Science.gov

Sample records for wave-sensitive lws opsins

  1. The molecular basis of color vision in colorful fish: Four Long Wave-Sensitive (LWS) opsins in guppies (Poecilia reticulata) are defined by amino acid substitutions at key functional sites

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Background Comparisons of functionally important changes at the molecular level in model systems have identified key adaptations driving isolation and speciation. In cichlids, for example, long wavelength-sensitive (LWS) opsins appear to play a role in mate choice and male color variation within and among species. To test the hypothesis that the evolution of elaborate coloration in male guppies (Poecilia reticulata) is also associated with opsin gene diversity, we sequenced long wavelength-sensitive (LWS) opsin genes in six species of the family Poeciliidae. Results Sequences of four LWS opsin genes were amplified from the guppy genome and from mRNA isolated from adult guppy eyes. Variation in expression was quantified using qPCR. Three of the four genes encode opsins predicted to be most sensitive to different wavelengths of light because they vary at key amino acid positions. This family of LWS opsin genes was produced by a diversity of duplication events. One, an intronless gene, was produced prior to the divergence of families Fundulidae and Poeciliidae. Between-gene PCR and DNA sequencing show that two of the guppy LWS opsins are linked in an inverted orientation. This inverted tandem duplication event occurred near the base of the poeciliid tree in the common ancestor of Poecilia and Xiphophorus. The fourth sequence has been uncovered only in the genus Poecilia. In the guppies surveyed here, this sequence is a hybrid, with the 5' end most similar to one of the tandem duplicates and the 3' end identical to the other. Conclusion Enhanced wavelength discrimination, a possible consequence of opsin gene duplication and divergence, might have been an evolutionary prerequisite for color-based sexual selection and have led to the extraordinary coloration now observed in male guppies and in many other poeciliids. PMID:18638376

  2. Androgens Increase lws Opsin Expression and Red Sensitivity in Male Three-Spined Sticklebacks

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Yi Ta; Wang, Feng-Yu; Fu, Wen-Chun; Anraku, Kazuhiko; Chen, I-Shiung

    2014-01-01

    Optomotor studies have shown that three-spined sticklebacks (Gasterosteus aculeatus) are more sensitive to red during summer than winter, which may be related to the need to detect the red breeding colour of males. This study aimed to determine whether this change of red light sensitivity is specifically related to reproductive physiology. The mRNA levels of opsin genes were examined in the retinae of sexually mature and immature fish, as well as in sham-operated males, castrated control males, or castrated males implanted with androgen 11-ketoandrostenedione (11 KA), maintained under stimulatory (L16:D8) or inhibitory (L8:D16) photoperiods. In both sexes, red-sensitive opsin gene (lws) mRNA levels were higher in sexually mature than in immature fish. Under L16:D8, lws mRNA levels were higher in intact than in castrated males, and were up-regulated by 11 KA treatment in castrated males. Moreover, electroretinogram data confirmed that sexual maturation resulted in higher relative red spectral sensitivity. Mature males under L16:D8 were more sensitive to red light than males under L8:D16. Red light sensitivity under L16:D8 was diminished by castration, but increased by 11 KA treatment. Thus, in sexually mature male sticklebacks, androgen is a key factor in enhancing sensitivity to red light via regulation of opsin gene expression. This is the first study to demonstrate that sex hormones can regulate spectral vision sensitivity. PMID:24963891

  3. Retinoic Acid Signaling Regulates Differential Expression of the Tandemly-Duplicated Long Wavelength-Sensitive Cone Opsin Genes in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Frey, Ruth A.; Hunter, Samuel S.; Ashino, Ryuichi; Kawamura, Shoji; Stenkamp, Deborah L.

