) the broadening of the outer ring of the image (associated with tunneling ionization), are observed and interpreted via wave packet propagation simulations and recently proposed resonance tunneling mechanisms. The electron spatial distribution measured by our microscope is a direct macroscopic image of the projection of the microscopic squared modulus of the electron wave that is quasibound to the atom and constitutes the first experimental realization of the experiment proposed 30 years ago. PMID:23683194

Cohen, S; Harb, M M; Ollagnier, A; Robicheaux, F; Vrakking, M J J; Barillot, T; Lépine, F; Bordas, C

2013-05-01

31

Wave Function Microscopy of Quasibound Atomic States  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In the 1980s Demkov, Kondratovich, and Ostrovsky and Kondratovich and Ostrovsky proposed an experiment based on the projection of slow electrons emitted by a photoionized atom onto a position-sensitive detector. In the case of resonant excitation, they predicted that the spatial electron distribution on the detector should represent nothing else but a magnified image of the projection of a quasibound electronic state. By exciting lithium atoms in the presence of a static electric field, we present in this Letter the first experimental photoionization wave function microscopy images where signatures of quasibound states are evident. Characteristic resonant features, such as (i) the abrupt change of the number of wave function nodes across a resonance and (ii) the broadening of the outer ring of the image (associated with tunneling ionization), are observed and interpreted via wave packet propagation simulations and recently proposed resonance tunneling mechanisms. The electron spatial distribution measured by our microscope is a direct macroscopic image of the projection of the microscopic squared modulus of the electron wave that is quasibound to the atom and constitutes the first experimental realization of the experiment proposed 30 years ago.

Cohen, S.; Harb, M. M.; Ollagnier, A.; Robicheaux, F.; Vrakking, M. J. J.; Barillot, T.; Lépine, F.; Bordas, C.

2013-05-01

32

Impact of a systolic parameter, defined as the ratio of right brachial pre-ejection period to ejection time, on the relationship between brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity and left ventricular diastolic function  

Microsoft Academic Search

Arterial stiffness is correlated with left ventricular (LV) diastolic function as well as susceptibility to LV systolic function. Therefore, if LV systolic function is not known, the relationship between arterial stiffness and LV diastolic function is difficult to determine. A total of 260 patients were included in the study. The brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV) and the ratio of right

Po-Chao Hsu; Tsung-Hsien Lin; Chee-Siong Lee; Chun-Yuan Chu; Ho-Ming Su; Wen-Chol Voon; Wen-Ter Lai; Sheng-Hsiung Sheu; H-M Su

2011-01-01

33

Microscopic Wave Function of Alpha Condensation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We explain how to treat a microscopic wave function of ?-condensation named THSR taking 3?-condensation as a typical example. The microscopic model, which fully takes into account the Pauli principle between all the constituent nucleons and effective inter-nucleon forces simultaneously, can play an important role in reproducing an ?-gas-like nature thanks to ?-condensation. We study its typical features by giving numerical results of the norm kernel for 3?-condensation.

Tohsaki, Akihiro; Funaki, Yasuro; Horiuchi, Hisashi; Röpke, Gerd; Schuck, Peter; Yamada, Taiichi

34

Impact Induced Surface Wave Propagation In Concrete Massif  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Experimental inspection of large concrete massifs was carried out. The concrete massif was excited by the light impact of metallic road, falling from the height 50 cm. The most energy (60-70)% from that impact goes for surface wave excitation in concrete. They are vertical polarized Relay waves, propagating in concrete, deeps till (0, 5 - 0, 7) ?, where ? is wave length of excited oscillations. Wave frequencies from the impact source in object under research are 2-4 kHz; they are frequencies of acoustic emission (AE) of moving metal about grainy surface. The mechanism of low-frequency acoustic emission in grainy materials is known as f = V/d, (V velocity of displacement [m/s] divide to length of displacement, [m]. In granular materials the diameter of grain is the determine length of displacement, That is simple, convenient nondestructive method for Relay wave excitation for inspection and monitoring of large surfaces of granular materials. Propagation of shock-induced surface wave for the distance of 50 m is observed. The velocity of propagation of vertically polarized Raleigh waves reflects the fractures inside the concrete body-the smaller is the wave velocity, the higher is the crack concentration. It speaks nonlinearity of surface wave propagation. Assessment of surface wave propagation velocity V and Q-factor sensitivity to structural changes is made. Q-Factor sensitivity is higher and applicability wider than that for surface waves.

Vilchinska, Nora A.

2008-06-01

35

Wave function methods for fractional electrons.  

PubMed

Determining accurate chemical potentials is of considerable interest in various chemical and physical contexts: from small molecular charge-transfer complexes to bandgap in bulk materials such as semi-conductors. Chemical potentials are typically evaluated either by density functional theory, or, alternatively, by computationally more intensive Greens function based GW computations. To calculate chemical potentials, the ground state energy needs to be defined for fractional charges. We thus explore an extension of wave function theories to fractional charges, and investigate the ionization potential and electron affinity as the derivatives of the energy with respect to the electron number. The ultimate aim is to access the chemical potential of correlated wave function methods without the need of explicitly changing the numbers of electrons, making the approach readily applicable to bulk materials. We find that even though second order perturbation theory reduces the fractional charge error considerably compared to Hartree-Fock and standard density functionals, higher order perturbation theory is more accurate and coupled-cluster approaches are even more robust, provided the electrons are bound at the Hartree-Fock level. The success of post-HF approaches to improve over HF relies on two equally important aspects: the integer values are more accurate and the Coulomb correlation between the fractionally occupied orbital and all others improves the straight line behavior significantly as identified by a correction to Hartree-Fock. Our description of fractional electrons is also applicable to fractional spins, illustrating the ability of coupled-cluster singles and doubles to deal with two degenerate fractionally occupied orbitals, but its inadequacy for three and more fractional spins, which occur, for instance, for spherical atoms and when dissociating double bonds. Our approach explores the realm of typical wave function methods that are applied mostly in molecular chemistry, but become available to the solid state community and offer the advantage of an integrated approach: fundamental gap, relative energies, and optimal geometries can be obtained at the same level. PMID:23968072

Steinmann, Stephan N; Yang, Weitao

2013-08-21

36

Impact of shear and curvature on surface gravity wave stress  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

It has been shown that surface gravity wave stress is sensitive to the low level wind profile shape. The simplest way of incorporating those effects in a theoretical model has been recently proposed, using a second order WKB approach, which leads to closed analytical formulae for the surface stress as a function of stability, low level wind and its two first derivatives (shear and curvature). In the present study, we assess the impact of those calculations on global scale gravity wave stress and the corresponding torque, using 6-hourly data from ERA-40 reanalysis, at full resolution. While the theory shows that linear wind shear leads to a reduced stress and curvature may lead to stress enhancement, the present results indicate that the latter effect is dominant. However, when one looks for regionally integrated stress fields for the large mountain ranges, where cancellation effects take place thorough time and space integration, the overall effect is one of drag enhancement in regions of dominant easterly flow, namely Antarctica and East Africa, leading to a slight reduction of the global westerly torque due to mountain waves. Drag enhancement due to wind profile curvature seems to be an important effect in Antarctic flow, where it accounts for a 50% increase in the mean regional torque, with implied consequences for the dynamics of the polar vortex.

Miranda, P. M. A.; Martins, J. P. A.; Teixeira, M. A. C.

2009-09-01

37

Nonlinear surface wave impact on the bottom  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The problem to compute the bottom pressure under the nonlinear water waves is studying. Jut now in oceanographic practice, the linear theory of water waves is the most popular in determining the relation between bottom pressure and sea surface. However the linear theory is not entirely correct to analyze strongly wave nonlinear processes. Such processes are for example, storm surge, and abnormally large wave or freak waves. Here numerical solutions of the fully nonlinear equations of motion of an ideal fluid in conformal variables is presented. The comparative evaluation of deficiencies in the linear theory calculating fluid pressure induced by surface waves is analysed. The exact formula for the calculation of the pressure in fluid using a conformal representation of the Euler equation is derived. It is shown the linear theory may underestimate the bottom pressure induced by strongly nonlinear surface waves (ka = 0.08, where k - wave number, a - wave amplitude), more than 17% in a shallow basin (kh = 0.58, where h - depth).

Kuznetsov, Konstantin; Shamin, Roman; Pelinovsky, Efim

2014-05-01

38

Propagation of detonation waves from an impact region  

Microsoft Academic Search

An experimental system was developed to study the propagation of a detonation wave away from a region that is initiated by the impact of a thin flyer plate. The propagation of detonation waves away from this region in pressed pellets of TATB and in RX-26-AF, a TATB\\/HMX formulation is studied. The system permits measurements at elevated, ambient, and low temperatures.

R. S. Lee; W. C. Tao; L. D. Crouch

1989-01-01

39

Wave energy converters and their impact on power systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

The objective of this paper is to give an introduction into ocean wave energy converters and their impact on power systems. The potential of wave energy is very large. There are a lot of different methods and systems for converting this power into electrical power, such as oscillating water columns, hinged contour devices as the Pelamis, overtopping devices as the

Henk Polinder; Mattia Scuotto

2005-01-01

40

Extreme waves impact on the ship mooring near berth  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Ensuring safe ships berthing and loading-unloading operations at berths need reliable mooring systems. The choice of its parameters corresponds to calculating of the maximum displacements of the boat, which are caused by external impact of extreme waves, winds, and currents. Ship motions are described by system of differential equations, which contain disturbing, inertia, damping, and restoring forces, which magnitude strongly depends on the berth design and configuration of its elements. The major impact on the boat movements is caused by sea waves. In the given paper, an interaction between sea waves and ship located near the berth is studied. The cross-sectional shape of the boat is assumed to be rectangular and under-berth slope profile is approximated by finite number of steps. Different types of berth constructions are taken into account: containing impermeable or partially permeable front vertical wall, wave attenuation camera behind it with or without under-berth slope. The fluid is assumed ideal and incompressible, and its motion is potential. The stated problem is reduced to the determination of the velocity potential that satisfies the Laplace equation; the boundary condition on the free surface; the condition of non-flux through the impermeable bottom, the ship and berth elements; the condition on the surface of the permeable wall that is in proportionality between the wave flow velocity through the wall and pressure drop from its front to back faces. The problem is solved by dividing of the region into sub-domains with conditions of the hydrodynamic pressure and velocity continuity on its boundaries. In each sub-domain the solution is found using Fourier method in the form of functional series with unknown coefficients which are found from the system of linear algebraic equations. Calculated velocity potentials are used to determine different hydrodynamic characteristics of ship motions, such as horizontal and vertical components of disturbing force and moment, added masses and damping coefficients for all types of boat motions. The results of calculations are presented and they are compared with experimental data performed by authors.

Leont'ev, Victor; Nudner, Igor; Semenov, Konstantin; Pelinovsky, Efim

2013-04-01

41

Applications of elliptic functions to ion-acoustic plasma waves  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

New several classes of exact solutions are obtained in terms of the Weierstrass elliptic function for some nonlinear partial differential equations modeling ion-acoustic waves as well as dusty plasmas in laboratory and space sciences. The Weierstrass elliptic function solutions of the Schamel equation, a fifth order dispersive wave equation and the Kawahara equation are constructed. Moreover, Jacobi elliptic function solutions and solitary wave solutions of the Schamel equation are also given. The stability of some periodic wave solutions is computationally studied.

Khater, A. H.; Hassan, M. M.; Krishnan, E. V.; Peng, Y. Z.

2008-12-01

42

The Projector Augmented Wave Method: ab-initio molecular dynamics with full wave functions  

Microsoft Academic Search

A brief introduction to the projector augmented wave method is given and recent developments are reviewed. The projector augmented wave method is an all-electron method for efficient ab-initio molecular dynamics simulations with the full wave functions. It extends and combines the traditions of existing augmented wave methods and the pseudopotential approach. Without sacrificing efficiency, the PAW method avoids transferability problems

Peter E. Blöchl; Clemens J. Först; Johannes Schimpl

2002-01-01

43

Guided ultrasonic waves for impact damage detection in composite panels  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Carbon fiber laminate composites, consisting of layers of polymer matrix reinforced with high strength carbon fibers, are increasingly employed for aerospace structures. They offer advantages for aerospace applications, e.g., good strength to weight ratio. However, impact during the operation and servicing of the aircraft can lead to barely visible and difficult to detect damage. Depending on the severity of the impact, fiber and matrix breakage or delaminations can occur, reducing the load carrying capacity of the structure. Efficient structural health monitoring of composite panels can be achieved using guided ultrasonic waves propagating along the structure. Impact damage was induced in the composite panels using standard drop weight procedures. The guided wave scattering at the impact damage was measured using a noncontact laser interferometer, quantified, and compared to baseline measurements on undamaged composite panels. Significant scattering of the first anti-symmetrical (A0) guided wave mode was observed, allowing for the detection of barely visible impact damage. The guided wave scattering was modeled using full three-dimensional Finite Element (FE) simulations, and the influence of the different damage mechanisms investigated. Good agreement between experiments and predictions was found. The sensitivity of guided waves for the detection of barely visible impact damage in composite panels has been verified.

Murat, B. I. S.; Khalili, P.; Fromme, P.

2014-03-01

44

Analysis of the impacts of Wave Energy Converter arrays on the nearshore wave climate in the Pacific Northwest  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

As concerns over the use of fossil fuels increase, more and more effort is being put into the search for renewable and reliable sources of energy. Developments in ocean technologies have made the extraction of wave energy a promising alternative. Commercial exploitation of wave energy would require the deployment of arrays of Wave Energy Converters (WECs) that include several to hundreds of individual devices. Interactions between WECs and ocean waves result in both near-field and far-field changes in the incident wave field, including a significant decrease in wave height and a redirection of waves in the lee of the array, referred to as the wave shadow. Nearshore wave height and direction are directly related to the wave radiation stresses that drive longshore currents, rip currents and nearshore sediment transport, which suggests that significant far-field changes in the wave field due to WEC arrays could have an impact on littoral processes. The goal of this study is to investigate the changes in nearshore wave conditions and radiation stress forcing as a result of an offshore array of point-absorber type WECs using a nested SWAN model, and to determine how array size, configuration, spacing and distance from shore influence these changes. The two sites of interest are the Northwest National Marine Renewable Energy Center (NNMREC) test sites off the coast of Newport Oregon, the North Energy Test Site (NETS) and the South Energy Test Site (SETS). NETS and SETS are permitted wave energy test sites located approximately 4 km and 10 km offshore, respectively. Twenty array configurations are simulated, including 5, 10, 25, 50 and 100 devices in two and three staggered rows in both closely spaced (three times the WEC diameter) and widely spaced (ten times the WEC diameter) arrays. Daily offshore wave spectra are obtained from a regional WAVEWATCH III hindcast for 2011, which are then propagated across the continental shelf using SWAN. Arrays are represented in SWAN through the external modification of the wave spectra at the device locations, based on a new experimentally determined Power Transfer Function established in an earlier WEC-array laboratory study. Changes in nearshore forcing conditions for each array size and configuration are compared in order to determine the scale of the far-field effects of WEC arrays and which array sizes and configurations could have the most significant impacts on coastal processes.

O'Dea, A.; Haller, M. C.

2013-12-01

45

Adiabatic corrections to density functional theory energies and wave functions.  

PubMed

The adiabatic finite-nuclear-mass-correction (FNMC) to the electronic energies and wave functions of atoms and molecules is formulated for density-functional theory and implemented in the deMon code. The approach is tested for a series of local and gradient corrected density functionals, using MP2 results and diagonal-Born-Oppenheimer corrections from the literature for comparison. In the evaluation of absolute energy corrections of nonorganic molecules the LDA PZ81 functional works surprisingly better than the others. For organic molecules the GGA BLYP functional has the best performance. FNMC with GGA functionals, mainly BLYP, show a good performance in the evaluation of relative corrections, except for nonorganic molecules containing H atoms. The PW86 functional stands out with the best evaluation of the barrier of linearity of H2O and the isotopic dipole moment of HDO. In general, DFT functionals display an accuracy superior than the common belief and because the corrections are based on a change of the electronic kinetic energy they are here ranked in a new appropriate way. The approach is applied to obtain the adiabatic correction for full atomization of alcanes C(n)H(2n+2), n = 4-10. The barrier of 1 mHartree is approached for adiabatic corrections, justifying its insertion into DFT. PMID:18537228

Mohallem, José R; Coura, Thiago de O; Diniz, Leonardo G; de Castro, Gustavo; Assafrão, Denise; Heine, Thomas

2008-09-25

46

Wave propagation in a plate after impact by a projectile  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The wave propagation in a circular plate after impact by a cylindrical projectile is studied. In the vicinity of impact, the pressure is computed numerically. An intense pressure pulse is generated that peaks 0.2 microns after impact, then drops sharply to a plateau. The response of the plate is determined adopting a modal solution of Mindlin's equations. Velocity and acceleration histories display both propagating and dispersive features.

El-Raheb, M.; Wagner, P.

1987-01-01

47

Impact of Functionally Graded Cylinders: Theory  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This final report summarizes the work funded under the Grant NAG3-2411 during the 04/05/2000-04/04/2001 period. The objective of this one-year project was to generalize the theoretical framework of the two-dimensional higher-order theory for the analysis of cylindrical functionally graded materials/structural components employed in advanced aircraft engines developed under past NASA Glenn funding. The completed generalization significantly broadens the theory's range of applicability through the incorporation of dynamic impact loading capability into its framework. Thus, it makes possible the assessment of the effect of damage due to fuel impurities, or the presence of submicron-level debris, on the life of functionally graded structural components. Applications involving advanced turbine blades and structural components for the reusable-launch vehicle (RLV) currently under development will benefit from the completed work. The theory's predictive capability is demonstrated through a numerical simulation of a one-dimensional wave propagation set up by an impulse load in a layered half-plane. Full benefit of the completed generalization of the higher-order theory described in this report will be realized upon the development of a related computer code.

Aboudi, Jacob; Pindera, Marek-Jerzy; Arnold, S. M. (Technical Monitor)

2001-01-01

48

An exponential multireference wave-function Ansatz  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

An exponential multireference wave-function Ansatz is formulated. In accordance with the state universal coupled-cluster Ansatz of Jeziorski and Monkhorst [Phys. Rev. A 24, 1668 (1981)] the approach uses a reference specific cluster operator. In order to achieve state selectiveness the excitation- and reference-related amplitude indexing of the state universal Ansatz is replaced by an indexing which is based on excited determinants. There is no reference determinant playing a particular role. The approach is size consistent, coincides with traditional single-reference coupled cluster if applied to a single-reference, and converges to full configuration interaction with an increasing cluster operator excitation level. Initial applications on BeH2, CH2, Li2, and nH2 are reported.

Hanrath, Michael

2005-08-01

49

Exact microscopic wave function for a topological quantum membrane.  

PubMed

The higher dimensional quantum Hall liquid constructed recently supports stable topological membrane excitations. Here we introduce a microscopic interacting Hamiltonian and present its exact ground state wave function. We show that this microscopic ground state wave function describes a topological quantum membrane. We also construct variational wave functions for excited states using the noncommutative algebra on the four sphere. Our approach introduces a nonperturbative method to quantize topological membranes. PMID:12785968

Zhang, Shou-Cheng

2003-05-16

50

Asymptotic behavior of atomic and molecular wave functions  

PubMed Central

The asymptotic form of bound-state wave functions is derived by analytic continuation of asymptotic scattering-state wave functions. The result is also regorously derived by using an approach that is independent of scattering theory. One aspect of the result is that the N electron wave function becomes the lowest accessible exact wave function for the remaining N — 1 electrons when one electron is far away from all the nuclei. This shows that the recently developed extended Koopmans' procedures are in principle exact for the first ionization energy.

Katriel, J.; Davidson, E. R.

1980-01-01

51

Holographic Wave Functions, Meromorphization and Counting Rules  

SciTech Connect

We study the large-Q{sup 2} behavior of the meson form factor F{sub M} (Q{sup 2}) constructed using the holographic light-front wave functions proposed recently by Brodsky and de Teramond. We show that this model can be also obtained within the Migdal's regularization approach (''meromorphization''), if one applies it to 3-point function for scalar currents made of scalar quarks. We found that the asymptotic 1/Q{sup 2} behavior of F{sub M} (Q{sup 2}) is generated by soft Feynman mechanism rather than by short distance dynamics, which causes very late onset of the 1/Q{sup 2} asymptotic behavior. It becomes visible only for unaccessible momenta Q{sup 2} {approx}> 10, GeV{sup 2}. Using meromorphization for spin-1/2 quarks, we demonstrated that resulting form factor F{sup spinor}{sub M} (Q{sup 2}) has 1/Q{sup 4} asymptotic behavior. Now, owing to the late onset of this asymptotic pattern, F{sup spinor}{sub M} (Q{sup 2}) imitates the 1/Q{sup 2} behavior in the few GeV{sup 2} region.

Anatoly Radyushkin

2006-05-10

52

Shock Waves Impacting Composite Material Plates: The Mutual Interaction  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

High-performance, fiber-reinforced polymer composites have been extensively used in structural applications in the last 30 years because of their light weight combined with high specific stiffness and strength at a rather low cost. The automotive industry has adopted these materials in new designs of lightweight vehicles. The mechanical response and characterization of such materials under transient dynamic loading caused with shock impact induced by blast is not well understood. Air blast is associated with a fast traveling shock front with high pressure across followed by a decrease in pressure behind due to expansion waves. The time scales associated with the shock front are typically 103 faster than those involved in the expansion waves. Impingement of blast waves on structures can cause a reflection of the wave off the surface of the structure followed by a substantial transient aerodynamic load, which can cause significant deformation and damage of the structure. These can alter the overpressure, which is built behind the reflected shock. In addition, a complex aeroelastic interaction between the blast wave and the structure develops that can induce reverberation within an enclosure, which can cause substantial overpressure through multiple reflections of the wave. Numerical simulations of such interactions are quite challenging. They usually require coupled solvers for the flow and the structure. The present contribution provides a physics-based analysis of the phenomena involved, a critical review of existing computational techniques together with some recent results involving face-on impact of shock waves on thin composite plates.

Andreopoulos, Yiannis

2013-02-01

53

Antipodal focusing of seismic waves after larger meteorite impacts  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We examine focusing of seismic waves at the antipode of large terrestrial meteorite impacts, using the Chicxulub impact as our case study. Numerical simulations are based on a spectral-element method, representing the impact as a Gaussian force in time and space. Simulating the impact as a point source at the surface of a spherically symmetric Earth model results in deceptively large peak displacements at the antipode. Earth's ellipticity, lateral heterogeneity and a spatially distributed source limit high-frequency waves from constructively interfering at the antipode, thereby reducing peak displacement by a factor of four. Nevertheless, for plausible impact parameters, we observe peak antipodal displacements of ˜ 4~m, dynamic stresses in excess of 15~bar, and strains of 2 ± 10-5 . While these values are significantly lower than prior estimates, mainly based on a point source in a spherically symmetric Earth model, wave interference en route to the antipode induces ``channels'' of peak stress that are 5~times greater than in surrounding areas. Underneath the antipode we observed ``chimneys'' of peak stress, strain and velocity, with peak values exceeding 50~bar, 10-5 and 0.1~m/s, respectively. Our results put quantitative constraints on the feasibility of impact-induced antipodal volcanism and seismicity, as well as mantle plume and hotspot formation.

Meschede, M.

2011-12-01

54

Projector augmented wave method: ab initio molecular dynamics with full wave functions  

Microsoft Academic Search

A brief introduction to the projector augmented wave method is given and recent developments are reviewed. The projector augmented\\u000a wave method is an all-electron method for efficient ab initio molecular dynamics simulations with full wave functions. It\\u000a extends and combines the traditions of existing augmented wave methods and the pseudopotential approach. Without sacrificing\\u000a efficiency, the PAW method avoids transferability problems

Peter E. Blöchl; Clemens J. Först; Johannes Schimpl

2003-01-01

55

The Projector Augmented Wave Method: ab-initio molecular dynamics with full wave functions  

Microsoft Academic Search

A brief introduction to the projector augmented wave method is given and\\u000arecent developments are reviewed. The projector augmented wave method is an\\u000aall-electron method for efficient ab-initio molecular dynamics simulations with\\u000athe full wave functions. It extends and combines the traditions of existing\\u000aaugmented wave methods and the pseudopotential approach. Without sacrificing\\u000aefficiency, the PAW method avoids transferability problems

Peter E. Blöchl; Clemens J. Först; Johannes Schimpl

2002-01-01

56

Transient wave propagation in composite plates due to impact  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Stress-wave propagation in a composite plate due to an impact has been examined using anisotropic elasticity theory. The plate is modelled as a number of identical anisotropic layers whose elastic moduli are given. Mindlin's (1959) approximate theory of plates is then applied to each layer to obtain a set of difference-differential equations of motion by using the interlaminar stresses and displacements as explicit variables. Dispersion relationships for harmonic waves are found when traction-free boundary conditions are applied to both surfaces of the plate. The difference-differential equations are reduced to difference equations via integral transforms. With given impact boundary conditions these equations are solved for an arbitrary number of layers in the plate, and the transient propagation of a stress wave is calculated by means of a fast Fourier transform algorithm.

Sung Kim, B.; Moon, F.

1977-01-01

57

Breaking wave impact forces on truss support structures for offshore wind turbines  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Due to depletion of the conventional energy sources, wind energy is becoming more popular these days. Wind energy is being produced mostly from onshore farms, but there is a clear tendency to transfer wind farms to the sea. The foundations of offshore wind turbines may be truss structures and might be located in shallow water, where are subjected to highly varying hydrodynamic loads, particularly from plunging breaking waves. There are models for impact forces prediction on monopiles. Typically the total wave force on slender pile from breaking waves is a superposition of slowly varying quasi-static force, calculated from the Morison equation and additional dynamical, short duration force due to the impact of the breaker front or breaker tongue. There is not much research done on the truss structures of wind turbines and there are still uncertainties on slamming wave forces, due to plunging breaking waves on those structures. Within the WaveSlam (Wave slamming forces on truss structures in shallow water) project the large scale tests were carried out in 2013 at the Large Wave Flume in Forschungszentrum Küste (FZK) in Hannover, Germany. The following institutions participated in this initiative: the University of Stavanger and the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (project management), University of Gda?sk, Poland, Hamburg University of Technology and the University of Rostock, Germany and Reinertsen AS, Norway. This work was supported by the EU 7th Framework Programme through the grant to the budget of the Integrating Activity HYDRALAB IV. The main aim of the experiment was to investigate the wave slamming forces on truss structures, development of new and improvement of existing methods to calculate forces from the plunging breakers. The majority of the measurements were carried out for regular waves with specified frequencies and wave heights as well as for the irregular waves based on JONSWAP spectrum. The truss structure was equipped with both total and local force transducers which measured the response of the structure to the impact force. Also, the free surface elevations, the water particle velocity and the water particle acceleration were recorded during the WaveSlam experiment. Both the total and the local force data have been analysed using the Frequency Response Function method, which has been already applied to the estimation of the wave slamming forces. The results of this classical approach were compared to the calculated slamming forces based on Goda and Wienke and Oumeraci theories. Slamming wave forces and slamming coefficients calculated using both models appeared to be very much larger than those obtained from the analysed recorded data, therefore there is a need for further research. Details of this research and modelling results will be presented in the final poster.

Cie?likiewicz, Witold; Gudmestad, Ove T.; Podra?ka, Olga

2014-05-01

58

Electronic Wave Functions Round a Vacancy in a Metal  

Microsoft Academic Search

A calculation of the wave functions round a vacancy in a metal has been carried out for a simple model. This corresponds to the case of a finite number of particles in a free-electron metal, with the boundary condition that the wave functions vanish on the surface of the spherical metal. Calculations are reported for particle numbers of approximately 2

N. H. March; A. M. Murray

1960-01-01

59

Interaction of an elastic cylindrical inclusion and a crack in half space impacted by SH-wave  

Microsoft Academic Search

Scattering of SH wave by an elastic half space containing an elastic cylindrical inclusion and a crack of any position and direction is studied by means of Green's function, complex function and multi-polar coordinate system. A suitable Green's function is constructed, which is the fundamental solution of the displacement field for a half space with an elastic cylindrical inclusion impacted

Zai-lin Yang; Pei-lei Yan; Bai-tao Sun

2009-01-01

60

Calculation of electronic excitations using wave-function in wave-function frozen-density embedding  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Recently, a general framework suitable for general frozen-density embedding (FDE) methods was published [S. Höfener, A. S. P. Gomes, and L. Visscher, J. Chem. Phys. 136, 044104 (2012)]. In the present article, we report the fragmentation of a supermolecule while treating all subsystems with coupled-cluster theory and the interaction of the subsystems with density-functional theory. This variant is denoted wave-function theory in wave-function theory FDE, or coupled-cluster theory in coupled-cluster theory FDE. Main target of this approach is not the embedding of a single molecule in large solvation shells, but rather the possibility to divide a complex system consisting of several molecules when all subsystems are to be treated with, e.g., coupled-cluster methods to provide a balanced and unbiased description. We present numerical results for hydrogen-bonded complexes which exhibit rather strong interactions. Cases with weakly interacting subsystems are expected to exhibit even higher accuracy. This facilitates the study of properties of larger complexes such as DNA base pairs with coupled-cluster methods.

Höfener, Sebastian; Visscher, Lucas

2012-11-01

61

Propagation of detonation waves from an impact region  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

An experimental system was developed to study the propagation of a detonation wave away from a region that is initiated by the impact of a thin flyer plate. The propagation of detonation waves away from this region in pressed pellets of TATB and in RX-26-AF, a TATB/HMX formulation is studied. The system permits measurements at elevated, ambient, and low temperatures. The the distance-time trajectory and arrival time of the detonation front at the downstream face of the explosive pellets is measured for pellets with thicknesses of 1 to 16 mm over the temperature range -80 to +80 C.

Lee, R. S.; Tao, W. C.; Crouch, L. D.

62

Green's functions for gravitational waves in FRW spacetimes  

SciTech Connect

A method for calculating the retarded Green's function for the gravitational wave equation in Friedmann-Robertson-Walker spacetimes within the formalism of linearized Einstein gravity is developed. Hadamard's general solution to Cauchy's problem for second-order, linear partial differential equations is applied to the FRW gravitational wave equation. The retarded Green's function may be calculated for any FRW spacetime, with curved or flat spatial sections, for which the functional form of the Ricci scalar curvature [ital R] is known. The retarded Green's function for gravitational waves propagating through a cosmological fluid composed of both radiation and dust is calculated analytically for the first time. It is also shown that for all FRW spacetimes in which the Ricci scalar curvature does not vanish, [ital R][ne]0, the Green's function violates Huygens' principle; the Green's function has support inside the light cone due to the scattering of gravitational waves off the background curvature.

Caldwell, R.R. (NASA/Fermilab Astrophysics Center, Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, P.O. Box 500, Batavia, Illinois 60510-0500 (United States))

1993-11-15

63

Symmetry-projected wave functions in quantum Monte Carlo calculations  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We consider symmetry-projected Hartree-Fock trial wave functions in constrained-path Monte Carlo (CPMC) calculations. Previous CPMC calculations have mostly employed Hartree-Fock (HF) trial wave functions, restricted or unrestricted. The symmetry-projected HF approach results in a hierarchy of wave functions with increasing quality: the more symmetries that are broken and restored in a self-consistent manner, the higher the quality of the trial wave function. This hierarchy is approximately maintained in CPMC calculations: the accuracy in the energy increases and the statistical variance decreases when further symmetries are broken and restored. Significant improvement is achieved in CPMC with the best symmetry-projected trial wave functions over those from simple HF. We analyze and quantify the behavior using the two-dimensional repulsive Hubbard model as an example. In the sign-problem-free region, where CPMC can be made exact but a constraint is deliberately imposed here, spin-projected wave functions remove the constraint bias. Away from half filling, spatial symmetry restoration in addition to that of the spin leads to highly accurate results from CPMC. Since the computational cost of symmetry-projected HF trial wave functions in CPMC can be made to scale algebraically with system size, this provides a potentially general approach for accurate calculations in many-fermion systems.

Shi, Hao; Jiménez-Hoyos, Carlos A.; Rodríguez-Guzmán, R.; Scuseria, Gustavo E.; Zhang, Shiwei

2014-03-01

64

Common generating function for two-dimensional hydrogen atom complete wave functions  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Schrödinger equation for the two-dimensional hydrogen atom is known to be separable and integrable in circular, parabolic, and elliptical coordinates. This makes it possible to construct a common generating function for the complete wave functions of the atom in the respective coordinates. The connections with the corresponding generating function and wave functions for the harmonic oscillator are recognized and

L. Chaos-Cador; E. Ley-Koo

2007-01-01

65

Probing [alpha]-particle wave functions using ([ital [rvec d  

SciTech Connect

Wave functions of the [alpha] particle corresponding to different [ital S]- and [ital D]-state deuteron-deuteron overlaps, [l angle][ital dd][vert bar][alpha][r angle], were investigated using exact finite-range distorted-wave Born-approximation (DWBA) analyses of ([ital [rvec d

Crosson, E.R.; Lemieux, S.K.; Ludwig, E.J.; Thompson, W.J. (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599-3255 (United States) Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, Durham, North Carolina 27706 (United States)); Bisenberger, M.; Hertenberger, R.; Hofer, D.; Kader, H.; Schiemenz, P.; Graw, G. (Sektion Physik, Universitaet Muenchen, 8046 Garching (Germany)); Eiro, A.M.; Santos, F.D. (Departamento de Fisica, Universidade de Lisboa, 1700 Lisboa (Portugal))

1993-06-01

66

Properties of wave functions in homogeneous anisotropic media  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The general solutions of the first, second, third, and fourth kinds to the wave equation in homogeneous anisotropic media are expressed by integrals over a finite range. The convergence of the series solution of wave functions in homogeneous anisotropic media [Phys. Rev. E 47, 664 (1993)] is discussed. The use of the wave functions in anisotropic media is demonstrated. The theory is expounded via an illustrative example of a two-dimensional scalar case. The analytical solution of plane-wave scattering by a conducting circular cylinder coated with anisotropic materials is formulated in terms of the series of wave functions for anisotropic media. Numerical results show that the solution in terms of wave functions of various kinds in anisotropic media gives essentially the same radar cross sections as obtained by Beker, Umashankar, and Taflove [Electromagnetics 10, 387 (1990)] using a different approach. Numerical results in the resonance region are presented for reference purposes. The analysis of this paper can be easily generalized to vector and tensor wave functions in homogeneous anisotropic media.

Ren, Wei; Wu, Xin Bao; Yi, Zhang; Lin, Wei Gan

1995-01-01

67

Impact of internal waves on the coherent underwater acoustic communication  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The 2001 Asian Sea International Experiment (ASIAEX2001) is a large-scale survey performed in the South China Sea. During May 2001 several minutes of M-sequence phase modulation signals were transmitted by a 400-Hz source repeatedly at intervals of half an hour, and received by an array 31 km away to conduct tomography of internal waves. The signal was treated as a binary-phase shift-keying (BPSK) communication signal with an information rate of 100 bps. The communication signals were demodulated by a decision-feedback equalizer. Since the intensity of the internal waves was not stable during the experiment period, data of two transmissions corresponding to a strong and a weak internal-wave activity were separately located and processed to investigate the impact of internal waves on the coherent underwater acoustic communication. The results show that internal waves cause a greatly fluctuating signal level and a rapidly varying multipath structure; consequently, these results show that the parameters of the equalizer need to be adjusted to mitigate the degradation of the communication performance.

Wang, Jun; Yang, Xiaoxia; Wu, Lixin; Wang, Haibin; Lynch, James F.; Newhall, Arthur

2012-11-01

68

Conversion Technique of Vector Wave Functions: Formulas and Applications.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The conversion theory of vector wave function is one of important problems in electromagnetics. This paper presents a systematic treatment of the conversion technique and some applications. In this paper, the conversion relations of standard and non-stand...

P. G. Xu S. Lu

1995-01-01

69

Rotating Waves in Neutral Partial Functional Differential Equations  

Microsoft Academic Search

General results on the existence and global continuation of rotating waves are established for partial neutral functional differential equations defined on the unit circle. These results are applied to a class of coupled lossless transmission lines.

J. Wu; H. Xia

1999-01-01

70

Uniform WKB approximation of Coulomb wave functions for arbitrary partial wave  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Coulomb wave functions are difficult to compute numerically for extremely low energies, even with direct numerical integration. Hence, it is more convenient to use asymptotic formulas in this region. It is the object of this paper to derive analytical asymptotic formulas valid for arbitrary energies and partial waves. Moreover, it is possible to extend these formulas for complex values of the parameters.

Michel, N.

2008-07-01

71

Multi-time wave functions for quantum field theory  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Multi-time wave functions such as ?(t1,x,…,tN,x) have one time variable tj for each particle. This type of wave function arises as a relativistic generalization of the wave function ?(t,x,…,x) of non-relativistic quantum mechanics. We show here how a quantum field theory can be formulated in terms of multi-time wave functions. We mainly consider a particular quantum field theory that features particle creation and annihilation. Starting from the particle-position representation of state vectors in Fock space, we introduce multi-time wave functions with a variable number of time variables, set up multi-time evolution equations, and show that they are consistent. Moreover, we discuss the relation of the multi-time wave function to two other representations, the Tomonaga-Schwinger representation and the Heisenberg picture in terms of operator-valued fields on space-time. In a certain sense and under natural assumptions, we find that all three representations are equivalent; yet, we point out that the multi-time formulation has several technical and conceptual advantages.

Petrat, Sören; Tumulka, Roderich

2014-06-01

72

Impact of sea-level rise and coral mortality on the wave dynamics and wave forces on barrier reefs.  

PubMed

A one-dimensional wave model was used to investigate the reef top wave dynamics across a large suite of idealized reef-lagoon profiles, representing barrier coral reef systems under different sea-level rise (SLR) scenarios. The modeling shows that the impacts of SLR vary spatially and are strongly influenced by the bathymetry of the reef and coral type. A complex response occurs for the wave orbital velocity and forces on corals, such that the changes in the wave dynamics vary reef by reef. Different wave loading regimes on massive and branching corals also leads to contrasting impacts from SLR. For many reef bathymetries, wave orbital velocities increase with SLR and cyclonic wave forces are reduced for certain coral species. These changes may be beneficial to coral health and colony resilience and imply that predicting SLR impacts on coral reefs requires careful consideration of the reef bathymetry and the mix of coral species. PMID:24768171

Baldock, T E; Golshani, A; Callaghan, D P; Saunders, M I; Mumby, P J

2014-06-15

73

Novel and simple description for a smooth transition from ?-cluster wave functions to jj-coupling shell model wave functions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We propose an improved version of the antisymmetrized quasicluster model (AQCM) to describe a smooth transition from the ?-cluster wave function to the jj-coupling shell model wave function and apply it to the ground state of 12C. The cluster-shell transition in 12C is characterized in AQCM by only two parameters: R representing the distance between ? clusters and the center of mass and ? describing the break of ? clusters. The optimal AQCM wave function for the ground state of 12C is an intermediate state between the three-? cluster state and the shell model state with the p3/2 subshell closure configuration. The result is consistent with that of the antisymmetrized molecular dynamics (AMD), and the optimal AQCM wave function quantitatively agrees with the AMD one, although the number of degrees of freedom in AQCM is significantly fewer.

Suhara, Tadahiro; Itagaki, Naoyuki; Cseh, József; P?oszajczak, Marek

2013-05-01

74

Impact of rheumatoid arthritis on sexual function  

PubMed Central

Sexuality is a complex aspect of the human being’s life and is more than just the sexual act. Normal sexual functioning consists of sexual activity with transition through the phases from arousal to relaxation with no problems, and with a feeling of pleasure, fulfillment and satisfaction. Rheumatic diseases may affect all aspects of life including sexual functioning. The reasons for disturbing sexual functioning are multifactorial and comprise disease-related factors as well as therapy. Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory autoimmune disease characterized by progressive joint destruction resulting from chronic synovial inflammation. It leads to various degrees of disability, and ultimately has a profound impact on the social, economic, psychological, and sexual aspects of the patient’s life. This is a systemic review about the impact of RA on sexual functioning.

Tristano, Antonio G

2014-01-01

75

Parametric dependence of ocean wave-radar modulation transfer functions  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Microwave techniques at X and L band were used to determine the dependence of ocean-wave radar modulation transfer functions (MTFs) on various environmental and radar parameters during the Marine Remote Sensing experiment of 1979 (MARSEN 79). These MIF are presented, as are coherence functions between the AM and FM parts of the backscattered microwave signal. It is shown that they both depend on several of these parameters. Besides confirming many of the properties of transfer functions reported by previous authors, indications are found that MTFs decrease with increasing angle between wave propagation and antenna-look directions but are essentially independent of small changes in air-sea temperature difference. However, coherence functions are much smaller when the antennas are pointed perpendicular to long waves. It is found that X band transfer functions measured with horizontally polarized microwave radiation have larger magnitudes than those obtained by using vertical polarization.

Plant, W. J.; Keller, W. C.; Cross, A.

1983-01-01

76

Improved WKB radial wave functions in several bases  

SciTech Connect

We develop approximate WKB-like solutions to the radial Schroedinger equation for problems with an angular momentum barrier using Riccati-Bessel, Coulomb, and harmonic-oscillator functions as basis functions. The solutions treat the angular momentum singularity near the origin more accurately in leading approximation than the standard WKB solutions based on sine waves. The solutions based on Riccati-Bessel and free Coulomb wave functions continue smoothly through the inner turning point and are appropriate for scattering problems. The solutions based on oscillator and bound Coulomb wave functions incorporate both turning points smoothly and are particularly appropriate for bound-state problems; no matching of piecewise solutions using Airy functions is necessary.

Durand, B.; Durand, L.

1986-05-01

77

Propagation of detonation waves from an impact region  

SciTech Connect

We have developed an experimental system for studying the propagation of a detonation wave away from a region that is initiated by the impact of a thin flyer plate. We have studied the propagation of detonation waves away from this region in pressed pellets of TATB and in RX-26-AF, a TATB/HMX formulation. The system permits measurements at elevated, ambient and low temperatures. We measured the distance-time trajectory and arrival time of the detonation front at the downstream face of the explosive pellets for pellets with thicknesses of 1-16 mm over the temperature range -80{degree}C to +80{degree}C. 9 refs., 10 figs.

Lee, R.S.; Tao, W.C.; Crouch, L.D.

1989-01-01

78

Impact of an oblique breaking wave on a wall  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The intention of this paper is to study impact force of an oblique-angled slamming wave acting on a rigid wall. In the present study the analytical approach is pursued based on a technique proposed by Shu (Proceedings of the International Conference on Applied Mathematics & Mathematical Physics, Sylhet, Bangladesh, 2000). A nonlinear theory in the context of potential flow is presented for determining accurately the free-surface profiles immediately after an oblique breaking wave impingement on the rigid vertical wall that suddenly starts from rest. The small-time expansion is taken as far as necessary to include the accelerating effect. The analytical solutions for the free-surface elevation are derived up to the third order. The results derived in this paper are of particular interest to the marine and offshore engineering industries, which will find the information useful for the design of ships, coastal and offshore.

Shu, Jian-Jun

2004-03-01

79

Pfaffian wave functions and topology of fermion nodes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Pfaffian is defined as a signed sum of all pair partitions of even number of elements and it can be viewed as a nontrivial generalization of determinant. Pfaffian enables to define the simplest possible antisymmetric wave function based on pair spinorbital(s) and therefore represents a pairing generalization of the Slater determinant of one-particle orbitals. Pfaffians actually accomodate several types of pairing wave functions, for example, one special case is the Bardeen-Cooper- Schrieffer wave function. Using this platform we propose pfaffian wave functions with simultaneous pairings both in singlet and triplet channels and we benchmark their performance in fixed-node quantum Monte Carlo. We implement Gaussian elimination-like algorithm which enables to calculate pfaffians with efficiency similar to calculation of determinants. For a testing set of first row atoms and molecules we show that single pfaffians provide correlation energies systematically at the level of about 95%. Linear combinations of small number of pfaffians recover another fraction of the missing correlation energy comparable to significantly larger determinantal expansions. In addition, we show that pfaffians possess an important property of fermionic wave functions, namely, the minimal number of two nodal domains defined by fermion nodes. This is related to the proof that under rather general conditions closed-shell ground state wave functions of fermionic systems in d>1 have two nodal domains for arbitrary system size. The explicit proofs cover a number of paradigmatic models such as fermions on a sphere surface, in a periodic box, atomic states, etc, and we discuss the implications of this on efficient construction of wave functions and on several types of many-body effects. Supported by NSF and done in collaboration with M. Bajdich, L.K. Wagner, G. Drobny, and K.E Schmidt.Refs: L. Mitas, PRL 96, 240402 (2006); L. Mitas, cond-mat/0605550; M. Bajdich et al, PRL 96, 130201 (2006); cond-mat/0610850.

Mitas, Lubos

2007-03-01

80

Impact of boat-generated waves on intertidal estuarine sediments  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Hydrodynamics in the macrotidal Seine estuary (France) are controlled by the semi-diurnal tidal regime modulated seasonally by the fluvial discharge. Wind effect on sediment transport (through wind waves and swell) is observed at the mouth of the estuary. Over the last century, authorities have put emphasis on facilitating economic exchanges by means of embankment building and increased dredging activity. These developments led to allow and secure sea vessel traffic in the Seine estuary (from its mouth to the port of Rouen, 125 km upstream) but they also resulted in a change of estuarine hydrodynamics and sediment transport features. A riversides restoration policy has been recently started by port authorities. In this context, the objective of the field-based study presented is to connect vessel characteristics (i.e. speed, draft...), boat-generated waves and their sedimentary impacts. Such information will be used by stakeholders to manage riverside. The natural intertidal site of interest is located in the fluvial freshwater part of the Seine estuary characterized by a 4.5 m maximum tidal range. The foreshore slope is gently decreasing and surface sediments are composed of fine to coarse sand with occasional mud drapes. In order to decipher boat-generated events, the sampling strategy is based on continuous ADV measurements coupled with a turbidimeter and an altimeter to study sediment dynamics. These instruments are settled in the lower part of the foreshore (i) to obtain a significant dataset (i.e. oceanic instruments are not measuring in air) on a zone statically affected by boat waves and (ii) because most of boat traffic occurs during early flood or late ebb period. Spatial variations are assessed along a cross-section through grain-size analysis of surface sediments and topography measurements using pole technique. Results enhance hydrodynamic and sedimentary impacts of boat-generated waves compared respectively to tidal and wind effects. Long-term altimeter measurements in relation with boat traffic data base demonstrate that boat-generated waves are the key hydrodynamic parameter controlling short term tidal flat evolution. Concerning hydrodynamics, two main types of boat-generated waves can be distinguished: one corresponds to barges, the other to sea vessels. The critical parameter controlling wave characteristics, bottom shear stress and thus sedimentary impacts is the distance between seabed and keel. Thus, considering their larger seabed-keel distance, barges do not significantly affect the sedimentary cover of the intertidal area. On the contrary, sea-vessels can induce rapid changes of the tidal flat texture (i.e. bed flattening, mud drapes...) and morphology: erosion and sedimentation rates in a range of 0.5 to 6 cm.min-1 have been measured. Such energetic events occur generally during the squat generated wave run-up and can affect the seabed in water depths up to 1.5 m. In the freshwater part of the Seine estuary annual sediment inputs are mostly controlled by river flow (during river flood) while medium term scale evolution is dependent on tidal range and short term sediment dynamics (i.e. bedload, resuspension) on sea-vessels waves.

Blanpain, O.; Deloffre, J.; Lafite, R.; Gomit, G.; Calluaud, D.; David, L.

2010-12-01

81

Estimation of surface wave Green's functions from correlation of direct waves, coda waves, and ambient noise in SE Tibet  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Empirical Green's functions (EGFs) between receivers can be obtained from seismic interferometry through cross-correlation of pairs of ground motion records. Full reconstruction of the Green's function requires diffuse wavefields or a uniform distribution of (noise) sources. In practice, EGFs differ from actual Green's functions because wavefields are not diffuse and the source distribution not uniform. This difference, which may depend on medium heterogeneity, complicates (stochastic) medium characterization as well as imaging and tomographic velocity analysis with EGFs. We investigate how source distribution and scale lengths of medium heterogeneity influence surface wave Green's function reconstruction in the period band of primary microseisms ( T = 10-20 s). With data from a broad-band seismograph array in SE Tibet we analyze the symmetry and travel-time properties of surface wave EGFs from correlation of data in different windows: ambient noise, direct surface waves, and surface wave coda. The EGFs from these different windows show similar dispersion characteristics, which demonstrates that the Green's function can be recovered from direct wavefields (e.g., ambient noise or earthquakes) or from wavefields scattered by heterogeneity on a regional scale. Directional bias and signal-to-noise ratio of EGFs can be understood better with (plane wave) beamforming of the energy contributing to EGF construction. Beamforming also demonstrates that seasonal variations in cross-correlation functions correlate with changes in ocean activity.

Yao, Huajian; Campman, Xander; de Hoop, Maarten V.; van der Hilst, Robert D.

2009-11-01

82

Approximate Electronic Energy Surfaces from Cuspless Wave Functions  

Microsoft Academic Search

The eigenfunctions of a molecular Hamiltonian in which all Coulomb potentials have been replaced by Hooke's law potentials are easily determined. Their electronic parts are essentially single-particle single-center harmonic oscillator, or Gaussian wave functions originating at the center of nuclear charge. An investigation is made to determine the feasibility of using these cuspless base functions in variational calculations of relative

Carl E. Wulfman

1960-01-01

83

Delta function excitation of waves in the earth's ionosphere  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Excitation of the earth's ionosphere by delta function current sheets is considered, and the temporal and spatial evolution of wave packets is analyzed for a two-component collisional F2 layer. Approximations of an inverse Fourier-Laplace transform via saddle point methods provide plots of typical wave packets. These illustrate cold plasma wave theory and may be used as a diagnostic tool since it is possible to relate specific features, e.g., the frequency of a modulation envelope, to plasma parameters such as the electron cyclotron frequency. It is also possible to deduce the propagation path length and orientation of a remote radio beacon.

Vidmar, R. J.; Crawford, F. W.; Harker, K. J.

1983-01-01

84

Spin and the Thermal Equilibrium Distribution of Wave Functions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Consider a quantum system S weakly interacting with a very large but finite system B called the heat bath, and suppose that the composite S?B is in a pure state ? with participating energies between E and E+? with small ?. Then, it is known that for most ? the reduced density matrix of S is (approximately) equal to the canonical density matrix. That is, the reduced density matrix is universal in the sense that it depends only on S's Hamiltonian and the temperature but not on B's Hamiltonian, on the interaction Hamiltonian, or on the details of ?. It has also been pointed out that S can also be attributed a random wave function ? whose probability distribution is universal in the same sense. This distribution is known as the "Scrooge measure" or "Gaussian adjusted projected (GAP) measure"; we regard it as the thermal equilibrium distribution of wave functions. The relevant concept of the wave function of a subsystem is known as the "conditional wave function." In this paper, we develop analogous considerations for particles with spin. One can either use some kind of conditional wave function or, more naturally, the "conditional density matrix," which is in general different from the reduced density matrix. We ask what the thermal equilibrium distribution of the conditional density matrix is, and find the answer that for most ? the conditional density matrix is (approximately) deterministic, in fact (approximately) equal to the canonical density matrix.

