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Sample records for wave short wavelength

  1. Short wavelength electrostatic waves in the earth's magnetosheath

    SciTech Connect

    Gallagher, D.L.

    1982-01-01

    Recent observations with the ISEE-1 spacecraft have found electric field emissions in the dayside magnetosheath whose frequency spectrum is modulated at twice the spacecraft spin period. The upper frequency cutoff in the frequency-time spectrum of the emissions has a characteristic parabola shape or ''festoon'' shape. The low frequency cutoff ranges from 100 Hz to 400 Hz, while the high frequency limit ranges from about 1kHz to 4kHz. The bandwidth is found to minimize for antenna orientations parallel to these wave number vectors, requiring the confinement of those vectors to a plane which contains the geocentric solar eclilptic coordinate z-axis. The spacecraft observed frequency spectrum results from the spacecraft antenna response to the Doppler shifted wave vector spectrum which exists in the plasma. Imposed constraints on the plasma rest-frame wave vectors and frequencies indicate that the emissions occur within the frequency range from about 150 Hz to 1 kHz, with wavelengths between about 30 meters and 600 meters. These constraints strongly suggest that the festoon-shaped emissions are ion-acoustic waves. The small group velocity and k vector direction of the ion-acoustic mode are consistent with wave generation upstream at the bow shock and convection downstream to locations within the outer dayside magnetosheath.

  2. Tunable short-wavelength spin wave excitation from pinned magnetic domain walls

    PubMed Central

    Van de Wiele, Ben; Hämäläinen, Sampo J.; Baláž, Pavel; Montoncello, Federico; van Dijken, Sebastiaan

    2016-01-01

    Miniaturization of magnonic devices for wave-like computing requires emission of short-wavelength spin waves, a key feature that cannot be achieved with microwave antennas. In this paper, we propose a tunable source of short-wavelength spin waves based on highly localized and strongly pinned magnetic domain walls in ferroelectric-ferromagnetic bilayers. When driven into oscillation by a microwave spin-polarized current, the magnetic domain walls emit spin waves with the same frequency as the excitation current. The amplitude of the emitted spin waves and the range of attainable excitation frequencies depend on the availability of domain wall resonance modes. In this respect, pinned domain walls in magnetic nanowires are particularly attractive. In this geometry, spin wave confinement perpendicular to the nanowire axis produces a multitude of domain wall resonances enabling efficient spin wave emission at frequencies up to 100 GHz and wavelengths down to 20 nm. At high frequency, the emission of spin waves in magnetic nanowires becomes monochromatic. Moreover, pinning of magnetic domain wall oscillators onto the same ferroelectric domain boundary in parallel nanowires guarantees good coherency between spin wave sources, which opens perspectives towards the realization of Mach-Zehnder type logic devices and sensors. PMID:26883893

  3. Tunable short-wavelength spin wave excitation from pinned magnetic domain walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van de Wiele, Ben; Hämäläinen, Sampo J.; Baláž, Pavel; Montoncello, Federico; van Dijken, Sebastiaan

    2016-02-01

    Miniaturization of magnonic devices for wave-like computing requires emission of short-wavelength spin waves, a key feature that cannot be achieved with microwave antennas. In this paper, we propose a tunable source of short-wavelength spin waves based on highly localized and strongly pinned magnetic domain walls in ferroelectric-ferromagnetic bilayers. When driven into oscillation by a microwave spin-polarized current, the magnetic domain walls emit spin waves with the same frequency as the excitation current. The amplitude of the emitted spin waves and the range of attainable excitation frequencies depend on the availability of domain wall resonance modes. In this respect, pinned domain walls in magnetic nanowires are particularly attractive. In this geometry, spin wave confinement perpendicular to the nanowire axis produces a multitude of domain wall resonances enabling efficient spin wave emission at frequencies up to 100 GHz and wavelengths down to 20 nm. At high frequency, the emission of spin waves in magnetic nanowires becomes monochromatic. Moreover, pinning of magnetic domain wall oscillators onto the same ferroelectric domain boundary in parallel nanowires guarantees good coherency between spin wave sources, which opens perspectives towards the realization of Mach-Zehnder type logic devices and sensors.

  4. Tunable short-wavelength spin wave excitation from pinned magnetic domain walls.

    PubMed

    Van de Wiele, Ben; Hämäläinen, Sampo J; Baláž, Pavel; Montoncello, Federico; van Dijken, Sebastiaan

    2016-01-01

    Miniaturization of magnonic devices for wave-like computing requires emission of short-wavelength spin waves, a key feature that cannot be achieved with microwave antennas. In this paper, we propose a tunable source of short-wavelength spin waves based on highly localized and strongly pinned magnetic domain walls in ferroelectric-ferromagnetic bilayers. When driven into oscillation by a microwave spin-polarized current, the magnetic domain walls emit spin waves with the same frequency as the excitation current. The amplitude of the emitted spin waves and the range of attainable excitation frequencies depend on the availability of domain wall resonance modes. In this respect, pinned domain walls in magnetic nanowires are particularly attractive. In this geometry, spin wave confinement perpendicular to the nanowire axis produces a multitude of domain wall resonances enabling efficient spin wave emission at frequencies up to 100 GHz and wavelengths down to 20 nm. At high frequency, the emission of spin waves in magnetic nanowires becomes monochromatic. Moreover, pinning of magnetic domain wall oscillators onto the same ferroelectric domain boundary in parallel nanowires guarantees good coherency between spin wave sources, which opens perspectives towards the realization of Mach-Zehnder type logic devices and sensors. PMID:26883893

  5. Short wavelength FELS

    SciTech Connect

    Sheffield, R.L.

    1991-01-01

    The generation of coherent ultraviolet and shorter wavelength light is presently limited to synchrotron sources. The recent progress in the development of brighter electron beams enables the use of much lower energy electron rf linacs to reach short-wavelengths than previously considered possible. This paper will summarize the present results obtained with synchrotron sources, review proposed short- wavelength FEL designs and then present a new design which is capable of over an order of magnitude higher power to the extreme ultraviolet. 17 refs., 10 figs.

  6. Short wavelength laser

    DOEpatents

    Hagelstein, P.L.

    1984-06-25

    A short wavelength laser is provided that is driven by conventional-laser pulses. A multiplicity of panels, mounted on substrates, are supported in two separated and alternately staggered facing and parallel arrays disposed along an approximately linear path. When the panels are illuminated by the conventional-laser pulses, single pass EUV or soft x-ray laser pulses are produced.

  7. Short wavelength laser

    DOEpatents

    Hagelstein, Peter L.

    1986-01-01

    A short wavelength laser (28) is provided that is driven by conventional-laser pulses (30, 31). A multiplicity of panels (32), mounted on substrates (34), are supported in two separated and alternately staggered facing and parallel arrays disposed along an approximately linear path (42). When the panels (32) are illuminated by the conventional-laser pulses (30, 31), single pass EUV or soft x-ray laser pulses (44, 46) are produced.

  8. A modified beam-to-earth transformation to measure short-wavelength internal waves with an acoustic Doppler current profiler

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scotti, A.; Butman, B.; Beardsley, R.C.; Alexander, P.S.; Anderson, S.

    2005-01-01

    The algorithm used to transform velocity signals from beam coordinates to earth coordinates in an acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) relies on the assumption that the currents are uniform over the horizontal distance separating the beams. This condition may be violated by (nonlinear) internal waves, which can have wavelengths as small as 100-200 m. In this case, the standard algorithm combines velocities measured at different phases of a wave and produces horizontal velocities that increasingly differ from true velocities with distance from the ADCP. Observations made in Massachusetts Bay show that currents measured with a bottom-mounted upward-looking ADCP during periods when short-wavelength internal waves are present differ significantly from currents measured by point current meters, except very close to the instrument. These periods are flagged with high error velocities by the standard ADCP algorithm. In this paper measurements from the four spatially diverging beams and the backscatter intensity signal are used to calculate the propagation direction and celerity of the internal waves. Once this information is known, a modified beam-to-earth transformation that combines appropriately lagged beam measurements can be used to obtain current estimates in earth coordinates that compare well with pointwise measurements. ?? 2005 American Meteorological Society.

  9. Properties of short-wavelength oblique Alfvén and slow waves

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, J. S.; Wu, D. J.; Voitenko, Y.; Yu, M. Y.; Lu, J. Y.

    2014-10-01

    Linear properties of kinetic Alfvén waves (KAWs) and kinetic slow waves (KSWs) are studied in the framework of two-fluid magnetohydrodynamics. We obtain the wave dispersion relations that are valid in a wide range of the wave frequency ω and plasma-to-magnetic pressure ratio β. The KAW frequency can reach and exceed the ion-cyclotron frequency at ion kinetic scales, whereas the KSW frequency remains sub-cyclotron. At β ∼ 1, the plasma and magnetic pressure perturbations of both modes are in anti-phase, so that there is nearly no total pressure perturbations. However, these modes also exhibit several opposite properties. At high β, the electric polarization ratios of KAWs and KSWs are opposite at the ion gyroradius scale, where KAWs are polarized in the sense of electron gyration (right-hand polarized) and KSWs are left-hand polarized. The magnetic helicity σ ∼ 1 for KAWs and σ ∼ –1 for KSWs, and the ion Alfvén ratio R{sub Ai} << 1 for KAWs and R{sub Ai} >> 1 for KSWs. We also found transition wavenumbers where KAWs change their polarization from left-handed to right-handed. These new properties can be used to discriminate KAWs and KSWs when interpreting kinetic-scale electromagnetic fluctuations observed in various solar-terrestrial plasmas. This concerns, in particular, identification of modes responsible for kinetic-scale pressure-balanced fluctuations and turbulence in the solar wind.

  10. Towards short wavelengths FELs workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Ben-Zvi, I.; Winick, H.

    1993-12-01

    This workshop was caged because of the growing perception in the FEL source community that recent advances have made it possible to extend FEL operation to wavelengths about two orders of magnitude shorter than the 240 nm that has been achieved to date. In addition short wavelength FELs offer the possibilities of extremely high peak power (several gigawatts) and very short pulses (of the order of 100 fs). Several groups in the USA are developing plans for such short wavelength FEL facilities. However, reviewers of these plans have pointed out that it would be highly desirable to first carry out proof-of-principle experiments at longer wavelengths to increase confidence that the shorter wavelength devices will indeed perform as calculated. The need for such experiments has now been broadly accepted by the FEL community. Such experiments were the main focus of this workshop as described in the following objectives distributed to attendees: (1) Define measurements needed to gain confidence that short wavelength FELs will perform as calculated. (2) List possible hardware that could be used to carry out these measurements in the near term. (3) Define a prioritized FEL physics experimental program and suggested timetable. (4) Form collaborative teams to carry out this program.

  11. Review of short wavelength lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Hagelstein, P.L.

    1985-03-18

    There has recently been a substantial amount of research devoted to the development of short wavelength amplifiers and lasers. A number of experimental results have been published wherein the observation of significant gain has been claimed on transitions in the EUV and soft x-ray regimes. The present review is intended to discuss the main approaches to the creation of population inversions and laser media in the short wavelength regime, and hopefully aid workers in the field by helping to provide access to a growing literature. The approaches to pumping EUV and soft x-ray lasers are discussed according to inversion mechanism. The approaches may be divided into roughly seven categories, including collisional excitation pumping, recombination pumping, direct photoionization and photoexcitation pumping, metastable state storage plus optical pumping, charge exchange pumping, and finally, the extension of free electron laser techniques into the EUV and soft x-ray regimes. 250 references.

  12. Transition operators in acoustic-wave diffraction theory. I - General theory. II - Short-wavelength behavior, dominant singularities of Zk0 and Zk0 exp -1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hahne, G. E.

    1991-01-01

    A formal theory of the scattering of time-harmonic acoustic scalar waves from impenetrable, immobile obstacles is established. The time-independent formal scattering theory of nonrelativistic quantum mechanics, in particular the theory of the complete Green's function and the transition (T) operator, provides the model. The quantum-mechanical approach is modified to allow the treatment of acoustic-wave scattering with imposed boundary conditions of impedance type on the surface (delta-Omega) of an impenetrable obstacle. With k0 as the free-space wavenumber of the signal, a simplified expression is obtained for the k0-dependent T operator for a general case of homogeneous impedance boundary conditions for the acoustic wave on delta-Omega. All the nonelementary operators entering the expression for the T operator are formally simple rational algebraic functions of a certain invertible linear radiation impedance operator which maps any sufficiently well-behaved complex-valued function on delta-Omega into another such function on delta-Omega. In the subsequent study, the short-wavelength and the long-wavelength behavior of the radiation impedance operator and its inverse (the 'radiation admittance' operator) as two-point kernels on a smooth delta-Omega are studied for pairs of points that are close together.

  13. A 50-MeV mm-wave electron linear accelerator system for production of tunable short wavelength synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Nassiri, A.; Kustom, R.L.; Mills, F.E.; Kang, Y.W.; Matthews, P.J.; Grudzien, D.; Song, J.; Horan, D.; Feinerman, A.D.; Willke, T.L. |; Henke, H. |

    1993-12-31

    The Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne in collaboration with the University of Illinois at Chicago and the University of Wisconsin at Madison is developing a new millimeter wavelength, 50-MeV electron linear accelerator system for production of coherent tunable wavelength synchrotron radiation. Modern micromachining techniques based on deep etch x-ray lithography, LIGA (Lithografie, Galvanoformung, Abformung), capable of producing high-aspect ratio structures are being considered for the fabrication of the accelerating components.

  14. Short wavelength FELs using the SLAC linac

    SciTech Connect

    Winick, H.; Bane, K.; Boyce, R.

    1993-08-01

    Recent technological developments have opened the possibility to construct a device which we call a Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS); a fourth generation light source, with brightness, coherence, and peak power far exceeding other sources. Operating on the principle of the free electron laser (FEL), the LCLS would extend the range of FEL operation to much aborter wavelength than the 240 mn that has so far been reached. We report the results of studies of the use of the SLAC linac to drive an LCLS at wavelengths from about 3-100 nm initially and possibly even shorter wavelengths in the future. Lasing would be achieved in a single pass of a low emittance, high peak current, high energy electron beam through a long undulator. Most present FELs use an optical cavity to build up the intensity of the light to achieve lasing action in a low gain oscillator configuration. By eliminating the optical cavity, which is difficult to make at short wavelengths, laser action can be extended to shorter wavelengths by Self-Amplified-Spontaneous-Emission (SASE), or by harmonic generation from a longer wavelength seed laser. Short wavelength, single pass lasers have been extensively studied at several laboratories and at recent workshops.

  15. Undulators for short wavelength FEL amplifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Schlueter, R.

    1994-08-01

    Issues critical to the design of undulators for use in short wavelength FEL amplifiers, such as attainable on-axis field strength, device compactness, field quality, required magnetic gap, and strong focusing schemes, are discussed. The relative strength of various undulator technologies, including pure permanent magnet, hybrid, warm electromagnetic, pulsed, and superconducting electromagnetic devices in both helical and planar configurations are reviewed. Favored design options for proposed short wavelength FELs, such as the Linac Coherent Light Source at SLAC and the DUV Free-Electron Laser at BNL, are presented.

  16. Undulators for short wavelength FEL amplifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Schlueter, R.D.

    1994-12-01

    Issues critical to the design of undulators for use in short wavelength FEL amplifiers, such as attainable on-axis field strength, device compactness, field quality, required magnetic gap, and strong focusing schemes, are discussed. The relative strength of various undulator technologies, including pure permanent magnet, hybrid, warm electromagnetic, pulsed, and superconducting electromagnetic devices in both helical and planar configurations are reviewed. Favored design options for proposed short wavelength FELs, such as the Linac Coherent Light Source at SLAC and the DUV Free-Electron Laser at BNL, are presented.

  17. Electricity and short wavelength radiation generator

    DOEpatents

    George, E.V.

    1985-08-26

    Methods and associated apparati for use of collisions of high energy atoms and ions of He, Ne, or Ar with themselves or with high energy neutrons to produce short wavelength radiation (lambda approx. = 840-1300 A) that may be utilized to produce cathode-anode currents or photovoltaic currents.

  18. Modulation compression for short wavelength harmonic generation

    SciTech Connect

    Qiang, J.

    2010-01-11

    Laser modulator is used to seed free electron lasers. In this paper, we propose a scheme to compress the initial laser modulation in the longitudinal phase space by using two opposite sign bunch compressors and two opposite sign energy chirpers. This scheme could potentially reduce the initial modulation wavelength by a factor of C and increase the energy modulation amplitude by a factor of C, where C is the compression factor of the first bunch compressor. Such a compressed energy modulation can be directly used to generate short wavelength current modulation with a large bunching factor.

  19. Far-field measurements of short-wavelength surface plasmons

    SciTech Connect

    Blau, Yochai; Gjonaj, Bergin; David, Asaf; Dolev, Shimon; Shterman, Doron; Bartal, Guy

    2015-03-23

    We present direct far-field measurements of short-wavelength surface plasmon polaritons (SPP) by conventional optics means. Plasmonic wavelength as short as 231 nm was observed for 532 nm illumination on a Ag−Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} platform, demonstrating the capability to characterize SPPs well below the optical diffraction limit. This is done by scaling a sub-wavelength interferometric pattern to a far-field resolvable periodicity. These subwavelength patterns are obtained by coupling light into counter-propagating SPP waves to create a standing-wave pattern of half the SPP wavelength periodicity. Such patterns are mapped by a scattering slit, tilted at an angle so as to increase the periodicity of the intensity pattern along it to more than the free-space wavelength, making it resolvable by diffraction limited optics. The simplicity of the method as well as its large dynamic range of measurable wavelengths make it an optimal technique to characterize the properties of plasmonic devices and high-index dielectric waveguides, to improve their design accuracy and enhance their functionality.

  20. Deformable mirror for short wavelength applications

    DOEpatents

    Chapman, Henry N.; Sweeney, Donald W.

    1999-01-01

    A deformable mirror compatible with short wavelength (extreme ultraviolet) radiation that can be precisely controlled to nanometer and subnanometer accuracy is described. Actuators are coupled between a reaction plate and a face plate which has a reflective coating. A control system adjusts the voltage supplied to the actuators; by coordinating the voltages supplied to the actuators, the reflective surface of the mirror can be deformed to correct for dimensional errors in the mirror or to produce a desired contour.

  1. Source of coherent short wavelength radiation

    DOEpatents

    Villa, Francesco

    1990-01-01

    An apparatus for producing coherent radiation ranging from X-rays to the far ultraviolet (i.e., 1 Kev to 10 eV) utilizing the Compton scattering effect. A photon beam from a laser is scattered on a high energy electron bunch from a pulse power linac. The short wavelength radiation produced by such scattering has sufficient intensity and spatial coherence for use in high resolution applications such as microscopy.

  2. Short wavelength striations on expanding plasma clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Winske, D.; Gary, S.P.

    1989-01-01

    The growth and evolution of short wavelength (

  3. Short wavelength FELs using the SLAC linac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winick, H.; Bane, K.; Boyce, R.; Cobb, J.; Loew, G.; Morton, P.; Nuhn, H.-D.; Paterson, J.; Pianetta, P.; Raubenheimer, T.; Seeman, J.; Tatchyn, R.; Vylet, V.; Pellegrini, C.; Rosenzweig, J.; Travish, G.; Prosnitz, D.; Scharlemann, E. T.; Halbach, K.; Kim, K.-J.; Schlueter, R.; Xie, M.; Bonifacio, R.; De Salvo, L.; Pierini, P.

    1994-08-01

    Recent technological developments have opened the possibility to construct a device which we call a linac coherent light source (LCLS) (C. Pellegrini et al., Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A 331 (1993) 223; H. Winick et al., Proc. IEEE 1993 Particle Accelerator Conf., Washington, DC, May 1993; C. Pellegrini, Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A 341 (1994) 326; J. Seeman, SPIE Meet. on Electron Beam Sources of High Brightness Radiation, San Diego, CA, July 1993 [1-4]); it would be a fourth-generation light source, with brightness, coherence, and peak power far exceeding other sources. Operating on the principle of the free electron laser (FEL), the LCLS would extend the range of FEL operation to much shorter wavelength than the 240 nm that has so far been reached. We report the results of studies of the use of the SLAC linac to drive an LCLS at wavelengths from about 3 to 100 nm initially and possibly even shorter wavelengths in the future. Lasing would be achieved in a single pass of a low emittance, high peak current, high-energy electron beam through a long undulator. Most present FELs use an optical cavity to build up the intensity of the light to achieve lasing action in a low-gain oscillator configuration. By eliminating the optical cavity, which is difficult to make at short wavelengths, laser action can be extended to shorter wavelengths by self-amplified-spontaneous-emission (SASE), or by harmonic generation from a longer wavelength seed laser. Short wavelength, single pass lasers have been extensively studied at several laboratories and at recent workshops (M. Cornacchia and H. Winick (eds.), SLAC Report 92/02; I. Ben-Zvi and H. Winick (eds.), BNL report 49651 [5,6]). The required low-emittance electron beam can be achieved with recently-developed rf photocathode electron guns (B.E. Carlsten, Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A 285 (1989) 313; J. Rosenzweig and L. Serafini, Proc. IEEE 1993 Particle Accelerator Conf., Washington, DC, 1993 [7,8]). The peak current is increased by about an

  4. Short-wavelength Magnetic Buoyancy Instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizerski, K. A.; Davies, C. R.; Hughes, D. W.

    2013-04-01

    Magnetic buoyancy instability plays an important role in the evolution of astrophysical magnetic fields. Here we revisit the problem introduced by Gilman of the short-wavelength linear stability of a plane layer of compressible isothermal fluid permeated by a horizontal magnetic field of strength decreasing with height. Dissipation of momentum and magnetic field is neglected. By the use of a Rayleigh-Schrödinger perturbation analysis, we explain in detail the limit in which the transverse horizontal wavenumber of the perturbation, denoted by k, is large (i.e., short horizontal wavelength) and show that the fastest growing perturbations become localized in the vertical direction as k is increased. The growth rates are determined by a function of the vertical coordinate z since, in the large k limit, the eigenmodes are strongly localized in the vertical direction. We consider in detail the case of two-dimensional perturbations varying in the directions perpendicular to the magnetic field, which, for sufficiently strong field gradients, are the most unstable. The results of our analysis are backed up by comparison with a series of initial value problems. Finally, we extend the analysis to three-dimensional perturbations.

  5. Dissipation regimes for short wind waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caulliez, Guillemette

    2013-02-01

    The dissipation processes affecting short wind waves of centimeter and decimeter scales are investigated experimentally in laboratory. The processes include damping due to molecular viscosity, generation of capillary waves, microbreaking, and breaking. The observations were made in a large wind wave tank for a wide range of fetches and winds, using a laser sheet and a high-resolution video camera. The work aims at constructing a comprehensive picture of dissipative processes in the short wind wave field, to find for which scales particular dissipative mechanism may become important. Four distinct regimes have been identified. For capillary-gravity wave fields, i.e., for dominant waves with scales below 4 cm, viscous damping is found to be the main dissipation mechanism. The gravity-capillary wave fields with dominant wavelength less than 10 cm usually exhibit a train of capillary ripples at the crest wavefront, but no wave breaking. For such waves, the main dissipation process is molecular viscosity occurring through nonlinear energy cascade toward high-frequency motions. Microscale breaking takes place for waves longer than 10 cm and manifests itself in a very localized surface disruption on the forward face of the crest. Such events generate turbulent motions in water and thus enhance wave dissipation. Plunging breaking, characterized by formation of a crest bulge, a microjet hitting the water surface and a splash-up, occurs for short gravity waves of wavelength exceeding 20 cm. Macroscale spilling breaking is also observed for longer waves at high winds. In both cases, the direct momentum transfer from breaking waves to the water flow contributes significantly to wave damping.

  6. Short wavelength infrared hybrid focal plane arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vural, K.; Blackwell, J. D.; Marin, E. C.; Edwall, D. D.; Rode, J. P.

    1983-01-01

    The employment of area focal plane arrays (FPA) has made it possible to obtain second generation infrared imaging systems with high resolution and sensitivity. The Short Wavelength Infrared (SWIR) region (1-2.5 microns) is of importance for imaging objects at high temperature and under conditions of reflected sunlight. The present investigation is concerned with electrooptical characterization results for 32 x 32 SWIR detector arrays and FPAs which are suitable for use in a prototype imaging spectrometer. The employed detector material is Hg(1-x)Cd(x)Te grown by liquid phase epitaxy on a CdTe transparent substrate. Attention is given to details of processing, the design of the detector array, the multiplexer, the fabrication of the hybrid FPA, and aspects of performance.

  7. Short-wave Diathermy

    PubMed Central

    1935-01-01

    It is submitted that the thermal action of short-wave therapy does not account for the therapeutic results obtained. The theory is put forward that many of the results obtained can be better explained by the disruptive and dispersive action of the impact of the electromagnetic vibrations. An analogy, indicating such disruptive effects at high frequency, is drawn from the molecular vibrations—transmitted through transformer oil, and excited by the application of high frequency currents to the layers of quartz in the piezo-electric oscillator of quartz. It is submitted that these disruptive and dispersive effects will be greatest where the conductivity of the tissues is low, such as in bones and fat, and it is shown that it is in these regions that the therapeutic action of these currents is most obvious. It is also pointed out that, if effects, comparable to those obtained in the subcutaneous area, are obtained in the deeper tissues and organs, the application of deep-wave therapy would be attended by serious risk. PMID:19990107

  8. Wave Tank Studies of Phase Velocities of Short Wind Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ermakov, S.; Sergievskaya, I.; Shchegolkov, Yu.

    Wave tank studies of phase velocities of short wind waves have been carried out using Ka-band radar and an Optical Spectrum Analyser. The phase velocities were retrieved from measured radar and optical Doppler shifts, taking into account measurements of surface drift velocities. The dispersion relationship was studied in centimetre (cm)- and millimetre(mm)-scale wavelength ranges at different fetches and wind speeds, both for a clean water surface and for water covered with surfactant films. It is ob- tained that the phase velocities do not follow the dispersion relation of linear capillary- gravity waves, increasing with fetch and, therefore, depending on phase velocities of dominant decimetre (dm)-centimetre-scale wind waves. One thus can conclude that nonlinear cm-mm-scale harmonics bound to the dominant wind waves and propagat- ing with the phase velocities of the decimetric waves are present in the wind wave spectrum. The resulting phase velocities of short wind waves are determined by re- lation between free and bound waves. The relative intensity of the bound waves in the spectrum of short wind waves is estimated. It is shown that this relation depends strongly on the surfactant concentration, because the damping effect due to films is different for free and bound waves; this results to changes of phase velocities of wind waves in the presence of surfactant films. This work was supported by MOD, UK via DERA Winfrith (Project ISTC 1774P) and by RFBR (Project 02-05-65102).

  9. Silicon-integrated short-wavelength hybrid-cavity VCSEL.

    PubMed

    Haglund, Emanuel P; Kumari, Sulakshna; Westbergh, Petter; Gustavsson, Johan S; Roelkens, Gunther; Baets, Roel; Larsson, Anders

    2015-12-28

    We demonstrate a short-wavelength hybrid-cavity vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) heterogeneously integrated on silicon. A GaAs-based "half-VCSEL" has been attached to a dielectric distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) on a silicon wafer using ultra-thin divinylsiloxane-bis-benzocyclobutene (DVS-BCB) adhesive bonding, thereby creating a cavity with the standing-wave optical field extending over the silicon- and GaAs-based parts of the cavity. A 9 µm oxide aperture diameter VCSEL with a threshold current of 1.2 mA produces 1.6 mW optical output power at 6.0 mA bias current with a wavelength of ~845 nm. PMID:26832027

  10. Short Wavelength Infrared Hybrid Focal Plane Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vural, K.; Blackwell, J. D...; Marin, E. C.; Edwall, D. D...; Rode, J. P.

    1983-11-01

    Short wavelength (λc = 2.5 μm) 32 x 32 HgCdTe focal plane arrays have been fabricated for use in an Airborne Imaging Spectrometer (AIS) developed by the Jet Propulsion Labora-tory for NASA. An Imaging Spectrometer provides simultaneous imaging of several spectral bands for applications in the sensing and monitoring of earth resources. The detector material is HgCdTe grown on CdTe substrates using liquid phase epitaxy. Planar processing is used to make photovoltaic detectors on 68 um centers. The detector array is mated to a silicon charge coupled device multiplexer to make hybrid focal plane arrays. Results show high performance detectors with a mean RoA = 9.6 x 107 Ω --cm2 and IleakAge (-100 mV) = 0.037 pA at 120K and near zero background. The yield and uniformity are high. The ratio of the standard deviation of the dc responsivity to the mean is 3% for 98.5% of the pixels. The D1.0 = 1.3 x 1012 cm - âœ"fiz/W at a background of 1013 ph/cm2-s and 120K which is close to the background limited (BLIP) D* of 1.9 x 1012 cm- âœ"Hz/W.

  11. Laser-to-electricity energy converter for short wavelengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stirn, R. J.; Yeh, Y. C. M.

    1975-01-01

    Short-wavelength energy converter can be made using Schottky barrier structure. It has wider band gap than p-n junction silicon semiconductors, and thus it has improved response at wavelengths down to and including ultraviolet region.

  12. Short-wavelength plasma turbulence and temperature anisotropy instabilities: Recent computational progress

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Gary, S. Peter

    2015-04-06

    Plasma turbulence consists of an ensemble of enhanced, broadband electromagnetic fluctuations, typically driven by multi-wave interactions which transfer energy in wavevector space via non- linear cascade processes. In addition, temperature anisotropy instabilities in collisionless plasmas are driven by quasi-linear wave–particle interactions which transfer particle kinetic energy to field fluctuation energy; the resulting enhanced fluctuations are typically narrowband in wavevector magnitude and direction. Whatever their sources, short-wavelength fluctuations are those at which charged particle kinetic, that is, velocity-space, properties are important; these are generally wavelengths of the order of or shorter than the ion inertial length or the thermal ion gyroradius.more » The purpose of this review is to summarize and interpret recent computational results concerning short-wavelength plasma turbulence, short-wavelength temperature anisotropy instabilities and relationships between the two phenomena.« less

  13. Short-wavelength plasma turbulence and temperature anisotropy instabilities: Recent computational progress

    SciTech Connect

    Gary, S. Peter

    2015-04-06

    Plasma turbulence consists of an ensemble of enhanced, broadband electromagnetic fluctuations, typically driven by multi-wave interactions which transfer energy in wavevector space via non- linear cascade processes. In addition, temperature anisotropy instabilities in collisionless plasmas are driven by quasi-linear wave–particle interactions which transfer particle kinetic energy to field fluctuation energy; the resulting enhanced fluctuations are typically narrowband in wavevector magnitude and direction. Whatever their sources, short-wavelength fluctuations are those at which charged particle kinetic, that is, velocity-space, properties are important; these are generally wavelengths of the order of or shorter than the ion inertial length or the thermal ion gyroradius. The purpose of this review is to summarize and interpret recent computational results concerning short-wavelength plasma turbulence, short-wavelength temperature anisotropy instabilities and relationships between the two phenomena.

  14. Short-wavelength plasma turbulence and temperature anisotropy instabilities: recent computational progress

    PubMed Central

    Gary, S. Peter

    2015-01-01

    Plasma turbulence consists of an ensemble of enhanced, broadband electromagnetic fluctuations, typically driven by multi-wave interactions which transfer energy in wavevector space via non- linear cascade processes. Temperature anisotropy instabilities in collisionless plasmas are driven by quasi-linear wave–particle interactions which transfer particle kinetic energy to field fluctuation energy; the resulting enhanced fluctuations are typically narrowband in wavevector magnitude and direction. Whatever their sources, short-wavelength fluctuations are those at which charged particle kinetic, that is, velocity-space, properties are important; these are generally wavelengths of the order of or shorter than the ion inertial length or the thermal ion gyroradius. The purpose of this review is to summarize and interpret recent computational results concerning short-wavelength plasma turbulence, short-wavelength temperature anisotropy instabilities and relationships between the two phenomena. PMID:25848081

  15. Lethal effects of short-wavelength visible light on insects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hori, Masatoshi; Shibuya, Kazuki; Sato, Mitsunari; Saito, Yoshino

    2014-12-01

    We investigated the lethal effects of visible light on insects by using light-emitting diodes (LEDs). The toxic effects of ultraviolet (UV) light, particularly shortwave (i.e., UVB and UVC) light, on organisms are well known. However, the effects of irradiation with visible light remain unclear, although shorter wavelengths are known to be more lethal. Irradiation with visible light is not thought to cause mortality in complex animals including insects. Here, however, we found that irradiation with short-wavelength visible (blue) light killed eggs, larvae, pupae, and adults of Drosophila melanogaster. Blue light was also lethal to mosquitoes and flour beetles, but the effective wavelength at which mortality occurred differed among the insect species. Our findings suggest that highly toxic wavelengths of visible light are species-specific in insects, and that shorter wavelengths are not always more toxic. For some animals, such as insects, blue light is more harmful than UV light.