    2015-01-01

    The signaling molecule retinoic acid (RA) regulates rod and cone photoreceptor fate, differentiation, and survival. Here we elucidate the role of RA in differential regulation of the tandemly-duplicated long wavelength-sensitive (LWS) cone opsin genes. Zebrafish embryos were treated with RA from 48 hours post-fertilization (hpf) to 75 hpf, and RNA was isolated from eyes for microarray analysis. ~170 genes showed significantly altered expression, including several transcription factors and components of cellular signaling pathways. Of interest, the LWS1 opsin gene was strongly upregulated by RA. LWS1 is the upstream member of the tandemly duplicated LWS opsin array and is normally not expressed embryonically. Embryos treated with RA 48 hpf to 100 hpf or beyond showed significant reductions in LWS2-expressing cones in favor of LWS1-expressing cones. The LWS reporter line, LWS-PAC(H) provided evidence that individual LWS cones switched from LWS2 to LWS1 expression in response to RA. The RA signaling reporter line, RARE:YFP indicated that increased RA signaling in cones was associated with this opsin switch, and experimental reduction of RA signaling in larvae at the normal time of onset of LWS1 expression significantly inhibited LWS1 expression. A role for endogenous RA signaling in regulating differential expression of the LWS genes in postmitotic cones was further supported by the presence of an RA signaling domain in ventral retina of juvenile zebrafish that coincided with a ventral zone of LWS1 expression. This is the first evidence that an extracellular signal may regulate differential expression of opsin genes in a tandemly duplicated array. PMID:26296154

  4. Gene duplication and divergence of long wavelength-sensitive opsin genes in the guppy, Poecilia reticulata.

    PubMed

    Watson, Corey T; Gray, Suzanne M; Hoffmann, Margarete; Lubieniecki, Krzysztof P; Joy, Jeffrey B; Sandkam, Ben A; Weigel, Detlef; Loew, Ellis; Dreyer, Christine; Davidson, William S; Breden, Felix

    2011-02-01

    Female preference for male orange coloration in the genus Poecilia suggests a role for duplicated long wavelength-sensitive (LWS) opsin genes in facilitating behaviors related to mate choice in these species. Previous work has shown that LWS gene duplication in this genus has resulted in expansion of long wavelength visual capacity as determined by microspectrophotometry (MSP). However, the relationship between LWS genomic repertoires and expression of LWS retinal cone classes within a given species is unclear. Our previous study in the related species, Xiphophorus helleri, was the first characterization of the complete LWS opsin genomic repertoire in conjunction with MSP expression data in the family Poeciliidae, and revealed the presence of four LWS loci and two distinct LWS cone classes. In this study we characterized the genomic organization of LWS opsin genes by BAC clone sequencing, and described the full range of cone cell types in the retina of the colorful Cumaná guppy, Poecilia reticulata. In contrast to X. helleri, MSP data from the Cumaná guppy revealed three LWS cone classes. Comparisons of LWS genomic organization described here for Cumaná to that of X. helleri indicate that gene divergence and not duplication was responsible for the evolution of a novel LWS haplotype in the Cumaná guppy. This lineage-specific divergence is likely responsible for a third additional retinal cone class not present in X. helleri, and may have facilitated the strong sexual selection driven by female preference for orange color patterns associated with the genus Poecilia. PMID:21170644

  5. Rapid light-induced shifts in opsin expression: finding new opsins, discerning mechanisms of change, and implications for visual sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Fuller, Rebecca C; Claricoates, Kristin M

    2011-08-01

    Light-induced shifts in cone frequency and opsin expression occur in many aquatic species. Yet little is known about how quickly animals can alter opsin expression and, thereby, track their visual environments. Similarly, little is known about whether adult animals can alter opsin expression or whether shifts in opsin expression are limited to critical developmental windows. We took adult wild-caught bluefin killifish (Lucania goodei) from three different lighting environments (spring, swamp and variable), placed them under two different lighting treatments (clear vs. tea-stained water) and monitored opsin expression over 4 weeks. We measured opsin expression for five previously described opsins (SWS1, SWS2B, SWS2A, RH2-1 and LWS) as well as RH2-2 which we discovered via 454 sequencing. We used two different metrics of opsin expression. We measured expression of each opsin relative to a housekeeping gene and the proportional expression of each opsin relative to the total pool of opsins. Population and lighting environment had large effects on opsin expression which were present at the earliest time points indicating rapid shifts in expression. The two measures of expression produced radically different patterns. Proportional measures indicated large effects of light on SWS1 expression, whereas relative measures indicated no such effect. Instead, light had large effects on the relative expression of SWS2B, RH2-2, RH2-1 and LWS. We suggest that proportional measures of opsin expression are best for making inferences about colour vision, but that measures relative to a housekeeping gene are better for making conclusions about which opsins are differentially regulated. PMID:21749514