Pandya, Viraj; Tumulka, Roderich

2013-09-01

85

General trial wave functions for a three body interaction  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Pfaffian wave function, which is a candidate for the 5/2 FQHE state, is the exact ground state of a short range three body model interaction, but little is known about the solutions of this model at other filling factors. Our starting point is the observation that the Pfaffian can be obtained by fully anti-symmetrizing a bilayer wave function of Halperin. A more general class of composite fermion wave functions for bilayer systems was constructed by Scarola and Jain. We find that, upon full antisymmetrization, these wave function provide a decent approximation to the low energy solutions of the three body model interaction at filling factors other than 1/2. The charged and neutral excitations of the full state are naturally constructed by creating excitations in one or both ``layers.'' We also investigate how well the ground and excited state wave functions work for the Coulomb interaction, both in the lowest and the second Landau levels. Systems with up to 18 particles are studied by a combination of exact diagonalization and Monte Carlo method.

Ganesh Jaya, Sreejith; Toke, Csaba; Jain, Jainendra

2010-03-01

86

Quantum Corral Wave-function Engineering  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present a theoretical method for the design and optimization of quantum corrals[1] with specific electronic properties. Taking advantage that spins are subject to a RKKY interaction that is directly controlled by the scattering of the quantum corral, we design corral structures that reproduce spin Hamiltonians with coupling constants determined a priori[2]. We solve exactly the bi-dimensional scattering problem for each corral configuration within the s-wave approximation[3] and subsequently the geometry of the quantum corral is optimized by means of simulated annealing[4] and genetic algorithms[5]. We demonstrate the possibility of automatic design of structures with complicated target electronic properties[6]. This work was performed under the auspices of the US Department of Energy by the University of California at the LLNL under contract no W-7405-Eng-48. [1] M. F. Crommie, C. P. Lutz and D. M. Eigler, Nature 403, 512 (2000) [2] D. P. DiVincenzo et al., Nature 408, 339 (2000) [3] G. A. Fiete and E. J. Heller, Rev. Mod. Phys. 75, 933 (2003) [4] M. R. A. T. N. Metropolis et al., J. Chem. Phys. 1087 (1953) [5] E. Aarts and J. K. Lenstra, eds. Local search in combinatorial problems (Princeton University Press, 1997) [6] A. A. Correa, F. Reboredo and C. Balseiro, Phys. Rev. B (in press).

Correa, Alfredo; Reboredo, Fernando; Balseiro, Carlos

2005-03-01

87

Helicon Wave Physics Impacts on Electrodeless Thruster Design  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Effective generation of helicon waves for high density plasma sources is determined by the dispersion relation and plasma power balance. Helicon wave plasma sources inherently require an applied magnetic field of .01-0.1 T, an antenna properly designed to couple to the helicon wave in the plasma, and an rf power source in the 10-100 s of MHz, depending on propellant choice. For a plasma thruster, particularly one with a high specific impulse (>2000 s), the physics of the discharge would also have to address the use of electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) heating and magnetic expansion. In all cases the system design includes an optimized magnetic field coil, plasma source chamber, and antenna. A preliminary analysis of such a system, calling on experimental data where applicable and calculations where required, has been initiated at Glenn Research Center. Analysis results showing the mass scaling of various components as well as thruster performance projections and their impact on thruster size are discussed.

Gilland, James

2003-01-01

88

Dirac single-particle wave functions in inelastic electron scattering  

SciTech Connect

We formulate inelastic electron scattering using Dirac single-particle wave functions to describe the nuclear states. The lower components of these wave functions are much larger than those obtained assuming a free space relation with the upper component taken to be a Schroedinger single-particle wave function. We note that the impulse approximation to the nuclear current operator is ambiguous in the present case. However, one of the two possible forms yields an explicitly conserved current in the single particle limit. We identify an inelastic amplitude which is linear in the lower components and is therefore very sensitive to the ''relativity'' of the bound nucleons. This amplitude is found to be dominant for transverse isoscalar transitions.

Shepard, J.R.; Rost, E.; Siciliano, E.R.; McNeil, J.A.

1984-06-01

89

Dirac single-particle wave functions in inelastic electron scattering  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We formulate inelastic electron scattering using Dirac single-particle wave functions to describe the nuclear states. The lower components of these wave functions are much larger than those obtained assuming a free space relation with the upper component taken to be a Schrödinger single-particle wave function. We note that the impulse approximation to the nuclear current operator is ambiguous in the present case. However, one of the two possible forms yields an explicitly conserved current in the single particle limit. We identify an inelastic amplitude which is linear in the lower components and is therefore very sensitive to the "relativity" of the bound nucleons. This amplitude is found to be dominant for transverse isoscalar transitions.

Shepard, J. R.; Rost, E.; Siciliano, E. R.; McNeil, J. A.

1984-06-01

90

Hydrogen-oscillator connection: Passage formulas between wave functions  

SciTech Connect

Recent works on the hydrogen-oscillator connection are extended to cover in a systematic (and easily computarizable) way the problem of the expansion of an R/sup 3/ hydrogen wave function in terms of R/sup 4/ oscillator wave functions. Passage formulas from oscillator to hydrogen wave functions are obtained in six cases resulting from the combination of the following coordinate systems: spherical and parabolic coordinate systems for the hydrogen atom in three dimensions, and Cartesian, double polar, and hyperspherical coordinate systems for the isotropic harmonic oscillator in four dimensions. These coordinate systems are particularly useful in physical applications (e.g., Zeeman and Stark effects for hydrogenlike ions and coherent state approaches to the Coulomb problem).

Kibler, M.; Ronveaux, A.; Negadi, T.

1986-06-01

91

Student use of a material anchor for quantum wave functions  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

We explain the appropriate use of pipe cleaners to represent quantum wave functions in terms of material anchors. We then analyze the actions of one undergraduate quantum mechanics student in an oral exam situation with two related tasks, both involving the visualization of a 3-d structure to represent the real and imaginary parts of the wave function on one spatial coordinate. Instruction before the exam included several in-class activities involving building 3-d representations of wave functions for several potentials using pipe cleaners. Though the oral exam did not specify that students should or should not use pipe cleaners, the student in this analysis brought and used them successfully during the exam. Analysis of the studentsâ use of this tool shows promise of benefit to future students in a more highly structured environment of instruction and assessment.

Schiber, Catherine C.; Close, Hunter G.; Close, Eleanor W.; Donnelly, David

2014-02-01

92

Diving-wave migration using Airy functions  

SciTech Connect

A method is described for imaging seismic reflection data selected from a data volume, comprising: preprocessing said selected seismic reflection data by application of normal moveout, dip moveout and a time-domain-to-frequency-domain transformation; determining the velocity field characteristic of said data volume; forming a velocity model for said data volume by fitting a velocity function to said velocity field, said function being characterized by a linear gradient in sloth; from the velocity model, calculating parameters for defining an Airy operator; separating normal seismic data from evanescent seismic data and saving said evanescant data in a random access memory; iterating downwardly, migrating said normal seismic data with the aid of said Airy operator; extracting said evanescent data from memory and iterating upwardly, migrating said evanescent seismic data with the aid of said Airy operator; summing the results of the downward and upward iterations; and inversely Fourier-transforming the summation.

Albertin, U.K.

1993-08-10

93

Wave propagation of functionally graded material plates in thermal environments.  

PubMed

The wave propagation of an infinite functionally graded plate in thermal environments is studied using the higher-order shear deformation plate theory. The thermal effects and temperature-dependent material properties are both taken into account. The temperature field considered is assumed to be a uniform distribution over the plate surface and varied in the thickness direction only. Material properties are assumed to be temperature-dependent, and graded in the thickness direction according to a simple power law distribution in terms of the volume fractions of the constituents. Considering the effects of transverse shear deformation and rotary inertia, the governing equations of the wave propagation in the functionally graded plate are derived by using the Hamilton's principle. The analytic dispersion relation of the functionally graded plate is obtained by solving an eigenvalue problem. Numerical examples show that the characteristics of wave propagation in the functionally graded plate are relates to the volume fraction index and thermal environment of the functionally graded plate. The influences of the volume fraction distributions and temperature on wave propagation of functionally graded plate are discussed in detail. The results carried out can be used in the ultrasonic inspection techniques and structural health monitoring. PMID:21663930

Sun, Dan; Luo, Song-Nan

2011-12-01

94

Accretion of Cometary Material as a Function of Impact Angle  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

It has been proposed that comets provided the raw ingredients for life during the first billion years of our planet's history. To investigate this possibility, we simulated comet-Earth impacts at a variety of impact angles. Our goal was to determine the mass fraction of material that would be likely to survive a terrestrial impact and come to rest as an isolated pond of water. We employed the Eulerian adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) code, GEODYN, in a 2-D, Cartesian (plane-strain) system. In the calculations, the impactors were modeled as solid-ice comets 1 km in diameter impacting into granite at escape velocity (11.2 km/s). The simulations were computed to a time of 2 seconds, long enough for multiple reverberations of the compression and rarefaction waves to propagate through the comet. Thermomechanical variables relevant to assessing comet conditions during the impact event were monitored at 1000 evenly distributed locations throughout the comet. At each location, the magnitude and orientation of the particle velocity vector were used to determine the fraction of comet mass that escapes Earth's gravity during the impact event. Pressure, density and temperature were also monitored to assess the survivability of organic matter distributed thoughout the comet. We determined that the fraction of comet mass that escapes Earth's gravity is not a simple monotonic function of impact angle. For example, the 15° impact showed the least accretion (61%) and the 90° impact had total accretion, but the 10° impact retained significantly more mass (at 71%) than the 15° impact. We also found that a significant amount of the comet experiences low peak temperatures; this was somewhat surprising given that the Earth target was a granitic hard rock. Approximately 80% (or 3x108kg) of the 10° impactor experienced temperatures between 250-350° C and corresponding pressures of 4.5-8.2 GPa. If the organic matter present in comets experienced similar conditions, we would expect it to survive with little deleterious alteration. We will consider the dispersion and final aerial distribution of our comet impactors. We will present our results using the phase diagram for H2O and experimental data from hypervelocity impact experiments. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by University of California Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under contract No. W-7405-Eng-48.

Karlow, B. A.; Lomov, I.; Antoun, T.; Blank, J. G.

2003-12-01

95

Wave-function recombination instability in cold-atom interferometers  

SciTech Connect

Cold-atom interferometers use guiding potentials that split the wave function of the Bose-Einstein condensate and then recombine it. We present a theoretical analysis of the wave-function recombination instability that is due to the weak nonlinearity of the condensate. It is most pronounced when the accumulated phase difference between the arms of the interferometer is close to an odd multiple of {pi} and consists in exponential amplification of the weak ground state mode by the strong first excited mode. The instability exists for both trapped-atom and beam interferometers.

Stickney, James A.; Zozulya, Alex A. [Department of Physics, WPI, 100 Institute Road, Worcester, Massachusetts 01609 (United States)

2002-11-01

96

Wave-function recombination instability in cold-atom interferometers  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Cold-atom interferometers use guiding potentials that split the wave function of the Bose-Einstein condensate and then recombine it. We present a theoretical analysis of the wave-function recombination instability that is due to the weak nonlinearity of the condensate. It is most pronounced when the accumulated phase difference between the arms of the interferometer is close to an odd multiple of ? and consists in exponential amplification of the weak ground state mode by the strong first excited mode. The instability exists for both trapped-atom and beam interferometers.

Stickney, James A.; Zozulya, Alex A.

2002-11-01

97

Many-body wave function in a dipole blockade configuration  

SciTech Connect

We report the results of simulations of the many atom wave function when a cold gas is excited to highly excited states. We simulated the many body wave function by direct numerical solution of Schroedinger's equation. We investigated the fraction of atoms excited and the correlation of excited atoms in the gas for different types of excitation when the blockade region was small compared to the sample size. We also investigated the blockade effect when the blockade region is comparable to the sample size to determine the sensitivity of this system and constraints for quantum information.

Robicheaux, F.; Hernandez, J. V. [Department of Physics, Auburn University, Alabama 36849-5311 (United States)

2005-12-15

98

Exact wave functions in a noncommutative field theory.  

PubMed

We consider the nonrelativistic field theory with a quartic interaction on a noncommutative plane and compute the 2-->2 scattering amplitude within perturbative analysis to all orders. We regain the results of the perturbative analysis by finding the scattering and the bound state wave functions of the two particle Schrodinger equation. These wave functions unusually have two center positions in the relative coordinates, whose separation is transverse to the total momentum and scales linearly with its magnitude, exhibiting the stringy nature of the noncommutative field theory. PMID:11019273

Bak, D; Kim, S K; Soh, K S; Yee, J H

2000-10-01

99

Evolution of wave function in a dissipative system  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

For a dissipative system with Ohmic friction, we obtain a simple and exact solution for the wave function of the system plus the bath. It is described by the direct product in two independent Hilbert space. One of them is described by an effective Hamiltonian, the other represents the effect of the bath, i.e., the Brownian motion, thus clarifying the structure of the wave function of the system whose energy is dissipated by its interaction with the bath. No path integral technology is needed in this treatment. The derivation of the Weisskopf-Wigner line width theory follows easily.

Yu, Li-Hua; Sun, Chang-Pu

1994-01-01

100

Impact of improved wave dissipation parameterisations on wave-current interactions in a coupled wave-ocean model  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The WAVEWATCH-III model is used operationally as part of the PREVIMER coastal forecast system. A global version of the model provides boundary conditions for a series of stand-alone high-resolution regional sub-domains, on unstructured grids, which are coupled with the regional ocean model MARS. New developments in the WW3 model include a combination of dissipation parameterisations (Ardhuin et al 2010). An anisotropic breaking-induced wind wave dissipation has been based on the local saturation spectrum, with a higher dissipation rate in the mean wave direction, designed to fit observed directional spreading. Additionally, a cumulative dissipation rate inspired by Babanin and Young (2005) but directly estimated from breaking wave probabilities dramatically enhances the dissipation at frequencies greater than 3 times the peak frequency. Regarding swell, a non-linear dissipation based on SAR-derived dissipation rates across the Pacific (Ardhuin et al., 2009) has been introduced. Validation of this model (Rascle and Ardhuin 2012, submitted) using a global hindcast from 1994-2010 shows improvements in significant wave height compared to an altimeter database, with values <10% in general. Regarding extreme events, Hanafin et al (2012) showed that the prediction of the timing of arrival, peak period and spectral distribution of very long swell generated by hurricane-level winds in the North Atlantic compared very well to coastal buoy observations. One of the aims of such improvements is to assist users by providing better geophysical parameters as output. Improvements noted in the mean squared slope compared to buoys, for example, implies a larger amount of energy is available to near-surface Langmuir turbulence. A recent study using the WW3 wave model and the MARS ocean model (Ardhuin et al, in press, JPO 2012) focused on near-shore wave interaction with strong currents. At small scales, rapid steepening of wave slopes by opposing currents induces enhanced breaking as the group velocity decreases. In the study area, tidal currents of up to 4m/s which are highly coherent over the water column and a high wind event created excellent conditions to test the performance of the model. A surface current radar with a resolution of 1km due to multiple signal classification algorithm and a number of buoys were used for validation. Adding currents in the wave model reduced the errors by up to 30% and clearly showed the effects of wave trapping by the strong tidal currents. Comparing different dissipation parameterisations, however, showed that none were completely satisfactory, indicating that further research is required in this area. For short wind waves, the relative wind at the air-sea interface becomes an important factor. At larger scales, waves are refracted by currents. In these cases, the choice of dissipation parameterisation was found to be less important when only one partition was present, though Ardhuin et al (2010) showed better results in mixed seas. Tidal modulations were shown to be due to currents, rather than water level, and a large impact was observed down-wave of currents that have large refraction effects as well as in the vicinity of the currents.

Hanafin, J. A.; Ardhuin, F.; Roland, A.; Leckler, F.; Rascle, N.

2012-12-01

101

Impact! Chandra Images a Young Supernova Blast Wave  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Two images made by NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory, one in October 1999, the other in January 2000, show for the first time the full impact of the actual blast wave from Supernova 1987A (SN1987A). The observations are the first time that X-rays from a shock wave have been imaged at such an early stage of a supernova explosion. Recent observations of SN 1987A with the Hubble Space Telescope revealed gradually brightening hot spots from a ring of matter ejected by the star thousands of years before it exploded. Chandra's X-ray images show the cause for this brightening ring. A shock wave is smashing into portions of the ring at a speed of 10 million miles per hour (4,500 kilometers per second). The gas behind the shock wave has a temperature of about ten million degrees Celsius, and is visible only with an X-ray telescope. "With Hubble we heard the whistle from the oncoming train," said David Burrows of Pennsylvania State University, University Park, the leader of the team of scientists involved in analyzing the Chandra data on SN 1987A. "Now, with Chandra, we can see the train." The X-ray observations appear to confirm the general outlines of a model developed by team member Richard McCray of the University of Colorado, Boulder, and others, which holds that a shock wave has been moving out ahead of the debris expelled by the explosion. As this shock wave collides with material outside the ring, it heats it to millions of degrees. "We are witnessing the birth of a supernova remnant for the first time," McCray said. The Chandra images clearly show the previously unseen, shock-heated matter just inside the optical ring. Comparison with observations made with Chandra in October and January, and with Hubble in February 2000, show that the X-ray emission peaks close to the newly discovered optical hot spots, and indicate that the wave is beginning to hit the ring. In the next few years, the shock wave will light up still more material in the ring, and an inward moving, or reverse, shock wave will heat the material ejected in the explosion itself. "The supernova is digging up its own past," said McCray. The observations were made on October 6, 1999, using the Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer (ACIS) and the High Energy Transmission Grating, and again on January 17, 2000, using ACIS. Other members of the team were Eli Michael of the University of Colorado; Dr. Una Hwang, Dr. Steven Holt and Dr. Rob Petre of NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, MD; Professor Roger Chevalier of the University of Virginia, Charlottesville; and Professors Gordon Garmire and John Nousek of Pennsylvania State University. The results will be published in an upcoming issue of the Astrophysical Journal. The ACIS instrument was built for NASA by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, and Pennsylvania State University. The High Energy Transmission Grating was built by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, AL, manages the Chandra program. TRW, Inc., Redondo Beach, CA, is the prime contractor for the spacecraft. The Smithsonian's Chandra X-ray Center controls science and flight operations from Cambridge, MA. More About SN 1987A Images to illustrate this release and more information on Chandra's progress can be found on the Internet at: http://chandra.harvard.edu/photo/2000/sn1987a/index.html AND http://chandra.nasa.gov More About SN 1987A

2000-05-01

102

A Green's function method for surface acoustic waves in functionally graded materials.  

PubMed

Acoustic wave propagation in anisotropic media with one-dimensional inhomogeneity is discussed. Using a Green's function approach, the wave equation with inhomogeneous variation of elastic property and mass density is transformed into an integral equation, which is then solved numerically. The method is applied to find the dispersion relation of surface acoustic waves for a medium with continuously or discontinuously varying elastic property and mass density profiles. PMID:17552695

Matsuda, Osamu; Glorieux, Christ

2007-06-01

103

Hydrodynamic waves and correlation functions in dusty plasmas  

SciTech Connect

A hydrodynamic description of strongly coupled dusty plasmas is given when physical quantities vary slowly in space and time and the system can be assumed to be in local thermodynamic equilibrium. The linear waves in such a system are analyzed. In particular, a dispersion equation is derived for low-frequency dust acoustic waves, including collisional damping effects, and compared with experimental results. The linear response of the system is calculated from the fluctuation-dissipation theorem and the hydrodynamic equations. The requirement that these two calculations coincide constrains the particle correlation function for slowly varying perturbations. It is shown that in the presence of weakly damped, long-wavelength dust-acoustic waves, the dust autocorrelation function is of the Debye{endash}H{umlt u}ckel form and the characteristic shielding distance is the dust Debye length. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

Wang, X.; Bhattacharjee, A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States)

1997-11-01

104

Surface acoustic wave depth profiling of a functionally graded material  

SciTech Connect

The potential and limitations of Rayleigh wave spectroscopy to characterize the elastic depth profile of heterogeneous functional gradient materials are investigated by comparing simulations of the surface acoustic wave dispersion curves of different profile-spectrum pairs. This inverse problem is shown to be quite ill posed. The method is then applied to extract information on the depth structure of a glass-ceramic (alumina) functionally graded material from experimental data. The surface acoustic wave analysis suggests the presence of a uniform coating region consisting of a mixture of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and glass, with a sharp transition between the coating and the substrate. This is confirmed by scanning electron microscope with energy dispersive x-ray analysis.

Goossens, Jozefien; Leclaire, Philippe; Xu Xiaodong; Glorieux, Christ; Martinez, Loic; Sola, Antonella; Siligardi, Cristina; Cannillo, Valeria; Van der Donck, Tom; Celis, Jean-Pierre [Laboratorium voor Akoestiek en Thermische Fysica, Departement Natuurkunde en Sterrenkunde, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, PO 2416, Celestijnenlaan 200D, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Equipe Circuit Instrumentation et Modelisation en Electronique (ECIME) IUP GE, Universite de Cergy, Rue de Eragny, Neuville sur Oise, 95031 Cergy Pontoise Cedex (France); Dipartimento di Ingegneria dei Materiali e dell' Ambiente, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Via Vignolese 905, 41100 Modena (Italy); Departement Department of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering (MTM), Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, PO 2450, Kasteelpark Arenberg 44, B-3001 Heverlee (Belgium)

2007-09-01

105

Calculation of the nucleon structure function from the nucleon wave function  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Harmonic oscillator wave functions have played an historically important role in our understanding of the structure of the nucleon, most notably by providing insight into the mass spectra of the low-lying states. High energy scattering experiments are known to give us a picture of the nucleon wave function at high-momentum transfer and in a frame in which the nucleon is traveling fast. A simple model that crosses the twin bridges of momentum scale and Lorentz frame that separate the pictures of the nucleon wave function provided by the deep inelastic scattering data and by the oscillator model is presented.

Hussar, Paul E.

1993-01-01

106

SIMULATION OF ROGUE WAVES AND THEIR IMPACT ON MARINE STRUCTURES  

Microsoft Academic Search

The design of safe and economic ofishore structures and ships requires detailed knowledge of the extreme wave environment and the corresponding loads and motions. For the investigation of wave\\/structure interaction and for the analysis of extreme wave events this paper de- scribes techniques to synthesize nonlinear gravity waves in irregular seas. Extreme waves registered in nature are simulated in a

F. Clauss; Christian E. Schmittner; Janou Hennig

2003-01-01

107

Towards model independent single-particle wave functions  

SciTech Connect

We report some results for light nuclei that strongly suggest that it is possible to construct good nuclear single-particle wave functions on the basis of recently available, shell related experimental information, by recourse to an information theory based inference approach.

Casas, M.; Plastino, A.; Puente, A. (Physics Department, National University La Plata, CC67, 1900 La Plata (Argentina) Departament di Fisica, Universitat de les Illes Balears, 07071 Palma de Mallorca (Spain))

1993-08-01

108

Simulation of wind wave growth with reference source functions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present results of extensive simulations of wind wave growth with the so-called reference source function in the right-hand side of the Hasselmann equation written as follows First, we use Webb's algorithm [8] for calculating the exact nonlinear transfer function Snl. Second, we consider a family of wind input functions in accordance with recent consideration [9] ( )s S = ?(k)N , ?(k) = ? ? ?- f (?). in k 0 ?0 in (2) Function fin(?) describes dependence on angle ?. Parameters in (2) are tunable and determine magnitude (parameters ?0, ?0) and wave growth rate s [9]. Exponent s plays a key role in this study being responsible for reference scenarios of wave growth: s = 4-3 gives linear growth of wave momentum, s = 2 - linear growth of wave energy and s = 8-3 - constant rate of wave action growth. Note, the values are close to ones of conventional parameterizations of wave growth rates (e.g. s = 1 for [7] and s = 2 for [5]). Dissipation function Sdiss is chosen as one providing the Phillips spectrum E(?) ~ ?5 at high frequency range [3] (parameter ?diss fixes a dissipation scale of wind waves) Sdiss = Cdiss?4w?N (k)?(? - ?diss) (3) Here frequency-dependent wave steepness ?2w = E(?,?)?5-g2 makes this function to be heavily nonlinear and provides a remarkable property of stationary solutions at high frequencies: the dissipation coefficient Cdiss should keep certain value to provide the observed power-law tails close to the Phillips spectrum E(?) ~ ?-5. Our recent estimates [3] give Cdiss ? 2.0. The Hasselmann equation (1) with the new functions Sin, Sdiss (2,3) has a family of self-similar solutions of the same form as previously studied models [1,3,9] and proposes a solid basis for further theoretical and numerical study of wave evolution under action of all the physical mechanisms: wind input, wave dissipation and nonlinear transfer. Simulations of duration- and fetch-limited wind wave growth have been carried out within the above model setup to check its conformity with theoretical predictions, previous simulations [2,6,9], experimental parameterizations of wave spectra [1,4] and to specify tunable parameters of terms (2,3). These simulations showed realistic spatio-temporal scales of wave evolution and spectral shaping close to conventional parameterizations [e.g. 4]. An additional important feature of the numerical solutions is a saturation of frequency-dependent wave steepness ?w in short-frequency range. The work was supported by the Russian government contract No.11.934.31.0035, Russian Foundation for Basic Research grant 11-05-01114-a and ONR grant N00014-10-1-0991. References [1] S. I. Badulin, A. V. Babanin, D. Resio, and V. Zakharov. Weakly turbulent laws of wind-wave growth. J. Fluid Mech., 591:339-378, 2007. [2] S. I. Badulin, A. N. Pushkarev, D. Resio, and V. E. Zakharov. Self-similarity of wind-driven seas. Nonl. Proc. Geophys., 12:891-946, 2005. [3] S. I. Badulin and V. E. Zakharov. New dissipation function for weakly turbulent wind-driven seas. ArXiv e-prints, (1212.0963), December 2012. [4] M. A. Donelan, J. Hamilton, and W. H. Hui. Directional spectra of wind-generated waves. Phil. Trans. Roy. Soc. Lond. A, 315:509-562, 1985. [5] M. A. Donelan and W. J. Pierson-jr. Radar scattering and equilibrium ranges in wind-generated waves with application to scatterometry. J. Geophys. Res., 92(C5):4971-5029, 1987. [6] E. Gagnaire-Renou, M. Benoit, and S. I. Badulin. On weakly turbulent scaling of wind sea in simulations of fetch-limited growth. J. Fluid Mech., 669:178-213, 2011. [7] R. L. Snyder, F. W. Dobson, J. A. Elliot, and R. B. Long. Array measurements of atmospheric pressure fluctuations above surface gravity waves. J. Fluid Mech., 102:1-59, 1981. [8] D. J. Webb. Non-linear transfers between sea waves. Deep Sea Res., 25:279-298, 1978. [9] V. E. Zakharov, D. Resio, and A. N. Pushkarev. New wind input term consistent with experimental, theoretical and numerical considerations. ArXiv e-prints, (1212.1069), December 2012.

Badulin, Sergei I.; Zakharov, Vladimir E.; Pushkarev, Andrei N.

2013-04-01

109

Orbital optimization in electronic wave functions; equations for quadratic and cubic convergence of general multiconfiguration wave functions  

Microsoft Academic Search

We derive variational equations for optimization of the orbitals of arbitrary multiconfiguration wave functions. Expressing the transformation matrix connecting the set of orthonormal trial vectors and the set of final optimal orbitals as an exponential matrix of independent rotation angles allows a simple derivation of the coupled variational equations to arbitrary order. We include the explicit results through third order

Laurence G. Yaffe; William A. Goddard III

1976-01-01

110

Association of Increased Arterial Wave Reflections With Decline in Renal Function in Chronic Kidney Disease Stages 3 and 4  

Microsoft Academic Search

BackgroundIncreased arterial wave reflections predict cardiovascular events in dialysis patients. Their impact on the progression of renal disease has not been determined.MethodsWe prospectively quantified wave reflections as pressure augmentation (AP) and augmentation index (AIx) using radial applanation tonometry and a transfer function, in 111 patients (mean age 53.6 years; 71 men, 31 diabetics) with chronic kidney disease not requiring dialysis.

Thomas Weber; Marcus Ammer; Duygu Gündüz; Paul Bruckenberger; Bernd Eber; Manfred Wallner

2011-01-01

111

An analytical model to predict dune erosion due to wave impact  

Microsoft Academic Search

An analytical model is developed to calculate recession distance and eroded volume for coastal dunes during severe storms. The transport relationship used in the model is based on wave impact theory, where individual swash waves hitting the dune face induce the erosion. Combining this relationship with the sediment volume conservation equation describes the response of the dune to high waves

Magnus Larson; Li Erikson; Hans Hanson

2004-01-01

112

A critical survey of wave propagation and impact in composite materials  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A review of the field of stress waves in composite materials is presented covering the period up to December 1972. The major properties of waves in composites are discussed and a summary is made of the major experimental results in this field. Various theoretical models for analysis of wave propagation in laminated, fiber and particle reinforced composites are surveyed. The anisotropic, dispersive and dissipative properties of stress pulses and shock waves in such materials are reviewed. A review of the behavior of composites under impact loading is presented along with the application of wave propagation concepts to the determination of impact stresses in composite plates.

Moon, F. C.

1973-01-01

113

Introducing surface waves in a coupled wave-atmosphere regional climate model: Impact on atmospheric mixing length  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The marine atmospheric boundary layer is strongly influenced by the moving surface in the presence of surface waves; the impact depends on the wave conditions and the interaction with the atmosphere. Previous studies using measurements as well as numerical simulations with large-eddy simulations have shown that surface waves propagating faster than the wind (swell) alter the surface exchange as well as turbulence properties in the atmosphere. This impact is here introduced in a coupled wave-atmosphere regional climate model with a so-called E - l turbulence scheme (where E is the turbulent kinetic energy and l is a mixing length). A wave age dependent coefficient (here called Wmix) is added to the mixing length in the turbulence parameterization. This acts similarly to inducing additional convection, with larger mixing length and increased eddy diffusivity, when we have near neutral stratification and strong swell. For shallow boundary layers the regional coupled climate model shows a larger response to the introduced wave coupling with increased near surface wind speed and smaller wind gradient between the surface and middle part of the boundary layer. The impact for the studied areas is relatively minor for parameters averaged over 1 year, but for limited periods and specific situations the impact is larger. One could expect a larger impact in areas with stronger swell dominance. We thus conclude that the impact of swell waves on the mixing in the boundary layer is not insignificant and should be taken into account when developing wave-atmosphere coupled regional climate models or global climate models.

Rutgersson, A.; Nilsson, E. O.; Kumar, R.

2012-11-01

114

Critical Analysis of the Density Functional Theory Prediction of Enhanced Capillary Waves  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present a critical analysis of the density functional description for capillary wave fluctuations on free liquid surfaces. The proposal made by Mecke and Dietrich, [Phys. Rev. EPLEEE81063-651X 59, 6766 (1999)10.1103/PhysRevE.59.6766], to obtain the effective wave vector dependent surface tension, and their prediction of an enhanced regime of capillary waves at mesoscopic scales, has had a large impact including claims of experimental observation [Fradin , Nature (London)NATUAS0028-0836 403, 871 (2000)10.1038/35002533; Mora , Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-9007 90, 216101 (2003)10.1103/PhysRevLett.90.216101]. Our analysis shows that there is a qualitative problem in the convergence of the low q expansion used for that prediction, and that the assumed link between the equilibrium density functional description of the liquid surface and its capillary wave fluctuations leads always to the unphysical decrease of the surface tension for large wave vectors.

Tarazona, P.; Checa, R.; Chacón, E.

2007-11-01

115

Numerical modeling of wave propagation in functionally graded materials using time-domain spectral Chebyshev elements  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Numerical modeling of the Lamb wave propagation in functionally graded materials (FGMs) by a two-dimensional time-domain spectral finite element method (SpFEM) is presented. The high-order Chebyshev polynomials as approximation functions are used in the present formulation, which provides the capability to take into account the through thickness variation of the material properties. The efficiency and accuracy of the present model with one and two layers of 5th order spectral elements in modeling wave propagation in FGM plates are analyzed. Different excitation frequencies in a wide range of 28-350 kHz are investigated, and the dispersion properties obtained by the present model are verified by reference results. The through thickness wave structure of two principal Lamb modes are extracted and analyzed by the symmetry and relative amplitude of the vertical and horizontal oscillations. The differences with respect to Lamb modes generated in homogeneous plates are explained. Zero-crossing and wavelet signal processing-spectrum decomposition procedures are implemented to obtain phase and group velocities and their dispersion properties. So it is attested how this approach can be practically employed for simulation, calibration and optimization of Lamb wave based nondestructive evaluation techniques for the FGMs. The capability of modeling stress wave propagation through the thickness of an FGM specimen subjected to impact load is also investigated, which shows that the present method is highly accurate as compared with other existing reference data.

Hedayatrasa, Saeid; Bui, Tinh Quoc; Zhang, Chuanzeng; Lim, Chee Wah

2014-02-01

116

Impact force identification in aerospace panels by an inverse ultrasonic guided wave problem  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper deals with monitoring impacts on aluminum and composite aerospace panels. The specific problems addressed are (1) the identification of the impact forces (force magnitude time history) and (2) the discrimination of "damaging impacts" from "non-damaging impacts." Ultrasonic guided waves generated by the impacts are used as the sensing mechanism. Flexible Macro-Fiber Composite (MFC) patches are used as the ultrasonic receivers. The impact force identification method is based on an optimization routine which minimizes the difference between the experimental impact waves and the numerical impact waves calculated by a Semi-Analytical Finite Element (SAFE) forced analysis. The differentiation of "damaging impacts" vs. "non-damaging impacts" is based on a frequency analysis of the impact waves. These techniques are demonstrated through an extensive experimental testing program involving the following six specimens: an aluminum panel, a quasi-isotropic CFRP composite panel, a highly anisotropic CFRP composite panel, a stiffened aluminum panel, a stiffened quasi-isotropic CFRP composite panel, and a stiffened anisotropic CFRP composite panel. These panels were subjected to low-velocity hammer impacts and to high-velocity gas-gun impacts by ice projectiles at speeds up to 170 m/sec using UCSD's gas-gun test facility. In all of these experiments, the techniques summarized above gave excellent results for both impact force identification and impact force discrimination.

Bartoli, Ivan; Salamone, Salvatore; Lanza di Scalea, Francesco; Rhymer, Jennifer; Kim, Hyonny

2011-03-01

117

Solitary transversal waves and vibro-impact motions in infinite chains and rods  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper deals with traveling waves in non-linear infinite elastic systems (chains and rods). A passage to a long wavelength approximation is realized. Conditions of the solitary waves existence are analyzed. The waves with regard to elastic impacts have been investigated. 7 2000 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved. The study of non-linearities due to vibro-impacts is of significant practical

Yu V. Mikhlina; A. M. Volok

118

The impact of the summer 2003 heat wave in Iberia: how should we measure it?  

Microsoft Academic Search

We present a new approach to improve the reliability of quantifying the impact of a heat wave on mortality rates. We show,\\u000a for the recent European summer 2003 heat wave, that the use of absolute maximum temperature values, or number of days above\\u000a a given threshold, can be misleading. Here, we have assessed the impact of the heat wave on

J. Díaz; R. García-Herrera; R. M. Trigo; C. Linares; M. A. Valente; J. M. De Miguel; E. Hernández

2006-01-01

119

Quantum Canonical Tensor Model and AN Exact Wave Function  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Tensor models in various forms are being studied as models of quantum gravity. Among them the canonical tensor model has a canonical pair of rank-three tensors as dynamical variables, and is a pure constraint system with first-class constraints. The Poisson algebra of the first-class constraints has structure functions, and provides an algebraically consistent way of discretizing the Dirac first-class constraint algebra for general relativity. This paper successfully formulates the Wheeler-DeWitt scheme of quantization of the canonical tensor model; the ordering of operators in the constraints is determined without ambiguity by imposing Hermiticity and covariance on the constraints, and the commutation algebra of constraints takes essentially the same form as the classical Poisson algebra, i.e. is first-class. Thus one could consistently obtain, at least locally in the configuration space, wave functions of "universe" by solving the partial differential equations representing the constraints, i.e. the Wheeler-DeWitt equations for the quantum canonical tensor model. The unique wave function for the simplest nontrivial case is exactly and globally obtained. Although this case is far from being realistic, the wave function has a few physically interesting features; it shows that locality is favored, and that there exists a locus of configurations with features of beginning of universe.

Sasakura, Naoki

2013-08-01

120

Deducing spectroscopic factors from wave-function asymptotics  

SciTech Connect

In a coupled-channel model, we explore the effects of coupling between configurations on the radial behavior of the wave function and, in particular, on the spectroscopic factor (SF) and the asymptotic normalization coefficient (ANC). We evaluate the extraction of a SF from the ratio of the ANC of the coupled-channel model to that of a single-particle approximation of the wave function. We perform this study within a core+n collective model, which includes two states of the core that connect by a rotational coupling. To get additional insights, we also use a simplified model that takes a {delta} function for the coupling potential. Calculations are performed for {sup 11}Be. Fair agreement is obtained between the SF inferred from the single-particle approximation and the one obtained within the coupled-channel models. Significant discrepancies are observed only for large coupling strength and/or large admixture, that is, a small SF. This suggests that reliable SFs can be deduced from the wave-function asymptotics when the structure is dominated by one configuration, that is, for a large SF.

Capel, P. [Physique Quantique, C.P. 165/82, and Physique Nucleaire Theorique et Physique Mathematique, C.P. 229, Universite Libre de Bruxelles (ULB), B-1050 Brussels (Belgium); National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States); Danielewicz, P.; Nunes, F. M. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States)

2010-11-15

121

Configuration interaction wave functions: A seniority number approach  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This work deals with the configuration interaction method when an N-electron Hamiltonian is projected on Slater determinants which are classified according to their seniority number values. We study the spin features of the wave functions and the size of the matrices required to formulate states of any spin symmetry within this treatment. Correlation energies associated with the wave functions arising from the seniority-based configuration interaction procedure are determined for three types of molecular orbital basis: canonical molecular orbitals, natural orbitals, and the orbitals resulting from minimizing the expectation value of the N-electron seniority number operator. The performance of these bases is analyzed by means of numerical results obtained from selected N-electron systems of several spin symmetries. The comparison of the results highlights the efficiency of the molecular orbital basis which minimizes the mean value of the seniority number for a state, yielding energy values closer to those provided by the full configuration interaction procedure.

Alcoba, Diego R.; Torre, Alicia; Lain, Luis; Massaccesi, Gustavo E.; Oña, Ofelia B.

2014-06-01

122

Laughlin wave function and one-dimensional free fermions  

SciTech Connect

Making use of the well-known phase-space reduction in the lowest Landau level, we show that the Laughlin wave function for the {nu}=1/{ital m} case can be obtained exactly as a coherent-state representation of a one-dimensional (1D) wave function. The 1D system consists of {ital m} copies of free fermions associated with each of the {ital N} electrons, confined in a common harmonic well potential. Interestingly, the condition for this exact correspondence is found to incorporate Jain`s parton picture. We argue that this correspondence between the free fermions and quantum Hall effect is due to the mapping of the 1D system under consideration to the Gaussian unitary ensemble in the random matrix theory.

Panigrahi, P.K.; Sivakumar, M. [School of Physics, University of Hyderabad, Hyderabad-500 134 (India)] [School of Physics, University of Hyderabad, Hyderabad-500 134 (India)

1995-11-15

123

Analytical wave functions for atomic quantum-defect theory  

Microsoft Academic Search

We present an exactly solvable effective potential that reproduces atomic spectra in the limit of exact quantum-defect theory, i.e., the limit in which, for a fixed l, the principal quantum number is modified by a constant: n*=n-delta(l). Transition probabilities for alkali atoms are calculated using the analytical wave functions obtained and agree well with accepted values. This allows us to

V. Alan Kostelecký; Michael Martin Nieto

1985-01-01

124

Interpreting the Quantum Wave Function in Terms of 'Interacting Faculties'  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this article we discuss the problem of finding an interpretation of\\u000aquantum mechanics which provides an objective account of physical reality. In\\u000athe first place we discuss the problem of interpretation and analyze the\\u000aimportance of such an objective account in physics. In this context we present\\u000athe problems which arise when interpreting the quantum wave function within the

Christian de Ronde

2007-01-01

125

Density functional perturbation theory within the projector augmented wave method  

Microsoft Academic Search

Density functional perturbation theory (DFPT) with ultrasoft pseudopotentials (US-PPs) is extended to the projector augmented wave (PAW) method. I show that minor modifications of the existing DFPT codes for US-PPs are sufficient for dealing with PAW. A few applications to small molecules (CO, H2O ) and to ferromagnetic Fe in the body-centered cubic structure validate the theory. Bibtex entry for

Andrea Dal Corso

2010-01-01

126

Computations of hypervelocity impact using the CTH shock wave physics code  

Microsoft Academic Search

Computer simulations of several hypervelocity impact events using the multi-dimensional, multi-material CTH shock wave physics code are presented and discussed. First, some two-dimensional CTH calculations are presented. These are then compared with calculations using another Eulerian shock wave physics code (CSQ) and with flash X-ray photographs of the impact events. Fully three-dimensional computations, including simulations of oblique impacts, are then

Frederick J. Zeigler; J. Michael McGlaun; Samuel L. Thompson; Timothy G. Trucano

1987-01-01

127

Analytical expressions for the log-amplitude correlation function for spherical wave propagation through anisotropic non-Kolmogorov atmosphere.  

PubMed

An analytical expression for the log-amplitude correlation function based on the Rytov approximation is derived for spherical wave propagation through an anisotropic non-Kolmogorov refractive turbulent atmosphere. The expression reduces correctly to the previously published analytic expressions for the case of spherical wave propagation through isotropic Kolmogorov turbulence. These results agree well with a wave-optics simulation based on the more general Fresnel approximation, as well as with numerical evaluations, for low-to-moderate strengths of turbulence. These results are useful for understanding the potential impact of deviations from the standard isotropic Kolmogorov spectrum. PMID:24561950

Gudimetla, V S Rao; Holmes, Richard B; Riker, Jim F

2014-01-01

128

Analytical expressions for the log-amplitude correlation function for plane wave propagation in anisotropic non-Kolmogorov refractive turbulence.  

PubMed

An analytical expression for the log-amplitude correlation function for plane wave propagation through anisotropic non-Kolmogorov turbulent atmosphere is derived. The closed-form analytic results are based on the Rytov approximation. These results agree well with wave optics simulation based on the more general Fresnel approximation as well as with numerical evaluations, for low-to-moderate strengths of turbulence. The new expression reduces correctly to the previously published analytic expressions for the cases of plane wave propagation through both nonisotropic Kolmogorov turbulence and isotropic non-Kolmogorov turbulence cases. These results are useful for understanding the potential impact of deviations from the standard isotropic Kolmogorov spectrum. PMID:23455912

Gudimetla, V S Rao; Holmes, Richard B; Riker, Jim F

2012-12-01

129

S-wave velocity structure in southwest China from surface wave tomography and receiver functions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Using the surface wave records of 504 teleseismic events at 50 temporal and 92 permanent seismic stations in southwest China, we extracted the phase velocity dispersion curves with interstation correlation method, and obtained the phase velocity maps at 10, 15, 25, 40, 60 and 75 s with a grid space of 0.5×0.5 from surface wave tomography. Meanwhile, we obtained the S-wave velocity structures beneath three profiles from the joint inversion of receiver functions and surface waves. From the maps at short periods (10 and 15 s) and long periods (40, 60 and 75 s), different distribution features of high velocity zones (HVZs for short) and low velocity zones (LVZs for short) are shown in the study area: HVZs at short periods are shown in the Panzhihua - Emeishan region, Sichuan basin and Weixi-Lijiang region, surrounding the LVZs from Songpan-Ganzi block to the east of Lijiang where there are significant higher elevations; whereas HVZs at long periods are shown in the Weixi-Lijiang region, Panzhihua-Chuxiong basin and Kunming-Tonghai region and forming a line in the center part of the study area, and the fast polarization directions of the shear wave from SKS analysis on the two sides of the line change significantly. These phenomena indicate plateau material flow can be blocked in two different depth intervals and leads to different horizontal extensions. From the maps at long periods and the structures along the profiles, LVZs are shown in the upper mantle beneath rapid slip fault zones, such as Anninghe - Zemuhe - Xiaojiang fault zone, Red River fault zone and Xiaojinhe fault zone, implying these faults are deep penetrating faults. Figure (a-f) Rayleigh wave phase velocity maps at 10, 15, 25,40,60 and 75 s with a resolution of 100 km. The black lines represent faults. The red points represent M?6 earthquakes. The colour scale changes in different panels. Figure (g) Distribution of the seismic stations and regional tectonic features in the study area. Figure (h-j) The S wave velocity structures beneath the profiles AA', BB' and CC' from the joint inversion of receiver functions and surface waves. The results at different stations are vertically projected to the profiles.

Wang, W.; Wu, J.; Fang, L.; Lai, G.; Yang, T.

2013-12-01

130

Statistical properties and correlation functions for drift waves  

SciTech Connect

The dissipative one-field drift wave equation is solved using the pseudospectral method to generate steady-state fluctuations. The fluctuations are analyzed in terms of space-time correlation functions and modal probability distributions. Nearly Gaussian statistics and exponential decay of the two-time correlation functions occur in the presence of electron dissipation, while in the absence of electron dissipation long-lived vortical structures occur. Formulas from renormalized, Markovianized statistical turbulence theory are given in a local approximation to interpret the dissipative turbulence.

Horton, W.

1986-05-01

131

The impact of heat waves on children's health: a systematic review.  

PubMed

Young children are thought to be particularly sensitive to heat waves, but relatively less research attention has been paid to this field to date. A systematic review was conducted to elucidate the relationship between heat waves and children's health. Literature published up to August 2012 were identified using the following MeSH terms and keywords: "heatwave", "heat wave", "child health", "morbidity", "hospital admission", "emergency department visit", "family practice", "primary health care", "death" and "mortality". Of the 628 publications identified, 12 met the selection criteria. The existing literature does not consistently suggest that mortality among children increases significantly during heat waves, even though infants were associated with more heat-related deaths. Exposure to heat waves in the perinatal period may pose a threat to children's health. Pediatric diseases or conditions associated with heat waves include renal disease, respiratory disease, electrolyte imbalance and fever. Future research should focus on how to develop a consistent definition of a heat wave from a children's health perspective, identifying the best measure of children's exposure to heat waves, exploring sensitive outcome measures to quantify the impact of heat waves on children, evaluating the possible impacts of heat waves on children's birth outcomes, and understanding the differences in vulnerability to heat waves among children of different ages and from different income countries. Projection of the children's disease burden caused by heat waves under climate change scenarios, and development of effective heat wave mitigation and adaptation strategies that incorporate other child protective health measures, are also strongly recommended. PMID:23525899

Xu, Zhiwei; Sheffield, Perry E; Su, Hong; Wang, Xiaoyu; Bi, Yan; Tong, Shilu

2014-03-01

132

Electronic Wave Functions. XI. A Calculation of Eight Variational Wave Functions for Cl, Cl, S and S-  

Microsoft Academic Search

The variational co-detor method has been applied to calculate wave functions and energies for the P2 and S2 states of Cl, the S1 state of Cl-, the P3, D1, S1 and P03 states of S and the P2 state of S-. This is the first application of the method to atoms of the second chemical period, and is thus an

S. F. Boys; V. E. Price

1954-01-01

133

A wave propagation model for the high velocity impact response of a composite sandwich panel  

Microsoft Academic Search

A solution methodology to predict the residual velocity of a hemispherical-nose cylindrical projectile impacting a composite sandwich panel at high velocity is presented. The term high velocity impact is used to describe impact scenarios where the projectile perforates the panel and exits with a residual velocity. The solution is derived from a wave propagation model involving deformation and failure of

Michelle S. Hoo Fatt; Dushyanth Sirivolu

2010-01-01

134

Projector augmented-wave method: Application to relativistic spin-density functional theory  

Microsoft Academic Search

Applying the projector augmented-wave (PAW) method to relativistic spin-density functional theory (RSDFT) we derive PAW Dirac-Kohn-Sham equations for four-component spinor pseudo-wave-functions. The PAW freedom to add a vanishing operator inside the PAW spheres allows us to transform these PAW Dirac-type equations into PAW Pauli-type equations for two-component spinor pseudo-wave-functions. With these wave functions, we get the frozen-core energy as well

Andrea Dal Corso

2010-01-01

135

Ramp wave generation using graded areal density ceramic flyers and the plate impact technique  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A requirement exists to generate realistic insults in energetic targets, for example ramp loadings leading to shock waves. This paper examines the development of a ceramic flyer ramp wave generation technique. Ceramic stereolithography was used to produce fully-dense, graded areal density alumina ceramic flyers. These flyers consisted of multiple square pyramids arranged on a solid base. The gas gun plate impact and electromagnetic particle velocity gauge techniques were used to observe the ramp waves generated when the flyers impacted a Kel-F 81 polymer target. Ramp waves of varying properties were successfully generated in the targets, and good agreement was obtained with 3D hydrocode modelling.

Taylor, P.; Goff, M.; Hazell, P. J.; Leighs, J.; Wood, D.; Appleby-Thomas, G. J.

2014-05-01

136

An efficient procedure for the development of optimized Projector Augmented Wave basis functions  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the Projector Augmented Wave (PAW) method, a local potential, basis functions, and projector functions form an All-Electron (AE) basis for valence wave functions in the application of Density Functional Theory (DFT). The construction of these potentials, basis functions and projector functions for each element can be complex, and several codes capable of utilizing the PAW method have been otherwise

R. J. Snow; A. F. Wright; C. Y. Fong

2010-01-01

137

Love wave propagation in functionally graded piezoelectric material layer.  