  16. Peripheral detection and resolution with mid-/long-wavelength and short-wavelength sensitive cone systems.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hai-Feng; Zele, Andrew J; Suheimat, Marwan; Lambert, Andrew J; Atchison, David A

    2016-08-01

    This study compared neural resolution and detection limits of the human mid-/long-wavelength and short-wavelength cone systems with anatomical estimates of photoreceptor and retinal ganglion cell spacings and sizes. Detection and resolution limits were measured from central fixation out to 35° eccentricity across the horizontal visual field using a modified Lotmar interferometer. The mid-/long-wavelength cone system was studied using a green (550 nm) test stimulus to which S-cones have low sensitivity. To bias resolution and detection to the short-wavelength cone system, a blue (450 nm) test stimulus was presented against a bright yellow background that desensitized the M- and L-cones. Participants were three trichromatic males with normal visual functions. With green stimuli, resolution showed a steep central-peripheral gradient that was similar between participants, whereas the detection gradient was shallower and patterns were different between participants. Detection and resolution with blue stimuli were poorer than for green stimuli. The detection of blue stimuli was superior to resolution across the horizontal visual field and the patterns were different between participants. The mid-/long-wavelength cone system's resolution is limited by midget ganglion cell spacing and its detection is limited by the size of the M- and L-cone photoreceptors, consistent with previous observations. We found that no such simple relationships occur for the short-wavelength cone system between resolution and the bistratified ganglion cell spacing, nor between detection and the S-cone photoreceptor sizes. PMID:27580041

  17. Research with high-power short-wavelength lasers.

    PubMed

    Holzrichter, J F; Campbell, E M; Lindl, J D; Storm, E

    1985-09-13

    Three high-temperature, high-density experments were conducted recently with the 10-terawatt, short-wavelength Novette laser system at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The experiments demonstrated successful solutions to problems that arose during previous laser-plasma interaction experiments with long-wavelength (greater than 1 micrometer) lasers: (i) large-scale plasmas, with dimensions approaching those needed for high-gain inertial fusion targets, were produced in which potentially deleterious laser-plasma instabilities were collisionally damped; (ii) deuterium-tritium fuel was imploded to a density of 20 grams per cubic centimeter and a pressure of 10(10) atmospheres under the improved laser conditions, and compression conditions (preheating and pressure) were consistent with code calculations that predict efficient (high-gain) burn of a large thermonuclear fuel mass when driven with a large, short-wavelength laser; and (iii) soft x-rays were amplified by a factor of 700 by stimulated emission at 206 and 209 angstroms (62 electron volts) from selenium ions in a laser-generated plasma. These small, short-pulse x-ray sources are 10(10) to 10(11) times brighter than the most powerful x-ray generators and synchrotron sources available today. The plasma conditions for these experiments were made possible by advances in Nd:glass laser technology, in techniques to generate efficiently its short-wavelength harmonics at 0.53, 0.35, and 0.26 micrometers, and in diagnostic and computational modeling. PMID:17753271

  18. Nonblocking space wavelength networks with wave-mixing frequency conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dasylva, Abel Clement; Montuno, Delfin Y.; Kodaypak, Prasad

    2002-06-01

    We describe what we believe to be new designs for all-optical cross connects, capable of wavelength conversion. They are based on two-dimensional, space-wavelength, Benes or Cantor topologies, and they exploit cascaded wave-mixing bulk frequency conversion. In these cross connects many channels at distinct frequencies can be simultaneously frequency translated in a common wave-mixing device, and a given lightpath may be converted many times between its input and output. The new wavelength-interchanging cross connects are nonblocking and require O{F log2 W[log2(FW)]n} wave-mixing converters, where n = 0, 1.

  19. Short wavelength trapped electron modes in tokamak plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, N.; Gong, X. Y.; Dong, J. Q.; Huang, Q. H.; Gong, L.; Li, J. C.

    2016-04-01

    The collisionless trapped electron modes in the short wavelength region k⊥ρs>1 (SWTEMs) are studied with the gyrokinetic integral eigenmode equation in tokamak plasmas. Here, we present a systematic study of the correlation between the SWTEMs and short wavelength ion temperature gradient (SWITG) modes. The kθρs spectra of TEM have double humps in the short wavelength and long wavelength regions, respectively. The SWITG modes with trapped electron effects taking into account have broader kθρs spectra. Dependences of growth rate and real frequency of SWTEMs on the various parameters, such as ion temperature gradient (ηi), the temperature gradient of trapped electrons (ηe), toroidicity (ɛn), magnetic shear ( s ̂ ), safety factor (q), and the ratio of temperature (Te/Ti), are investigated in detail. It is found that the SWTEMs propagate in the electron diamagnetic drift direction and require temperature gradient of trapped electrons ηe exceeding thresholds. Moreover, the ion temperature gradient has a strong stabilizing effect on the SWTEMs. The SWTEMs become stable in both regimes of toroidicity ɛn > 0.1 and magnetic shear s ̂>0.5 regardless of the fraction of trapped electrons. In addition, the properties of short wavelength ITG (SWITG) modes are discussed with different ratio of trapped electrons. It is found that trapped electrons of greater fraction have a stronger destabilizing effect on the SWTEM and SWITG modes. These results are significant for the electrons anomalous transport experiments in the future.

  20. Short-wavelength ablation of solids: pulse duration and wavelength effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juha, Libor; Bittner, Michal; Chvostova, Dagmar; Letal, Vit; Krasa, Josef; Otcenasek, Zdenek; Kozlova, Michaela; Polan, Jiri; Prag, Ansgar R.; Rus, Bedrich; Stupka, Michal; Krzywinski, Jacek; Andrejczuk, Andrzej; Pelka, Jerzy B.; Sobierajski, Ryszard H.; Ryc, Leszek; Feldhaus, Josef; Boody, Frederick P.; Fiedorowicz, Henryk; Bartnik, Andrzej; Mikolajczyk, Janusz; Rakowski, Rafal; Kubat, P.; Pina, Ladislav; Grisham, Michael E.; Vaschenko, Georgiy O.; Menoni, Carmen S.; Rocca, Jorge J. G.

    2004-11-01

    For conventional wavelength (UV-Vis-IR) lasers delivering radiation energy to the surface of materials, ablation thresholds, ablation (etch) rates, and the quality of ablated structures often differ dramatically between short (typically nanosecond) and ultrashort (typically femtosecond) pulses. Various short-wavelength (l < 100 nm) lasers emitting pulses with durations ranging from ~ 10 fs to ~ 1 ns have recently been put into a routine operation. This makes it possible to investigate how the ablation characteristics depend on the pulse duration in the XUV spectral region. 1.2-ns pulses of 46.9-nm radiation delivered from a capillary-discharge Ne-like Ar laser (Colorado State University, Fort Collins), focused by a spherical Sc/Si multilayer-coated mirror were used for an ablation of organic polymers and silicon. Various materials were irradiated with ellipsoidal-mirror-focused XUV radiation (λ = 86 nm, τ = 30-100 fs) generated by the free-electron laser (FEL) operated at the TESLA Test Facility (TTF1 FEL) in Hamburg. The beam of the Ne-like Zn XUV laser (λ = 21.2 nm, τ < 100 ps) driven by the Prague Asterix Laser System (PALS) was also successfully focused by a spherical Si/Mo multilayer-coated mirror to ablate various materials. Based on the results of the experiments, the etch rates for three different pulse durations are compared using the XUV-ABLATOR code to compensate for the wavelength difference. Comparing the values of etch rates calculated for short pulses with those measured for ultrashort pulses, we can study the influence of pulse duration on XUV ablation efficiency. Ablation efficiencies measured with short pulses at various wavelengths (i.e. 86/46.9/21.2 nm from the above-mentioned lasers and ~ 1 nm from the double stream gas-puff Xe plasma source driven by PALS) show that the wavelength influences the etch rate mainly through the different attenuation lengths.

  1. Short Wavelength Seeding through Compression for Fee Electron Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Qiang, Ji

    2010-03-29

    In this paper, we propose a seeding scheme that compresses an initial laser modulation in the longitudinal phase space of an electron beam by using two opposite sign bunch compressors and two opposite sign energy chirpers. This scheme could potentially reduce the initial modulation wavelength by a factor of C and increase the energy modulation amplitude by a factor of C , where Cis the compression factor of the first bunch compressor. Using two lasers as energy chirpers, such a modulation compression scheme can generate kilo-Ampershort wavelength current modulation with significant bunching factor from an initial a few tens Amper current. This compression scheme can also be used togenerate a prebunched single atto-second short wavelength current modulation and prebunched two color, two atto-second modulations.

  2. Simultaneous rocket probe and radar measurements of equatorial spread F-transitional and short wavelength results

    SciTech Connect

    Kelley, M.C.; Pfaff, R.; Baker, K.D.; Ulwick, J.C.; Livingston, R.; Rino, C.; Tsunoda, R.

    1982-03-01

    During the PLUMEX I rocket flight from Kwajalein Island, plasma density and electric field fluctuations were measured in situ, simultaneous with ground-based radar backscatter measurements at 0.96-m and 0.36-m wavelengths. The rocket penetrated an extremely turbulent topside region which had associated intense backscatter. As measured by the radar the backscatter power was decaying with time during and after the flight. The intermediate wavelength (0.1--10 km) in situ electron density measurements are described in a companion paper, while here we report the transitional and short wavelength results (lambda<100 m). These data include the first in situ equatorial spread F measurements of the electric field component of electrostatic fluctuations with wavelengths less than 1 m. At all altitudes above about 280 km, a repeatable form for the wave-number spectrum was found for the electron density and electric field fluctuations at wavelengths less than about 100 m. The density spectrum varies approximately as k/sup -5/ and the electric field spectrum as k/sup -3/. The steepness of the density spectrum corresponds to an absence of steep edges in the density waveform on the scale of 100 m and less. These two spectral forms are shown to be consistent with an explanation involving low-frequency waves with finite wave numbers parallel to the magnetic field (k/sub parallel/).Both theory and laboratory experiments show a power law density fluctuation spectrum for gradient-driven drift waves with negative index in the range 4.5--6.0. Since such waves do have finite k/sub parallel/, and since sharp gradients exist in the spread F environment, we conclude that at sufficiently high altitudes, drift waves act on the steep gradients caused by a primary longer-wavelength instability to create the observed spectral form.

  3. Method for fabricating photovoltaic device having improved short wavelength photoresponse

    DOEpatents

    Catalano, Anthony W.

    1989-07-04

    Amorphous p-i-n silicon photovoltaic cells with improved short wavelength photoresponse are fabricated with reduced p-dopant contamination at the p/i interface. Residual p-dopants are removed by flushing the deposition chamber with a gaseous mixture capable of reacting with excess doping contaminants prior to the deposition of the i-layer and subsequent to the deposition of the p-layer.

  4. Interferometric coherency determination of wavelength or what are broadband ELF waves?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kintner, P. M.; Franz, J.; Schuck, P.; Klatt, E.

    2000-09-01

    To determine the wavelength of waves within a random, isotropic wave field, we introduce the observable of wave coherency measured with plasma wave interferometers. We show generally that within a random direction wave field, wavelengths large compared to the interferometer length produce large coherency (nearly 1), but wavelengths the order of a few times the interferometer length, or smaller, produce small coherency (close to zero). We apply this principle first to examining auroral hiss and lower hybrid waves measured by the Physics of Auroral Zone Electrons (PHAZE) 2 and Topside Probe of the Auroral Zone (TOPAZ) 3 experiments and show that the implied wavelengths are consistent with the expected dispersion relations and with other, different estimates of wavelength for these modes. Next, we apply the principle to broadband extra low frequency (BB-ELF) electric fields observed in both experiments and conclude that the wavelengths are small. In one case we calculate the coherency of BB-ELF electric fields, using an ensemble average of 7889 data samples, and demonstrate that the coherency near the oxygen gyrofrequency is very small (≅0.15), corresponding to wavelengths of 10 m and the order of the ion gyroradius. We conclude that because of the short wavelengths, previous satellite measurements of BB-ELF electric fields may have underestimated the electric field amplitudes, unless ion gyroradii are substantially larger than the case for these rocket measurements. Although the wavelengths and frequencies of BB-ELF electric fields are now known, we are unable to assign the wave to a known, normal mode of homogeneous plasmas. This suggests that inhomogeneities may be essential for describing BB-ELF electric fields.

  5. Short wave infrared imager cockpit interface issues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marasco, Peter L.

    2007-04-01

    With the introduction of the night-vision goggle (NVG) into vehicle cockpits, the transfer of visual information to the observer became more complex. This problem stems primarily from the fact that the image intensifier tube photocathode was sensitive to much of the visible spectrum. NVGs were capable of sensing and amplifying visible cockpit light, making the observation of the scene outside of the cockpit, the primary use for NVGs, difficult if not impossible. One solution was to establish mutually exclusive spectral bands; a band of shorter wavelengths reserved for transmission of visible information from the cockpit instrumentation to the observer and a longer wavelength region left to the night vision goggle for imaging the night environment. Several documents have been published outlining the night vision imaging system (NVIS) compatible lighting performance enabling this approach, seen as necessary for military and civilian aviation. Recent advances in short wave infrared (SWIR) sensor technology make it a possible alternative to the image intensifiers for night imaging application. However, application-specific integration issues surrounding the new sensor type must still be thoroughly investigated. This paper examines the impact of the SWIR spectral sensitivity on several categories of lighting found in vehicle cockpits and explores cockpit integration issues that may arise from the SWIR spectral sensitivity.

  6. Output characteristics of SASE-driven short-wavelength FELs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fawley, William M.

    1997-05-01

    This paper investigates various properties of the 'microspikes' associated with self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) in a short wavelength free-electron laser (FEL). Using results from the 2-D numerical simulation code GINGER, we confirm theoretical predictions such as the convective group velocity in the exponential gain regime. In the saturated gain regime beyond the initial saturation, we find that the average radiation power continues to grow with an approximately linearly dependence upon undulator length. Moreover, the spectrum significantly broadens and shifts in wavelength to the redward direction, with P(omega) approaching a constant, asymptotic value. This is in marked contrast to the exponential gain regime where the spectrum steadily narrows, P(omega) grows, and the central wavelength remains constant with z. Via use of a spectrogram diagnostic S(omega, t), it appears that the radiation pattern in the saturated gain regime is composed of an ensemble of distinct 'sinews' whose widths (Delta) (lambda) remain approximately constant but whose central wavelengths can 'chirp' by varying a small extent with t.

  7. Short wavelength limits of current shot noise suppression

    SciTech Connect

    Nause, Ariel; Dyunin, Egor; Gover, Avraham

    2014-08-15

    Shot noise in electron beam was assumed to be one of the features beyond control of accelerator physics. Current results attained in experiments at Accelerator Test Facility in Brookhaven and Linac Coherent Light Source in Stanford suggest that the control of the shot noise in electron beam (and therefore of spontaneous radiation and Self Amplified Spontaneous Emission of Free Electron Lasers) is feasible at least in the visible range of the spectrum. Here, we present a general linear formulation for collective micro-dynamics of e-beam noise and its control. Specifically, we compare two schemes for current noise suppression: a quarter plasma wavelength drift section and a combined drift/dispersive (transverse magnetic field) section. We examine and compare their limits of applicability at short wavelengths via considerations of electron phase-spread and the related Landau damping effect.

  8. Frequency and wavelength prediction of ultrasonic induced liquid surface waves.

    PubMed

    Mahravan, Ehsan; Naderan, Hamid; Damangir, Ebrahim

    2016-12-01

    A theoretical investigation of parametric excitation of liquid free surface by a high frequency sound wave is preformed, using potential flow theory. Pressure and velocity distributions, resembling the sound wave, are applied to the free surface of the liquid. It is found that for impinging wave two distinct capillary frequencies will be excited: One of them is the same as the frequency of the sound wave, and the other is equal to the natural frequency corresponding to a wavenumber equal to the horizontal wavenumber of the sound wave. When the wave propagates in vertical direction, mathematical formulation leads to an equation, which has resonance frequency equal to half of the excitation frequency. This can explain an important contradiction between the frequency and the wavelength of capillary waves in the two cases of normal and inclined interaction of the sound wave and the free surface of the liquid. PMID:27566141

  9. An Experimental Investigation of Wind- and Mechanically Generated Short Wavelength Spilling Breakers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diorio, J. D.; Liu, X.; Duncan, J. H.

    2006-11-01

    Short wavelength spilling breakers are studied in a wind wave tank that is 12.8 m long and 1.15 m wide and 0.91 m deep. The crest profile histories during breaking are measured with a photographic technique that employs a high-speed digital movie camera, a laser light sheet, and fluorescent dye. The photographic system is mounted on an instrument carriage that is set to move along the tank in phase with the crests of the breaking waves. In the first step in the experiment, breakers generated by the wind are measured at three wind speeds and three fetches at each wind speed. In the second step in the experiment, a mechanical wave maker is used without wind to generate a wave train consisting of a dominant wave and two unstable sidebands. The amplitudes and frequencies of these wave components are adjusted to create breakers at the various fetches and dominant wave frequencies found in the wind wave experiments. The similarities and differences between the ripple patterns at the crest during breaking between the wind wave and mechanical wave cases are discussed.

  10. Volcano monitoring by short wavelength infrared satellite remote sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothery, D. A.; Francis, P. W.; Wood, C. A.

    1988-01-01

    The use of short wavelength IR Landsat TM data for volcano monitoring is examined. By determining the pixel-integrated from the TM data, it is possible to estimate the temperature and size of hot areas which occupy less than one complete pixel. Examples of volcano monitoring with remote sensing data are discussed. It is suggested that the entire volcanic temperature range (100-1200 C) could be accomplished by decreasing the band 6 gain by just one order of magnitude so that it was sensitive to radiance from 1 to 100 mW/sq cm/sr/micron.

  11. Research with high-power short-wavelength lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Holzrichter, J.F.; Campbell, E.M.; Lindl, J.D.; Storm, E.

    1985-03-05

    Three important high-temperature, high-density experiments were conducted recently using the 10-TW, short-wavelength Novette laser system at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. These experiments demonstrated successful solutions to problems that arose during previous experiments with long wavelength lasers (lambda greater than or equal to 1..mu..m) in which inertial confinement fusion (ICF), x-ray laser, and other high-temperature physics concepts were being tested. The demonstrations were: (1) large-scale plasmas (typical dimensions of up to 1000 laser wavelengths) were produced in which potentially deleterious laser-plasma instabilities were collisionally damped. (2) Deuterium-tritium fuel was imploded to a density of 20 g/cm/sup 3/ and a pressure of 10/sup 10/ atm. (3) A 700-fold amplification of soft x rays by stimulated emission at 206 and 209 A (62 eV) from Se/sup +24/ ions was observed in a laser-generated plasma. Isoelectronic scaling to 155 A (87 eV) in Y/sup +29/ was also demonstrated.

  12. On the wavelength of self-organized shoreline sand waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falqués, A.; van den Berg, N.; Ribas, F.; Caballeria, M.; Calvete, D.

    2012-04-01

    Shoreline sand waves are undulations of the shoreline that extend into the bathymetry up to a certain depth. Here we will focus on self-organized sand waves that form due to shoreline instability in case of very oblique wave incidence (Ashton et al., 2001). The model of Ashton and co-authors did not predict any wavelength selection for the emerging sand waves whereas Falqués and Calvete (2005) predicted a wavelength selection in the range 4-15 km. This difference is attributable to that Falqués and Calvete (2005) computed wave refraction and shoaling over the actual curvilinear depth contours while Ashton et al. (2001) assumed locally rectilinear and parallel contours. Although there exist shoreline features at a larger scale (Ashton et al. 2001; Falqués et al. 2011) sand waves at a few km scale are more common (Ruessink and Jeuken, 2002; Davidson-Arnott and van Heyningen, 2003; Falqués et al., 2011; Medellin et al., 2008) . While their characteristic wavelength is a robust model output (Falqués and Calvete, 2005; Uguccioni et al., 2006; van den Berg et al., 2011) the physical reasons for the existence of a wavelength selection are still unknown. Furthermore, the parameter dependence of the dominant wavelength, Lm, is largely unexplored. In particular, the disparity between the large length scale of sand waves and the relevant length scales of the problem: width of the surf zone, water wave wavelength, etc. is intriguing. The aim of the present contribution is to gain insight into those physical reasons and the dependence of Lm on beach profile and water wave properties. The essence of sandwave behaviour can be captured with the simple one-line shoreline modelling concept by looking at the alongshore position of the maximum in total transport rate Q, which is here investigated with both the linearized model of Falqués and Calvete (2005) and the nonlinear model of van den Berg et al. (2011) . It is found that the position of that maximum is largely controlled

  13. Short-wavelength visible light emission from silicon nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pi, Xiaodong; Liptak, Rick; Campbell, Stephen; Kortshagen, Uwe

    2007-03-01

    Si is the material of choice for modern microelectronics but, as an indirect-bandgap semiconductor, it is not an efficient light emitter. An electrically pumped Si laser would present a breakthrough for optoelectronic integration that may enable optical interconnect to make computers faster. Si light emitting diodes may revolutionize solid-state lighting and displays because of the low cost and environmental friendliness of Si. One of the most challenging problems of Si-based lighting and displays is the lack of a reliable and efficient full visible spectrum emission. Si nanocrystals (Si-NCs) have so far been the most promising form of Si to emit light. Most of the synthesis approaches of Si-NCs, however, only lead to red light emission. Our recent work on Si-NCs synthesized by non-thermal plasmas has focused on extending their light emission into the short-wavelength range. Firstly, the process of oxidation-etching-oxidation of Si-NCs is investigated. This process causes the size of Si-NCs to decrease, leading to shorter wavelength light emission from Si-NCs. Yellow or green photoluminescence (PL) has been observed from initially oxidized red light emitting Si-NCs after HF vapour etching and atmospheric oxidation. The intensity of PL from Si-NCs, however, decreases by a factor up to 100. It is found that HF etching restructures the surface of Si-NCs. This leads to a decrease in the incorporation of O during subsequent oxidation, which finally results in silicon suboxide SiO1.9. Such an understoichiometry indicates a high density of defects such as Si dangling bonds at the Si-NC/oxide interface. Therefore, the PL efficiency is extremely low for short-wavelength light emitting Si-NCs obtained by the process of oxidation-etching-oxidation. Secondly, an integrated two-stage plasma system is employed to achieve the light emission from Si-NCs in the full visible spectrum range. Red-light-emitting Si-NCs are produced in the first stage by the plasma decomposition of SiH4

  14. Stability of short wavelength tearing and twisting modes

    SciTech Connect

    Waelbroeck, F.L.

    1998-09-22

    The stability and mutual interaction of tearing and twisting modes in a torus is governed by matrices that generalize the well-known {Delta}{prime} stability index. The diagonal elements of these matrices determine the intrinsic stability of modes that reconnect the magnetic field at a single resonant surface. The off-diagonal elements indicate the strength of the coupling between the different modes. The author shows how the elements of these matrices can be evaluated, in the limit of short wavelength, from the free energy driving radially extended ballooning modes. The author applies the results by calculating the tearing and twisting {Delta}{prime} for a model high-beta equilibrium with circular flux surfaces.

  15. Put a Short-Wave Radio in Your Foreign Language Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oksenholt, Svein

    1977-01-01

    Advantages of the short-wave radio as a supplement to foreign language instruction as well as practical hints on wavelength, antenna, and techniques for use are provided. Selective annotated bibliography. (STS)

  16. Coherent control with a short-wavelength free-electron laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prince, K. C.; Allaria, E.; Callegari, C.; Cucini, R.; de Ninno, G.; di Mitri, S.; Diviacco, B.; Ferrari, E.; Finetti, P.; Gauthier, D.; Giannessi, L.; Mahne, N.; Penco, G.; Plekan, O.; Raimondi, L.; Rebernik, P.; Roussel, E.; Svetina, C.; Trovò, M.; Zangrando, M.; Negro, M.; Carpeggiani, P.; Reduzzi, M.; Sansone, G.; Grum-Grzhimailo, A. N.; Gryzlova, E. V.; Strakhova, S. I.; Bartschat, K.; Douguet, N.; Venzke, J.; Iablonskyi, D.; Kumagai, Y.; Takanashi, T.; Ueda, K.; Fischer, A.; Coreno, M.; Stienkemeier, F.; Ovcharenko, Y.; Mazza, T.; Meyer, M.

    2016-03-01

    Extreme ultraviolet and X-ray free-electron lasers (FELs) produce short-wavelength pulses with high intensity, ultrashort duration, well-defined polarization and transverse coherence, and have been utilized for many experiments previously possible only at long wavelengths: multiphoton ionization, pumping an atomic laser and four-wave mixing spectroscopy. However one important optical technique, coherent control, has not yet been demonstrated, because self-amplified spontaneous emission FELs have limited longitudinal coherence. Single-colour pulses from the FERMI seeded FEL are longitudinally coherent, and two-colour emission is predicted to be coherent. Here, we demonstrate the phase correlation of two colours, and manipulate it to control an experiment. Light of wavelengths 63.0 and 31.5 nm ionized neon, and we controlled the asymmetry of the photoelectron angular distribution by adjusting the phase, with a temporal resolution of 3 as. This opens the door to new short-wavelength coherent control experiments with ultrahigh time resolution and chemical sensitivity.

  17. The photobleaching sequence of a short-wavelength visual pigment.

    PubMed

    Kusnetzow, A; Dukkipati, A; Babu, K R; Singh, D; Vought, B W; Knox, B E; Birge, R R

    2001-07-01

    The photobleaching pathway of a short-wavelength cone opsin purified in delipidated form (lambda(max) = 425 nm) is reported. The batho intermediate of the violet cone opsin generated at 45 K has an absorption maximum at 450 nm. The batho intermediate thermally decays to the lumi intermediate (lambda(max) = 435 nm) at 200 K. The lumi intermediate decays to the meta I (lambda(max) = 420 nm) and meta II (lambda(max) = 388 nm) intermediates at 258 and 263 K, respectively. The meta II intermediate decays to free retinal and opsin at >270 K. At 45, 75, and 140 K, the photochemical excitation of the violet cone opsin at 425 nm generates the batho intermediate at high concentrations under moderate illumination. The batho intermediate spectra, generated via decomposing the photostationary state spectra at 45 and 140 K, are identical and have properties typical of batho intermediates of other visual pigments. Extended illumination of the violet cone opsin at 75 K, however, generates a red-shifted photostationary state (relative to both the dark and the batho intermediates) that has as absorption maximum at approximately 470 nm, and thermally reverts to form the normal batho intermediate when warmed to 140 K. We conclude that this red-shifted photostationary state is a metastable state, characterized by a higher-energy protein conformation that allows relaxation of the all-trans chromophore into a more planar conformation. FTIR spectroscopy of violet cone opsin indicates conclusively that the chromophore is protonated. A similar transformation of the rhodopsin binding site generates a model for the VCOP binding site that predicts roughly 75% of the observed blue shift of the violet cone pigment relative to rhodopsin. MNDO-PSDCI calculations indicate that secondary interactions involving the binding site residues are as important as the first-order chromophore protein interactions in mediating the wavelength maximum. PMID:11425310

  18. Wavelength Tuning Characteristics of Idler Waves in Terahertz-Wave Parametric Oscillator Using Optical Double Resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takida, Yuma; Ohira, Tatsuya; Tadokoro, Yuzuru; Kumagai, Hiroshi; Nashima, Shigeki

    We experimentally investigated the wavelength tuning of oscillating idler (Stokes) waves by slightly translating the position of a mirror constituting an enhancement cavity in a terahertz (THz)-wave parametric oscillator (TPO) with optical double resonance. The wide tuning range of the idler wavelength was from 781.5 to 787.3 nm, corresponding to the frequency range of THz (signal) waves from 0.7 to 3.5 THz. The measured intersecting angle between pump and idler waves was in good agreement with the theoretical calculation of the noncollinear phase-matching condition in all the above tuning range.

  19. Short wavelength topography on the inner-core boundary

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Aimin; Masson, Yder; Romanowicz, Barbara

    2007-01-01

    Constraining the topography of the inner-core boundary is important for studies of core–mantle coupling and the generation of the geodynamo. We present evidence for significant temporal variability in the amplitude of the inner core reflected phase PKiKP for an exceptionally high-quality earthquake doublet, observed postcritically at the short-period Yellowknife seismic array (YK), which occurred in the South Sandwich Islands within a 10-year interval (1993/2003). This observation, complemented by data from several other doublets, indicates the presence of topography at the inner-core boundary, with a horizontal wavelength on the order of 10 km. Such topography could be sustained by small-scale convection at the top of the inner core and is compatible with a rate of super rotation of the inner core of ≈0.1–0.15° per year. In the absence of inner-core rotation, decadal scale temporal changes in the inner-core boundary topography would provide an upper bound on the viscosity at the top of the inner core. PMID:17190798

  20. Ultrafast molecular processes at the short-wavelength regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picon, A.; Lehmann, C. S.; Bostedt, C.; Rudenko, A.; Rolles, D.; Marinelli, A.; Young, L.; Pratt, S. T.; Southworth, S. H.

    2016-05-01

    Fundamental molecular processes that underlie chemical reactivity and biological processes typically involve intramolecular dynamics consisting of nuclear motion and the flow of charge and energy across atomic sites. Examples include photosynthesis, electron transfer in biomolecules, and molecular fragmentation. Molecular phenomena initiated by the absorption of an XUV/x-ray photon is one of the most challenging questions for the new generation of XUV/x-ray sources. New capabilities at accelerator-based are continuously being developed, being possible to nowadays generate two-color XUV/x-ray pulses with controlled time delay. The site-specificity of those photons allow the excitation of inner-shell electrons in a particular site of the molecule and, with a controlled time delay, the probing of the induced intramolecular dynamics in another site of the same molecule, opening the door to the unexplored field of intramolecular processes initiated by short-wavelength photons. Also, novel XUV/x-ray sources allow the generation of two-color pulses with a high spatio-temporal degree of coherence, suitable for quantum control schemes involving inner-shell electrons. In this talk, we present new theoretical and experimental results towards this direction. This work is funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Basic Energy Sciences, Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences Division, under Contract No. DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  1. Ultra-short wavelength operation of a thulium fibre laser in the 1660-1750 nm wavelength band.

    PubMed

    Daniel, J M O; Simakov, N; Tokurakawa, M; Ibsen, M; Clarkson, W A

    2015-07-13

    Ultra-short wavelength operation of a thulium fibre laser is investigated. Through use of core pumping and high feedback efficiency wavelength selection, a continuously-tunable fibre laser source operating from 1660 nm to 1720 nm is demonstrated in a silica host. We discuss the range of applications within this important wavelength band such as polymer materials processing and medical applications targeting characteristic C-H bond resonance peaks. As a demonstration of the power scalability of thulium fibre lasers in this band, fixed wavelength operation at 1726 nm with output power up 12.6 W and with slope efficiency > 60% is also shown. PMID:26191883

  2. The spectral sensitivity of the human short-wavelength sensitive cones derived from thresholds and color matches.

    PubMed

    Stockman, A; Sharpe, L T; Fach, C

    1999-08-01

    We used two methods to estimate short-wave (S) cone spectral sensitivity. Firstly, we measured S-cone thresholds centrally and peripherally in five trichromats, and in three blue-cone monochromats, who lack functioning middle-wave (M) and long-wave (L) cones. Secondly, we analyzed standard color-matching data. Both methods yielded equivalent results, on the basis of which we propose new S-cone spectral sensitivity functions. At short and middle-wavelengths, our measurements are consistent with the color matching data of Stiles and Burch (1955, Optica Acta, 2, 168-181; 1959, Optica Acta, 6, 1-26), and other psychophysically measured functions, such as pi 3 (Stiles, 1953, Coloquio sobre problemas opticos de la vision, 1, 65-103). At longer wavelengths, S-cone sensitivity has previously been over-estimated. PMID:10492818

  3. Solar irradiance short wave radiation users guide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinolich, Paul; Arnone, Robert A.

    1995-05-01

    Solar irradiance for short wave radiation (400-700 nm) at the sea surface can be calculated using inputs obtained from satellite systems and model estimates. The short wave solar irradiance is important for estimating the surface heating that occurs in the near surface and estimating the available irradiance for biological growth in the upper ocean. The variability of the solar irradiance is believed to have significant influence on the global carbon cycle. This users guide provides an understanding of the models and operational procedures for using the software and understanding the results.

  4. Submicrojoule femtosecond erbium-doped fibre laser for the generation of dispersive waves at submicron wavelengths

    SciTech Connect

    Kotov, L V; Koptev, M Yu; Anashkina, E A; Muravyev, S V; Andrianov, A V; Kim, A V; Bubnov, M M; Likhachev, M E; Ignat'ev, A D; Lipatov, D S; Gur'yanov, A N

    2014-05-30

    We have demonstrated a femtosecond erbium-doped fibre laser system built in the master oscillator/power amplifier (MOPA) approach. The final amplifier stage utilises a specially designed large mode area active fibre cladding-pumped by multimode laser diodes. The system is capable of generating submicrojoule pulses at a wavelength near 1.6 μm. We have obtained 530-fs pulses with an energy of 400 nJ. The output of the system can be converted to wavelengths shorter than 1 μm through the generation of dispersive waves in passive nonlinear fibre. We have obtained ultra-short 7-nJ pulses with a spectral width of ∼100 nm and a centre wavelength of 0.9 μm, which can be used as a seed signal in parametric amplifiers in designing petawatt laser systems. (lasers)

  5. Wavelength selection and symmetry breaking in orbital wave ripples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nienhuis, Jaap H.; Perron, J. Taylor; Kao, Justin C. T.; Myrow, Paul M.

    2014-10-01

    Sand ripples formed by waves have a uniform wavelength while at equilibrium and develop defects while adjusting to changes in the flow. These patterns arise from the interaction of the flow with the bed topography, but the specific mechanisms have not been fully explained. We use numerical flow models and laboratory wave tank experiments to explore the origins of these patterns. The wavelength of "orbital" wave ripples (λ) is directly proportional to the oscillating flow's orbital diameter (d), with many experimental and field studies finding λ/d ≈ 0.65. We demonstrate a coupling that selects this ratio: the maximum length of the flow separation zone downstream of a ripple crest equals λ when λ/d ≈ 0.65. We show that this condition maximizes the growth rate of ripples. Ripples adjusting to changed flow conditions develop defects that break the bed's symmetry. When d is shortened sufficiently, two new incipient crests appear in every trough, but only one grows into a full-sized crest. Experiments have shown that the same side (right or left) wins in every trough. We find that this occurs because incipient secondary crests slow the flow and encourage the growth of crests on the next flank. Experiments have also shown that when d is lengthened, ripple crests become increasingly sinuous and eventually break up. We find that this occurs because crests migrate preferentially toward the nearest adjacent crest, amplifying any initial sinuosity. Our results reveal the mechanisms that form common wave ripple patterns and highlight interactions among unsteady flows, sediment transport, and bed topography.