  6. Intra-retinal variation of opsin gene expression in the guppy (Poecilia reticulata).

    PubMed

    Rennison, Diana J; Owens, Gregory L; Allison, W Ted; Taylor, John S

    2011-10-01

    Although behavioural experiments demonstrate that colouration influences mate choice in many species, a complete understanding of this form of signalling requires information about colour vision in the species under investigation. The guppy (Poecilia reticulata) has become a model species for the study of colour-based sexual selection. To investigate the role of opsin gene duplication and divergence in the evolution of colour-based mate choice, we used in situ hybridization to determine where the guppy's nine cone opsins are expressed in the retina. Long wavelength-sensitive (LWS) opsins were more abundant in the dorsal retina than in the ventral retina. One of the middle wavelength-sensitive opsins (RH2-1) exhibited the opposite pattern, while the other middle wavelength-sensitive opsin (RH2-2) and the short wavelength-sensitive opsins (SWS1, SWS2A and SWS2B) were expressed throughout the retina. We also found variation in LWS opsin expression among individuals. These observations suggest that regions of the guppy retina are specialized with respect to wavelength discrimination and/or sensitivity. Intra-retinal variability in opsin expression, which has been observed in several fish species, might be an adaptation to variation in the strength and spectral composition of light entering the eye from above and below. The discovery that opsin expression varies in the guppy retina may motivate new behavioural experiments designed to study its role in mate choice. PMID:21900472

  7. Rod monochromacy and the coevolution of cetacean retinal opsins.

    PubMed

    Meredith, Robert W; Gatesy, John; Emerling, Christopher A; York, Vincent M; Springer, Mark S

    2013-04-01

    Cetaceans have a long history of commitment to a fully aquatic lifestyle that extends back to the Eocene. Extant species have evolved a spectacular array of adaptations in conjunction with their deployment into a diverse array of aquatic habitats. Sensory systems are among those that have experienced radical transformations in the evolutionary history of this clade. In the case of vision, previous studies have demonstrated important changes in the genes encoding rod opsin (RH1), short-wavelength sensitive opsin 1 (SWS1), and long-wavelength sensitive opsin (LWS) in selected cetaceans, but have not examined the full complement of opsin genes across the complete range of cetacean families. Here, we report protein-coding sequences for RH1 and both color opsin genes (SWS1, LWS) from representatives of all extant cetacean families. We examine competing hypotheses pertaining to the timing of blue shifts in RH1 relative to SWS1 inactivation in the early history of Cetacea, and we test the hypothesis that some cetaceans are rod monochomats. Molecular evolutionary analyses contradict the "coastal" hypothesis, wherein SWS1 was pseudogenized in the common ancestor of Cetacea, and instead suggest that RH1 was blue-shifted in the common ancestor of Cetacea before SWS1 was independently knocked out in baleen whales (Mysticeti) and in toothed whales (Odontoceti). Further, molecular evidence implies that LWS was inactivated convergently on at least five occasions in Cetacea: (1) Balaenidae (bowhead and right whales), (2) Balaenopteroidea (rorquals plus gray whale), (3) Mesoplodon bidens (Sowerby's beaked whale), (4) Physeter macrocephalus (giant sperm whale), and (5) Kogia breviceps (pygmy sperm whale). All of these cetaceans are known to dive to depths of at least 100 m where the underwater light field is dim and dominated by blue light. The knockout of both SWS1 and LWS in multiple cetacean lineages renders these taxa rod monochromats, a condition previously unknown among mammalian species. PMID:23637615

  8. Rod Monochromacy and the Coevolution of Cetacean Retinal Opsins

    PubMed Central

    Meredith, Robert W.; Gatesy, John; Emerling, Christopher A.; York, Vincent M.; Springer, Mark S.