PubMed

An exact approach is used to investigate Love waves in functionally graded piezoelectric material (FGPM) layer bonded to a semi-infinite homogeneous solid. The piezoelectric material is polarized in z-axis direction and the material properties change gradually with the thickness of the layer. We here assume that all material properties of the piezoelectric layer have the same exponential function distribution along the x-axis direction. The analytical solutions of dispersion relations are obtained for electrically open or short circuit conditions. The effects of the gradient variation of material constants on the phase velocity, the group velocity, and the coupled electromechanical factor are discussed in detail. The displacement, electric potential, and stress distributions along thickness of the graded layer are calculated and plotted. Numerical examples indicate that appropriate gradient distributing of the material properties make Love waves to propagate along the surface of the piezoelectric layer, or a bigger electromechanical coupling factor can be obtained, which is in favor of acquiring a better performance in surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices. PMID:17107699

Du, Jianke; Jin, Xiaoying; Wang, Ji; Xian, Kai

2007-03-01

138

Multiconfigurational electronic wave functions without a reference configuration: Analysis of a simulated annealing strategy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Multiconfigurational floating Gaussian electronic wave functions are obtained for a variety of 2-electron atoms and for H2. These correlated wave functions are unusual in that they are constructed without taking excitations from a reference configuration. The description of electron correlation, the degree to which the proper ground state symmetry is attained, and the behavior of wave functions obtained by simulated