  6. Cameras Reveal Elements in the Short Wave Infrared

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    Goodrich ISR Systems Inc. (formerly Sensors Unlimited Inc.), based out of Princeton, New Jersey, received Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contracts from the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Marshall Space Flight Center, Kennedy Space Center, Goddard Space Flight Center, Ames Research Center, Stennis Space Center, and Langley Research Center to assist in advancing and refining indium gallium arsenide imaging technology. Used on the Lunar Crater Observation and Sensing Satellite (LCROSS) mission in 2009 for imaging the short wave infrared wavelengths, the technology has dozens of applications in military, security and surveillance, machine vision, medical, spectroscopy, semiconductor inspection, instrumentation, thermography, and telecommunications.

  7. The degradation of alzak by short wavelength ultraviolet radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donohoe, M. J.; Mcintosh, R., Jr.; Henninger, J. H.

    1972-01-01

    The changes in reflectance of thermal aluminum coating samples exposed to different irradiating utraviolet wavelengths are discussed. It is shown that the coating is damaged faster and further by 180 to 210 in radiation than by Lyman alpha radiation. On an equivalent incident energy basis, Lyman alpha does less damage than 180 to 210 nm radiation. Above 300 nm no degradation is observed for long exposures and below 300 nm increasing degradation with decreasing wavelength is found. It is concluded that Lyman alpha radiation need not be included in laboratory testing of this thermal coating for spacecraft structures.

  8. Atomic diffraction by light gratings with very short wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sancho, Pedro

    2013-06-01

    Lasers with wavelengths of the order of the atomic size are becoming available. We explore the behavior of light-matter interactions in this emergent field by considering the atomic Kapitza-Dirac effect. We derive the diffraction patterns, which are in principle experimentally testable. From a fundamental point of view, our proposal provides an example of system where the periodicity of the diffraction grating is comparable to the size of the diffracted object.

  9. Dark- and bright-rogue-wave solutions for media with long-wave-short-wave resonance.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shihua; Grelu, Philippe; Soto-Crespo, J M

    2014-01-01

    Exact explicit rogue-wave solutions of intricate structures are presented for the long-wave-short-wave resonance equation. These vector parametric solutions feature coupled dark- and bright-field counterparts of the Peregrine soliton. Numerical simulations show the robustness of dark and bright rogue waves in spite of the onset of modulational instability. Dark fields originate from the complex interplay between anomalous dispersion and the nonlinearity driven by the coupled long wave. This unusual mechanism, not available in scalar nonlinear wave equation models, can provide a route to the experimental realization of dark rogue waves in, for instance, negative index media or with capillary-gravity waves. PMID:24580164

  10. Panorama of new generation of accelerator based short wavelength coherent light sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couprie, M. E.

    2015-12-01

    The newly developed intense short wavelength light sources (from Extreme Ultra-Violet (EUV) to X-rays) have open the path to the exploration of matter for revealing structures and electronic processes and for following their evolution in time. After drawing the panorama of existing accelerator based short wavelength light sources, the new trends of evolution of short wavelengths FEL are described, with some illustrations with the example of the LUNEX5 (free electron Laser a New accelerator for the Exploitation of X-ray radiation of 5th generation) demonstrator project of advanced compact Free Electron Laser.

  11. Short-Wavelength Infrared Views of Messier 81

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    The magnificent spiral arms of the nearby galaxy Messier 81 are highlighted in this NASA Spitzer Space Telescope image. Located in the northern constellation of Ursa Major (which also includes the Big Dipper), this galaxy is easily visible through binoculars or a small telescope. M81 is located at a distance of 12 million light-years from Earth.

    Because of its proximity, M81 provides astronomers with an enticing opportunity to study the anatomy of a spiral galaxy in detail. The unprecedented spatial resolution and sensitivity of Spitzer at infrared wavelengths show a clear separation between the several key constituents of the galaxy: the old stars, the interstellar dust heated by star formation activity, and the embedded sites of massive star formation. The infrared images also permit quantitative measurements of the galaxy's overall dust content, as well as the rate at which new stars are being formed.

    The infrared image was obtained by Spitzer's infrared array camera. It is a four-color composite of invisible light, showing emissions from wavelengths of 3.6 microns (blue), 4.5 microns (green), 5.8 microns (yellow) and 8.0 microns (red). Winding outward from the bluish-white central bulge of the galaxy, where old stars predominate and there is little dust, the grand spiral arms are dominated by infrared emission from dust. Dust in the galaxy is bathed by ultraviolet and visible light from the surrounding stars. Upon absorbing an ultraviolet or visible-light photon, a dust grain is heated and re-emits the energy at longer infrared wavelengths. The dust particles, composed of silicates (which are chemically similar to beach sand) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, trace the gas distribution in the galaxy. The well-mixed gas (which is best detected at radio wavelengths) and dust provide a reservoir of raw materials for future star formation.

    The infrared-bright clumpy knots within the spiral arms denote where massive stars are being born in giant H

  12. Interpretation of long- and short-wavelength magnetic anomalies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    DeNoyer, John M.

    1980-01-01

    Magset was launched on October 30, 1979. More than a decade of examining existing data, devising appropriate models of the global magnetic field, and extending methods for interpreting long-wavelength magnetic anomalies preceded this launch Magnetic data collected by satellite can be interrupted by using a method of analysis that quantitively describes the magnetic field resulting from three-dimensional geologic structures that are bounded by an arbitrary number of polygonal faces, Each face my have any orientation and three or more sides. At each point of the external field, the component normal to each face is obtained by using an expression for the solid angle subtended by a generalized polygon. The "cross" of tangential components are relatively easy to obtain for the same polygons. No approximations have been made related to orbit height that restrict the dimensions of the polygons relative to the distance from the external field points. This permits the method to be used to model shorter wavelength anomalies obtained from aircraft or ground surveys. The magnetic fields for all the structures considered are determine in the same rectangular coordinate system. The coordinate system is in depended from the orientation of geologic trends and permits multiple structures or bodies to be included in the same magnetic field calculations. This single reference system also simplified adjustments in position and direction to account for earth curvature in regional interpretation.

  13. All-incoherent wavelength conversion in highly nonlinear fiber using four-wave mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kharraz, Osayd M.; Ahmad, Harith; Forsyth, David I.; Dernaika, Mohamad; Zulkifli, Mohd Zamani B.; Ismail, Mohd Faizal B.; Mohammad, Abu Bakar B.

    2014-09-01

    This work describes efficient and polarization insensitive, all-incoherent four-wave mixing wavelength conversion achieved within a short length of highly nonlinear fiber medium, created by using both spectrally sliced pump and probe channels from a single-amplified spontaneous emission source coupled to two narrowband Fiber Bragg grating (FBG) filters. This simple and cost-effective scheme is capable of generating a down-converted probe channel across a 17.2-nm wavelength span, while still maintaining a high conversion efficiency of around -22 dB and an optical-signal-to-noise ratio of ˜21 dB. The effects of pump power, FBG detuning, and polarization are also reported.

  14. Non-wiggler-averaged theory of short wavelength free-electron lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Freund, H.P.

    1995-12-31

    A three-dimensional nonlinear analysis of the interaction in short wavelength free-electron lasers is presented using a non-wiggler-averaged formulation for the electron trajectories. The analysis and simulation code is based upon a slow-time-scale amplifier model in which it is assumed that the interaction is with a single frequency wave, and Maxwell`s equations are averaged over a wave period. This eliminates the fast time scale from the analysis. Note that although Maxwell`s equations are averaged over the wave period, no average is imposed on the Lorentz force equations. The electromagnetic field is represented as a superposition of Gaussian optical modes. The wiggler model used is that of a three-dimensional planar wiggler which dictates the choice of a Gauss-Hermite mode decomposition. These fields are substituted into Maxwell`s equations and, after averaging over the wave period and integration over the transverse coordinates, yields nonlinear differential equations for the evolution of the amplitude and phase of each mode. These equations are integrated simultaneously with the three-dimensional Lorentz force equations for an ensemble of electrons. Advantages which are derived from the non-wiggler-averaged orbit treatment are: the adiabatic injection of the beam into the wiggler can be modeled; effects due to the transverse wiggler inhomogeniety such as betatron oscillations and synchrotron-betatron coupling are implicitly included in the treatment; wiggler imperfections can be included in the analysis by the relatively simple expedient of allowing the wiggler amplitude to vary with axial position; and harmonic interactions are implicitly included. The first two advantages relate to the self-consistent treatment of emittance growth due to the injection process and the transverse wiggler inhomogenieties. It should be noted that MEDUSA is also capable of analyzing the effect of the measured imperfections of a specific wiggler magnet to be used in an experiment.

  15. LSWAVE 2000: Lasers and short-wavelength applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandner, W.

    2001-07-01

    LSWAVE 2000 was organized as a Satellite Workshop to the Seventh International Conference on Synchrotron Radiation Instrumentation SRI 2000. It was held on Saturday, August 26, 2000, at the Technische Universität Berlin, and was jointly organized by the Max Born Institute for Nonlinear Optics and Short Pulse Spectroscopy (MBI) and the Technical University Berlin (TUB). The organizing committee consisted of Wilhelm Raith (chairman), Wolfgang Sandner, Ingolf Hertel, Manfred Wick, Bernd Winter, Tatjana Gießel, Holger Stiel, Ingo Will, Ursula Bayr (secretary) and Silvia Szlapka (secretary). Continuing information on the Workshop and its proceedings may be found under http://www.mbi-berlin.de/lswave2000/.

  16. Ultrafast terawatt laser sources for high-field particle acceleration and short wavelength generation

    SciTech Connect

    Downer, M.C.; Siders, C.W.

    1996-12-31

    The Laser Sources working group concerned itself with recent advances in and future requirements for the development of laser sources relevant to high-energy physics (HEP) colliders, small scale accelerators, and the generation of short wave-length radiation. We heavily emphasized pulsed terawatt peak power laser sources for several reasons. First, their development over the past five years has been rapid and multi-faceted, and has made relativistic light intensity available to the advanced accelerator community, as well as the wider physics community, for the first time. Secondly, they have strongly impacted plasma-based accelerator research over the past two years, producing the first experimental demonstrations of the laser wakefield accelerator (LWFA) in both its resonantly-driven and self-modulated forms. Thirdly, their average power and wall-plug efficiency currently fall well short of projected requirements for future accelerators and other high average power applications, but show considerable promise for improving substantially over the next few years. A review of this rapidly emerging laser technology in the context of advanced accelerator research is therefore timely.

  17. Gravitational waves and short gamma ray bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Predoi, Valeriu

    2012-07-01

    Short hard gamma-ray bursts (GRB) are believed to be produced by compact binary coalescences (CBC) { either double neutron stars or neutron star{black hole binaries. The same source is expected to emit strong gravitational radiation, detectable with existing and planned gravitational wave observatories. The focus of this work is to describe a series of searches for gravitational waves (GW) from compact binary coalescence (CBC) events triggered by short gamma-ray burst detections. Specifically, we will present the motivation, frameworks, implementations and results of searches for GW associated with short gamma-ray bursts detected by Swift, Fermi{GBM and the InterPlanetary Network (IPN) gamma-ray detectors. We will begin by presenting the main concepts that lay the foundation of gravitational waves emission, as they are formulated in the theory of General Relativity; we will also brie y describe the operational principles of GW detectors, together with explaining the main challenges that the GW detection process is faced with. Further, we will motivate the use of observations in the electromagnetic (EM) band as triggers for GW searches, with an emphasis on possible EM signals from CBC events. We will briefly present the data analysis techniques including concepts as matched{filtering through a collection of theoretical GW waveforms, signal{to{ noise ratio, coincident and coherent analysis approaches, signal{based veto tests and detection candidates' ranking. We will use two different GW{GRB search examples to illustrate the use of the existing coincident and coherent analysis methods. We will also present a series of techniques meant to improve the sensitivity of existing GW triggered searches. These include shifting background data in time in order to obtain extended coincident data and setting a prior on the GRB inclination angle, in accordance with astrophysical observations, in order to restrict the searched parameter space. We will describe the GW data analysis

  18. Investigating short wavelength correlated errors on low resolution mode altimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poisson, Jean-Christophe; Thibaut, Pierre; Dibarboure, Gérald; Labroue, Sylvie; Lasne, Yannick; Boy, François; Picot, Nicolas

    2013-04-01

    Although conventional radar altimetry products (Jason1, Jason2, LRM CRYOSAT2, etc) have a spatial resolution as high as 300 m, the observation of ocean scales smaller than 100 km is limited by the existence of a "spectral hump", i.e. a geographically coherent error. In the frame of the future altimetry missions (SAR for Cryosat -2 and Sentinel-3 missions and interferometry for the SWOT mission) it becomes crucial to investigate again and to better understand the signals obtained at small scales by conventional altimeter missions. Through an analysis of simulations, we show that heterogeneous backscattering scenes can result in the corruption of the altimeter waveforms and retracked parameters. The retrackers used in current ground processors cannot well fit the Brown model during backscattering events because this model has been designed for a homogeneous scene. The error is also propagated along-track because of the size and shape of the low resolution mode (LRM) disc-shaped footprint. The hump phenomenon is shown to be almost ubiquitous in the ocean, yet more intense at low latitudes and in the Indian Ocean and Western Pacific Ocean, where backscattering events are more frequent. Its overall signature could be a Gaussian-like random signal smooth for wavelengths smaller than 15 km, i.e. white noise on 1 Hz products. The analysis of current data from 5 altimetry missions highlights the influence of the instrument design and altitude, and the influence of the retracker used. The spectral hump is a systematic response to random events and it is possible to mitigate it with new processing. Simulations and geographically limited datasets from the synthetic aperture radar mode (SARM) of Cryosat-2 show that the thin stripe-shaped synthetic footprint of SARM might be less sensitive to the artifact.

  19. Mercury cadmium telluride short- and medium-wavelength infrared staring focal plane arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vural, Kadri

    1987-01-01

    Short and medium IR wavelength 64 x 64 hybrid focal plane arrays (FPAs) have been developed using sapphire-grown HgCdTe. The short wavelength arrays were developed for a prototype airborne imaging spectrometer, while those of medium wavelength are suitable for tactical missile seekers and strategic surveillance systems. Attention is presently given to results obtained for these FPAs' current-voltage characteristics, as well as for their characterization at different temperatures. The detector arrays were also mated to a multiplexer and characterized under different operating conditions. The unit cell size used is 52 x 52 microns.

  20. Increased signals from short-wavelength-excited fluorescent molecules using sub-Ti:Sapphire wavelengths

    PubMed Central

    NORRIS, G; AMOR, R; DEMPSTER, J; AMOS, W B; MCCONNELL, G

    2012-01-01

    We report the use of an all-solid-state ultrashort pulsed source specifically for two-photon microscopy at wavelengths shorter than those of the conventional Ti:Sapphire laser. Our approach involves sum–frequency mixing of the output from an optical parametric oscillator (λ= 1400–1640 nm) synchronously pumped by a Yb-doped fibre laser (λ= 1064 nm), with the residual pump radiation. This generated an fs-pulsed output tunable in the red spectral region (λ= 620–636 nm, ∼150 mW, 405 fs, 80 MHz, M2∼ 1.3). We demonstrate the performance of our ultrashort pulsed system using fluorescently labelled and autofluorescent tissue, and compare with conventional Ti:Sapphire excitation. We observe a more than 3-fold increase in fluorescence signal intensity using our visible laser source in comparison with the Ti:Sapphire laser for two-photon excitation at equal illumination peak powers of 1.16 kW or less. PMID:23078118

  1. Conversion of electrostatic plasma waves into electromagnetic waves - Numerical calculation of the dispersion relation for all wavelengths.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oya, H.

    1971-01-01

    The dispersion curves have been computed for a wide range of wavelengths from electromagnetic waves to electrostatic waves in a magnetoactive warm plasma with a Maxwellian velocity distribution function. The computation was carried out mainly for the perpendicular propagation mode. The upper hybrid resonance is the connection point of the electrostatic waves and the electromagnetic waves. The electrostatic waves not associated with the upper hybrid resonance are subjected to electron cyclotron damping when the wavelength becomes long. Oblique propagation is allowed for the electrostatic waves in a frequency range from the plasma frequency to the upper hybrid resonance frequency in the long-wavelength region where Landau damping can be neglected and where the electrostatic mode smoothly connects to the electromagnetic X-mode. In a slightly inhomogeneous plasma, the Bernstein-mode electrostatic wave can escape by being converted into the O-mode electromagnetic wave; two reflections take place during this escape process.

  2. Short-wave cooperative instabilities in representative aircraft vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabre, David; Jacquin, Laurent

    2004-05-01

    This paper considers the short-wave cooperative instabilities in a family of vortices representative of aircraft wakes. These vortices are characterized by two core scales, an internal core scale a1 and an external core scale a2, and their azimuthal velocity follows a power law V(r)˜r-α in the intermediate zone (a1wavelengths and the structure of the unstable modes are characterized as functions of the base flow parameters α and a2/a1. For 0.5⩽α⩽1, the wavelength of the instability is of the order of the internal scale a1 and the unstable modes only affect the internal core. In this case the growth rate of the instability is in accordance with the predictions of the elliptical instability theory and is a growing function of the parameter a2/a1. For 0⩽α<0.4, the wavelength of the instability is of the order of the external scale a2 and the unstable modes extend into the intermediate zone. In this case the growth rate of the instability differs from the predictions of the elliptical instability theory and is independent upon the parameter a2/a1. Interestingly, a sharp transition between these two regimes occurs for 0.4<α<0.5, in a range of parameters corresponding to experimentally measured trailing wakes. In this range, the bands of wave numbers affected by the instability are particularly large and may coalesce into a broadband spectrum.

  3. Influence of short gravity waves on thermal radio emission of water surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilin, V. A.; Naumov, A. A.; Rayzer, V. Y.; Filonovich, S. R.; Etkin, V. S.

    1985-06-01

    An experimental study is presented of the thermal radio emission caused by short waves, accompanied by a quantitative interpretation of the data obtained. Emphasis is on an analysis of the variation in radio brightness contrast as a function of steepness of the short gravity waves, measured by means of a high-frequency radiometer operating in the lambda = 0.8 cm range. Waves were artificially generated in a small channel, wavelength 8 to 40 cm, height 0.6 to 3 cm. Due to the high sensitivity of the radiometric apparatus used, effects were recorded which were related to the influence of the profile and steepness of the short gravity waves. The possibility of using the geometrical optics approximation for quantitative interpretation of the experimental data is demonstrated. The model is based on essentially non-Gaussian statistics of slopes corresponding to quasimonochromatic waves of finite amplitude.

  4. Terahertz imaging of sub-wavelength particles with Zenneck surface waves

    SciTech Connect

    Navarro-Cía, M.; Natrella, M.; Graham, C.; Renaud, C. C.; Seeds, A. J.; Mitrofanov, O.; Dominec, F.; Kužel, P.; Delagnes, J. C.; Mounaix, P.

    2013-11-25

    Impact of sub-wavelength-size dielectric particles on Zenneck surface waves on planar metallic antennas is investigated at terahertz (THz) frequencies with THz near-field probe microscopy. Perturbations of the surface waves show the particle presence, despite its sub-wavelength size. The experimental configuration, which utilizes excitation of surface waves at metallic edges, is suitable for THz imaging of dielectric sub-wavelength size objects. As a proof of concept, the effects of a small strontium titanate rectangular particle and a titanium dioxide sphere on the surface field of a bow-tie antenna are experimentally detected and verified using full-wave simulations.

  5. Widely Wavelength-Tunable Blue-Shifted Dispersive Waves for Broadband Visible Wavelength Generation in a Photonic Crystal Fiber Cladding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Jin-Hui; Sang, Xin-Zhu; Yu, Chong-Xiu; Shen, Xiang-Wei; Wang, Kui-Ru; Yan, Bin-Bin; Han, Ying; Zhou, Gui-Yao; Hou, Lan-Tian

    2012-10-01

    Blue-shifted dispersive waves (DWs) are efficiently generated from the red-shifted solitons by coupling the 120 fs pulses into the fundamental mode of the multi-knots of a photonic crystal fiber cladding. When the femtosecond pulses at the wavelength of 825 nm and the average power of 300 mW are coupled into knots 1-3, the conversion efficiency ηDW of 32% and bandwidth BDW of 50 nm are obtained. The ultrashort pulses generated by the DWs can be tunable over the whole visible wavelength by adjusting the wavelengths of the pump pulses coupled into different knots. It can be believed that this widely wavelength-tunable ultrashort visible pulse source has important applications in ultrafast photonics and resonant Raman scattering.

  6. Effect of short wavelength illumination on the characteristic bulk diffusion length in ribbon silicon solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ho, C. T.; Mathias, J. D.

    1981-01-01

    The influence of short wavelength light on the characteristic bulk minority carrier diffusion length of the ribbon silicon photovoltaic cell has been investigated. We have measured the intensity and wavelength dependence of the diffusion length in an EFG ribbon cell, and compared it with a standard Czochralski grown silicon cell. While the various short wavelength illuminations have shown no influence on the diffusion length in the CZ cell, the diffusion lengths in the ribbon cell exhibit a strong dependence on the volume generation rate as well as on the wavelength of the superimposed lights. We have concluded that the trap-filling phenomenon at various depths in the bulk neutral region of the cell is consistent with the experimental observation.

  7. Short wavelength HgCdTe staring focal plane for low background astronomy applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, D.; Stobie, J.; Hartle, N.; Lacroix, D.; Maschhoff, K.

    1989-01-01

    The design of a 128x128 staring short wave infrared (SWIR) HgCdTe focal plane incorporating charge integrating transimpedance input preamplifiers is presented. The preamplifiers improve device linearity and uniformity, and provide signal gain ahead of the miltiplexer and readout circuitry. Detector's with cutoff wavelength of 2.5 microns and operated at 80 K have demonstrated impedances in excess of 10(exp 16) ohms with 60 percent quantum efficiency. Focal plane performance using a smaller format device is presented which demonstrates the potential of this approach. Although the design is capable of achieving less than 30 rms electrons with todays technology, initial small format devices demonstrated a read noise of 100 rms electrons and were limited by the atypical high noise performance of the silicon process run. Luminescence from the active silicon circuitry in the multiplexer limits the minimum detector current to a few hundred electrons per second. Approaches to eliminate this excessive source of current is presented which should allow the focal plane to achieve detector background limited performance.

  8. 256×1 element linear InGaAs short wavelength near-infrared detector arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xue; Tang, Hengjing; Fan, Guangyu; Liu, Dafu; Shao, Xiumei; Zhang, Yonggang; Zhang, Haiyan; Chen, Xinyu; Zhu, Sangen; Gong, Haimei; Fang, Jiaxiong

    2008-03-01

    256×1 element linear InGaAs detector arrays assembly have been fabricated for the short wave infrared band(0.9~1.7μm), including the detector, CMOS readout circuits, thermoelectric cooler in a sealed package. The InGaAs detectors were achieved by mesa structure on the p-InP/i-InGaAs/n-InP double hetero-structure epitaxial material. 256×1 element linear InGaAs detectors were wire-bonded to 128×1 element odd and even ROIC, which were packaged in a dual-in-line package by parallel sealing. The characteristics of detectors and detector arrays module were investigated at the room temperature. The detector shows response peak at 1.62μm with 50% cutoff wavelength of 1.73μm and average R0A with 5.02KΩ•cm2. Response non-uniformity and average peak detectivity of 256×1 element linear InGaAs detector arrays are 3.10% and 1.38×10 12cmHz 1/2/W, respectively.

  9. Skylab radar altimeter: short-wavelength perturbations detected in ocean surface profiles.

    PubMed

    Leitao, C D; McGoogan, J T

    1974-12-27

    Short-wavelength anomalies in sea surface topography, caused by the gravitational effects of major ocean bottom topographic features, have been detected by the radar altimeter aboard Skylab. Some features, such as deep ocean trenches, seamounts, and escarpments, displace the ocean surface by as much as 15 meters over 100-kilometer wavelengths. This experiment demonstrates the potential of satellite altimetry for determining the ocean geoid and for mapping major features of the ocean bottom. PMID:17833933

  10. Skylab radar altimeter - Short-wavelength perturbations detected in ocean surface profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leitao, C. D.; Mcgoogan, J. T.

    1974-01-01

    Short-wavelength anomalies in sea surface topography, caused by the gravitational effects of major ocean bottom topographic features, have been detected by the radar altimeter aboard Skylab. Some features, such as deep ocean trenches, seamounts, and escarpments, displace the ocean surface by as much as 15 meters over 100-kilometer wavelengths. This experiment demonstrates the potential of satellite altimetry for determining the ocean geoid and for mapping major features of the ocean bottom.

  11. Short Wavelength Cone Opsin Is Not Expressed in the Retina of Arboreal African Pangolin (Manis tricuspis)

    PubMed Central

    Adekanmbi, Adejoke J.; Adekanmbi, Adefisayo A.; Akinola, Oluwole B.

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports a study of cone photoreceptors present in the retina of Manis tricuspis. Specifically, the LWS (L-) opsin expressed in longwave-sensitive cones and SWS1 (S-) opsin shortwave-sensitive cones were targeted. Vertical sections revealed reactivity to a cone marker, peanut agglutinin (PNA), and to an LWS antibody, but not to an SWS1 antibody. This suggests that the Manis tricuspis visual system is not able to discriminate shorter wavelengths from longer wavelengths because the short wavelength cones are not expressed in their retina. PMID:27242946

  12. Short Wavelength Cone Opsin Is Not Expressed in the Retina of Arboreal African Pangolin (Manis tricuspis).

    PubMed

    Adekanmbi, Adejoke J; Adekanmbi, Adefisayo A; Akinola, Oluwole B

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports a study of cone photoreceptors present in the retina of Manis tricuspis. Specifically, the LWS (L-) opsin expressed in longwave-sensitive cones and SWS1 (S-) opsin shortwave-sensitive cones were targeted. Vertical sections revealed reactivity to a cone marker, peanut agglutinin (PNA), and to an LWS antibody, but not to an SWS1 antibody. This suggests that the Manis tricuspis visual system is not able to discriminate shorter wavelengths from longer wavelengths because the short wavelength cones are not expressed in their retina. PMID:27242946

  13. High frame rate photoacoustic imaging using multiple wave-length LED array light source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agano, Toshitaka; Sato, Naoto; Nakatsuka, Hitoshi; Kitagawa, Kazuo; Hanaoka, Takamitsu; Morisono, Koji; Shigeta, Yusuke; Tanaka, Chizuyo

    2016-03-01

    We have successfully imaged photoacoustic differences of light absorbance between two images acquired by different wave-length LED array light source. Compared to photoacoustic imaging system using conventional solid-state laser light source, LED light source can be driven at higher frequency pulses, so we were able to get the subtraction image at higher frame rate that calculated from two images which were captured at each wave-length LED light pulse timing. We developed LED array light source which is composed to have two different wave-length chips, so each wave-length light pulse can be controlled and emitted freely. Thus LED array light source can be composed as multiple selectable wavelength more than two, and a various combination of subtraction image may become available at high frame rate.

  14. Enhancement of the short wavelength upconversion emission in inverse opal photonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hangjun; Zhu, Jialun; Yang, Zhengwen; Yan, Dong; Wang, Rongfei; Qiu, Jianbei; Song, Zhiguo; Yu, Xue; Yang, Yong; Zhou, Dacheng; Yin, Zhaoyi

    2014-05-01

    Upconversion luminescence properties of Yb-Tb codoped Bi4Ti3O12 inverse opals have been investigated. The results show that the upconversion emission can be modulated by the photonic band gap. More significantly, in the upconversion inverse opals, the excited-state absorption of Tb3+ is greatly enhanced by the suppression of upconversion spontaneous emissions of the intermediate excited state, and thus the short wavelength upconversion emission from Tb3+ is considerably improved. We believe that the present work will be valuable for not only the foundational study of upconversion emission modifications but also new optical devices in upconversion displays and short wavelength upconversion lasers. PMID:24734648

  15. Four-wave mixing in wavelength-division-multiplexed soliton systems: damping and amplification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ablowitz, M. J.; Biondini, G.; Chakravarty, S.; Jenkins, R. B.; Sauer, J. R.

    1996-10-01

    Four-wave mixing in wavelength-division-multiplexed soliton systems with damping and amplification is studied. An analytical model is introduced that explains the dramatic growth of the four-wave terms. The model yields a resonance condition relating the soliton frequency and the amplifier distance. It correctly predicts all essential features regarding the resonant growth of the four-wave contributions.

  16. Coexisting rogue waves within the (2+1)-component long-wave-short-wave resonance.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shihua; Soto-Crespo, Jose M; Grelu, Philippe

    2014-09-01

    The coexistence of two different types of fundamental rogue waves is unveiled, based on the coupled equations describing the (2+1)-component long-wave-short-wave resonance. For a wide range of asymptotic background fields, each family of three rogue wave components can be triggered by using a slight deterministic alteration to the otherwise identical background field. The ability to trigger markedly different rogue wave profiles from similar initial conditions is confirmed by numerical simulations. This remarkable feature, which is absent in the scalar nonlinear Schrödinger equation, is attributed to the specific three-wave interaction process and may be universal for a variety of multicomponent wave dynamics spanning from oceanography to nonlinear optics. PMID:25314555

  17. CLASSICAL AREAS OF PHENOMENOLOGY: Investigation of pump-wavelength dependence of terahertz-wave parametric oscillator based on LiNbO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Bo; Liu, Jin-Song; Li, En-Bang; Yao, Jian-Quan

    2009-07-01

    This paper investigates the performances of terahertz-wave parametric oscillators (TPOs) based on the LiNbO3 crystal at different pump wavelengths. The calculated results show that TPO characteristics, including the frequency tuning range, the THz-wave gain and the stability of THz-wave output direction based on the Si-prism coupler, can be significantly improved by using a short-wavelength pump. It also demonstrates that a long-wavelength-pump allows the employment of a short TPO cavity due to an enlarged phase-matching angle, that is, an increased angular separation between the pump and oscillated Stokes beams under the THz-wave generation at a specific frequency. The study provides an useful guide and a theoretical basis for the further improvement of TPO systems.

  18. Exploiting the short wavelength gain of silica-based thulium-doped fiber amplifiers.

    PubMed

    Li, Z; Jung, Y; Daniel, J M O; Simakov, N; Tokurakawa, M; Shardlow, P C; Jain, D; Sahu, J K; Heidt, A M; Clarkson, W A; Alam, S U; Richardson, D J

    2016-05-15

    Short wavelength operation (1650-1800 nm) of silica-based thulium-doped fiber amplifiers (TDFAs) is investigated. We report the first demonstration of in-band diode-pumped silica-based TDFAs working in the 1700-1800 nm waveband. Up to 29 dB of small-signal gain is achieved in this spectral region, with an operation wavelength accessible by diode pumping as short as 1710 nm. Further gain extension toward shorter wavelengths is realized in a fiber laser pumped configuration. A silica-based TDFA working in the 1650-1700 nm range with up to 29 dB small-signal gain and noise figure as low as 6.5 dB is presented. PMID:27176961

  19. Internal stress and degradation in short-wavelength AlGaAs double-heterojunction devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ladany, I.; Furman, T. R.; Marinelli, D. P.

    1979-01-01

    Aging tests of incoherently operated zinc-doped double-heterojunction (DH) lasers designed for short-wavelength (0.71-0.72 micron) operation show that the introduction of buffer layers between the substrate and the DH structure leads to a drastic reduction in gradual degradation. This is attributed to a decrease in lattice mismatch stress.

  20. Sensitivity enhancement of surface thermal lens technique with a short-wavelength probe beam: Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xiaorong; Li, Bincheng

    2015-02-15

    Surface thermal lens is a highly sensitive photothermal technique to measure low absorption losses of various solid materials. In such applications, the sensitivity of surface thermal lens is a key parameter for measuring extremely low absorption. In this paper, we experimentally investigated the influence of probe beam wavelength on the sensitivity of surface thermal lens for measuring the low absorptance of optical laser components. Three probe lasers with wavelength 375 nm, 633 nm, and 1570 nm were used, respectively, to detect the surface thermal lens amplitude of a highly reflective coating sample excited by a cw modulated Gaussian beam at 1064 nm. The experimental results showed that the maximum amplitude of surface thermal lens signal obtained at corresponding optimized detection distance was inversely proportional to the wavelength of the probe beam, as predicted by previous theoretical model. The sensitivity of surface thermal lens could, therefore, be improved by detecting surface thermal lens signal with a short-wavelength probe beam.