    2013-01-01

    Cetaceans have a long history of commitment to a fully aquatic lifestyle that extends back to the Eocene. Extant species have evolved a spectacular array of adaptations in conjunction with their deployment into a diverse array of aquatic habitats. Sensory systems are among those that have experienced radical transformations in the evolutionary history of this clade. In the case of vision, previous studies have demonstrated important changes in the genes encoding rod opsin (RH1), short-wavelength sensitive opsin 1 (SWS1), and long-wavelength sensitive opsin (LWS) in selected cetaceans, but have not examined the full complement of opsin genes across the complete range of cetacean families. Here, we report protein-coding sequences for RH1 and both color opsin genes (SWS1, LWS) from representatives of all extant cetacean families. We examine competing hypotheses pertaining to the timing of blue shifts in RH1 relative to SWS1 inactivation in the early history of Cetacea, and we test the hypothesis that some cetaceans are rod monochomats. Molecular evolutionary analyses contradict the “coastal” hypothesis, wherein SWS1 was pseudogenized in the common ancestor of Cetacea, and instead suggest that RH1 was blue-shifted in the common ancestor of Cetacea before SWS1 was independently knocked out in baleen whales (Mysticeti) and in toothed whales (Odontoceti). Further, molecular evidence implies that LWS was inactivated convergently on at least five occasions in Cetacea: (1) Balaenidae (bowhead and right whales), (2) Balaenopteroidea (rorquals plus gray whale), (3) Mesoplodon bidens (Sowerby's beaked whale), (4) Physeter macrocephalus (giant sperm whale), and (5) Kogia breviceps (pygmy sperm whale). All of these cetaceans are known to dive to depths of at least 100 m where the underwater light field is dim and dominated by blue light. The knockout of both SWS1 and LWS in multiple cetacean lineages renders these taxa rod monochromats, a condition previously unknown among mammalian species. PMID:23637615

  9. Evolution of opsin expression in birds driven by sexual selection and habitat.

    PubMed

    Bloch, Natasha I

    2015-01-01

    Theories of sexual and natural selection predict coevolution of visual perception with conspecific colour and/or the light environment animals occupy. One way to test these theories is to focus on the visual system, which can be achieved by studying the opsin-based visual pigments that mediate vision. Birds vary greatly in colour, but opsin gene coding sequences and associated visual pigment spectral sensitivities are known to be rather invariant across birds. Here, I studied expression of the four cone opsin genes (Lws, Rh2, Sws2 and Sws1) in 16 species of New World warblers (Parulidae). I found levels of opsin expression vary both across species and between the sexes. Across species, female, but not male Sws2 expression is associated with an index of sexual selection, plumage dichromatism. This fits predictions of classic sexual selection models, in which the sensory system changes in females, presumably impacting female preference, and co-evolves with male plumage. Expression of the opsins at the extremes of the light spectrum, Lws and Uvs, correlates with the inferred light environment occupied by the different species. Unlike opsin spectral tuning, regulation of opsin gene expression allows for fast adaptive evolution of the visual system in response to natural and sexual selection, and in particular, sex-specific selection pressures. PMID:25429020

  10. Molecular and functional characterization of opsins in barfin flounder (Verasper moseri).

    PubMed

    Kasagi, Satoshi; Mizusawa, Kanta; Murakami, Naoto; Andoh, Tadashi; Furufuji, Sumihisa; Kawamura, Shoji; Takahashi, Akiyoshi