Dario A. Estrin; Chiachin Tsoo; Sherwin J. Singer

1990-01-01

139

Propagation of impact-induced shock waves in porous sandstone using mesoscale modeling  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Abstract-Generation and propagation of shock <span class="hlt">waves</span> by meteorite <span class="hlt">impact</span> is significantly affected by material properties such as porosity, water content, and strength. The objective of this work was to quantify processes related to the shock-induced compaction of pore space by numerical modeling, and compare the results with data obtained in the framework of the Multidisciplinary Experimental and Modeling <span class="hlt">Impact</span> Research Network (MEMIN) <span class="hlt">impact</span> experiments. We use mesoscale models resolving the collapse of individual pores to validate macroscopic (homogenized) approaches describing the bulk behavior of porous and water-saturated materials in large-scale models of crater formation, and to quantify localized shock amplification as a result of pore space crushing. We carried out a suite of numerical models of planar shock <span class="hlt">wave</span> propagation through a well-defined area (the "sample") of porous and/or water-saturated material. The porous sample is either represented by a homogeneous unit where porosity is treated as a state variable (macroscale model) and water content by an equation of state for mixed material (ANEOS) or by a defined number of individually resolved pores (mesoscale model). We varied porosity and water content and measured thermodynamic parameters such as shock <span class="hlt">wave</span> velocity and particle velocity on meso- and macroscales in separate simulations. The mesoscale models provide additional data on the heterogeneous distribution of peak shock pressures as a consequence of the complex superposition of reflecting rarefaction <span class="hlt">waves</span> and shock <span class="hlt">waves</span> originating from the crushing of pores. We quantify the bulk effect of porosity, the reduction in shock pressure, in terms of Hugoniot data as a <span class="hlt">function</span> of porosity, water content, and strength of a quartzite matrix. We find a good agreement between meso-, macroscale models and Hugoniot data from shock experiments. We also propose a combination of a porosity compaction model (?-? model) that was previously only used for porous materials and the ANEOS for water-saturated quartzite (all pore space is filled with water) to describe the behavior of partially water-saturated material during shock compression. Localized amplification of shock pressures results from pore collapse and can reach as much as four times the average shock pressure in the porous sample. This may explain the often observed localized high shock pressure phases next to more or less unshocked grains in impactites and meteorites.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">GÜLdemeister, Nicole; WÜNnemann, Kai; Durr, Nathanael; Hiermaier, Stefan</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">140</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19990079377&hterms=adoption&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D90%26Ntt%3Dadoption"> <span id="translatedtitle">A Critical Examination of Wind-<span class="hlt">Wave</span> Spectral <span class="hlt">Functional</span> Form</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Traditionally, data from random ocean <span class="hlt">waves</span> are presented in spectral <span class="hlt">functions</span>. The spectra are the result of Fourier analysis. Fourier spectral analysis has dominated data analysis for, at least, the last hundred years. It has been the standard method for is examining the global amplitude-frequency distributions. Although Fourier transform valid under extremely general conditions, there are some crucial restrictions for the Fourier spectral analysis. The system must be linear, and the data must be stationary- otherwise, the resulting spectrum will make little physical sense. The stationarity requirement is also a common required criterion for most of other available data analysis methods. Nevertheless, few, if any, natural phenomena are linear and stationary. To compound these complications is the imperfection of our probes or numerical schemes the interactions of the imperfect probes even with a perfect linear system can make the final data nonlinear. Furthermore, all the available data are usually of finite duration. Under these conditions, Fourier analysis is of limited use, For lack of alternatives, however, Fourier analysis is still used to process such data. The loose application of Fourier analysis and the insouciant adoption of the stationary and linear assumptions may lead to misleading conclusions. Ocean <span class="hlt">waves</span> are know to be nonlinear, and the wind system generating the <span class="hlt">wave</span> field are seldom stationary- As a result, the traditional examination of the spectral form hardly made physical sense. A new method for analyzing nonlinear and nonstationary data has been developed. The key part is the Empirical Mode Decomposition (EMD) method with which any complicated data set can be decomposed into a finite and often small number of Intrinsic Mode <span class="hlt">Functions</span> (IMF) that serve as the basis of the representation of the data, This decomposition method is adaptive, and, therefore, highly efficient. The IMFs admit well-behaved Hilbert transforms, and yield instantaneous energy and frequency as <span class="hlt">functions</span> of time that give sharp identifications of imbedded structures. The final presentation of the results is an energy-frequency-time distribution, designated as the Hilbert Spectrum. Among the main conceptual innovations is the introduction of the instantaneous frequencies for complicated data sets, which eliminate the need of spurious harmonics to represent nonlinear and nonstationary signals. The spectral forms of the ocean <span class="hlt">waves</span> are very different. This new method offers the first physical meaningful view of the <span class="hlt">wave</span> spectrum. Data from laboratory and field will be presented to illustrate the differences.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Huang, Norden E.; Long, Steven R.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1999-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_6");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> 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<img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">141</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010AGUFMGC51B0759I"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Impact</span> of Tropical Instability <span class="hlt">Waves</span> on ENSO characteristics</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Tropical instability <span class="hlt">waves</span> (TIWs) are equatorial sub-synoptic-scale eddies observed both in the Pacific and Atlantic Oceans as cusp-shaped frontal <span class="hlt">waves</span> propagating westward during the second half of the year. It is known that TIWs are produced due both to a barotropic shear of an equatorial current system and to a meridional gradient of density and sea surface temperature (SST) through a baroclinic instability. TIWs are an important mechanism for distributing heat in the meridional direction. Recent study suggested that TIWs could play an important role in producing the asymmetry between El Niño and La Niña (An, 2008). In this study, the <span class="hlt">impact</span> of TIWs in the Pacific Ocean on El Niño/Southen Oscillation (ENSO) is investigated by introducing a new scheme of TIWs into a coupled atmosphere-ocean general circulation model (AOGCM) MIROC. 100-year integrations are performed with and without the TIW parameterization which is the first attempt to represent the effect of baroclinic eddy heat transport. A comparison between two experiments figure out the three important roles of baroclinic eddies in ENSO characteristic. One is the responsibility of TIWs for ENSO asymmetry as suggested by An (2008). It is suggested that asymmetric heat transport associated with TIWs which are active (inactive) during La Niño (El Niño) gives an asymmetric negative feedback to ENSO, and explain the observed asymmetric feature of stronger-amplitude El Niño and weaker-amplitude La Niña asymmetry. Although previous studies have been suggested various possible factors affecting ENSO asymmetry, the significance level of TIW effect is still not clear. Yet, our results show that TIW-induced heat transport has a significant role in inducing ENSO skewness. The second role of baroclinic eddies is to promote the lower frequency of ENSO, because the stratification modified by the eddy heat transport around the off-equatorial thermocline is favorable for the reduction of the phase speed of the equatorial Rossby <span class="hlt">wave</span>. As the third role of TIWs, it is found that the damping effect of TIW-induced heating which is dominant near the surface results in suppressing the temperature variations induced by a SST mode (Neelin et al,. 1998 ;Guilyardi, 2006) of ENSO. As a result, the contribution of a thermocline mode (Guilyardi, 2006) relatively increases. The resulting changes in ENSO characteristics are consistent with the observed ENSO modulation including increase of period, asymmetry, and shift from SST to thermocline mode, concurrent with the observed 1970’s climate shift. The result of ocean assimilation conducted by high-resolution MIROC also shows the increasing TIW activity through the increasing meridional density gradient in the eastern tropical Pacific associated with the climate shift. Therefore, this numerical approach provides a new suggestion that TIWs have an important role in the interaction between the Pacific decadal variability and ENSO, and have possibility to contribute to the understanding of them.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Imada, Y.; Kimoto, M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">142</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/20695498"> <span id="translatedtitle">Relativistic treatment of pion <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> in the annihilation pp{yields}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Quark model intrinsic <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> of highly energetic pions in the reaction pp{yields}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +} are subjected to a relativistic treatment. The annihilation is described in a constituent quark model with A2 and R2 flavor-flux topology, and the annihilated quark-antiquark pairs are in {sup 3}P{sub 0} and {sup 3}S{sub 1} states. We study the effects of pure Lorentz transformations on the antiquark and quark spatial <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> and their respective spinors in the pion. The modified quark geometry of the pion has considerable <span class="hlt">impact</span> on the angular dependence of the annihilation mechanisms.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">El-Bennich, B.; Kloet, W.M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rutgers University, 136 Frelinghuysen Road, Piscataway, New Jersey 08854-8019 (United States)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">143</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3505979"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Functional</span> <span class="hlt">impact</span> bias reveals cancer drivers</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Identifying cancer driver genes and pathways among all somatic mutations detected in a cohort of tumors is a key challenge in cancer genomics. Traditionally, this is done by prioritizing genes according to the recurrence of alterations that they bear. However, this approach has some known limitations, such as the difficulty to correctly estimate the background mutation rate, and the fact that it cannot identify lowly recurrently mutated driver genes. Here we present a novel approach, Oncodrive-fm, to detect candidate cancer drivers which does not rely on recurrence. First, we hypothesized that any bias toward the accumulation of variants with high <span class="hlt">functional</span> <span class="hlt">impact</span> observed in a gene or group of genes may be an indication of positive selection and can thus be used to detect candidate driver genes or gene modules. Next, we developed a method to measure this bias (FM bias) and applied it to three datasets of tumor somatic variants. As a proof of concept of our hypothesis we show that most of the highly recurrent and well-known cancer genes exhibit a clear FM bias. Moreover, this novel approach avoids some known limitations of recurrence-based approaches, and can successfully identify lowly recurrent candidate cancer drivers.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Gonzalez-Perez, Abel; Lopez-Bigas, Nuria</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">144</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2005IJQC..102..250N"> <span id="translatedtitle">On calculations of correlated <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> with heavy configurational mixing</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We discuss aspects of the theory and computation of <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> and energies of discrete states of polyelectronic atoms that are represented in zero order by configurations with holes in subshells below the valence subshell. Both in zero order and in the remaining correlation components, such <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> have particularities stemming from the state-specific self-consistent field and the heavy configurational mixing associated with near-degeneracies and hole-filling correlations. By referring to a variety of examples from small- and large-scale calculations, it is noted that appropriate penetration into the many-body problem can provide, in an economic and physically transparent way, reliable interpretations and semi- and fully quantitative understanding of issues related to states with inner holes and to cases of near-degeneracies that result in strongly correlated <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span>. Whenever hole-filling correlations are allowed, multiple correlations (i.e., beyond single- and double-orbital substitutions in the single reference configuration) acquire increased importance relative to that in ordinary electronic structures. This is demonstrated via large-scale multiconfigurational Hartree-Fock (MCHF) plus configuration interaction (CI) calculations on the Cl KL3s3p62S discrete state, which is the lowest of its symmetry. The calculations incorporated correlations up to selected sextuple orbital excitations from the M shell. MCHF plus CI calculations at the level of quadruple orbital substitutions were also carried out for the Cl KL3s23p52Po ground state and the excitation energy at this level of calculation was found to be 85,364 cm-1, in excellent agreement with the experimental value of the fine-structure-weighted average, 85,385 cm-1 (10.59 eV). Within the approximations of the calculation, the hole-filling triple and quadruple orbital correlations, which, of course, are absent from the 2Po state, contribute about 1 eV, which is significant.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Nicolaides, Cleanthes A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">145</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012AGUFMOS11C1664D"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Impact</span> of grouping on growth of ocean <span class="hlt">waves</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The problem of growth of ocean <span class="hlt">waves</span> by wind has been considered many times during the last fifty years but many aspect of the phenomenon is still not understood. It is commonly assumed that the growth of <span class="hlt">waves</span> by wind is mainly driven by Miles inviscid mechanism, which assumes that the critical layer is confined inside the viscous sublayer. In this study we are considering the influence of grouping on the growth of ocean <span class="hlt">waves</span> induced by wind. For this a finite volume computational model for a two dimensional turbulent shear flow of air over a moving <span class="hlt">wave</span> group was developed. Numerical simulations involving different <span class="hlt">wave</span> groups (different heights, different number of <span class="hlt">waves</span> in the group, different shapes of <span class="hlt">waves</span>) as well as different wind velocities, were carried. Our attention is focused on the disturbed air flow right above the surface of the <span class="hlt">wave</span> and its effects on the flow structure in the vicinity of the critical layer. We Show that the critical layer height varies above the group of <span class="hlt">waves</span> and is not confined to the viscous sublayer.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Drullion, F.; Sajjadi, S.; Hunt, J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">146</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011PhRvB..83p5116D"> <span id="translatedtitle">Tunneling matrix elements with antiferromagnetic Gutzwiller <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We use a generalized Gutzwiller approximation elaborated to evaluate matrix elements with partially projected <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> and formerly applied to homogeneous systems [N. Fukushima , Phys. Rev. BPRBMDO1098-012110.1103/PhysRevB.72.144505 72, 144505 (2005); B. Edegger , Adv. Phys. 56, 927 (2007)]. In the present paper we consider projected single-particle (hole) excitations for electronic systems with antiferromagnetic order and obtain the corresponding tunneling probabilities. The accuracy and the reliability of our analytical approximation is tested using the variational Monte Carlo method. Possible comparisons with experimental results are also discussed.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">di Ciolo, Andrea; Tocchio, Luca F.; Gros, Claudius</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">147</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1983dspw.rept.....S"> <span id="translatedtitle">Dirac single particle <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> in inelastic electron scattering</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Inelastic electron scattering using Dirac single particle wavefunctions are formulated to describe the nuclear states. The lower components of these wavefunctions are much larger than those obtained assuming a free space relation with the upper component taken to be a Schroedinger single particle <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span>. The impulse approximation to the nuclear current operator is ambiguous in the present case. One of the two possible forms yields an explicitly conserved current in the single particle limit. An inelastic amplitude is identified which is linear in the lower components and is therefore very sensitive to the relativity of the bound nucleons. This amplitude is dominant for transverse isoscalar transitions.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Shephard, J. R.; Rost, E.; Siciliano, E. R.; McNeil, J. A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">148</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21254359"> <span id="translatedtitle">Four-site Higgsless model with <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> mixing</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Motivated by models of holographic technicolor, we discuss a four-site deconstructed Higgsless model with nontrivial <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> mixing. We compute the spectrum of the model, the electroweak triple gauge-boson vertices, and, for brane-localized fermions, the electroweak parameters to O(M{sub W}{sup 2}/M{sub {rho}}{sup 2}). We discuss the conditions under which {alpha}S vanishes (even for brane-localized fermions) and the (distinct but overlapping) conditions under which the phenomenologically interesting decay a{sub 1}{yields}W{gamma} is nonzero and suppressed by only one power of (M{sub W}/M{sub {rho}})</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Chivukula, R. Sekhar; Simmons, Elizabeth H. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">149</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1999FizB....8..193B"> <span id="translatedtitle">Hyperspherical Ground State <span class="hlt">Wave</span> <span class="hlt">Functions</span> for Nuclei with a > 4</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The general formulation of a technically advantageous method to find the ground state solution of the Schrödinger equation in configuration space for systems with the number of particles A greater than 4 is presented. The <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> is expanded in pair-correlated hyperspherical harmonics beyond the lowest-order approximation and then calculated in the Faddeev approach. A recent efficient recursive method to construct antisymmetric A-particle hyperspherical harmonics is used. The accuracy is tested for the bound-state energies of nuclei with A = 6 to 12 using the effective V4 potentials. The high quality of the obtained results becomes evident from a comparison with other approaches.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Barnea, Nir; Leidemann, Winfried; Orlandini, Giuseppina</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">150</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013NJPh...15k5008G"> <span id="translatedtitle">Quantum fluctuation relations for ensembles of <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">New quantum fluctuation relations are presented. In contrast with the standard approach, where the initial state of the driven system is described by the (micro) canonical density matrix, here we assume that it is described by a (micro) canonical distribution of <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span>, as originally proposed by Schrödinger. While the standard fluctuation relations are based on von Neumann measurement postulate, these new fluctuation relations do not involve any quantum collapse, but involve instead a notion of work as the change in expectation of the Hamiltonian.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">>Michele Campisi, <author</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">151</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.agu.org/journals/jc/v085/iC09/JC085iC09p04957/JC085iC09p04957.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Ocean <span class="hlt">Wave</span>-Radar Modulation Transfer <span class="hlt">Functions</span> From the West Coast Experiment</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Short gravity-capillary <span class="hlt">waves</span>, the equilibrium, or the steady state excitations of the ocean surface are modulated by longer ocean <span class="hlt">waves</span>. These short <span class="hlt">waves</span> are the predominant microwave scatterers on the ocean surface under many viewing conditions so that the modulation is readily measured with CW Doppler radar used as a two-scale <span class="hlt">wave</span> probe. Modulation transfer <span class="hlt">functions</span> (the ratio of the</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">J. W. Wright; W. J. Plant; W. C. Keller; W. L. Jones</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1980-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">152</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=ADA531115"> <span id="translatedtitle">Factors Affecting Energy Absorption of a Plate during Shock <span class="hlt">Wave</span> <span class="hlt">Impact</span> Using a Damage Material Model.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This thesis examines the influences of five factors on the strain energy at failure of metallic alloy plates during a shock <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">impact</span>. The five factors are material type, initial damage, boundary conditions, plate thickness, and plate temperature. The f...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Z. K. Crosby</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">153</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/49264650"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Wave</span> propagation and transient response of a FGM plate under a point <span class="hlt">impact</span> load based on higher-order shear deformation theory</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">In this paper, the <span class="hlt">wave</span> propagation and transient response of an infinite <span class="hlt">functionally</span> graded plate under a point <span class="hlt">impact</span> load are presented. The effective material properties of <span class="hlt">functionally</span> graded materials (FGMs) for the plate are assumed to vary continuously through the plate thickness and be distributed according to a volume fraction power law along the plate thickness. Based on the</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Dan Sun; Song-Nan Luo</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">154</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.springerlink.com/index/l2477476103t16h8.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Heat <span class="hlt">Wave</span> Hazards: An Overview of Heat <span class="hlt">Wave</span> <span class="hlt">Impacts</span> in Canada</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Extreme heat events are natural hazards affecting Canada and many other regions of the world. This paper presents an overview of the issues involved in defining heat <span class="hlt">waves</span> and harmful hot weather events, followed by a spatial and historical overview of heat <span class="hlt">waves</span> across Canada, and an assessment of heat <span class="hlt">wave</span> adaptation potential in selected cities. The Prairies, Southern Ontario,</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Karen E. Smoyer-Tomic; Robyn Kuhn; Alana Hudson</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">155</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/1625037"> <span id="translatedtitle">Ring-<span class="hlt">waves</span> generated by water drops <span class="hlt">impacting</span> on water surfaces at rest</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Radar observations of the ocean surface can be affected by <span class="hlt">impacting</span> raindrops. Ring-<span class="hlt">wave</span> measurements are presented for drops of 2.2 and 2.8 mm in diameter <span class="hlt">impacting</span> on fresh and salt water surfaces initially at rest. They are based on the observation of the mirror image of a sharp edge on the perturbed surface. The retrieved <span class="hlt">wave</span> profiles show a rather</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Christophe Craeye; Piotr W. Sobieski; Larry F. Bliven; Albert Guissard</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1999-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">156</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19740061866&hterms=Blum&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D50%26Ntt%3DBlum"> <span id="translatedtitle">A technique for generating shear <span class="hlt">waves</span> in cylindrical shells under radial <span class="hlt">impact</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Experimental techniques are developed to study and measure the shear-<span class="hlt">wave</span> velocity in an aluminum cylindrical shell subjected to a radial <span class="hlt">impact</span>. The radial <span class="hlt">impact</span> is obtained by exploding an electrical detonator inserted in plastic plugs mounted on the end of the shell. Strain gages, mounted on the outside surface of the shell at various axial locations, are used to obtain oscilloscope traces from which the shear-<span class="hlt">wave</span> velocity can be calculated.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Blum, A.; Mortimer, R. W.; Rose, J. L.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1974-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">157</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/3909481"> <span id="translatedtitle">The <span class="hlt">impact</span> of heat <span class="hlt">waves</span> and cold spells on mortality rates in the Dutch population</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">We conducted the study described in this paper to investigate the <span class="hlt">impact</span> of ambient temperature on mortality in the Netherlands during 1979-1997, the <span class="hlt">impact</span> of heat <span class="hlt">waves</span> and cold spells on mortality in particular, and the possibility of any heat <span class="hlt">wave</span>- or cold spell-induced forward dis- placement of mortality. We found a V-like relationship between mortality and temperature, with an</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Maud M. T. E. Huynen; P Martens; Dieneke Schram; Matty P. Weijenberg; Anton E. Kunst</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2001-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">158</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/26498873"> <span id="translatedtitle">Gas filtration during the <span class="hlt">impact</span> of weak shock <span class="hlt">waves</span> on granular layers</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">This paper deals with the unsteady gas filtration through a granular layer attached to a rigid end-wall when <span class="hlt">impacted</span> head-on by a weak shock <span class="hlt">wave</span> in a shock tube. The main goal of the present work is to study the gas pressure field developed inside the granular layer during its compression by the shock <span class="hlt">wave</span>. A physical model is proposed</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">A. Britan; G. Ben-Dor; T. Elperin; O. Igra; J. P. Jiang</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1997-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">159</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.as.miami.edu/geography/research/climatology/Shanghai%20HHWS_IJB.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Heat <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">impacts</span> on mortality in Shanghai, 1998 and 2003</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">A variety of research has linked extreme heat to heightened levels of daily mortality and, not surprisingly, heat <span class="hlt">waves</span> both in 1998 and in 2003 all led to elevated mortality in Shanghai, China. While the heat <span class="hlt">waves</span> in the two years were similar in meteorological character, elevated mortality was much more pronounced during the 1998 event, but it remains unclear</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Jianguo Tan; Youfei Zheng; Guixiang Song; Laurence S. Kalkstein; Adam J. Kalkstein; Xu Tang</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">160</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014EGUGA..1614392S"> <span id="translatedtitle">The stability of freak <span class="hlt">waves</span> with regard to external <span class="hlt">impact</span> and perturbation of initial data</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We investigate solutions of the equations, describing freak <span class="hlt">waves</span>, in perspective of stability with regard to external <span class="hlt">impact</span> and perturbation of initial data. The modeling of freak <span class="hlt">waves</span> is based on numerical solution of equations describing a non-stationary potential flow of the ideal fluid with a free surface. We consider the two-dimensional infinitely deep flow. For <span class="hlt">waves</span> modeling we use the equations in conformal variables. The variant of these equations is offered in [1]. Mathematical correctness of these equations was discussed in [2]. These works establish the uniqueness of solutions, offer the effective numerical solution calculation methods, prove the numerical convergence of these methods. The important aspect of numerical modeling of freak <span class="hlt">waves</span> is the stability of solutions, describing these <span class="hlt">waves</span>. In this work we study the questions of stability with regards to external <span class="hlt">impact</span> and perturbation of initial data. We showed the stability of freak <span class="hlt">waves</span> numerical model, corresponding to the external <span class="hlt">impact</span>. We performed series of computational experiments with various freak <span class="hlt">wave</span> initial data and random external <span class="hlt">impact</span>. This <span class="hlt">impact</span> means the power density on free surface. In each experiment examine two <span class="hlt">waves</span>: the <span class="hlt">wave</span> that was formed by external <span class="hlt">impact</span> and without one. In all the experiments we see the stability of equation`s solutions. The random external <span class="hlt">impact</span> practically does not change the time of freak <span class="hlt">wave</span> formation and its form. Later our work progresses to the investigation of solution's stability under perturbations of initial data. We take the initial data that provide a freak <span class="hlt">wave</span> and get the numerical solution. In common we take the numerical solution of equation with perturbation of initial data. The computing experiments showed that the freak <span class="hlt">waves</span> equations solutions are stable under perturbations of initial data.So we can make a conclusion that freak <span class="hlt">waves</span> are stable relatively external perturbation and perturbation of initial data both. 1. Zakharov V.E., Dyachenko A.I., Vasilyev O.A. New method for numerical simulation of a nonstationary potential flow of incompressible fluid with a free surface// Eur. J.~Mech. B Fluids. 2002. V. 21. P. 283-291. 2. R.V. Shamin. Dynamics of an Ideal Liquid with a Free Surface in Conformal Variables // Journal of Mathematical Sciences, Vol. 160, No. 5, 2009. P. 537-678. 3. R.V. Shamin, V.E. Zakharov, A.I. Dyachenko. How probability for freak <span class="hlt">wave</span> formation can be found // THE EUROPEAN PHYSICAL JOURNAL - SPECIAL TOPICS Volume 185, Number 1, 113-124, DOI: 10.1140/epjst/e2010-01242-y</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Smirnova, Anna; Shamin, Roman</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_7");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" 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showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">161</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24952519"> <span id="translatedtitle">Configuration interaction <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span>: A seniority number approach.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This work deals with the configuration interaction method when an N-electron Hamiltonian is projected on Slater determinants which are classified according to their seniority number values. We study the spin features of the <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> and the size of the matrices required to formulate states of any spin symmetry within this treatment. Correlation energies associated with the <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> arising from the seniority-based configuration interaction procedure are determined for three types of molecular orbital basis: canonical molecular orbitals, natural orbitals, and the orbitals resulting from minimizing the expectation value of the N-electron seniority number operator. The performance of these bases is analyzed by means of numerical results obtained from selected N-electron systems of several spin symmetries. The comparison of the results highlights the efficiency of the molecular orbital basis which minimizes the mean value of the seniority number for a state, yielding energy values closer to those provided by the full configuration interaction procedure. PMID:24952519</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Alcoba, Diego R; Torre, Alicia; Lain, Luis; Massaccesi, Gustavo E; Oña, Ofelia B</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-06-21</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">162</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/20650331"> <span id="translatedtitle">Quasirelativistic quasilocal finite <span class="hlt">wave-function</span> collapse model</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A Markovian <span class="hlt">wave-function</span> collapse model is presented where the collapse-inducing operator, constructed from quantum fields, is a manifestly covariant generalization of the mass-density operator utilized in the nonrelativistic continuous spontaneous localization (CSL) <span class="hlt">wave-function</span> collapse model. However, the model is not Lorentz invariant because two such operators do not commute at spacelike separation, i.e., the time-ordering operation in one Lorentz frame, the 'preferred' frame, is not the time-ordering operation in another frame. However, the characteristic spacelike distance over which the commutator decays is the particle's Compton wavelength so, since the commutator rapidly gets quite small, the model is 'almost' relativistic. This quasirelativistic CSL (QRCSL) model is completely finite: unlike previous, relativistic, models, it has no (infinite) energy production from the vacuum state. QRCSL calculations are given of the collapse rate for a single free particle in a superposition of spatially separated packets, and of the energy production rate for any number of free particles: these reduce to the CSL rates if the particle's Compton wavelength is small compared to the model's distance parameter. One motivation for QRCSL is the realization that previous relativistic models entail excitation of nuclear states which exceeds that of experiment, whereas QRCSL does not; an example is given involving quadrupole excitation of the {sup 74}Ge nucleus.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Pearle, Philip [Department of Physics, Hamilton College, Clinton, New York 13323 (United States)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">163</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2004APS..MARW36011O"> <span id="translatedtitle">Measuring electron <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> in nanostructures via photoemission</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Vicinal noble metal surfaces with regular arrays of straight steps and flat terraces can be used as model lateral superlattices to understand their basic electronic properties by means of photoemission. Here we focus on samples that display surface electron confinement within high index oriented terraces, i.e., lateral quantum well states. The photoemission intensity displays angular dependence in the direction perpendicular to the steps as expected for infinite, one-dimensional quantum wells [1]. In a first approach, such intensity represents the square modulus of the quantum well <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> in reciprocal space. Furthermore, the corresponding electron <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> in real space can be recovered applying an iterative formalism used in x-ray diffraction and called oversampling [2]. The method has been tested in Au(111) vicinal surfaces with regular arrays of monatomic steps, and further applied to faceted Cu(111) surfaces that also display lateral quantum wells. [1] A. Mugarza., A. Mascaraque, V. Pérez-Dieste, V. Repain, S. Rousset, F. J. García de Abajo, and J. E. Ortega, Phys. Rev. Lett. 87, 107601 (2001). [2] A. Mugarza, J. E. Ortega , F. J. Himpsel, and F. J. García de Abajo, Phys. Rev. B 67, 081404 (2003).</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ortega, Enrique; Mugarza, Aitor; Garcia de Abajo, Javier; Kuntze, Jens; Himpsel, Franz</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">164</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/eimsapi.dispdetail?deid=95909"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">IMPACTS</span> OF URBANIZATION ON WATERSHED HYDROLOGIC <span class="hlt">FUNCTION</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Although urbanization has a major <span class="hlt">impact</span> on watershed hydrology, there have not been studies to quantify basic hydrological relationships that are altered by the addition of impervious surfaces. The USDA-ARS and USEPA-ORD-NRMRL have initiated a pilot program to study the <span class="hlt">impacts</span>...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">165</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.springerlink.com/index/l322697256142ux8.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Raising Operators for the Whittaker <span class="hlt">Wave</span> <span class="hlt">Functions</span> of the Toda Chain and Intertwining Operators</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Intertwiners between representations of Lie groups can be used for obtaining relations for matrix elements. We apply this technique to obtain different identities for the <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> of the open Toda chain, in particular, raising operators and bilinear relations for the <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> on different energy levels. We also recall the group-theory approach to the Toda chain: treating the <span class="hlt">wave</span></p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">A. Chervov</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">166</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23844401"> <span id="translatedtitle">The environmental <span class="hlt">impact</span> of a <span class="hlt">Wave</span> Dragon array operating in the Black Sea.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The present work describes a study related to the influence on the shoreline dynamics of a <span class="hlt">wave</span> farm consisting of <span class="hlt">Wave</span> Dragon devices operating in the western side of the Black Sea. Based on historical data analysis of the <span class="hlt">wave</span> climate, the most relevant environmental conditions that could occur were defined, and for these cases, simulations with SWAN spectral phase averaged <span class="hlt">wave</span> model were performed. Two situations were considered for the most representative patterns: model simulations without any <span class="hlt">wave</span> energy converter and simulations considering a <span class="hlt">wave</span> farm consisting of six <span class="hlt">Wave</span> Dragon devices. Comparisons of the <span class="hlt">wave</span> model outputs have been carried out in both geographical and spectral spaces. The results show that although a significant influence appears near the <span class="hlt">wave</span> farm, this gradually decreases to the coast line level. In order to evaluate the influence of the <span class="hlt">wave</span> farm on the longshore currents, a nearshore circulation modeling system was used. In relative terms, the longshore current velocities appear to be more sensitive to the presence of the <span class="hlt">wave</span> farm than the significant <span class="hlt">wave</span> height. Finally, the possible <span class="hlt">impact</span> on the marine flora and fauna specific to the target area was also considered and discussed. PMID:23844401</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Diaconu, Sorin; Rusu, Eugen</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">167</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.springerlink.com/index/q62x3r71431p850w.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Cumulative <span class="hlt">impacts</span> on water quality <span class="hlt">functions</span> of wetlands</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The total effect of cumulative <span class="hlt">impacts</span> on the water quality <span class="hlt">functions</span> of wetlands cannot be predicted from the sum of the effects each individual <span class="hlt">impact</span> would have by itself. The wetland is not a simple filter; it embodies chemical, physical, and biotic processes that can detain, transform, release, or produce a wide variety of substances. Because wetland water quality <span class="hlt">functions</span></p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Harold F. Hemond; Janina Benoit</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1988-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">168</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014PApGe.tmp...20R"> <span id="translatedtitle">SH <span class="hlt">Wave</span> Number Green's <span class="hlt">Function</span> for a Layered, Elastic Half-Space. Part I: Theory and Dynamic Canyon Response by the Discrete <span class="hlt">Wave</span> Number Boundary Element Method</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We present a closed-form frequency-<span class="hlt">wave</span> number (? - k) Green's <span class="hlt">function</span> for a layered, elastic half-space under SH <span class="hlt">wave</span> propagation. It is shown that for every (? - k) pair, the fundamental solution exhibits two distinctive features: (1) the original layered system can be reduced to a system composed by the uppermost superficial layer over an equivalent half-space; (2) the fundamental solution can be partitioned into three different fundamental solutions, each one carrying out a different physical interpretation, i.e., an equivalent half-space, source image <span class="hlt">impact</span>, and dispersive <span class="hlt">wave</span> effect, respectively. Such an interpretation allows the proper use of analytical and numerical integration schemes, and ensures the correct assessment of Cauchy principal value integrals. Our method is based upon a stiffness-matrix scheme, and as a first approach we assume that observation points and the impulsive SH line-source are spatially located within the uppermost superficial layer. We use a discrete <span class="hlt">wave</span> number boundary element strategy to test the benefits of our fundamental solution. We benchmark our results against reported solutions for an infinitely long circular canyon subjected to oblique incident SH <span class="hlt">waves</span> within a homogeneous half-space. Our results show an almost exact agreement with previous studies. We further shed light on the <span class="hlt">impact</span> of horizontal strata by examining the dynamic response of the circular canyon to oblique incident SH <span class="hlt">waves</span> under different layered half-space configurations and incident angles. Our results show that modifications in the layering structure manifest by larger peak ground responses, and stronger spatial variability due to interactions of the canyon geometry with trapped Love <span class="hlt">waves</span> in combination with impedance contrast effects.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Restrepo, Doriam; Gómez, Juan David; Jaramillo, Juan Diego</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">169</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/24777377"> <span id="translatedtitle">P3, Positive slow <span class="hlt">wave</span> and working memory load: a study on the <span class="hlt">functional</span> correlates of slow <span class="hlt">wave</span> activity</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Parietal positivities of the `slow <span class="hlt">wave</span>' type are known to emerge after the P300 whenever target detection leads to a complex subsidiary task. Although the <span class="hlt">functional</span> correlates of these `positive slow <span class="hlt">waves</span>' (PSW) are not known, it has been suggested that they may index (a) the selection or decision processes, (b) the preparation of the response or (c) the evaluation</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Luis Garc??a-Larrea; Guillaume Cézanne-Bert</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1998-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">170</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013AGUFMSH41D2212B"> <span id="translatedtitle">Magnetospheric Electron-Velocity-Distribution <span class="hlt">Function</span> Information from <span class="hlt">Wave</span> Observations</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The electron-velocity-distribution <span class="hlt">function</span> was determined to be highly non-Maxwellian and more appropriate to a kappa distribution, with ? ? 2.0, near magnetic midnight in the low-latitude magnetosphere just outside a stable plasmasphere during extremely quiet geomagnetic conditions. The kappa results were based on sounder-stimulated Qn plasma resonances using the Radio Plasma Imager (RPI) on the IMAGE satellite; the state of the plasmasphere was determined from IMAGE/EUV observations. The Qn resonances correspond to the maximum frequencies of Bernstein-mode <span class="hlt">waves</span> that are observed between the harmonics of the electron cyclotron frequency in the frequency domain above the upper-hybrid frequency. Here we present the results of a parametric investigation that included suprathermal electrons in the electron-velocity-distribution <span class="hlt">function</span> used in the plasma-<span class="hlt">wave</span> dispersion equation to calculate the Qn frequencies for a range of kappa and fpe/fce values for Qn resonances from Q1 to Q9. The Qn frequencies were also calculated using a Maxwellian distribution and they were found to be greater than those calculated using a kappa distribution with the frequency differences increasing with increasing n for a fixed ? and with decreasing ? for a fixed n. The calculated fQn values have been incorporated into the RPI BinBrowser software providing a powerful tool for rapidly obtaining information on the nature of the magnetospheric electron-velocity-distribution <span class="hlt">function</span> and the electron number density Ne. This capability enabled accurate (within a few percent) in-situ Ne determinations to be made along the outbound orbital track as IMAGE moved away from the plasmapause. The extremely quiet geomagnetic conditions allowed IMAGE/EUV-extracted counts to be compared with the RPI-determined orbital-track Ne profile. The comparisons revealed remarkably similar Ne structures.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Benson, R. F.; Vinas, A. F.; Osherovich, V. A.; Fainberg, J.; Purser, C. M.; Adrian, M. L.; Galkin, I. A.; Reinisch, B. W.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">171</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013JGRA..118.5039B"> <span id="translatedtitle">Magnetospheric electron-velocity-distribution <span class="hlt">function</span> information from <span class="hlt">wave</span> observations</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The electron-velocity-distribution <span class="hlt">function</span> was determined to be highly non-Maxwellian and more appropriate to a kappa distribution, with ? ? 2.0, near magnetic midnight in the low-latitude magnetosphere just outside a stable plasmasphere during extremely quiet geomagnetic conditions. The kappa results were based on sounder-stimulated Qn plasma resonances using the Radio Plasma Imager (RPI) on the IMAGE satellite; the state of the plasmasphere was determined from IMAGE/EUV observations. The Qn resonances correspond to the maximum frequencies of Bernstein-mode <span class="hlt">waves</span> that are observed between the harmonics of the electron cyclotron frequency in the frequency domain above the upper-hybrid frequency. Here we present the results of a parametric investigation that included suprathermal electrons in the electron-velocity-distribution <span class="hlt">function</span> used in the plasma-<span class="hlt">wave</span> dispersion equation to calculate the Qn frequencies for a range of kappa and fpe/fce values for Qn resonances from Q1 to Q9. The Qn frequencies were also calculated using a Maxwellian distribution, and they were found to be greater than those calculated using a kappa distribution with the frequency differences increasing with increasing n for a fixed ? and with decreasing ? for a fixed n. The calculated fQn values have been incorporated into the RPI BinBrowser software providing a powerful tool for rapidly obtaining information on the nature of the magnetospheric electron-velocity-distribution <span class="hlt">function</span> and the electron number density Ne. This capability enabled accurate (within a few percent) in situ Ne determinations to be made along the outbound orbital track as IMAGE moved away from the plasmapause. The extremely quiet geomagnetic conditions allowed IMAGE/EUV-extracted counts to be compared with the RPI-determined orbital-track Ne profile. The comparisons revealed remarkably similar Ne structures.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Benson, Robert F.; ViñAs, Adolfo F.; Osherovich, Vladimir A.; Fainberg, Joseph; Purser, Carola M.; Adrian, Mark L.; Galkin, Ivan A.; Reinisch, Bodo W.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-08-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">172</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5459724"> <span id="translatedtitle">Jastrow <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> for closed-shell atoms</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A linked-cluster expansion that has been derived previously to calculate expectation values for Jastrow-type <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> is applied to variational calculations for closed-shell atoms. In the calculation the Hartree-Fock ground state is multiplied by a correlating factor Pig(r/sub i/)Pif(r/sub i/j) and the <span class="hlt">functions</span> f and g determined variationally. Only the lowest-order direct terms are included in the calculation so that the variational principle is not strictly valid. The calculation is carried out in momentum space in order to simplify the treatment of the kinetic energy operator. The variational principle leads to a Fredholm equation of the first kind for the correlating factor. Parametrized forms of the correlating factor are given for the cases considered. It is found that the direct terms calculated overestimate the correlation energy of the atoms considered but estimates of the exchange terms indicate that these would largely account for the differences. It is found that it is not adequate to include only the two-particle <span class="hlt">functions</span> f in the correlating factor, but the one-particle <span class="hlt">function</span> g must also be included. The atoms considered are He, Be, Ne, Mg, and Ar.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Talman, J.D.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1980-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">173</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014JPhCS.490a2091A"> <span id="translatedtitle">Velocity selective trapping of atoms in a frequency-modulated standing laser <span class="hlt">wave</span>: <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> and stochastic trajectory approaches</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> of a moderately cold atom in a stationary near-resonant standing light <span class="hlt">wave</span> delocalizes very fast due to <span class="hlt">wave</span> packet splitting. However, frequency modulation of the field may suppress packet splitting for some atoms having specific velocities in a narrow range. These atoms remain localized in a small space for a long time. We show that modulated field can not only trap, but also cool the atoms. We perform a numerical experiment with a large atomic ensebmble having wide initial velocity and energy distribution. During the experiment, most of atoms leave the <span class="hlt">wave</span> while trapped atoms have narrow energy distribution</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Argonov, Victor</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">174</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1987swcm.conf.....Z"> <span id="translatedtitle">Computations of hypervelocity <span class="hlt">impact</span> using the CTH shock <span class="hlt">wave</span> physics code</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Computer simulations of several hypervelocity <span class="hlt">impact</span> events using the multi-dimensional, multi-material CTH shock <span class="hlt">wave</span> physics code are presented and discussed. First, some two-dimensional CTH calculations are presented. These are then compared with calculations using another Eulerian shock <span class="hlt">wave</span> physics code (CSQ) and with flash X-ray photographs of the <span class="hlt">impact</span> events. Fully three-dimensional computations, including simulations of oblique <span class="hlt">impacts</span>, are then presented. Possible improvements in the physical and computational models used in the calculations are mentioned. The influence of these calculations on CTH development is discussed.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Zeigler, Frederick J.; McGlaun, J. Michael; Thompson, Samuel L.; Trucano, Timothy G.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">175</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6030978"> <span id="translatedtitle">Computations of hypervelocity <span class="hlt">impact</span> using the CTH shock <span class="hlt">wave</span> physics code</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Computer simulations of several hypervelocity <span class="hlt">impact</span> events using the multi-dimensional, multi-material CTH shock <span class="hlt">wave</span> physics code are presented and discussed. First, some two-dimensional CTH calculations are presented. These are then compared with calculations using another Eulerian shock <span class="hlt">wave</span> physics code (CSQ) and with flash x-ray photographs of the <span class="hlt">impact</span> events. Fully three-dimensional computations, including simulations of oblique <span class="hlt">impacts</span>, will then be presented. Possible improvements in the physical and computational models used in the calculations will be mentioned. The influence of these calculations on CTH development will be discussed.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Zeigler, F.J.; McGlaun, J.M.; Thompson, S.L.; Trucano, T.G.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1987-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">176</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014JGRC..119.1217K"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Impact</span> of wind <span class="hlt">waves</span> on the air-sea fluxes: A coupled model</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">revised wind-over-<span class="hlt">wave</span>-coupling model is developed to provide a consistent description of the sea surface drag and heat/moister transfer coefficients, and associated wind velocity and temperature profiles. The spectral distribution of short wind <span class="hlt">waves</span> in the decimeter to a few millimeters range of wavelengths is introduced based on the <span class="hlt">wave</span> action balance equation constrained using the Yurovskaya et al. (2013) optical field <span class="hlt">wave</span> measurements. The model is capable to reproduce fundamental statistical properties of the sea surface, such as the mean square slope and the spectral distribution of breaking crests length. The surface stress accounts for the effect of airflow separation due to <span class="hlt">wave</span> breaking, which enables a better fit of simulated form drag to observations. The <span class="hlt">wave</span> breaking controls the overall energy losses for the gravity <span class="hlt">waves</span>, but also the generation of shorter <span class="hlt">waves</span> including the parasitic capillaries, thus enhancing the form drag. Breaking <span class="hlt">wave</span> contribution to the form drag increases rapidly at winds above 15 m/s where it exceeds the nonbreaking <span class="hlt">wave</span> contribution. The overall <span class="hlt">impact</span> of wind <span class="hlt">waves</span> (breaking and nonbreaking) leads to a sheltering of the near-surface layer where the turbulent mixing is suppressed. Accordingly, the air temperature gradient in this sheltered layer increases to maintain the heat flux constant. The resulting deformation of the air temperature profile tends to lower the roughness scale for temperature compared to its value over the smooth surface.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kudryavtsev, V.; Chapron, B.; Makin, V.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">177</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008JHEP...07..087G"> <span id="translatedtitle">Topological <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> and the 4D-5D lift</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We revisit the holomorphic anomaly equations satisfied by the topological string amplitude from the perspective of the 4D-5D lift, in the context of ``magic'' Script N = 2 supergravity theories. In particular, we interpret the Gopakumar-Vafa relation between 5D black hole degeneracies and the topological string amplitude as the result of a canonical transformation from 4D to 5D charges. Moreover we use the known Bekenstein-Hawking entropy of 5D black holes to constrain the asymptotic behavior of the topological <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> at finite topological coupling but large Kähler classes. In the process, some subtleties in the relation between 5D black hole degeneracies and the topological string amplitude are uncovered, but not resolved. Finally we extend these considerations to the putative one-parameter generalization of the topological string amplitude, and identify the canonical transformation as a Weyl reflection inside the 3D duality group.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Gao, Peng; Pioline, Boris</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">178</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013APS..MARN23012M"> <span id="translatedtitle">Exact Matrix Product States for Quantum Hall <span class="hlt">Wave</span> <span class="hlt">Functions</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We show that the model <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> used to describe the fractional quantum Hall effect have exact representations as matrix product states (MPS). These MPS can be implemented numerically in the orbital basis of both finite and infinite cylinders, which provides an efficient way of calculating arbitrary observables. We extend this approach to the charged excitations and numerically compute their Berry phases. Finally, we present an algorithm for numerically computing the real-space entanglement spectrum starting from an arbitrary orbital basis MPS, which allows us to study the scaling properties of the real-space entanglement spectra on infinite cylinders. The real-space entanglement spectrum obeys a scaling form dictated by the edge conformal field theory, allowing us to accurately extract the two entanglement velocities of the Moore-Read state.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Mong, Roger; Zaletel, Michael</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">179</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012PhRvB..86x5305Z"> <span id="translatedtitle">Exact matrix product states for quantum Hall <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We show that the model <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> used to describe the fractional quantum Hall effect have exact representations as matrix product states (MPS). These MPS can be implemented numerically in the orbital basis of both finite and infinite cylinders, which provides an efficient way of calculating arbitrary observables. We extend this approach to the charged excitations and numerically compute their Berry phases. Finally, we present an algorithm for numerically computing the real-space entanglement spectrum starting from an arbitrary orbital basis MPS, which allows us to study the scaling properties of the real-space entanglement spectra on infinite cylinders. The real-space entanglement spectrum obeys a scaling form dictated by the edge conformal field theory, allowing us to accurately extract the two entanglement velocities of the Moore-Read state. In contrast, the orbital space spectrum is observed to scale according to a complex set of power laws that rule out a similar collapse.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Zaletel, Michael P.; Mong, Roger S. K.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">180</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008SPIE.6932E..40O"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Impact</span> detection using ultrasonic <span class="hlt">waves</span> based on case based reasoning</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This study focuses on a structural health monitoring (SHM) using case-based reasoning (CBR). Structural condition is diagnosed using propagation patterns of ultra-sonic <span class="hlt">waves</span>. Firstly, emitted pseudo-AE <span class="hlt">waves</span> are measured in pencil lead fracture experiments. Then, the AE signals are classified into 90 types according to location, magnitude and structural condition. Secondly, pattern identification is conducted using feature parameters extracted from the signals for damage pattern recognition. Finally, feasibility of the method to real structures using CBR is studied. Results showed that the damage patterns could be determined with 82% accuracy. If only the damage location is needed, of the accuracy was higher with 95%. The proposed method using ultra-sonic <span class="hlt">waves</span> and CBR is thus feasible for practical applications.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Otsuka, Takehisa; Mita, Akira</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a 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showDiv("page_11");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">181</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/1042058"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Impact</span> of Phase Transitions on P <span class="hlt">Wave</span> Velocities</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In regions where a high pressure phase is in equilibrium with a low pressure phase, the bulk modulus defined by the P-V relationship is greatly reduced. Here we evaluate the effect of such transitions on the P <span class="hlt">wave</span> velocity. A model, where cation diffusion is the rate limiting factor, is used to project laboratory data to the conditions of a seismic <span class="hlt">wave</span> propagating in the two-phase region. We demonstrate that for the minimum expected effect there is a significant reduction of the seismic velocity, as large as 10% over a narrow depth range.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">D Weidner; L Li</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-12-31</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">182</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22484031"> <span id="translatedtitle">Rosuvastatin improves pulse <span class="hlt">wave</span> reflection by restoring endothelial <span class="hlt">function</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">One of the major indicators of intact endothelial <span class="hlt">function</span> is basal nitric oxide (NO) activity. Further, it seems to be likely that statin therapy exerts beneficial effects on vascular <span class="hlt">function</span>, at least in part via an improvement of NO bioavailability. In the present double-blind crossover study 29 hypercholesterolemic patients were randomly assigned to receive rosuvastatin and placebo for 42days. Pulse <span class="hlt">wave</span> analysis was assessed after 30min of rest (baseline) and after infusion of N(G)-monomethyl-l-arginine (l-NMMA) at the end of 42days treatment period. The magnitude of the increase in central augmentation index (cAIx) in response to inhibition of NO synthase (NOS) by l-NMMA is indicative of basal NO activity. CAIx was significantly lower (18.3±10 versus 21.9±12%, p=0.027) with rosuvastatin compared to placebo. There was no increment of cAIx in response to l-NMMA in placebo group. In contrast, cAIx increased significantly in response to l-NMMA (20.5±11 versus 25.7±10mm Hg, p=0.001) in rosuvastatin group. The percentage of increase of cAIx tended to be more pronounced after treatment with rosuvastatin compared to placebo (53.7±92 versus 14.1±36%, p=0.087). Pulse pressure amplification (PPA) improved (1.31±0.2 versus 1.26±0.2%, p=0.016) after rosuvastatin compared to placebo. Regression analyses revealed that both LDL-cholesterol and CRP-levels are independent determinants of basal NO activity improvement, which itself is an independent determinant of vascular <span class="hlt">function</span>, expressed by an improvement of pulse <span class="hlt">wave</span> reflection and PPA. In this placebo controlled study, treatment with rosuvastatin improved vascular and endothelial <span class="hlt">function</span>. Determinants for improved NO production in patients with hypercholesterolemia were the achieved levels of LDL-cholesterol and CRP. Overall, in patients without CV disease, rosuvastatin exerted beneficially effect on vascular dysfunction, one of the earliest manifestation of atherosclerosis. PMID:22484031</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ott, C; Schneider, M P; Schlaich, M P; Schmieder, R E</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">183</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15836768"> <span id="translatedtitle">A novel <span class="hlt">function</span> of <span class="hlt">WAVE</span> in lamellipodia: <span class="hlt">WAVE</span>1 is required for stabilization of lamellipodial protrusions during cell spreading.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">When a cell spreads and moves, reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton pushes the cell membrane, and the resulting membrane protrusions create new points of contact with the substrate and generate the locomotive force. Membrane extension and adhesion to a substrate must be tightly coordinated for effective cell movement, but little is known about the mechanisms underlying these processes. <span class="hlt">WAVEs</span> are critical regulators of Rac-induced actin reorganization. <span class="hlt">WAVE</span>2 is essential for formation of lamellipodial structures at the cell periphery stimulated by growth factors, but it is thought that <span class="hlt">WAVE</span>1 is dispensable for such processes in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs). Here we show a novel <span class="hlt">function</span> of <span class="hlt">WAVE</span> in lamellipodial protrusions during cell spreading. During spreading on fibronectin (FN), MEFs with knockouts (KOs) of <span class="hlt">WAVE</span>1 and <span class="hlt">WAVE</span>2 showed different membrane dynamics, suggesting that these molecules have distinct roles in lamellipodium formation. Formation of lamellipodial structures on FN was inhibited in <span class="hlt">WAVE</span>2 KO MEFs. In contrast, <span class="hlt">WAVE</span>1 is not essential for extension of lamellipodial protrusions but is required for stabilization of such structures. <span class="hlt">WAVE</span>1-deficiency decreased the density of actin filaments and increased the speed of membrane extension, causing deformation of focal complex at the tip of spreading edges. Thus, at the tip of the lamellipodial protrusion, <span class="hlt">WAVE</span>2 generates the membrane protrusive structures containing actin filaments, and modification by <span class="hlt">WAVE</span>1 stabilizes these structures through cell-substrate adhesion. Coordination of <span class="hlt">WAVE</span>1 and <span class="hlt">WAVE</span>2 activities appears to be necessary for formation of proper actin structures in stable lamellipodia. PMID:15836768</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Yamazaki, Daisuke; Fujiwara, Takashi; Suetsugu, Shiro; Takenawa, Tadaomi</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">184</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3176557"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Impact</span> of Stone Removal on Renal <span class="hlt">Function</span>: A Review</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Stone removal can improve renal <span class="hlt">function</span> by eradicating obstruction and, in certain cases, an underlying infection. Stone-removing procedures, however, may negatively <span class="hlt">impact</span> <span class="hlt">functional</span> integrity. Many things may <span class="hlt">impact</span> the latter, including the procedures used, the methods of assessing <span class="hlt">function</span>, the time when these assessments are made, the occurrence of complications, the baseline condition of the kidney, and patient-related factors. In the majority of cases, little significant <span class="hlt">functional</span> impairment occurs. However, there are gaps in our knowledge of this subject, including the cumulative effects of multiple procedures violating the renal parenchyma and long-term <span class="hlt">functional</span> outcomes.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Wood, Kyle; Keys, Tristan; Mufarrij, Patrick; Assimos, Dean G</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">185</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=AD656898"> <span id="translatedtitle">Tables of Spheroidal <span class="hlt">Wave</span> <span class="hlt">Functions</span>. Part 3. Second Volume of Oblate Radial <span class="hlt">Functions</span> of the First and Second Type.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The theory of oblate spheroidal <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> is briefly reviewed and a list of literature references to applications of oblate spheroidal theory is furnished. Formulas useful for the numerical calculation of oblate radial <span class="hlt">functions</span> of the first and seco...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">B. K. Carmichael R. V. Baier S. Hanish W. H. Buckler</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1967-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">186</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6922228"> <span id="translatedtitle">Cumulative <span class="hlt">impacts</span> on water-quality <span class="hlt">functions</span> of wetlands</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Cumulative <span class="hlt">impacts</span> on the water-quality <span class="hlt">function</span> of wetlands are <span class="hlt">impacts</span> whose total effect cannot be predicted from the sum of the effects of individual <span class="hlt">impacts</span>. The wetland is not a simple filter; it embodies chemical, physical, and biotic processes that can detain, transform, release, or produce a wide variety of substances. Because wetland water-quality <span class="hlt">functions</span> result from the operation of many individual, distinct, and quite dissimilar mechanisms, it is necessary to consider the nature of each individual process. Given knowledge of the various wetland processes, it is possible to make more-guided judgments about the effects a suite of <span class="hlt">impacts</span> is likely to have. When considered in this light, many common wetland alterations seem likely to involve cumulative <span class="hlt">impact</span>. The wetland manager may be guided further by appropriate field measurements at specific sites; such data can aid in predicting cumulative <span class="hlt">impact</span> or assessing the results of past wetland management.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hemond, H.F.; Benoit, J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1988-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">187</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24038752"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Impacts</span> of a spring heat <span class="hlt">wave</span> on canopy processes in a northern hardwood forest.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Heat <span class="hlt">wave</span> frequency, duration, and intensity are predicted to increase with global warming, but the potential <span class="hlt">impacts</span> of short-term high temperature events on forest <span class="hlt">functioning</span> remain virtually unstudied. We examined canopy processes in a forest in Central Ontario following 3 days of record-setting high temperatures (31–33 °C) that coincided with the peak in leaf expansion of dominant trees in late May 2010. Leaf area dynamics, leaf morphology, and leaf-level gas-exchange were compared to data from prior years of sampling (2002–2008) at the same site, focusing on Acer saccharum Marsh., the dominant tree in the region. Extensive shedding of partially expanded leaves was observed immediately following high temperature days, with A. saccharum losing ca. 25% of total leaf production but subsequently producing an unusual second flush of neoformed leaves. Both leaf losses and subsequent reflushing were highest in the upper canopy; however, retained preformed leaves and neoformed leaves showed reduced size, resulting in an overall decline in end-of-season leaf area index of 64% in A. saccharum, and 16% in the entire forest. Saplings showed lower leaf losses, but also a lower capacity to reflush relative to mature trees. Both surviving preformed and neoformed leaves had severely depressed photosynthetic capacity early in the summer of 2010, but largely regained photosynthetic competence by the end of the growing season. These results indicate that even short-term heat <span class="hlt">waves</span> can have severe <span class="hlt">impacts</span> in northern forests, and suggest a particular vulnerability to high temperatures during the spring period of leaf expansion in temperate deciduous forests. PMID:24038752</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Filewod, Ben; Thomas, Sean C</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">188</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24070284"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> for time-dependent harmonically confined electrons in a time-dependent electric field.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The many-body <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> of a system of interacting particles confined by a time-dependent harmonic potential and perturbed by a time-dependent spatially homogeneous electric field is derived via the Feynman path-integral method. The <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> is comprised of a phase factor times the solution to the unperturbed time-dependent Schro?dinger equation with the latter being translated by a time-dependent value that satisfies the classical driven equation of motion. The <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> reduces to that of the Harmonic Potential Theorem <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> for the case of the time-independent harmonic confining potential. PMID:24070284</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Li, Yu-Qi; Pan, Xiao-Yin; Sahni, Viraht</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-09-21</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">189</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21448638"> <span id="translatedtitle">Riemann {zeta} <span class="hlt">function</span> from <span class="hlt">wave</span>-packet dynamics</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We show that the time evolution of a thermal phase state of an anharmonic oscillator with logarithmic energy spectrum is intimately connected to the generalized Riemann {zeta} <span class="hlt">function</span> {zeta}(s,a). Indeed, the autocorrelation <span class="hlt">function</span> at a time t is determined by {zeta}({sigma}+i{tau},a), where {sigma} is governed by the temperature of the thermal phase state and {tau} is proportional to t. We use the JWKB method to solve the inverse spectral problem for a general logarithmic energy spectrum; that is, we determine a family of potentials giving rise to such a spectrum. For large distances, all potentials display a universal behavior; they take the shape of a logarithm. However, their form close to the origin depends on the value of the Hurwitz parameter a in {zeta}(s,a). In particular, we establish a connection between the value of the potential energy at its minimum, the Hurwitz parameter and the Maslov index of JWKB. We compare and contrast exact and approximate eigenvalues of purely logarithmic potentials. Moreover, we use a numerical method to find a potential which leads to exact logarithmic eigenvalues. We discuss possible realizations of Riemann {zeta} <span class="hlt">wave</span>-packet dynamics using cold atoms in appropriately tailored light fields.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Mack, R.; Schleich, W. P. [Institut fuer Quantenphysik, Albert-Einstein-Allee 11, Universitaet Ulm, D-89069 Ulm (Germany); Dahl, J. P. [Institut fuer Quantenphysik, Albert-Einstein-Allee 11, Universitaet Ulm, D-89069 Ulm (Germany); Chemical Physics, Department of Chemistry, Technical University of Denmark, DTU 207, DK-2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark); Moya-Cessa, H. [Institut fuer Quantenphysik, Albert-Einstein-Allee 11, Universitaet Ulm, D-89069 Ulm (Germany); Instituto Nacional de Astrofisica, Optica y Electronica, Apartado Postal 51 Y 216, 72000 Puebla (Mexico); Strunz, W. T. [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Technische Universitaet Dresden, D-01062 Dresden (Germany); Walser, R. [Institut fuer Quantenphysik, Albert-Einstein-Allee 11, Universitaet Ulm, D-89069 Ulm (Germany); Institut fuer Angewandte Physik, Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, D-64289 Darmstadt (Germany)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-09-15</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">190</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21541610"> <span id="translatedtitle">Higher twist parton distributions from light-cone <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We explore the possibility to construct higher-twist parton distributions in a nucleon at some low reference scale from convolution integrals of the light-cone <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> (WFs). To this end we introduce simple models for the four-particle nucleon WFs involving three valence quarks and a gluon with total orbital momentum zero, and estimate their normalization (WF at the origin) using QCD sum rules. We demonstrate that these WFs provide one with a reasonable description of both polarized and unpolarized parton densities at large values of the Bjorken variable x{>=}0.5. Twist-three parton distributions are then constructed as convolution integrals of qqqg and the usual three-quark WFs. The cases of the polarized structure <span class="hlt">function</span> g{sub 2}(x,Q{sup 2}) and single transverse spin asymmetries are considered in detail. We find that the so-called gluon pole contribution to twist-three distributions relevant for single spin asymmetry vanishes in this model, but is generated perturbatively at higher scales by the evolution, in the spirit of Glueck-Reya-Vogt parton distributions.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Braun, V. M.; Lautenschlager, T.; Pirnay, B. [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Universitaet Regensburg, D-93040 Regensburg (Germany); Manashov, A. N. [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Universitaet Regensburg, D-93040 Regensburg (Germany); Department of Theoretical Physics, St. Petersburg State University 199034, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">191</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/18802650"> <span id="translatedtitle">The <span class="hlt">wave</span> structure <span class="hlt">function</span> in weak to strong fluctuations: an analytic model based on heuristic theory</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Rytov perturbation method can be used to derive analytic expressions governing statistical quantities of an optical <span class="hlt">wave</span> propagating through the Earth's atmosphere. It is generally accepted that the validity of these expressions is restricted to the weak fluctuation regime, and that the <span class="hlt">wave</span> structure <span class="hlt">function</span> for plane and spherical <span class="hlt">waves</span> obtained via the Rytov method is valid in all</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Cynthia Y Young; Aaron J Masino; Fredrick E Thomas; Christopher J Subich</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">192</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/1983/0917/report.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Sketches of a hammer-<span class="hlt">impact</span>, spiked-base, shear-<span class="hlt">wave</span> source</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Generation of shear <span class="hlt">waves</span> in shallow seismic investigations (those to depths usually less than 100 m) can be accomplished by horizontally striking with a hammer either the end of a wood plank or metal structure embedded at the ground surface. The dimensioned sketches of this report are of a steel, hammer-<span class="hlt">impact</span>, spiked-base, shear-<span class="hlt">wave</span> source. It has been used on outcrops and in a desert environment and for conducting experiments on the effect of rotating source direction.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hasbrouck, W. P.