  1. Short-wavelength enrichment of polychromatic light enhances human melatonin suppression potency.

    PubMed

    Brainard, George C; Hanifin, John P; Warfield, Benjamin; Stone, Marielle K; James, Mary E; Ayers, Melissa; Kubey, Alan; Byrne, Brenda; Rollag, Mark

    2015-04-01

    The basic goal of this research is to determine the best combination of light wavelengths for use as a lighting countermeasure for circadian and sleep disruption during space exploration, as well as for individuals living on Earth. Action spectra employing monochromatic light and selected monochromatic wavelength comparisons have shown that short-wavelength visible light in the blue-appearing portion of the spectrum is most potent for neuroendocrine, circadian, and neurobehavioral regulation. The studies presented here tested the hypothesis that broad spectrum, polychromatic fluorescent light enriched in the short-wavelength portion of the visible spectrum is more potent for pineal melatonin suppression in healthy men and women. A total of 24 subjects were tested across three separate experiments. Each experiment used a within-subjects study design that tested eight volunteers to establish the full-range fluence-response relationship between corneal light irradiance and nocturnal plasma melatonin suppression. Each experiment tested one of the three types of fluorescent lamps that differed in their relative emission of light in the short-wavelength end of the visible spectrum between 400 and 500 nm. A hazard analysis, based on national and international eye safety criteria, determined that all light exposures used in this study were safe. Each fluence-response curve demonstrated that increasing corneal irradiances of light evoked progressively increasing suppression of nocturnal melatonin. Comparison of these fluence-response curves supports the hypothesis that polychromatic fluorescent light is more potent for melatonin regulation when enriched in the short-wavelength spectrum. PMID:25726691

  2. Propagation of Long-Wavelength Nonlinear Slow Sausage Waves in Stratified Magnetic Flux Tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbulescu, M.; Erdélyi, R.

    2016-05-01

    The propagation of nonlinear, long-wavelength, slow sausage waves in an expanding magnetic flux tube, embedded in a non-magnetic stratified environment, is discussed. The governing equation for surface waves, which is akin to the Leibovich-Roberts equation, is derived using the method of multiple scales. The solitary wave solution of the equation is obtained numerically. The results obtained are illustrative of a solitary wave whose properties are highly dependent on the degree of stratification.

  3. Water Surface Currents, Short Gravity-Capillary Waves and Radar Backscatter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atakturk, Serhad S.; Katsaros, Kristina B.

    1993-01-01

    Despite their importance for air-sea interaction and microwave remote sensing of the ocean surface, intrinsic properties of short gravity-capillary waves are not well established. This is largely due to water surface currents and their effects on the direct measurements of wave parameters conducted at a fixed point. Frequencies of small scale waves propagating on a surface which itself is in motion, are subject to Doppler shifts. Hence, the high frequency tail of the wave spectra obtained from such temporal observations is smeared. Conversion of this smeared measured-frequency spectra to intrinsic-frequency (or wavenumber) spectra requires corrections for the Doppler shifts. Such attempts in the past have not been very successful in particular when field data were used. This becomes evident if the amplitude modulation of short waves by underlying long waves is considered. Microwave radar studies show that the amplitude of a short wave component attains its maximum value near the crests and its minimum in the troughs of the long waves. Doppler-shifted wave data yield similar results but much larger in modulation magnitude, as expected. In general, Doppler shift corrections reduce the modulation magnitude. Overcorrection may result in a negligible modulation or even in a strong modulation with the maximum amplitude in the wave troughs. The latter situation is clearly contradictory to our visual observations as well as the radar results and imply that the advection by currents is overestimated. In this study, a differential-advection approach is used in which small scale waves are advected by the currents evaluated not at the free surface, but at a depth proportional to their wavelengths. Applicability of this approach is verified by the excellent agreement in phase and magnitude of short-wave modulation between results based on radar and on wave-gauge measurements conducted on a lake.

  4. Short wind waves on the ocean: Wavenumber-frequency spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plant, William J.

    2015-03-01

    Dominant surface waves on the ocean exhibit a dispersion relation that confines their energy to a curve in a wavenumber-frequency spectrum. Short wind waves on the ocean, on the other hand, are advected by these dominant waves so that they do not exhibit a well-defined dispersion relation over many realizations of the surface. Here we show that the short-wave analog to the dispersion relation is a distributed spectrum in the wavenumber-frequency plane that collapses to the standard dispersion relation in the absence of long waves. We compute probability distributions of short-wave wavenumber given a (frequency, direction) pair and of short-wave frequency given a (wavenumber, direction) pair. These two probability distributions must yield a single spectrum of surface displacements as a function of wavenumber and frequency, F(k,f). We show that the folded, azimuthally averaged version of this spectrum has a "butterfly" pattern in the wavenumber-frequency plane if significant long waves are present. Integration of this spectrum over frequency yields the well-known k-3 wavenumber spectrum. When integrated over wavenumber, the spectrum yields an f-4 form that agrees with measurement. We also show that a cut through the unfolded F(k,f) at constant k produces the well-known form of moderate-incidence-angle Doppler spectra for electromagnetic scattering from the sea. This development points out the dependence of the short-wave spectrum on the amplitude of the long waves.

  5. Low work function surface layers produced by laser ablation using short-wavelength photons

    DOEpatents

    Balooch, Mehdi; Dinh, Long N.; Siekhaus, Wigbert J.

    2000-01-01

    Short-wavelength photons are used to ablate material from a low work function target onto a suitable substrate. The short-wavelength photons are at or below visible wavelength. The elemental composition of the deposit is controlled by the composition of the target and the gaseous environment in which the ablation process is performed. The process is carried out in a deposition chamber to which a short-wavelength laser is mounted and which includes a substrate holder which can be rotated, tilted, heated, or cooled. The target material is mounted onto a holder that spins the target during laser ablation. In addition, the deposition chamber is provided with a vacuum pump, an external gas supply with atomizer and radical generator, a gas generator for producing a flow of molecules on the substrate, and a substrate cleaning device, such as an ion gun. The substrate can be rotated and tilted, for example, whereby only the tip of an emitter can be coated with a low work function material.

  6. Controlled generation of short-wavelength periodic megagauss magnetic fields in plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Fiuza, F.; Silva, L. O.

    2009-01-22

    We examine the possibility of producing short-wavelength MG magnetic fields by exciting a magnetic mode from the collision of electromagnetic light pulses with relativistic ionization fronts. PIC simulation results demonstrate the validity of the scheme to generate compact coherent long lived magnetic structures that can be used to produce ultrashort-wavelength radiation with existing state-of-the-art laser systems. In particular, we analyze the possibility of making a compact Gamma-ray synchrotron source based on this magnetic mode.

  7. Short-wavelength near infrared stimulation of the inner ear hair cells.

    PubMed

    Xia, Nan; Peng, Fei; Wang, Xing; Zheng, Xiao L; Wan, Xiao P; Yuan, Wei; Hou, Wen S

    2014-01-01

    To explore whether the short wavelength near infrared laser can stimulate the functional hair cells, pulsed laser with wavelength of 808-nm was used to stimulate guinea pigs cochlea. Compound action potential (CAP) and auditory brainstem responses (ABR) were recorded during the experiments. We successfully recorded photomechanical responses from normal hearing animals and demonstrated the responses were not induced by optical acoustic events. Furthermore, we studied the effect of different stimulation parameters on neural response. The results show that cochlear activation can be modulated with different optical parameters. PMID:25570531

  8. New Insight into Short-Wavelength Solar Wind Fluctuations from Vlasov Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sahraoui, Fouad; Belmont, G.; Goldstein, M. L.

    2012-01-01

    The nature of solar wind (SW) turbulence below the proton gyroscale is a topic that is being investigated extensively nowadays, both theoretically and observationally. Although recent observations gave evidence of the dominance of kinetic Alfven waves (KAWs) at sub-ion scales with omega < omega(sub ci), other studies suggest that the KAW mode cannot carry the turbulence cascade down to electron scales and that the whistler mode (i.e., omega > omega (sub ci)) is more relevant. Here, we study key properties of the short-wavelength plasma modes under limited, but realistic, SW conditions, Typically Beta(sub i) approx. > Beta (sub e) 1 and for high oblique angles of propagation 80 deg <= Theta (sub kB) < 90 deg as observed from the Cluster spacecraft data. The linear properties of the plasma modes under these conditions are poorly known, which contrasts with the well-documented cold plasma limit and/or moderate oblique angles of propagation (Theta (sub kB) < 80 deg). Based on linear solutions of the Vlasov kinetic theory, we discuss the relevance of each plasma mode (fast, Bernstein, KAW, whistler) in carrying the energy cascade down to electron scales. We show, in particular, that the shear Alfven mode (known in the magnetohydrodynamic limit) extends at scales kappa rho (sub i) approx. > 1 to frequencies either larger or smaller than omega (sub ci), depending on the anisotropy kappa (parallel )/ kappa(perpendicular). This extension into small scales is more readily called whistler (omega > omega (sub ci)) or KAW (omega < omega (sub ci)) although the mode is essentially the same. This contrasts with the well-accepted idea that the whistler branch always develops as a continuation at high frequencies of the fast magnetosonic mode. We show, furthermore, that the whistler branch is more damped than the KAW one, which makes the latter the more relevant candidate to carry the energy cascade down to electron scales. We discuss how these new findings may facilitate resolution

  9. NEW INSIGHT INTO SHORT-WAVELENGTH SOLAR WIND FLUCTUATIONS FROM VLASOV THEORY

    SciTech Connect

    Sahraoui, F.; Belmont, G.; Goldstein, M. L.

    2012-04-01

    The nature of solar wind (SW) turbulence below the proton gyroscale is a topic that is being investigated extensively nowadays, both theoretically and observationally. Although recent observations gave evidence of the dominance of kinetic Alfven waves (KAWs) at sub-ion scales with {omega} < {omega}{sub ci}, other studies suggest that the KAW mode cannot carry the turbulence cascade down to electron scales and that the whistler mode (i.e., {omega} > {omega}{sub ci}) is more relevant. Here, we study key properties of the short-wavelength plasma modes under limited, but realistic, SW conditions, typically {beta}{sub i} {approx}> {beta}{sub e} {approx} 1 and for high oblique angles of propagation 80 Degree-Sign {<=} {Theta}{sub kB} < 90 Degree-Sign as observed from the Cluster spacecraft data. The linear properties of the plasma modes under these conditions are poorly known, which contrasts with the well-documented cold plasma limit and/or moderate oblique angles of propagation ({Theta}{sub kB} < 80 Degree-Sign ). Based on linear solutions of the Vlasov kinetic theory, we discuss the relevance of each plasma mode (fast, Bernstein, KAW, whistler) in carrying the energy cascade down to electron scales. We show, in particular, that the shear Alfven mode (known in the magnetohydrodynamic limit) extends at scales k{rho}{sub i} {approx}> 1 to frequencies either larger or smaller than {omega}{sub ci}, depending on the anisotropy k{sub ||}/k . This extension into small scales is more readily called whistler ({omega} > {omega}{sub ci}) or KAW ({omega} < {omega}{sub ci}), although the mode is essentially the same. This contrasts with the well-accepted idea that the whistler branch always develops as a continuation at high frequencies of the fast magnetosonic mode. We show, furthermore, that the whistler branch is more damped than the KAW one, which makes the latter the more relevant candidate to carry the energy cascade down to electron scales. We discuss how these new findings

  10. New methods for calculating short-wave radio paths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, A. V.; Tsedilina, E. E.; Cherkashin, Iu. N.

    Recent research on the calculation of short-wave paths at IZMIRAN (the Soviet Institute for the Study of Terrestrial Magnetism, the Ionosphere, and the Propagation of Radio Waves) is reviewed. Particular attention is given to: (1) the development of approximate analytical methods for ray-tracing calculations and for determining the geometrical-optics characteristics of a radio signal in a horizontally irregular ionosphere; (2) investigations of the long-range and short-wave propagation of decametric waves; and (3) the development of a parabolic-equation method for considering diffraction and scattering in a medium with regular and random irregularities.

  11. Forest Canopy Waves: The Long-Wavelength Component

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pulido, Manuel; Chimonas, George

    Air flowing over a forest canopy is examined for instabilities driven by Jeffreys' drag mechanism. The calculations indicate that the mechanism is generally effective in strong wind conditions and extremely effective when the boundary layer supports wave trapping. The instability forces the free wind down amongst the trees, creatingepisodes of stress in the foliage.

  12. Near infrared spectroscopy for mastitis diagnosis: Two-dimensional correlation study in short wavelength region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsenkova, Roumiana; Murayama, Koichi; Kawano, Sumio; Wu, Yuqing; Toyoda, Kiyohiko; Ozaki, Yukihiro

    2000-03-01

    We describe the application of two-dimensional correlation spectroscopic (2DCOS) technique for mastitic diagnosis. Seven average spectra in the short wavelength region (700-1100 nm) of mastitic levels separated from healthy to disease were subjected to 2DCOS analysis. Synchronous correlation map clearly showed water and fat bands. Asynchronous correlation map indicated the dynamical variations of milk constituents in milk occurred when a cow gets mastitis.

  13. Permittivity of water at millimeter wave-lengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blue, M. D.

    1976-01-01

    Work performed on the permittivity of seawater and ice at 100 GHz was described. Measurements on water covered the temperature range from 0 to 50 C, while the measurements on ice were taken near - 10 C. In addition, a small number of measurements were made on the reflectivity of absorber materials used in a previous program on research in millimeter wave techniques. Normal incidence reflectivity was measured, and the result was used to obtain the index of refraction. For the case of normal incidence, reflectivity at a fixed temperature was reproducible to 1% for values near 40%. For reflectivity measurements on ice, the lack of attenuation leads to reflection from the back surface of the sample; this complication was circumvented by using a wedge shaped sample and freezing the water in a container lined with absorber material.

  14. Sub-wavelength energy trapping of elastic waves in a metamaterial.

    PubMed

    Colombi, Andrea; Roux, Philippe; Rupin, Matthieu

    2014-08-01

    Deep sub-wavelength focusing has been demonstrated for locally resonant metamaterials using electromagnetic and acoustic waves. The elastic equivalents of such objects are made of sub-wavelength resonating beams fixed to a two-dimensional plate, as presented here. Independent of a random or regular arrangement of the resonators, the metamaterial shows large bandgaps that are independent of the incident wave direction. Numerical simulations demonstrate that the insertion of a defect in the layout, as a shorter resonator, creates strong amplification of the wave-field on the defect. This energy trapping, which is localized on a spatial scale that is much smaller than the wavelength in the two-dimensional plate, leads to a >1 factor in terms of the local density of energy. PMID:25096146

  15. Nonlinear wave interactions between short pulses of different spatio-temporal extents

    PubMed Central

    Sivan, Y.; Rozenberg, S.; Halstuch, A.; Ishaaya, A. A.

    2016-01-01

    We study the nonlinear wave interactions between short pulses of different spatio-temporal extents. Unlike the well-understood mixing of quasi-monochromatic waves, this configuration is highly non-intuitive due to the complex coupling between the spatial and temporal degrees of freedom of the interacting pulses. We illustrate the process intuitively with transitions between different branches of the dispersion curves and interpret it in terms of spectral exchange between the interacting pulses. We verify our interpretation with an example whereby a spectrally-narrow pulse “inherits” the wide spectrum of a pump pulse centered at a different wavelength, using exact numerical simulations, as well as a simplified coupled mode analysis and an asymptotic analytical solution. The latter also provides a simple and intuitive quantitative interpretation. The complex wave mixing process studied here may enable flexible spatio-temporal shaping of short pulses and is the starting point of the study of more complicated systems. PMID:27381552

  16. Why are very short times so long and very long times so short in elastic waves?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parravicini, Guido; Rigamonti, Serena

    2011-01-01

    In a first study of thermoelastic waves, such as in the textbook of Landau and Lifshitz, one might at first glance understand that when the given period is very short, waves are isentropic because heat conduction does not set in, while if the given period is very long, waves are isothermal because there is enough time for thermalization to be thoroughly accomplished. When one pursues the study of these waves further, by the mathematical inspection of the complete thermoelastic wave equation one finds that if the period is very short, much shorter than a characteristic time of the material, the wave is isothermal, while if it is very long, much longer than the characteristic time, the wave is isentropic. One also learns that this fact is supported by experiments: at low frequencies the elastic waves are isentropic, while they are isothermal when the frequencies are so high that can be attained in few cases. The authors show that there is no contradiction between first-glance understanding and the mathematical treatment of the elastic wave equation: for thermal effects very long periods are so short and very short periods are so long.

  17. Gene duplications and evolution of the short wavelength-sensitive visual pigments in vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, S

    1994-01-01

    When invertebrate rhodopsins were used as the outgroup, the rooted phylogenetic tree of 26 vertebrate visual pigments (VPs) was constructed. These VPs are distinguished into the following four clusters: (1) RH1 cluster consisting of rhodopsins, (2) RH2 cluster consisting of VPs with variable ranges of absorption spectra, (3) SWS cluster of short wavelength-sensitive VPs, and (4) LWS/MSW cluster of long and medium wavelength-sensitive VPs. Short wavelength-sensitive VPs from Astyanax fasciatus (AF23), goldfish (BCa), chicken (BCg and VGg), and human (BHs) belong to SWS cluster, whereas that from gecko (BGge) belongs to the RH2 cluster. The SWS cluster is further divided into SWS-I (BHs and VGg) and SWS-II (AF23, BCa, and BGg) groups. The SWS-I group has accumulated more amino acid changes than any other group of VPs. It is suggested that amino acid changes at a few key positions might have been important in the functional differentiation of the SWS-I group from the SWS-II group. PMID:8121284

  18. Short and ultrashort wavelength lasers; Proceedings of the Meeting, Los Angeles, CA, Jan. 14, 15, 1988

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, C. Randol

    1988-01-01

    Various papers on short and ultrashort wavelength lasers are presented. The topics addressed include: pulsed-power driven, photopumped X-ray laser research at the Naval Research Laboratory; X-ray laser studies at LLE; toward shorter wavelengths for soft X-ray lasers based on lithiumlike ions; imploding coaxial krypton gas puffs as a potential X-ray laser; gain optimization and saturation of the Xe III 109 nm Auger laser; multiphoton double ionization of barium; soft X-ray FEL using a two-beam elliptical pill-box wake-field cavity; and spectra of highly ionized atoms. Also discussed are: progress in the gamma-ray laser program at Texas; nuclear transitions induced by atomic excitations; nuclear structure of the proposed gamma-ray laser candidate nucleus Re-186; conversion-electron experiment to characterize the decay of the Np-237 shape isomer; Mossbauer effect experiments applicable to GRASERS; overview of pulsed premixed short wavelength chemical laser concepts; hybrid chemical/excimer laser concept; isocyanic acid as a laser fuel.

  19. Short-wavelength buckling and shear failures for compression-loaded composite laminates. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shuart, M. J.

    1985-01-01

    The short-wavelength buckling (or the microbuckling) and the interlaminar and inplane shear failures of multi-directional composite laminates loaded in uniaxial compression are investigated. A laminate model is presented that idealizes each lamina. The fibers in the lamina are modeled as a plate, and the matrix in the lamina is modeled as an elastic foundation. The out-of-plane w displacement for each plate is expressed as a trigonometric series in the half-wavelength of the mode shape for laminate short-wavelength buckling. Nonlinear strain-displacement relations are used. The model is applied to symmetric laminates having linear material behavior. The laminates are loaded in uniform end shortening and are simply supported. A linear analysis is used to determine the laminate stress, strain, and mode shape when short-wavelength buckling occurs. The equations for the laminate compressive stress at short-wavelength buckling are dominated by matrix contributions.

  20. Phase engineered wavelength conversion of ultra-short optical pulses in TI:PPLN waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babazadeh, Amin; Nouroozi, Rahman; Sohler, Wolfgang

    2016-02-01

    A phase engineered all-optical wavelength converter for ultra-short pulses (down to 140 fs) in a Ti-diffused, periodically poled lithium niobate (Ti:PPLN) waveguide is proposed. The phase engineering, due to the phase conjugation between signal and idler (converted signal) pulses which takes place in the cascaded second harmonic generation and difference frequency generation (cSHG/DFG) based wavelength conversion, already leads to shorter idler pulses. The proposed device consists of an unpoled (passive) waveguide section beside of the PPLN waveguide section in order to compensate pulse broadening and phase distortion of the idler pulses induced by the wavelength conversion (in the PPLN section). For example numerical analysis shows that a 140 fs input signal pulse is only broadened by 1.6% in a device with a combination of 20 mm and 6 mm long periodically poled and unpoled waveguide sections. Thus, cSHG/DFG based wavelength converters of a bandwidth of several Tbits/s can be designed.

  1. Output characteristics of SASE-driven short wavelength FEL`s

    SciTech Connect

    Fawley, W.M.

    1997-02-01

    This paper investigates various properties of the ``microspikes`` associated with self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) in a short wavelength free-electron laser (FEL). Using results from the 2-D numerical simulation code GINGER, we confirm theoretical predictions such as the convective group velocity in the exponential gain regime. In the saturated gain regime beyond the initial saturation, we find that the average radiation power continues to grow with an approximately linearly dependence upon undulator length. Moreover, the spectrum significantly broadens and shifts in wavelength to the redward direction, with{ital P(w)} approaching a constant, asymptotic value. This is in marked contrast to the exponential gain regime where the spectrum steadily narrows, {ital P(w)} grows, and the central wavelength remains constant with {ital z}. Via use of a spectrogram diagnostic {ital S(w,t)}, it appears that the radiation pattern in the saturated gain regime is composed of an ensemble of distinct ``sinews`` whose widths AA remain approximately constant but whose central wavelengths can ``chirp`` by varying a small extent with {ital t}.

  2. Widely tunable spectrum translation and wavelength exchange by four-wave mixing in optical fibers.

    PubMed

    Marhic, M E; Park, Y; Yang, F S; Kazovsky, L G

    1996-12-01

    By a suitable choice of the wavelengths of two pumps and one signal about the zero-dispersion wavelength of a fiber, it is possible to generate mainly one four-wave-mixing product (idler) whose spectrum is a translated version of that of the signal; no spectral inversion or phase conjugation is involved. Unit conversion efficiency can in principle be obtained. Complete exchange of power between two wavelengths can be implemented. One can adjust the wavelengths of the signal and the idler at will over tens of nanometers, while maintaining high conversion efficiency, by suitably tuning the pumps. For fixed pump wavelengths, the signal bandwidth scales linearly with pump power and can reach several nanometers for pump powers of the order of several watts in silica fibers or less in highly nonlinear fibers. PMID:19881841

  3. Task I: A Computational Model for Short Wavelength Stall Inception and Development In Multi-Stage Compressors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suder, Kenneth (Technical Monitor); Tan, Choon-Sooi

    2003-01-01

    A computational model is presented for simulating axial compressor stall inception and development via disturbances with length scales on the order of several (typically about three) blade pitches. The model was designed for multi-stage compressors in which stall is initiated by these short wavelength disturbances, also referred to as spikes. The inception process described is fundamentally nonlinear, in contrast to the essentially linear behavior seen in so-called modal stall inception . The model was able to capture the following experimentally observed phenomena: (1) development of rotating stall via short wavelength disturbances, (2) formation and evolution of localized short wavelength stall cells in the first stage of a mismatched compressor, (3) the switch from long to short wavelength stall inception resulting from the re-staggering of the inlet guide vane, (4) the occurrence of rotating stall inception on the negatively sloped portion of the compressor characteristic. Parametric investigations indicated that (1) short wavelength disturbances were supported by the rotor blade row, (2) the disturbance strength was attenuated within the stators, and (3) the reduction of inter-blade row gaps can suppress the growth of short wavelength disturbances. It is argued that each local component group (rotor plus neighboring stators) has its own instability point (i.e. conditions at which disturbances are sustained) for short wavelength disturbances, with the instability point for the compressor set by the most unstable component group.

  4. Short-wavelength attenuated polychromatic white light during work at night: limited melatonin suppression without substantial decline of alertness.

    PubMed

    van de Werken, Maan; Giménez, Marina C; de Vries, Bonnie; Beersma, Domien G M; Gordijn, Marijke C M

    2013-08-01

    Exposure to light at night increases alertness, but light at night (especially short-wavelength light) also disrupts nocturnal physiology. Such disruption is thought to underlie medical problems for which shiftworkers have increased risk. In 33 male subjects we investigated whether short-wavelength attenuated polychromatic white light (<530 nm filtered out) at night preserves dim light melatonin levels and whether it induces similar skin temperature, alertness, and performance levels as under full-spectrum light. All 33 subjects participated in random order during three nights (at least 1 wk apart) either under dim light (3 lux), short-wavelength attenuated polychromatic white light (193 lux), or full-spectrum light (256 lux). Hourly saliva samples for melatonin analysis were collected along with continuous measurements of skin temperature. Subjective sleepiness and activation were assessed via repeated questionnaires and performance was assessed by the accuracy and speed of an addition task. Our results show that short-wavelength attenuated polychromatic white light only marginally (6%) suppressed salivary melatonin. Average distal-to-proximal skin temperature gradient (DPG) and its pattern over time remained similar under short-wavelength attenuated polychromatic white light compared with dim light. Subjects performed equally well on an addition task under short-wavelength attenuated polychromatic white light compared with full-spectrum light. Although subjective ratings of activation were lower under short-wavelength attenuated polychromatic white light compared with full-spectrum light, subjective sleepiness was not increased. Short-wavelength attenuated polychromatic white light at night has some advantages over bright light. It hardly suppresses melatonin concentrations, whereas performance is similar to the bright light condition. Yet, alertness is slightly reduced as compared with bright light, and DPG shows similarity to the dim light condition, which is

  5. Up-conversion luminescence of gold nanospheres when excited at nonsurface plasmon resonance wavelength by a continuous wave laser.

    PubMed

    Neupane, Bhanu; Zhao, Luyang; Wang, Gufeng

    2013-09-11

    We show that, when gold nanospheres are excited at the red side of the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) wavelength at 592 nm by a continuous wave (CW) laser, they give substantial up-converted luminescence in the SPR wavelength range. The luminescence intensity scales as a second-order function of the excitation power, with a quantum yield ~1/50 of down-conversion luminescence when illuminated at a power of 30 MW/cm(2). The luminescence spectrum is completely different than the SPR profile, indicating a new emission mechanism possibly involving interband transitions coupled with phonons or localized vibration of neighboring gold atoms. Such luminescence is also observed to be substantial for short gold nanorods with an aspect ratio of ~2 but weak for bulk gold. This study provides new insight to the understanding of gold nanoparticle luminescence and opens a new detection scheme for gold nanoparticle-based biological imaging. PMID:23914976

  6. Shear wavelength estimation based on inverse filtering and multiple-point shear wave generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitazaki, Tomoaki; Kondo, Kengo; Yamakawa, Makoto; Shiina, Tsuyoshi

    2016-07-01

    Elastography provides important diagnostic information because tissue elasticity is related to pathological conditions. For example, in a mammary gland, higher grade malignancies yield harder tumors. Estimating shear wave speed enables the quantification of tissue elasticity imaging using time-of-flight. However, time-of-flight measurement is based on an assumption about the propagation direction of a shear wave which is highly affected by reflection and refraction, and thus might cause an artifact. An alternative elasticity estimation approach based on shear wavelength was proposed and applied to passive configurations. To determine the elasticity of tissue more quickly and more accurately, we proposed a new method for shear wave elasticity imaging that combines the shear wavelength approach and inverse filtering with multiple shear wave sources induced by acoustic radiation force (ARF). The feasibility of the proposed method was verified using an elasticity phantom with a hard inclusion.

  7. Interplay of mulitphoton and tunneling ionization in short-wavelength-driven high-order harmonic generation

    SciTech Connect

    Gkortsas, Vasileios-Marios; Bhardwaj, Siddharth; Lai, Chien-Jen; Hong, Kyung-Han; Falcao-Filho, Edilson L.; Kaertner, Franz X.

    2011-07-15

    High-order harmonic generation efficiency is theoretically modeled and compared with experiments using 400 and 800 nm driver pulses. It is shown that, for a short drive wavelength and a Keldysh parameter larger than 1, the Ammosov-Delone-Krainov (ADK) ionization model does not give a good agreement between theory and experiment. Since the ADK ionization model only accounts for tunnel ionization, it underestimates the yield of low-order harmonics from the wings of the driver pulse. In contrast, the Yudin-Ivanov ionization model [Phys. Rev. A 64, 013409 (2001)], which accounts for both tunnel and multiphoton ionization, gives much better agreement with the experimental results.

  8. A short wave infrared hyperspectral imager for landmine detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McFee, John E.; Achal, Steve; Ivanco, Tyler; Anger, Cliff

    2005-06-01

    DRDC Suffield and Itres Research have jointly investigated the use of visible and infrared hyperspectral imaging for landmine detection since 1988. There has been considerable success detecting surface-laid landmines by classification of their visible/near infrared (VNIR - 400 to 1000 nm wavelength) spectral signatures, but it has not been possible to find VNIR spectral characteristics that would generically distinguish anthropogenic objects from natural features such as rocks, vegetation, soil, etc. Preliminary studies in 1998 suggested that it might be possible to develop such a generic classifier in the short wave infrared (SWIR) and that detection performance might improve. Because of a lack of available SWIR hyperspectral imagers with adequate performance for mine detection, a prototype pushbroom SWIR hyperspectral imager was developed and completed in summer 2002. The now commercially available instrument, sasi, has 160 bands over a spectral range of 850 to 2450 nm, signal to noise ratio of 400:1 with f/1.8 fore-optics, and 600 pixels over a 37.7° field of view. A number of mission flights have been carried out and excellent imagery obtained. In October 2003, Itres and DRDC Suffield personnel obtained field SWIR hyperspectral imagery in the DRDC Suffield Mine Pen of numerous surface-laid mines, one buried mine, other surface-laid human-made items, background materials and people from a horizontally scanning personnel-lift at an altitude of roughly 5 m. Preliminary indications are that a simple generic classification decision boundary should be able to distinguish surface-laid landmines from many human-made artifacts and natural materials. The buried mine was not detected, but the mine had been buried for several years and hence there would be no residual surface disturbance. Furthermore, the small sample size and limited observation time make it difficult to generalize about SWIR performance for buried mines. The instrument is described and the preliminary

  9. Small animal imaging platform for quantitative assessment of short-wave infrared-emitting contrast agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Philip; Mingozzi, Marco; Higgins, Laura M.; Ganapathy, Vidya; Zevon, Margot; Riman, Richard E.; Roth, Charles M.; Moghe, Prabhas V.; Pierce, Mark C.

    2015-03-01

    We report the design, calibration, and testing of a pre-clinical small animal imaging platform for use with short-wave infrared (SWIR) emitting contrast agents. Unlike materials emitting at visible or near-infrared wavelengths, SWIR-emitting agents require detection systems with sensitivity in the 1-2 μm wavelength region, beyond the range of commercially available small animal imagers. We used a collimated 980 nm laser beam to excite rare-earth-doped NaYF4:Er,Yb nanocomposites, as an example of a SWIR emitting material under development for biomedical imaging applications. This beam was raster scanned across the animal, with fluorescence in the 1550 nm wavelength region detected by an InGaAs area camera. Background adjustment and intensity non-uniformity corrections were applied in software. The final SWIR fluorescence image was overlaid onto a standard white-light image for registration of contrast agent uptake with respect to anatomical features.

  10. Measuring the electron density gradients of dense plasmas by deflectometry using short-wavelength probe

    SciTech Connect

    Nejdl, J.; Kozlova, M.; Mocek, T.; Rus, B.

    2010-12-15

    A new and simple experimental technique for the measurement of electron density gradients in dense laser-produced plasmas using an electromagnetic wave probe is presented. The main advantage of this method is the low requirements on coherence of the probing beam. The method is based on measuring the deformation of the Talbot pattern of a two-dimensional grating that stems from the distortion of the probe beam wave-front caused by the gradients of the index of refraction. The compromise between spatial resolution and sensitivity for the given wavelength of the probe beam is set by the experimental design. The proposed technique was experimentally verified on plasmas that were created by either a point focus or a line focus of a laser interacting with various solid targets. In the experiments reported here, all plasmas were probed by a Ne-like Zn x-ray laser beam at 21.2 nm, but the technique is applicable for any wavelength of the probe.

  11. Improving Short Wave Breaking Behavior In Surfbeat Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roelvink, J.; Daly, C.; Vandongeren, A. R.; van Thiel de Vries, J.; McCall, R.