    2015-02-10

    Green light irradiation facilitates the somatic growth of barfin flounder (Verasper moseri). However, the V. moseri visual system, which may be associated with somatic growth by acting on the endocrine system upon exposure to this particular wavelength, remains largely unexplored. Herein, we characterized the visual opsin repertoire of V. moseri to understand the molecular basis underlying this effect. The five types of visual opsins that are found in vertebrates were cloned from RNA that was extracted from the eyes of V. moseri. Notably, V. moseri possessed one pseudogene (RH2-A) and two intact (RH2-B and RH2-C) copies of "green-sensitive" opsin genes. The wavelengths of maximum absorption spectra (?max) for each of the reconstituted photopigments were 552nm for "red-sensitive" LWS, 506nm for RH2-B, 490nm for RH2-C, 482nm and 416nm for "blue-sensitive" SWS2A and SWS2B, respectively, 367nm for "ultraviolet-sensitive" SWS1, and 494nm for "dim-light sensitive rhodopsin" RH1. The ?max of SWS2A was longer than that of any other reported vertebrate SWS2 opsin. By measuring the expression level of these opsin genes with quantitative RT-PCR in 3-, 15-, and 27-month-old fish, we found that RH2-B and SWS2A were expressed at a constant level, whereas the expression of LWS, RH2-C, SWS2B, and SWS1 opsin genes decreased, and that of RH1 increased with age. Barfin flounders inhabit inshore waters at a young age and expand their habitat to deep sea areas as they age, and green light is relatively abundant in deep water compared to the lights of other wavelengths in shallow water. Our results indicate that gene repertoire and expression profile of the opsin genes of barfin flounder are adaptive to their habitat shift that occurs during development, with some opsins acquiring a distinct ?max. PMID:25433330

  11. Short- and long-wavelength-sensitive opsins are involved in photoreception both in the retina and throughout the central nervous system of crayfish.

    PubMed

    Kingston, Alexandra C N; Cronin, Thomas W

    2015-12-01

    Crayfish have two classes of photoreceptors in the retinas of their reflecting superposition eyes. Long-wavelength-sensitive photoreceptors, comprised of microvilli from R1-7 cells, make up the main rhabdoms. Eighth retinular cells, located distal to the main rhabdoms, house short-wavelength-sensitive photoreceptors. While the opsin involved in long-wavelength sensitivity has long been known, we present the first description of the short-wavelength-sensitive opsin in the retina of the red swamp crayfish, Procambarus clarkii. The expression patterns of these SWS and LWS opsin proteins in the retina are consistent with the previously described locations of SWS and LWS receptors. Crayfish also have a well-characterized extraocular photoreceptor, called the caudal photoreceptor, located in the sixth abdominal ganglion. To search for retinal opsins in the caudal photoreceptor (and elsewhere in the CNS), we used RT-PCR and immunohistochemical labeling. We found both SWS and LWS opsin transcripts not only in the sixth abdominal ganglion, but also in all ganglia of the nerve cord. Immunolabeling shows that both opsins are expressed in nerve fibers that extend from the brain through the entire length of the CNS. Thus, the same two photopigments are used both for vision in the retina and for extraocular functions throughout the CNS of crayfish. PMID:26445969

  12. Opsin evolution in the Ambulacraria.

    PubMed

    D'Aniello, S; Delroisse, J; Valero-Gracia, A; Lowe, E K; Byrne, M; Cannon, J T; Halanych, K M; Elphick, M R; Mallefet, J; Kaul-Strehlow, S; Lowe, C J; Flammang, P; Ullrich-Lüter, E; Wanninger, A; Arnone, M I