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1983-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">193</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/49492274"> <span id="translatedtitle">The counter-jet formation in an air bubble induced by the <span class="hlt">impact</span> of shock <span class="hlt">waves</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The interaction of an air bubble (isolated in water or attached to a boundary) with shock <span class="hlt">waves</span> induced by electric sparks is investigated by high-speed photography. The interaction is closely related to the counter-jet induced by the <span class="hlt">impact</span> of shock <span class="hlt">waves</span>. The formation of a counter-jet in an air bubble is related to the liquid jet formed in the same</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Li-xin BAI; Wei-lin XU; Chao LI; Yan-dong GAO</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">194</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014AdAtS..31..851N"> <span id="translatedtitle">Planetary <span class="hlt">wave</span> reflection and its <span class="hlt">impact</span> on tropospheric cold weather over Asia during January 2008</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Reflection of stratospheric planetary <span class="hlt">waves</span> and its <span class="hlt">impact</span> on tropospheric cold weather over Asia during January 2008 were investigated by applying two dimensional Eliassen-Palm (EP) flux and three-dimensional Plumb <span class="hlt">wave</span> activity fluxes. The planetary <span class="hlt">wave</span> propagation can clearly be seen in the longitude-height and latitude-height sections of the Plumb <span class="hlt">wave</span> activity flux and EP flux, respectively, when the stratospheric basic state is partially reflective. Primarily, a <span class="hlt">wave</span> packet emanating from Baffin Island/coast of Labrador propagated eastward, equatorward and was reflected over Central Eurasia and parts of China, which in turn triggered the advection of cold wind from the northern part of the boreal forest regions and Siberia to the subtropics. The wide region of Central Eurasia and China experienced extreme cold weather during the second ten days of January 2008, whereas the extraordinary persistence of the event might have occurred due to an anomalous blocking high in the Urals-Siberia region.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Nath, Debashis; Chen, Wen; Wang, Lin; Ma, Yin</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">195</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012JChPh.137j4103B"> <span id="translatedtitle">Computing many-body <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> with guaranteed precision: The first-order Møller-Plesset <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> for the ground state of helium atom</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We present an approach to compute accurate correlation energies for atoms and molecules using an adaptive discontinuous spectral-element multiresolution representation for the two-electron <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span>. Because of the exponential storage complexity of the spectral-element representation with the number of dimensions, a brute-force computation of two-electron (six-dimensional) <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> with high precision was not practical. To overcome the key storage bottlenecks we utilized (1) a low-rank tensor approximation (specifically, the singular value decomposition) to compress the <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span>, and (2) explicitly correlated R12-type terms in the <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> to regularize the Coulomb electron-electron singularities of the Hamiltonian. All operations necessary to solve the Schrödinger equation were expressed so that the reconstruction of the full-rank form of the <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> is never necessary. Numerical performance of the method was highlighted by computing the first-order Møller-Plesset <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> of a helium atom. The computed second-order Møller-Plesset energy is precise to ~2 microhartrees, which is at the precision limit of the existing general atomic-orbital-based approaches. Our approach does not assume special geometric symmetries, hence application to molecules is straightforward.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Bischoff, Florian A.; Harrison, Robert J.; Valeev, Edward F.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">196</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2005APS..SHK.C5003O"> <span id="translatedtitle">Failure <span class="hlt">Wave</span> in DEDF and Soda-Lime Glass During Rod <span class="hlt">Impact</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Investigations of glass by planar, and classical and symmetric Taylor <span class="hlt">impact</span> experiments reveal that failure <span class="hlt">wave</span> velocity U/F depends on <span class="hlt">impact</span> velocity, geometry, and the type of glass. U/F typically increases with <span class="hlt">impact</span> velocity to between ˜ 1.4 C/S and C/L (shear and longitudinal <span class="hlt">wave</span> velocities, respectively). This paper reports the results of direct high-speed photographic measurements of the failure <span class="hlt">wave</span> for gold rod <span class="hlt">impact</span> from 1.2 and 2.0 km/s on DEDF glass (C/S = 2.0, C/L =3.5 km/s). The average rod penetration velocity, u, was measured using flash X-rays. Gold rods eliminated penetrator strength effects. U/F for gold rod <span class="hlt">impact</span> on DEDF is ˜ 1.0-1.2 km/s, which is considerably less than C/S. The increase of u with <span class="hlt">impact</span> velocity is greater than that of U/F. These results are confirmed by soda-lime glass <span class="hlt">impact</span> on a gold rod at an <span class="hlt">impact</span> velocity of 1300 m/s. Similar results are found in``edge-on-<span class="hlt">impact</span>'' tests; U/F values of 1.4 km/s and 2.4-2.6 km/s in soda-lime glass are reported for W-alloy rod <span class="hlt">impact</span>, considerably less than C/S (3.2 km/s) [1,2]. [1] Bless, et. al.(1990) AIP Proc. Shock Comp. Cond. Matter---1989, pp. 939-942 (1990) [2] E. L. Zilberbrand, et. al. (1999) Int. J. <span class="hlt">Impact</span> Engng., 23, 995-1001 (1999).</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Orphal, Dennis; Behner, Thilo; Anderson, Charles; Templeton, Douglas</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">197</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5376788"> <span id="translatedtitle">A combined <span class="hlt">wave</span> distribution <span class="hlt">function</span> and stability analysis of Viking particle and low-frequency <span class="hlt">wave</span> data</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In this paper the authors present an investigation of low-frequency <span class="hlt">waves</span> observed on auroral field lines below the acceleration region by the Swedish satellite Viking. The measured frequency spectra are peaked at half the local proton gyrofrequency, and the <span class="hlt">waves</span> are observed in close connection with precipitating electrons. In order to obtain information about the distribution of <span class="hlt">wave</span> energy in <span class="hlt">wave</span> vector space, they reconstruct the <span class="hlt">wave</span> distribution <span class="hlt">function</span> (WDF) from observed spectral densities. They use a new scheme that allows them to reconstruct simultaneously the WDF over a broad frequency band. The method also makes it possible to take into account available particle observations as well as Doppler shifts caused by the relative motion between the plasma and the satellite. The distribution of energy in <span class="hlt">wave</span> vector space suggested by the reconstructed WDF is found to be consistent with what is expected from a plasma instability driven by the observed precipitating electrons. Furthermore, by using UV images obtained on Viking, they demonstrate that the <span class="hlt">wave</span> propagation directions indicated by the reconstructed WDFs are consistent with a simple model of the presumed <span class="hlt">wave</span> source in the electron precipitation region.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Oscarsson, T.E.; Roennmark, K.G. (Univ. of Umea (Sweden))</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1990-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">198</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014A%26A...565A..47M"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Impact</span> of rotation on stochastic excitation of gravity and gravito-inertial <span class="hlt">waves</span> in stars</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Context. Gravity <span class="hlt">waves</span> (or their signatures) are detected in stars thanks to helio- and asteroseismology, and they may play an important role in the evolution of stellar angular momentum. Moreover, a previous observational study of the CoRoT target HD 51452 demonstrated the potential strong <span class="hlt">impact</span> of rotation on the stochastic excitation of gravito-inertial <span class="hlt">waves</span> in stellar interiors. Aims: Our goal is to explore and unravel the action of rotation on the stochastic excitation of gravity and gravito-inertial <span class="hlt">waves</span> in stars. Methods: The dynamics of gravito-inertial <span class="hlt">waves</span> in stellar interiors in both radiation and in convection zones is described with a local non-traditional f-plane model. The coupling of these <span class="hlt">waves</span> with convective turbulent flows, which leads to their stochastic excitation, is studied in this framework. Results: First, we find that in the super-inertial regime in which the <span class="hlt">wave</span> frequency is twice as high as the rotation frequency (? > 2?), the evanescence of gravito-inertial <span class="hlt">waves</span> in convective regions decreases with decreasing <span class="hlt">wave</span> frequency. Next, in the sub-inertial regime (? < 2?), gravito-inertial <span class="hlt">waves</span> become purely propagative inertial <span class="hlt">waves</span> in convection zones. Simultaneously, turbulence in convective regions is modified by rotation. Indeed, the turbulent energy cascade towards small scales is slowed down, and in the case of rapid rotation, strongly anisotropic turbulent flows are obtained that can be understood as complex non-linear triadic interactions of propagative inertial <span class="hlt">waves</span>. These different behaviours, due to the action of the Coriolis acceleration, strongly modify the <span class="hlt">wave</span> coupling with turbulent flows. On one hand, turbulence weakly influenced by rotation is coupled with evanescent gravito-inertial <span class="hlt">waves</span>. On the other hand, rapidly rotating turbulence is intrinsically and strongly coupled with sub-inertial <span class="hlt">waves</span>. Finally, to study these mechanisms, the traditional approximation cannot be assumed because it does not properly treat the coupling between gravity and inertial <span class="hlt">waves</span> in the sub-inertial regime. Conclusions: Our results demonstrate the action of rotation on stochastic excitation of gravity <span class="hlt">waves</span> thanks to the Coriolis acceleration, which modifies their dynamics in rapidly rotating stars and turbulent flows. As the ratio 2?/? increases, the couplings and thus the amplitude of stochastic gravity <span class="hlt">waves</span> are amplified.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Mathis, S.; Neiner, C.; Tran Minh, N.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">199</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3647171"> <span id="translatedtitle">Quantum anti-Zeno effect without <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> reduction</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We study the measurement-induced enhancement of the spontaneous decay for a two-level subsystem, where measurements are treated as couplings between the excited state and an auxiliary state rather than the von Neumann's <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> reduction. The photon radiated in a fast decay of the atom, from the auxiliary state to the excited state, triggers a quasi-measurement, as opposed to a projection measurement. Our use of the term “quasi-measurement” refers to a “coupling-based measurement”. Such frequent quasi-measurements result in an exponential decay of the survival probability of atomic initial state with a photon emission following each quasi-measurement. Our calculations show that the effective decay rate is of the same form as the one based on projection measurements. The survival probability of the atomic initial state obtained by tracing over all the photon states is equivalent to that of the atomic initial state with a photon emission following each quasi-measurement.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ai, Qing; Xu, Dazhi; Yi, Su; Kofman, A. G.; Sun, C. P.; Nori, Franco</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">200</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014JPhCS.504a2020D"> <span id="translatedtitle">Newton force from <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> collapse: speculation and test</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Diosi-Penrose model of quantum-classical boundary postulates gravity-related spontaneous <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> collapse of massive degrees of freedom. The decoherence effects of the collapses are in principle detectable if not masked by the overwhelming environmental decoherence. But the DP (or any other, like GRW, CSL) spontaneous collapses are not detectable themselves, they are merely the redundant formalism of spontaneous decoherence. To let DP collapses become testable physics, recently we extended the DP model and proposed that DP collapses are responsible for the emergence of the Newton gravitational force between massive objects. We identified the collapse rate, possibly of the order of 1/ms, with the rate of emergence of the Newton force. A simple heuristic emergence (delay) time was added to the Newton law of gravity. This non-relativistic delay is in peaceful coexistence with Einstein's relativistic theory of gravitation, at least no experimental evidence has so far surfaced against it. We derive new predictions of such a 'lazy' Newton law that will enable decisive laboratory tests with available technologies. The simple equation of 'lazy' Newton law deserves theoretical and experimental studies in itself, independently of the underlying quantum foundational considerations.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Diósi, Lajos</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" 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onClick='return showDiv("page_8");' href="#">8</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_9");' href="#">9</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_10");' href="#">10</a> <a style="font-weight: bold;">11</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#">12</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#">13</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#">14</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#">15</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#">16</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#">17</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#">18</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#">19</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#">20</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">201</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013JGRD..11810980W"> <span id="translatedtitle">Global observations of gravity <span class="hlt">wave</span> intermittency and its <span class="hlt">impact</span> on the observed momentum flux morphology</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Three years of gravity <span class="hlt">wave</span> observations from the High Resolution Dynamics Limb Sounder instrument on NASA's Aura satellite are examined. We produce estimates of the global distribution of gravity <span class="hlt">wave</span> momentum flux as a <span class="hlt">function</span> of individual observed <span class="hlt">wave</span> packets. The observed distribution at the 25 km altitude level is dominated by the small proportion of <span class="hlt">wave</span> packets with momentum fluxes greater than ˜0.5 mPa. Depending on latitude and season, these <span class="hlt">wave</span> packets only comprise ˜7-25% of observations, but are shown to be almost entirely responsible for the morphology of the observed global momentum flux distribution. Large-amplitude <span class="hlt">wave</span> packets are found to be more important over orographic regions than over flat ocean regions, and to be especially high in regions poleward of 40°S during austral winter. The momentum flux carried by the largest packets relative to the distribution mean is observed to decrease with height over orographic <span class="hlt">wave</span> generation regions, but to increase with height at tropical latitudes; the mesospheric intermittency resulting is broadly equivalent in both cases. Consistent with previous studies, <span class="hlt">waves</span> in the top 10% of the extratropical distribution are observed to carry momentum fluxes more than twice the mean and <span class="hlt">waves</span> in the top 1% more than 10× the mean, and the Gini coefficient is found to characterize the observed distributions well. These results have significant implications for gravity <span class="hlt">wave</span> modeling.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Wright, C. J.; Osprey, S. M.; Gille, J. C.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">202</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=JINRR280318"> <span id="translatedtitle">Connection Between Spheric and Parabolic Coulomb <span class="hlt">Wave</span> <span class="hlt">Functions</span> in a Continuous Spectrum.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The direct and unverse transformations connecting parabolic and spherical Coulomb <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> in the continuous spectrum are obtained. The coefficients of this transformations are expressed in term of generalized hypergeometric <span class="hlt">function</span> sub 3 F sub 2 i...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">G. S. Pogosyan V. M. Ter-Antonyan</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1980-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">203</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22224217"> <span id="translatedtitle">Dynamical model for longitudinal <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> in light-front holographic QCD</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We construct a Schrödinger-like equation for the longitudinal <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> of a meson in the valence qq{sup -bar} sector, based on the ’t Hooft model for large-N two-dimensional QCD, and combine this with the usual transverse equation from light-front holographic QCD, to obtain a model for mesons with massive quarks. The computed <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> are compared with the <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> ansatz of Brodsky and de Téramond and used to compute decay constants and parton distribution <span class="hlt">functions</span>. The basis <span class="hlt">functions</span> used to solve the longitudinal equation may be useful for more general calculations of meson states in QCD. -- Highlights: •Provide relativistic quark model based on light-front holographic QCD. •Incorporate dependence on quark mass. •Consistent with the Brodsky–de Téramond quark-<span class="hlt">wave-function</span> ansatz. •Compute meson decay constants and parton distribution <span class="hlt">functions</span>. •Illustrate use of basis <span class="hlt">functions</span> that could be convenient for more general numerical calculations in light-front QCD.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Chabysheva, Sophia S.; Hiller, John R., E-mail: jhiller@d.umn.edu</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-10-15</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">204</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010cosp...38.1431H"> <span id="translatedtitle">The <span class="hlt">impact</span> of atmospheric <span class="hlt">waves</span> on the O2 1.27-um nightglow distribution</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">O2 -1.27µm nightglow is the indicator of the general circulation at about 95 km in Venus. Recent nightglow observations reported that the nightglow emission showed the temporal variations with a timescale of a few hours and days [e.g.,Gerard et al., 2008]. The temporal variations are thought to be caused by wind fluctuations due to atmospheric <span class="hlt">waves</span> propagating from the lower atmosphere. In recent years, the importance of planetary-scale <span class="hlt">waves</span> on the general circulation of the Venusian atmosphere has been recognized. Forbes and Konopliv [2007] suggested the propagation of planetary-scale <span class="hlt">waves</span> originated in the cloud deck into the upper atmosphere. However, the <span class="hlt">impact</span> of the planetary-scale <span class="hlt">waves</span> on the Venusian upper atmosphere has not been investigated yet. In this study, we have performed numerical simulations with a general circulation model (GCM), which includes the altitude region of 80 -about 200 km in order to understand the <span class="hlt">impact</span> of atmospheric <span class="hlt">waves</span> on the nightglow distribution. Our model considers the chemical processes and calculates the O2 -1.27µm nightglow intensity. The planetary-scale <span class="hlt">waves</span> (thermal tides, Kelvin <span class="hlt">wave</span>, and Rosbby <span class="hlt">wave</span>) are imposed at the lower boundary. The amplitudes and phase velocities of the <span class="hlt">waves</span> are assumed from the study by Del Genio and Rossow [1990]. The simulation results show dominance of the Kelvin <span class="hlt">wave</span> at about 80 -120 km with a vertical wavelength of about 40 -50 km. The amplitude of the zonal wind fluctuation caused by the Kelvin <span class="hlt">wave</span> has a maximum value of about 9 m/s at about 95 km. Our results suggest that the Kelvin <span class="hlt">wave</span> would cause the wind variation of the nightglow emission region between the 00:00LT -00:40LT with a period of 4 days. In this presentation, we will show the details of our simulation results considering the planetary-scale <span class="hlt">waves</span>. In addition, we will present the initial results of a simulation considering the small-scale gravity <span class="hlt">wave</span>.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hoshino, Naoya; Fujiwara, Hitoshi; Takagi, Masahiro; Kasaba, Yasumasa; Takahashi, Yukihiro</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">205</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=DE90625344"> <span id="translatedtitle">Rotation effect in the vibration-rotation <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> of a diatomic molecule.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The aim of this work is to dissociate, in the <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> describing the vibration-rotation motion of a diatomic molecule, the effect of the rotation from the pure vibration <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> and to give the analytic expression of this rotational effect. 14...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">M. Korek</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1989-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">206</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/51384339"> <span id="translatedtitle">Donor dependence of polarizability and electron <span class="hlt">wave-function</span> volume for shallow states in semiconductors</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The dependence of the polarizability and the volume of donor electron <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> on the donor binding energy is determined from a model <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> for shallow states. The polarizability results are in good agreement with experiment and previous calculations by Lipari and Dexter for donors in silicon. Power laws relating the polarizability and volume to the binding energy were</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">R. J. Deri; T. G. Castner</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1986-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">207</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/20775252"> <span id="translatedtitle">Hadronic Spectra and Light-Front <span class="hlt">Wave</span> <span class="hlt">Functions</span> in Holographic QCD</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We show how the string amplitude {phi}(z) defined on the fifth dimension in AdS{sub 5} space can be precisely mapped to the light-front <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> of hadrons in physical space-time. We find an exact correspondence between the holographic variable z and an <span class="hlt">impact</span> variable {zeta}, which represents the measure of transverse separation of the constituents within the hadrons. In addition, we derive effective four dimensional Schroedinger equations for the bound states of massless quarks and gluons which exactly reproduce the anti-de Sitter conformal field theory results and give a realistic description of the light-quark meson and baryon spectrum as well as the form factors for spacelike Q{sup 2}. Only one parameter which sets the mass scale, {lambda}{sub QCD}, is introduced.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Brodsky, Stanley J. [Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94309 (United States); Teramond, Guy F. de [Universidad de Costa Rica, San Jose (Costa Rica)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-05-26</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">208</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2006APS..DPPCP1103H"> <span id="translatedtitle">Ion distribution <span class="hlt">function</span> perturbations due to propagating Alfven <span class="hlt">waves</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A number of mechanisms for ion heating in the fast solar wind have been proposed. For example, the ions could be directly heated by ion-cyclotron damping of Alfven <span class="hlt">waves</span> or counter-propagating, low-frequency, Alfven <span class="hlt">waves</span> could generate a turbulent cascade that heats ions by exciting higher frequency <span class="hlt">waves</span> that then damp on the ions. In this preliminary study, we report measurements of shear Alfven <span class="hlt">wave</span> propagation and damping at <span class="hlt">wave</span> frequencies near the ion cyclotron frequency. The low amplitude <span class="hlt">waves</span> are excited by a steady state loop antenna immersed in high-density, argon and helium, helicon source plasmas. The propagating <span class="hlt">waves</span> were detected with an absolutely calibrated magnetic pick up coil located 30 cm downstream from the launching antenna. The experiments were conducted in the West Virginia University HELIX (Hot hELIcon eXperiment) device. In argon plasma, perturbations of the ion velocity space distribution due to the Alfven <span class="hlt">wave</span> are measured with laser induced fluorescence and compared to theoretical predictions.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Houshmandyar, Saeid; Scime, Earl; Compton, Chris</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">209</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20066646"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Impact</span> of lightning strikes on hospital <span class="hlt">functions</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Two regional hospitals were struck by lightning during a one-month period. The first hospital, which had 236 beds, suffered a direct strike to the building. This resulted in a direct spread of the power peak and temporary failure of the standard power supply. The principle problems, after restoring standard power supply, were with the fire alarm system and peripheral network connections in the digital radiology systems. No direct <span class="hlt">impact</span> on the hardware could be found. Restarting the servers resolved all problems. The second hospital, which had 436 beds, had a lightning strike on the premises and mainly experienced problems due to induction. All affected installations had a cable connection from outside in one way or another. The power supplies never were endangered. The main problem was the failure of different communication systems (telephone, radio, intercom, fire alarm system). Also, the electronic entrance control went out. During the days after the lightening strike, multiple software problems became apparent, as well as failures of the network connections controlling the technical support systems. There are very few ways to prepare for induction problems. The use of fiber-optic networks can limit damage. To the knowledge of the authors, these are the first cases of lightning striking hospitals in medical literature. PMID:20066646</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Mortelmans, Luc J M; Van Springel, Gert L J; Van Boxstael, Sam; Herrijgers, Jan; Hoflacks, Stefaan</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">210</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011GeoJI.187..529M"> <span id="translatedtitle">Antipodal focusing of seismic <span class="hlt">waves</span> due to large meteorite <span class="hlt">impacts</span> on Earth</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We examine focusing of seismic <span class="hlt">waves</span> at the antipode of large terrestrial meteorite <span class="hlt">impacts</span>, using the Chicxulub <span class="hlt">impact</span> as our case study. Numerical simulations are based on a spectral-element method, representing the <span class="hlt">impact</span> as a Gaussian force in time and space. Simulating the <span class="hlt">impact</span> as a point source at the surface of a spherically symmetric earth model results in deceptively large peak displacements at the antipode. Earth's ellipticity, lateral heterogeneity and a spatially distributed source limit high-frequency <span class="hlt">waves</span> from constructively interfering at the antipode, thereby reducing peak displacement by a factor of 4. Nevertheless, for plausible <span class="hlt">impact</span> parameters, we observe peak antipodal displacements of ˜4 m, dynamic stresses in excess of 15 bar, and strains of 2 × 10-5 . Although these values are significantly lower than prior estimates, mainly based on a point source in a spherically symmetric earth model, <span class="hlt">wave</span> interference en route to the antipode induces 'channels' of peak stress that are five times greater than in surrounding areas. Underneath the antipode, we observed 'chimneys' of peak stress, strain and velocity, with peak values exceeding 50 bar, 10-5 and 0.1 m s-1, respectively. Our results put quantitative constraints on the feasibility of <span class="hlt">impact</span>-induced antipodal volcanism and seismicity, as well as mantle plume and hotspot formation.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Meschede, Matthias A.; Myhrvold, Conor L.; Tromp, Jeroen</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">211</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014GPC...119...71A"> <span id="translatedtitle">Projections of heat <span class="hlt">waves</span> with high <span class="hlt">impact</span> on human health in Europe</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Climate change will result in more intense, more frequent and longer lasting heat <span class="hlt">waves</span>. The most hazardous conditions emerge when extreme daytime temperatures combine with warm night-time temperatures, high humidities and light winds for several consecutive days. Here, we assess present and future heat <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">impacts</span> on human health in Europe. Present daily physiologically equivalent temperatures (PET) are derived from the ERA-Interim reanalysis. PET allows to specifically focus on heat-related risks on humans. Regarding projections, a suite of high-resolution regional climate models - run under SRES A1B scenario - has been used. A quantile-quantile adjustment is applied to the daily simulated PET to correct biases in individual model climatologies and a multimodel ensemble strategy is adopted to encompass model errors. Two types of heat <span class="hlt">waves</span> differently <span class="hlt">impacting</span> human health - strong and extreme stress - are defined according to specified thresholds of thermal stress and duration. Heat <span class="hlt">wave</span> number, frequency, duration and amplitude are derived for each type. Results reveal relatively strong correlations between the spatial distribution of strong and extreme heat <span class="hlt">wave</span> amplitudes and mortality excess for the 2003 European summer. Projections suggest a steady increase and a northward extent of heat <span class="hlt">wave</span> attributes in Europe. Strong stress heat <span class="hlt">wave</span> frequencies could increase more than 40 days, lasting over 20 days more by 2075-2094. Amplitudes might augment up to 7 °C per heat <span class="hlt">wave</span> day. Important increases in extreme stress heat <span class="hlt">wave</span> attributes are also expected: up to 40 days in frequency, 30 days in duration and 4 °C in amplitude. We believe that with this information at hand policy makers and stakeholders on vulnerable populations to heat stress can respond more effectively to the future challenges imposed by climate warming.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Amengual, A.; Homar, V.; Romero, R.; Brooks, H. E.; Ramis, C.; Gordaliza, M.; Alonso, S.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-08-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">212</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3526071"> <span id="translatedtitle">The <span class="hlt">impact</span> of influenza on <span class="hlt">functional</span> decline</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">OBJECTIVES Examine the relationship of influenza and activities of daily living (ADL) decline and other clinical indicators among nursing home (NH) residents. DESIGN retrospective, NH aggregated longitudinal study. SETTING 2,351 NHs in 122 US cities during years 1999–2005. PARTICIPANTS Long-stay (>90 days) NH residents. MEASUREMENTS Quarterly, city-level influenza mortality rate, state-level influenza severity. Quarterly incidence of MDS-derived ADL decline (? 4 points), weight loss, new or worsening pressure ulcers, and infections. Outcome variables chosen as clinical controls: antipsychotic use, restraint use, persistent pain. RESULTS City-level influenza mortality and state-level influenza severity were both associated with higher rates of large (4 points or more) ADL decline (mortality ?=0.20, p<.001; severity ?=0.18, p<.001), weight loss (?=0.19, p<.001; ?=0.24, p<.001), worsening pressure ulcers (?=0.04, p=0.08; ?=0.12, p<.001), and infections (?=0.41, p<.001; ?=0.47, p<.001), but not with restraints use, antipsychotic use, or persistent pain. NH influenza vaccination rates were very weakly associated with our outcomes (e.g. ?= ?0.009, p=0.03 for ADL decline, ?= 0.008, p=0.07 for infections). Compared to the summer quarter of lowest influenza activity, our results for the other quarters translate to an additional 12,284 NH residents experiencing large ADL decline annually, 15,168 experiencing significant weight loss, 6,284 new or worsening pressure ulcers, and 29,753 experiencing infections due to influenza. CONCLUSION Our results suggest a substantial and potentially costly <span class="hlt">impact</span> of influenza on NH residents. The effect of influenza vaccination on preventing further ADL decline and other clinical outcomes in NH residents should be studied further.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Gozalo, Pedro L.; Pop-Vicas, Aurora; Feng, Zhanlian; Gravenstein, Stefan; Mor, Vincent</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">213</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23995621"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Impact</span> of heat <span class="hlt">waves</span> on mortality in Croatia.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The aim of this work was to determine the criteria for heat loads associated with an increase in mortality in different climatic regions of Croatia. The relationship between heat stress and mortality was analysed for the period 1983-2008. The input series is excess mortality defined as the deviations of mortality from expected values determined by means of a Gaussian filter of 183 days. The assessment of the thermal environment was performed by means of physiologically equivalent temperature (PET). The curve depicting the relationship between mortality and temperature has a U shape, with increased mortality in both the cold and warm parts of the scale but more pronounced in the warm part. The threshold temperature for increased mortality was determined using a scatter plot and fitting data by means of moving average of mortality; the latter is defined as the temperature at which excess mortality becomes significant. The values are higher in the continental part of Croatia than at the coast due to the refreshing influence of the sea during the day. The same analysis on a monthly basis shows that at the beginning of the warm season increased mortality occurs at a lower temperature compared with later on in the summer, and the difference is up to 15 °C between August and April. The increase in mortality is highest during the first 3-5 days and after that it decreases and falls below the expected value. Long-lasting heat <span class="hlt">waves</span> present an increased risk, but in very long heat <span class="hlt">waves</span> the increase in mortality is reduced due to mortality displacement. PMID:23995621</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Zaninovi?, Ksenija; Matzarakis, Andreas</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-08-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">214</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/26094139"> <span id="translatedtitle">Behavior of the surface of a bubbly liquid after detonation <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">impact</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">In safety engineering, one position of interest inside heterogeneous systems of the type liquid–gas is the contact surface between these two phases. Under certain conditions, e.g. shock <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">impact</span>, phenomena can take place at this position that can have a significant influence on the explosion behavior of the system. In this work an investigation is presented about the existence of</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">K. Mitropetros; P. A. Fomin; H. Hieronymus</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">215</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/39197354"> <span id="translatedtitle">Geographical differences on the mortality <span class="hlt">impact</span> of heat <span class="hlt">waves</span> in Europe</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Climate change is potentially the biggest global health threat in the 21st century. Deaths related with heat <span class="hlt">waves</span> and spread of infectious diseases will be part of the menace though the major <span class="hlt">impact</span> will be caused by malnutrition, diarrhea and extreme climate events. Consequently, loss of healthy life years as a result of global climate change is predicted to be</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Jordi Sunyer</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">216</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/19964215"> <span id="translatedtitle">Propagation of <span class="hlt">impact</span>-induced longitudinal <span class="hlt">waves</span> in mechanical systems with variable kinematic structure</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">In the present investigation of the propagation of <span class="hlt">impact</span>-induced longitudinal <span class="hlt">waves</span> in mechanical systems with variable kinematic structure, the mechanical system's configuration is identified by means of two different sets of modes: the first describing the system configuration before change in system topology, and the second describing the configuration of the system after topology changes. It is assumed that collision</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">A. A. Shabana; W. H. Gau</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1993-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">217</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/842991"> <span id="translatedtitle">Electron-<span class="hlt">impact</span> excitation-autoionization of helium in the S-<span class="hlt">wave</span> limit</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Excitation of the autoionizing states of helium by electron <span class="hlt">impact</span> is shown in calculations in the s-<span class="hlt">wave</span> limit to leave a clear signature in the singly differential cross section for the (e,2e) process. It is suggested that such behavior should be seen generally in (e,2e) experiments on atoms that measure the single differential cross section.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Horner, Daniel A.; McCurdy, C. William; Rescigno, Thomas N.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">218</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/55699904"> <span id="translatedtitle">Multicriteria analysis to evaluate <span class="hlt">wave</span> energy converters based on their environmental <span class="hlt">impact</span>: an Italian case study</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The exploitation of renewable energy resources is fast becoming a key objective in many countries. Countries with coastlines have particularly valuable renewable energy resources in the form of tides, currents, <span class="hlt">waves</span> and offshore wind. Due to the visual <span class="hlt">impact</span> of siting large numbers of energy generating devices (eg. wind turbines) in terrestrial landscapes, considerable attention is now being directed towards</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Arianna Azzellino; Pasquale Contestabile; Caterina Lanfredi; Diego Vicinanza</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">219</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/6380105"> <span id="translatedtitle">Europe's 2003 heat <span class="hlt">wave</span>: a satellite view of <span class="hlt">impacts</span> and land–atmosphere feedbacks</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">ABSTRACT A combination of satellite imagery, meteorological station data, and the NCEP\\/NCAR reanalysis has been used to explore the spatial and temporal evolution of the 2003 heat <span class="hlt">wave</span> in France, with focus on understanding the <span class="hlt">impacts</span> and feedbacks at the land surface. Vegetation was severely affected across the study area, especially in a swath across central France that corresponds,to the</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Benjamin F. Zaitchik; Alison K. Macalady; Laurent R. Bonneau; Ronald B. Smith</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">220</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=ADA586450"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Impact</span> of Parameterized Lee <span class="hlt">Wave</span> Drag on the Energy Budget of an Eddying Global Ocean Model.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The <span class="hlt">impact</span> of parameterized topographic internal lee <span class="hlt">wave</span> drag on the input and output terms in the total mechanical energy budget of a hybrid coordinate high-resolution global ocean general circulation model forced by winds and air-sea buoyancy fluxes is...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">B. K. Arbic D. S. Trossman J. A. Goff S. R. Jayne S. T. Garner</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' 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style="font-weight: bold;">12</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#">13</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#">14</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#">15</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#">16</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#">17</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#">18</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#">19</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#">20</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">221</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/53322522"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Impact</span> of ultrasonic guided <span class="hlt">wave</span> transducer design on health monitoring of composite structures</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Structural health monitoring of composite materials will lead to a significant safety and economic <span class="hlt">impact</span> on the aircraft and aerospace industries. Ultrasonic guided <span class="hlt">wave</span> based methods are becoming popular because of an excellent compromise between coverage area and sensitivity for localized damage detection. The transducers currently used in composite health monitoring are designed mostly in an empirical manner. The work</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Huidong Gao; Joseph L. Rose</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">222</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/283116"> <span id="translatedtitle">Optical transfer <span class="hlt">function</span> for nonparaxial phase conjugation in degenerate four-<span class="hlt">wave</span> mixing</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The optical transfer <span class="hlt">function</span> (OTF) related to the phase-conjugate mirror operating as an imaging device is examined. The OTF derived is based on the nonparaxial solution of parametric four-<span class="hlt">wave</span> mixing; i.e., the OTF is valid for a wide angular spectrum of the probe <span class="hlt">wave</span>. The influence of the nonuniform pump <span class="hlt">waves</span> on the Fourier spectrum of the conjugate <span class="hlt">wave</span> is estimated in an approximation that is valid for the generated <span class="hlt">wave</span> of weak intensity. 14 refs., 2 figs.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Bouchal, Z. [Palacky University, Olomouc (Czech Republic)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1993-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">223</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/7011899"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Impact</span> of ozone depletion on immune <span class="hlt">function</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Depletion of stratospheric ozone is expected to lead to an increase in the amount of UV-B radiation present in sunlight. In addition to its well known ability to cause skin cancer, UV-B radiation has been shown to alter the immune system. The immune system is the body's primary defense mechanism against infectious diseases and protects against the development of certain types of cancer. Any impairment of immune <span class="hlt">function</span> may jeopardize health by increasing susceptibility to infectious diseases, increasing the severity of infections, or delaying recovery for infections. In addition, impaired immune <span class="hlt">function</span> can increase the incidence of certain cancers, particularly cancers of the skin. Research carried out with laboratory animals over the past 15 years has demonstrated that exposure of the skin to UV-B radiation can suppress certain types of immune responses. These include rejection of UV-induced skin cancers and melanomas, contact allergy reactions to chemicals, delayed-type hypersensitivity responses to microbial and other antigens, and phagocytosis and elimination of certain bacteria from lymphoid tissues. Recent studies with mycobacterial infection of mice demonstrated that exposure to UV-B radiation decreased the delayed hypersensitivity response to mycobacterial antigens and increased the severity of infection. In humans, UV-B radiation has also been shown to impair the contact allergy response. These studies demonstrate that UV radiation can decrease immune responses in humans and laboratory and raise the possibility that increased exposure to UV-B radiation could adversely affect human health by increasing the incidence or severity of certain infectious diseases.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Jeevan, A.; Kripke, M.L. (Univ. of Texas, Houston, TX (United States). Dept. of Immunology)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1993-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">224</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011AGUFM.P31F..02L"> <span id="translatedtitle">Natural <span class="hlt">impacts</span> on the Moon and Mars: seismic constrains on the <span class="hlt">impact</span> shock <span class="hlt">wave</span> and perspectives in term of crustal and upper mantle imaging.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Natural <span class="hlt">Impacts</span> occurring on the surface of telluric planets are important seismic sources for constraining the crustal and upper mantle structure, especially when their <span class="hlt">impact</span> location and <span class="hlt">impacting</span> time can be determined by other complementing experiments, such as Earth based flash detection for the Moon or differential orbital imaging of the surface for Mars. When these complementary data are not available, which was the case of Apollo with the exception of artificial <span class="hlt">impacts</span>, the location of <span class="hlt">impact</span> as compared to quake is easier, as only their geographical location must be determined from seismic data. We present recent results of the analysis of <span class="hlt">impact</span> related seismic data gathered by the Apollo Lunar seismic network during the 70th. By using the artificial <span class="hlt">impact</span>, we first develop a calibrated analysis for extracting the impulse (i.e. mass time <span class="hlt">impact</span> velocity) from the amplitude of seismic <span class="hlt">waves</span>, and point out the effect of the generation of ejecta in the seismic impulse. This approach not only allows to constrain the mass of the <span class="hlt">impacts</span>, but also to constrain the <span class="hlt">impact</span> frequency-impactor mass relation. By combining both the Apollo long period and short period data, further analysis can be made on the dynamic of the seismic source. The combination of these date provides indeed broadband seismic analysis have been made allowing to constraint the seismic cut-off frequency and source spectrum associated with both natural and artificial <span class="hlt">impacts</span>. We show that the source cut-off is, as compared to moonquakes, relatively low and around a few Hz for remotely detected <span class="hlt">impacts</span>. It is also depending not only on the <span class="hlt">impact</span> size, but also on the <span class="hlt">impact</span> location, as the seismic radiation of the shock <span class="hlt">wave</span> depends on the most-upper regolith layers. We finally use our results and forward modeling to prepare the GEMS seismic mission to Mars, considered by NASA for a launch in 2016. In order to have a robust estimation of the rates of seismic detection of <span class="hlt">impacts</span>, we analyze and model the differences of seismic propagation properties between Mars and the Moon, and use this modeling to estimate the seismic response of <span class="hlt">impacts</span> on Mars, as a <span class="hlt">function</span> of both the impactor characteristics (mass and velocity) and epicentral distance. We then use statistical models of impactors, confirmed by both the Apollo seismic observations and the Mars Orbiter <span class="hlt">impacts</span> observations, to estimate the present flux on Mars and to constrain the rate of seismic <span class="hlt">impact</span> detection, as well as the expected probability to further locale these events by differential remote sensing. This analysis is performed by taking into account both the expected performances of the VBB seismometer of GEMS and the expected environmental noise after its deployment on the Martian surface. The perspectives in terms of crustal and upper mantle seismic imaging are finally provided in conclusion for both GEMS on Mars and SELENE2 on the Moon.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Lognonne, P.; Gudkova, T.; Le Feuvre, M.; Garcia, R. F.; Kawamura, T.; Banerdt, B.; Kobayashi, N.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">225</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012PhRvB..86a4404P"> <span id="translatedtitle">Topological and entanglement properties of resonating valence bond <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We examine in details the connections between topological and entanglement properties of short-range resonating valence bond (RVB) <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> using projected entangled pair states (PEPS) on kagome and square lattices on (quasi)infinite cylinders with generalized boundary conditions (and perimeters with up to 20 lattice spacings). By making use of disconnected topological sectors in the space of dimer lattice coverings, we explicitly derive (orthogonal) “minimally entangled” PEPS RVB states. For the kagome lattice, using the quantum Heisenberg antiferromagnet as a reference model, we obtain the finite-size scaling with increasing cylinder perimeter of the vanishing energy separations between these states. In particular, we extract two separate (vanishing) energy scales corresponding (i) to insert a vison line between the two ends of the cylinder and (ii) to pull out and freeze a spin at either end. We also investigate the relations between bulk and boundary properties and show that, for a bipartition of the cylinder, the boundary Hamiltonian defined on the edge can be written as a product of a highly nonlocal projector, which fundamentally depends upon boundary conditions, with an emergent (local) SU(2)-invariant one-dimensional (superfluid) t-J Hamiltonian, which arises due to the symmetry properties of the auxiliary spins at the edge. This multiplicative structure, a consequence of the disconnected topological sectors in the space of dimer lattice coverings, is characteristic of the topological nature of the states. For minimally entangled RVB states, it is shown that the entanglement spectrum, which reflects the properties of the (gapless or gapped) edge modes, is a subset of the spectrum of the local Hamiltonian, e.g., half of it for the kagome RVB state, providing a simple argument on the origin of the topological entanglement entropy S0=-ln2 of the Z2 spin liquid. We propose to use these features to probe topological phases in microscopic Hamiltonians, and some results are compared to existing density matrix renormalization group data.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Poilblanc, Didier; Schuch, Norbert; Pérez-García, David; Cirac, J. Ignacio</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">226</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2005PThPh.113...87S"> <span id="translatedtitle">Effective Interaction for the Jastrow Model <span class="hlt">Wave</span> <span class="hlt">Function</span> with the Transcorrelated Method</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We show that the short-range repulsion of nucleon-nucleon interactions can be eliminated by use of the transcorrelated method starting from Jastrow-type <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span>. We derive an energy-independent effective interaction acting on the model <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span>. We propose two ways to determine the Jastrow correlation <span class="hlt">function</span> and examine their utility in systems of two nucleons and two rare-gas atoms interacting via the Morse potential. We show that the minimization of the variance of the local energy can be exploited to optimize the basis set that constitutes the solution of the equation of motion for the model <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span>.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Suzuki, Y.; Matsumura, H.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">227</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/1013121"> <span id="translatedtitle">Covariant spectator theory of $np$ scattering:\\\\ Effective range expansions and relativistic deuteron <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We present the effective range expansions for the 1S0 and 3S1 scattering phase shifts, and the relativistic deuteron <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> that accompany our recent high precision fits (with \\chi^2/N{data} \\simeq 1) to the 2007 world np data below 350 MeV. The <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> are expanded in a series of analytical <span class="hlt">functions</span> (with the correct asymptotic behavior at both large and small arguments) that can be Fourier-transformed from momentum to coordinate space and are convenient to use in any application. A fortran subroutine to compute these <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> can be obtained from the authors.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Franz Gross, Alfred Stadler</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">228</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20040090016&hterms=glucose+uptake&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D30%26Ntt%3Dglucose%2Buptake"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Impact</span> of weightlessness on muscle <span class="hlt">function</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The most studied skeletal muscles which depend on gravity, "antigravity" muscles, are located in the posterior portion of the legs. Antigravity muscles are characterized generally by a different fiber type composition than those which are considered nonpostural. The gravity-dependent <span class="hlt">function</span> of the antigravity muscles makes them particularly sensitive to weightlessness (unweighting) resulting in a substantial loss of muscle protein, with a relatively greater loss of myofibrillar (structural) proteins. Accordingly alpha-actin mRNA decreases in muscle of rats exposed to microgravity. In the legs, the soleus seems particularly responsive to the lack of weight-bearing associated with space flight. The loss of muscle protein leads to a decreased cross-sectional area of muscle fibers, particularly of the slow-twitch, oxidative (SO) ones compared to fast-twitch glycolytic (FG) or oxidative-glycolytic (FOG) fibers. In some muscles, a shift in fiber composition from SO to FOG has been reported in the adaptation to spaceflight. Changes in muscle composition with spaceflight have been associated with decreased maximal isometric tension (Po) and increased maximal shortening velocity. In terms of fuel metabolism, results varied depending on the pathway considered. Glucose uptake, in the presence of insulin, and activities of glycolytic enzymes are increased by space flight. In contrast, oxidation of fatty acids may be diminished. Oxidation of pyruvate, activity of the citric acid cycle, and ketone metabolism in muscle seem to be unaffected by microgravity.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Tischler, M. E.; Slentz, M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1995-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">229</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=AD751669"> <span id="translatedtitle">Electromagnetic <span class="hlt">Wave</span> <span class="hlt">Functions</span> for Parabolic Plasma Density Profiles.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The computation of the reflection and transmission coefficients was undertaken in an earlier paper for a class of one-dimensional <span class="hlt">wave</span> propagation problems in inhomogeneous plasmas devoid of external magnetic field. More precisely, making use of an extens...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">A. Banos D. L. Kelly</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1972-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">230</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21322904"> <span id="translatedtitle">On Dissipation <span class="hlt">Function</span> of Ocean <span class="hlt">Waves</span> due to Whitecapping</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Hasselmann kinetic equation provides a statistical description of <span class="hlt">waves</span> ensemble. Several catastrophic events are beyond statistical model. In the case of gravity <span class="hlt">waves</span> on the surface of the deep fluid may be the most frequent and important events of such kind are whitecapping and <span class="hlt">wave</span> breaking. It was shown earlier that such effects leads to additional dissipation in the energy contaning region around <span class="hlt">waves</span> spectral peak, which can be simulated by means of empiric dissipative term in kinetic equation. In order to find dependence of this term with respect to nonlinearity in the system (steepness of the surface) we preformed two numerical experiments: weakly nonlinear one in the framework of 3D hydrodynamics and fully nonlinear one for 2D hydrodynamic. In spite of significantly different models and initial conditions, both these experiments yielded close results. Obtained data can be used to define analytical formula for dependence of the dissipative term of dissipation coefficient with respect to mean steepness of the surface.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Zakharov, V. E. [Department of Mathematics, University of Arizona, 617 N. Santa Rita Ave., P.O. Box 210089, Tucson, AZ 85721-0089 (United States); Waves and Solitons LLC, 918 W. Windsong Dr., Phoenix, AZ 85045 (United States); Korotkevich, A. O. [P. N. Lebedev Physical Institute RAS, 53 Leninsky Prosp., GSP-1 Moscow, 119991 (Russian Federation); Department of Mathematics and Statistics, University of New Mexico, MSC03 2150, 1 University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131-0001 (United States); L. D. Landau Institute for Theoretical Physics RAS, 2 Kosygin Str., Moscow, 119334 (Russian Federation); Prokofiev, A. O. [L. D. Landau Institute for Theoretical Physics RAS, 2 Kosygin Str., Moscow, 119334 (Russian Federation)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-09-09</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">231</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013AGUFM.S31C2360B"> <span id="translatedtitle">Understanding complex teleseismic <span class="hlt">wave</span> propagation in the Sierra Nevada through vertical-component P-<span class="hlt">wave</span> receiver <span class="hlt">functions</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Past seismic studies attempting to image the lithosphere underneath the Sierra Nevada and to constrain the geometry of the upper mantle Isabella anomaly, a high <span class="hlt">wave</span>-speed body underneath the western foothills of the range, have observed complex behavior in teleseismic and regional waveforms recorded at stations within the range. Notably, a 1993 teleseismic mini-array recorded multipath P-<span class="hlt">wave</span> arrivals, topographic reflections, and scattered energy ~25 km west of the Sierran crest. These effects suggest <span class="hlt">wave</span> propagation through strongly heterogeneous lithosphere complicated by near-surface phenomena. Multipathing and other complex <span class="hlt">wave</span> propagation are indicative of strong variations in wavespeed, which in turn reflect structural complexity important in understanding the genesis of the Isabella anomaly. However, determining the extent of such propagative behavior in and underneath the Sierra Nevada has not been studied. We investigate the behavior of teleseismic P-<span class="hlt">waves</span> using vertical-component receiver <span class="hlt">functions</span> in an effort to better understand the extent of complex waveforms as a first tool in better constraining the geographic region(s) where sufficiently complex lithospheric structure exists. We expect that the presence of sufficiently high velocity gradients should result in P-<span class="hlt">wave</span> multipath arrivals from events that skirt the perimeter of the Isabella anomaly from certain backazimuths. We deconvolve regionally beamed vertical P-waveforms from individual vertical component P-<span class="hlt">waves</span>. This effectively recovers variability in the P waveforms that is normally lost in typical single-station radial- and transverse-component receiver <span class="hlt">function</span> analyses. Vertical P-<span class="hlt">wave</span> beams are constructed using dbxcor, a waveform correlation algorithm developed by G. Pavlis. Seismic data for the northern and central Sierra Nevada are from the 2005-2007 Sierra Nevada Earthscope Project (SNEP) and further supplemented by many permanent and temporary stations including the Earthscope Transportable Array. Data for the southern Sierra Nevada comes from the 1997 Sierran Paradox Experiment (SPE).</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Bernardino, M. J.; Jones, C. H.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">232</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014EGUGA..1616785W"> <span id="translatedtitle">Thermal <span class="hlt">Impact</span> of oceanic coastal Kelvin <span class="hlt">waves</span> along West African coasts</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We investigate the role of the intra-seasonal oceanic Kevin <span class="hlt">waves</span> and their <span class="hlt">impacts</span> on Sea Surface Temperature (SST) along the three West African coastal upwelling regions. 1/4° NEMO OGCM runs were carried out and analyzed to study the detailed of coastal <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">impacts</span> on SST. Idealized experiments support the altimetry results, and particularly the observed amplitude and velocity changes. SST <span class="hlt">impacts</span> of up to 0.5°C/cm are visible in model runs, as well as in observations by regression of SSH on SST along coastlines. The experiments allow for a partition of lateral and vertical advection and mixing processes, and uncover their competing or constructive effects on the thermal stratification and the SST field, depending on location and mean circulation.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Wade, Malick; Lazar, Alban</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">233</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3659130"> <span id="translatedtitle">What is the <span class="hlt">impact</span> of electromagnetic <span class="hlt">waves</span> on epileptic seizures?</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Background The effects of electromagnetic <span class="hlt">waves</span> (EMWs) on humans and their relationship with various disorders have been investigated. We aimed to investigate the effects of exposure to different frequencies of EMWs in various durations in a mouse epilepsy model induced by pentylenetetrazole (PTZ). Material/Methods A total of 180 4-week-old male mice weighing 25–30 g were used in this study. Each experimental group consisted of 10 mice. They were exposed to 900, 700, 500, 300, and 100 MHz EMWs for 20 hours, 12 hours and 2 hours. Following electromagnetic radiation exposure, 60 mg/kg of PTZ was injected intraperitoneally to all mice. Each control was also injected with PTZ without any exposure to EMW. The latency of initial seizure and most severe seizure onset were compared with controls. Results The shortest initial seizure latency was noted in the 12-hour group, followed by the 700 MHz. The mean initial seizure latencies in the 2-hour EMW exposed group was significantly shorter compared to that in the 12- and 20-hour groups. There was no significant difference between 12- and 20-hour EMW exposed groups. There was a significant difference between control and 2- and 10-hour EMW exposed groups. No statistically significant differences were noted in mean latencies of the most severe seizure latency, following 20-, 12-, and 2- hour EMW exposed groups and control groups. Conclusions Our findings suggest that acute exposure to EMW may facilitate epileptic seizures, which may be independent of EMW exposure time. This information might be important for patients with epilepsy. Further studies are needed.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Cinar, Nilgun; Sahin, Sevki; Erdinc, Oguz O.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">234</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24344343"> <span id="translatedtitle">Remarks on nodal volume statistics for regular and chaotic <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> in various dimensions.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We discuss the statistical properties of the volume of the nodal set of <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> for two paradigmatic model systems which we consider in arbitrary dimension s?2: the cuboid as a paradigm for a regular shape with separable <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> and planar random <span class="hlt">waves</span> as an established model for chaotic <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> in irregular shapes. We give explicit results for the mean and variance of the nodal volume in the arbitrary dimension, and for their limiting distribution. For the mean nodal volume, we calculate the effect of the boundary of the cuboid where Dirichlet boundary conditions reduce the nodal volume compared with the bulk. Boundary effects for chaotic <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> are calculated using random <span class="hlt">waves</span> which satisfy a Dirichlet boundary condition on a hyperplane. We put forward several conjectures on what properties of cuboids generalize to general regular shapes with separable <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> and what properties of random <span class="hlt">waves</span> can be expected for general irregular shapes. These universal features clearly distinguish between the two cases. PMID:24344343</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Gnutzmann, Sven; Lois, Stylianos</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-01-28</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">235</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2001/ofr-01-0440/"> <span id="translatedtitle">A test of a mechanical multi-<span class="hlt">impact</span> shear-<span class="hlt">wave</span> seismic source</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We modified two gasoline-engine-powered earth tampers, commonly used as compressional-(P) <span class="hlt">wave</span> seismic energy sources for shallow reflection studies, for use as shear(S)-<span class="hlt">wave</span> energy sources. This new configuration, termed ?Hacker? (horizontal Wacker?), is evaluated as an alternative to the manual sledgehammer typically used in conjunction with a large timber held down by the front wheels of a vehicle. The Hacker maximizes the use of existing equipment by a quick changeover of bolt-on accessories as opposed to the handling of a separate source, and is intended to improve the depth of penetration of S-<span class="hlt">wave</span> data by stacking hundreds of <span class="hlt">impacts</span> over a two to three minute period. Records were made with a variety of configurations involving up to two Hackers simultaneously then compared to a reference record made with a sledgehammer. Preliminary results indicate moderate success by the higher amplitude S-<span class="hlt">waves</span> recorded with the Hacker as compared to the hammer method. False triggers generated by the backswing of the Hacker add unwanted noise and we are currently working to modify the device to eliminate this effect. Correlation noise caused by insufficient randomness of the Hacker <span class="hlt">impact</span> sequence is also a significant noise problem that we hope to reduce by improving the coupling of the Hacker to the timber so that the operator has more control over the <span class="hlt">impact</span> sequence.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Worley, David M.; Odum, Jack K.; Williams, Robert A.; Stephenson, William J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2001-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">236</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012APhy...58..339G"> <span id="translatedtitle">Surface <span class="hlt">waves</span> in materials with <span class="hlt">functionally</span> gradient coatings</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Surface <span class="hlt">wave</span> excitation and propagation in a half-space with a continuous dependence of elastic properties on depth has been considered. The total <span class="hlt">wave</span> field generated by a given surface load can be represented as a convolution of the Green's matrix of the medium with the vector of surface stresses, while the traveling surface <span class="hlt">waves</span> are described by the residues from the poles of the Green's matrix Fourier symbol. Comparison of the gradient and multilayer models shows that with a high enough number of partitions (layers), the dispersion properties and amplitude-frequency characteristics of surface <span class="hlt">waves</span> in FGMs are described by the curves obtained upon a steplike approximation of gradient properties; however, with high contrast properties, the multilayer model can be more time-consuming. The effect of the vertical inhomogeneity of the medium on the surface <span class="hlt">wave</span> characteristics has been analyzed for a series of typical dependences occurring in micro- and nanocoatings due to diffusions or technological features of sputtering and gluing of protective films.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Glushkov, E. V.; Glushkova, N. V.; Fomenko, S. I.; Zhang, C.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">237</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/10124199"> <span id="translatedtitle">Semiempirical dissipation source <span class="hlt">functions</span> for ocean <span class="hlt">waves</span>: Part I, definition, calibration and validation</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">New parameterizations for the spectra dissipation of wind-generated <span class="hlt">waves</span> are\\u000aproposed. The rates of dissipation have no predetermined spectral shapes and\\u000aare <span class="hlt">functions</span> of the <span class="hlt">wave</span> spectrum and wind speed and direction, in a way\\u000aconsistent with observation of <span class="hlt">wave</span> breaking and swell dissipation properties.\\u000aNamely, the swell dissipation is nonlinear and proportional to the swell\\u000asteepness, and dissipation due</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Fabrice Ardhuin; Jean-Francois Filipot; Rudy Magne; Erick Rogers; Alexander Babanin; Pierre Queffeulou; Lotfi Aouf; Jean-Michel Lefevre; Aron Roland; Andre van der Westhuysen; Fabrice Collard</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">238</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2004CaJPh..82..549N"> <span id="translatedtitle">A new way of finding locations of zeros of <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A new analytic method is presented for evaluating zeros of <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span>. In this method, locating the zeros of <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> of the Schrodinger equation is converted to finding the roots of a polynomials. The coefficient of this polynomial can be evaluated analytically for a class of potentials. The speciality of this method is that the zeros are located without solving an equation of motion for the <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span>. The method is valid for both real and complex systems and can be applied for locating both real and complex zeros. Examples are given to illustrate the method.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Nanayakkara, A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">239</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014PhRvA..89d4101S"> <span id="translatedtitle">Semiclassical and quantum analysis of a free-particle Hermite <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In this Brief Report we discuss a solution of the free-particle Schrödinger equation in which the time and space dependence are not separable. The <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> is written as a product of exponential terms, Hermite polynomials, and a phase. The peaks in the <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> decelerate and then accelerate around t =0. We analyze this behavior within both a quantum and a semiclassical regime. We show that the acceleration does not represent true acceleration of the particle but can be related to the envelope <span class="hlt">function</span> of the allowed classical paths. Comparison with other "accelerating" <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> is also made. The analysis provides considerable insight into the meaning of the quantum <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span>.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Strange, P.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">240</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19740041796&hterms=wave+energy&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D70%26Ntt%3Dwave%2Benergy"> <span id="translatedtitle">Degenerate RS perturbation theory. [Rayleigh-Schroedinger energies and <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A concise, systematic procedure is given for determining the Rayleigh-Schroedinger energies and <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> of degenerate states to arbitrarily high orders even when the degeneracies of the various states are resolved in arbitrary orders. The procedure is expressed in terms of an iterative cycle in which the energy through the (2n + 1)-th order is expressed in terms of the partially determined <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> through the n-th order. Both a direct and an operator derivation are given. The two approaches are equivalent and can be transcribed into each other. The direct approach deals with the <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> (without the use of formal operators) and has the advantage that it resembles the usual treatment of nondegenerate perturbations and maintains close contact with the basic physics. In the operator approach, the <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> are expressed in terms of infinite-order operators which are determined by the successive resolution of the space of the zeroth-order <span class="hlt">functions</span>.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hirschfelder, J. O.; Certain, P. R.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1974-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' 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onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">241</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1991SPIE.1358.1057P"> <span id="translatedtitle">The application of cylindrical blast <span class="hlt">waves</span> to <span class="hlt">impact</span> studies of materials</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">An exploding wire method is described in which the <span class="hlt">impact</span> properties of hollow polymeric cylinders are investigated by subjecting them to internal, high-pressure, blast <span class="hlt">wave</span> loading. Studies of the blast <span class="hlt">waves</span> themselves, and of the expansion of thin-walled polymer tubes and rings, have been made using high-speed image convertor photography at 10 exp 5 to 10 exp 6 frames/s. Such observations, when combined with strain gauge and pressure measurements where necesary, have enabled the mechanical properties of several polymers to be determined at high strain rates from 10 exp 3 to 10 exp 5/s.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Parry, D. J.; Stewardson, H. R.; Ahmad, S. H.; Al-Maliky, N.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1991-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">242</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19800067236&hterms=transfer+function&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D70%26Ntt%3Dtransfer%2Bfunction"> <span id="translatedtitle">Ocean <span class="hlt">wave</span>-radar modulation transfer <span class="hlt">functions</span> from the West Coast experiment</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Short gravity-capillary <span class="hlt">waves</span>, the equilibrium, or the steady state excitations of the ocean surface are modulated by longer ocean <span class="hlt">waves</span>. These short <span class="hlt">waves</span> are the predominant microwave scatterers on the ocean surface under many viewing conditions so that the modulation is readily measured with CW Doppler radar used as a two-scale <span class="hlt">wave</span> probe. Modulation transfer <span class="hlt">functions</span> (the ratio of the cross spectrum of the line-of-sight orbital speed and backscattered microwave power to the autospectrum of the line-of-sight orbital speed) were measured at 9.375 and 1.5 GHz (Bragg wavelengths of 2.3 and 13 cm) for winds up to 10 m/s and ocean <span class="hlt">wave</span> periods from 2-18 s. The measurements were compared with the relaxation-time model; the principal result is that a source of modulation other than straining by the horizontal component of orbital speed, possibly the <span class="hlt">wave</span>-induced airflow, is responsible for most of the modulation by <span class="hlt">waves</span> of typical ocean <span class="hlt">wave</span> period (10 s). The modulations are large; for unit coherence, spectra of radar images of deep-water <span class="hlt">waves</span> should be proportional to the quotient of the slope spectra of the ocean <span class="hlt">waves</span> by the ocean <span class="hlt">wave</span> frequency.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Wright, J. W.; Plant, W. J.; Keller, W. C.; Jones, W. L.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1980-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">243</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.esm.vt.edu/~rbatra/pdfpapers/computational2007(374-390).pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Wave</span> propagation in <span class="hlt">functionally</span> graded materials by modified smoothed particle hydrodynamics (MSPH) method</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">We use the modified smoothed particle hydrodynamics (MSPH) method to study the propagation of elastic <span class="hlt">waves</span> in <span class="hlt">functionally</span> graded materials. An artificial viscosity is added to the hydrostatic pressure to control oscillations in the shock <span class="hlt">wave</span>. Computed results agree well with the analytical solution of the problem. It is shown that, for the same placement of particles\\/nodes the MSPH method</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">G. M. Zhang; R. C. Batra</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">244</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.mpl.ucsd.edu/people/pgerstoft/papers/geophysics2006.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Green’s <span class="hlt">functions</span> extraction and surface-<span class="hlt">wave</span> tomography from microseisms in southern California</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">We use crosscorrelations of seismic noise data from 151 stations in southern California to extract the group velocities of surface <span class="hlt">waves</span> between the station pairs for the purpose of determining the surface-<span class="hlt">wave</span> velocity structure. We devel- oped an automated procedure for estimating the Green's <span class="hlt">functions</span> and subsequent tomographic inversion from the 11,325 station pairs based on the characteristics of the</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Peter Gerstoft; Karim G. Sabra; Philippe Roux; W. A. Kuperman; Michael C. Fehler</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">245</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.cwp.mines.edu/documents/cwpreports/cwp-467p.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Extracting the Green's <span class="hlt">function</span> from the correlation of coda <span class="hlt">waves</span>: A derivation based on stationary phase</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Green's <span class="hlt">function</span> of <span class="hlt">waves</span> that propagate between two receivers can be found by cross-correlating multiply scattered <span class="hlt">waves</span> recorded at these receivers. This technique obviates the need for a source at one of these locations, and is therefore called ``passive imaging.'' This principle has been explained by assuming that the normal modes of the system are uncorrelated and that all</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Roel Snieder</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">246</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.math.tamu.edu/~phoward/admin/cpde1.