    2009-12-01

    In present surfzone modeling three approaches are widely applied: short-wave resolving models, ‘surfbeat’ models, which resolve wave energy modulations on the time-scale of wave groups and their associated infragravity waves, and wave averaged models. In all three approaches, wave breaking is a process that is highly schematized and governed by several empirical coefficients. In this presentation we will focus on the breaking process in ‘surfbeat’ models, such as XBeach (Roelvink et al, 2009). These models need to describe the short wave dissipation by breaking as a function of the slowly-varying short wave energy or wave height. The model usually applied is that by Roelvink (1993), which combines a probability that waves are breaking as function of wave heigth over water depth ratio H/h with a bore-type dissipation formulation similar to that by Battjes and Janssen (1978). A drawback of such a formulation is that there is no ‘memory’ in the breaking process, and the amount of breaking instantly varies with the water depth (though the wave height itself does have a memory). For cases with bichromatic waves, or for long-period swell, this does not reflect reality enough: waves that start breaking do not instantly stop breaking once the water depth increases, but continue until some lower threshold is reached. This concept was captured in Dally’s (1992) wave-by-wave approach, where individual waves are tracked in a probabilistic setting. We have now implemented a similar formulation in XBeach, where the property that waves are breaking is tracked; it is switched on when H/h exceeds a first criterion; this property is propagated using an advection equation and when H/h gets below a second criterion breaking is switched off. This formulation can do two things the previous one can’t: maintain groupiness inside the surf zone and have a maximum of wave breaking in the trough after a steep bar, as was observed for instance in Arcilla et al’s (1994) test 1

  12. Directional short wind wave spectra derived from the sea surface photography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dulov, Vladimir; Yurovskaya, Maria; Chapron, Bertrand; Kudryavtsev, Vladimir

    2014-05-01

    New field measurements of 2-D wave number short wind wave spectra in the wavelength range from few millimeters to few decimeters are reported and discussed. The measurement method proposed by [Kosnik and Dulov, 2011] is based on stereophotography and image brightness contrast processing. The method strongly builds on the brightness cross-spectral analysis to reduce the noise within this short wave gravity and capillary range. Field measurements of wind wave spectra are still rare, and the reported data thus provide valuable information to bring new evidences on the 2-D spectral distribution of short wind waves in the wavelength range from decimeters to millimeters. As found, the folded spectra of decimeter waves are very weakly dependent on the wind speed and its direction. Wind speed and direction sensitivity only starts to appear in the short wavelength range, more precisely in the vicinity of the wave number 100 rad/m, where the wind exponent grows from 0.5 to 1.5-2.5 at 800 rad/m, and angular anisotropy parameter introduced by [Elfouhaily et al., 1997] amounts the value of 0.5. These aspects are consistent with other previously reported optical and radar data. For the latter, we solely extracted the polarization sensitivity to best isolate the contribution associated to the wave saturation spectrum around the Bragg resonant wave number. For the former, mean-squared slope statistics were used to assess the integrated shortscale directional spectral properties. As revealed, observed direction spectral distributions are significantly different from those previously suggested [Elfouhaily et al., 1997; Kudryavtsev et al., 2003, 2005]. On the basis of these new in situ measurements, we then propose to revise the semiempirical analytical model of short wind wave spectra developed by [Kudryavtsev et al., 2003, 2005]. In this model the key parameter is exponent n governing the nonlinear dissipation rate as D ~ Bn+1, where B is saturation spectrum. Accordingly, new

  13. Demonstration of guided-wave phenomena at extreme-ultraviolet and soft-x-ray wavelengths.

    PubMed

    Ceglio, N M; Hawryluk, A M; Stearns, D G; Kühne, M; Müller, P

    1988-04-01

    We report an explicit demonstration of classical guided-wave propagation at XUV and soft-x-ray wavelengths. Experiments were performed using narrow-band synchrotron radiation at 5, 20.8, 21, and 30 nm. Free-standing gold transmission gratings served as waveguide structures. These structures had a 300-nm grating period with waveguide channel widths as small as 100 nm and were as thick as 700 nm in the direction of guided-wave transmission. Guided-wave phenomena were manifest in strongly asymmetric diffraction patterns resulting from the angular tilt of the transmission-grating normal from the incident-beam direction. PMID:19745868

  14. Effects of filtering visual short wavelengths during nocturnal shiftwork on sleep and performance.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Shadab A; Shapiro, Colin M; Wang, Flora; Ainlay, Hailey; Kazmi, Syeda; Brown, Theodore J; Casper, Robert F

    2013-10-01

    Circadian phase resetting is sensitive to visual short wavelengths (450-480 nm). Selectively filtering this range of wavelengths may reduce circadian misalignment and sleep impairment during irregular light-dark schedules associated with shiftwork. We examined the effects of filtering short wavelengths (<480 nm) during night shifts on sleep and performance in nine nurses (five females and four males; mean age ± SD: 31.3 ± 4.6 yrs). Participants were randomized to receive filtered light (intervention) or standard indoor light (baseline) on night shifts. Nighttime sleep after two night shifts and daytime sleep in between two night shifts was assessed by polysomnography (PSG). In addition, salivary melatonin levels and alertness were assessed every 2 h on the first night shift of each study period and on the middle night of a run of three night shifts in each study period. Sleep and performance under baseline and intervention conditions were compared with daytime performance on the seventh day shift, and nighttime sleep following the seventh daytime shift (comparator). On the baseline night PSG, total sleep time (TST) (p < 0.01) and sleep efficiency (p = 0.01) were significantly decreased and intervening wake times (wake after sleep onset [WASO]) (p = 0.04) were significantly increased in relation to the comparator night sleep. In contrast, under intervention, TST was increased by a mean of 40 min compared with baseline, WASO was reduced and sleep efficiency was increased to levels similar to the comparator night. Daytime sleep was significantly impaired under both baseline and intervention conditions. Salivary melatonin levels were significantly higher on the first (p < 0.05) and middle (p < 0.01) night shifts under intervention compared with baseline. Subjective sleepiness increased throughout the night under both conditions (p < 0.01). However, reaction time and throughput on vigilance tests were similar to daytime performance under intervention but impaired

  15. Characteristics and plasma parameters of a short-wavelength low-pressure discharge lamp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuaibov, A. K.; Shevera, I. V.; Malinina, A. A.

    2008-10-01

    We have studied the working optical characteristics and electron kinetic coefficients of a short-wavelength, electric discharge exciplex-halogen UV-VUV lamp employing a mixture of argon and chlorine with a total pressure of P = 0.5 10 kPa. The lamp operates on a system of broadened electron-vibrational bands of ArCl (175 nm) and chlorine (200, 258 nm) molecules, which overlap to form a continuum in the spectral range of 160 260 nm. It is established that the optimum mixtures are those with p(Ar) - p(Cl2) = (2 4)-(0.15 0.30) kPa. The average output power of the short-wavelength radiation is 1 2 W at an efficiency of ˜5%. The electron energy distribution functions (EDFs) and the discharge plasma parameters have been calculated by solving the Boltzmann equation for a gas mixture with the experimentally determined optimum composition in the range of E/ P values from 1 to 200 V/(cm Torr), where E is the electric field strength and P is the total gas pressure. Using the obtained EDFs, the electron transport characteristics, specific discharge power losses for the main elementary processes, and rate constants of electron processes are determined.

  16. Short-time Chebyshev wave packet method for molecular photoionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Zhaopeng; Zheng, Yujun

    2016-08-01

    In this letter we present the extended usage of short-time Chebyshev wave packet method in the laser induced molecular photoionization dynamics. In our extension, the polynomial expansion of the exponential in the time evolution operator, the Hamiltonian operator can act on the wave packet directly which neatly avoids the matrix diagonalization. This propagation scheme is of obvious advantages when the dynamical system has large Hamiltonian matrix. Computational simulations are performed for the calculation of photoelectronic distributions from intense short pulse ionization of K2 and NaI which represent the Born-Oppenheimer (BO) model and Non-BO one, respectively.

  17. The opto-cryo-mechanical design of the short wavelength camera for the CCAT Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parshley, Stephen C.; Adams, Joseph; Nikola, Thomas; Stacey, Gordon J.

    2014-07-01

    The CCAT observatory is a 25-m class Gregorian telescope designed for submillimeter observations that will be deployed at Cerro Chajnantor (~5600 m) in the high Atacama Desert region of Chile. The Short Wavelength Camera (SWCam) for CCAT is an integral part of the observatory, enabling the study of star formation at high and low redshifts. SWCam will be a facility instrument, available at first light and operating in the telluric windows at wavelengths of 350, 450, and 850 μm. In order to trace the large curvature of the CCAT focal plane, and to suit the available instrument space, SWCam is divided into seven sub-cameras, each configured to a particular telluric window. A fully refractive optical design in each sub-camera will produce diffraction-limited images. The material of choice for the optical elements is silicon, due to its excellent transmission in the submillimeter and its high index of refraction, enabling thin lenses of a given power. The cryostat's vacuum windows double as the sub-cameras' field lenses and are ~30 cm in diameter. The other lenses are mounted at 4 K. The sub-cameras will share a single cryostat providing thermal intercepts at 80, 15, 4, 1 and 0.1 K, with cooling provided by pulse tube cryocoolers and a dilution refrigerator. The use of the intermediate temperature stage at 15 K minimizes the load at 4 K and reduces operating costs. We discuss our design requirements, specifications, key elements and expected performance of the optical, thermal and mechanical design for the short wavelength camera for CCAT.

  18. Photochemistry of the primary event in short-wavelength visual opsins at low temperature.

    PubMed

    Vought, B W; Dukkipatti, A; Max, M; Knox, B E; Birge, R R

    1999-08-31

    Two short-wavelength cone opsins, frog (Xenopus laevis) violet and mouse UV, were expressed in mammalian COS1 cells, purified in delipidated form, and studied using cryogenic UV-vis spectrophotometry. At room temperature, the X. laevis violet opsin has an absorption maximum at 426 nm when generated with 11-cis-retinal and an absorption maximum of 415 nm when generated with 9-cis-retinal. The frog short-wavelength opsin has two different batho intermediates, one stable at 30 K (lambda(max) approximately 446 nm) and the other at 70 K (lambda(max) approximately 475 nm). Chloride ions do not affect the absorption maximum of the violet opsin. At room temperature, mouse UV opsin has an absorption maximum of 357 nm, while at 70 K, the pigment exhibits a bathochromic shift to 403 nm with distinct vibronic structure and a strong secondary vibronic band at 380 nm. We have observed linear relationships when analyzing the energy difference between the initial and bathochromic intermediates and the normalized difference spectra of the batho-shifted intermediates of rod and cone opsins. We conclude that the binding sites of these pigments change from red to green to violet via systematic shifts in the position of the primary counterion relative to the protonated Schiff base. The mouse UV cone opsin does not fit this trend, and we conclude that wavelength selection in this pigment must operate via a different molecular mechanism. We discuss the possibility that the mouse UV chromophore is initially unprotonated. PMID:10471278

  19. Short wavelengths active bichromatic pulsed pyrometer for solids and liquids designed for measurements in harsh environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navello, L.; Lebedinsky, J.; Offret, J. P.; Serio, B.; Davin, T.; Bailly, Y.; Hervé, P.

    2015-05-01

    Optical passive methods for temperature measurements such as thermography or optical pyrometry are very interesting because they allow a non-intrusive measurement when the emissivity is known. The knowledge of this coefficient is critical for determining the actual temperature of a surface from the thermal radiation emitted in a wavelength band. The bichromatic pulsed pyrometer allows to overcome the knowledge of this parameter provided that precautions are taken in the choice of the values of wavelengths. When the object to be measured is placed in harsh environments, such passive optical methods are greatly disturbed by the presence of an optically absorbing medium. They are also distorted when the measured objects are located in very hot environments emitting intense disturbing radiation. In this study, we present an active bichromatic radiometric method for measuring the temperature of a surface in harsh environments. The method is based on a localized excitation by a modulated laser source in the infrared range. Detecting the temperature modulation, which is correlated with the excitation, is performed using a lock-in amplifier able to extract the signal embedded in a noise up to a million times superior. Working at short wavelengths (visible range and near infrared range) offers a large dynamic range and minimizes the error due to variations in emissivity with the wavelength. This system collects the radiation emitted by the object at a distance from a few meters up to dozens of meters depending on the configuration of the optical system. Both the principle and the design of the active bichromatic optical surface thermometer are presented and discussed. To demonstrate the method, results obtained on a molten ceramic stream are presented.

  20. Lack of short-wavelength light during the school day delays dim light melatonin onset (DLMO) in middle school students

    PubMed Central

    Figueiro, Mariana G.; Rea, Mark S.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Circadian timing affects sleep onset. Delayed sleep onset can reduce sleep duration in adolescents required to awake early for a fixed school schedule. The absence of short-wavelength (“blue”) morning light, which helps entrain the circadian system, can hypothetically delay sleep onset and decrease sleep duration in adolescents. The goal of this study was to investigate whether removal of short-wavelength light during the morning hours delayed the onset of melatonin in young adults. METHODS Dim light melatonin onset (DLMO) was measured in eleven 8th-grade students before and after wearing orange glasses, which removed short-wavelength light, for a five-day school week. RESULTS DLMO was significantly delayed (30 minutes) after the five-day intervention, demonstrating that short-wavelength light exposure during the day can be important for advancing circadian rhythms in students. CONCLUSIONS Lack of short-wavelength light in the morning has been shown to delay the circadian clock in controlled laboratory conditions. The results presented here are the first to show, outside laboratory conditions, that removal of short-wavelength light in the morning hours can delay DLMO in 8th-grade students. These field data, consistent with results from controlled laboratory studies, are directly relevant to lighting practice in schools. PMID:20150866

  1. Sub-optical wavelength acoustic wave modulation of integrated photonic resonators at microwave frequencies.

    PubMed

    Tadesse, Semere Ayalew; Li, Mo

    2014-01-01

    Light-sound interactions have long been exploited in various acousto-optic devices based on bulk crystalline materials. Conventionally, these devices operate in megahertz frequency range where the acoustic wavelength is much longer than the optical wavelength and a long interaction length is required to attain significant coupling. With nanoscale transducers, acoustic waves with sub-optical wavelengths can now be excited to induce strong acousto-optic coupling in nanophotonic devices. Here we demonstrate microwave frequency surface acoustic wave transducers co-integrated with nanophotonic resonators on piezoelectric aluminum nitride substrates. Acousto-optic modulation of the resonance modes at above 10 GHz with the acoustic wavelength significantly below the optical wavelength is achieved. The phase and modal matching conditions in this scheme are investigated for efficient modulation. The new acousto-optic platform can lead to novel optical devices based on nonlinear Brillouin processes and provides a direct, wideband link between optical and microwave photons for microwave photonics and quantum optomechanics. PMID:25400144

  2. Room temperature continuous-wave operation of GaInNAs long wavelength VCSELs

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, M C; Coldren, C W; Spruytte, S G; Peterson, H E; Harris, J S

    2000-06-22

    Vertical cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) are becoming increasingly important for short-haul optical fiber transmission systems. Given the commercial success of GaAs-based 850nm VCSELs, dramatic enhancements in transmission bandwidth and distance can be achieved in conventional single- and multi-mode fiber by extending the emission wavelength to the 1300nm-1550nm range. GaInNAs is a promising active layer material grown on GaAs that can achieve 1300nm emission [l], and electrically pulsed broad-area GaInNAs VCSELs [2,3] have been realized. Here we take advantage of the properties of GaAs-based materials-thermally-conductive high contrast mirrors and AlAs-oxide current apertures-to demonstrate for the first time low-threshold ({approx}1 mA) GaInNAs VCSELs emitting at a wavelength of 1200 nm under continuous-wave room temperature operation. The device structure is shown schematically in figure 1. The bottom mirror consists of a 22.5-period n-doped GaAs/AlAs distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) designed for a center wavelength {lambda} near 1200nm, the top mirror is a 22-period p-doped DBR whose reflectance is enhanced by a Ti/Au contact electrode, and the GaAs {lambda} cavity contains three 70{angstrom}, Ga{sub 0.3}In{sub 0.7}N{sub 0.02}As{sub 0.98} quantum wells (QWs) separated by 200{angstrom} GaAs barriers. The epilayers were grown by molecular beam epitaxy using solid-source arsenic and a rf nitrogen plasma source. After growth, the first 17 mirror periods of the top mirror were dry etched and subsequently capped with SiO{sub 2}, and the remaining three periods were etched to expose the AlAs for lateral oxidation, which formed square unoxidized apertures as small as 3.6 {micro}m on a side. After the top contact metalization, devices were mounted without heat sinking on a glass slide for optical emission through the substrate, which was contacted electrically with indium solder. The output power and voltage vs. injection current for a 5{micro}m x 5{micro

  3. Wavelength-assignable 1310/1550 nm wavelength conversion using completely phase-matched two-pump four-wave mixing in a silicon waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jian; Gao, Shiming

    2015-12-01

    A wavelength converter between 1310 and 1550 nm bands is presented based on two-pump four-wave mixing (FWM) in a silicon waveguide. The principle of the inter-band wavelength conversion is analyzed. For an arbitrary incident signal, the converted idler wavelength can be freely assigned by suitably setting the two pump wavelengths to completely satisfy the phase-matching condition. Simulation results show that the signal can be flexibly converted between 1310 and 1550 bands. The conversion efficiencies for the signals with different wavelengths are very stable because the FWM phase-matching condition is completely met. Using this two-pump FWM configuration, channel-selective function can also be realized for wavelength division multiplexing (WDM) signals by engineering the dispersion profile of the silicon waveguide according to the WDM channel spacing.

  4. Identification of informative bands in the short-wavelength NIR region for non-invasive blood glucose measurement

    PubMed Central

    Uwadaira, Yasuhiro; Ikehata, Akifumi; Momose, Akiko; Miura, Masayo

    2016-01-01

    The “glucose-linked wavelength” in the short-wavelength near-infrared (NIR) region, in which the light intensity reflected from the hand palm exhibits a good correlation to the blood glucose value, was investigated. We performed 391 2-h carbohydrate tolerance tests (CTTs) using 34 participants and a glucose-linked wavelength was successfully observed in almost every CTT; however, this wavelength varied between CTTs even for the same person. The large resulting data set revealed the distribution of the informative wavelength. The blood glucose values were efficiently estimated by a simple linear regression with clinically acceptable accuracies. The result suggested the potential for constructing a personalized low-invasive blood glucose sensor using short-wavelength NIR spectroscopy. PMID:27446701

  5. Into French and the World via Short Wave.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rorke, Robert Cornelius

    1978-01-01

    A report on the introduction and use of short wave broadcasts in an intensive spoken French class. The kinds of materials used, class structure, the nature of assignments, student motivation, testing, cultural advantages, student reactions, and suggestions for further application are discussed. A list of useful references is included. (AMH)

  6. Short-Wave Radio: An Aid to Language Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lutcavage, Charles P.

    1982-01-01

    Discusses use of short-wave radio broadcasts as method for expanding students' appreciation of practical advantages of language learning. Suggests use of news broadcasts and gives guidelines for using broadcasts such as level of aural comprehension in class. (Author/BK)

  7. Radio wave propagation at frequencies exceeding MUF-F2 in the short wave band

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashkaliyev, Y. F.; Bocharov, V. I.

    1972-01-01

    The results of measurements of field strength and signal/noise ratio on experimental ionospheric-scattering short wave radio links are presented. It is shown that the seasonal and diurnal variations of field strength are determined by features of solar and meteoric activity. The role of the sporadic E-layer in propagation of short radio waves at frequencies exceeding MUF-F2 is noted.

  8. Travelling-wave resonant four-wave mixing breaks the limits of cavity-enhanced all-optical wavelength conversion

    PubMed Central

    Morichetti, Francesco; Canciamilla, Antonio; Ferrari, Carlo; Samarelli, Antonio; Sorel, Marc; Melloni, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    Wave mixing inside optical resonators, while experiencing a large enhancement of the nonlinear interaction efficiency, suffers from strong bandwidth constraints, preventing its practical exploitation for processing broad-band signals. Here we show that such limits are overcome by the new concept of travelling-wave resonant four-wave mixing (FWM). This approach combines the efficiency enhancement provided by resonant propagation with a wide-band conversion process. Compared with conventional FWM in bare waveguides, it exhibits higher robustness against chromatic dispersion and propagation loss, while preserving transparency to modulation formats. Travelling-wave resonant FWM has been demonstrated in silicon-coupled ring resonators and was exploited to realize a 630-μm-long wavelength converter operating over a wavelength range wider than 60 nm and with 28-dB gain with respect to a bare waveguide of the same physical length. Full compatibility of the travelling-wave resonant FWM with optical signal processing applications has been demonstrated through signal retiming and reshaping at 10 Gb s−1 PMID:21540838

  9. InGaAs versus HgCdTe for short-wavelength infrared applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogalski, Antoni; Ciupa, Robert

    1999-04-01

    The carrier lifetimes in In(subscript x)Ga(subscript 1-x)As (InGaAs) and Hg(subscript 1-x)Cd(subscript x)Te (HgCdTe) ternary alloys for radiative and Auger recombination are calculated for temperature 300 K in the short wavelength range 1.5 less than (lambda) less than 3.7 micrometer. Due to photon recycling, an order of magnitude enhancements in the radiative lifetimes over those obtained from the standard van Roosbroeck and Shockley expression, has been assumed. This theoretical prediction has been confirmed by good agreement with experimental data for n-type In(subscript 0.53)Ga(subscript 0.47)As. The possible Auger recombination mechanisms (CHCC, CHLH and CHSH processes) in direct-gap semiconductors are investigated. In both n-type ternary alloys, the carrier lifetimes are similar, and competition between radiative and CHCC processes take place. In p-type materials the carrier lifetime are also comparable, however the most effective channels of Auger mechanisms are: CHSH process in InGaAs, and CHLH process in HgCdTe. Next, the performance of heterostructure p-on-n photovoltaic devices are considered. Theoretically predicted R(subscript o)A values are compared with experimental data reported by other authors. In(subscript 0.53)Ga(subscript 0.47)As photodiodes have shown the device performance within a factor of 10 of theoretical limit. However, the performance of InGaAs photodiodes decreases rapidly at intermediate wavelengths due to mismatch-induced defects. HgCdTe photodiodes maintain high performance close to ultimate limit over a wider range of wavelengths. In this context technology of HgCdTe is considerably advanced since the same lattice parameter of this alloy over wide composition range.

  10. Emitted short wavelength infrared radiation for detection and monitoring of volcanic activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothery, D. A.; Francis, P. W.; Wood, C. A.

    1988-01-01

    Thematic Mapper images from LANDSAT were used to monitor volcanoes. Achievements include: (1) the discovery of a magmatic precursor to the 16 Sept. 1986 eruption of Lascar, northern Chile, on images from Mar. and July 1985 and of continuing fumarolic activity after the eruption; (2) the detection of unreported major changes in the distribution of lava lakes on Erta'Ale, Ethiopia; and (3) the mapping of a halo of still-hot spatter surrounding a vent on Mount Erebus, Antarctica, on an image acquired 5 min after a minor eruption otherwise known only from seismic records. A spaceborne short wavelength infrared sensor for observing hot phenomena of volcanoes is proposed. A polar orbit is suggested.

  11. Random crustal magnetization and its effect on coherence of short-wavelength marine magnetic anomalies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blakely, R.J.

    1979-01-01

    Recent studies of DSDP samples from layer 2A of oceanic basement have found complex magnetic stratigraphies that seem incompatible with the frequent existence of linear short-wavelength anomalies caused by palaeomagnetic field behavior. Statistical models are developed for the lateral variation of the average magnetization of layer 2A: a Poisson series for reversals of the earth's field and a stairstep random series for discrete magnetic units. It is shown with the power-density spectra of these statistical models that lateral inhomogeneities must average out over distances of less than a few hundred meters. Specifically, individual magnetic units of the type seen at DSDP Site 332 cannot extend uniformly for distances greater than a few hundred meters. ?? 1979.

  12. Steady State Analysis of Short-wavelength, High-gainFELs in a Large Storage Ring

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Z.; Bane, K.; Cai, Y.; Chao, A.; Hettel, R.; Pellegrini, C.; /UCLA

    2007-10-15

    Storage ring FELs have operated successfully in the low-gain regime using optical cavities. Discussions of a high-gain FEL in a storage ring typically involve a special bypass to decouple the FEL interaction from the storage ring dynamics. In this paper, we investigate the coupled dynamics of a high-gain FEL in a large storage ring such as PEP and analyze the equilibrium solution. We show that an FEL in the EUV and soft x-ray regimes can be integrated into a very bright storage ring and potentially provides three orders of magnitude improvement in the average brightness at these radiation wavelengths. We also discuss possibilities of seeding with HHG sources to obtain ultra-short, high-peak power EUV and soft x-ray pulses.

  13. SWAT system performance predictions. Project report. [SWAT (Short-Wavelength Adaptive Techniques)

    SciTech Connect

    Parenti, R.R.; Sasiela, R.J.

    1993-03-10

    In the next phase of Lincoln Laboratory's SWAT (Short-Wavelength Adaptive Techniques) program, the performance of a 241-actuator adaptive-optics system will be measured using a variety of synthetic-beacon geometries. As an aid in this experimental investigation, a detailed set of theoretical predictions has also been assembled. The computational tools that have been applied in this study include a numerical approach in which Monte-Carlo ray-trace simulations of accumulated phase error are developed, and an analytical analysis of the expected system behavior. This report describes the basis of these two computational techniques and compares their estimates of overall system performance. Although their regions of applicability tend to be complementary rather than redundant, good agreement is usually obtained when both sets of results can be derived for the same engagement scenario.... Adaptive optics, Phase conjugation, Atmospheric turbulence Synthetic beacon, Laser guide star.

  14. Short-wavelength cone-opponent retinal ganglion cells in mammals

    PubMed Central

    MARSHAK, DAVID W.; MILLS, STEPHEN L.

    2014-01-01

    In all of the mammalian species studied to date, the short-wavelength-sensitive (S) cones and the S-cone bipolar cells that receive their input are very similar, but the retinal ganglion cells that receive synapses from the S-cone bipolar cells appear to be quite different. Here, we review the literature on mammalian retinal ganglion cells that respond selectively to stimulation of S-cones and respond with opposite polarity to longer wavelength stimuli. There are at least three basic mechanisms to generate these color-opponent responses, including: (1) opponency is generated in the outer plexiform layer by horizontal cells and is conveyed to the ganglion cells via S-cone bipolar cells, (2) inputs from bipolar cells with different cone inputs and opposite response polarity converge directly on the ganglion cells, and (3) inputs from S-cone bipolar cells are inverted by S-cone amacrine cells. These are not mutually exclusive; some mammalian ganglion cells that respond selectively to S-cone stimulation seem to utilize at least two of them. Based on these findings, we suggest that the small bistratified ganglion cells described in primates are not the ancestral type, as proposed previously. Instead, the known types of ganglion cells in this pathway evolved from monostratified ancestral types and became bistratified in some mammalian lineages. PMID:24759445

  15. Short-wavelength cone-opponent retinal ganglion cells in mammals.

    PubMed

    Marshak, David W; Mills, Stephen L

    2014-03-01

    In all of the mammalian species studied to date, the short-wavelength-sensitive (S) cones and the S-cone bipolar cells that receive their input are very similar, but the retinal ganglion cells that receive synapses from the S-cone bipolar cells appear to be quite different. Here, we review the literature on mammalian retinal ganglion cells that respond selectively to stimulation of S-cones and respond with opposite polarity to longer wavelength stimuli. There are at least three basic mechanisms to generate these color-opponent responses, including: (1) opponency is generated in the outer plexiform layer by horizontal cells and is conveyed to the ganglion cells via S-cone bipolar cells, (2) inputs from bipolar cells with different cone inputs and opposite response polarity converge directly on the ganglion cells, and (3) inputs from S-cone bipolar cells are inverted by S-cone amacrine cells. These are not mutually exclusive; some mammalian ganglion cells that respond selectively to S-cone stimulation seem to utilize at least two of them. Based on these findings, we suggest that the small bistratified ganglion cells described in primates are not the ancestral type, as proposed previously. Instead, the known types of ganglion cells in this pathway evolved from monostratified ancestral types and became bistratified in some mammalian lineages. PMID:24759445

  16. Short-wavelength interband cascade infrared photodetectors operating above room temperature

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Lotfi, Hossein; Li, Lu; Lei, Lin; Jiang, Yuchao; Yang, Rui Q.; Klem, John F.; Johnson, Matthew B.

    2016-01-13

    High temperature operation (250–340 K) of short-wavelength interband cascade infrared photodetectors (ICIPs) with InAs/GaSb/Al0.2In0.8Sb/GaSb superlattice absorbers has been demonstrated with a 50% cutoff wavelength of 2.9 μm at 300 K. Two ICIP structures, one with two and the other with three stages, were designed and grown to explore this multiple-stage architecture. At λ = 2.1 μm, the two- and three-stage ICIPs had Johnson-noise-limited detectivities of 5.1 × 109 and 5.8 ×109 cm Hz1/2/W, respectively, at 300 K. The better device performance of the three-stage ICIP over the two-stage ICIP confirmed the advantage of more stages for this cascade architecture. Furthermore,more » an Arrhenius activation energy of 450 meV is extracted for the bulk resistance-area product, which indicates the dominance of the diffusion current at these high temperatures.« less

  17. Design considerations for the development of a space qualification Short Wavelength Imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer (SWIFTS)

    SciTech Connect

    Abbink, R.E.

    1997-06-01

    This document is the final report on work performed at Sandia National Laboratories during FY 1992 and 1993 for a Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program to look at problems associated with the design and long term operation of a short wavelength imaging Fourier Transform (FT) spectrometer for use in space. In attempts to answer two fundamental questions: is a FT spectrometer with a resolution of 1 cm{sup {minus}1} covering the silicon detector wavelength range of 0.4 to 1.1 microns feasible in a long life space instrument and, if so, is it the best method of obtaining the desired information? Emphasis has been on identifying methods which minimize reliance on precision mechanical alignment and precise velocity control. An important consideration has also been to develop methods which will be compatible with a variety of self-scanning solid state imaging devices. A breadboard instrument was constructed using cube corner retroreflectors and a laser diode position reference. Some preliminary results are reported. This work is primarily intended to act as an aid to engineers at Sandia who wish to pursue the fabrication of a flight qualified instrument. The theoretical parts are intended to be somewhat tutorial in nature to aid the engineer who is not familiar with FT spectroscopy.

  18. Layered convection in Io: Implications for short-wavelength surface topography and heat flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahnas, M. H.; Pysklywec, R. N.; Peltier, W. R.

    2013-07-01

    Io, one of the four Galilean moons of Jupiter is remarkable for its extensive volcanism and extreme interior tidal heating. The tidal heating likely yields a very low viscosity asthenosphere and consequently a very high Rayleigh number of O(1012) for convection in the interior. In a state of quasi-steady balance the internally generated heat must be transported from the interior to the base of the Io lithosphere and exhausted to space. The mechanisms whereby the convective radial heat transfer is evacuated involve both conduction and volcanism. Despite Io's ubiquitous volcanism, only 4% of its mountains (montes) appear to have a volcanic origin and most of the mountainous regions seem to be related to tectonic processes. By employing an original control volume based numerical model we investigate the style of convection in the interior of Io and the correlation of the scale of convection with the Ionian surface heat flux and topography. Our control volume results support the existence of significant asthenospheric heating and demonstrate that short wavelength features of the surface heat flux are well correlated in scale to an expected layered intra-lithospheric style small-scale convection. These numerical analyses suggest that the amplitude of the short wavelength topography of Io is expected to be on the order of a few hundreds of meters. The model results also demonstrate that the Ionian highs cannot be produced by a lithospheric flexure process above the hot upwellings and therefore other tectonic events, such as have previously been suggested; must be responsible for the formation of the high Ionian mountains that reach in excess of 17 km in elevation.

  19. Review of short-wave infrared spectroscopy and imaging methods for biological tissue characterization

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Robert H.; Nadeau, Kyle P.; Jaworski, Frank B.; Tromberg, Bruce J.; Durkin, Anthony J.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. We present a review of short-wave infrared (SWIR, defined here as ∼1000 to 2000 nm) spectroscopy and imaging techniques for biological tissue optical property characterization. Studies indicate notable SWIR absorption features of tissue constituents including water (near 1150, 1450, and 1900 nm), lipids (near 1040, 1200, 1400, and 1700 nm), and collagen (near 1200 and 1500 nm) that are much more prominent than corresponding features observed in the visible and near-infrared (VIS-NIR, defined here as ∼400 to 1000 nm). Furthermore, the wavelength dependence of the scattering coefficient has been observed to follow a power-law decay from the VIS-NIR to the SWIR region. Thus, the magnitude of tissue scattering is lower at SWIR wavelengths than that observed at VIS or NIR wavelengths, potentially enabling increased penetration depth of incident light at SWIR wavelengths that are not highly absorbed by the aforementioned chromophores. These aspects of SWIR suggest that the tissue spectroscopy and imaging in this range of wavelengths have the potential to provide enhanced sensitivity (relative to VIS-NIR measurements) to chromophores such as water and lipids, thereby helping to characterize changes in the concentrations of these chromophores due to conditions such as atherosclerotic plaque, breast cancer, and burns. PMID:25803186

  20. Quantitative short-wave infrared multispectral imaging of in vivo tissue optical properties

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Robert H.; Nadeau, Kyle P.; Jaworski, Frank B.; Rowland, Rebecca; Nguyen, John Q.; Crouzet, Christian; Saager, Rolf B.; Choi, Bernard; Tromberg, Bruce J.; Durkin, Anthony J.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. Extending the wavelength range of spatial frequency domain imaging (SFDI) into the short-wave infrared (SWIR) has the potential to provide enhanced sensitivity to chromophores such as water and lipids that have prominent absorption features in the SWIR region. Here, we present, for the first time, a method combining SFDI with unstructured (zero spatial frequency) illumination to extract tissue absorption and scattering properties over a wavelength range (850 to 1800 nm) largely unexplored by previous tissue optics techniques. To obtain images over this wavelength range, we employ a SWIR camera in conjunction with an SFDI system. We use SFDI to obtain in vivo tissue reduced scattering coefficients at the wavelengths from 850 to 1050 nm, and then use unstructured wide-field illumination and an extrapolated power-law fit to this scattering spectrum to extract the absorption spectrum from 850 to 1800 nm. Our proof-of-principle experiment in a rat burn model illustrates that the combination of multispectral SWIR imaging, SFDI, and unstructured illumination can characterize in vivo changes in skin optical properties over a greatly expanded wavelength range. In the rat burn experiment, these changes (relative to normal, unburned skin) included increased absorption and increased scattering amplitude and slope, consistent with changes that we previously reported in the near-infrared using SFDI. PMID:25120175

  1. Quantitative short-wave infrared multispectral imaging of in vivo tissue optical properties.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Robert H; Nadeau, Kyle P; Jaworski, Frank B; Rowland, Rebecca; Nguyen, John Q; Crouzet, Christian; Saager, Rolf B; Choi, Bernard; Tromberg, Bruce J; Durkin, Anthony J

    2014-08-01

    Extending the wavelength range of spatial frequency domain imaging (SFDI) into the short-wave infrared (SWIR) has the potential to provide enhanced sensitivity to chromophores such as water and lipids that have prominent absorption features in the SWIR region. Here, we present, for the first time, a method combining SFDI with unstructured (zero spatial frequency) illumination to extract tissue absorption and scattering properties over a wavelength range (850 to 1800 nm) largely unexplored by previous tissue optics techniques. To obtain images over this wavelength range, we employ a SWIR camera in conjunction with an SFDI system. We use SFDI to obtain in vivo tissue reduced scattering coefficients at the wavelengths from 850 to 1050 nm, and then use unstructured wide-field illumination and an extrapolated power-law fit to this scattering spectrum to extract the absorption spectrum from 850 to 1800 nm. Our proof-of-principle experiment in a rat burn model illustrates that the combination of multispectral SWIR imaging, SFDI, and unstructured illumination can characterize in vivo changes in skin optical properties over a greatly expanded wavelength range. In the rat burn experiment, these changes (relative to normal, unburned skin) included increased absorption and increased scattering amplitude and slope, consistent with changes that we previously reported in the near-infrared using SFDI. PMID:25120175

  2. Review of short-wave infrared spectroscopy and imaging methods for biological tissue characterization.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Robert H; Nadeau, Kyle P; Jaworski, Frank B; Tromberg, Bruce J; Durkin, Anthony J

    2015-03-01

    We present a review of short-wave infrared (SWIR, defined here as ∼1000 to 2000 nm) spectroscopy and imaging techniques for biological tissue optical property characterization. Studies indicate notable SWIR absorption features of tissue constituents including water (near 1150, 1450, and 1900 nm), lipids (near 1040, 1200, 1400, and 1700 nm), and collagen (near 1200 and 1500 nm) that are much more prominent than corresponding features observed in the visible and near-infrared (VIS-NIR, defined here as ∼400 to 1000 nm). Furthermore, the wavelength dependence of the scattering coefficient has been observed to follow a power-law decay from the VIS-NIR to the SWIR region. Thus, the magnitude of tissue scattering is lower at SWIR wavelengths than that observed at VIS or NIR wavelengths, potentially enabling increased penetration depth of incident light at SWIR wavelengths that are not highly absorbed by the aforementioned chromophores. These aspects of SWIR suggest that the tissue spectroscopy and imaging in this range of wavelengths have the potential to provide enhanced sensitivity (relative to VIS-NIR measurements) to chromophores such as water and lipids, thereby helping to characterize changes in the concentrations of these chromophores due to conditions such as atherosclerotic plaque, breast cancer, and burns. PMID:25803186

  3. Review of short-wave infrared spectroscopy and imaging methods for biological tissue characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Robert H.; Nadeau, Kyle P.; Jaworski, Frank B.; Tromberg, Bruce J.; Durkin, Anthony J.