    2015-12-01

    Opsins - G-protein coupled receptors involved in photoreception - have been extensively studied in the animal kingdom. The present work provides new insights into opsin-based photoreception and photoreceptor cell evolution with a first analysis of opsin sequence data for a major deuterostome clade, the Ambulacraria. Systematic data analysis, including for the first time hemichordate opsin sequences and an expanded echinoderm dataset, led to a robust opsin phylogeny for this cornerstone superphylum. Multiple genomic and transcriptomic resources were surveyed to cover each class of Hemichordata and Echinodermata. In total, 119 ambulacrarian opsin sequences were found, 22 new sequences in hemichordates and 97 in echinoderms (including 67 new sequences). We framed the ambulacrarian opsin repertoire within eumetazoan diversity by including selected reference opsins from non-ambulacrarians. Our findings corroborate the presence of all major ancestral bilaterian opsin groups in Ambulacraria. Furthermore, we identified two opsin groups specific to echinoderms. In conclusion, a molecular phylogenetic framework for investigating light-perception and photobiological behaviors in marine deuterostomes has been obtained. PMID:26472700

  13. Ciliary Transport of Opsin

    PubMed Central

    Williams, David S.

    2010-01-01

    As part of the renewal of photoreceptor outer segment disk membranes, membrane proteins are transported along the region of the cilium, connecting the inner and outer segments. Genetics studies have indicated the role of motor proteins in this transport. Direct analysis of live cells is needed to increase our understanding of the transport mechanisms further. Here, we show that transfection of hTERT-RPE1 cells with constructs encoding RHO-EGFP, but not RHO-mCherry, results in the distribution of fluorescently-tagged opsin in the plasma membrane. When the cells have differentiated and possess cilia, a portion of the RHO-EGFP was observed along the cilia. Due to the remarkable conservation of ciliary protein function, this system of Rho-Egfp transfected hTERT-RPE1 cells provides a valid model with which to study the ciliary transport of opsin directly in live cells. PMID:20238016

  14. Evolution and functional diversity of jellyfish opsins.

    PubMed

    Suga, Hiroshi; Schmid, Volker; Gehring, Walter J

    2008-01-01

    Cnidaria are the most basal animal phylum possessing complex eyes [1]. Their eyes predominantly use ciliary photoreceptor cells (c-PRCs) like vertebrates, whereas insect eyes use rhabdomeric photoreceptor cells (r-PRCs) [1-4]. These two cell types show not only different cytoarchitectures but distinct phototransduction cascades, which are triggered by the respective types of opsins (e.g., [5]), ciliary opsins (c-opsins) and rhabdomeric opsins (r-opsins) [6]. Recent reports suggested that the c- and r-PRCs and their respective opsins diverged at least before the deuterostome-protostome split [7-9]. To study the earlier evolution of animal PRCs and opsins, we investigated two hydrozoan jellyfishes. We report here the first-characterized cnidarian opsins. Molecular phylogeny revealed that the cloned 20 jellyfish opsins, together with all the opsins from a hydra and some from a sea anemone, are more closely related to the c-opsins than to any other major opsin subfamily, indicating that the divergence of c- and r-opsins antedates the Cnidaria-Bilateria split. Possible scenarios of animal PRC evolution are discussed. Furthermore, Cladonema opsins show several distinct tissue- and stage-specific expression patterns. The expression of specific opsins in the eyes suggests a role in vision, whereas that in the gonads suggests a role in light-controlled release of gametes. PMID:18160295

  15. Catalogue of ISO LWS observations of asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hormuth, F.; Müller, T. G.