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Pointwise Green's <span class="hlt">Function</span> Estimates Toward Stability for Degenerate Viscous Shock <span class="hlt">Waves</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">We consider degenerate viscous shock <span class="hlt">waves</span> arising in systems of two conservation laws, where degeneracy describes viscous shock <span class="hlt">waves</span> for which the asymptotic endstates are sonic to the hyperbolic system (the shock speed is equal to one of the characteristic speeds). In particular, we develop detailed pointwise estimates on the Green's <span class="hlt">function</span> associated with the linearized perturbation equation, sufficient for</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Peter Howard</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">247</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18986946"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Functionally</span> graded piezoelectric materials for modal transducers for exciting bulk and surface acoustic <span class="hlt">waves</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We show that <span class="hlt">functionally</span> graded piezoelectric materials can be used to make modal actuators through theoretical analyses of the excitation of extensional motion in an elastic rod and Rayleigh surface <span class="hlt">waves</span> over an elastic half-plane. The results suggest alternatives with certain advantages for the excitation of bulk and surface acoustic <span class="hlt">waves</span>. PMID:18986946</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Yang, Jiashi; Jin, Zhihe; Li, Jiangyu</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">248</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/26241110"> <span id="translatedtitle">A one-dimensional model for designing <span class="hlt">functionally</span> graded materials to manage stress <span class="hlt">waves</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The development of <span class="hlt">Functionally</span> Graded Materials (FGMs) for energy-absorbing applications requires understanding of stress <span class="hlt">wave</span> propagation in these structures in order to optimize their resistance to failure. A simple, one-dimensional model is proposed to develop insight into stress <span class="hlt">wave</span> management issues. This model is initially applied to FGMs with discrete layering, then extended to continuously graded architectures. From this model,</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hugh A. Bruck</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2000-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">249</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://zarinslab.stanford.edu/publications/zarins_bib/zarins_pdf/2005/alsac_graft_jvs05.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">The <span class="hlt">impact</span> of aortic endografts on renal <span class="hlt">function</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Objective: To determine the <span class="hlt">impact</span> on late postoperative renal <span class="hlt">function</span> of suprarenal and infrarenal fixation of endografts used to treat infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). Methods: Retrospective analysis of 277 patients treated from 2000 to 2003 with three different endografts at two clinical centers. Five patients on dialysis for preoperative chronic renal failure were excluded. Group IF of 135 patients</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Jean-Marc Alsac; Christopher K. Zarins; Maarit A. Heikkinen; John Karwowski; Frank R. Arko; Pascal Desgranges; Françoise Roudot-Thoraval; Jean-Pierre Becquemin</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">250</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013JPhCS.419a2046Y"> <span id="translatedtitle">A Study on Propagation Characteristic of One-dimensional Stress <span class="hlt">Wave</span> in <span class="hlt">Functionally</span> Graded Armor Composites</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The development of <span class="hlt">Functionally</span> Graded Materials (FGM) for energy-absorbing applications requires understanding of stress <span class="hlt">wave</span> propagation in these structures in order to optimize their resistance to failure. One-dimensional stress <span class="hlt">wave</span> in FGM composites under elastic and plastic <span class="hlt">wave</span> loading have been investigated. The stress distributions through the thickness and stress status have been analyzed and some comparisons have been done with the materials of sharp interfaces (two-layered material). The results demonstrate that the gradient structure design greatly decreases the severity of the stress concentrations at the interfaces and there are no clear differences in stress distribution in FGM composites under elastic and plastic <span class="hlt">wave</span> loading.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Yang, S. Y.; Liu, X.; Cao, D. F.; Mei, H.; Lei, Z. T.; Liu, L. S.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">251</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1994NuPhB.419..455W"> <span id="translatedtitle">Chiral operator product algebra hidden in certain fractional quantum Hall <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In this paper we study the conditions under which an N-electron <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> for a fractional quantum Hall (FQH) state can be viewed as an N-point correlation <span class="hlt">function</span> in a conformal field theory (CFT). Several concrete examples are presented to illustrate, when these conditions are satisfied, how to "derive" or "uncover" a relevant operator algebra in the associated CFT from the FQH <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span>. Besides the known pfaffian state, the states studied here include three d-<span class="hlt">wave</span> paired states, one for spinless electrons and two for spin- {1}/{2} electrons (one of them is the Haldane-Rezayi state). It is suggested that the non-abelian topological order hidden in these states can be characterized by their associated chiral operator product algebra, from which one may infer the quantum numbers of quasiparticles and calculate their <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span>.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Wen, Xia-Gang; Wu, Yong-Shi</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1994-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">252</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21948966"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Waves</span> of trouble: MRSA strain dynamics and assessment of the <span class="hlt">impact</span> of infection control.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">There has been a sustained decline in bloodstream infections due to methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) throughout the UK. The UK MRSA epidemic, which began in the 1990s, has been dominated by two epidemic MRSA (EMRSA) clones {EMRSA-15, of clonal complex (CC) 22 [sequence type (ST) 22], and EMRSA-16, of CC30 (ST36)}. It appears that both these clones followed a <span class="hlt">wave</span> trajectory (initial expansion, relative stasis, then decline). Three recent studies have shown that ST36 has declined faster than ST22, a change that appears to have begun before the recent intensification of intensive control measures in the UK. The biological basis of infectious disease <span class="hlt">waves</span>, including those of MRSA, is discussed, as are the implications of such <span class="hlt">waves</span> for the assessment of the <span class="hlt">impact</span> of infection control measures. PMID:21948966</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Wyllie, David; Paul, John; Crook, Derrick</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">253</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014CEJPh.tmp...19B"> <span id="translatedtitle">Spinless relativistic particle in energy-dependent potential and normalization of the <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The problem of normalization related to a Klein-Gordon particle subjected to vector plus scalar energydependent potentials is clarified in the context of the path integral approach. In addition the correction relating to the normalizing constant of <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> is exactly determined. As examples, the energy dependent linear and Coulomb potentials are considered. The <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> obtained via spectral decomposition, were found exactly normalized.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Benchikha, Amar; Chetouani, Lyazid</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">254</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013PhRvC..88d4004J"> <span id="translatedtitle">Self-consistent random-phase approximation from a coupled-cluster <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> perspective</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Self-consistent random-phase approximation is rederived in a consistent way with the help of the coupled cluster ground state <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> truncated at the two-body level. An exact killing operator for this <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> is introduced allowing for a detailed discussion of the approximation scheme. Several exactly solvable models are reanalyzed under this new perspective giving rise to a quantitative evaluation of the performances of this many-body method.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Jemaï, M.; Delion, D. S.; Schuck, P.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">255</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/48261284"> <span id="translatedtitle">Three-Parameter <span class="hlt">Wave</span> <span class="hlt">Functions</span> for ns 2 -Orbitals in Alkali—Metal Negative Ions</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">A three-parameter variational <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> is used to describe the binding energy of alkali—metal negative ions using a two-electron system in the ns2-state. Each electron is described by a modified screened hydrogenic <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> involving two free screening parameters denoted by c and a in addition to the core-screened nuclear charge, \\u000a$$\\\\mathop {\\\\text{Z}}\\\\limits^{\\\\text{*}}$$\\u000a. The model is applied to lithium,</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">M. A. Abbadi; I. I. Al-Qasir; J. M. Khalifeh</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">256</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/18967346"> <span id="translatedtitle">Critical <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> and a Cantor-set spectrum of a one-dimensional quasicrystal model</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The electronic properties of a tight-binding model which possesses two types of hopping matrix element (or on-site energy) arranged in a Fibonacci sequence are studied. The <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> are either self-similar (fractal) or chaotic and show ``critical'' (or ``exotic'') behavior. Scaling analysis for the self-similar <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> at the center of the band and also at the edge of the</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Mahito Kohmoto; Bill Sutherland; Chao Tang</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1987-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">257</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/56227440"> <span id="translatedtitle">Central-Field Approximation for the Electronic <span class="hlt">Wave</span> <span class="hlt">Functions</span> of Simple Molecules</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The use of a central-field type of molecular orbital for the electronic <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> of simple molecules has been investigated and application has been made to H2, H2O and CH4.Ionization potentials calculated with the use of these <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> are generally in good agreement with experimental values. No empirical data have been used in these calculations except the known equilibrium</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Koichi Funabashi; John L. Magee</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1957-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">258</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011PhRvA..84d4103B"> <span id="translatedtitle">Convergence of repeated quantum nondemolition measurements and <span class="hlt">wave-function</span> collapse</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Motivated by recent experiments on quantum trapped fields, we give a rigorous proof that repeated indirect quantum nondemolition (QND) measurements converge to the collapse of the <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> as predicted by the postulates of quantum mechanics for direct measurements. We also relate the rate of convergence toward the collapsed <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> to the relative entropy of each indirect measurement, a result which makes contact with information theory.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Bauer, Michel; Bernard, Denis</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">259</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.springerlink.com/index/y1618037134894p2.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Elastic <span class="hlt">Wave</span> Propagation in a Class of Cracked, <span class="hlt">Functionally</span> Graded Materials by BIEM</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Elastic <span class="hlt">wave</span> propagation in cracked, <span class="hlt">functionally</span> graded materials (FGM) with elastic parameters that are exponential <span class="hlt">functions</span> of a single spatial co-ordinate is studied in this work. Conditions of plane strain are assumed to hold as the material is swept by time-harmonic, incident <span class="hlt">waves</span>. The FGM has a fixed Poisson’s ratio of 0.25, while both shear modulus and density profiles vary</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">P. S. Dineva; T. V. Rangelov; G. D. Manolis</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">260</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/26602767"> <span id="translatedtitle">Internal generation of <span class="hlt">waves</span>: Delta source <span class="hlt">function</span> method and source term addition method</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">In this study, we investigate two internal <span class="hlt">wave</span> generation methods in numerical modeling of time-dependent equations for water <span class="hlt">wave</span> propagation, i.e., delta source <span class="hlt">function</span> method and source term addition method, the latter of which has been called the line source method in literatures. We derive delta source <span class="hlt">functions</span> for the Boussinesq-type equations and extended mild-slope equations. By applying the fractional</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Gunwoo Kim; Changhoon Lee; Kyung-Duck Suh</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' 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id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' href="#">4</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_5");' href="#">5</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_6");' href="#">6</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_7");' href="#">7</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_8");' href="#">8</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_9");' href="#">9</a> <a onClick='return 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src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">261</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/55366116"> <span id="translatedtitle">Linear density response <span class="hlt">function</span> in the projector augmented <span class="hlt">wave</span> method: Applications to solids, surfaces, and interfaces</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">We present an implementation of the linear density response <span class="hlt">function</span> within the projector-augmented <span class="hlt">wave</span> method with applications to the linear optical and dielectric properties of both solids, surfaces, and interfaces. The response <span class="hlt">function</span> is represented in plane <span class="hlt">waves</span> while the single-particle eigenstates can be expanded on a real space grid or in atomic-orbital basis for increased efficiency. The exchange-correlation kernel</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Jun Yan; Jens. J. Mortensen; Karsten W. Jacobsen; Kristian S. Thygesen</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">262</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014PhyS...89e4027W"> <span id="translatedtitle">Alpha-particle formation and decay rates from Skyrme–HFB <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">? decay is treated microscopically, where the unstable mother nucleus and residual daughter nucleus are described using Hartree–Fock–Bogoliubov (HFB) <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span>, obtained with the Skyrme effective interaction. From these <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> the amplitude for forming ? particles in the mother nucleus is computed. Two different Skyrme parametrizations with different pairing properties are compared, and we find good agreement with experiment for relative decay rates in both cases. The absolute values of the decay rates are underestimated.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ward, D. E.; Carlsson, B. G.; Åberg, S.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">263</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22093410"> <span id="translatedtitle">Convergence of repeated quantum nondemolition measurements and <span class="hlt">wave-function</span> collapse</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Motivated by recent experiments on quantum trapped fields, we give a rigorous proof that repeated indirect quantum nondemolition (QND) measurements converge to the collapse of the <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> as predicted by the postulates of quantum mechanics for direct measurements. We also relate the rate of convergence toward the collapsed <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> to the relative entropy of each indirect measurement, a result which makes contact with information theory.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Bauer, Michel [Institut de Physique Theorique de Saclay, CEA-Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Laboratoire de Physique Theorique de l'Ecole Normale Superieure, CNRS/ENS, Ecole Normale Superieure, 24 rue Lhomond, F-75005 Paris (France); Bernard, Denis [Laboratoire de Physique Theorique de l'Ecole Normale Superieure, CNRS/ENS, Ecole Normale Superieure, 24 rue Lhomond, F-75005 Paris (France)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-10-15</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">264</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/54884343"> <span id="translatedtitle">Efficient Computation of Prolate Spheroidal <span class="hlt">Wave</span> <span class="hlt">Functions</span> in Radio Astronomical Source Modeling</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The application of orthonormal basis <span class="hlt">functions</span> such as Prolate Spheroidal <span class="hlt">Wave</span> <span class="hlt">Functions</span> (PSWF) for accurate source modeling in radio astronomy has been comprehensively studied. They are of great importance for high fidelity, high dynamic range imaging with new radio telescopes as well as conventional ones. But the construction of PSWF is computationally expensive compared to other closed form basis <span class="hlt">functions</span>.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Parisa Noorishad; Sarod Yatawatta</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">265</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1240305"> <span id="translatedtitle">The <span class="hlt">impact</span> of heat <span class="hlt">waves</span> and cold spells on mortality rates in the Dutch population.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We conducted the study described in this paper to investigate the <span class="hlt">impact</span> of ambient temperature on mortality in the Netherlands during 1979-1997, the <span class="hlt">impact</span> of heat <span class="hlt">waves</span> and cold spells on mortality in particular, and the possibility of any heat <span class="hlt">wave</span>- or cold spell-induced forward displacement of mortality. We found a V-like relationship between mortality and temperature, with an optimum temperature value (e.g., average temperature with lowest mortality rate) of 16.5 degrees C for total mortality, cardiovascular mortality, respiratory mortality, and mortality among those [Greater and equal to] 65 year of age. For mortality due to malignant neoplasms and mortality in the youngest age group, the optimum temperatures were 15.5 degrees C and 14.5 degrees C, respectively. For temperatures above the optimum, mortality increased by 0.47, 1.86, 12.82, and 2.72% for malignant neoplasms, cardiovascular disease, respiratory diseases, and total mortality, respectively, for each degree Celsius increase above the optimum in the preceding month. For temperatures below the optimum, mortality increased 0.22, 1.69, 5.15, and 1.37%, respectively, for each degree Celsius decrease below the optimum in the preceding month. Mortality increased significantly during all of the heat <span class="hlt">waves</span> studied, and the elderly were most effected by extreme heat. The heat <span class="hlt">waves</span> led to increases in mortality due to all of the selected causes, especially respiratory mortality. Average total excess mortality during the heat <span class="hlt">waves</span> studied was 12.1%, or 39.8 deaths/day. The average excess mortality during the cold spells was 12.8% or 46.6 deaths/day, which was mostly attributable to the increase in cardiovascular mortality and mortality among the elderly. The results concerning the forward displacement of deaths due to heat <span class="hlt">waves</span> were not conclusive. We found no cold-induced forward displacement of deaths.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Huynen, M M; Martens, P; Schram, D; Weijenberg, M P; Kunst, A E</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2001-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">266</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.agu.org/journals/jb/jb0910/2008JB006261/2008JB006261.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Deep crustal structure of the Indian shield from joint inversion of P <span class="hlt">wave</span> receiver <span class="hlt">functions</span> and Rayleigh <span class="hlt">wave</span> group velocities: Implications for Precambrian crustal evolution</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The S <span class="hlt">wave</span> velocity structure of the crust and uppermost mantle of the Indian shield has been investigated by jointly inverting P <span class="hlt">wave</span> receiver <span class="hlt">functions</span> and Rayleigh <span class="hlt">wave</span> group velocities at 38 broadband stations in the subcontinent. The Indian shield is an amalgamation of several terranes of Archean and Proterozoic age that were partly flooded by Deccan Trap volcanism during</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">S. Jagadeesh; S. S. Rai; T. J. Owens</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">267</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21611722"> <span id="translatedtitle">Analysis of Real Ship Rolling Dynamics under <span class="hlt">Wave</span> Excitement Force Composed of Sums of Cosine <span class="hlt">Functions</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The ship motion equation with a cosine <span class="hlt">wave</span> excitement force describes the slip moments in regular <span class="hlt">waves</span>. A new kind of <span class="hlt">wave</span> excitement force model, with the form as sums of cosine <span class="hlt">functions</span> was proposed to describe ship rolling in irregular <span class="hlt">waves</span>. Ship rolling time series were obtained by solving the ship motion equation with the fourth-order-Runger-Kutta method. These rolling time series were synthetically analyzed with methods of phase-space track, power spectrum, primary component analysis, and the largest Lyapunove exponent. Simulation results show that ship rolling presents some chaotic characteristic when the <span class="hlt">wave</span> excitement force was applied by sums of cosine <span class="hlt">functions</span>. The result well explains the course of ship rolling's chaotic mechanism and is useful for ship hydrodynamic study.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Zhang, Y. S. [Department of Scientific Research, Dalian Naval Academy, Dalian 116018 (China); Cai, F. [Department of Navigation, Dalian Naval Academy, Dalian 116018 (China); Xu, W. M. [Department of Hydrography and Cartography, Dalian Naval Academy, Dalian 116018 (China)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-09-28</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">268</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010EGUGA..12.6038A"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Impact</span> of intraseasonal Kelvin <span class="hlt">waves</span> on the primary production in the Humboldt Upwelling System</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Humboldt Current System is the most productive upwelling system in terms of small pelagic fish catch in the world ocean. Due to its proximity to the tropics, it is highly sensitive to the intense intraseasonnal to interannual fluctuations originating from the Equatorial Pacific, which propagate poleward along the Peruvian coasts in the form of coastal Kelvin <span class="hlt">waves</span>. These <span class="hlt">waves</span> act to displace upward or downward the thermocline and the nutricline, generating a modification of the nutrient input into the euphotic zone and modifying the nearshore mesoscale activity. The <span class="hlt">impact</span> of this process on the primary productivity of the upwelling system, the strucuture of the ecosystem, the offshore and downward export of organic matter is evaluated for the different characteristics of the <span class="hlt">waves</span> during the period 2000-2006 using SeaWiFS sea color data, DUACS altimetric observations and numerical simulations from a regional coupled dynamical/biological model. The <span class="hlt">impact</span> of the coastal <span class="hlt">waves</span> on the biological activity is contrasted with regards to the seasonality of the upwelling system.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Albert, Aurélie; Echevin, Vincent; Lévy, Marina</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">269</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013OcMod..72..119T"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Impact</span> of parameterized lee <span class="hlt">wave</span> drag on the energy budget of an eddying global ocean model</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The <span class="hlt">impact</span> of parameterized topographic internal lee <span class="hlt">wave</span> drag on the input and output terms in the total mechanical energy budget of a hybrid coordinate high-resolution global ocean general circulation model forced by winds and air-sea buoyancy fluxes is examined here. <span class="hlt">Wave</span> drag, which parameterizes the generation of internal lee <span class="hlt">waves</span> arising from geostrophic flow impinging upon rough topography, is included in the prognostic model, ensuring that abyssal currents and stratification in the model are affected by the <span class="hlt">wave</span> drag. An inline mechanical (kinetic plus gravitational potential) energy budget including four dissipative terms (parameterized topographic internal lee <span class="hlt">wave</span> drag, quadratic bottom boundary layer drag, vertical eddy viscosity, and horizontal eddy viscosity) demonstrates that <span class="hlt">wave</span> drag dissipates less energy in the model than a diagnostic (offline) estimate would suggest, due to reductions in both the abyssal currents and stratification. The equator experiences the largest reduction in energy dissipation associated with <span class="hlt">wave</span> drag in inline versus offline estimates. Quadratic bottom drag is the energy sink most affected globally by the presence of <span class="hlt">wave</span> drag in the model; other energy sinks are substantially affected locally, but not in their global integrals. It is suggested that <span class="hlt">wave</span> drag cannot be mimicked by artificially increasing the quadratic bottom drag because the energy dissipation rates associated with bottom drag are not spatially correlated with those associated with <span class="hlt">wave</span> drag where the latter are small. Additionally, in contrast to bottom drag, <span class="hlt">wave</span> drag is a non-local energy sink. All four aforementioned dissipative terms contribute substantially to the total energy dissipation rate of about one terawatt. The partial time derivative of potential energy (non-zero since the isopycnal depths have a long adjustment time), the surface advective fluxes of potential energy, the rate of change of potential energy due to diffusive mass fluxes, and the conversion between internal energy and potential energy also play a non-negligible role in the total mechanical energy budget. Reasons for the <10% total mechanical energy budget imbalance are discussed.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Trossman, David S.; Arbic, Brian K.; Garner, Stephen T.; Goff, John A.; Jayne, Steven R.; Metzger, E. Joseph; Wallcraft, Alan J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">270</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2135701"> <span id="translatedtitle">AN EXPERIMENTAL STUDY OF SHOCK <span class="hlt">WAVES</span> RESULTING FROM THE <span class="hlt">IMPACT</span> OF HIGH VELOCITY MISSILES ON ANIMAL TISSUES</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The spark shadowgram method of studying shock <span class="hlt">waves</span> is described. It has been used to investigate the properties of such <span class="hlt">waves</span> produced by the <span class="hlt">impact</span> of a high velocity missile on the surface of water. The method can be adapted for study of behavior of shock <span class="hlt">waves</span> in tissue by placing the tissue on a water surface or immersing it in water. Spark shadowgrams then reveal <span class="hlt">waves</span> passing from tissue to water or reflected from tissue surfaces. Reflection and transmission of shock <span class="hlt">waves</span> from muscle, liver, stomach, and intestinal wall are compared with reflection from non-living surfaces such as gelatin gel, steel, plexiglas, cork, and air. Because of its heterogeneous structure, <span class="hlt">waves</span> transmitted by tissue are dispersed and appear as a series of wavelets. When the accoustical impedance (density x <span class="hlt">wave</span> velocity) of a medium is less than that in which the <span class="hlt">wave</span> is moving, reflection will occur with inversion of the <span class="hlt">wave</span>; i.e., a high pressure <span class="hlt">wave</span> will become a low pressure <span class="hlt">wave</span>. This inversion occurs at an air surface and is illustrated by shadowgrams of reflection from stomach wall, from a segment of colon filled with gas, and from air-filled rubber balloons. Bone (human skull and beef ribs) shows good reflection and some transmission of shock <span class="hlt">waves</span>. When steel is directly hit by a missile, clearly visible elastic <span class="hlt">waves</span> pass from metal to water, but a similar direct hit on bone does not result in elastic <span class="hlt">waves</span> strong enough to be detected by a spark shadowgram.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Harvey, E. Newton; McMillen, J. Howard</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1947-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">271</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/27651106"> <span id="translatedtitle">An efficient procedure for the development of optimized Projector Augmented <span class="hlt">Wave</span> basis <span class="hlt">functions</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">In the Projector Augmented <span class="hlt">Wave</span> (PAW) method, a local potential, basis\\u000afunctions, and projector <span class="hlt">functions</span> form an All-Electron (AE) basis for valence\\u000awave <span class="hlt">functions</span> in the application of Density <span class="hlt">Functional</span> Theory (DFT). The\\u000aconstruction of these potentials, basis <span class="hlt">functions</span> and projector <span class="hlt">functions</span> for\\u000aeach element can be complex, and several codes capable of utilizing the PAW\\u000amethod have been otherwise</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">R. J. Snow; A. F. Wright; C. Y. Fong</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">272</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22065751"> <span id="translatedtitle">Influence of coastal vegetation on the 2004 tsunami <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">impact</span> in west Aceh.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In a tsunami event human casualties and infrastructure damage are determined predominantly by seaquake intensity and offshore properties. On land, <span class="hlt">wave</span> energy is attenuated by gravitation (elevation) and friction (land cover). Tree belts have been promoted as "bioshields" against <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">impact</span>. However, given the lack of quantitative evidence of their performance in such extreme events, tree belts have been criticized for creating a false sense of security. This study used 180 transects perpendicular to over 100 km on the west coast of Aceh, Indonesia to analyze the influence of coastal vegetation, particularly cultivated trees, on the <span class="hlt">impact</span> of the 2004 tsunami. Satellite imagery; land cover maps; land use characteristics; stem diameter, height, and planting density; and a literature review were used to develop a land cover roughness coefficient accounting for the resistance offered by different land uses to the <span class="hlt">wave</span> advance. Applying a spatial generalized linear mixed model, we found that while distance to coast was the dominant determinant of <span class="hlt">impact</span> (casualties and infrastructure damage), the existing coastal vegetation in front of settlements also significantly reduced casualties by an average of 5%. In contrast, dense vegetation behind villages endangered human lives and increased structural damage. Debris carried by the backwash may have contributed to these dissimilar effects of land cover. For sustainable and effective coastal risk management, location of settlements is essential, while the protective potential of coastal vegetation, as determined by its spatial arrangement, should be regarded as an important livelihood provider rather than just as a bioshield. PMID:22065751</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Laso Bayas, Juan Carlos; Marohn, Carsten; Dercon, Gerd; Dewi, Sonya; Piepho, Hans Peter; Joshi, Laxman; van Noordwijk, Meine; Cadisch, Georg</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-11-15</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">273</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3219142"> <span id="translatedtitle">Influence of coastal vegetation on the 2004 tsunami <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">impact</span> in west Aceh</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In a tsunami event human casualties and infrastructure damage are determined predominantly by seaquake intensity and offshore properties. On land, <span class="hlt">wave</span> energy is attenuated by gravitation (elevation) and friction (land cover). Tree belts have been promoted as “bioshields” against <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">impact</span>. However, given the lack of quantitative evidence of their performance in such extreme events, tree belts have been criticized for creating a false sense of security. This study used 180 transects perpendicular to over 100 km on the west coast of Aceh, Indonesia to analyze the influence of coastal vegetation, particularly cultivated trees, on the <span class="hlt">impact</span> of the 2004 tsunami. Satellite imagery; land cover maps; land use characteristics; stem diameter, height, and planting density; and a literature review were used to develop a land cover roughness coefficient accounting for the resistance offered by different land uses to the <span class="hlt">wave</span> advance. Applying a spatial generalized linear mixed model, we found that while distance to coast was the dominant determinant of <span class="hlt">impact</span> (casualties and infrastructure damage), the existing coastal vegetation in front of settlements also significantly reduced casualties by an average of 5%. In contrast, dense vegetation behind villages endangered human lives and increased structural damage. Debris carried by the backwash may have contributed to these dissimilar effects of land cover. For sustainable and effective coastal risk management, location of settlements is essential, while the protective potential of coastal vegetation, as determined by its spatial arrangement, should be regarded as an important livelihood provider rather than just as a bioshield.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Laso Bayas, Juan Carlos; Marohn, Carsten; Dercon, Gerd; Dewi, Sonya; Piepho, Hans Peter; Joshi, Laxman; van Noordwijk, Meine; Cadisch, Georg</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">274</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014EEEV...13...23Y"> <span id="translatedtitle">A whole-space transform formula of cylindrical <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> for scattering problems</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The theory of elastic <span class="hlt">wave</span> scattering is a fundamental concept in the study of elastic dynamics and <span class="hlt">wave</span> motion, and the <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> expansion technique has been widely used in many subjects. To supply the essential tools for solving <span class="hlt">wave</span> scattering problems induced by an eccentric source or multi-sources as well as multi-scatters, a whole-space transform formula of cylindrical <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> is presented and its applicability to some simple cases is demonstrated in this study. The transforms of <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> in cylindrical coordinates can be classified into two basic types: interior transform and exterior transform, and the existing Graf's addition theorem is only suitable for the former. By performing a new replacement between the two coordinates, the exterior transform formula is first deduced. It is then combined with Graf's addition theorem to establish a whole-space transform formula. By using the whole-space transform formula, the scattering solutions by the sources outside and inside a cylindrical cavity are constructed as examples of its application. The effectiveness and advantages of the whole-space transform formula is illustrated by comparison with the approximate model based on a large cycle method. The whole-space transform formula presented herein can be used to perform the transform between two different cylindrical coordinates in the whole space. In addition, its concept and principle are universal and can be further extended to establish the coordinate transform formula of <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> in other coordinate systems.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Yuan, Xiaoming</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">275</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ia.usu.edu/viewproject.php?project=ia:15200"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Waves</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The following websites are useful tools in understanding how energy is transferred from place to place through <span class="hlt">waves</span>. Start by downloading the assignment and then begin with website number 1 and continue until you have visited all three websites. Begin by downloading the IA <span class="hlt">Waves</span> Internet Assignment: IA <span class="hlt">Waves</span> Internet Assignment You will answer the questions in Microsoft Word and then e-mail the assignment to me. Website #1: Read about basic information on <span class="hlt">waves</span> and answer the questions from part 1 of the IA <span class="hlt">Waves</span> Guide: Basic <span class="hlt">Wave</span> Information Website #2: Follow the instructions for the following ...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hansen, Mr.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-11-12</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">276</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009EGUGA..11.8538C"> <span id="translatedtitle">The <span class="hlt">impact</span> of midlatitude stationary <span class="hlt">waves</span> on the Hadley cell and ENSO</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Stationary planetary <span class="hlt">waves</span> are excited in the midlatitudes, propagate equatorward and are absorbed in the subtropics. The <span class="hlt">impact</span> these <span class="hlt">waves</span> have on the tropical climate has yet to be fully unraveled. One strand of research (Caballero 2007) has shown that interannual variability of stationary <span class="hlt">wave</span> Reynolds stresses is well correlated with interannual variability in Hadley cell strength, a connection which can be physically understood by considering the zonal-mean momentum balance in the subtropics. A separate line of research (Vimont et al. 2003, Anderson 2004) has shown that changes in midlatitude planetary <span class="hlt">waves</span> local to the Pacific strongly affect ENSO variability. Here, we show that the two phenomena are in fact closely connected. Interannual variability of <span class="hlt">wave</span> activity flux convergence in the subtropical Pacific strongly affects the local Hadley cell, including subtropical subsidence and surface wind stresses, which in turn can initiate the onset of ENSO events. As a result, a winter with an anomalously strong Hadley cell tends to be followed a year later by an El Niño event.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Caballero, R.; Anderson, B. T.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">277</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009AGUFM.A11G..06C"> <span id="translatedtitle">The <span class="hlt">impact</span> of midlatitude stationary <span class="hlt">waves</span> on the Hadley cell and ENSO</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Stationary planetary <span class="hlt">waves</span> are excited in the midlatitudes, propagate equatorward and are absorbed in the subtropics. The <span class="hlt">impact</span> these <span class="hlt">waves</span> have on the tropical climate has yet to be fully unraveled. One strand of research (Caballero 2007) has shown that interannual variability of stationary <span class="hlt">wave</span> Reynolds stresses is well correlated with interannual variability in Hadley cell strength, a connection which can be physically understood by considering the zonal-mean momentum balance in the subtropics. A separate line of research (Vimont et al. 2003, Anderson 2003) has shown that changes in midlatitude planetary <span class="hlt">waves</span> local to the Pacific strongly affect ENSO variability. Here, we show that the two phenomena are in fact closely connected. Interannual variability of <span class="hlt">wave</span> activity flux convergence in the subtropical Pacific strongly affects the local Hadley cell, including subtropical subsidence and surface wind stresses, which in turn can initiate the onset of ENSO events. As a result, a winter with an anomalously strong Hadley cell tends to be followed a year later by an El Niño event.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Caballero, R.; Anderson, B. T.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">278</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22093281"> <span id="translatedtitle">Stigma experiences in bipolar patients: the <span class="hlt">impact</span> upon <span class="hlt">functioning</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The aim of this study was to investigate the <span class="hlt">impact</span> of self-rated stigma and <span class="hlt">functioning</span> in patients with bipolar disorder in South Brazil. This is a cross-sectional study. Sixty participants with bipolar disorder were recruited from an outpatient Bipolar Disorder Program. Experiences with and <span class="hlt">impact</span> of perceived stigma were evaluated using the Inventory of Stigmatizing Experiences. <span class="hlt">Functional</span> impairment was assessed with the <span class="hlt">Functioning</span> Assessment Short Test (FAST). Higher scores of self-perceived stigma were correlated with higher FAST scores, indicating more disability. After linear correlation analysis, current depressive symptoms, age at onset of treatment, age at diagnosis and <span class="hlt">functioning</span> were correlated with self-perceived stigma. The study demonstrated a correlation between stigma and poor <span class="hlt">functioning</span> in bipolar disorder. Perceived stigma is really important to individuals with bipolar disorder, both to how they experience their illness and to its results on <span class="hlt">functioning</span>. Potential consequences of such results for mental health care professionals are discussed. Differential clinical features, sociocultural factors and the sample size limit the generalization of the present findings. PMID:22093281</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Thomé, E S; Dargél, A A; Migliavacca, F M; Potter, W A; Jappur, D M C; Kapczinski, F; Ceresér, K M</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">279</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010AGUFMSH41B1788L"> <span id="translatedtitle">Kinetic Alfvén <span class="hlt">wave</span> and ion velocity distribution <span class="hlt">functions</span> in the solar wind</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Using 1D test particle simulations, the effect of a kinetic Alfvén <span class="hlt">wave</span> on the velocity distribution <span class="hlt">function</span> of protons in the collisionless solar wind is investigated. We first use linear Vlasov theory to obtain the property of a kinetic Alfvén <span class="hlt">wave</span> numerically (the <span class="hlt">wave</span> propagates in the direction almost perpendicular to the background magnetic field). We then numerically simulate how the <span class="hlt">wave</span> will shape the proton velocity distribution <span class="hlt">function</span>. It is found that Landau resonance may be able to generate two components in the initially Maxwellian proton velocity distribution <span class="hlt">function</span>: a tenuous beam component along the direction of the background magnetic field and a core component. The streaming speed of the beam relative to the core proton component is about 1.2 -- 1.3 Alfvén speed. However, no perpendicular ion heating is observed from the simulation. Reference: Li, X., Lu, Q.M., Chen, Y., Li, B., Xia, L.D., ApJ, 719, L190, 2010.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Li, X.; Lu, Q.; Chen, Y.; Li, B.; Xia, L.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">280</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10830359"> <span id="translatedtitle">Transfer and Green <span class="hlt">functions</span> based on modal analysis for Lamb <span class="hlt">waves</span> generation</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This work presents an easy way to deduce the tensorial transfer and Green <span class="hlt">functions</span> for Lamb <span class="hlt">waves</span> generated in isotropic elastic plates. These <span class="hlt">functions</span> could be applied to obtain the response of each propagating mode in the ensemble of excited modes arising from any sort of pulsed excitation (wedge transducers, lasers, etc.). The transfer <span class="hlt">function</span> is based on modal analysis development. Not only is it easy to manipulate but also allows the avoidance of laborious calculations for each kind of Lamb <span class="hlt">waves</span> source. Theoretical predictions are compared with those of Viktorov [I. A. Viktorov, Rayleigh and Lamb <span class="hlt">Waves</span> (Plenum, New York, 1967)] and with experimental measurements of Lamb <span class="hlt">waves</span> generated by the wedge-transducer method. PMID:10830359</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Nunez; Ing; Negreira; Fink</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2000-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return 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src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">281</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014EGUGA..1614017S"> <span id="translatedtitle">Modelling rock-avalanche induced <span class="hlt">impact</span> <span class="hlt">waves</span>: Sensitivity of the model chains to model parameters</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">New lakes are forming in high-mountain areas all over the world due to glacier recession. Often they will be located below steep, destabilized flanks and are therefore exposed to <span class="hlt">impacts</span> from rock-/ice-avalanches. Several events worldwide are known, where an outburst flood has been triggered by such an <span class="hlt">impact</span>. In regions such as in the European Alps or in the Cordillera Blanca in Peru, where valley bottoms are densely populated, these far-travelling, high-magnitude events can result in major disasters. Usually natural hazards are assessed as single hazardous processes, for the above mentioned reasons, however, development of assessment and reproduction methods of the hazardous process chain for the purpose of hazard map generation have to be brought forward. A combination of physical process models have already been suggested and illustrated by means of lake outburst in the Cordillera Blanca, Peru, where on April 11th 2010 an ice-avalanche of approx. 300'000m3 triggered an <span class="hlt">impact</span> <span class="hlt">wave</span>, which overtopped the 22m freeboard of the rock-dam for 5 meters and caused and outburst flood which travelled 23 km to the city of Carhuaz. We here present a study, where we assessed the sensitivity of the model chain from ice-avalanche and <span class="hlt">impact</span> <span class="hlt">wave</span> to single parameters considering rock-/ice-avalanche modeling by RAMMS and <span class="hlt">impact</span> <span class="hlt">wave</span> modeling by IBER. Assumptions on the initial rock-/ice-avalanche volume, calibration of the friction parameters in RAMMS and assumptions on erosion considered in RAMMS were parameters tested regarding their influence on overtopping parameters that are crucial for outburst flood modeling. Further the transformation of the RAMMS-output (flow height and flow velocities on the shoreline of the lake) into an inflow-hydrograph for IBER was also considered a possible source of uncertainties. Overtopping time, volume, and <span class="hlt">wave</span> height as much as mean and maximum discharge were considered decisive parameters for the outburst flood modeling and were therewith assumed dependent values. The resulting 54 runs were evaluated by an ANOVA-analysis for each dependent variable. Results show, that the model chain is able to correctly reproduce the 5m-overtopping <span class="hlt">wave</span>. Further the dependency from the input parameters could be assessed for every dependent variable. It was e.g. shown, that RAMMS-calibration has the strongest influence on all variations, it is more crucial then the uncertainties introduced by assumptions on the initial rock-avalanche volume. The study shows, that from a hazard-assessment point of view, combinations of model chains are acceptable and permissible.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Schaub, Yvonne; Huggel, Christian</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">282</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=PB94186525"> <span id="translatedtitle">Signal <span class="hlt">Wave</span> Generator Signals Recorded by the Federal Outdoor <span class="hlt">Impact</span> Laboratory's On-Board Data Acquisition System.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The document contains signal <span class="hlt">wave</span> generator signals recorded by the data acquisition system (DAS) used by the Federal Highway Administration's Federal Outdoor <span class="hlt">Impact</span> Laboratory (FOIL) located at the Turner-Fairbank Highway Research Center (TFHRC) in McLea...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">C. Brown B. Liu</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1994-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">283</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4016673"> <span id="translatedtitle">Comparing the <span class="hlt">functional</span> <span class="hlt">impact</span> of knee replacements in two cohorts</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Background To examine if different rates of total knee replacement (TKR) in two similar cohorts with symptomatic knee osteoarthritis (OA) were associated with different <span class="hlt">functional</span> <span class="hlt">impact</span> of disease. Methods Subjects from the Multicenter Osteoarthritis Study (MOST) and the Osteoarthritis Initiative (OAI), persons with or at high risk of OA, had knee radiographs, completed Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) surveys and had TKRs confirmed at each visit. At each visit, subjects were defined as having symptomatic OA (SxOA) if???one knee had pain and radiographic OA or if they had a TKR. WOMAC <span class="hlt">function</span> scores at each visit were compared by analysis of covariance adjusting for age, sex, body mass index, race, site, depression, comorbidity, painful leg joints and knees affected. Post-TKR <span class="hlt">function</span> scores were imputed to estimate scores that would have been present without TKR. Results Subjects with SxOA (n >?750 in MOST and in OAI) had a mean age 66 to 67 years; most were women and were White. Subjects were followed 4–5 years. Among those with SxOA, more TKRs were done in MOST (35%) than OAI (19%). Adjusted mean WOMAC <span class="hlt">function</span> (0–68, 68 =?worst) improved from 26.9 to 21.9 in MOST and from 24.5 to 22.0 in OAI (difference between MOST and OAI in change in WOMAC <span class="hlt">function</span>, p =?.01). Estimates of <span class="hlt">function</span> without TKRs showed <span class="hlt">function</span> would not have changed in MOST (23.2 at baseline to 22.4). Conclusions <span class="hlt">Functional</span> status of subjects with knee OA in MOST improved more than in OAI, probably because of higher rates of TKRs. The decline suggests that TKR diminishes the <span class="hlt">functional</span> <span class="hlt">impact</span> of OA in the community.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">284</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013AGUFMEP13A0817L"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Impact</span> Of Coral Structures On <span class="hlt">Wave</span> Directional Spreading Across A Shallow Reef Flat - Lizard Island, Northern Great Barrier Reef</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Coral reef hydrodynamics operate at several and overlapping spatial-temporal scales. <span class="hlt">Waves</span> have the most important forcing <span class="hlt">function</span> on shallow (< 5 m) reefs as they drive most ecological and biogeochemical processes by exerting direct physical stress, directly mixing water (temperature and nutrients) and transporting sediments, nutrients and plankton. Reef flats are very effective at dissipating <span class="hlt">wave</span> energy and providing an important ecosystem service by protecting highly valued shorelines. The effectiveness of reef flats to dissipate <span class="hlt">wave</span> energy is related to the extreme hydraulic roughness of the benthos and substrate composition. Hydraulic roughness is usually obtained empirically from frictional-dissipation calculations, as detailed field measurements of bottom roughness (e.g. chain-method or profile gauges) is a very labour and time-consuming task. In this study we measured the <span class="hlt">impact</span> of coral structures on <span class="hlt">wave</span> directional spreading. Field data was collected during October 2012 across a reef flat on Lizard Island, northern Great Barrier Reef. <span class="hlt">Wave</span> surface levels were measured using an array of self-logging pressure sensors. A rapid in situ close-range photogrammetric method was used to create a high-resolution (0.5 cm) image mosaic and digital elevation model. Individual coral heads were extracted from these datasets using geo-morphometric and object-based image analysis techniques. <span class="hlt">Wave</span> propagation was modelled using a modified version of the SWAN model which includes the measured coral structures in 2m by 1m cells across the reef. The approach followed a cylinder drag approach, neglecting skin friction and inertial components. Testing against field data included bed skin friction. Our results show, for the first time, how the variability of the reef benthos structures affects <span class="hlt">wave</span> dissipation across a shallow reef flat. This has important implications globally for coral reefs, due to the large extent of their area occupied by reef flats, particularly, as global-scale degradation in coral reef health is causing a lowering of reef carbonate production that might lead to a decrease in reef structure and roughness.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Leon, J. X.; Baldock, T.; Callaghan, D. P.; Hoegh-guldberg, O.; Mumby, P.; Phinn, S. R.; Roelfsema, C. M.; Saunders, M. I.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">285</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21748397"> <span id="translatedtitle">Reconstruction of gastric slow <span class="hlt">wave</span> from finger photoplethysmographic signal using radial basis <span class="hlt">function</span> neural network.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Extraction of extra-cardiac information from photoplethysmography (PPG) signal is a challenging research problem with significant clinical applications. In this study, radial basis <span class="hlt">function</span> neural network (RBFNN) is used to reconstruct the gastric myoelectric activity (GMA) slow <span class="hlt">wave</span> from finger PPG signal. Finger PPG and GMA (measured using Electrogastrogram, EGG) signals were acquired simultaneously at the sampling rate of 100 Hz from ten healthy subjects. Discrete wavelet transform (DWT) was used to extract slow <span class="hlt">wave</span> (0-0.1953 Hz) component from the finger PPG signal; this slow <span class="hlt">wave</span> PPG was used to reconstruct EGG. A RBFNN is trained on signals obtained from six subjects in both fasting and postprandial conditions. The trained network is tested on data obtained from the remaining four subjects. In the earlier study, we have shown the presence of GMA information in finger PPG signal using DWT and cross-correlation method. In this study, we explicitly reconstruct gastric slow <span class="hlt">wave</span> from finger PPG signal by the proposed RBFNN-based method. It was found that the network-reconstructed slow <span class="hlt">wave</span> provided significantly higher (P < 0.0001) correlation (? 0.9) with the subject's EGG slow <span class="hlt">wave</span> than the correlation obtained (?0.7) between the PPG slow <span class="hlt">wave</span> from DWT and the EEG slow <span class="hlt">wave</span>. Our results showed that a simple finger PPG signal can be used to reconstruct gastric slow <span class="hlt">wave</span> using RBFNN method. PMID:21748397</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Mohamed Yacin, S; Srinivasa Chakravarthy, V; Manivannan, M</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">286</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23785219"> <span id="translatedtitle">FRACTALS WITH POINT <span class="hlt">IMPACT</span> IN <span class="hlt">FUNCTIONAL</span> LINEAR REGRESSION.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This paper develops a point <span class="hlt">impact</span> linear regression model in which the trajectory of a continuous stochastic process, when evaluated at a "sensitive time point", is associated with a scalar response. The proposed model complements and is more interpretable than the <span class="hlt">functional</span> linear regression approach that has become popular in recent years. The trajectories are assumed to have fractal (self-similar) properties in common with a fractional Brownian motion with an unknown Hurst exponent. Bootstrap confidence intervals based on the least-squares estimator of the sensitive time point are developed. Misspecification of the point <span class="hlt">impact</span> model by a <span class="hlt">functional</span> linear model is also investigated. Non-Gaussian limit distributions and rates of convergence determined by the Hurst exponent play an important role. PMID:23785219</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">McKeague, Ian W; Sen, Bodhisattva</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">287</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/26656737"> <span id="translatedtitle">Bleustein–Gulyaev <span class="hlt">waves</span> in some <span class="hlt">functionally</span> graded materials</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Functionally</span> Graded Materials are inhomogeneous elastic bodies whose properties vary continuously with space. Hence consider a half-space (x2>0) occupied by a special <span class="hlt">Functionally</span> Graded Material made of an hexagonal (6 mm) piezoelectric crystal for which the elastic stiffness c44, the piezoelectric constant e15, the dielectric constant ?11, and the mass density, all vary proportionally to the same “inhomogeneity <span class="hlt">function</span>”f(x2), say.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Bernard Collet; Michel Destrade; Gérard A. Maugin</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">288</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010RvGeo..48.4006W"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Impact</span> of a Cosmic Body into Earth's Ocean and the Generation of Large Tsunami <span class="hlt">Waves</span>: Insight from Numerical Modeling</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The strike of a cosmic body into a marine environment differs in several respects from <span class="hlt">impact</span> on land. Oceans cover approximately 70% of the Earth's surface, implying not only that oceanic <span class="hlt">impact</span> is a very likely scenario for future <span class="hlt">impacts</span> but also that most <span class="hlt">impacts</span> in Earth's history must have happened in marine environments. Therefore, the study of oceanic <span class="hlt">impact</span> is imperative in two respects: (1) to quantify the hazard posed by future oceanic <span class="hlt">impacts</span>, including the potential threat of large <span class="hlt">impact</span>-generated tsunami-like <span class="hlt">waves</span>, and (2) to reconstruct Earth's <span class="hlt">impact</span> record by accounting for the large number of potentially undiscovered crater structures in the ocean crust. Reconstruction of the <span class="hlt">impact</span> record is of crucial importance both for assessing the frequency of collision events in the past and for better predicting the probability of future <span class="hlt">impact</span>. We summarize the advances in the study of oceanic <span class="hlt">impact</span> over the last decades and focus in particular on how numerical models have improved our understanding of cratering in the oceanic environment and the generation of <span class="hlt">waves</span> by <span class="hlt">impact</span>. We focus on insight gleaned from numerical modeling studies into the deceleration of the projectile by the water, cratering of the ocean floor, the late stage modification of the crater due to gravitational collapse, and water resurge. Furthermore, we discuss the generation and propagation of large tsunami-like <span class="hlt">waves</span> as a result of a strike of a cosmic body in marine environments.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Wünnemann, K.; Collins, G. S.; Weiss, R.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">289</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://dx.doi.org/10.1130/G19678.1"> <span id="translatedtitle">Shock-<span class="hlt">wave</span>-induced fracturing of calcareous nannofossils from the Chesapeake Bay <span class="hlt">impact</span> crater</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Fractured calcareous nannofossils of the genus Discoaster from synimpact sediments within the Chesapeake Bay <span class="hlt">impact</span> crater demonstrate that other petrographic shock indicators exist for the cratering process in addition to quartz minerals. Evidence for shock-induced taphonomy includes marginal fracturing of rosette-shaped Discoaster species into pentagonal shapes and pressure- and temperature-induced dissolution of ray tips and edges of discoasters. Rotational deformation of individual crystallites may be the mechanism that produces the fracture pattern. Shock-<span class="hlt">wave</span>-fractured calcareous nannofossils were recovered from synimpact matrix material representing tsunami or resurge sedimentation that followed <span class="hlt">impact</span>. Samples taken from cohesive clasts within the crater rubble show no evidence of shock-induced fracturing. The data presented here support growing evidence that microfossils can be used to determine the intensity and timing of wet-<span class="hlt">impact</span> cratering.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Self-Trail, J. M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">290</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=hydrogen+AND+energy&pg=5&id=EJ187590"> <span id="translatedtitle">Completeness of the Coulomb <span class="hlt">Wave</span> <span class="hlt">Functions</span> in Quantum Mechanics</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Gives an explicit and elementary proof that the radial energy eigenfunctions for the hydrogen atom in quantum mechanics, bound and scattering states included, form a complete set. The proof uses some properties of the confluent hypergeometric <span class="hlt">functions</span> and the Cauchy residue theorem from analytic <span class="hlt">function</span> theory. (Author/GA)</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Mukunda, N.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1978-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">291</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4077491"> <span id="translatedtitle">Clinical application of plasma shock <span class="hlt">wave</span> lithotripsy in treating <span class="hlt">impacted</span> stones in the bile duct system</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">AIM: To verify the safety and efficacy of plasma shock <span class="hlt">wave</span> lithotripsy (PSWL) in fragmenting <span class="hlt">impacted</span> stones in the bile duct system. METHODS: From September 1988 to April 2005, 67 patients (26 men and 41 women) with <span class="hlt">impacted</span> stones underwent various biliary operations with tube (or T-tube) drainage. Remnant and <span class="hlt">impacted</span> stones in the bile duct system found by cholangiography after the operation were fragmented by PSWL and choledochofiberscopy. A total of 201 <span class="hlt">impacted</span> stones were fragmented by PSWL setting the voltage at 2.5-3.5 kV, and the energy output at 2-3 J for each pulse of PSWL. Then the fragmented stones were extracted by choledochofiberscopy. The safety and efficacy of PSWL were observed during and after the procedure. RESULTS: One hundred and ninety-nine of 201 <span class="hlt">impacted</span> stones (99.0%) in the bile duct system were successfully fragmented using PSWL and extracted by choledochofiberscopy. The stone clearance rate for patients was 97% (65/67). Ten patients felt mild pain in the right upper quadrant of the abdomen, and could tolerate it well. Eleven patients had a small amount of bleeding from the mucosa of the bile duct. The bleeding was transient and stopped spontaneously within 2 min of normal saline irrigation. There were no significant complications during and after the procedure. CONCLUSION:PSWL is a safe and effective method for fragmenting <span class="hlt">impacted</span> stones in the bile duct system.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Xu, Zhi; Wang, Li-Xin; Zhang, Neng-Wei; Hou, Chun-Sheng; Ling, Xiao-Feng; Xu, Yao; Zhou, Xiao-Si</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">292</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9341032"> <span id="translatedtitle">[Coronary artery disease, myocardial perfusion and ventricular <span class="hlt">function</span> in Q-<span class="hlt">wave</span> and non-Q-<span class="hlt">wave</span> myocardial infarcts].</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Controversy remains in considering non-Q <span class="hlt">wave</span> myocardial infarction (NQMI) a distinct pathophysiological entity of Q <span class="hlt">wave</span> myocardial infarction (QMI). In order to analyze the severity of coronary artery disease, extension of myocardial scar or myocardial ischemia and ventricular <span class="hlt">function</span>, 78 consecutive patients with QMI and 32 with NQMI, mean age 55.4 +/- 8.5, not submitted to thrombolytic therapy, were studied. Coronary angiography, exercise thallium scintigraphy and radionuclide ventriculography were performed in all at least within 3 months of a prior myocardial infarction. In the present study the occurrence of QMI was significantly more frequent in older patients than NQMI. There was no prevalence of occlusion either in the right, left circumflex or left anterior descending coronary arteries in both groups. Ejection fraction, degree of occlusion and presence of collateral circulation showed an equal prevalence in QMI and NQMI patients. A higher incidence of multivessel disease was found in NQMI that had less necrosis than QMI patients. The prevalence of exercise induced thallium-201 redistribution defects within the infarct zone was substantially higher and involved more scar segments in NQMI patients. Physiological and clinical consequences of coronary thrombosis depends on the size and the number of diseased arteries, the approach the pathophysiologic consequences of coronary disease in terms of fractal structure has been suggested. A pronounced heterogeneity in regional myocardial blood flow in a fractal branching arterial network may be responsible for the pathophysiologic differences of coronary thrombosis between Q-<span class="hlt">wave</span> and non Q-<span class="hlt">wave</span> infarction. PMID:9341032</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Macieira-Coelho, E; Garcia-Alves, M; da Costa, B; Cantinho, G; Pedro, P; Dionisio, I; Gouveia, A; de Padua, F</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1997-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">293</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6650392"> <span id="translatedtitle">Rule-based trial <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> for generalized valence bond theory</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We present a general method suitable for automatic generation of trial <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> for generalized valence bond (GVB) descriptions of large molecules. This method uses pseudo-Hartree-Fock (P-HF) molecular orbitals formed from HF atomic orbitals but without Fock matrix diagonalization. The occupied P-HF orbitals are projected onto atomic basis <span class="hlt">functions</span> to obtain GVB first natural orbitals, and the unoccupied HF orbitals are projected to obtain GVB second natural orbitals. This method (denoted GVB-INIT) is fast because no HF <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> need be calculated and because the localization is piecewise atomic. In conjunction with the recently developed GVB-DIIS method for converging GVB <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> and the new pseudospectral programs (PS-GVB) for the Fock matrix elements, GVB-INIT makes calculation of highly correlated GVB <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> quite practical. The efficacy of GVB-INIT is illustrated by application to several cases including GVB <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> with up to 26 correlated pairs. 17 refs., 7 tabs.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Langlois, J.M.; Yamasaki, Terumasa; Muller, R.P.; Goddard, W.A. III (California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA (United States))</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1994-12-22</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">294</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21389174"> <span id="translatedtitle">Effect of single-particle splitting in the exact <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> of the isovectorial pairing Hamiltonian</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The structure of the exact <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> of the isovectorial pairing Hamiltonian with nondegenerate single-particle levels is discussed. The way that the single-particle splittings break the quartet condensate solution found for N=Z nuclei in a single degenerate level is established. After a brief review of the exact solution, the structure of the <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> is analyzed and some particular cases are considered where a clear interpretation of the <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> emerges. An expression for the exact <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> in terms of the isospin triplet of pair creators is given. The ground-state <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> is analyzed as a <span class="hlt">function</span> of pairing strength, for a system of four protons and four neutrons. For small and large values of the pairing strength a dominance of two-pair (quartets) scalar couplings is found, whereas for intermediate values enhancements of the nonscalar couplings are obtained. A correlation of these enhancements with the creation of Cooper-like pairs is observed.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Lerma H, S. [Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Fisica e Inteligencia Artificial, Universidad Veracruzana, Lomas del Estadio s/n, 91000, Xalapa, Ver. (Mexico)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-07-15</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">295</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012GeoRL..3915308S"> <span id="translatedtitle">Beyond receiver <span class="hlt">functions</span>: Passive source reverse time migration and inverse scattering of converted <span class="hlt">waves</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We present a <span class="hlt">wave</span> equation prestack depth migration to image crust and mantle structures using multi-component earthquake data recorded at dense seismograph arrays. Transmitted P and S <span class="hlt">waves</span> recorded on the surface are back propagated using an elastic <span class="hlt">wave</span> equation solver. The <span class="hlt">wave</span> modes are separated after the reverse-time continuation of the wavefield from the surface, and subjected to a (cross-correlation type) imaging condition forming an inverse scattering transform. Reverse time migration (RTM) does not make assumptions about the presence or properties of interfaces - notably, it does not assume that interfaces are (locally) horizontal. With synthetic experiments, and different background models, we show that passive source RTM can reconstruct dipping and vertically offset interfaces even in the presence of complex <span class="hlt">wave</span> phenomena (such as caustics and point diffraction) and that its performance is superior to traditional receiver <span class="hlt">function</span> analysis, e.g., common conversion point (CCP) stacking, in complex geological environments.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Shang, Xuefeng; de Hoop, Maarten V.; van der Hilst, Robert D.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-08-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">296</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21231494"> <span id="translatedtitle">Manipulating and imaging the shape of an electronic <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> by magnetotunneling spectroscopy.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We measure the current due to electrons tunneling through the ground state of hydrogenic Si donors placed in a GaAs quantum well in the presence of a magnetic field tilted at an angle to the plane of the well. The component of B parallel to the direction of current compresses the donor <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span>. By measuring the current as a <span class="hlt">function</span> of the perpendicular component of B, we probe how the magnetocompression affects the spatial form of the <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> and observe directly the transition from Coulombic to magnetic confinement at high fields. PMID:21231494</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Patanè, A; Mori, N; Makarovsky, O; Eaves, L; Zambrano, M L; Arce, J C; Dickinson, L; Maude, D K</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">297</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19830013626&hterms=delta+wave&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D70%26Ntt%3Ddelta%2Bwave"> <span id="translatedtitle">Transient difference solutions of the inhomogeneous <span class="hlt">wave</span> equation: Simulation of the Green's <span class="hlt">function</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A time-dependent finite difference formulation to the inhomogeneous <span class="hlt">wave</span> equation is derived for plane <span class="hlt">wave</span> propagation with harmonic noise sources. The difference equation and boundary conditions are developed along with the techniques to simulate the Dirac delta <span class="hlt">function</span> associated with a concentrated noise source. Example calculations are presented for the Green's <span class="hlt">function</span> and distributed noise sources. For the example considered, the desired Fourier transformed acoustic pressures are determined from the transient pressures by use of a ramping <span class="hlt">function</span> and an integration technique, both of which eliminates the nonharmonic pressure associated with the initial transient.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Baumeiste, K. J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1983-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">298</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19830044686&hterms=delta+wave&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D70%26Ntt%3Ddelta%2Bwave"> <span id="translatedtitle">Transient difference solutions of the inhomogeneous <span class="hlt">wave</span> equation - Simulation of the Green's <span class="hlt">function</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A time-dependent finite difference formulation to the inhomogeneous <span class="hlt">wave</span> equation is derived for plane <span class="hlt">wave</span> propagation with harmonic noise sources. The difference equation and boundary conditions are developed along with the techniques to simulate the Dirac delta <span class="hlt">function</span> associated with a concentrated noise source. Example calculations are presented for the Green's <span class="hlt">function</span> and distributed noise sources. For the example considered, the desired Fourier transformed acoustic pressures are determined from the transient pressures by use of a ramping <span class="hlt">function</span> and an integration technique, both of which eliminates the nonharmonic pressure associated with the initial transient.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Baumeister, K. J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1983-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">299</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013PhRvD..88l5001K"> <span id="translatedtitle">Yang-Mills vacuum <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functional</span> in three dimensions at weak coupling</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We compute the Yang-Mills vacuum <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functional</span> in three dimensions at weak coupling with O(e2) precision. We use two different methods to solve the <span class="hlt">functional</span> Schrödinger equation. One of them generalizes to O(e2) the method followed by Hatfield at O(e) [Phys. Lett. B 147, 435 (1984)]. The other uses the weak coupling version of the gauge invariant formulation of the Schrödinger equation and the ground state <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functional</span> followed by Karabali, Nair, and Yelnikov [Nucl. Phys. B824, 387 (2010)]. We compare both results and discuss the differences between them.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Krug, Sebastian; Pineda, Antonio</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">300</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21419509"> <span id="translatedtitle">Covariant spectator theory of np scattering: Effective range expansions and relativistic deuteron <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We present the effective range expansions for the {sup 1}S{sub 0} and {sup 3}S{sub 1} scattering phase shifts, and the relativistic deuteron <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> that accompany our recent high precision fits (with {chi}{sup 2}/N{sub data{approx_equal}}1) to the 2007 world np data below 350 MeV. The <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> are expanded in a series of analytical <span class="hlt">functions</span> (with the correct asymptotic behavior at both large and small arguments) that can be Fourier-transformed from momentum to coordinate space and are convenient to use in any application. A fortran subroutine to compute these <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> can be obtained from the authors.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Gross, Franz; Stadler, Alfred [College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, Virginia 23185 (United States) and Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, Virginia 23606 (United States); Centro de Fisica Nuclear da Universidade de Lisboa, P-1649-003 Lisboa (Portugal) and Departamento de Fisica da Universidade de Evora, P-7000-671 Evora (Portugal)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-09-15</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" 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onClick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#">20</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">301</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21981520"> <span id="translatedtitle">Equality of bulk <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> and edge correlations in some topological superconductors: a spacetime derivation.