    2015-03-01

    We present a review of short-wave infrared (SWIR, defined here as ˜1000 to 2000 nm) spectroscopy and imaging techniques for biological tissue optical property characterization. Studies indicate notable SWIR absorption features of tissue constituents including water (near 1150, 1450, and 1900 nm), lipids (near 1040, 1200, 1400, and 1700 nm), and collagen (near 1200 and 1500 nm) that are much more prominent than corresponding features observed in the visible and near-infrared (VIS-NIR, defined here as ˜400 to 1000 nm). Furthermore, the wavelength dependence of the scattering coefficient has been observed to follow a power-law decay from the VIS-NIR to the SWIR region. Thus, the magnitude of tissue scattering is lower at SWIR wavelengths than that observed at VIS or NIR wavelengths, potentially enabling increased penetration depth of incident light at SWIR wavelengths that are not highly absorbed by the aforementioned chromophores. These aspects of SWIR suggest that the tissue spectroscopy and imaging in this range of wavelengths have the potential to provide enhanced sensitivity (relative to VIS-NIR measurements) to chromophores such as water and lipids, thereby helping to characterize changes in the concentrations of these chromophores due to conditions such as atherosclerotic plaque, breast cancer, and burns.

  4. Concentric waves and short-period oscillations observed in the ionosphere after the 2013 Moore EF5 tornado

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishioka, Michi; Tsugawa, Takuya; Kubota, Minoru; Ishii, Mamoru

    2013-11-01

    We detected clear concentric waves and short-period oscillations in the ionosphere after an Enhanced Fujita scale (EF)5 tornado hit Moore, Oklahoma, U.S., on 20 May 2013 using dense wide-coverage ionospheric total electron content (TEC) observations in North America. These concentric waves were nondispersive, with a horizontal wavelength of ~120 km and a period of ~13 min. They were observed for more than 7 h throughout North America. TEC oscillations with a period of ~4 min were also observed to the south of Moore for more than 8 h. A comparison between the TEC observations and infrared cloud image from the GOES satellite indicates that the concentric waves and short-period oscillations are caused by supercell-induced atmospheric gravity waves and acoustic resonances, respectively. This observational result provides the first clear evidence of a severe meteorological event causing atmospheric waves propagating upward in the upper atmosphere and reaching the ionosphere.

  5. Large-amplitude plasma wave generation with a high-intensity short-pulse beat wave.

    PubMed

    Walton, B; Najmudin, Z; Wei, M S; Marle, C; Kingham, R J; Krushelnick, K; Dangor, A E; Clarke, R J; Poulter, M J; Hernandez-Gomez, C; Hawkes, S; Neely, D; Collier, J L; Danson, C N; Fritzler, S; Malka, V

    2002-12-15

    A short-pulse laser beat wave scheme for advanced particle accelerator applications is examined. A short, intense (3-ps, >10(18)-W cm(-2)) two-frequency laser pulse is produced by use of a modified chirped-pulse amplification scheme and is shown to produce relativistic plasma waves during interactions with low-density plasmas. The generation of plasma waves was observed by measurement of forward Raman scattering. Resonance was found to occur at an electron density many times that expected, owing to ponderomotive displacement of plasma within the focal region. PMID:18033483

  6. Comparing wavelengths simulated by the coastal wave model CWAM and TerraSAR-X satellite data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gebhardt, Claus; Pleskachevsky, Andrey; Rosenthal, Wolfgang; Lehner, Susanne; Hoffmann, Peter; Kieser, Jens; Bruns, Thomas

    2016-07-01

    The accuracy of the high resolution coastal wave forecast model CWAM is validated on the basis of sea state information from satellite images of TerraSAR-X (TS-X). At the same time, the performance of the satellite retrieval of sea state parameters is demonstrated. Employing 2-dimensional spatial Fourier Transformation, image spectra are derived from TS-X and locally varying patterns of the peak wavelength are provided using state-of-the-art satellite retrieval. Subsequently, wavelength comparisons are performed between a typical set of TS-X scenes acquired in December 2013 over the German Bight and the model hindcasts. The results are mostly in reasonable agreement. Potential shortcomings of the wave model are discussed as well.

  7. Wave-length dependencies of light scattering in normal and cold swollen rabbit corneas and their structural implications*

    PubMed Central

    Farrell, R. A.; McCally, R. L.; Tatham, P. E. R.

    1973-01-01

    1. The studies described herein involve the use of light scattering measurements to characterize the ultrastructural arrangement of the constituent collagen fibrils in rabbit corneal stromas. 2. Theoretical light scattering techniques for calculating the scattering to be expected from the structures revealed by electron micrographs are discussed, and comparison with the experimental light scattering tests the validity of these structures. 3. The wave-length dependence of light transmission and of angular light scattering from normal corneas is in agreement with the short range ordering of collagen fibrils depicted in electron micrographs. 4. The transmission measurements on oedematous rabbit corneas indicate that transmission decreases linearly with the ratio of thickness to normal thickness. 5. The wave-length dependence of transmission through cold swollen corneas indicates that the increased scattering is caused by large inhomogeneities in the ultrastructure. Electron micrographs do, indeed, reveal the presence of such inhomogeneities in the form of large regions completely devoid of fibrils. ImagesPlate 1Plate 2Plate 3 PMID:4754873

  8. Automated model-based calibration of short-wavelength infrared (SWIR) imaging spectrographs.

    PubMed

    Kosec, Matjaž; Bürmen, Miran; Tomaževič, Dejan; Pernuš, Franjo; Likar, Boštjan

    2012-10-01

    Among the variety of available hyperspectral imaging systems, the line-scan technique stands out for its short acquisition time and good signal-to-noise ratio. However, due to imperfections in the camera lens and, in particular, optical components of the imaging spectrograph, the acquired images are spatially and spectrally distorted, which can significantly degrade the accuracy of the subsequent hyperspectral image analysis. In this work, we propose and evaluate an automated method for correction of spatial and spectral distortions introduced by a line-scan hyperspectral imaging system operating in the short wavelength infrared (SWIR) spectral range from 1000 nm to 2500 nm. The proposed method is based on non-rigid registration of the distorted and reference images corresponding to two passive calibration objects. The results of the validation show that the proposed method is accurate, efficient, and applicable for calibration of line-scan hyperspectral imaging systems. Moreover, the design of the method and of the calibration objects allows integration with systems operating in diffuse reflectance or transmittance modes. PMID:23031695

  9. MHz gravitational waves from short-term anisotropic inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Asuka; Soda, Jiro

    2016-04-01

    We reveal the universality of short-term anisotropic inflation. As a demonstration, we study inflation with an exponential type gauge kinetic function which is ubiquitous in models obtained by dimensional reduction from higher dimensional fundamental theory. It turns out that an anisotropic inflation universally takes place in the later stage of conventional inflation. Remarkably, we find that primordial gravitational waves with a peak amplitude around 10-26~ 10-27 are copiously produced in high-frequency bands 10 MHz~100 MHz. If we could detect such gravitational waves in future, we would be able to probe higher dimensional fundamental theory.

  10. Spatio-Temporal Measurements of Short Wind Water Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rocholz, Roland; Jähne, Bernd

    2010-05-01

    Spatio-temporal measurements of wind-driven short-gravity capillary waves are reported for a wide range of experimental conditions, including wind, rain and surface slicks. The experiments were conducted in the Hamburg linear wind/wave flume in cooperation with the Institute of Oceanography at the University of Hamburg, Germany. Both components of the slope field were measured optically at a fetch of 14.4 m using a color imaging slope gauge (CISG) with a footprint of 223 x 104 mm and a resolution of 0.7 mm. The instrument was improved versus earlier versions (Jähne and Riemer (1990), Klinke (1992)) to achieve a sampling rate of 312.5 Hz, which now allows for the computation of 3D wavenumber-frequency spectra (see Rocholz (2008)). This made it possible to distinguish waves traveling in and against wind direction, which proved useful to distinguish wind waves from ring waves caused by rain drop impacts. Using a new calibration method it was possible to correct for the intrinsic nonlinearities of the instrument in the slope range up to ±1. In addition, the Modulation Transfer Function (MTF) was measured and employed for the restoration of the spectral amplitudes for wavenumbers in the range from 60 to 2300 rad/m. The spectra for pure wind conditions are generally consistent with previous measurements. But, the shape of the saturation spectra in the vicinity of k~1000 rad/m (i.e. pure capillary waves) stands in contradiction to former investigations where a sharp spectral cutoff (k^(-2) or k^(-3)) is commonly reported (e.g. Jähne and Riemer (1990)). This cutoff is reproduced by almost all semi-empirical models of the energy flux in the capillary range (e.g. Kudryavtsev et al. (1999), Apel (1994)). However, the new MTF corrected spectra show only a gentle decrease (between k^(-0.5) and k^(-1)) for k > 1000 rad/m. Therefore the question for the relative importance of different dissipation mechanisms might need a new assessment. References: J. R. Apel. An improved

  11. Wavelength dependence of eddy dissipation and Coriolis force in the dynamics of gravity wave driven fluctuations in the OH nightglow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hickey, M. P.

    1988-01-01

    This paper examines the effect of inclusion of Coriolis force and eddy dissipation in the gravity wave dynamics theory of Walterscheid et al. (1987). It was found that the values of the ratio 'eta' (where eta is a complex quantity describing the ralationship between the intensity oscillation about the time-averaged intensity, and the temperature oscillation about the time-averaged temperature) strongly depend on the wave period and the horizontal wavelength; thus, if comparisons are to be made between observations and theory, horizontal wavelengths will need to be measured in conjunction with the OH nightglow measurements. For the waves with horizontal wavelengths up to 1000 km, the eddy dissipation was found to dominate over the Coriolis force in the gravity wave dynamics and also in the associated values of eta. However, for waves with horizontal wavelengths of 10,000 km or more, the Coriolis force cannot be neglected; it has to be taken into account along with the eddy dissipation.

  12. Spectral tuning and evolution of primate short-wavelength-sensitive visual pigments

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Livia S.; Davies, Wayne L.; Robinson, Phyllis R.; Hunt, David M.

    2012-01-01

    The peak sensitivities (λmax) of the short-wavelength-sensitive-1 (SWS1) pigments in mammals range from the ultraviolet (UV) (360–400 nm) to the violet (400–450 nm) regions of the spectrum. In most cases, a UV or violet peak is determined by the residue present at site 86, with Phe conferring UV sensitivity (UVS) and either Ser, Tyr or Val causing a shift to violet wavelengths. In primates, however, the tuning mechanism of violet-sensitive (VS) pigments would appear to differ. In this study, we examine the tuning mechanisms of prosimian SWS1 pigments. One species, the aye-aye, possesses a pigment with Phe86 but in vitro spectral analysis reveals a VS rather than a UVS pigment. Other residues (Cys, Ser and Val) at site 86 in prosimians also gave VS pigments. Substitution at site 86 is not, therefore, the primary mechanism for the tuning of VS pigments in primates, and phylogenetic analysis indicates that substitutions at site 86 have occurred at least five times in primate evolution. The sole potential tuning site that is conserved in all primate VS pigments is Pro93, which when substituted by Thr (as found in mammalian UVS pigments) in the aye-aye pigment shifted the peak absorbance into the UV region with a λmax value at 371 nm. We, therefore, conclude that the tuning of VS pigments in primates depends on Pro93, not Tyr86 as in other mammals. However, it remains uncertain whether the initial event that gave rise to the VS pigment in the ancestral primate was achieved by a Thr93Pro or a Phe86Tyr substitution. PMID:21697177

  13. The Design of the Short Wavelength Camera for the CCAT Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stacey, Gordon J.; Parshley, S.; Nikola, T.; Dowell, C. D.; Adams, J. D.; Bertoldi, F.; Chapman, S.; Cortes, G.; Day, P.; Glenn, J.; Halpern, M.; Hollister, M.; Kovacs, A.; LeDuc, H.; McKenney, C.; Monroe, R.; Mroczkowski, T.; Nguyen, H. T.; Niemack, M.; Rajagopalan, G.; Radford, S. J.; Schaaf, R.; Scott, D.; Schoenwald, J.; Swenson, L.; Yoshida, H.; Zmuidzinas, J.

    2013-01-01

    We present the design for the Short Wavelength Camera (SWCam) that we are proposing for use on the 25 meter CCAT submillimeter telescope. SWCam utilizes the absorber-coupled MKID based detector arrays that are being developed at JPL, and will soon be tested in the MAKO camera on the CSO. The primary SWCam band is centered on the 350 um telluric window but we plan capabilities in the 450 and 200 um telluric windows as well. Due to the curvature of the CCAT focal plane, the camera is split into 7 sub-cameras - a central camera and six cameras in a closed-packed outer ring. Each silicon lens-based camera illuminates an array consisting of ~7750 pixels with a plate scale of 3”/pixel which corresponds to an image plane sampling of lambda/D per pixel at 350 um. The combined pixel count is ~ 54,000 and the effective instantaneous field of view is ~ 13’ in diameter. All the cameras are contained in a single closed-cycle cryostat simplifying the optical/cryo/mechanical systems. The system is expected to achieve a back-ground limited sensitivity ~20 to 30 mJy/sqrt(Hz) under good weather conditions 0.43 mm precipitatable water vapor burden), so that the SWCam on CCAT approaches (5 sigma) the expected confusion noise for distant infrared bright galaxies on CCAT (<1 mJy) in about 4 hours integration time, and can map a degree of sky to this limit in about 100 hours of integration time. The primary science for SWCam is to investigate star, galaxy and structure formation over cosmic time through large scale (10s of square degrees) surveys in the submm continuum bands. SWCam is a key part of a triad of instruments that enable this science, including a long wavelength camera (LWCam), and a broad-band direct detection spectrometer (X-Spec) - instruments also described within this session.

  14. TES arrays for the short wavelength band of the SAFARI instrument on SPICA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khosropanah, P.; Hijmering, R.; Ridder, M.; Gao, J. R.; Morozov, D.; Mauskopf, P. D.; Trappe, N.; O'Sullivan, C.; Murphy, A.; Griffin, D.; Goldie, D.; Glowacka, D.; Withington, S.; Jackson, B. D.; Audley, M. D.; de Lange, G.

    2012-09-01

    SPICA is an infra-red (IR) telescope with a cryogenically cooled mirror (~5K) with three instruments on board, one of which is SAFARI that is an imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer (FTS) with three bands covering the wavelength of 34-210 μm. We develop transition edge sensors (TES) array for short wavelength band (34-60 μm) of SAFARI. These are based on superconducting Ti/Au bilayer as TES bolometers with a Tc of about 105 mK and thin Ta film as IR absorbers on suspended silicon nitride (SiN) membranes. These membranes are supported by long and narrow SiN legs that act as weak thermal links between the TES and the bath. Previously an electrical noise equivalent power (NEP) of 4×10-19 W/√Hz was achieved for a single pixel of such detectors. As an intermediate step toward a full-size SAFARI array (43×43), we fabricated several 8×9 detector arrays. Here we describe the design and the outcome of the dark and optical tests of several of these devices. We achieved high yield (<93%) and high uniformity in terms of critical temperature (<5%) and normal resistance (7%) across the arrays. The measured dark NEPs are as low as 5×10-19 W/√Hz with a response time of about 1.4 ms at preferred operating bias point. The optical coupling is implemented using pyramidal horns array on the top and hemispherical cavity behind the chip that gives a measured total optical coupling efficiency of 30±7%.

  15. Backscattering of gyrotron radiation and short-wavelength turbulence during electron cyclotron resonance plasma heating in the L-2M stellarator

    SciTech Connect

    Batanov, G. M.; Borzosekov, V. D. Kovrizhnykh, L. M.; Kolik, L. V.; Konchekov, E. M.; Malakhov, D. V.; Petrov, A. E.; Sarksyan, K. A.; Skvortsova, N. N.; Stepakhin, V. D.; Kharchev, N. K.

    2013-06-15

    Backscattering of gyrotron radiation ({theta} = {pi}) by short-wavelength density fluctuations (k{sub Up-Tack} = 30 cm{sup -1}) in the plasma of the L-2M stellarator was studied under conditions of electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma heating at the second harmonic of the electron gyrofrequency (75 GHz). The scattering of the O-wave emerging due to the splitting of the linearly polarized gyrotron radiation into the X- and O-waves was analyzed. The signal obtained after homodyne detection of scattered radiation is a result of interference of the reference signal, the quasi-steady component, and the fast oscillating component. The coefficients of reflection of the quasi-steady component, R{sub =}{sup 2}(Y), and fast oscillating component, R{sub {approx}}{sup 2}(Y), of scattered radiation are estimated. The growth of the R{sub {approx}}{sup 2}(Y) coefficient from 3.7 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -4} to 5.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -4} with increasing ECR heating power from 190 to 430 kW is found to correlate with the decrease in the energy lifetime from 1.9 to 1.46 ms. The relative density of short-wavelength fluctuations is estimated to be Left-Pointing-Angle-Bracket n{sub {approx}}{sup 2} Right-Pointing-Angle-Bracket / Left-Pointing-Angle-Bracket n{sub e}{sup 2} Right-Pointing-Angle-Bracket = 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -7}. It is shown that the frequencies of short-wavelength fluctuations are in the range 10-150 kHz. The recorded short-wavelength fluctuations can be interpreted as structural turbulence, the energy of which comprises {approx}10% of the total fluctuations energy. Simulations of transport processes show that neoclassical heat fluxes are much smaller than anomalous ones. It is suggested that short-wavelength turbulence plays a decisive role in the anomalous heat transport.

  16. A study of short wave instability on vortex filaments

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Hong Yun

    1996-12-01

    The numerical stability and accuracy of the vortex method are studied. The effect of the ordinary differential equations (ODE) solver and of the time step on the numerical stability is analyzed. Various ODE solvers are compared and a best performer is chosen. A new constraint on the time step based on numerical stability is proposed and verified in numerical simulations. It is shown through numerical examples that empirical rules for selecting the spatial discretization obtained in simple test problems may not be extended to more general problems. The thin tube vortex filament method is applied to the problem of Widnall`s instability on vortex rings. Numerical results different from previous calculations are presented and the source of the discrepancies is explained. The long time behavior of the unstable mode on thin vortex rings is simulated and analyzed. The short wave instability on vortex filaments is investigated both theoretically and numerically. It is shown that the short wave instability always occurs on co-rotating vortex filaments of fixed core structure. Furthermore when they are close to each other, vortex filaments produce short wave unstable modes which lead to wild stretching and folding. However, when the inter-filament distance is large in comparison with the core size of the filaments, unstable modes are bounded by a small fraction of the core size and the vortex filaments do not create hairpins nor wild stretching. These findings may explain the smooth behavior of the superfluid vortices. The formation of hairpin structures on numerical vortex filaments is investigated. It is shown that the formation of hairpin structures is independent of the ODE solver, of the time step and of other numerical parameters. The hairpin structures are primarily caused by short wave instability on co-rotating vortex filaments.

  17. The search for atmospheric waves below the clouds of Jupiter using radio wavelength observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cosentino, Rick; Butler, Bryan; Sault, Bob; Morales-Juberias, Raul; Simon, Amy

    2015-11-01

    We observed Jupiter at 2 cm wavelength with the VLA in early February 2015. This particular frequency is mostly sensitive to variations in ammonia opacity and probes a depth between 1 and 2 bars pressure; below the visible cloud deck at 0.7 bars. The data acquired was projected into a cartographic map of the planet following the technique of Sault et al. (2004). The horizontal resolution is ~1500 km and we have examined the map for atmospheric waves on these and larger scales. The map has revealed prominent features near 8N, in the North Equatorial Belt, where the 5 micron hotspot planetary wave feature also resides. The Great Red Spot is also prominent and has a noticeable meridional asymmetry. We will present our analysis of the spatial structure for the entire map and best fit of its wave feature spectrum.Our research is supported by NRAO and NMT.

  18. Effects of Stable Stratification on the Short Wave Instability in a Vortex Pair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nomura, K.; Mahoney, D.; Tsutsui, H.; Crockett, J.; Rottman, J.

    2002-11-01

    The evolution of a counter-rotating vortex pair in a stably stratified fluid is investigated using three-dimensional direct numerical simulations. The study focuses on the short wave instability occurring in this flow which consists of a sinusoidal asymmetric deformation of the vortices with wavelength on the order of the vortex spacing. The short wave instability has been observed in unstratified laboratory experiments and numerical simulations. In stable stratification, our simulation results show an earlier onset and higher growth rate. This is due to the enhanced strain that occurs when the vortices move closer together as a result of the generated baroclinic torque. With relatively weak stratification, the wavelength of the instability remains comparable to that in the unstratified case and a significant increase in the growth rate is exhibited. For stronger stratification, the form of the instability becomes more complex and the growth rate is less than that for weak stratification. Details of the structure and dynamics of the flow are presented.

  19. Characteristics of short-period internal waves in the Kara Sea inferred from satellite SAR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlov, I. E.; Kudryavtsev, V. N.; Zubkova, E. V.; Zimin, A. V.; Chapron, B.

    2015-12-01

    In this paper we present the results of short-period internal wave (SIW) observations in the Kara Sea on the basis of satellite ENVISAT ASAR data between July and October 2007. Altogether, 248 internal wave (IW) packets and solitons are identified in 89 SAR images. Detailed spatial statistics of IW signatures and their properties in the Kara Sea is presented. The primary regions of IW activity are the areas near the Kara Gates Strait, the southeastern part of the Novaya Zemlya Trough, and in the vicinity of Cape Zhelaniya. We identify the regions where large IW packets are observed with wavelengths up to 2-3 km and the front length exceeding 200 km. The mean interpacket distance for observed IWs is about 20 km, but it may reach 50-60 km. Consequent IW packets are observed to travel up to 500 km from the presumed generation points. The results of satellite observations are compared with results of previous studies.

  20. Short-wavelength sensitive opsin (SWS1) as a new marker for vertebrate phylogenetics

    PubMed Central

    van Hazel, Ilke; Santini, Francesco; Müller, Johannes; Chang, Belinda SW

    2006-01-01

    Background Vertebrate SWS1 visual pigments mediate visual transduction in response to light at short wavelengths. Due to their importance in vision, SWS1 genes have been isolated from a surprisingly wide range of vertebrates, including lampreys, teleosts, amphibians, reptiles, birds, and mammals. The SWS1 genes exhibit many of the characteristics of genes typically targeted for phylogenetic analyses. This study investigates both the utility of SWS1 as a marker for inferring vertebrate phylogenetic relationships, and the characteristics of the gene that contribute to its phylogenetic utility. Results Phylogenetic analyses of vertebrate SWS1 genes produced topologies that were remarkably congruent with generally accepted hypotheses of vertebrate evolution at both higher and lower taxonomic levels. The few exceptions were generally associated with areas of poor taxonomic sampling, or relationships that have been difficult to resolve using other molecular markers. The SWS1 data set was characterized by a substantial amount of among-site rate variation, and a relatively unskewed substitution rate matrix, even when the data were partitioned into different codon sites and individual taxonomic groups. Although there were nucleotide biases in some groups at third positions, these biases were not convergent across different taxonomic groups. Conclusion Our results suggest that SWS1 may be a good marker for vertebrate phylogenetics due to the variable yet consistent patterns of sequence evolution exhibited across fairly wide taxonomic groups. This may result from constraints imposed by the functional role of SWS1 pigments in visual transduction. PMID:17107620

  1. Ultraviolet and short wavelength visible light exposure: why ultraviolet protection alone is not adequate.

    PubMed

    Reichow, Alan W; Citek, Karl; Edlich, Richard F

    2006-01-01

    The danger of exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation in both the natural environment and artificial occupational settings has long been recognized by national and international standards committees and worker safety agencies. There is an increasing body of literature that suggests that protection from UV exposure is not enough. Unprotected exposure to the short wavelengths of the visible spectrum, termed the "blue light hazard", is gaining acceptance as a true risk to long-term visual health. Global standards and experts in the field are now warning that those individuals who spend considerable time outdoors should seek sun filter eyewear with high impact resistant lenses that provide 100% UV filtration, high levels of blue light filtration, and full visual field lens/frame coverage as provided by high wrap eyewear. The Skin Cancer Foundation has endorsed certain sunglasses as "product[s]...effective [as] UV filter[s] for the eyes and surrounding skin". However, such endorsement does not necessarily mean that the eyewear meets all the protective needs for outdoor use. There are several brands that offer products with such protective characteristics. Performance sun eyewear by Nike Vision, available in both corrective and plano (nonprescription) forms, is one such brand incorporating these protective features. PMID:17073573

  2. A conserved aromatic residue regulating photosensitivity in short-wavelength sensitive cone visual pigments.

    PubMed

    Kuemmel, Colleen M; Sandberg, Megan N; Birge, Robert R; Knox, Barry E

    2013-07-30

    Visual pigments have a conserved phenylalanine in transmembrane helix 5 located near the β-ionone ring of the retinal chromophore. Site-directed mutants of this residue (F207) in a short-wavelength sensitive visual pigment (VCOP) were studied using UV-visible spectroscopy to investigate its role in photosensitivity and formation of the light-activated state. The side chain is important for pigment formation: VCOP(F207A), VCOP(F207L), VCOP(F207M), and VCOP(F207W) substitutions all bound 11-cis-retinal and formed a stable visual pigment, while VCOP(F207V), VCOP(F207S), VCOP(F207T), and VCOP(F207Y) substitutions do not. The extinction coefficients of all pigments are close, ranging between 35800 and 45600 M⁻¹ cm⁻¹. Remarkably, the mutants exhibit an up to 5-fold reduction in photosensitivity and also abnormal photobleaching behavior. One mutant, VCOP(F207A), forms an isomeric composition of the retinal chromophore after illumination comparable to that of wild-type VCOP yet does not release the all-trans-retinal chromophore. These findings suggest that the conserved F207 residue is important for a normal photoactivation pathway, formation of the active conformation and the exit of all-trans-retinal from the chromophore-binding pocket. PMID:23808485

  3. Conserved residues in the extracellular loops of short-wavelength cone visual pigments.

    PubMed

    Chen, Min-Hsuan; Sandberg, Daniel J; Babu, Kunnel R; Bubis, Jose; Surya, Arjun; Ramos, Lavoisier S; Zapata, Heidi J; Galan, Jhenny F; Sandberg, Megan N; Birge, Robert R; Knox, Barry E

    2011-08-16

    The role of the extracellular loop region of a short-wavelength sensitive pigment, Xenopus violet cone opsin, is investigated via computational modeling, mutagenesis, and spectroscopy. The computational models predict a complex H-bonding network that stabilizes and connects the EC2-EC3 loop and the N-terminus. Mutations that are predicted to disrupt the H-bonding network are shown to produce visual pigments that do not stably bind chromophore and exhibit properties of a misfolded protein. The potential role of a disulfide bond between two conserved Cys residues, Cys(105) in TM3 and Cys(182) in EC2, is necessary for proper folding and trafficking in VCOP. Lastly, certain residues in the EC2 loop are predicted to stabilize the formation of two antiparallel β-strands joined by a hairpin turn, which interact with the chromophore via H-bonding or van der Waals interactions. Mutations of conserved residues result in a decrease in the level of chromophore binding. These results demonstrate that the extracellular loops are crucial for the formation of this cone visual pigment. Moreover, there are significant differences in the structure and function of this region in VCOP compared to that in rhodopsin. PMID:21688771

  4. Short-wavelength ablation of polymers in the high-fluence regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liberatore, Chiara; Mann, Klaus; Müller, Matthias; Pina, Ladislav; Juha, Libor; Vyšín, Ludek; Rocca, Jorge J.; Endo, Akira; Mocek, Tomas

    2014-05-01

    Short-wavelength ablation of poly(1,4-phenylene ether-ether-sulfone) (PPEES) and poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) was investigated using extreme ultraviolet (XUV) and soft x-ray (SXR) radiation from plasma-based sources. The initial experiment was performed with a 10 Hz desktop capillary-discharge XUV laser lasing at 46.9 nm. The XUV laser beam was focused onto the sample by a spherical mirror coated with a Si/Sc multilayer. The same materials were irradiated with 13.5 nm radiation emitted by plasmas produced by focusing an optical laser beam onto a xenon gas-puff target. A Schwarzschild focusing optics coated with a Mo/Si multilayer was installed at the source to achieve energy densities exceeding 0.1 J cm-2 in the tight focus. The existing experimental system at the Laser Laboratorium Göttingen was upgraded by implementing a 1.2 J driving laser. An increase of the SXR fluence was secured by improving the alignment technique.

  5. Short-wavelength gravity lineations and unusual flexure results at the Puka Puka volcanic ridge system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodwillie, Andrew M.

    1995-12-01

    Short-wavelength gravity lineations aligned parallel to the direction of absolute motion of the Pacific plate, and a newly discovered series of linear, elongate volcanic ridges in the south-central pacific Ocean are just two of the many geophysical and geochemical anomalies that have been observed in this area. These Puka Puka volcanic ridges can be traced for 2600 km along the trough of a major gravity lineation and stretch from close to the East Pacific Rise, in the east, to the Tuamotu Islands in the west. The ridges were the focus of a recent cruise to this area that collected high quality gravity and multi-beam swath bathymetry data, in addition to dredge samples that are suitable for radiometric age dating. A complete 2-D lithospheric flexure analysis of these new data reveals that each of the volcanic ridges is associated with an unusually low effective elastic plate thickness. Previous workers showed this region to be characterised by lower than expected elastic thickness values, which were interpreted in terms of both regional and more localised thermal anomalies in the oceanic lithosphere. The new flexure results obtained for the volcanic ridges in this study confirm these low values. Lithospheric stretching and small-scale convection models that have been put forward to explain the origin of the lineations and volcanic ridges have been re-examined in light of these new results but neither is found to satisfactorily explain all of the observations.

  6. Short-wavelength stability analysis of Hill's vortex with/without swirl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hattori, Y.; Hijiya, K.

    2010-07-01

    The stability of Hill's vortex with/without swirl is studied by the short-wavelength stability analysis or WKB analysis. It is shown that the classical Hill's spherical vortex is subjected not only to the Widnall instability but also to the curvature instability found for thin vortex rings and helical vortex tubes. A new "combined" mode of instability caused by the two instabilities is discovered. The magnitude of the exponential growth rate of the combined mode is similar with the curvature instability around the stagnation point; it exceeds the Widnall instability near the boundary. The effects of swirl on the instabilities are investigated using a family of solutions obtained by Moffatt ["The degree of knottedness of tangled vortex lines," J. Fluid Mech. 35, 117 (1969)]. As the swirl parameter α increases, a stable region appears around the stagnation point; the maxima of the growth rates decrease; the combined mode region disappears for α ≥3. As α increases further, however, the region of the generalized centrifugal instability emerges from the stagnation point.

  7. High detectivity short-wavelength II-VI quantum cascade detector

    SciTech Connect

    Ravikumar, Arvind P. Gmachl, Claire F.; Garcia, Thor A.; Tamargo, Maria C.; Jesus, Joel De

    2014-08-11

    We report on the experimental demonstration of a ZnCdSe/ZnCdMgSe-based short-wavelength photovoltaic Quantum Cascade Detector (QCD). The QCD operates in two spectral bands centered around 2.6 μm and 3.6 μm. Calibrated blackbody measurements yield a peak responsivity of 0.1 mA/W or 2400 V/W at 80 K, and a corresponding 300 K background radiation limited infrared performance detectivity (BLIP) of ∼2.5 × 10{sup 10 }cm √Hz/W. Comparison of background illuminated and dark current-voltage measurements demonstrates a BLIP temperature of 200 K. The device differential resistance-area product, decreases from about 10{sup 6} Ω cm{sup 2} at 80 K to about 8000 Ω cm{sup 2} at 300 K, indicative of the ultra-low Johnson noise in the detectors.