    2009-04-01

    Context: The long wavelength spectrometer (LWS) onboard the infrared space observatory (ISO) observed the four large main-belt asteroids (1) Ceres, (2) Pallas, (4) Vesta, and (10) Hygiea multiple times. The photometric and spectroscopic data cover the wavelength range between 43 and 197 ?m, and are a unique dataset for future investigations and detailed characterisations of these bodies. Aims: The standard ISO archive products, produced through the last post-mission LWS pipeline, were still affected by instrument artefacts. Our goal was to provide the best possible data products to exploit the full scientific potential of these observations. Methods: For all asteroid observations we analysed in detail the dark current, the calibration reference flashes, the space environment effects (glitches), memory effects, tracking influences, and various other sources of uncertainty. We performed a refined reduction of all measurements, corrected for the various effects, and re-calibrated the data. We outline the data reduction process and give an overview of the available data and the quality of the observations. We apply a thermophysical model to the flux measurements to derive far-IR based diameter and albedo values of the asteroids. The measured thermal rotational lightcurve of (4) Vesta is compared to model predictions. Results: The catalogue of LWS (long wavelength spectrometer) observations of asteroids contains 57 manually reduced datasets, including seven non-standard observations, which as such did not have final pipeline products available before. In total, the archive now contains 11 spectral scans and 46 fixed grating measurements with a simultaneous observation at 10 key wavelengths distributed over the full LWS range. The new data products are now accessible via the ISO data archive as highly processed data products (HPDP). Conclusions: The quality of the data products was checked against state-of-the-art thermophysical model predictions and an excellent agreement was found. The absolute photometric accuracy is better than 10%. The calibrated spectra will serve as a source for future mineralogical studies of dwarf planets and dwarf planet candidates. Based on observations with ISO, an ESA project with instruments funded by ESA Member States (especially the PI countries: France, Germany, the Netherlands and the UK) and with the participation of ISAS and NASA.

  16. Variable light environments induce plastic spectral tuning by regional opsin coexpression in the African cichlid fish, Metriaclima zebra.

    PubMed

    Dalton, Brian E; Lu, Jessica; Leips, Jeff; Cronin, Thomas W; Carleton, Karen L

    2015-08-01

    Critical behaviours such as predation and mate choice often depend on vision. Visual systems are sensitive to the spectrum of light in their environment, which can vary extensively both within and among habitats. Evolutionary changes in spectral sensitivity contribute to divergence and speciation. Spectral sensitivity of the retina is primarily determined by visual pigments, which are opsin proteins bound to a chromophore. We recently discovered that photoreceptors in different regions of the retina, which view objects against distinct environmental backgrounds, coexpress different pairs of opsins in an African cichlid fish, Metriaclima zebra. This coexpression tunes the sensitivity of the retinal regions to the corresponding backgrounds and may aid in detection of dark objects, such as predators. Although intraretinal regionalization of spectral sensitivity in many animals correlates with their light environments, it is unknown whether variation in the light environment induces developmentally plastic alterations of intraretinal sensitivity regions. Here, we demonstrate with fluorescent in situ hybridization and qPCR that the spectrum and angle of environmental light both influence the development of spectral sensitivity regions by altering the distribution and level of opsins across the retina. Normally, M. zebra coexpresses LWS opsin with RH2A? opsin in double cones of the ventral but not the dorsal retina. However, when illuminated from below throughout development, adult M. zebra coexpressed LWS and RH2A? in double cones both dorsally and ventrally. Thus, environmental background spectra alter the spectral sensitivity pattern that develops across the retina, potentially influencing behaviours and related evolutionary processes such as courtship and speciation. PMID:26175094

  17. Opsin vs opsin: New materials for biotechnological applications

    SciTech Connect

    Alfinito, Eleonora; Reggiani, Lino

    2014-08-14

    The need of new diagnostic methods satisfying, as an early detection, a low invasive procedure and a cost-efficient value, is orienting the technological research toward the use of bio-integrated devices, in particular, bio-sensors. The set of know-why necessary to achieve this goal is wide, from biochemistry to electronics and is summarized in an emerging branch of electronics, called proteotronics. Proteotronics is here applied to state a comparative analysis of the electrical responses coming from type-1 and type-2 opsins. In particular, the procedure is used as an early investigation of a recently discovered family of opsins, the proteorhodopsins activated by blue light, BPRs. The results reveal some interesting and unexpected similarities between proteins of the two families, suggesting the global electrical response are not strictly linked to the class identity.