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">For certain systems, the N-particle ground-state <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> of the bulk happen to be exactly equal to the N-point spacetime correlation <span class="hlt">functions</span> at the edge, in the infrared limit. We show why this had to be so for a class of topological superconductors, beginning with the p+ip state in D=2+1. Varying the chemical potential as a <span class="hlt">function</span> of Euclidean time between weak and strong pairing states is shown to extract the <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span>. Then a Euclidean rotation that exchanges time and space and approximate Lorentz invariance lead to the edge connection. This framework readily generalizes to other dimensions. We illustrate it with a D=3+1 example, superfluid 3He- B, and a p-<span class="hlt">wave</span> superfluid in D=1+1. Our method works only when the particle number is not conserved, as in superconductors. PMID:21981520</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Shankar, R; Vishwanath, Ashvin</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">302</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/19841543"> <span id="translatedtitle">The Computation of <span class="hlt">Wave</span> <span class="hlt">Functions</span> in Momentum Space - II: The Hydrogen Molecule Ion</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">A new approach is made to the problem of computing accurate momentum distribution <span class="hlt">functions</span> for electrons in molecules. The usual molecular orbital <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> (linear combination of atomic orbitals) has already been employed for this purpose but has proved inadequate in attempts to explain the width of the Compton profile. Using the method of a previous paper, the l.c.a.o. type</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">R. McWeeny</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1949-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">303</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/1570567"> <span id="translatedtitle">Pseudospectral method based on prolate spheroidal <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> for frequency-domain electromagnetic simulations</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">We apply prolate spheroidal <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> of order zero as basis <span class="hlt">functions</span> in the pseudospectral method for frequency-domain electromagnetic simulation problems. Like the traditional pseudospectral frequency-domain (PSFD) methods based on Chebyshev and Legendre polynomial series, the prolate PSFD method yields exponential order of accuracy. In terms of the number of samples utilized per wavelength, the prolate expansion is superior to</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Narayan Kovvali; Wenbin Lin; Lawrence Carin</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">304</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/19980899"> <span id="translatedtitle">Optical Transfer <span class="hlt">Function</span> of Concave Grating Spectrometer Based on <span class="hlt">Wave</span> Optical Method</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Optical transfer <span class="hlt">functions</span> (OTF) of two types of spectrometer --- Eagle mounting and Seya-Namioka mounting --- are calculated by the <span class="hlt">wave</span>-optical method which defines the OTF as the autocorrelation <span class="hlt">function</span> of the pupil. Results obtained are compared with previous results of the present authors and interpreted as effects of diffraction and aberration on the broadening of point image. The OTFs</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Tsuneo Katayama; Akio Takahashi</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1970-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">305</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/19041225"> <span id="translatedtitle">Donor electron <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> for phosphorus in silicon: Beyond effective-mass theory</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">We calculate the electronic <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> for a phosphorus donor in silicon by numerical diagonalization of the donor Hamiltonian in the basis of the pure crystal Bloch <span class="hlt">functions</span>. The Hamiltonian is calculated at discrete points localized around the conduction band minima in the reciprocal lattice space. Such a technique goes beyond the approximations inherent in the effective-mass theory, and can</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">C. J. Wellard; L. C. L. Hollenberg</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">306</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010PhLA..374.1311O"> <span id="translatedtitle">Coordinate space <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> from the Algebraic Bethe Ansatz for the inhomogeneous six-vertex model</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We derive the coordinate space <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> for the inhomogeneous six-vertex model from the Algebraic Bethe Ansatz. The result is in agreement with the result first obtained long time ago by Yang and Gaudin in the context of the problem of one-dimensional fermions with ?-<span class="hlt">function</span> interaction.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ovchinnikov, A. A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">307</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1998PhRvA..57...48B"> <span id="translatedtitle">Hyperspherical <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> with orthogonal and permutational symmetry</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Hyperspherical harmonic basis <span class="hlt">functions</span>, expressed in terms of the Jacobi coordinates and belonging to well-defined irreducible representations of the orthogonal and symmetric groups, were recently introduced. The usefulness of these basis <span class="hlt">functions</span> is presented and the two-body matrix elements between these <span class="hlt">functions</span> are evaluated, using the various hyperspherical coefficients of fractional parentage. The appropriate rotation, necessary for this evaluation, is achieved by using the rotational symmetry of these <span class="hlt">functions</span>. Therefore, the representation matrices of the orthogonal group are sufficient for the calculation of the two-body matrix elements. Thus, the Raynal-Revai and the T coefficients are unnecessary. These results make this basis set suitable for few-body calculations in nuclear, atomic, and molecular physics, as well as for microscopic calculations of collective modes in nuclear physics.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Barnea, Nir; Novoselsky, Akiva</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1998-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">308</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.springerlink.com/index/n586x137n1620u0u.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Continuum bound state and transition matrix of the scattering <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> for projected Yamaguchi potential</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The presence of a continuum bound state for the nucleon-nucleon (nn) scattering by a nonlocal potential in which Yamaguchi potential enters as an attractive part is examined. It is well-known\\u000a that an extra node in the radial <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> is directly related to the existence of a continuum bound state in the scattering\\u000a spectrum. The extra nodes of the <span class="hlt">wave</span></p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">D K Ghosh</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1984-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">309</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/19042770"> <span id="translatedtitle">Projector augmented-<span class="hlt">wave</span> approach to density-<span class="hlt">functional</span> perturbation theory</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The density-<span class="hlt">functional</span> theory total energy within the projector-augmented <span class="hlt">wave</span> formalism is expressed in a form suitable for application of the variation-perturbation formalism. We derive the corresponding expressions up to the third order. The much deeper complexity of the projector-augmented <span class="hlt">wave</span> formalism, compared to the norm-conserving pseudopotential case, implies the introduction of several new notations. However, the structure of the resulting</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Christophe Audouze; François Jollet; Marc Torrent; Xavier Gonze</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">310</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/4819967"> <span id="translatedtitle">Numerical simulation of two-dimensional <span class="hlt">wave</span> propagation in <span class="hlt">functionally</span> graded materials</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The propagation of stress <span class="hlt">waves</span> in <span class="hlt">functionally</span> graded materials (FGMs) is studied numerically by means of the composite <span class="hlt">wave</span>-propagation algorithm. Two distinct models of FGMs are considered: (i) a multilayered metal–ceramic composite with averaged properties within layers; (ii) randomly embedded ceramic particles in a metal matrix with prescribed volume fraction. The numerical simulation demonstrates the applicability of that algorithm to the modelling</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Arkadi Berezovski; Juri Engelbrecht; G. A Maugin</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">311</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6903575"> <span id="translatedtitle">Integration contours for the no-boundary <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> of the universe</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In the no-boundary proposal for the initial conditions of a closed cosmology, the <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> of the universe is the integral of exp(-action) over a contour of four-geometries and matter-field configurations on compact manifolds having only that boundary necessary to specify the arguments of the <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span>. There is no satisfactory covariant Hamiltonian quantum mechanics of closed cosmologies from which the contour may be derived, as there would be for defining the ground states of asymptotically flat spacetimes. No compelling prescription, such as the conformal rotation for asymptotically flat spacetimes, has been advanced. In this paper it is argued that the contour of integration can be constrained by simple physical considerations: (1) the integral defining the <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> should converge; (2) the <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> should satisfy the constraints implementing diffeomorphism invariance; (3) classical spacetime when the universe is large should be a prediction; (4) the correct field theory in curved spacetime should be reproduced in this spacetime; (5) to the extent that wormholes make the cosmological constant dependent on initial conditions the <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> should predict its vanishing.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Halliwell, J.J. (Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (USA)); Hartle, J.B. (Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (USA))</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1990-03-15</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">312</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014PhyB..442...81H"> <span id="translatedtitle">Thermodynamics of ferromagnetic spin chains in a magnetic field: <span class="hlt">Impact</span> of the spin-<span class="hlt">wave</span> interaction</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The thermodynamic properties of ferromagnetic spin chains have been the subject of many publications. Still, the problem of how the spin-<span class="hlt">wave</span> interaction manifest itself in these low-temperature series has been neglected. Using the method of effective Lagrangians, we explicitly evaluate the partition <span class="hlt">function</span> of ferromagnetic spin chains at low temperatures and in the presence of a magnetic field up to three loops in the perturbative expansion where the spin-<span class="hlt">wave</span> interaction sets in. We discuss in detail the renormalization and the numerical evaluation of a particular three-loop graph and derive the low-temperature series for the free energy density, energy density, heat capacity, entropy density, as well as the magnetization and the susceptibility. In the low-temperature expansion for the free energy density, the spin-<span class="hlt">wave</span> interaction starts manifesting itself at order T5/2. In the pressure, the coefficient of the T5/2-term is positive, indicating that the spin-<span class="hlt">wave</span> interaction is repulsive. While it is straightforward to go up to three-loop order in the effective loop expansion, the analogous calculation on the basis of conventional condensed matter methods, such as spin-<span class="hlt">wave</span> theory, appears to be beyond reach.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hofmann, Christoph P.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">313</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4074072"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Wave</span> Propagation Analysis of Edge Cracked Circular Beams under <span class="hlt">Impact</span> Force</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This paper presents responses of an edge circular cantilever beam under the effect of an <span class="hlt">impact</span> force. The beam is excited by a transverse triangular force impulse modulated by a harmonic motion. The Kelvin–Voigt model for the material of the beam is used. The cracked beam is modelled as an assembly of two sub-beams connected through a massless elastic rotational spring. The considered problem is investigated within the Bernoulli-Euler beam theory by using energy based finite element method. The system of equations of motion is derived by using Lagrange's equations. The obtained system of linear differential equations is reduced to a linear algebraic equation system and solved in the time domain by using Newmark average acceleration method. In the study, the effects of the location of crack, the depth of the crack, on the characteristics of the reflected <span class="hlt">waves</span> are investigated in detail. Also, the positions of the cracks are calculated by using reflected <span class="hlt">waves</span>.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Akbas, Seref Doguscan</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">314</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24972050"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Wave</span> Propagation Analysis of Edge Cracked Circular Beams under <span class="hlt">Impact</span> Force.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This paper presents responses of an edge circular cantilever beam under the effect of an <span class="hlt">impact</span> force. The beam is excited by a transverse triangular force impulse modulated by a harmonic motion. The Kelvin-Voigt model for the material of the beam is used. The cracked beam is modelled as an assembly of two sub-beams connected through a massless elastic rotational spring. The considered problem is investigated within the Bernoulli-Euler beam theory by using energy based finite element method. The system of equations of motion is derived by using Lagrange's equations. The obtained system of linear differential equations is reduced to a linear algebraic equation system and solved in the time domain by using Newmark average acceleration method. In the study, the effects of the location of crack, the depth of the crack, on the characteristics of the reflected <span class="hlt">waves</span> are investigated in detail. Also, the positions of the cracks are calculated by using reflected <span class="hlt">waves</span>. PMID:24972050</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Akba?, Seref Do?u?can</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">315</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21011231"> <span id="translatedtitle">Electron-<span class="hlt">impact</span> ionization of diatomic molecules using a configuration-average distorted-<span class="hlt">wave</span> method</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Electron-<span class="hlt">impact</span> ionization cross sections for diatomic molecules are calculated in a configuration-average distorted-<span class="hlt">wave</span> method. Core bound orbitals for the molecular ion are calculated using a single-configuration self-consistent-field method based on a linear combination of Slater-type orbitals. The core bound orbitals are then transformed onto a two-dimensional (r,{theta}) numerical lattice from which a Hartree potential with local exchange is constructed. The single-particle Schroedinger equation is then solved for the valence bound orbital and continuum distorted-<span class="hlt">wave</span> orbitals with S-matrix boundary conditions. Total cross section results for H{sub 2} and N{sub 2} are compared with those from semiempirical calculations and experimental measurements.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Pindzola, M. S.; Robicheaux, F.; Colgan, J.; Ballance, C. P. [Department of Physics, Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama 36849 (United States); Theoretical Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Department of Physics, Rollins College, Winter Park, Florida 32789 (United States)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-07-15</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">316</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/48348528"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Impact</span> of IQ Discrepancy on Executive <span class="hlt">Function</span> in High-<span class="hlt">Functioning</span> Autism: Insight into Twice Exceptionality</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">We examined the <span class="hlt">impact</span> of IQ discrepancy (IQD) within (1) and above (1+) one standard deviation on executive <span class="hlt">function</span> in HFA\\u000a using the BRIEF. We hypothesized that IQD would benefit executive <span class="hlt">function</span>. IQD 1 is hallmarked by deficits in BRIEF indices\\u000a and subscales inhibit, shift, initiate, working memory, planning and organization, and monitor (MANCOVA, p < .003, corrected). As IQD increases to</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">M. Layne Kalbfleisch; Ashlee R. Loughan</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">317</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4030595"> <span id="translatedtitle">Modifying Measures Based on Differential Item <span class="hlt">Functioning</span> (DIF) <span class="hlt">Impact</span> Analyses</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Objectives Measure modification can <span class="hlt">impact</span> comparability of scores across groups and settings. Changes in items can affect the percent admitting to a symptom. Methods Using item response theory (IRT) methods, well-calibrated items can be used interchangeably, and the exact same item does not have to be administered to each respondent, theoretically permitting wider latitude in terms of modification. Results Recommendations regarding modifications vary, depending on the use of the measure. In the context of research, adjustments can be made at the analytic level by freeing and fixing parameters based on findings of differential item <span class="hlt">functioning</span> (DIF). The consequences of DIF for clinical decision making depend on whether or not the patient’s performance level approaches the scale decision cutpoint. High-stakes testing may require item removal or separate calibrations to ensure accurate assessment. Discussion Guidelines for modification based on DIF analyses and illustrations of the <span class="hlt">impact</span> of adjustments are presented.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Teresi, Jeanne A.; Ramirez, Mildred; Jones, Richard N.; Choi, Seung; Crane, Paul K.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">318</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/18567472"> <span id="translatedtitle">Exp-<span class="hlt">function</span> method for nonlinear <span class="hlt">wave</span> equations</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">In this paper, a new method, called Exp-<span class="hlt">function</span> method, is proposed to seek solitary solutions, periodic solutions and compacton-like solutions of nonlinear differential equations. The modified KdV equation and Dodd–Bullough–Mikhailov equation are chosen to illustrate the effectiveness and convenience of the suggested method.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ji-Huan He; Xu-Hong Wu</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">319</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3338535"> <span id="translatedtitle">The <span class="hlt">Impact</span> of Social Disparity on Prefrontal <span class="hlt">Function</span> in Childhood</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The prefrontal cortex (PFC) develops from birth through late adolescence. This extended developmental trajectory provides many opportunities for experience to shape the structure and <span class="hlt">function</span> of the PFC. To date, a few studies have reported links between parental socioeconomic status (SES) and prefrontal <span class="hlt">function</span> in childhood, raising the possibility that aspects of environment associated with SES <span class="hlt">impact</span> prefrontal <span class="hlt">function</span>. Considering that behavioral measures of prefrontal <span class="hlt">function</span> are associated with learning across multiple domains, this is an important area of investigation. In this study, we used fMRI to replicate previous findings, demonstrating an association between parental SES and PFC <span class="hlt">function</span> during childhood. In addition, we present two hypothetical mechanisms by which SES could come to affect PFC <span class="hlt">function</span> of this association: language environment and stress reactivity. We measured language use in the home environment and change in salivary cortisol before and after fMRI scanning. Complexity of family language, but not the child's own language use, was associated with both parental SES and PFC activation. Change in salivary cortisol was also associated with both SES and PFC activation. These observed associations emphasize the importance of both enrichment and adversity-reduction interventions in creating good developmental environments for all children.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Sheridan, Margaret A.; Sarsour, Khaled; Jutte, Douglas; D'Esposito, Mark; Boyce, W. Thomas</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">320</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/19140128"> <span id="translatedtitle">Kohn-Sham potentials and <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> from electron densities</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">A method is introduced that allows the determination of the Kohn-Sham effective potential and the corresponding Kohn-Sham orbitals belonging to an arbitrary electron density with boundary conditions of a bound and finite system. For atoms or molecules the exchange-correlation potential and the exchange-correlation energy can be obtained also. The procedure easily can be implemented using existing density-<span class="hlt">functional</span> programs.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Andreas Görling</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1992-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' 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onClick='return showDiv("page_9");' href="#">9</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_10");' href="#">10</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#">11</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#">12</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#">13</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#">14</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#">15</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#">16</a> <a style="font-weight: bold;">17</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#">18</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#">19</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#">20</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">321</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20010062168&hterms=hartree-fock+method&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D10%26Ntt%3Dhartree-fock%2Bmethod"> <span id="translatedtitle">Second-Order Moller-Plesset Perturbation Theory for Molecular Dirac-Hartree-Fock <span class="hlt">Wave</span> <span class="hlt">Functions</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Moller-Plesset perturbation theory is developed to second order for a selection of Kramers restricted Dirac-Hartree-Fock closed and open-shell reference <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span>. The open-shell <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> considered are limited to those with no more than two electrons in open shells, but include the case of a two-configuration SCF reference. Denominator shifts are included in the style of Davidson's OPT2 method. An implementation which uses unordered integrals with labels is presented, and results are given for a few test cases.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Dyall, Kenneth G.; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1994-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">322</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010cosp...38.1542K"> <span id="translatedtitle">Dust heating through Alfven <span class="hlt">waves</span> using non-Maxwellian distribution <span class="hlt">function</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Quasilinear theory is used to calculate the resonant heating of dust particles in a hot, col-lisionless and magnetized plasma through Alfven <span class="hlt">waves</span>, using generalized (r, q) distribution <span class="hlt">function</span>. The linear dispersion relation for the electromagnetic dust cyclotron Alfven <span class="hlt">waves</span>, is evaluated using the Vlasov model. The dependence of the heating rate on the charge, mass and density of the dust species is subsequently investigated. The dependence of the heating rate on the spectral indices r and q of the distribution <span class="hlt">function</span> is also investigated. It is found that the heating is sensitive to negative value of spectral index r.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kiran, Zubia; Shah, Hassan</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">323</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23038529"> <span id="translatedtitle">Visualization of superluminal pulses inside a white light cavity using plane <span class="hlt">wave</span> spatio temporal transfer <span class="hlt">functions</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In a white light cavity (WLC), the group velocity is superluminal over a finite bandwidth. For a WLC-based data buffering system we recently proposed, it is important to visualize the behavior of pulses inside such a cavity. The conventional plane <span class="hlt">wave</span> transfer <span class="hlt">functions</span>, valid only over space that is translationally invariant, cannot be used for the space inside WLC or any cavity, which is translationally variant. Here, we develop the plane <span class="hlt">wave</span> spatio temporal transfer <span class="hlt">function</span> (PWSTTF) method to solve this problem, and produce visual representations of a Gaussian input pulse incident on a WLC, for all times and positions. PMID:23038529</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Yum, H N; Jang, Y J; Liu, X; Shahriar, M S</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-08-13</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">324</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24964297"> <span id="translatedtitle">Harvesting broadband kinetic <span class="hlt">impact</span> energy from mechanical triggering/vibration and water <span class="hlt">waves</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We invented a triboelectric nanogenerator (TENG) that is based on a wavy-structured Cu-Kapton-Cu film sandwiched between two flat nanostructured PTFE films for harvesting energy due to mechanical vibration/<span class="hlt">impacting</span>/compressing using the triboelectrification effect. This structure design allows the TENG to be self-restorable after <span class="hlt">impact</span> without the use of extra springs and converts direct <span class="hlt">impact</span> into lateral sliding, which is proved to be a much more efficient friction mode for energy harvesting. The working mechanism has been elaborated using the capacitor model and finite-element simulation. Vibrational energy from 5 to 500 Hz has been harvested, and the generator's resonance frequency was determined to be ?100 Hz at a broad full width at half-maximum of over 100 Hz, producing an open-circuit voltage of up to 72 V, a short-circuit current of up to 32 ?A, and a peak power density of 0.4 W/m(2). Most importantly, the wavy structure of the TENG can be easily packaged for harvesting the <span class="hlt">impact</span> energy from water <span class="hlt">waves</span>, clearly establishing the principle for ocean <span class="hlt">wave</span> energy harvesting. Considering the advantages of TENGs, such as cost-effectiveness, light weight, and easy scalability, this approach might open the possibility for obtaining green and sustainable energy from the ocean using nanostructured materials. Lastly, different ways of agitating water were studied to trigger the packaged TENG. By analyzing the output signals and their corresponding fast Fourier transform spectra, three ways of agitation were evidently distinguished from each other, demonstrating the potential of the TENG for hydrological analysis. PMID:24964297</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Wen, Xiaonan; Yang, Weiqing; Jing, Qingshen; Wang, Zhong Lin</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-07-22</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">325</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21335911"> <span id="translatedtitle">Single scattering estimates for the scintillation <span class="hlt">function</span> of <span class="hlt">waves</span> in random media</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The energy density of high frequency <span class="hlt">waves</span> propagating in highly oscillatory random media is well approximated by solutions of deterministic kinetic models. The scintillation <span class="hlt">function</span> determines the statistical instability of the kinetic solution. This paper analyzes the single scattering term in the scintillation <span class="hlt">function</span>. This is the term of the scintillation <span class="hlt">function</span> that is linear in the power spectrum of the random fluctuations. We show that the structure of the scintillation <span class="hlt">function</span> is already quite complicated in this simplified setting. It strongly depends on the singularity of the initial conditions for the <span class="hlt">wave</span> field and on the correlation properties of the random medium. We obtain limiting expressions for the scintillation <span class="hlt">function</span> as the correlation length of the random medium tends to zero.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Bal, Guillaume; Langmore, Ian [Department of Applied Physics and Applied Mathematics, Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 (United States); Pinaud, Olivier [CNRS, UMR 5208 Institut Camille Jordan/ISTIL, Universite de Lyon, Universite Lyon 1, Batiment du Doyen Jean Braconnier, 43, Blvd. du 11 Novembre 1918, F - 69622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-02-15</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">326</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013APS..MARC42010F"> <span id="translatedtitle">Coherent State <span class="hlt">Wave-Functions</span> on a Torus with a Constant Magnetic Field</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We study two alternative definitions of localized states in the lowest Landau level (LLL) on a torus. The first is to project a delta <span class="hlt">function</span> onto the LLL, while the other is to put all the N zeros of the <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> at the same point, thus localizing the <span class="hlt">function</span> at the vicinity of the antipodal point. These two families of localized states both have many properties in common with the coherent states on the plane and on the sphere, viz. a simple resolution of unity and a self-reproducing kernel. However, only the projected delta <span class="hlt">function</span> gives maximally localized states. We also show how to project expressions containing holomorphic derivatives and nonholomorphic coordinates onto the LLL, and briefly discuss the importance of this for constructing hierarchical QH <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span>.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Fremling, Mikael</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">327</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24661243"> <span id="translatedtitle">An integrated perspective and <span class="hlt">functional</span> <span class="hlt">impact</span> of the mitochondrial acetylome.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Growing evidence suggests that a range of reversible protein post-translational modifications such as acetylation regulates mitochondria signalling, <span class="hlt">impacting</span> cellular homeostasis. However, the extent of this type of regulation in the control of mitochondria <span class="hlt">functionality</span> is just beginning to be discovered, aided by the availability of high-resolution mass spectrometers and bioinformatic tools. Data mining from literature on protein acetylation profiling focused on mitochondria isolated from tissues retrieved more than 1395 distinct proteins, corresponding to more than 4858 acetylation sites. ClueGo analysis of identified proteins highlighted oxidative phosphorylation, tricarboxylic acid cycle, fatty acid oxidation and amino acid metabolism as the biological processes more prone to regulation through acetylation. This review also examines the physiological relevance of protein acetylation on the molecular pathways harbored in mitochondria under distinct pathophysiological conditions as caloric restriction and alcohol-induced liver damage. This integrative perspective will certainly help to envisage future studies targeting the regulation of mitochondrial <span class="hlt">functionality</span>. PMID:24661243</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Amado, Francisco M; Barros, António; Azevedo, Ana Lúcia; Vitorino, Rui; Ferreira, Rita</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">328</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/15011418"> <span id="translatedtitle">Probability Density <span class="hlt">Function</span> for <span class="hlt">Waves</span> Propagating in a Straight PEC Rough Wall Tunnel</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The probability density <span class="hlt">function</span> for <span class="hlt">wave</span> propagating in a straight perfect electrical conductor (PEC) rough wall tunnel is deduced from the mathematical models of the random electromagnetic fields. The field propagating in caves or tunnels is a complex-valued Gaussian random processing by the Central Limit Theorem. The probability density <span class="hlt">function</span> for single modal field amplitude in such structure is Ricean. Since both expected value and standard deviation of this field depend only on radial position, the probability density <span class="hlt">function</span>, which gives what is the power distribution, is a radially dependent <span class="hlt">function</span>. The radio channel places fundamental limitations on the performance of wireless communication systems in tunnels and caves. The transmission path between the transmitter and receiver can vary from a simple direct line of sight to one that is severely obstructed by rough walls and corners. Unlike wired channels that are stationary and predictable, radio channels can be extremely random and difficult to analyze. In fact, modeling the radio channel has historically been one of the more challenging parts of any radio system design; this is often done using statistical methods. In this contribution, we present the most important statistic property, the field probability density <span class="hlt">function</span>, of <span class="hlt">wave</span> propagating in a straight PEC rough wall tunnel. This work only studies the simplest case--PEC boundary which is not the real world but the methods and conclusions developed herein are applicable to real world problems which the boundary is dielectric. The mechanisms behind electromagnetic <span class="hlt">wave</span> propagation in caves or tunnels are diverse, but can generally be attributed to reflection, diffraction, and scattering. Because of the multiple reflections from rough walls, the electromagnetic <span class="hlt">waves</span> travel along different paths of varying lengths. The interactions between these <span class="hlt">waves</span> cause multipath fading at any location, and the strengths of the <span class="hlt">waves</span> decrease as the distance between the transmitter and receiver increases.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Pao, H</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-11-08</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">329</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/20645993"> <span id="translatedtitle">Uniform approximation of <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> with improved semiclassical transformation amplitudes and Gram-Schmidt orthogonalization</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Semiclassical transformation theory implies an integral representation for stationary-state <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> {psi}{sub m}(q) in terms of angle-action variables ({theta},J). It is a particular solution of Schroedinger's time-independent equation when terms of order ({Dirac_h}/2{pi}){sup 2} and higher are omitted, but the preexponential factor A(q,{theta}) in the integrand of this integral representation does not possess the correct dependence on q. The origin of the problem is identified: the standard unitarity condition invoked in semiclassical transformation theory does not fix adequately in A(q,{theta}) a factor which is a <span class="hlt">function</span> of the action J written in terms of q and {theta}. A prescription for an improved choice of this factor, based on successfully reproducing the leading behavior of <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> in the vicinity of potential minima, is outlined. Exact evaluation of the modified integral representation via the residue theorem is possible. It yields <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> which are not, in general, orthogonal. However, closed-form results obtained after Gram-Schmidt orthogonalization bear a striking resemblance to the exact analytical expressions for the stationary-state <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> of the various potential models considered (namely, a Poeschl-Teller oscillator and the Morse oscillator)</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Davis, Edward D. [Department of Physics, Kuwait University, P.O. Box 5969, Safat (Kuwait)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">330</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010JGRD..11516213J"> <span id="translatedtitle">Composite analysis of dust <span class="hlt">impacts</span> on African easterly <span class="hlt">waves</span> in the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer era</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This study examines the synoptic scale <span class="hlt">impacts</span> of African dust on easterly <span class="hlt">waves</span> in the tropical northeast Atlantic. Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer aerosol optical depth (AOD), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration products, and National Center for Environmental Prediction reanalysis fields in the Atlantic main hurricane development region (MDR) form the basis for statistical analysis of a limited set of cases objectively selected for the 2000-2008 hurricane seasons when thresholds are exceeded for sea surface temperature (SST), easterly wind shear, cyclonic vorticity, and upward motion. After ranking African easterly <span class="hlt">waves</span> by AOD, the top (dusty) and bottom (clean) cases are studied as composite differences. African dust and subsidence cause temperatures to warm ˜3°C in the 700 hPa layer, while SSTs cause temperatures to cool, stabilizing the atmosphere. Increased AOD and strong (10 m s-1) 600 hPa easterly winds limit cloud efficiency through shear and oversupply of condensation nuclei. Vertical section composites demonstrate that warm dry subsident air coincides with the African dust plume in the latitudes 18°N-30°N. Hurricane reanalysis data indicate that higher AOD in the MDR reduces chances for the intensification of African easterly <span class="hlt">waves</span>.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Jury, Mark R.; Santiago, Myrna J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-08-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">331</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013JGRC..118.2685S"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Impact</span> of current-<span class="hlt">wave</span> interaction on storm surge simulation: A case study for Hurricane Bob</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Hurricane Bob moved up the U.S. east coast and crossed over southern New England and the Gulf of Maine [with peak marine winds up to 54 m/s (100 mph)] on 19-20 August 1991, causing significant damage along the coast and shelf. A 3-D fully <span class="hlt">wave</span>-current-coupled finite-volume community ocean model system was developed and applied to simulate and examine the coastal ocean responses to Hurricane Bob. Results from process study-oriented experiments showed that the <span class="hlt">impact</span> of <span class="hlt">wave</span>-current interaction on surge elevation varied in space and time, more significant over the shelf than inside the inner bays. While sea level change along the coast was mainly driven by the water flux controlled by barotropic dynamics and the vertically integrated highest water transports were essentially the same for cases with and without water stratification, the hurricane-induced <span class="hlt">wave</span>-current interaction could generate strong vertical current shear in the stratified areas, leading to a strong offshore transport near the bottom and vertical turbulent mixing over the continental shelf. Stratification could also result in a significant difference of water currents around islands where the water is not vertically well mixed.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Sun, Yunfang; Chen, Changsheng; Beardsley, Robert C.; Xu, Qichun; Qi, Jianhua; Lin, Huichan</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">332</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014JPhCS.500k2022E"> <span id="translatedtitle">Development of a shock <span class="hlt">wave</span> adhesion test for composite bonds by pulsed laser and mechanical <span class="hlt">impacts</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Evaluating the bonding quality of composite material is becoming one of the main challenges faced by aeronautic industries. This work aims to the development of a technique using shock <span class="hlt">wave</span>, which would enable to quantify the bonding mechanical quality. Laser shock experiments were carried out. This technique enables high tensile stress generation in the thickness of composite bonds. The resulting damage has been quantified using different methods such as confocal microscopy, ultrasound and cross section observation. The discrimination between a correct bond and a weak bond was possible thanks to these experiments. Nevertheless, laser sources are not well adapted for optimization of such a test because of often fixed settings. That is why mechanical <span class="hlt">impacts</span> on bonded composites were also performed in this work. By changing the thickness of aluminum projectiles, the generated tensile stresses by the shock <span class="hlt">wave</span> propagation were moved toward the composite/bond interface. The made observations prove that the technique optimization is possible. The key parameters for the development of a bonding test using shock <span class="hlt">waves</span> have been identified.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ecault, R.; Boustie, M.; Touchard, F.; Arrigoni, M.; Berthe, L.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">333</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014PhRvB..89k5136S"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Wave-function</span> vortex attachment via matrix products: Application to atomic Fermi gases in flat spin-orbit bands</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Variational <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> that introduce zeros (vortices) to screen repulsive interactions are typically difficult to verify in unbiased microscopic calculations. An approach is constructed to insert vortices into ansatz <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> using a matrix-product representation. This approach opens the door to validation of a broad class of Jastrow-based <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span>. The formalism is applied to a model motivated by experiments on ultracold atomic gases in the presence of synthetic spin-orbit coupling. Validated <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> show that vortices in atomic Fermi gases with flat Rashba spin-orbit bands cluster near the system center and should therefore be directly visible in time-of-flight imaging.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Scarola, V. W.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">334</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010JGRC..11512009H"> <span id="translatedtitle">Coupling of surge and <span class="hlt">waves</span> for an Ivan-like hurricane <span class="hlt">impacting</span> the Tampa Bay, Florida region</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The interactions between <span class="hlt">waves</span> and storm surge are investigated using an unstructured grid, coupled <span class="hlt">wave</span>-surge model forced by a hypothetical Ivan-like hurricane <span class="hlt">impacting</span> the Tampa Bay, Florida region. The <span class="hlt">waves</span> derived from the unstructured version of the third-generation <span class="hlt">wave</span> model simulating <span class="hlt">waves</span> nearshore. The surge derives from the unstructured Finite-Volume Coastal Ocean Model, to which <span class="hlt">wave</span>-induced forces (based on radiation stress theory) are added to the traditional forces by winds and atmospheric pressure. Dependent upon complex bathymetry and geometry, the <span class="hlt">wave</span>-induced forces result in an additional 0.3˜0.5 m of surge relative to an uncoupled, surge-only simulation, and the increase in coastal sea level by the storm surge adds some 1.0˜1.5 m to the significant <span class="hlt">wave</span> heights nearshore. Such strong interactions through coupling suggest that <span class="hlt">waves</span> should not be omitted in hurricane storm surge simulations, especially because the forces by <span class="hlt">waves</span> on coastal structures are perhaps the most damaging of the hurricane related forces.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Huang, Yong; Weisberg, Robert H.; Zheng, Lianyuan</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">335</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013EGUGA..15.3438S"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Impact</span> of Anthropogenic Land Cover Change on Heat <span class="hlt">Waves</span> : the summer 2003 as a testbed.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In this study we investigate the two-way interactions of vegetation and climate on regional scales. a comparison is performed to assess the <span class="hlt">impact</span> for the anomalous year 2003 of a potential vegetation distribution where human influence is suppressed to a simulation with a current vegetation distribution via a modelling approach. Main processes which contribute to these differences are analysed. Both simulations are performed with the help of the modelling platform MORCE which comprises a coupled version of the atmospheric model WRF and the dynamic vegetation model ORCHIDEE. The first run was conducted using a potential vegetation map, the second used a current vegetation map. The simulation domain in the Mediterranean region has been chosen for its important climate sensitivity to surface conditions in summer. It is at the same time the location of maximal observed temperature anomalies during the heat <span class="hlt">waves</span> 2003. Currently summer temperature changes induced by land cover modification is yet unclear at these latitudes. The differences in vegetation cover correspond to conversion of agricultural land use to natural grassland and forest and can be compared to a reforestation of about 45% of the domains surface. By replacing the agricultural vegetation by a mixture of forests and prairies, the mean capacity of photosynthetic activity is reduced due to increased stomatal resistance and smaller LAI. The exceptional meteorological conditions in 2003 enhance development of the cover of vegetation in both simulations and result in great photosynthetic activity and transpiration. The simulation with current vegetation cover (CUR) is colder during the first heat <span class="hlt">wave</span> in June due to large evapotranspiration of the agricultural plants. Plants start to get limited in soil moisture in July. Vegetation in CUR is most affected and starts welting. In this circumstances the simulation without human <span class="hlt">impact</span> on land cover plays out its advantage of greater heat resilience on the long term. During the second heat <span class="hlt">wave</span> in August the repartition of turbulent heat fluxes .</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Stéfanon, Marc; Schindler, Solveig; Drobinski, Philippe; de Noblet-Ducoudré, Nathalie; D'Andrea, Fabio</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">336</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/12666600"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">function</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Integral equations for the spin-weighted spheroidal <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> is given . For the prolate spheroidal <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> with m = 0, there exists the integral equation whose kernel is sin x x , and the sinc <span class="hlt">function</span> kernel sin x x is of great mathematical significance. In the paper, we also extend the similar sinc <span class="hlt">function</span> kernel sin x x</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Guihua Tian</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">337</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012GeoJI.189..481S"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Impact</span> of pore space topology on permeability, cut-off frequencies and validity of <span class="hlt">wave</span> propagation theories</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">For the first time, a comprehensive and quantitative analysis of the domains of validity of popular <span class="hlt">wave</span> propagation theories for porous/cracked media is provided. The case of a simple, yet versatile rock microstructure is detailed. The microstructural parameters controlling the applicability of the scattering theories, the effective medium theories, the quasi-static (Gassmann limit) and dynamic (inertial) poroelasticity are analysed in terms of pores/cracks characteristic size, geometry and connectivity. To this end, a new permeability model is devised combining the hydraulic radius and percolation concepts. The predictions of this model are compared to published micromechanical models of permeability for the limiting cases of capillary tubes and penny-shaped cracks. It is also compared to published experimental data on natural rocks in these limiting cases. It explicitly accounts for pore space topology around the percolation threshold and far above it. Thanks to this permeability model, the scattering, squirt-flow and Biot cut-off frequencies are quantitatively compared. This comparison leads to an explicit mapping of the domains of validity of these <span class="hlt">wave</span> propagation theories as a <span class="hlt">function</span> of the rock's actual microstructure. How this mapping <span class="hlt">impacts</span> seismic, geophysical and ultrasonic <span class="hlt">wave</span> velocity data interpretation is discussed. The methodology demonstrated here and the outcomes of this analysis are meant to constitute a quantitative guide for the selection of the most suitable modelling strategy to be employed for prediction and/or interpretation of rocks elastic properties in laboratory-or field-scale applications when information regarding the rock's microstructure is available.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Sarout, Joël.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">338</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3644369"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Functional</span> Connectivity between Brain Areas Estimated by Analysis of Gamma <span class="hlt">Waves</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The goal of this study is to investigate <span class="hlt">functional</span> connectivity between different brain regions by analyzing the temporal relationship of the maxima of gamma <span class="hlt">waves</span> recorded in multiple brain areas. Local field potentials were recorded from motor cortex, hippocampus, entorhinal cortex and piriform cortex of rats. Gamma activity was filtered and separated into two bands; high (65–90Hz) and low (30–55Hz) gamma. Maxima for gamma activity <span class="hlt">waves</span> were detected and <span class="hlt">functional</span> connectivity between different brain regions was determined using Shannon entropy for perievent histograms for each pair channels. Significant Shannon entropy values were reported as connectivity factors. We defined a connectivity matrix based the connectivity factors between different regions. We found that maxima of low and high frequency gamma occur in strong temporal relationship between some brain areas, indicating the existence of <span class="hlt">functional</span> connections between these areas. The spatial pattern of <span class="hlt">functional</span> connections between brain areas was different for slow <span class="hlt">wave</span> sleep and waking states. However for each behavioral state in the same animal the pattern of <span class="hlt">functional</span> connections was stable over time within 30 minutes of continuous analysis and over a 5 day period. With the same electrode montage the pattern of <span class="hlt">functional</span> connectivity varied from one subject to another. Analysis of the temporal relationship of maxima of gamma <span class="hlt">waves</span> between various brain areas could be a useful tool for investigation of <span class="hlt">functional</span> connections between these brain areas. This approach could be applied for analysis of <span class="hlt">functional</span> alterations occurring in these connections during different behavioral tasks and during processes related to learning and memory. The specificity in the connectivity pattern from one subject to another can be explained by the existence of unique <span class="hlt">functional</span> networks for each subject.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kheiri, Farshad; Bragin, Anatol; Engel, Jerome</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">339</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/901524"> <span id="translatedtitle">Multi-<span class="hlt">functional</span> Nanowire Evanescent <span class="hlt">Wave</span> Optical Sensors</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Controlling the flow of photons through a fluidic media withsubwavelength optics is a major step towards the development of on-chipphotonic sensors. Central to this idea will be designing amulti-<span class="hlt">functional</span> nanomaterial that can efficiently trap, route anddeliver light to various sensing channels, filters and detectors on aphotonic chip. Semiconductor nanowire waveguides offer an exceptionalsolution to the confinement of optical energy in solution and can bedirectly integrated into microfluidic devices. Here we demonstrate anovel optical sensing platform that utilizes the evanescent field of atin dioxide single crystalline waveguide to perform a wide array ofspectroscopic analyses including absorption, fluorescence and surfaceenhanced Raman on sub-picoliter probe volumes. Since the same waveguidecavity can transmit both broadband and monochromatic light it allowsmultiple modes of detection to be carried out on the same analyte. Tomove beyond less chemical specific optical techniques such as absorptionand fluorescence we exploit the amplified electric field around silvernanocubes to enhance the vibronic signatures of molecules present in theevanescent field. With excellent chemical resilience to strong acidicconditions, the waveguides can be completely cleaned from the attachedmetal nanoparticles making the devices fully reusable. These results openup the possibility of engineering self-contained, multiplexed photonicsensors that detect and identify chemical species in complex biologicaland environmental systems.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Sirbuly, Donald J.; Tao, Andrea; Law, Matt; Fan, Rong; Yang,Peidong</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-10-18</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">340</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8406976"> <span id="translatedtitle">Electromagnetic <span class="hlt">wave</span> emitting products and "Kikoh" potentiate human leukocyte <span class="hlt">functions</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Tourmaline (electric stone, a type of granite stone), common granite stone, ceramic disks, hot spring water and human palmar energy (called "Kikoh" in Japan and China), all which emit electromagnetic radiation in the far infrared region (wavelength 4-14 microns). These materials were thus examined for effects on human leukocyte activity and on lipid peroxidation of unsaturated fatty acids. It was revealed that these materials significantly increased intracellular calcium ion concentration, phagocytosis, and generation of reactive oxygen species in neutrophils, and the blastogenetic response of lymphocytes to mitogens. Chemotactic activity by neutrophils was also enhanced by exposure to tourmaline and the palm of "Kikohshi" i.e., a person who heals professionally by the laying on of hands. Despite the increase in reactive oxygen species generated by neutrophils, lipid peroxidation from unsaturated fatty acid was markedly inhibited by these four materials. The results suggest that materials emitting electromagnetic radiation in the far infrared range, which are widely used in Japan for cosmetic, therapeutic, and preservative purposes, appear capable of potentiating leukocyte <span class="hlt">functions</span> without promoting oxidative injury. PMID:8406976</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Niwa, Y; Iizawa, O; Ishimoto, K; Jiang, X; Kanoh, T</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1993-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' 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src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">341</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19940011881&hterms=dilation&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D50%26Ntt%3Ddilation"> <span id="translatedtitle">The seismic response of an aquifer to the propagation of an <span class="hlt">impact</span> generated shock <span class="hlt">wave</span>: A possible trigger of the Martian outflow channels?</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Aquifer dilation from shock <span class="hlt">waves</span> produced by the 8.4 magnitude Alaskan earthquake of 1964 led to water and sediment ejection from the ground up to 400 km away from the earthquake's epicenter. Groundwater disturbances were observed as far away as Perry, Florida (approximately 5500 km), where well water fluctuations with an amplitude of as much as 2.3 m were reported. The martian cratering record provides evidence that the planet has experienced numerous seismic events of a similar, and often much greater, magnitude. Given this fact, and the photogeologic evidence for abundant water in the early crust, the response of a basalt aquifer to the propagation of compressional <span class="hlt">waves</span> (P-<span class="hlt">waves</span>) produced by <span class="hlt">impacts</span> in the 33-1000 km diameter size range were investigated. The resulting one-dimensional changes in effective stress and pore pressure were calculated - as a <span class="hlt">function</span> of both distance and time - based on the following assumptions: (1) that all of the seismic energy radiated by an <span class="hlt">impact</span> is transmitted as a single compressional <span class="hlt">wave</span>; (2) that both the host rock and groundwater are compressible; and (3) that there is no net flow between the water-filled pores.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Leyva, Ivett A.; Clifford, Stephen M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1993-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">342</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/26602579"> <span id="translatedtitle">Generation of random <span class="hlt">waves</span> in time-dependent extended mild-slope equations using a source <span class="hlt">function</span> method</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">We develop techniques of numerical <span class="hlt">wave</span> generation in the time-dependent extended mild-slope equations of Suh et al. [1997. Time-dependent equations for <span class="hlt">wave</span> propagation on rapidly varying topography. Coastal Engineering 32, 91–117] and Lee et al. [2003. Extended mild-slope equation for random <span class="hlt">waves</span>. Coastal Engineering 48, 277–287] for random <span class="hlt">waves</span> using a source <span class="hlt">function</span> method. Numerical results for both regular and</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Gunwoo Kim; Changhoon Lee; Kyung-Duck Suh</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">343</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013PhPl...20a2118B"> <span id="translatedtitle">The incomplete plasma dispersion <span class="hlt">function</span>: Properties and application to <span class="hlt">waves</span> in bounded plasmas</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The incomplete plasma dispersion <span class="hlt">function</span> is a generalization of the plasma dispersion <span class="hlt">function</span> in which the defining integral spans a semi-infinite, rather than infinite, domain. It is useful for describing the linear dielectric response and <span class="hlt">wave</span> dispersion in non-Maxwellian plasmas when the distribution <span class="hlt">functions</span> can be approximated as Maxwellian over finite, or semi-infinite, intervals in velocity phase-space. A ubiquitous example is the depleted Maxwellian electron distribution found near boundary sheaths or double layers, where the passing interval can be modeled as Maxwellian with a lower temperature than the trapped interval. The depleted Maxwellian is used as an example to demonstrate the utility of using the incomplete plasma dispersion <span class="hlt">function</span> for calculating modifications to <span class="hlt">wave</span> dispersion relations.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Baalrud, S. D.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">344</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24351880"> <span id="translatedtitle">Factors associated with symptom-specific psychological and <span class="hlt">functional</span> <span class="hlt">impact</span> among acoustic neuroma patients.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Introduction: The main purpose of this study was to investigate the psychological and <span class="hlt">functional</span> <span class="hlt">impact</span> attributed to acoustic neuroma symptoms. Materials and methods: A sample of 207 acoustic neuroma patients completed a study-specific questionnaire about the severity, frequency, and psychological and <span class="hlt">functional</span> <span class="hlt">impact</span> of 9 acoustic neuroma symptoms. Results: The survey response rate was 56.4 per cent. All symptoms had some degree of psychological <span class="hlt">impact</span> for the majority of participants; hearing loss was the symptom most often reported to have a severe psychological <span class="hlt">impact</span>. The majority of respondents reported <span class="hlt">functional</span> <span class="hlt">impact</span> attributed to hearing loss, balance disturbance, dizziness, eye problems, headache and fatigue; balance disturbance was the symptom most often reported to have a severe <span class="hlt">functional</span> <span class="hlt">impact</span>. For most symptoms, psychological and <span class="hlt">functional</span> <span class="hlt">impact</span> were related to severity and frequency. Conclusion: Of the acoustic neuroma symptoms investigated, hearing loss and balance disturbance were the most likely to have a severe psychological and <span class="hlt">functional</span> <span class="hlt">impact</span>, respectively. PMID:24351880</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Brooker, J E; Fletcher, J M; Dally, M J; Briggs, R J S; Cousins, V C; Malham, G M; Kennedy, R J; Smee, R I; Burney, S</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">345</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/393327"> <span id="translatedtitle">A search for the {Delta}{sup {minus}} <span class="hlt">wave-function</span> component in light nuclei</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We have studied the ({pi}{sup +}, {pi}{sup {+-}}p) reactions on {sup 3}He, {sup 4}He, {sup 6}Li, and {sup 7}Li at incident energy 500 MeV in quasi-free kinematics. A signature attributable to pre-existing {Delta} components of the ground state <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> is observed.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Morris, C.L.; Zumbro, J.D.; Boudrie, R.L. [and others</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1996-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">346</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011JPhCS.306a2024F"> <span id="translatedtitle">The Fermionic Projector, entanglement and the collapse of the <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">After a brief introduction to the fermionic projector approach, we review how entanglement and second quantized bosonic and fermionic fields can be described in this framework. The constructions are discussed with regard to decoherence phenomena and the measurement problem. We propose a mechanism leading to the collapse of the <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> in the quantum mechanical measurement process.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Finster, Felix</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">347</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/41891978"> <span id="translatedtitle">Thermospheric gravity <span class="hlt">waves</span>: Observations and interpretation using the transfer <span class="hlt">function</span> model (TFM)</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Gravity <span class="hlt">waves</span> are prominent in the polar region of the terrestiral thermosphere, and can be excited by perturbations in Joule heating and Lorents force due to magnetospheric processes. We show observations from the Dynamics Explorer-2 satellite to illustrate the complexity of the phenomenon and review the transfer <span class="hlt">function</span> model (TFM) which has guided our interpretation. On a statistical basis, the</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">H. G. Mayr; I. Harris; F. A. Herrero; N. W. Spencer; F. Varosi; W. D. Pesnell</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1990-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">348</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/26241998"> <span id="translatedtitle">A spectrally formulated finite element for <span class="hlt">wave</span> propagation analysis in <span class="hlt">functionally</span> graded beams</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">In this paper, spectral finite element method is employed to analyse the <span class="hlt">wave</span> propagation behavior in a <span class="hlt">functionally</span> graded (FG) beam subjected to high frequency impulse loading, which can be either thermal or mechanical. A new spectrally formulated element that has three degrees of freedom per node (based upon the first order shear deformation theory) is developed, which has an</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">A. Chakraborty; S. Gopalakrishnan</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">349</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/55088739"> <span id="translatedtitle">Indeterminacy of the Delta <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> constructed from QCD sum-rule moments</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The case of the Delta (1232)-resonance is examined as another striking example where the method of obtaining polynomial models of hadronic <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> from QCD sum-rule moments fails because of non-convergence. It is found that polynomial models for the Delta distribution amplitude are completely undetermined. Additional constraints from QCD are therefore necessary.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Robert Eckardt; Jörg Hansper; Manfred F. Gari</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1994-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">350</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/19842073"> <span id="translatedtitle">The Cellular Method of Determining Electronic <span class="hlt">Wave</span> <span class="hlt">Functions</span> and Eigenvalues in Crystals, with Applications to Sodium</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The eigenvalues and <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> for the conduction electrons in metallic sodium are calculated for various points of high symmetry in the Brillouin zone. The method adopted is an extension of that used by von der Lage and Bethe in which boundary conditions are applied at a large number of points on the surface of the atomic polyhedron. Eigenvalues are</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">D. J. Howarth; H. Jones</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1952-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">351</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/22464188"> <span id="translatedtitle">Application of the virial theorem to the study of molecular electronic <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">With aid of the virial theorem formulated for the energy differences of two electronic states some theorems on the <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> of diatomic molecules have been proven. It is shown how proper Rydberg states can be distinguished from other electronic states with a diffuse outer orbital by virtue of the virial theorem and that a singlet-triplet pair of excited states</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Martin Jungen</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1976-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">352</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=AD723836"> <span id="translatedtitle">Tables of Radial Spheroidal <span class="hlt">Wave</span> <span class="hlt">Functions</span>. Volume 1. Prolate, m equals 0.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The volume is one of a series of six volumes published by the Naval Research Laboratory containing tabulation of explicit values of radial spheroidal <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> of both oblate and prolate kinds over extended ranges of parameters. It is designed to pro...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">A. L. Van Buren B. J. King R. V. Baier S. Hanish</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1970-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">353</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=AD728430"> <span id="translatedtitle">Tables of Radial Spheroidal <span class="hlt">Wave</span> <span class="hlt">Functions</span>. Volume 2. Prolate, m = 1.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This volume is volume 2 of a series of six volumes published by the Naval Research Laboratory containing tabulation of explicit values of radial spheroidal <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> of both oblate and prolate kinds over extended ranges of parameters. It is designed ...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">A. L. Van Buren B. J. King R. V. Baier S. Hanish</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1970-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">354</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=AD723667"> <span id="translatedtitle">Tables of Radial Spheroidal <span class="hlt">Wave</span> <span class="hlt">Functions</span>. Volume 3. Prolate, m equals 2.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The volume is one of a series of six volumes published by the Naval Research Laboratory containing tabulation of explicit values of radial spheroidal <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> of both oblate and prolate kinds over extended ranges of parameters. It is designed to pro...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">A. L. Van Buren B. J. King R. V. Baier S. Hanish</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1970-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">355</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2006PhRvB..74b4423T"> <span id="translatedtitle">Exact two-holon <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> in the Kuramoto-Yokoyama model</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We construct the explicit two-holon eigenstates of the SU(2) Kuramoto-Yokoyama model at the level of explicit <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span>. We derive the exact energies and obtain the individual holon momenta, which are quantized according to the half-Fermi statistics of the holons.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Thomale, Ronny; Schuricht, Dirk; Greiter, Martin</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">356</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=wave+AND+energy&id=EJ1014570"> <span id="translatedtitle">Three-Dimensional Visualization of <span class="hlt">Wave</span> <span class="hlt">Functions</span> for Rotating Molecule: Plot of Spherical Harmonics</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">At an early stage of learning quantum chemistry, undergraduate students usually encounter the concepts of the particle in a box, the harmonic oscillator, and then the particle on a sphere. Rotational levels of a diatomic molecule can be well approximated by the energy levels of the particle on a sphere. <span class="hlt">Wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> for the particle in a…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Nagaoka, Shin-ichi; Teramae, Hiroyuki; Nagashima, Umpei</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">357</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6535869"> <span id="translatedtitle">Theoretical calculation of shakeup intensities using Xa--SW <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The ground and 1s core hole state molecular <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> of CH/sub 4/, NH/sub 3/, H/sub 2/O, and HF obtained from Xa--SW calculations using the touching spheres (TS) and overlapping spheres (OS) approximations are used to calculate the intensity of shakeup satellites observed in their ls core level photoelectron spectra. The sudden approximation was assumed in the calculation. In case of TS Xa--SW <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span>, the one electron overlap integral inside the intersphere was calculated via Green's theorem. For OS Xa--SW <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span>, the integration over the awkwardly shaped intersphere region was circumvented by distributing the intersphere charge into the atomic spheres according to the charge partition scheme suggested by Case and Karplus. Our results show that there are no significant differences between the shakeup energies calculated from the TS and OS approximations. However, shakeup intensities calculated from TS Xa--SW <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> are more reliable and in better numerical agreement with experiment.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Tse, J.S.; Loubriel, G.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1981-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">358</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/eimsapi.dispdetail?deid=192783"> <span id="translatedtitle">Frequency-Domain Green's <span class="hlt">Functions</span> for Radar <span class="hlt">Waves</span> in Heterogeneous 2.5D Media</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Green?s <span class="hlt">functions</span> for radar <span class="hlt">waves</span> propagating in heterogeneous media may be calculated in the frequency domain using a hybrid of two numerical methods. The model is defined in the Cartesian coordinate system, and its electromagnetic properties may vary in the x and z directions, ...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">359</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/18849889"> <span id="translatedtitle">Maximally localized Wannier <span class="hlt">functions</span> constructed from projector-augmented <span class="hlt">waves</span> or ultrasoft pseudopotentials</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">We report a theoretical scheme that enables the calculation of maximally localized Wannier <span class="hlt">functions</span> within the formalism of projector-augmented <span class="hlt">waves</span> (PAW), which also includes the ultrasoft pseudopotential (USPP) approach. We give a description of the basic underlying formalism and explicitly write out all the required matrix elements using the common ingredients of the PAW\\/USPP theory. We report an implementation of</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">A. Ferretti; A. Calzolari; B. Bonferroni; R. Di Felice</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">360</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013JChPh.139h4103A"> <span id="translatedtitle">Seniority number in spin-adapted spaces and compactness of configuration interaction <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This work extends the concept of seniority number, which has been widely used for classifying N-electron Slater determinants, to <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> of N electrons and spin S, as well as to N-electron spin-adapted Hilbert spaces. We propose a spin-free formulation of the seniority number operator and perform a study on the behavior of the expectation values of this operator under transformations of the molecular basis sets. This study leads to propose a quantitative evaluation for the convergence of the expansions of the <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> in terms of Slater determinants. The non-invariant character of the seniority number operator expectation value of a <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> with respect to a unitary transformation of the molecular orbital basis set, allows us to search for a change of basis which minimizes that expectation value. The results found in the description of <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> of selected atoms and molecules show that the expansions expressed in these bases exhibit a more rapid convergence than those formulated in the canonical molecular orbital bases and even in the natural orbital ones.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Alcoba, Diego R.; Torre, Alicia; Lain, Luis; Massaccesi, Gustavo E.; Oña, Ofelia B.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-08-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return 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onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">361</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17059259"> <span id="translatedtitle">Application of Coulomb <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> discrete variable representation to atomic systems in strong laser fields.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We present an efficient and accurate grid method for solving the time-dependent Schrodinger equation for an atomic system interacting with an intense laser pulse. Instead of the usual finite difference (FD) method, the radial coordinate is discretized using the discrete variable representation (DVR) constructed from Coulomb <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span>. For an accurate description of the ionization dynamics of atomic systems, the Coulomb <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> discrete variable representation (CWDVR) method needs three to ten times fewer grid points than the FD method. The resultant grid points of the CWDVR are distributed unevenly so that one has a finer grid near the origin and a coarser one at larger distances. The other important advantage of the CWDVR method is that it treats the Coulomb singularity accurately and gives a good representation of continuum <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span>. The time propagation of the <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> is implemented using the well-known Arnoldi method. As examples, the present method is applied to multiphoton ionization of both the H atom and the H(-) ion in intense laser fields. The short-time excitation and ionization dynamics of H by an abruptly introduced static electric field is also investigated. For a wide range of field parameters, ionization rates calculated using the present method are in excellent agreement with those from other accurate theoretical calculations. PMID:17059259</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Peng, Liang-You; Starace, Anthony F</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-10-21</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">362</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013PhRvL.110j6802W"> <span id="translatedtitle">Bloch Model <span class="hlt">Wave</span> <span class="hlt">Functions</span> and Pseudopotentials for All Fractional Chern Insulators</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We introduce a Bloch-like basis in a C-component lowest Landau level fractional quantum Hall (FQH) effect, which entangles the real and internal degrees of freedom and preserves an Nx×Ny full lattice translational symmetry. We implement the Haldane pseudopotential Hamiltonians in this new basis. Their ground states are the model FQH <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span>, and our Bloch basis allows for a mutatis mutandis transcription of these model <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> to the fractional Chern insulator of arbitrary Chern number C, obtaining <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> different from all previous proposals. For C>1, our <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> are related to color-dependent magnetic-flux inserted versions of Halperin and non-Abelian color-singlet states. We then provide large-size numerical results for both the C=1 and C=3 cases. This new approach leads to improved overlaps compared to previous proposals. We also discuss the adiabatic continuation from the fractional Chern insulator to the FQH in our Bloch basis, both from the energy and the entanglement spectrum perspectives.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Wu, Yang-Le; Regnault, N.; Bernevig, B. Andrei</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">363</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/19848756"> <span id="translatedtitle">Lower bounds to energies for Gaussian <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span>: studies of the hydrogen-atom ground state</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">To test the possibility of extending lower bound energy determinations to molecules by the methods of Temple, Weinstein, and Stevenson and Crawford, lower bounds for the energy of the 1s ground state of the H atom are computed for Gaussian based <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span>, for which the calculation of the average value of the square of the Hamiltonian is not too</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">M E Schwartz</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1967-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">364</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012PhRvD..86c4504J"> <span id="translatedtitle">0++ glueball <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> for improved SU(2) lattice gauge theory in (2+1) dimensions</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Using the improved lattice gauge field Hamiltonian and the truncated eigenvalue equation method, we compute the 0++ glueball <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> of (2+1)-dimensional SU(2) gauge field theory. The result shows a good scaling behavior in the weak coupling region 3?1/g2?6.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Jiang, Jun-Qin</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-08-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">365</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ajronline.org/cgi/reprint/145/2/305.