  8. Wavelength and temperature dependence of continuous-wave laser absorptance in Kapton thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palm, William J.; Marciniak, Michael A.; Perram, Glen P.; Gross, Kevin C.; Bailey, William F.; Walters, Craig T.

    2012-12-01

    Optical properties and laser damage characteristics of thin-film aluminized Kapton were investigated. Spectral absorptance of virgin and irradiated samples was measured from the Kapton side of multilayered insulation over 0.2 to 15 μm wavelengths at both room temperature and 150°C. The laser-damage parameters of penetration time and maximum temperature were then measured in a vacuum environment at laser wavelengths of 1.07 and 10.6 μm. Differences in damage behavior at these two wavelengths were observed due to differences in starting absorption properties at these wavelengths. During laser irradiation, the Kapton thin film was observed with a calibrated FLIR thermal imager in the 8 to 9.2 μm band to determine its temperature evolution. Spectral radiance throughout the mid- and long-wave infrared was also observed with a Fourier transform spectrometer, allowing temperature-dependent spectral emittance to be determined. Kapton emittance increased after the material heated past approximately 500°C, and continued to increase as it cooled posttest. This evolving temperature-dependent spectral emittance successfully predicts the increasing absorptance that led to shortened penetration times and increased heating rates for the 1.07 μm laser. For tests with constant absorptance and no material breakdown, a simplified one-dimensional thermal conduction and radiation model successfully predicts the temporally evolving temperature.

  9. Adaptive two-wave mixing wavelength demodulation of fiber Bragg grating sensor for monitoring dynamic strains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Yi; Zhou, Yi; Krishnaswamy, Sridhar

    2005-05-01

    A two-wave mixing (TWM) wavelength demodulator using InP:Fe photorefractive crystal (PRC) in the C-band (1530-1570nm) is demonstrated. The system can be used as a wavelength demodulator for use with Fiber Bragg Grating (FBG) sensors to monitor dynamic strains. In this configuration, the FBG is illuminated with a broadband source, and any strain in the FBG is encoded as a wavelength shift of the light reflected by the FBG. The reflected light from the FBG is spilt into two unbalanced paths and both beams (pump and signal) mix in the PRC. Any wavelength shift of the reflected light results in an equivalent phase shift between the pump and signal beams as they travel unbalanced path lengths. Since TWM is an adaptive process, the two interfering beams are naturally in quadrature and remain in quadrature even in the presence of large quasi-static strains. We demonstrate that FBG demodulation using TWM has the ability to selectively monitor dynamic strains without the need for active compensation of large quasi-static strains that otherwise would cause the FBG sensor to drift. As TWM interferometers can be readily multiplexed at relatively low cost; the proposed technique can be used to demodulate signals from a network of FBG sensors for use in structural health monitoring.

  10. Continuous-wave dual-wavelength Nd:YAG laser operation at 1319 and 1338 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, G. C.; Lee, Y. D.; Zao, Y. D.; Xu, L. J.; Wang, J. B.; Chen, G. B.; Lu, J.

    2013-04-01

    We report an efficient continuous-wave (CW) dual-wavelength operation of an Nd:YAG (YAG: yttrium aluminum garnet) laser at 1319 and 1338 nm. An output power of 2.47 W for the dual-wavelength operation was achieved at the incident pump power of 16.7 W. Intracavity sum-frequency mixing at 1319 and 1338 nm was then realized in an LBO (lithium triborate) crystal to reach the red range. A maximum output power of 879 mW in the red spectral range at 664 nm has been achieved. The red output stability is better than 3.4%. The red beam quality M2 values are about 1.21 and 1.35 in the horizontal and vertical directions respectively.

  11. Spectral tuning in vertebrate short wavelength-sensitive 1 (SWS1) visual pigments: can wavelength sensitivity be inferred from sequence data?

    PubMed

    Hauser, Frances E; van Hazel, Ilke; Chang, Belinda S W

    2014-11-01

    The molecular mechanisms underlying the enormous diversity of visual pigment wavelength sensitivities found in nature have been the focus of many molecular evolutionary studies, with particular attention to the short wavelength-sensitive 1 (SWS1) visual pigments that mediate vision in the ultraviolet to violet range of the electromagnetic spectrum. Over a decade of study has revealed that the remarkable extension of SWS1 absorption maxima (λ max ) into the ultraviolet occurs through a deprotonation of the Schiff base linkage of the retinal chromophore, a mechanism unique to this visual pigment type. In studies of visual ecology, there has been mounting interest in inferring visual sensitivity at short wavelengths, given the importance of UV signaling in courtship displays and other behaviors. Since experimentally determining spectral sensitivities can be both challenging and time-consuming, alternative strategies such as estimating λ max based on amino acids at sites known to affect spectral tuning are becoming increasingly common. However, these estimates should be made with knowledge of the limitations inherent in these approaches. Here, we provide an overview of the current literature on SWS1 site-directed mutagenesis spectral tuning studies, and discuss methodological caveats specific to the SWS1-type pigments. We focus particular attention on contrasting avian and mammalian SWS1 spectral tuning mechanisms, which are the best studied among vertebrates. We find that avian SWS1 visual pigment spectral tuning mechanisms are fairly consistent, and therefore more predictable in terms of wavelength absorption maxima, whereas mammalian pigments are not well suited to predictions of λ max from sequence data alone. PMID:24890094

  12. Multi-photon ionization of atoms in intense short-wavelength radiation fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Michael

    2015-05-01

    The unprecedented characteristics of XUV and X-ray Free Electron Lasers (FELs) have stimulated numerous investigations focusing on the detailed understanding of fundamental photon-matter interactions in atoms and molecules. In particular, the high intensities (up to 106 W/cm2) giving rise to non-linear phenomena in the short wavelength regime. The basic phenomenology involves the production of highly charged ions via electron emission to which both sequential and direct multi-photon absorption processes contribute. The detailed investigation of the role and relative weight of these processes under different conditions (wavelength, pulse duration, intensity) is the key element for a comprehensive understanding of the ionization dynamics. Here the results of recent investigations are presented, performed at the FELs in Hamburg (FLASH) and Trieste (FERMI) on atomic systems with electronic structures of increasing complexity (Ar, Ne and Xe). Mainly, electron spectroscopy is used to obtain quantitative information about the relevance of various multi-photon ionization processes. For the case of Ar, a variety of processes including above threshold ionization (ATI) from 3p and 3s valence shells, direct 2p two-photon ionization and resonant 2p-4p two-photon excitations were observed and their role was quantitatively determined comparing the experimental ionization yields to ab-initio calculations of the cross sections for the multi-photon processes. Using Ar as a benchmark to prove the reliability of the combined experimental and theoretical approach, the more complex and intriguing case of Xe was studied. Especially, the analysis of the two-photon ATI from the Xe 4d shell reveals new insight into the character of the 4d giant resonance, which was unresolved in the linear one-photon regime. Finally, the influence of intense XUV radiation to the relaxation dynamics of the Ne 2s-3p resonance was investigated by angle-resolved electron spectroscopy, especially be observing

  13. An investigation of the modulation of capillary and short gravity waves in the open ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, D. D.; Shemdin, O. H.

    1980-01-01

    A preliminary investigation of the modulation of capillary and gravity waves by long ocean waves is described. A pressure transducer is used to obtain water surface displacements, and a high-response laser-optical system is used to detect short-wave slopes. Analytical techniques are developed to account for the orbital motion of long waves. The local mean squared wave slope is found to be maximum leeward of the long-wave crests. For the long waves studied here and for short waves from 1 cm to 1 m, the longer a short-wave component is, the more leeward its maximum tends to occur. Also, the shortest waves tend to modulate least. The modulation of short waves is found to be strong enough to be an important component of the synthetic aperture radar image formation mechanism for long ocean waves.

  14. A short-wavelength infrared emitting multimodal probe for non-invasive visualization of phagocyte cell migration in living mice.

    PubMed

    Tsukasaki, Y; Komatsuzaki, A; Mori, Y; Ma, Q; Yoshioka, Y; Jin, T

    2014-11-28

    For the non-invasive visualization of cell migration in deep tissues, we synthesized a short-wavelength infrared (SWIR) emitting multimodal probe that contains PbS/CdS quantum dots, rhodamine 6G and iron oxide nanoparticles. This probe enables multimodal (SWIR fluorescence/magnetic resonance) imaging of phagocyte cell migration in living mice. PMID:25296382

  15. Four-wave mixing stability in hybrid photonic crystal fibers with two zero-dispersion wavelengths.

    PubMed

    Sévigny, Benoit; Vanvincq, Olivier; Valentin, Constance; Chen, Na; Quiquempois, Yves; Bouwmans, Géraud

    2013-12-16

    The four-wave mixing process in optical fibers is generally sensitive to dispersion uniformity along the fiber length. However, some specific phase matching conditions show increased robustness to longitudinal fluctuations in fiber dimensions, which affect the dispersion, even for signal and idler wavelengths far from the pump. In this paper, we present the method by which this point is found, how the fiber design characteristics impact on the stable point and demonstrate the stability through propagation simulations using the non-linear Schrödinger equation. PMID:24514659

  16. Retrieval of short ocean wave slope using polarimetric imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zappa, Christopher J.; Banner, Michael L.; Schultz, Howard; Corrada-Emmanuel, Andres; Wolff, Lawrence B.; Yalcin, Jacob

    2008-05-01

    We present a passive optical remote sensing technique for recovering shape information about a water surface, in the form of a two-dimensional slope map. The method, known as polarimetric slope sensing (PSS), uses the relationship between surface orientation and the change in polarization of reflected light to infer the instantaneous two-dimensional slope across the field-of-view of an imaging polarimeter. For unpolarized skylight, the polarization orientation and degree of linear polarization of the reflected skylight provide sufficient information to determine the local surface slope vectors. A controlled laboratory experiment was carried out in a wave tank with mechanically generated gravity waves. A second study was performed from a pier on the Hudson River, near Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory. We demonstrated that the two-dimensional slope field of short gravity waves could be recovered accurately without interfering with the fluid dynamics of the air or water, and water surface features appear remarkably realistic. The combined field and laboratory results demonstrate that the polarimetric camera gives a robust characterization of the fine-scale surface wave features that are intrinsic to wind-driven air-sea interaction processes.

  17. Image measurements of short-period gravity waves at equatorial latitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, M. J.; Pendleton, W. R.; Clark, S.; Takahashi, H.; Gobbi, D.; Goldberg, R. A.

    1997-11-01

    A high-performance, all-sky imaging system has been used to obtain novel data on the morphology and dynamics of short-period (<1 hour) gravity waves at equatorial latitudes. Gravity waves imaged in the upper mesosphere and lower thermosphere were recorded in three nightglow emissions, the near-infrared OH emission, and the visible wavelength OI (557.7 nm) and Na (589.2 nm) emissions spanning the altitude range ˜80-100 km. The measurements were made from Alcantara, Brazil (2.3°S, 44.5°W), during the period August-October 1994 as part of the NASA/Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais "Guara campaign". Over 50 wave events were imaged from which a statistical study of the characteristics of equatorial gravity waves has been performed. The data were found to divide naturally into two groups. The first group corresponded to extensive, freely propagating (or ducted) gravity waves with observed periods ranging from 3.7 to 36.6 min, while the second group consisted of waves of a much smaller scale and transient nature. The later group exhibited a bimodal distribution for the observed periods at 5.18±0.26 min and 4.32±0.15 min, close to the local Brunt-Vaisala period and the acoustic cutoff period, respectively. In comparison, the larger-scale waves exhibited a clear tendency for their horizontal wavelengths to increase almost linearly with observed period. This trend was particularly well defined around the equinox and can be represented by a power-law relationship of the form λh=(3.1±0.5)τob1.06±0.10, where λh is measured in kilometers and τob in minutes. This result is in very good agreement with previous radar and passive optical measurements but differs significantly from the relationship λh ∝ τ1.5ob inferred from recent lidar studies. The larger-scale waves were also found to exhibit strong anisotropy in their propagation headings with the dominant direction of motion toward the-NE-ENE suggesting a preponderance for wave generation over the South

  18. Photoresist outgassing: a potential Achilles heel for short-wavelength optical lithography?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunz, Roderick R.

    2004-05-01

    The outgassing of volatile organic compounds during photoresist exposure at short wavelengths (<200 nm) has in recent years become a cause for concern as a source for contamination of lithographic optics and has triggered a significant investment of resources to understand and address the problem. In this paper, we report on Lincoln Laboratory"s contribution to this industry-wide effort with results from two types of outgassing measurements aimed at providing a better understanding of the risk posed by this phenomenon. The first method is a quantitative measurement based on a gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer and measures the outgassing by collecting the vapor sample over several minutes in order to enhance sensitivity. This first method cannot determine the outgassing time dependence over the duration of the exposure (~seconds). Our second method, based on laser desorption mass spectrometry, has been performed under UHV conditions to determine the time-dependence of photoresist outgassing and has shown that, for both 193- and 157-nm exposures, a majority of the total outgassed vapor is desorbed during the exposure time. The time dependence of the remaining amount that outgasses after exposure can be fit to a double exponential with characteristic time constants of ~0.5 and ~3 seconds, indicating that even in the limiting case of very short exposures (<<1 second), most material (>50%) would outgas within seconds. The implications of these findings are twofold. First, analytical methods used to measure outgassing that rely on long (>10 minute) sample collection and preconcentration steps must now assume that the measured product is liberated over a few-second time frame when converting the data to outgassing rates. This means that the peak transient outgassing rates for the few seconds during and immediately after exposure derived using this corrected method could be hundreds of times higher than previously reported, with values approaching as much as 1014

  19. Increasing robustness of indirect drive capsule designs against short wavelength hydrodynamic instabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Haan, S W; Herrmann, M C; Dittrich, T R; Fetterman, A J; Marinak, M M; Munro, D; Pollaine, S M; Salmonson, J D; Strobel, G L; Suter, L J

    2004-11-12

    Target designs are described that are meant to achieve ignition on the National Ignition Facility. Simulations of recent indirect drive cryogenic capsule designs indicate dramatically reduced growth of short wavelength hydrodynamic instabilities, resulting from two changes in the designs. First, better optimization results from systematic mapping of the ignition target performance over the parameter space of ablator and DT-ice thickness combinations, using techniques developed by one of us (Herrmann). After the space is mapped with one-dimensional simulations, exploration of it with two-dimensional simulations quantifies the dependence of instability growth on target dimensions. Low modes and high modes grow differently in different regions of the space, allowing a trade-off of the two regimes of growth. Significant improvement in high-mode stability can be achieved, relative to previous designs, with only insignificant increase in low-mode growth. This procedure produces capsule designs that, in simulations, tolerate several times the surface roughness that could be tolerated by capsules optimized by older more heuristic techniques. Another significant reduction in instability growth, by another factor of several, is achieved with ablators with 'graded dopants.' In this type of capsule the mid-Z dopant, which is needed in the ablator to minimize x-ray preheat at the ablator-ice interface, is optimally positioned within the ablator. A fabrication scenario for graded dopants already exists, using sputter coating to fabricate the ablator shell. We describe the systematics of these advances in capsule design, discuss the basis behind their improved performance, and summarize how this is affecting our plans for NIF ignition.

  20. Internal structure of laser supported detonation waves by two-wavelength Mach-Zehnder interferometer

    SciTech Connect

    Shimamura, Kohei; Kawamura, Koichi; Fukuda, Akio; Wang Bin; Yamaguchi, Toshikazu; Komurasaki, Kimiya; Hatai, Keigo; Fukui, Akihiro; Arakawa, Yoshihiro

    2011-04-15

    Characteristics of the internal structure of the laser supported detonation (LSD) waves, such as the electron density n{sub e} and the electron temperature T{sub e} profiles behind the shock wave were measured using a two-wavelength Mach-Zehnder interferometer along with emission spectroscopy. A TEA CO{sub 2} laser with energy of 10 J/pulse produced explosive laser heating in atmospheric air. Results show that the peak values of n{sub e} and T{sub e} were, respectively, about 2 x 10{sup 24} m{sup -3} and 30 000 K, during the LSD regime. The temporal variation of the laser absorption coefficient profile estimated from the measured properties reveals that the laser energy was absorbed perfectly in a thin layer behind the shock wave during the LSD regime, as predicted by Raizer's LSD model. However, the absorption layer was much thinner than a plasma layer, the situation of which was not considered in Raizer's model. The measured n{sub e} at the shock front was not zero while the LSD was supported, which implies that the precursor electrons exist ahead of the shock wave.

  1. Dual-wavelength operation of continuous-wave and mode-locked erbium-doped fiber lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pottiez, O.; Martinez-Rios, A.; Monzon-Hernandez, D.; Ibarra-Escamilla, B.; Kuzin, E. A.; Hernandez-Garcia, J. C.

    2012-06-01

    We study numerically and experimentally multiple-wavelength operation of an erbium-doped figure-eight fiber laser including a multiple-bandpass optical filter formed by two concatenated fiber tapers. Both continuous-wave and pulsed operations are considered. In the continuous-wave regime, stable long-term operation at multiple closely spaced wavelengths is only obtained if fine adjustments of the cavity losses are performed. Under these conditions, simultaneous lasing at up to four wavelengths separated by 1.5 nm was observed experimentally. Tunable single-wavelength operation over more than 20 nm is also observed in the continuous-wave regime. In the passive mode locking regime, numerical simulations indicate that mechanisms involving the filter losses and the nonlinear transmission characteristic of the NOLM contribute in principle to stabilize dual-wavelength operation, allowing less demanding cavity loss adjustments. In this regime, the problem of synchronization between the pulse trains generated at each wavelength adds an additional dimension to the problem. In presence of cavity dispersion, the pulses at each wavelength tend to be asynchronous if the wavelength separation is large, however they can be synchronous in the case of closely spaced wavelengths, if cross-phase modulation is able to compensate for the dispersion-induced walkoff. Experimentally, fundamental and 2nd-order harmonic mode locking was observed, characterized by the generation of noise-like pulses. Finally, a regime of multi-wavelength passive Q-switching was also observed. We believe that this work will be helpful to guide the design of multiple-wavelength fiber laser sources, which are attractive for a wide range of applications including Wavelength Division Multiplexing transmissions, signal processing and sensing.

  2. Short wavelength effects on the collisionless neoclassical polarization and residual zonal flow level

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao Yong; Catto, Peter J.

    2006-10-15

    Sheared zonal flow helps to reduce the turbulent transport caused by the ion temperature gradient mode. Rosenbluth and Hinton (R-H) calculated the residual zonal flow level for radial wavelengths that are much larger than the ion poloidal gyroradius. Their calculation is extended to treat arbitrary radial wavelengths. For the radial wavelengths that approach the ion poloidal gyroradius, but are much larger than the ion gyroradius, an analytical formula is obtained. For radial wavelengths that are comparable or shorter than the poloidal ion gyroradius and the ion gyroradius a numerical solution is provided. These small radial wavelength results are then extended into the electron temperature gradient regime, where the residual zonal flow level is large but ineffective in regulating the turbulence, indicating that the conventional R-H explanation that zonal flow regulates turbulence is incomplete.

  3. Wavelength conversion of 28 GBaud 16-QAM signals based on four-wave mixing in a silicon nanowire.

    PubMed

    Adams, Rhys; Spasojevic, Mina; Chagnon, Mathieu; Malekiha, Mahdi; Li, Jia; Plant, David V; Chen, Lawrence R

    2014-02-24

    We demonstrate error-free wavelength conversion of 28 GBaud 16-QAM single polarization (112 Gb/s) signals based on four-wave mixing in a dispersion engineered silicon nanowire (SNW). Wavelength conversion covering the entire C-band is achieved using a single pump. We characterize the performance of the wavelength converter subsystem through the electrical signal to noise ratio penalty as well as the bit error rate of the converted signal as a function of input signal power. Moreover, we evaluate the degradation of the optical signal to noise ratio due to wavelength conversion in the SNW. PMID:24663730

  4. From individual spiking neurons to population behavior: Systematic elimination of short-wavelength spatial modes.

    PubMed

    Steyn-Ross, Moira L; Steyn-Ross, D A

    2016-02-01

    Mean-field models of the brain approximate spiking dynamics by assuming that each neuron responds to its neighbors via a naive spatial average that neglects local fluctuations and correlations in firing activity. In this paper we address this issue by introducing a rigorous formalism to enable spatial coarse-graining of spiking dynamics, scaling from the microscopic level of a single type 1 (integrator) neuron to a macroscopic assembly of spiking neurons that are interconnected by chemical synapses and nearest-neighbor gap junctions. Spiking behavior at the single-neuron scale ℓ≈10μm is described by Wilson's two-variable conductance-based equations [H. R. Wilson, J. Theor. Biol. 200, 375 (1999)], driven by fields of incoming neural activity from neighboring neurons. We map these equations to a coarser spatial resolution of grid length Bℓ, with B≫1 being the blocking ratio linking micro and macro scales. Our method systematically eliminates high-frequency (short-wavelength) spatial modes q(->) in favor of low-frequency spatial modes Q(->) using an adiabatic elimination procedure that has been shown to be equivalent to the path-integral coarse graining applied to renormalization group theory of critical phenomena. This bottom-up neural regridding allows us to track the percolation of synaptic and ion-channel noise from the single neuron up to the scale of macroscopic population-average variables. Anticipated applications of neural regridding include extraction of the current-to-firing-rate transfer function, investigation of fluctuation criticality near phase-transition tipping points, determination of spatial scaling laws for avalanche events, and prediction of the spatial extent of self-organized macrocolumnar structures. As a first-order exemplar of the method, we recover nonlinear corrections for a coarse-grained Wilson spiking neuron embedded in a network of identical diffusively coupled neurons whose chemical synapses have been disabled. Intriguingly

  5. From individual spiking neurons to population behavior: Systematic elimination of short-wavelength spatial modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steyn-Ross, Moira L.; Steyn-Ross, D. A.

    2016-02-01

    Mean-field models of the brain approximate spiking dynamics by assuming that each neuron responds to its neighbors via a naive spatial average that neglects local fluctuations and correlations in firing activity. In this paper we address this issue by introducing a rigorous formalism to enable spatial coarse-graining of spiking dynamics, scaling from the microscopic level of a single type 1 (integrator) neuron to a macroscopic assembly of spiking neurons that are interconnected by chemical synapses and nearest-neighbor gap junctions. Spiking behavior at the single-neuron scale ℓ ≈10 μ m is described by Wilson's two-variable conductance-based equations [H. R. Wilson, J. Theor. Biol. 200, 375 (1999), 10.1006/jtbi.1999.1002], driven by fields of incoming neural activity from neighboring neurons. We map these equations to a coarser spatial resolution of grid length B ℓ , with B ≫1 being the blocking ratio linking micro and macro scales. Our method systematically eliminates high-frequency (short-wavelength) spatial modes q ⃗ in favor of low-frequency spatial modes Q ⃗ using an adiabatic elimination procedure that has been shown to be equivalent to the path-integral coarse graining applied to renormalization group theory of critical phenomena. This bottom-up neural regridding allows us to track the percolation of synaptic and ion-channel noise from the single neuron up to the scale of macroscopic population-average variables. Anticipated applications of neural regridding include extraction of the current-to-firing-rate transfer function, investigation of fluctuation criticality near phase-transition tipping points, determination of spatial scaling laws for avalanche events, and prediction of the spatial extent of self-organized macrocolumnar structures. As a first-order exemplar of the method, we recover nonlinear corrections for a coarse-grained Wilson spiking neuron embedded in a network of identical diffusively coupled neurons whose chemical synapses have

  6. Short monolithic dual-wavelength single-longitudinal-mode DBR phosphate fiber laser.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Lingyun; Hofmann, Peter; Schülzgen, Axel; Peyghambarian, N; Albert, Jacques

    2014-06-20

    We propose and demonstrate a 5-cm-long monolithic dual-wavelength single-longitudinal mode distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) all-phosphate fiber laser. Strong UV-induced fiber Bragg gratings are directly written in highly Er/Yb codoped phosphate fiber. The separation between gratings is selected as 1 cm to only excite two longitudinal modes in the DBR cavity. By exploiting the spatial hole burning effect and the polarization hole burning effect, stable narrow-linewidth dual-wavelength lasing emission with 38 pm wavelength spacing and a total emitted power of 2.8 mW is obtained from this DBR fiber laser. A microwave signal at 4.58 GHz is generated by the heterodyne detection of the dual-wavelength laser. PMID:24979414

  7. Nanorose and lipid detection in atherosclerotic plaque using dual-wavelength photothermal wave imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tianyi; Qiu, Jinze; Ma, Li Leo; Li, Xiankai; Sun, Jingjing; Ryoo, Seungyup; Johnston, Keith P.; Feldman, Marc D.; Milner, Thomas E.

    2010-02-01

    Atherosclerosis and specifically rupture of vulnerable plaques account for 23% of all deaths worldwide, far surpassing both infectious diseases and cancer. In atherosclerosis, macrophages can infiltrate plaques which are often associated with lipid deposits. Photothermal wave imaging is based on the periodic thermal modulation of a sample using intensity modulated light. Intensity modulated light enters the sample and is absorbed by targeted chromophores and generates a periodic thermal modulation. We report use of photothermal wave imaging to visualize nanoroses (taken up by macrophages via endocytosis) and lipids in atherosclerotic plaques. Two excitation wavelengths were selected to image nanoroses (800 nm) and lipids (1210 nm). Atherosclerotic plaque in a rabbit abdominal artery was irradiated (800 nm and 1210 nm separately) at a frequency of 4 Hz to generate photothermal waves. The radiometric temperature at the tissue surface was recorded by an infrared (IR) camera over a 10 second time period at the frame rate of 25.6 Hz. Extraction of images (256 × 256 pixels) at various frequencies was performed by Fourier transform at each pixel. Frequency amplitude images were obtained corresponding to 800 nm and 1210 nm laser irradiation. Computed images suggest that the distributions of both nanorose and lipid can be identified in amplitude images at a frequency of 4 Hz. Nanoroses taken up by macrophages are distributed at the edges of lipid deposits. Observation of high concentration of nanoroses in atherosclerotic plaque confirms that nanoroses are present at locations associated with lipid deposits.

  8. [Measurement of Soil Total N Based on Portable Short Wave NIR Spectroscopy Technology].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hai-liang; He, Yong

    2016-01-01

    portable short wave near-infrared spectral technology to predict soil total nitrogen and wavelengths selection could be very useful to reduce redundancy of spectra. PMID:27228747

  9. Photonic crystal fibre enables short-wavelength two-photon laser scanning fluorescence microscopy with fura-2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McConnell, Gail; Riis, Erling

    2004-10-01

    We report on a novel and compact reliable laser source capable of short-wavelength two-photon laser scanning fluorescence microscopy based on soliton self-frequency shift effects in photonic crystal fibre. We demonstrate the function of the system by performing two-photon microscopy of smooth muscle cells and cardiac myocytes from the rat pulmonary vein and Chinese hamster ovary cells loaded with the fluorescent calcium indicator fura-2/AM.

  10. First Demonstration of the Echo-Enabled Harmonic Generation Technique for Short-Wavelength Seeded Free Electron Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Xiang, D.; Colby, E.; Dunning, M.; Gilevich, S.; Hast, C.; Jobe, K.; McCormick, D.; Nelson, J.; Raubenheimer, T.O.; Soong, K.; Stupakov, G.; Szalata, Z.; Walz, D.; Weathersby, S.; Woodley, M.; Pernet, P.-L.; /Ecole Polytechnique, Lausanne

    2010-08-25

    We report the first experimental demonstration of the echo-enabled harmonic generation (EEHG) technique which holds great promise for generation of high power, fully coherent short-wavelength radiation. In this experiment, coherent radiation at the 3rd and 4th harmonic of the second seed laser is generated from the so-called beam echo effect. The experiment confirms the physics behind this technique and paves the way for applying the EEHG technique for seeded x-ray free electron lasers.

  11. Design and operational characteristics of a compact relativistic electron beam generator for the excitation of short wavelength lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, T.; Murakami, H.; Saito, Y.; Yamagishi, A.; Inaba, H.

    1980-11-01

    A compact and simple high current relativistic electron beam (REB) generator for the excitation of lasers in the short wavelength region has been designed and constructed. The REB generator which includes a Tesla transformer-type high-voltage generator, a water pulse forming line, and a cold cathode electron gun, generates 250 keV, 15 kA, and 15 ns pulsed electron beams.

  12. Design and initial performance evaluation of a portable short wave infrared spectroradiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Mark W.

    1992-01-01

    The design, initial calibration, and performance evaluations of a portable short wave infrared (SWIR) spectroradiometer are described. The spectroradiometer covers the range from 1.1 to 2.5 microns with a spectral resolution that may be varied from less than 10 nm to more than 100 nm. A single spectrum is acquired in about 2 sec. The SNR is about 230 at a wavelength of 2.2 microns for a Lambertian surface of 90-percent reflectance illuminated by the sun at normal incidence with 14.8-nm resolution, a 25 C background temperature, and no atmospheric attenuation. FOV-defining optics are coupled by a flexible fiber-optics bundle to the spectroradiometer, which consists of a concave holographic diffraction grating with a flat focal field imaged onto a 1024-element platinum silicide linear-array detector.

  13. Evidence for short-period acoustic waves in the solar atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wunnenberg, M.; Kneer, F.; Hirzberger, J.

    2002-11-01

    Short-period acoustic waves are thought to supply the energy for the radiative losses of the non-magnetic chromosphere of the Sun and, in general, of late-type stars. Here, we present evidence for the existence of waves in the solar atmosphere with periods in the range of 50 s wavelengths near line center. The power in the short-period range is concentrated above intergranular spaces. We estimate an acoustic flux into the chromosphere of approximately 3*E6 erg cm-2 s-1, as needed for the chromospheric radiative losses.

  14. Measurement of thermal radiation using regular glass optics and short-wave infrared detectors.

    PubMed

    Yoon, H W; Eppeldauer, G P

    2008-01-21

    The measurement of thermal radiation from ambient-temperature objects using short-wave infrared detectors and regular glass optics is described. The detectors are chosen to operate in the 2.0 microm to 2.5 microm atmospheric window. Selection of detectors with high shunt resistance along with the 4-stage thermo-electric cooling of the detectors to -85 degrees C results in detectivity, D*, of 4 x 10(13) cm Hz(1/2)/W which is near the background limited performance at 295 K. Furthermore, the use of regular-glass commercial optics to collect the thermal radiation results in diffraction-limited imaging. The use of a radiation thermometer constructed with these elements for the measurement of a blackbody from 20 degrees C to 50 degrees C results in noise-equivalent temperature difference (NETD) of < 3 mK at 50 degrees C. The operation at shorter wavelengths than traditional thermal sensors also leads to lower sensitivity to the emissivity of the object in determining the temperature of the object. These elements are used to construct a calibrator for an infrared collimator, and such a system demonstrates noise-equivalent irradiances of < 5 fW/cm(2). These results indicate that radiometers using short-wave infrared sensors could be constructed utilizing commercial glass optics with possible better performance and lower NETD than existing radiometers using cryogenically-cooled mid-infrared or thermal infrared detectors. PMID:18542168

  15. High spectral resolution airborne short wave infrared hyperspectral imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Liqing; Yuan, Liyin; Wang, Yueming; Zhuang, Xiaoqiong

    2016-05-01

    Short Wave InfraRed(SWIR) spectral imager is good at detecting difference between materials and penetrating fog and mist. High spectral resolution SWIR hyperspectral imager plays a key role in developing earth observing technology. Hyperspectral data cube can help band selections that is very important for multispectral imager design. Up to now, the spectral resolution of many SWIR hyperspectral imagers is about 10nm. A high sensitivity airborne SWIR hyperspectral imager with narrower spectral band will be presented. The system consists of TMA telescope, slit, spectrometer with planar blazed grating and high sensitivity MCT FPA. The spectral sampling interval is about 3nm. The IFOV is 0.5mrad. To eliminate the influence of the thermal background, a cold shield is designed in the dewar. The pixel number of spatial dimension is 640. Performance measurement in laboratory and image analysis for flight test will also be presented.

  16. Expanding the dynamic range of short wave infrared (SWIR) imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Marc; Stern, Mark C.

    2010-04-01

    Advances have been made in short wave infrared (SWIR) imaging technology to address the most demanding imaging and surveillance applications. Multiple techniques have been developed and deployed in Goodrich's SWIR indium gallium arsenide (InGaAs) cameras to optimize the dynamic range performance of standard, commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) products. New developments have been implemented on multiple levels to give these cameras the unique ability to automatically compensate for changes in light levels over more than 5 orders of magnitude, while improving intra-scenic dynamic range. Features recently developed and implemented include a new Automatic Gain Control (AGC) algorithm, image flash suppression, and a proprietary image-enhancement algorithm with a simplified but powerful user command structure.

  17. Mixed solitons in a (2+1)-dimensional multicomponent long-wave-short-wave system.

    PubMed

    Kanna, T; Vijayajayanthi, M; Lakshmanan, M

    2014-10-01

    We derive a (2+1)-dimensional multicomponent long-wave-short-wave resonance interaction (LSRI) system as the evolution equation for propagation of N-dispersive waves in weak Kerr-type nonlinear medium in the small-amplitude limit. The mixed- (bright-dark) type soliton solutions of a particular (2+1)-dimensional multicomponent LSRI system, deduced from the general multicomponent higher-dimensional LSRI system, are obtained by applying the Hirota's bilinearization method. Particularly, we show that the solitons in the LSRI system with two short-wave components behave like scalar solitons. We point out that for an N-component LSRI system with N>3, if the bright solitons appear in at least two components, interesting collision behavior takes place, resulting in energy exchange among the bright solitons. However, the dark solitons undergo standard elastic collision accompanied by a position shift and a phase shift. Our analysis on the mixed bound solitons shows that the additional degree of freedom which arises due to the higher-dimensional nature of the system results in a wide range of parameters for which the soliton collision can take place. PMID:25375561

  18. Wavelength and Intensity Dependence of Short Pulse Laser Xenon Double Ionization between 500 and 2300 nm

    SciTech Connect

    Gingras, G.; Tripathi, A.; Witzel, B.