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Renal morphology and <span class="hlt">function</span> immediately after extracorporeal shock-<span class="hlt">wave</span> lithotripsy</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The acute effects of extracorporeal shock-<span class="hlt">wave</span> lithotripsy (ESWL) on morphology and <span class="hlt">function</span> of the kidney were evaluated by excretory urography, quantitative radionuclide renography (QRR), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in 33 consecutive patients. Excretory urograms demonstrated an enlarged kidney in seven (18%) of 41 treatments and partial or complete obstruction of the ureter by stone fragments after 15 (37%) of</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Jun V. Kaude; Clyde M. Williams; Michael A. Millner; K. N. Scott; Birdwell Finlayson</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1985-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">366</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/53800555"> <span id="translatedtitle">Effects of complex-valued electronic <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> on nuclear motions</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Moleculer species and colliding groups of atoms are considered for which the electronic <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> are complex-valued, having arguments that depend parametrically on the nuclear coordinates. The effective Hamiltonian for nuclear motions in the adiabatic approximation that arises in the present case differs from the ordinary Born-Oppeneheimer Hamiltonian, the latter being obtained when restriction to real-valued electronic <span class="hlt">functions</span> is made.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">C. A. Coulson; R. B. Gerber</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1968-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">367</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/20991188"> <span id="translatedtitle">Spectral and partial-<span class="hlt">wave</span> decomposition of time-dependent <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> on a grid: Photoelectron spectra of H and H{sub 2}{sup +} in electromagnetic fields</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We present a method for spectral (bound and continuum) and partial-<span class="hlt">wave</span> analysis of a three-dimensional time-dependent <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span>, defined on a grid, without projecting onto the field-free eigenstates of the system. The method consists of propagating the time-dependent Schroedinger equation to obtain its autocorrelation <span class="hlt">function</span> C(t)=<{psi}(r,T)|{psi}(r,T+t)> after the end of the interaction, at time T, of the system with an external time-dependent field. The Fourier spectrum of this correlation <span class="hlt">function</span> is directly related to the expansion coefficients of the <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> on the field-free bound and continuum energy eigenstates of the system. By expanding on a spherical harmonics basis we show how to calculate the contribution of the various partial <span class="hlt">waves</span> to the total photoelectron energy spectrum.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Nikolopoulos, L. A. A.; Kjeldsen, T. K.; Madsen, L. B. [Lundbeck Foundation Theoretical Center for Quantum System Research, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Aarhus, 8000 Aarhus C (Denmark)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-06-15</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">368</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22340281"> <span id="translatedtitle">The <span class="hlt">impact</span> of alcohol dependence on social brain <span class="hlt">function</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The <span class="hlt">impact</span> of alcoholism (ALC) or alcohol dependence on the neural mechanisms underlying cognitive and affective empathy (i.e. the different routes to understanding other people's minds) in schizophrenic patients and non-schizophrenic subjects is still poorly understood. We therefore aimed at determining the extent to which the ability to infer other people's mental states and underlying neural mechanisms were affected by ALC. We examined 48 men, who suffered either from ALC, schizophrenia, both disorders or none of these disorders, using <span class="hlt">functional</span> magnetic resonance imaging while performing on a mind reading task that involves both cognitive and affective aspects of empathy. Using voxel-based morphometry, we additionally examined whether between-group differences in <span class="hlt">functional</span> activity were associated with deficits in brain structural integrity. During mental state attribution, all clinical groups as compared with healthy controls exhibited poor performance as well as reduced right-hemispheric insular <span class="hlt">function</span> with the highest error rate and insular dysfunction seen in the schizophrenic patients without ALC. Accordingly, both behavioral performance and insular <span class="hlt">functioning</span> revealed schizophrenia × ALC interaction effects. In addition, schizophrenic patients relative to non-schizophrenic subjects (regardless of ALC) exhibited deficits in structural integrity and task-related recruitment of the left ventrolateral prefrontal cortex (vlPFC). Our data suggest that ALC-related impairment in the ability to infer other people's mental states is limited to insular dysfunction and thus deficits in affective empathy. By contrast, mentalizing in schizophrenia (regardless of ALC) may be associated with insular dysfunction as well as a combination of structural and <span class="hlt">functional</span> deficits in the left vlPFC. PMID:22340281</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Gizewski, Elke R; Müller, Bernhard W; Scherbaum, Norbert; Lieb, Bodo; Forsting, Michael; Wiltfang, Jens; Leygraf, Norbert; Schiffer, Boris</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">369</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21352298"> <span id="translatedtitle">Test of a general symmetry-derived N-body <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The resources required to solve the general interacting quantum N-body problem scale exponentially with N, making the solution of this problem very difficult when N is large. In a previous series of papers we develop an approach for a fully interacting <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> for a confined system of identical bosons with a general two-body interaction. This method tames the N scaling by developing a perturbation series that is order-by-order invariant under a point group isomorphic with S{sub N}. Group theory and graphical techniques are then used to solve for the <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> exactly and analytically at each order, yielding a solution for the general N-body problem which scales as N{sup 0} at any given order. Recently this formalism has been used to obtain the first-order fully interacting <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> for a system of harmonically confined bosons interacting harmonically. In this paper, we report the application of this N-body <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> to a system of N fully interacting bosons in three dimensions. We derive an expression for the density profile for a confined system of harmonically interacting bosons. Choosing this simple interaction is not necessary or even advantageous for our method, however this choice allows a direct comparison of our exact results through first order with exact results obtained in an independent solution. Our density profile for the <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> through first order in three dimensions is indistinguishable from the first-order exact result obtained independently and shows strong convergence to the exact result to all orders.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Dunn, Martin; Laing, W. Blake; Toth, Derrick; Watson, Deborah K. [Homer L. Dodge Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Oklahoma, Norman, Oklahoma 73019 (United States)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-12-15</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">370</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/56370179"> <span id="translatedtitle">Comparison of the projector augmented-<span class="hlt">wave</span>, pseudopotential, and linearized augmented-plane-<span class="hlt">wave</span> formalisms for density-<span class="hlt">functional</span> calculations of solids</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The projector augmented-<span class="hlt">wave</span> (PAW) method was developed by Blöautchl as a method to accurately and efficiently calculate the electronic structure of materials within the framework of density-<span class="hlt">functional</span> theory. It contains the numerical advantages of pseudopotential calculations while retaining the physics of all-electron calculations, including the correct nodal behavior of the valence-electron <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> and the ability to include upper core</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">N. A. W. Holzwarth; G. E. Matthews; R. B. Dunning; A. R. Tackett; Y. Zeng</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1997-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">371</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/19008088"> <span id="translatedtitle">Comparison of the projector augmented-<span class="hlt">wave</span>, pseudopotential, and linearized augmented-plane-<span class="hlt">wave</span> formalisms for density-<span class="hlt">functional</span> calculations of solids</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The projector augmented-<span class="hlt">wave</span> (PAW) method was developed by Bl{umlt o}chl as a method to accurately and efficiently calculate the electronic structure of materials within the framework of density-<span class="hlt">functional</span> theory. It contains the numerical advantages of pseudopotential calculations while retaining the physics of all-electron calculations, including the correct nodal behavior of the valence-electron <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> and the ability to include upper</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">N. A. W. Holzwarth; G. E. Matthews; R. B. Dunning; A. R. Tackett; Y. Zeng</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1997-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">372</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012JAMTP..53..907K"> <span id="translatedtitle">Numerical simulation of <span class="hlt">wave</span> formation in an oblique <span class="hlt">impact</span> of plates by the method of molecular dynamics</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Results of numerical simulations of <span class="hlt">wave</span> formation in an oblique symmetric <span class="hlt">impact</span> of metal plates by the method of molecular dynamics are presented. In this case, the <span class="hlt">impacting</span> plates experience the same loading conditions as in explosive welding. It is demonstrated that the evolution of <span class="hlt">waves</span> on the interface between the welded plates is caused by self-induced oscillations in the vicinity of the contact point. A mechanism of building-up and sustaining of self-induced oscillations is proposed on the basis of numerical calculations performed.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kiselev, S. P.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">373</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/19239909"> <span id="translatedtitle">Mapping donor electron <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> deformations at sub-Bohr orbit resolution</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Quantum <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> engineering of dopant-based Si nano-structures reveals\\u000anew physics in the solid-state, and is expected to play a vital role in future\\u000ananoelectronics. Central to any fundamental understanding or application is the\\u000aability to accurately characterize the deformation of the electron <span class="hlt">wave</span>\\u000afunctions in these atom-based structures through electromagnetic field control.\\u000aWe present a method for mapping the</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Seung H. Park; Rajib Rahman; Gerhard Klimeck; Lloyd C. L. Hollenberg</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">374</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012JPhCS.343a2067L"> <span id="translatedtitle">The <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> collapse as symmetry breakdown and effect of field quantization</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">It is pointed out that ordinary quantum mechanics as a phenomenological theory cannot account for the <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> collapse if it is not seen within the frame work of free field quantization which is needed to understand the particle structure of matter during <span class="hlt">wave</span> packet evolution and to explain the collapse as symmetry breakdown by detection. Deuteron photo decay and the decay of a two-fermion spin singlet state (Bohm's version of EPR) with subsequent detection of one fermion serve as examples. A projection postulate and superluminal signals are not necessary to understand what entangled states predict.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Lewin, K.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">375</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/55119883"> <span id="translatedtitle">Surface electronic <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> of a semi-infinite muffin-tin lattice. II. Application to Cu (001) and (110)</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The spherical-<span class="hlt">wave</span> method for evaluating the electronic <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> of a semi-infinite muffin-tin lattice is applied to the (001) and (110) surfaces of copper. It is demonstrated to be a feasible calculational procedure capable of yielding detailed information about the electronic <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> in the vicinity of a metal surface. Since he focus of this paper is on the interpretation</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">M. J. G. Lee; N. A. W. Holzwarth</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1978-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">376</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/204204"> <span id="translatedtitle">De Broglie wavelets versus Schroedinger <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span>: A ribbon model approach to quantum theory and the mechanisms of quantum interference</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">As an alternative to better physical explanations of the mechanisms of quantum interference and the origins of uncertainty broadening, a linear hopping model is proposed with ``color-varying`` dynamics to reflect fast exchange between time-reversed states. Intricate relations between this model, particle-<span class="hlt">wave</span> dualism, and relativity are discussed. The <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> is shown to possess dual characteristics of a stable, localized ``soliton-like`` de Broglie wavelet and a delocalized, interfering Schroedinger carrier <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span>.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Tang, Jau</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1996-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">377</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012AGUFM.S41A2396K"> <span id="translatedtitle">Preliminary Results for Crustal Structure in Southeastern Africa from P-<span class="hlt">wave</span> Receiver <span class="hlt">Functions</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The crustal structure of southeastern Africa is investigated by modeling P-<span class="hlt">wave</span> receiver <span class="hlt">functions</span> using H-k stacking and joint inversion methods. P-<span class="hlt">wave</span> receiver <span class="hlt">functions</span> are analyzed for 29 broadband seismic stations in Zambia, Malawi and Mozambique. Estimates for the Moho depth and Poisson's ratio are determined from H-k stacking, and estimates for the shear <span class="hlt">wave</span> velocity are determined by the joint inversion of receiver <span class="hlt">functions</span> and surface <span class="hlt">wave</span> dispersion. Preliminary results show that Moho depths beneath southeastern Africa range from 32 km to 51 km. Thicker crust is found in Proterozoic terrains, such as the Irumide Belt, while thinner crust is found in reworked Archean terrains, such as the Bangweulu Block. These results are consistent with previous studies and global averages for Precambrian terrains. The preliminary results also show a range of Poisson's ratios from 0.2 to 0.3. These new results for southeastern Africa are being combined with similar results from elsewhere in eastern and southern Africa to improve our understanding of African crustal structure.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kachingwe, M.; Nyblade, A.; Mulibo, G.; Mulowezi, A.; Kunkuta, E.; De Magalhães, V.; Wysession, M. E.; Wiens, D. A.; Julia, J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">378</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013AGUFM.S31C2358K"> <span id="translatedtitle">Preliminary Results for Crustal Structure in Southeastern Africa from P-<span class="hlt">wave</span> Receiver <span class="hlt">Functions</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The crustal structure of southeastern Africa is investigated by modeling P-<span class="hlt">wave</span> receiver <span class="hlt">functions</span> using H-k stacking and joint inversion methods. P-<span class="hlt">wave</span> receiver <span class="hlt">functions</span> are analyzed for 29 broadband seismic stations in Zambia, Malawi and Mozambique. Estimates for the Moho depth and Poisson's ratio are determined from H-k stacking, and estimates for the shear <span class="hlt">wave</span> velocity are determined by the joint inversion of receiver <span class="hlt">functions</span> and surface <span class="hlt">wave</span> dispersion. Preliminary results show that Moho depths beneath southeastern Africa range from 32 km to 51 km. Thicker crust is found in Proterozoic terrains, such as the Irumide Belt, while thinner crust is found in reworked Archean terrains, such as the Bangweulu Block. These results are consistent with previous studies and global averages for Precambrian terrains. The preliminary results also show a range of Poisson's ratios from 0.2 to 0.3. These new results for southeastern Africa are being combined with similar results from elsewhere in eastern and southern Africa to improve our understanding of African crustal structure.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kachingwe, M.; Nyblade, A.; Mulibo, G. D.; Mulowezi, A.; Kunkuta, E.; De Magalhães, V.; Wiens, D. A.; Wysession, M. E.; Julia, J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">379</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010E%26PSL.300..395H"> <span id="translatedtitle">Crustal structure of the Gamburtsev Mountains, East Antarctica, from S-<span class="hlt">wave</span> receiver <span class="hlt">functions</span> and Rayleigh <span class="hlt">wave</span> phase velocities</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Gamburtsev Subglacial Mountains (GSM), located in central East Antarctica, are one of the most enigmatic tectonic features on Earth. Buried beneath several kilometers of ice, the mountains are characterized by peak elevations reaching ~ 3000 m above sea level. In this study, new data from the Gamburtsev Antarctic Mountains Seismic Experiment (GAMSEIS) are presented, which substantially improve constraints on the crustal and upper mantle structure in this region. S-<span class="hlt">wave</span> receiver <span class="hlt">functions</span> and Rayleigh <span class="hlt">wave</span> phase velocities are used to analyze data from the GAMSEIS deployment and to improve estimates of crustal thickness beneath the East Antarctic craton and the GSM. Our results indicate that the cratonic crust surrounding the GSM is ~ 40-45 km thick. Beneath the GSM, the crust thickens to ~ 55-58 km and provides isostatic support for the high mountain elevations. It has been suggested that thicker crust beneath the GSM may reflect magmatic underplating associated with a mantle plume. However, considering our results with those from other previous and ongoing studies, we instead favor models in which the GSM are an old continental feature associated with either Proterozoic or Paleozoic tectonic events.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hansen, Samantha E.; Nyblade, Andrew A.; Heeszel, David S.; Wiens, Douglas A.; Shore, Patrick; Kanao, Masaki</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">380</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://dx.doi.org/10.1190/1.1444055"> <span id="translatedtitle">Frequency-domain Green's <span class="hlt">functions</span> for radar <span class="hlt">waves</span> in heterogeneous 2.5D media</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Green's <span class="hlt">functions</span> for radar <span class="hlt">waves</span> propagating in heterogeneous 2.5D media might be calculated in the frequency domain using a hybrid method. The model is defined in the Cartesian coordinate system, and its electromagnetic properties might vary in the x- and z-directions, but not in the y-direction. <span class="hlt">Wave</span> propagation in the x- and z-directions is simulated with the finite-difference method, and <span class="hlt">wave</span> propagation in the y-direction is simulated with an analytic <span class="hlt">function</span>. The absorbing boundaries on the finite-difference grid are perfectly matched layers that have been modified to make them compatible with the hybrid method. The accuracy of these numerical Greens <span class="hlt">functions</span> is assessed by comparing them with independently calculated Green's <span class="hlt">functions</span>. For a homogeneous model, the magnitude errors range from -4.16% through 0.44%, and the phase errors range from -0.06% through 4.86%. For a layered model, the magnitude errors range from -2.60% through 2.06%, and the phase errors range from -0.49% through 2.73%. These numerical Green's <span class="hlt">functions</span> might be used for forward modeling and full waveform inversion. ?? 2009 Society of Exploration Geophysicists. All rights reserved.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ellefsen, K. J.; Croize, D.; Mazzella, A. T.; McKenna, J. R.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' 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onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">381</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3469023"> <span id="translatedtitle">Serum Uric Acid Level and Diverse <span class="hlt">Impacts</span> on Regional Arterial Stiffness and <span class="hlt">Wave</span> Reflection</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Background: Both increased arterial stiffness and hyperuricaemia are associated with elevated cardiovascular risks. Little is known about the relations of serum uric acid (UA) level to regional arterial stiffness and <span class="hlt">wave</span> reflection. The aim of the study was to investigate the gender-specific association of serum UA and indices of arterial <span class="hlt">function</span> in a community-based investigation in China. Methods: Cross-sectional data from 2374 adults (mean age 58.24 years) who underwent routine laboratory tests, regional pulse <span class="hlt">wave</span> velocity (PWV) and pulse <span class="hlt">wave</span> analysis measurements were analyzed in a gender-specific manner. None of the participants had atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease, chronic renal failure, systemic inflammatory disease, gout, or were under treatment which would affect serum UA level. Results: Men had higher serum UA level than women. Subjects with hyperuricaemia had significantly higher carotid-ankle PWV in both genders (P< 0.05), and the carotid-femoral PWV (PWVc-f) was higher in women (P< 0.001) while the augmentation index was marginally lower in men (P = 0.049). Multiple regression analysis showed that serum UA was an independent determinant only for PWVc-f in women (? = 0.104, P = 0.027) when adjusted for atherogenic confounders. No other independent relationship was found between UA level and other surrogates of arterial stiffness. Conclusions: Serum UA levels are associated with alterations in systemic arterial stiffness that differ in men and women. Women might be more susceptible to large vascular damage associated with hyperuricaemia.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Bian, Suyan; Guo, Hongyang; Ye, Ping; Luo, Leiming; Wu, Hongmei; Xiao, Wenkai</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">382</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/244625"> <span id="translatedtitle">Heavy quark fragmentation <span class="hlt">functions</span> for D-<span class="hlt">wave</span> quarkonium and charmed beauty mesons</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">At the large transverse momentum region, the production of heavy-heavy bound-states such as charmonium, bottomonium, and {anti b}c mesons in high energy e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} and hadronic collisions is dominated by parton fragmentation. The authors calculate the heavy quark fragmentation <span class="hlt">functions</span> into the D-<span class="hlt">wave</span> quarkonium and {anti b}c mesons to leading order in the strong coupling constant and in the non-relativistic expansion. In the {anti b}c meson case, one set of its D-<span class="hlt">wave</span> states is expected to lie below the open flavor threshold. The total fragmentation probability for a {anti b} antiquark to split into the D-<span class="hlt">wave</span> {anti b}c mesons is about 2 {times} 10{sup {minus}5}, which implies that only 2% of the total pseudo-scalar ground state B{sub c} comes from the cascades of these orbitally excited states.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Cheung, K. [Texas Univ., Austin, TX (United States). Center for Particle Physics; Yuan, T.C. [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States). Davis Inst. for High Energy Physics</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1995-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">383</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012AGUFMSA34A..01M"> <span id="translatedtitle">Global Propagation of Gravity <span class="hlt">Waves</span> Generated with the Whole Atmosphere Transfer <span class="hlt">Function</span> Model</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Gravity <span class="hlt">waves</span> are ubiquitous phenomena in the Earth's atmosphere, accounting for a significant fraction of its observed variability. These <span class="hlt">waves</span>, with periods ranging from minutes to hours, are thought to be a major means for exchange of momentum and energy between atmospheric regions. The Transfer <span class="hlt">Function</span> Model (TFM) describes acoustic gravity <span class="hlt">waves</span> (AGW) that propagate across the globe in a dissipative static background atmosphere extending from the ground to 700 km. The model is limited to <span class="hlt">waves</span> with periods << 12 hr where the Coriolis force is not important. Formulated in terms of zonal vector spherical harmonics and oscillation frequencies, the linearized equations of energy, mass, and momentum conservation are solved to generate the transfer <span class="hlt">function</span> (TF) for a chosen height distribution of the excitation source. The model accounts for momentum exchange between atmospheric species (He, O, N2, O2, Ar), which affects significantly the <span class="hlt">wave</span> amplitudes and phases of thermospheric temperature, densities, and wind fields. Covering a broad range of frequencies and spherical harmonic <span class="hlt">wave</span> numbers (wavelengths), without limitations, the assembled TF captures the physics that controls the propagation of AGW, and the computational effort is considerable. For a chosen horizontal geometry and impulsive time dependence of the source, however, the global <span class="hlt">wave</span> response is then obtained in short order. The model is computationally efficient and well suited to serve as an experimental and educational tool for simulating propagating <span class="hlt">wave</span> patterns on the globe. The model is also semi-analytical and therefore well suited to explore the different <span class="hlt">wave</span> modes that can be generated under varying dynamical conditions. The TFM has been applied to simulate the AGW, which are generated in the auroral region of the thermosphere by joule heating and momentum coupling due to solar wind induced electric fields [e.g., Mayr et al., Space Science Reviews, 1990]. The auroral source generates three distinct classes of <span class="hlt">waves</span>: (1) Lamb <span class="hlt">waves</span> that propagate in the thermosphere with about 800 m/s, strongly dissipated by molecular viscosity. (2) <span class="hlt">Waves</span> reflected from the Earth surface, which return in narrow propagation cones to the thermosphere with velocities of about 200 m/s. (3) <span class="hlt">Waves</span> that are ducted through the lower atmosphere and leak back into the thermosphere, where they propagate with about 300 m/s, virtually without dissipation. <span class="hlt">Waves</span> from the leaking duct, with short propagation velocity, thus can propagate from the auroral region to equatorial latitudes, and this has been observed. The TFM has been applied to simulate AGW patterns during magnetic sub-storm activity observed with the Dynamics Explorer (DE) spacecraft. The TFM can readily be employed also to simulate AGW generated with excitation sources in the lower atmosphere, and efforts are underway to resurrect the model with present day advanced computers and analysis software [e.g., Porter et al., AGU, 2008].</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Mayr, H. G.; Talaat, E. R.; Wolven, B. C.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">384</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19880039583&hterms=scarf&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D40%26Ntt%3Dscarf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Micron-sized particle <span class="hlt">impacts</span> detected near Uranus by the Voyager 2 plasma <span class="hlt">wave</span> instrument</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The characteristics and distribution of the small particles detected by the plasma-<span class="hlt">wave</span> and radio-astronomy instruments during the Voyager 2 encounter with Uranus in January 1986 are examined. The nature of the observational data and the analysis techniques employed are discussed, and the results are presented in graphs. Particles of rms mass about 2.6 ng and radii of a few microns were found in an <span class="hlt">impact</span> region of thickness 3840 km, with a maximum number density of 1600/cu m about 280 km from the equatorial plane, shortly after Voyager 2 crossed the plane of the Uranian rings. The possible origin of the particles in the rings or in small satellites outside the rings is considered.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Gurnett, D. A.; Kurth, W. S.; Scarf, K. L.; Burns, J. A.; Cuzzi, J. N.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1987-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">385</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/53154179"> <span id="translatedtitle">Electronic <span class="hlt">Wave</span> <span class="hlt">Functions</span>. III. Some Theorems on Integrals of Antisymmetric <span class="hlt">Functions</span> of Equivalent Orbital Form</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">A fresh formulation of the Slater methods of constructing antisymmetric <span class="hlt">functions</span> is given. This formulation enables a systematic reduction scheme to be found for the integrals of all antisymmetric <span class="hlt">functions</span> which occur in a completely convergent variational procedure. The theorems are purely mathematical, but the types of integral considered are those which would be obtained from <span class="hlt">functions</span> representing both equal</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">S. F. Boys</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1951-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">386</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014IJBm..tmp...24S"> <span id="translatedtitle">The <span class="hlt">impact</span> of heat, cold, and heat <span class="hlt">waves</span> on hospital admissions in eight cities in Korea</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Although the <span class="hlt">impact</span> of temperature on mortality is well documented, relatively fewer studies have evaluated the associations of temperature with morbidity outcomes such as hospital admissions, and most studies were conducted in North America or Europe. We evaluated weather and hospital admissions including specific causes (allergic disease, asthma, selected respiratory disease, and cardiovascular disease) in eight major cities in Korea from 2003 to 2008. We also explored potential effect modification by individual characteristics such as sex and age. We used hierarchical modeling to first estimate city-specific associations between heat, cold, or heat <span class="hlt">waves</span> and hospitalizations, and then estimated overall effects. Stratified analyses were performed by cause of hospitalization, sex, and age (0-14, 15-64, 65-74, and ?75 years). Cardiovascular hospitalizations were significantly associated with high temperature, whereas hospitalizations for allergic disease, asthma, and selected respiratory disease were significantly associated with low temperature. The overall heat effect for cardiovascular hospitalization was a 4.5 % (95 % confidence interval 0.7, 8.5 %) increase in risk comparing hospitalizations at 25 to 15 °C. For cold effect, the overall increase in risk of hospitalizations comparing 2 with 15 °C was 50.5 (13.7, 99.2 %), 43.6 (8.9, 89.5 %), and 53.6 % (9.8, 114.9 %) for allergic disease, asthma, and selected respiratory disease, respectively. We did not find statistically significant effects of heat <span class="hlt">waves</span> compared with nonheat <span class="hlt">wave</span> days. Our results suggest susceptible populations such as women and younger persons. Our findings provide suggestive evidence that both high and low ambient temperatures are associated with the risk of hospital admissions, particularly in women or younger person, in Korea.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Son, Ji-Young; Bell, Michelle L.; Lee, Jong-Tae</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">387</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22666595"> <span id="translatedtitle">Assessments of arterial stiffness and endothelial <span class="hlt">function</span> using pulse <span class="hlt">wave</span> analysis.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Conventionally, the assessments of endothelial <span class="hlt">function</span> and arterial stiffness require different sets of equipment, making the inclusion of both tests impractical for clinical and epidemiological studies. Pulse <span class="hlt">wave</span> analysis (PWA) provides useful information regarding the mechanical properties of the arterial tree and can also be used to assess endothelial <span class="hlt">function</span>. PWA is a simple, valid, reliable, and inexpensive technique, offering great clinical and epidemiological potential. The current paper will outline how to measure arterial stiffness and endothelial <span class="hlt">function</span> using this technique and include discussion of validity and reliability. PMID:22666595</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Stoner, Lee; Young, Joanna M; Fryer, Simon</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">388</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3361177"> <span id="translatedtitle">Assessments of Arterial Stiffness and Endothelial <span class="hlt">Function</span> Using Pulse <span class="hlt">Wave</span> Analysis</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Conventionally, the assessments of endothelial <span class="hlt">function</span> and arterial stiffness require different sets of equipment, making the inclusion of both tests impractical for clinical and epidemiological studies. Pulse <span class="hlt">wave</span> analysis (PWA) provides useful information regarding the mechanical properties of the arterial tree and can also be used to assess endothelial <span class="hlt">function</span>. PWA is a simple, valid, reliable, and inexpensive technique, offering great clinical and epidemiological potential. The current paper will outline how to measure arterial stiffness and endothelial <span class="hlt">function</span> using this technique and include discussion of validity and reliability.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Stoner, Lee; Young, Joanna M.; Fryer, Simon</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">389</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013AIPC.1569...33A"> <span id="translatedtitle">Expansion of X-ray form factor for close shell using uncorrelated <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The atomic scattering factor has been studied for Be+ve, and B+2ve ions using the uncorrelated <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> (Hartree-Fock (HF)) for inter particle electronic shells. The physical importance of this factor appears in its relation to several important atomic properties as, the coherent scattering intensity, the total scattering intensity, the incoherent scattering <span class="hlt">function</span>, the coherent scattering cross section, the total incoherent cross section, the nuclear magnetic shielding constant, the geometrical structure factor. Also there is one atomic properties the one particle radial density distribution <span class="hlt">function</span> D(r)has been studied using the partitioning technique.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">AL-Robayi, Enas M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">390</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24623048"> <span id="translatedtitle">Human adipocyte <span class="hlt">function</span> is <span class="hlt">impacted</span> by mechanical cues.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Fibrosis is a hallmark of human white adipose tissue (WAT) during obesity-induced chronic inflammation. The <span class="hlt">functional</span> <span class="hlt">impact</span> of increased interstitial fibrosis (peri-adipocyte fibrosis) on adjacent adipocytes remains unknown. Here we developed a novel in vitro 3D culture system in which human adipocytes and decellularized material of adipose tissue (dMAT) from obese subjects are embedded in a peptide hydrogel. When cultured with dMAT, adipocytes showed decreased lipolysis and adipokine secretion and increased expression/production of cytokines (IL-6, G-CSF) and fibrotic mediators (LOXL2 and the matricellular proteins THSB2 and CTGF). Moreover, some alterations including lipolytic activity and fibro-inflammation also occurred when the adipocyte/hydrogel culture was mechanically compressed. Notably, CTGF expression levels correlated with the amount of peri-adipocyte fibrosis in WAT from obese individuals. Moreover, dMAT-dependent CTGF promoter activity, which depends on ?1-integrin/cytoskeleton pathways, was enhanced in the presence of YAP, a mechanosensitive co-activator of TEAD transcription factors. Mutation of TEAD binding sites abolished the dMAT-induced promoter activity. In conclusion, fibrosis may negatively affect human adipocyte <span class="hlt">function</span> via mechanosensitive molecules, in part stimulated by cell deformation. PMID:24623048</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Pellegrinelli, V; Heuvingh, J; du Roure, O; Rouault, C; Devulder, A; Klein, C; Lacasa, M; Clément, E; Lacasa, D; Clément, K</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">391</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23714123"> <span id="translatedtitle">Reliability assessment of different plate theories for elastic <span class="hlt">wave</span> propagation analysis in <span class="hlt">functionally</span> graded plates.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The importance of elastic <span class="hlt">wave</span> propagation problem in plates arises from the application of ultrasonic elastic <span class="hlt">waves</span> in non-destructive evaluation of plate-like structures. However, precise study and analysis of acoustic guided <span class="hlt">waves</span> especially in non-homogeneous waveguides such as <span class="hlt">functionally</span> graded plates are so complicated that exact elastodynamic methods are rarely employed in practical applications. Thus, the simple approximate plate theories have attracted much interest for the calculation of <span class="hlt">wave</span> fields in FGM plates. Therefore, in the current research, the classical plate theory (CPT), first-order shear deformation theory (FSDT) and third-order shear deformation theory (TSDT) are used to obtain the transient responses of flexural <span class="hlt">waves</span> in FGM plates subjected to transverse impulsive loadings. Moreover, comparing the results with those based on a well recognized hybrid numerical method (HNM), we examine the accuracy of the plate theories for several plates of various thicknesses under excitations of different frequencies. The material properties of the plate are assumed to vary across the plate thickness according to a simple power-law distribution in terms of volume fractions of constituents. In all analyses, spatial Fourier transform together with modal analysis are applied to compute displacement responses of the plates. A comparison of the results demonstrates the reliability ranges of the approximate plate theories for elastic <span class="hlt">wave</span> propagation analysis in FGM plates. Furthermore, based on various examples, it is shown that whenever the plate theories are used within the appropriate ranges of plate thickness and frequency content, solution process in <span class="hlt">wave</span> number-time domain based on modal analysis approach is not only sufficient but also efficient for finding the transient waveforms in FGM plates. PMID:23714123</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Mehrkash, Milad; Azhari, Mojtaba; Mirdamadi, Hamid Reza</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">392</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/48908495"> <span id="translatedtitle">Contrasting spectral changes limit albedo <span class="hlt">impact</span> on land-atmosphere coupling during the 2003 European heat <span class="hlt">wave</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Soil moisture related changes in the Earth's reflectance have been suggested to <span class="hlt">impact</span> warm season climate variability through their direct <span class="hlt">impact</span> on surface shortwave radiative forcing. Here we investigate the potential contribution of albedo to land-atmosphere coupling during the 2003 European heat <span class="hlt">wave</span>. MODIS land surface albedo data for the years 2000–2004 are utilized to identify visible, near-infrared, and total</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">A. J. Teuling; S. I. Seneviratne</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">393</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010CoPhC.181.2098P"> <span id="translatedtitle">An accurate Fortran code for computing hydrogenic continuum <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> at a wide range of parameters</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The accurate computations of hydrogenic continuum <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> are very important in many branches of physics such as electron-atom collisions, cold atom physics, and atomic ionization in strong laser fields, etc. Although there already exist various algorithms and codes, most of them are only reliable in a certain ranges of parameters. In some practical applications, accurate continuum <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> need to be calculated at extremely low energies, large radial distances and/or large angular momentum number. Here we provide such a code, which can generate accurate hydrogenic continuum <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> and corresponding Coulomb phase shifts at a wide range of parameters. Without any essential restrict to angular momentum number, the present code is able to give reliable results at the electron energy range [10,10] eV for radial distances of [10,10] a.u. We also find the present code is very efficient, which should find numerous applications in many fields such as strong field physics. Program summaryProgram title: HContinuumGautchi Catalogue identifier: AEHD_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEHD_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 1233 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 7405 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Fortran90 in fixed format Computer: AMD Processors Operating system: Linux RAM: 20 MBytes Classification: 2.7, 4.5 Nature of problem: The accurate computation of atomic continuum <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> is very important in many research fields such as strong field physics and cold atom physics. Although there have already existed various algorithms and codes, most of them can only be applicable and reliable in a certain range of parameters. We present here an accurate FORTRAN program for calculating the hydrogenic continuum <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> in a very wide range of parameters, which suffices the needs of most practical applications. The Coulomb phases are also calculated. For any given momentum, radial point, and the largest angular momentum number, the code calculates all the angular components at once. The algorithm we adopt has been given in details by Gautchi [1,2], who suggested a stable minimal solution of general three term recurrence relations. Solution method: Minimum solution of three-term recurrence relations developed by W. Gautchi [1,2]. Running time: A few seconds to a few minutes, depending how many different <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> one needs to calculate.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Peng, Liang-You; Gong, Qihuang</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">394</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24813072"> <span id="translatedtitle">Modeling the <span class="hlt">functional</span> network of primary intercellular Ca(2+) <span class="hlt">wave</span> propagation in astrocytes and its application to study drug effects.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We introduce a simple procedure of multivariate signal analysis to uncover the <span class="hlt">functional</span> connectivity among cells composing a living tissue and describe how to apply it for extracting insight on the effect of drugs in the tissue. The procedure is based on the covariance matrix of time resolved activity signals. By determining the time-lag that maximizes covariance, one derives the weight of the corresponding connection between cells. Introducing simple constraints, it is possible to conclude whether pairs of cells are <span class="hlt">functionally</span> connected and in which direction. After testing the method against synthetic data we apply it to study intercellular propagation of Ca(2+) <span class="hlt">waves</span> in astrocytes following an external stimulus, with the aim of uncovering the <span class="hlt">functional</span> cellular connectivity network. Our method proves to be particularly suited for this type of networking signal propagation where signals are pulse-like and have short time-delays, and is shown to be superior to standard methods, namely a multivariate Granger algorithm. Finally, based on the statistical analysis of the connection weight distribution, we propose simple measures for assessing the <span class="hlt">impact</span> of drugs on the <span class="hlt">functional</span> connectivity between cells. PMID:24813072</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Pires, Marcelo; Raischel, Frank; Vaz, Sandra H; Cruz-Silva, Andreia; Sebastião, Ana M; Lind, Pedro G</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">395</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013CMMPh..53.1626R"> <span id="translatedtitle">Rotating <span class="hlt">waves</span> in parabolic <span class="hlt">functional</span> differential equations with rotation of spatial argument and time delay</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The parabolic <span class="hlt">functional</span> differential equation is considered on the circle [0, 2?]. Here, D > 0, T > 0, K > 0, and ? ? (0, 1). Such equations arise in the modeling of nonlinear optical systems with a time delay T > 0 and a spatial argument rotated by an angle ? ? [0, 2?) in the nonlocal feedback loop in the approximation of a thin circular layer. The goal of this study is to describe spatially inhomogeneous rotating-<span class="hlt">wave</span> solutions bifurcating from a homogeneous stationary solution in the case of a Andronov-Hopf bifurcation. The existence of such <span class="hlt">waves</span> is proved by passing to a moving coordinate system, which makes it possible to reduce the problem to the construction of a nontrivial solution to a periodic boundary value problem for a stationary delay differential equation. The existence of rotating <span class="hlt">waves</span> in an annulus resulting from a Andronov-Hopf bifurcation is proved, and the leading coefficients in the expansion of the solution in powers of a small parameter are obtained. The conditions for the stability of <span class="hlt">waves</span> are derived by constructing a normal form for the Andronov-Hopf bifurcation for the <span class="hlt">functional</span> differential equation under study.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Razgulin, A. V.; Romanenko, T. E.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">396</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21035829"> <span id="translatedtitle">Love <span class="hlt">waves</span> in <span class="hlt">functionally</span> graded piezoelectric materials by stiffness matrix method.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A numerical matrix method relative to the propagation of ultrasonic guided <span class="hlt">waves</span> in <span class="hlt">functionally</span> graded piezoelectric heterostructure is given in order to make a comparative study with the respective performances of analytical methods proposed in literature. The preliminary obtained results show a good agreement, however numerical approach has the advantage of conceptual simplicity and flexibility brought about by the stiffness matrix method. The propagation behaviour of Love <span class="hlt">waves</span> in a <span class="hlt">functionally</span> graded piezoelectric material (FGPM) is investigated in this article. It involves a thin FGPM layer bonded perfectly to an elastic substrate. The inhomogeneous FGPM heterostructure has been stratified along the depth direction, hence each state can be considered as homogeneous and the ordinary differential equation method is applied. The obtained solutions are used to study the effect of an exponential gradient applied to physical properties. Such numerical approach allows applying different gradient variation for mechanical and electrical properties. For this case, the obtained results reveal opposite effects. The dispersive curves and phase velocities of the Love <span class="hlt">wave</span> propagation in the layered piezoelectric film are obtained for electrical open and short cases on the free surface, respectively. The effect of gradient coefficients on coupled electromechanical factor, on the stress fields, the electrical potential and the mechanical displacement are discussed, respectively. Illustration is achieved on the well known heterostructure PZT-5H/SiO(2), the obtained results are especially useful in the design of high-performance acoustic surface devices and accurately prediction of the Love <span class="hlt">wave</span> propagation behaviour. PMID:21035829</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ben Salah, Issam; Wali, Yassine; Ben Ghozlen, Mohamed Hédi</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">397</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/44278679"> <span id="translatedtitle">Formation mechanism of extreme storm <span class="hlt">waves</span> in the Black Sea</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The study and description of storm <span class="hlt">waves</span> is important for both navigation and estimation of their <span class="hlt">impact</span> on coasts and relevant technical buildings. It is particularly true of “extreme <span class="hlt">waves</span>” observed in the sea. The extreme <span class="hlt">waves</span> are manifested in deviations of the distribution <span class="hlt">function</span> of <span class="hlt">wave</span> height probability from the classical Rayleigh distribution and are characterized by high values</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">S. Yu. Kuznetsov; Ya. V. Saprykina; R. D. Kos’yan; O. V. Pushkarev</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">398</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008AGUFMSA43A1562P"> <span id="translatedtitle">The Transfer <span class="hlt">Function</span> Model (TFM) as a Tool for Simulating Gravity <span class="hlt">Wave</span> Phenomena in the Mesosphere</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Transfer <span class="hlt">Function</span> Model (TFM) is semi-analytical and linear, and it is designed to describe the acoustic gravity <span class="hlt">waves</span> (GW) propagating over the globe and from the ground to 600 km under the influence of vertical temperature variations. <span class="hlt">Wave</span> interactions with the flow are not accounted for. With an expansion in terms of frequency-dependent spherical harmonics, the time consuming vertical integration of the conservation equations is reduced to computing the transfer <span class="hlt">function</span> (TF). (The applied lower and upper boundary conditions assure that spurious <span class="hlt">wave</span> reflections will not occur.) The TF describes the dynamical properties of the medium divorced from the complexities of the temporal and horizontal variations of the excitation source. Given the TF, the atmospheric response to a chosen source is then obtained in short order to simulate the GW propagating through the atmosphere over the globe. In the past, this model has been applied to study auroral processes, which produce distinct <span class="hlt">wave</span> phenomena such as: (1) standing lamb modes that propagate horizontally in the viscous medium of the thermosphere, (2) <span class="hlt">waves</span> generated in the auroral oval that experience geometric amplification propagating to the pole where constructive interference generates secondary <span class="hlt">waves</span> that propagate equatorward, (3) ducted modes propagating through the middle atmosphere that leak back into the thermosphere, and (4) GWs reflected from the Earth's surface that reach the thermosphere in a narrow propagation cone. Well-defined spectral features characterize these <span class="hlt">wave</span> modes in the TF to provide analytical understanding. We propose the TFM as a tool for simulating GW in the mesosphere and in particular the features observed in Polar Mesospheric Clouds (PMC). With present-day computers, it takes less than one hour to compute the TF, so that there is virtually no practical limitation on the source configurations that can be applied and tested in the lower atmosphere. And there is no limitation on the temporal and spatial resolutions the model simulations can provide. We shall discuss the concept and organization of the TFM and present samples of GW simulations that illustrate the capabilities of the model and its user interface. We shall discuss in particular the <span class="hlt">waves</span> that leak into the mesopause from the thermosphere above and propagate into the region from tropospheric weather systems below.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Porter, H.; Mayr, H.; Moore, J.; Wilson, S.; Armaly, A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">399</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/56178007"> <span id="translatedtitle">A correlation between Schmidt hammer rebound numbers with <span class="hlt">impact</span> strength index, slake durability index and P-<span class="hlt">wave</span> velocity</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The main objective of this study was to establish statistical relationship between Schmidt hammer rebound numbers with <span class="hlt">impact</span> strength index (ISI), slake durability index (SDI) and P-<span class="hlt">wave</span> velocity. These are important properties to characterize a rock mass and are being widely used in geological and geotechnical engineering. Due to its importance, Schmidt hammer rebound number is considered as one of</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">P. K. Sharma; Manoj Khandelwal; T. N. Singh</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">400</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/26491740"> <span id="translatedtitle">Dynamic buckling of elastic–plastic square tubes under axial <span class="hlt">impact</span>—I: stress <span class="hlt">wave</span> propagation phenomenon</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The speeds of the stress <span class="hlt">waves</span> that can propagate in an elastic–plastic medium with isotropic linear strain hardening in a plane stress state are obtained in order to analyse the influence of the transient deformation process on the initiation of buckling in square tubes under axial <span class="hlt">impact</span>. The kinematic conditions across a surface of discontinuity were employed to obtain the</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">D. Karagiozova</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' 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showDiv("page_12");' href="#">12</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#">13</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#">14</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#">15</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#">16</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#">17</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#">18</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#">19</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#">20</a> <a style="font-weight: bold;">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">401</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012PhRvB..86h5308R"> <span id="translatedtitle">Reconstruction of the <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> of coupled nanoscopic emitters using a coherent optical technique</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We show how coherent, spatially resolved spectroscopy can disentangle complex hybrid <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> into <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> of the individual emitters. This way, detailed information on the coupling of the individual emitters, not available in far-field spectroscopy, can be revealed. Here we propose a quantum state tomography protocol that relies on the ability to selectively excite each emitter individually by spatially localized pulses. Simulations of coupled semiconductor GaAs/InAs quantum dots using light fields available in current nanoplasmonics show that undesired resonances can be removed from measured spectra. The method can be applied to a broad range of coupled emitters to study the internal coupling, including pigments in photosynthesis and artificial light harvesting.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Richter, Marten; Schlosser, Felix; Schoth, Mario; Burger, Sven; Schmidt, Frank; Knorr, Andreas; Mukamel, Shaul</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-08-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">402</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20720881"> <span id="translatedtitle">Least-squares fitting of orthogonal polynomials to the <span class="hlt">wave</span>-aberration <span class="hlt">function</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The <span class="hlt">wave</span>-aberration <span class="hlt">function</span> of systems with circular and square apertures can be expanded in terms of Zernike and Legendre polynomials. The polynomial terms form orthogonal sets; therefore each coefficient independently determined by an integral satisfies the principle of least squares. To evaluate the integral the pupil is divided into small areas where the <span class="hlt">wave</span>-aberration <span class="hlt">function</span> is approximated by the first three terms of a Taylor series expansion: the optical path difference and components of geometric aberration. In final form the coefficients are expressed by the sum of three bilinear terms by combining three matrices and six vectors. The former depend on the construction parameters and the latter on the ray pattern. PMID:20720881</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Rayces, J L</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1992-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">403</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012PhRvC..86c4323U"> <span id="translatedtitle">Further improvement in the variational many-body <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> for light nuclei</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">An improved variational ansatz is proposed and implemented for variational many-body <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> for light nuclei with nucleons interacting through Argonne (AV18) and Urbana IX (UIX) three-nucleon interactions. The new ansatz is based upon variationally distinguishing between the various components of the two-body Jastrow and operatorial correlations, which are operated upon by three-body and spin-orbit correlations. We obtain noticeable improvement in the quality of the <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> and lowering of the energies compared to earlier results. The new energies are -8.38(1), -28.07(1), and -29.90(1) MeV for 3H, 4He, and 6Li, respectively. Though, the present improved ansatz still fails to stabilize the 6Li nucleus against a breakup into an ? particle and a deuteron by 390 KeV; nonetheless, it is an improvement over previous studies.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Usmani, Q. N.; Anwar, K.; Abdullah, Nooraihan</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">404</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014JPhA...47v5302N"> <span id="translatedtitle">Semiclassical <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> and semiclassical dynamics for the Kepler/Coulomb problem</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We investigate the semiclassical Kepler/Coulomb problem using the classical constants of the motion in the framework of Nelson’s stochastic mechanics. This is done by considering the eigenvalue relations for a family of coherent states (known as the atomic elliptic states) whose <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> are concentrated on the elliptical orbit corresponding to the associated classical problem. We show that these eigenvalue relations lead to identities for the semiclassical energy, angular momentum and Hamilton–Lenz–Runge vectors in the elliptical case. These identities are then extended to include the cases of circular, parabolic and hyperbolic motions. We show that in all cases the semiclassical <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> is determined by our identities and so our identities can be seen as defining a semiclassical Kepler/Coulomb problem. The results are interpreted in terms of two dynamical systems: one a complex valued solution to the classical mechanics for a Coulomb potential and the other the drift field for a semiclassical Nelson diffusion.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Neate, Andrew; Truman, Aubrey</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">405</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19860043880&hterms=transfer+function&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D40%26Ntt%3Dtransfer%2Bfunction"> <span id="translatedtitle">Measurements of ocean <span class="hlt">wave</span> spectra and modulation transfer <span class="hlt">function</span> with the airborne two-frequency scatterometer</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The directional spectrum and the microwave modulation transfer <span class="hlt">function</span> of ocean <span class="hlt">waves</span> can be measured with the airborne two frequency scatterometer technique. Similar to tower based observations, the aircraft measurements of the Modulation Transfer <span class="hlt">Function</span> (MTF) show that it is strongly affected by both wind speed and sea state. Also detected are small differences in the magnitudes of the MTF between downwind and upwind radar look directions, and variations with ocean wavenumber. The MTF inferred from the two frequency radar is larger than that measured using single frequency, <span class="hlt">wave</span> orbital velocity techniques such as tower based radars or ROWS measurements from low altitude aircraft. Possible reasons for this are discussed. The ability to measure the ocean directional spectrum with the two frequency scatterometer, with supporting MTF data, is demonstrated.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Weissman, D. E.; Johnson, J. W.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1986-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">406</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19840019214&hterms=duck+ocean&qs=N%3D0%26Ntk%3DAll%26Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntt%3Dduck%2Bocean"> <span id="translatedtitle">Measurements of ocean <span class="hlt">wave</span> spectra and modulation transfer <span class="hlt">function</span> with the airborne two frequency scatterometer</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The directional spectrum and the microwave modulation transfer <span class="hlt">function</span> of ocean <span class="hlt">waves</span> can be measured with the airborne two frequency scatterometer technique. Similar to tower based observations, the aircraft measurements of the Modulation Transfer <span class="hlt">Function</span> (MTF) show that it is strongly affected by both wind speed and sea state. Also detected are small differences in the magnitudes of the MTF between downwind and upwind radar look directions, and variations with ocean wavenumber. The MTF inferred from the two frequency radar is larger than that measured using single frequency, <span class="hlt">wave</span> orbital velocity techniques such as tower based radars or ROWS measurements from low altitude aircraft. Possible reasons for this are discussed. The ability to measure the ocean directional spectrum with the two frequency scatterometer, with supporting MTF data, is demonstrated.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Weissman, D. E.; Johnson, J. W.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1984-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">407</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11461411"> <span id="translatedtitle">Calculations of properties of screened He-like systems using correlated <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The purpose of the present study is twofold. First, the techniques of correlated <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> for two-electron systems have been extended to obtain results for P and D states in a screening environment, and in particular for Debye screening. In these calculations, the satisfaction of both the quantum virial theorem and a related sum rule has been enforced and found to provide a high degree of stability of the solutions. Second, in order to facilitate the general use of correlated <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> in combination with sum rule stability criteria, a rather systematic computational approach to this notoriously cumbersome method has been developed and thoroughly discussed here. Accurate calculations for few-electron systems are of interest to plasma diagnostics; in particular, when inaccuracies in binding energies are drastically magnified as they occur in exponents of Boltzmann factors. PMID:11461411</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Dai, S T; Solovyova, A; Winkler, P</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2001-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">408</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2004PhRvL..92d7603O"> <span id="translatedtitle">Probing the <span class="hlt">Wave</span> <span class="hlt">Function</span> of Shallow Li and Na Donors in ZnO Nanoparticles</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Electron paramagnetic resonance and electron nuclear double resonance (ENDOR) experiments on ZnO nanoparticles reveal the presence of shallow donors related to interstitial Li and Na atoms. The shallow character of the <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> is evidenced by the multitude of 67Zn ENDOR lines and further by the hyperfine interactions with the 7Li and 23Na nuclei that are much smaller than for atomic lithium and sodium. In the case of the Li-doped nanoparticles, an increase of the hyperfine interaction with the 7Li nucleus and with the 1H nuclei in the Zn(OH)2 capping layer is observed when reducing the size of the nanoparticles. This effect is caused by the confinement of the shallow-donor 1s-type <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> that has a Bohr radius of about 1.5nm, i.e., comparable to the dimension of the nanoparticles.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Orlinskii, Serguei B.; Schmidt, Jan; Baranov, Pavel G.; Hofmann, Detlev M.; de Mello Donegá, Celso; Meijerink, Andries</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">409</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/901592"> <span id="translatedtitle">Form Factors and <span class="hlt">Wave</span> <span class="hlt">Functions</span> of Vector Mesons in Holographic QCD</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Within the framework of a holographic dual model of QCD, we develop a formalism for calculating form factors of vector mesons. We show that the holographic bound states can be described not only in terms of eigenfunctions of the equation of motion, but also in terms of conjugate <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> that are close analogues of quantum-mechanical bound state <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span>. We derive a generalized VMD representation for form factors, and find a very specific VMD pattern, in which form factors are essentially given by contributions due to the first two bound states in the Q^2-channel. We calculate electric radius of the \\rho-meson, finding the value < r_\\rho^2>_C = 0.53 fm^2.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hovhannes R. Grigoryan; Anatoly V. Radyushkin</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">410</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012PhRvB..85w5450A"> <span id="translatedtitle">Conductance of one-dimensional quantum wires with anomalous electron <span class="hlt">wave-function</span> localization</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We study the statistics of the conductance g through one-dimensional disordered systems where electron <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> decay spatially as |?|˜exp(-?r?) for 0<?<1, ? being a constant. In contrast to the conventional Anderson localization where |?|˜exp(-?r) and the conductance statistics is determined by a single parameter, the mean free path, here we show that when the <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> is anomalously localized (?<1), the full statistics of the conductance is determined by the average <lng> and the power ?. Our theoretical predictions are verified numerically by using a random hopping tight-binding model at zero energy, where due to the presence of chiral symmetry in the lattice there exists an anomalous localization; this case corresponds to the particular value ?=1/2. To test our theory for other values of ?, we introduce a statistical model for random hopping in the tight-binding Hamiltonian.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Amanatidis, Ilias; Kleftogiannis, Ioannis; Falceto, Fernando; Gopar, Víctor A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">411</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/7234876"> <span id="translatedtitle">Probing. alpha. -particle <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> by ( d ,. alpha. ) tensor analyzing powers</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Components of {alpha}-particle <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> corresponding to {ital d}-{ital d} configurations are used to predict analyzing powers in the ({ital d},{alpha}) reaction. Tensor analyzing powers, especially {ital A}{sub {ital x}{ital x}}, are shown to clearly distinguish between <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> generated by different realistic nucleon-nucleon interactions. Data for the {sup 58}Ni({ital d},{alpha}){sup 56}Co reaction to the 7{sup +} stretched-nucleon-orbital state at 2.283-MeV excitation in {sup 56}Co, measured with 22-MeV deuterons, are compared to predictions from the Argonne and Urbana interactions. Similar comparisons are made to data for the lowest {ital J} {sup {pi}}=7{sup +} state in {sup 48}Sc populated by the {sup 50}Ti({ital d},{alpha}){sup 48}Sc reaction at 16 MeV.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Crosson, E.R.; Das, R.K.; Lemieux, S.K.; Ludwig, E.J.; Thompson, W.J. (University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599-3255 (United States) Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, Durham, North Carolina 27706 (United States)); Bisenberger, M.; Hertenberger, R.; Hofer, D.; Kader, H.; Schiemenz, P.; Graw, G. (Sektion Physik, Universitaet Muenchen, 8046 Garching (Germany)); Eiro, A.M.; Santos, F.D. (Centro de Fisica Nuclear da Universidade de Lisboa, 1699 Lisboa Codex (Portugal))</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1992-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">412</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009AmJPh..77..546B"> <span id="translatedtitle">Gaussian <span class="hlt">wave</span> packets in phase space: The Fermi gF <span class="hlt">function</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A pure quantum state can be equivalently represented by means of its <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> ?(q) or by the Fermi <span class="hlt">function</span> gF(q,p), with q and p coordinates and conjugate momenta of the system of interest. We show that a Gaussian <span class="hlt">wave</span> packet can be conveniently visualized in phase space by the curve gF(q,p)=0. The change in time of the gF=0 curve is calculated for a Gaussian packet evolving freely or under a constant or a harmonic force, and the spreading or shrinking of the packet is easily interpreted in phase space. We also discuss a gedanken prism microscope experiment for measuring the position-momentum correlation. This gedanken experiment, together with the well-known Heisenberg microscope and von Neumann velocimeter, is sufficient to fully determine the state of a Gaussian packet.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Benenti, Giuliano; Strini, Giuliano</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">413</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011PhRvC..84e4301K"> <span id="translatedtitle">Two-neutron correlations in microscopic <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> of 6He, 8He, and 12C</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Two-neutron densities obtained from microscopic <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> of 6He and 8He are investigated to reveal dineutron correlations. In particular, the comparison of the two-neutron density with the product of one-neutron densities is useful for a quantitative discussion of dineutron correlations. The calculations show that the S=0 spatial two-neutron correlation increases at the surface of 6He(01+) and 8He(02+). The enhancement is remarkable in the 6He(01+) ground state but not as prominent in the 8He(01+) ground state. Configuration mixing of many Slater determinants is essential to describe the dineutron correlations. Two-neutron densities in 12C <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> with ?-cluster structures are also studied.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kanada-En'Yo, Yoshiko; Feldmeier, Hans; Suhara, Tadahiro</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">414</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ije.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/reprint/37/2/309.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Has the <span class="hlt">impact</span> of heat <span class="hlt">waves</span> on mortality changed in France since the European heat <span class="hlt">wave</span> of summer 2003? A study of the 2006 heat <span class="hlt">wave</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Results During the 2006 heat <span class="hlt">wave</span> (from 11 to 28 July), about 2065 excess deaths occurred in France. Considering the observed temperatures and with the hypothesis that heat-related mortality had not changed since 2003, 6452 excess deaths were predicted for the period. The observed mortality during the 2006 heat <span class="hlt">wave</span> was thus markedly less than the expected mortality (? 4400</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">A Fouillet; G Rey; V Wagner; K Laaidi; P Empereur-Bissonnet; A Le Tertre; P Frayssinet; P Bessemoulin; F Laurent; P De Crouy-Chanel; E Jougla; D Hemon</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">415</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3932484"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Impact</span> of post-kidney transplant parathyroidectomy on allograft <span class="hlt">function</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Background The <span class="hlt">impact</span> of parathyroidectomy on allograft <span class="hlt">function</span> in kidney transplant patients is unclear. Methods We conducted a retrospective, observational study of all kidney transplant recipients from 1988 to 2008 who underwent parathyroidectomy for uncontrolled hyperparathyroidism (n = 32). Post-parathyroidectomy, changes in estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and graft loss were recorded. Cross-sectional associations at baseline between eGFR and serum calcium, phosphate, and parathyroid hormone (PTH), and associations between their changes within subjects during the first two months post-parathyroidectomy were assessed. Results Post-parathyroidectomy, the mean eGFR declined from 51.19 mL/min/1.73 m2 at parathyroidectomy to 44.78 mL/min/1.73 m2 at two months (p < 0.0001). Subsequently, graft <span class="hlt">function</span> improved, and by 12 months, mean eGFR recovered to 49.76 mL/min/1.73 m2 (p = 0.035). Decrease in serum PTH was accompanied by a decrease in eGFR (p = 0.0127) in the first two months post-parathyroidectomy. Patients whose eGFR declined by ? 20% (group 1) in the first two months post-parathyroidectomy were distinguished from the patients whose eGFR declined by <20% (group 2). The two groups were similar except that group 1 had a higher baseline mean serum PTH compared with group 2, although not significant (1046.7 ± 1034.2 vs. 476.6 ± 444.9, p = 0.14). In group 1, eGFR declined at an average rate of 32% (p < 0.0001) during the first month post-parathyroidectomy compared with 7% (p = 0.1399) in group 2, and the difference between these two groups was significant (p = 0.0003). The graft <span class="hlt">function</span> recovered in both groups by one yr. During median follow-up of 66.00 ± 49.45 months, 6 (18%) patients lost their graft with a mean time to graft loss from parathyroidectomy of 37.2 ± 21.6 months. The causes of graft loss were rejection (n = 2), pyelonephritis (n = 1) and chronic allograft nephropathy (n = 3). No graft loss occurred during the first-year post-surgery. Conclusion Parathyroidectomy may lead to transient kidney allograft dysfunction with eventual recovery of graft <span class="hlt">function</span> by 12 months post-parathyroidectomy. Higher level of serum PTH pre-parathyoidectomy is associated with a more profound decrease in eGFR post-parathyroidectomy.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Parikh, Samir; Nagaraja, Haikady; Agarwal, Anil; Samavedi, Srinivas; Von Visger, Jon; Nori, Uday; Andreoni, Kenneth; Pesavento, Todd; Singh, Neeraj</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">416</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/54387707"> <span id="translatedtitle">Time-dependent density-<span class="hlt">functional</span> theory in the projector augmented-<span class="hlt">wave</span> method</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">We present the implementation of the time-dependent density-<span class="hlt">functional</span> theory both in linear-response and in time-propagation formalisms using the projector augmented-<span class="hlt">wave</span> method in real-space grids. The two technically very different methods are compared in the linear-response regime where we found perfect agreement in the calculated photoabsorption spectra. We discuss the strengths and weaknesses of the two methods as well as their</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Michael Walter; Hannu Häkkinen; Lauri Lehtovaara; Martti Puska; Jussi Enkovaara; Carsten Rostgaard</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">417</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/4540494"> <span id="translatedtitle">On a Gauss-Givental representation of quantum Toda chain <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">We propose group theory interpretation of the integral representation of the\\u000aquantum open Toda chain <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> due to Givental. In particular we\\u000aconstruct the representation of $U((\\\\mathfrak{gl}(N))$ in terms of first order\\u000adifferential operators in Givental variables. The construction of this\\u000arepresentation turns out to be closely connected with the integral\\u000arepresentation based on the factorized Gauss decomposition. We</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">A. Gerasimov; S. Kharchev; D. Lebedev; S. Oblezin</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">418</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/27681472"> <span id="translatedtitle">Matter <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> and Yukawa couplings in F-theory grand unification</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">We study the local structure of zero mode <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span> of chiral matter fields in F-theory unification. We solve the differential equations for the zero modes derived from local Higgsing in the 8-dimensional parent action of F-theory 7-branes. The solutions are found as expansions both in powers and derivatives of the magnetic fluxes. Yukawa couplings are given by an overlap</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">L. E. Ibáñez</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">419</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014PhST..160a4018H"> <span id="translatedtitle">Efficient basis for the Dicke model: II. <span class="hlt">Wave</span> <span class="hlt">function</span> convergence and excited states</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">An extended bosonic coherent basis has been shown by Chen et al (2008 Phys. Rev. A 78 051801) and Liu T et al (2009 Phys. Rev. A 80 165308) to provide numerically exact solutions of the finite-size Dicke model. The advantages in employing this basis, as compared with the photon number (Fock) basis, are exhibited to be valid for a large region of the Hamiltonian parameter space and many excited states by analyzing the convergence in the <span class="hlt">wave</span> <span class="hlt">functions</span>.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hirsch, Jorge G.; Bastarrachea-Magnani, Miguel A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">420</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19720050627&hterms=sine&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D40%26Ntt%3Dsine"> <span id="translatedtitle">Response <span class="hlt">functions</span> for sine- and square-<span class="hlt">wave</span> modulations of disparity.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Depth sensations cannot be elicited by modulations of disparity that are more rapid than about 6 Hz, regardless of the modulation amplitude. Vergence tracking also fails at similar modulation rates, suggesting that this portion of the oculomotor system is limited by the behavior of disparity detectors. For sinusoidal modulations of disparity between 1/2 to 2 deg of disparity, most depth-response <span class="hlt">functions</span> exhibit a low-frequency decrease that is not observed with square-<span class="hlt">wave</span> modulations of disparity.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Richards, W.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1972-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a on