    2009-10-23

    The wavelength and intensity dependence of xenon ionization with 50 fs laser pulses has been studied using time-of-flight mass spectrometry. We compare the ion yield distribution of singly and doubly charged xenon with the Perelomov-Popov-Terent'ev (PPT) theory, Perelomov, Popov, and Terent'ev, Zh. Eksp. Teor. Fiz. 50, 1393 (1966) [Sov. Phys. JETP 23, 924 (1966)], in the regime between 500 and 2300 nm. The intensity dependence for each wavelength is measured in a range between 1x10{sup 13} and 1x10{sup 15} W/cm{sup 2}. The Xe{sup +}-ion signal is in good agreement with the PPT theory at all used wavelengths. In addition we demonstrate that ionic 5s5p{sup 6} {sup 2}S state is excited by an electron impact excitation process and contributes to the nonsequential double ionization process.

  19. Analysis of GEOS-3 altimeter data and extraction of ocean wave height and dominant wavelength

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walsh, E. J.

    1979-01-01

    When the amplitude and timing biases are removed from the GEOS-3 Sample and Hold (S&H) gates, the mean return waveforms can be excellently fitted with a theoretical template which represents the convolution of: (1) the radar point target response; (2) the range noise (jitter) in the altimeter tracking loop; (3) the sea surface height distribution; and (4) the antenna pattern as a function of the range to mean sea level. Several techniques of varying complexity to remove the effect of the tracking loop jitter in computing the wave height are considered. They include: (1) realigning the S&H gates to their actual positions with respect to mean sea level before averaging; (2) using the observed standard deviation on the altitude measurement to remove the integrated effect of the tracking loop jitter, and (3) using a look-up table to correct for the expected value of range noise. Analysis of skewness in the GEOS return waveform demonstrates the potential of a satellite radar altimeter to determine the dominant wavelength of ocean waves.

  20. Group III nitride semiconductors for short wavelength light-emitting devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orton, J. W.; Foxon, C. T.

    1998-01-01

    The group III nitrides (AlN, GaN and InN) represent an important trio of semiconductors because of their direct band gaps which span the range 1.95-6.2 eV, including the whole of the visible region and extending well out into the ultraviolet (UV) range. They form a complete series of ternary alloys which, in principle, makes available any band gap within this range and the fact that they also generate efficient luminescence has been the main driving force for their recent technological development. High brightness visible light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are now commercially available, a development which has transformed the market for LED-based full colour displays and which has opened the way to many other applications, such as in traffic lights and efficient low voltage, flat panel white light sources. Continuously operating UV laser diodes have also been demonstrated in the laboratory, exciting tremendous interest for high-density optical storage systems, UV lithography and projection displays. In a remarkably short space of time, the nitrides have therefore caught up with and, in some ways, surpassed the wide band gap II-VI compounds (ZnCdSSe) as materials for short wavelength optoelectronic devices. The purpose of this paper is to review these developments and to provide essential background material in the form of the structural, electronic and optical properties of the nitrides, relevant to these applications. We have been guided by the fact that the devices so far available are based on the binary compound GaN (which is relatively well developed at the present time), together with the ternary alloys AlGaN and InGaN, containing modest amounts of Al or In. We therefore concentrate, to a considerable extent, on the properties of GaN, then introduce those of the alloys as appropriate, emphasizing their use in the formation of the heterostructures employed in devices. The nitrides crystallize preferentially in the hexagonal wurtzite structure and devices have so

  1. Continuous-wave dual-wavelength operation of a diode-end-pumped Nd:GGG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, G. C.; Li, Y. D.; Zhao, M.; Jin, G. Y.; Wang, J. B.

    2011-08-01

    A diode-end-pumped continuous-wave (CW) simultaneous dual-wavelength laser operation at 1062 and 1331 nm in a single Nd:GGG was demonstrated. A total output power of 1.08 W at the two fundamental wavelengths was achieved at the incident pump power of 18.2 W. The optical-to-optical conversion is up to 5.9% with respect to the incident pump power. To the best of our knowledge, this is first work on CW simultaneous dual-wavelength operation of a diode pumped Nd:GGG laser. The article is published in the original.)

  2. Nearly lattice-matched short-wave infrared InGaAsBi detectors on InP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Y.; Zhang, Y. G.; Chen, X. Y.; Ma, Y. J.; Xi, S. P.; Du, B.; Li, Hsby.

    2016-01-01

    This work reports on the demonstration of a short-wave infrared detector nearly lattice matched to InP substrate using quaternary InGaAsBi as the absorption layer. The bismuth content of about 3.2% has red-shifted the 50% cut-off wavelength from about 1.6 μm to 2.1 μm at room temperature, indicating a bandgap reduction of about 180 meV due to bismuth incorporation. The detector shows an encouraging dark current density of 2.4 × 10-4 A/cm2 at bias voltage of -10 mV at 300 K. This work shows the promising potential of InP-based lattice-matched InGaAsBi detectors for short-wave infrared detection.

  3. Third harmonic generation in the short-wavelength UV range by a single plasmonic nanostructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melentiev, P. N.; Kuzin, A. A.; Afanasiev, A. E.; Balykin, V. I.

    2016-05-01

    The nonlinear optical interaction of laser radiation with nanostructures formed in gold and aluminium nanofilms has been experimentally studied. It is shown that, despite the high susceptibility χ3 of aluminium in comparison with gold, the third-harmonic generation efficiency at a wavelength of 260 nm is much higher for the nanostructures formed in a gold nanofilm because of the efficient excitation of a localised plasmon resonance at the fundamental frequency.

  4. Conductors, semiconductors, and insulators irradiated with short-wavelength free-electron laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krzywinski, J.; Sobierajski, R.; Jurek, M.; Nietubyc, R.; Pelka, J. B.; Juha, L.; Bittner, M.; Létal, V.; Vorlíček, V.; Andrejczuk, A.; Feldhaus, J.; Keitel, B.; Saldin, E. L.; Schneidmiller, E. A.; Treusch, R.; Yurkov, M. V.

    2007-02-01

    The results of a study of irreversible changes induced at surfaces of metals, semiconductors, and insulators by extreme ultraviolet (λ<100nm) ultrashort pulses provided by TESLA Test Facility Free-Electron Laser, Phase 1 (TTF1 FEL) are reported and discussed. The laser was tuned at 86, 89, and 98nm during the experiments reported here. Energy spectra of ions ejected from the irradiated surfaces are also reported. Special attention is paid to the difference in the ablation behavior of (semi)conductors and insulators that we have observed. The difference is dramatic, while the absorption coefficients are similar for all materials at the TTF1 FEL wavelength.

  5. Using short-wave infrared imaging for fruit quality evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Dong; Lee, Dah-Jye; Desai, Alok

    2013-12-01

    Quality evaluation of agricultural and food products is important for processing, inventory control, and marketing. Fruit size and surface quality are two important quality factors for high-quality fruit such as Medjool dates. Fruit size is usually measured by length that can be done easily by simple image processing techniques. Surface quality evaluation on the other hand requires more complicated design, both in image acquisition and image processing. Skin delamination is considered a major factor that affects fruit quality and its value. This paper presents an efficient histogram analysis and image processing technique that is designed specifically for real-time surface quality evaluation of Medjool dates. This approach, based on short-wave infrared imaging, provides excellent image contrast between the fruit surface and delaminated skin, which allows significant simplification of image processing algorithm and reduction of computational power requirements. The proposed quality grading method requires very simple training procedure to obtain a gray scale image histogram for each quality level. Using histogram comparison, each date is assigned to one of the four quality levels and an optimal threshold is calculated for segmenting skin delamination areas from the fruit surface. The percentage of the fruit surface that has skin delamination can then be calculated for quality evaluation. This method has been implemented and used for commercial production and proven to be efficient and accurate.

  6. Mather-type dense plasma focus as a new optical pump for short-wavelength high-power lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Fanning, J.J.; Kim, K.

    1984-04-01

    For the first time, a Mather-type dense plasma focus (MDPF) is successfully operated as an optical pump for lasers. Rhodamine-6G dye is optically pumped using the MDPF fluorescence, producing a laser pulse 1 ..mu..s in duration and more than 50 kW in output power. No optimization is attempted either of the laser cavity or of the lasing medium concentration and volume. A brief description of the experimental setup is presented, along with a summary and discussion of the results. The advantages of the present optical pump source and, in particular, their implications for the pumping of short-wavelength lasers are discussed.

  7. Demonstration of the Echo-Enabled Harmonic Generation Technique for Short-Wavelength Seeded Free Electron Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Xiang, D.; Colby, E.; Dunning, M.; Gilevich, S.; Hast, C.; Jobe, K.; McCormick, D.; Nelson, J.; Raubenheimer, T. O.; Soong, K.; Stupakov, G.; Szalata, Z.; Walz, D.; Weathersby, S.; Woodley, M.; Pernet, P.-L.

    2010-09-10

    We report the first experimental demonstration of the echo-enabled harmonic generation technique, which holds great promise for generation of high-power, fully coherent short-wavelength radiation. In this experiment, coherent radiation at the 3rd and 4th harmonics of the second seed laser is generated from the so-called beam echo effect. The experiment confirms the physics behind this technique and paves the way for applying the echo-enabled harmonic generation technique for seeded x-ray free electron lasers.

  8. Optical property of Ce3+-doped lutetium lithium fluoride for the short-wavelength device application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, Toshihiko; Yamanoi, Kohei; Arita, Ren; Hori, Tatsuhiro; Fukuda, Kazuhito; Minami, Yuki; Cadatal-Raduban, Marilou; Sarukura, Nobuhiko; Fukuda, Tsuguo; Nagasono, Mitsuru; Ishikawa, Tetsuya

    2014-10-01

    We report on the optical properties of Ce:LLF excited by the 61-nm wavelength emission of the SPring-8 compact self amplification of spontaneous emission source (SCSS) test accelerator, which is a prototype self-amplified stimulated emission (SASE)-type free electron laser (FEL) that emits extreme ultraviolet (EUV) radiation. Ce:LLF fluorescence at 308 nm and 322 nm wavelength was observed using a streak camera. The temporal profile exhibited a 62.1-ns fast decay component and 8.63-ns slow decay component. This double exponential behavior is observed with EUV-FEL excitation and is due to the de-excitation process involving several relaxation steps because of the energetically long distance and intricate band structure between the excitation and emission states. The double exponential nature of fluorescence decay is not observable with low-energy excitation sources; hence, our results show the importance of novel light sources, such as the FEL, for the development and characterization of new materials.

  9. Highly coherent red-shifted dispersive wave generation around 1.3 μm for efficient wavelength conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xia; Bi, Wanjun; Chen, Wei; Xue, Tianfeng; Hu, Lili; Liao, Meisong; Gao, Weiqing

    2015-03-14

    This research investigates the mechanism of the optical dispersive wave (DW) and proposes a scheme that can realize an efficient wavelength conversion. In an elaborately designed photonic crystal fiber, a readily available ytterbium laser operating at ∼1 μm can be transferred to the valuable 1.3 μm wavelength range. A low-order soliton is produced to concentrate the energy of the DW into the target wavelength range and improve the degree of coherence. The input chirp is demonstrated to be a factor that enhances the wavelength conversion efficiency. With a positive initial chirp, 76.6% of the pump energy in the fiber can be transferred into a spectral range between 1.24 and 1.4 μm. With the use of a grating compressor, it is possible to compress the generated coherent DW of several picoseconds into less than 90 fs.

  10. Picosecond pulses from wavelength-swept continuous-wave Fourier domain mode-locked lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eigenwillig, Christoph M.; Wieser, Wolfgang; Todor, Sebastian; Biedermann, Benjamin R.; Klein, Thomas; Jirauschek, Christian; Huber, Robert

    2013-05-01

    Ultrafast lasers have a crucial function in many fields of science; however, up to now, high-energy pulses directly from compact, efficient and low-power semiconductor lasers are not available. Therefore, we introduce a new approach based on temporal compression of the continuous-wave, wavelength-swept output of Fourier domain mode-locked lasers, where a narrowband optical filter is tuned synchronously to the round-trip time of light in a kilometre-long laser cavity. So far, these rapidly swept lasers enabled orders-of-magnitude speed increase in optical coherence tomography. Here we report on the generation of ~60-70 ps pulses at 390 kHz repetition rate. As energy is stored optically in the long-fibre delay line and not as population inversion in the laser-gain medium, high-energy pulses can now be generated directly from a low-power, compact semiconductor-based oscillator. Our theory predicts subpicosecond pulses with this new technique in the future.

  11. Continuous-wave single-frequency laser with dual wavelength at 1064 and 532 nm.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chenwei; Lu, Huadong; Yin, Qiwei; Su, Jing

    2014-10-01

    A continuous-wave high-power single-frequency laser with dual-wavelength output at 1064 and 532 nm is presented. The dependencies of the output power on the transmission of the output coupler and the phase-matching temperature of the LiB(3)O(5) (LBO) crystal are studied. An output coupler with transmission of 19% is used, and the temperature of LBO is controlled to the optimal phase-matching temperature of 422 K; measured maximal output powers of 33.7 W at 1064 nm and of 1.13 W at 532 nm are obtained with optical-optical conversion efficiency of 45.6%. The laser can be single-frequency operated stably and mode-hop-free, and the measured frequency drift is less than 15 MHz in 1 min. The measured Mx2 and My2 for the 1064 nm laser are 1.06 and 1.09, respectively. The measured Mx2 and My2 for the 532 nm laser are 1.12 and 1.11, respectively. PMID:25322220

  12. Numerical modeling of extended short wave infrared InGaAs focal plane arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glasmann, Andreu; Wen, Hanqing; Bellotti, Enrico

    2016-05-01

    Indium gallium arsenide (In1-xGaxAs) is an ideal material choice for short wave infrared (SWIR) imaging due to its low dark current and excellent collection efficiency. By increasing the indium composition from 53% to 83%, it is possible to decrease the energy gap from 0.74 eV to 0.47 eV and consequently increase the cutoff wavelength from 1.7 μm to 2.63 μm for extended short wavelength (ESWIR) sensing. In this work, we apply our well-established numerical modeling methodology to the ESWIR InGaAs system to determine the intrinsic performance of pixel detectors. Furthermore, we investigate the effects of different buffer/cap materials. To accomplish this, we have developed composition-dependent models for In1-xGaxAs, In1-xAlxAs, and InAs1-y Py. Using a Green's function formalism, we calculate the intrinsic recombination coefficients (Auger, radiative) to model the diffusion-limited behavior of the absorbing layer under ideal conditions. Our simulations indicate that, for a given total thickness of the buffer and absorbing layer, structures utilizing a linearly graded small-gap InGaAs buffer will produce two orders of magnitude more dark current than those with a wide gap, such as InAlAs or InAsP. Furthermore, when compared with experimental results for ESWIR photodiodes and arrays, we estimate that there is still a 1.5x magnitude of reduction in dark current before reaching diffusion-limited behavior.

  13. Material processing with ultra-short pulse lasers working in 2μm wavelength range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voisiat, B.; Gaponov, D.; Gečys, P.; Lavoute, L.; Silva, M.; Hideur, A.; Ducros, N.; Račiukaitis, G.

    2015-03-01

    New wavelengths of laser radiation are of interest for material processing. Results of application of the all-fiber ultrashort pulsed laser emitting in 2 µm range, manufactured by Novae, are presented. Average output power was 4.35 W in a single-spatial-mode beam centered at the 1950 nm wavelength. Pulses duration was 40 ps, and laser operated at 4.2 MHz pulse repetition rate. This performance corresponded to 25 kW of pulse peak power and almost 1 µJ in pulse energy. Material processing was performed using three different focusing lenses (100, 30 and 18 mm) and mechanical stages for the workpiece translation. 2 µm laser radiation is strongly absorbed by some polymers. Swelling of PMMA surface was observed for scanning speed above 5 mm/s using the average power of 3.45 W focused with the 30 mm lens. When scanning speed was reduced below 4 mm/s, ablation of PMMA took place. The swelling of PMMA is a consequence of its melting due to absorbed laser power. Therefore, experiments on butt welding of PMMA and overlapping welding of PMMA with other polymers were performed. Stable joint was achieved for the butt welding of two PMMA blocks with thickness of 5 mm. The laser was used to cut a Kapton film on a paper carrier with the same set-up as previous. The cut width depended on the cutting speed and focusing optics. A perfect cut with a width of 11 µm was achieved at the translation speed of 60 mm/s.

  14. Feasibility study on a short-pulsed IR wavelength for effective calculus fragmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Hyun Wook

    2015-05-01

    Laser-induced lithotripsy has been used for a minimally-invasive surgery to treat kidney-stone disease associated with urinary obstruction. A short-pulsed Tm:YAG laser (λ = 2.01 µm) was developed to improve fragmentation efficiency and was evaluated with a Ho:YAG laser (λ = 2.12 μm) as to its ablation feature and mass removal rate. Application of a train of sub-microsecond pulses with a lower energy at a frequency of 500 Hz created multiple events of cavitation that accompanied strong acoustic transients. During Tm:YAG irradiation, both high light absorption and secondary photomechanical impacts readily fragmented the calculus into small pieces (< 3 mm) and removed them 130 times faster than photothermal Ho:YAG lithotripsy. The proposed short-pulsed Tm:YAG approach may be an effective lithotripter for treating calculus disease.

  15. Spectrally-isolated violet to blue wavelength generation by cascaded degenerate four-wave mixing in a photonic crystal fiber.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Jinhui; Kang, Zhe; Li, Feng; Zhang, Xianting; Zhou, Guiyao; Sang, Xinzhu; Wu, Qiang; Yan, Binbin; Zhou, Xian; Wang, Liang; Zhong, Kangping; Wang, Kuiru; Yu, Chongxiu; Tam, Hwa Yaw; Wai, P K A

    2016-06-01

    Generation of spectrally-isolated wavelengths in the violet to blue region based on cascaded degenerate four-wave mixing (FWM) is experimentally demonstrated for the first time in a tailor-made photonic crystal fiber, which has two adjacent zero dispersion wavelengths (ZDWs) at 696 and 852 nm in the fundamental mode. The influences of the wavelength λp and the input average power Pav of the femtosecond pump pulses on the phase-matched frequency conversion process are studied. When femtosecond pump pulses at λp of 880, 870, and 860 nm and Pav of 500 mW are coupled into the normal dispersion region close to the second ZDW, the first anti-Stokes waves generated near the first ZDW act as a secondary pump for the next FWM process. The conversion efficiency ηas2 of the second anti-Stokes waves, which are generated at the violet to blue wavelengths of 430, 456, and 472 nm, are 4.8, 6.48, and 9.66%, for λp equalling 880, 870, and 860 nm, respectively. PMID:27244427

  16. Three-dimensional blast-wave-driven Rayleigh-Taylor instability and the effects of long-wavelength modesa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuranz, C. C.; Drake, R. P.; Grosskopf, M. J.; Budde, A.; Krauland, C.; Marion, D. C.; Visco, A. J.; Ditmar, J. R.; Robey, H. F.; Remington, B. A.; Miles, A. R.; Cooper, A. B. R.; Sorce, C.; Plewa, T.; Hearn, N. C.; Killebrew, K. L.; Knauer, J. P.; Arnett, D.; Donajkowski, T.

    2009-05-01

    This paper describes experiments exploring the three-dimensional (3D) Rayleigh-Taylor instability at a blast-wave-driven interface. This experiment is well scaled to the He/H interface during the explosion phase of SN1987A. In the experiments, ˜5 kJ of energy from the Omega laser was used to create a planar blast wave in a plastic disk, which is accelerated into a lower-density foam. These circumstances induce the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability and, after the shock passes the interface, the system quickly becomes dominated by the Rayleigh-Taylor instability. The plastic disk has an intentional pattern machined at the plastic/foam interface. This perturbation is 3D with a basic structure of two orthogonal sine waves with a wavelength of 71 μm and an amplitude of 2.5 μm. Additional long-wavelength modes with a wavelength of either 212 or 424 μm are added onto the single-mode pattern. The addition of the long-wavelength modes was motivated by the results of previous experiments where material penetrated unexpectedly to the shock front, perhaps due to an unintended structure. The current experiments and simulations were performed to explore the effects of this unintended structure; however, we were unable to reproduce the previous results.

  17. Three-dimensional blast-wave-driven Rayleigh-Taylor instability and the effects of long-wavelength modes

    SciTech Connect

    Kuranz, C. C.; Drake, R. P.; Grosskopf, M. J.; Budde, A.; Krauland, C.; Marion, D. C.; Visco, A. J.; Ditmar, J. R.; Robey, H. F.; Remington, B. A.; Miles, A. R.; Cooper, A. B. R.; Sorce, C.; Plewa, T.; Hearn, N. C.; Killebrew, K. L.; Knauer, J. P.; Arnett, D.; Donajkowski, T.

    2009-05-15

    This paper describes experiments exploring the three-dimensional (3D) Rayleigh-Taylor instability at a blast-wave-driven interface. This experiment is well scaled to the He/H interface during the explosion phase of SN1987A. In the experiments, {approx}5 kJ of energy from the Omega laser was used to create a planar blast wave in a plastic disk, which is accelerated into a lower-density foam. These circumstances induce the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability and, after the shock passes the interface, the system quickly becomes dominated by the Rayleigh-Taylor instability. The plastic disk has an intentional pattern machined at the plastic/foam interface. This perturbation is 3D with a basic structure of two orthogonal sine waves with a wavelength of 71 {mu}m and an amplitude of 2.5 {mu}m. Additional long-wavelength modes with a wavelength of either 212 or 424 {mu}m are added onto the single-mode pattern. The addition of the long-wavelength modes was motivated by the results of previous experiments where material penetrated unexpectedly to the shock front, perhaps due to an unintended structure. The current experiments and simulations were performed to explore the effects of this unintended structure; however, we were unable to reproduce the previous results.

  18. Atomic layer deposition of absorbing thin films on nanostructured electrodes for short-wavelength infrared photosensing

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Jixian; Sutherland, Brandon R.; Hoogland, Sjoerd; Fan, Fengjia; Sargent, Edward H.; Kinge, Sachin

    2015-10-12

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD), prized for its high-quality thin-film formation in the absence of high temperature or high vacuum, has become an industry standard for the large-area deposition of a wide array of oxide materials. Recently, it has shown promise in the formation of nanocrystalline sulfide films. Here, we demonstrate the viability of ALD lead sulfide for photodetection. Leveraging the conformal capabilities of ALD, we enhance the absorption without compromising the extraction efficiency in the absorbing layer by utilizing a ZnO nanowire electrode. The nanowires are first coated with a thin shunt-preventing TiO{sub 2} layer, followed by an infrared-active ALD PbS layer for photosensing. The ALD PbS photodetector exhibits a peak responsivity of 10{sup −2} A W{sup −1} and a shot-derived specific detectivity of 3 × 10{sup 9} Jones at 1530 nm wavelength.

  19. Measurements of Short Wavelength Plasma Fluctuations Using the DIII-D Phase Contrast Imaging Diagnostic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorris, J. R.; Rost, J. C.; Porkolab, M.; Burrell, K. H.

    2010-11-01

    The DIII-D Phase Contrast Imaging (PCI) diagnostic has been upgraded and used to measure turbulence in the outer plasma region (0.7 < r/a < 1) covering an operational range of 10 kHz through 10 MHz and 2-30 cm-1. A novel rotating mask has been used to measure turbulence as a function of propagation angle about the PCI chord. This technique provides localized measurements along the PCI chord for turbulence with k˜0, and an estimate of the turbulence k value otherwise. Long wavelength (|k|<˜12 cm-1) turbulence is localized to within the instrumental width of the last closed flux surface (LCFS) (r/a>˜0.9). Modes with finite (and theoretically unexpected) parallel wavenumber have been seen to propagate at angles as large as k/k ˜0.1-0.4. Due to the finite k, these modes cannot be localized with the present techniques. A theoretical explanation for these modes is lacking at the present time.

  20. Resonant condition for storage ring short wavelength FEL with power exceeding Renieri limit

    SciTech Connect

    Litvinenko, V.N.; Burnham, B.; Wu, Y.

    1995-12-31

    In this paper we discuss the possibility of operating a storage ring FEL with resonant conditions providing for preservation of electron beam structure on an optical wave scale. We suggest tuning the storage ring betatron and synchrotron tunes on one of the high (N-th) order resonances to compensate dynamic diffusion of optical phase. This mode of operation does not require isochronicity of the ring lattice. In these conditions optical phase will be restored after N turns around the ring and stochastic conditions used in the derivation of Renieri limit are no longer applicable. We discuss the influence of high order terms in electron motion, RF frequency stability, and synchrotron radiation effects on preservation of optical phase.

  1. A tunable dual-wavelength pump source based on simulated polariton scattering for terahertz-wave generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Bo; Liu, Jinsong; Yao, Jianquan; Li, Enbang

    2013-11-01

    We propose a dual-wavelength pump source by utilizing stimulated polariton scattering in a LiNbO3 crystal. The residual pump and the generated tunable Stokes waves can be combined to generate THz-wave generation via difference frequency generation (DFG). With a pump energy of 49 mJ, Stokes waves with a tuning range from 1067.8 to 1074 nm have been generated, and an output energy of up to 14.9 mJ at 1070 nm has been achieved with a conversion efficiency of 21.7%. A sum frequency generation experiment was carried out to demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed scheme for THz-wave DFG.

  2. Localized measurement of short wavelength plasma fluctuations with the DIII-D phase contrast imaging diagnostic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorris, J. R.; Rost, J. C.; Porkolab, M.

    2009-02-01

    A novel rotating mask system has been designed and implemented on the DIII-D phase contrast imaging (PCI) diagnostic to produce the first spatially localized PCI measurements of a tokamak plasma. The localization technique makes use of the variation in the magnetic field component perpendicular to the viewing chord as a function of chord height. This new capability provides measurements in the range of 2wave numbers up to 40 cm-1 to probe electron scale turbulence in the plasma core.

  3. Localized measurement of short wavelength plasma fluctuations with the DIII-D phase contrast imaging diagnostic

    SciTech Connect

    Dorris, J. R.; Rost, J. C.; Porkolab, M.

    2009-02-15

    A novel rotating mask system has been designed and implemented on the DIII-D phase contrast imaging (PCI) diagnostic to produce the first spatially localized PCI measurements of a tokamak plasma. The localization technique makes use of the variation in the magnetic field component perpendicular to the viewing chord as a function of chord height. This new capability provides measurements in the range of 2wave numbers up to 40 cm{sup -1} to probe electron scale turbulence in the plasma core.

  4. Glacial modifications of short-wavelength topography and potential feedbacks on the denudation of a deglaciated mountain range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salcher, Bernhard; Kober, Florian; Kissling, Eduard; Willett, Sean

    2014-05-01

    Distinct erosional landforms in the European Alps and other mid- to high-latitude mountain belts highlight the importance of glacial erosion in shaping mountain topography. Here we focus on the glacially induced modifications to the short-wavelength topography of the European Central Alps in an attempt to characterize the impact of glacial erosion on topography and to highlight potential feedback mechanisms on the denudation of the deglaciated mountain range. Glacial induced changes to the short-wavelength topography were analyzed by measuring the variations of drainage density and hillslope relief across the range. Variations of denudation rates were analyzed by compiling catchment-averaged concentrations of cosmogenic 10Be from existing studies covering Alpine and Foreland basins. Our results underline the importance of the LGM ELA elevation (i.e. the Equilibrium Line Altitude at the Late Glacial Maximum) as an important limit for the destruction of short-wavelength topography: The cumulative impact of glacial erosion above the LGM ELA has progressively decreased (i) drainage density, (ii) channel integration and (iii) commensurately increased hillslopes length (or hillslope relief). Exceptions from this trend are the highest and steepest peaks and ridges, nunataks even during the LGM. Alpine catchments in the orogen parts below this limit (i.e. Alpine foothills) lack strong modifications by glaciers. Here, glacial erosion is largely restricted to glacial troughs. There is also a statistically significant correlation between drainage density (or hillslope length) and catchment-wide denudation rates. The correlation does not define a single-valued function; rather there are two populations above and below the LGM ELA, one with a positive correlation for low-elevation, fluvially-dominated landscapes and a second for high-elevation, glacially-eroded basins in which this correlation is negative. We speculate that the commensurate lengthening of hillslopes increase

  5. Wavelength conversion for polarization multiplexing signal using four-wave mixing in semiconductor optical amplifier with reduced polarization crosstalk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Hui; Chen, Ming; Wan, Qiuzhen; Zheng, Zhiwei

    2016-06-01

    We investigated wavelength conversion for polarization multiplexing signal based on four-wave mixing in a semiconductor optical amplifier. We found that the converted signals endured crosstalk among the pol-muxed channels. We also proposed and demonstrated a wavelength conversion scheme with polarization diversity technique. By utilizing the technique, the converted polarization multiplexing signal can be received without crosstalk. In addition, the performance of the proposed system is numerically analyzed with respect to the bit error rate of the converted signal, different frequency spacing between signal and pump and modulated data rate. The simulation results show that the proposed scheme may be a promising method to realize transparent wavelength conversion for polarization multiplexing signals.

  6. Simultaneous three-wavelength continuous wave laser at 946 nm, 1319 nm and 1064 nm in Nd:YAG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lü, Yanfei; Zhao, Lianshui; Zhai, Pei; Xia, Jing; Fu, Xihong; Li, Shutao

    2013-01-01

    A continuous-wave (cw) diode-end-pumped Nd:YAG laser that generates simultaneous laser at the wavelengths 946 nm, 1319 nm and 1064 nm is demonstrated. The optimum oscillation condition for the simultaneous three-wavelength operation has been derived. Using the separation of the three output couplers, we obtained the maximum output powers of 0.24 W at 946 nm, 1.07 W at 1319 nm and 1.88 W at 1064 nm at the absorbed pump power of 11.2 W. A total output power of 3.19 W for the three-wavelength was achieved at the absorbed pump power of 11.2 W with optical conversion efficiency of 28.5%.

  7. Graphene-assisted nonlinear optical device for four-wave mixing based tunable wavelength conversion of QPSK signal.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xiao; Zeng, Mengqi; Wang, Andong; Zhu, Long; Fu, Lei; Wang, Jian

    2015-10-01

    We fabricate a nonlinear optical device based on a fiber pigtail cross-section coated with a single-layer graphene grown by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method. Using such graphene-assisted nonlinear optical device, we experimentally demonstrate tunable wavelength conversion of a 10 Gbaud quadrature phase-shift keying (QPSK) signal by exploiting degenerate four-wave mixing (FWM) progress in graphene. We study the conversion efficiency as functions of the pump power and pump wavelength and evaluate the bit-error rate (BER) performance. The observed optical signal-to-noise ratio (OSNR) penalties for tunable QPSK wavelength conversion are less than 2.2 dB at a BER of 1 × 10(-3). PMID:26480130

  8. Effect of pump wave reflections on the excitation of a dual-wavelength vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser

    SciTech Connect

    Morozov, M. Yu.; Morozov, Yu. A. Popov, V. V.

    2009-03-15

    The effect of pump wave reflections on the carrier generation rate and uniformity of carrier population in quantum wells (QWs) of a dual-wavelength vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser has been numerically analyzed. The laser's active region has been described within a mathematical model allowing any number of QWs and arbitrary distribution of carrier generation rate. It is shown that the optimal arrangement of blocking layers in the active region of a dual-wavelength vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser allows one to obtain a very uniform QW population. It is established that pump wave reflections significantly affect the local carrier generation rate and, therefore, the distribution of excited carriers in the laser structure.

  9. Two-dimensional radiation and scattering at short wave length

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoon, W. S.; Park, J. M.; Eversman, W.

    1990-01-01

    In the present investigation of radiation and scattering by objects when the wavelengths are much smaller than the characteristic dimensions of the radiator or scatterer, the boundary-element method is used to obtain computational accuracy and efficiency. The approach employed for wavelengths less than 5 percent of object characteristic dimensions involves cubic elements, approximate polynomial and asymptotic evaluations of the fundamental solution, and a tailoring of the order of the Gaussian quadrature according to the local demands dictated by the distance between sending and receiving points. The method addresses the propagation of low-frequency sound over large terrain features.

  10. Ways and peculiarities of submillimeter wavelength detection with short-channel field-effect transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Orlov, M. L. Panin, A. N.; Orlov, L. K.

    2009-06-15

    The detection properties of some short-channel field-effect transistors (FETs) have been analyzed using the steady-state output characteristics of these devices. The calculated dependences of voltage-power sensitivity on applied voltage are compared with the corresponding curves obtained from high-frequency measurements. It is shown that the nonmonotonic dependence of the FET photosensitivity on gate voltage that is observed in the frequency range of 400-750 GHz is not related to resonant excitation of 2D plasmons in the subgate plasma but is due to the change in the distribution of stationary fields in the structure and, as a result, to the change in the efficiency of nonresonant nonlinearity procedures in the transistor's electron subsystem with an increase in the gate-channel voltage. This conclusion is confirmed by analysis of the frequency dependences of photoresponse in the range under consideration, which do not exhibit resonant behavior at the frequencies corresponding to the peaks in the curves measured at a fixed frequency and different gate voltages.