  18. Diversity of Active States in TMT Opsins

    PubMed Central

    Sakai, Kazumi; Yamashita, Takahiro; Imamoto, Yasushi; Shichida, Yoshinori

    2015-01-01

    Opn3/TMT opsins belong to one of the opsin groups with vertebrate visual and non-visual opsins, and are widely distributed in eyes, brains and other internal organs in various vertebrates and invertebrates. Vertebrate Opn3/TMT opsins are further classified into four groups on the basis of their amino acid identities. However, there is limited information about molecular properties of these groups, due to the difficulty in preparing the recombinant proteins. Here, we successfully expressed recombinant proteins of TMT1 and TMT2 opsins of medaka fish (Oryzias latipes) in cultured cells and characterized their molecular properties. Spectroscopic and biochemical studies demonstrated that TMT1 and TMT2 opsins functioned as blue light-sensitive Gi/Go-coupled receptors, but exhibited spectral properties and photo-convertibility of the active state different from each other. TMT1 opsin forms a visible light-absorbing active state containing all-trans-retinal, which can be photo-converted to 7-cis- and 9-cis-retinal states in addition to the original 11-cis-retinal state. In contrast, the active state of TMT2 opsin is a UV light-absorbing state having all-trans-retinal and does not photo-convert to any other state, including the original 11-cis-retinal state. Thus, TMT opsins are diversified so as to form a different type of active state, which may be responsible for their different functions. PMID:26491964

  19. Vision for the Future of Lws TR&T

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwadron, N.; Mannucci, A. J.; Antiochos, S. K.; Bhattacharjee, A.; Gombosi, T. I.; Gopalswamy, N.; Kamalabadi, F.; Linker, J.; Pilewskie, P.; Pulkkinen, A. A.; Spence, H. E.; Tobiska, W. K.; Weimer, D. R.; Withers, P.; Bisi, M. M.; Kuznetsova, M. M.; Miller, K. L.; Moretto, T.; Onsager, T. G.; Roussev, I. I.; Viereck, R. A.

    2014-12-01

    The Living With a Star (LWS) program addresses acute societal needs for understanding the effects of space weather and developing scientific knowledge to support predictive capabilities. Our society's heavy reliance on technologies affected by the space environment, an enormous number of airline customers, interest in space tourism, and the developing plans for long-duration human exploration space missions are clear examples that demonstrate urgent needs for space weather models and detailed understanding of space weather effects and risks. Since its inception, the LWS program has provided a vehicle to innovate new mechanisms for conducting research, building highly effective interdisciplinary teams, and ultimately in developing the scientific understanding needed to transition research tools into operational models that support the predictive needs of our increasingly space-reliant society. The advances needed require broad-based observations that cannot be obtained by large missions alone. The Decadal Survey (HDS, 2012) outlines the nation's needs for scientific development that will build the foundation for tomorrow's space weather services. Addressing these goals, LWS must develop flexible pathways to space utilizing smaller, more diverse and rapid development of observational platforms. Expanding utilization of ground-based assets and shared launches will also significantly enhance opportunities to fulfill the growing LWS data needs. Partnerships between NASA divisions, national/international agencies, and with industry will be essential for leveraging resources to address increasing societal demand for space weather advances. Strengthened connections to user communities will enhance the quality and impact of deliverables from LWS programs. Thus, we outline the developing vision for the future of LWS, stressing the need for deeper scientific understanding to improve forecasting capabilities, for more diverse data resources, and for project deliverables that address the growing needs of user communities.

  20. Analysis of the opsin repertoire in the tardigrade Hypsibius dujardini provides insights into the evolution of opsin genes in panarthropoda.

    PubMed

    Hering, Lars; Mayer, Georg

    2014-09-01

    Screening of a deeply sequenced transcriptome using Illumina sequencing as well as the genome of the tardigrade Hypsibius dujardini revealed a set of five opsin genes. To clarify the phylogenetic position of these genes and to elucidate the evolutionary history of opsins in Panarthropoda (Onychophora + Tardigrada + Arthropoda), we reconstructed the phylogeny of broadly sampled metazoan opsin genes using maximum likelihood and Bayesian inference methods in conjunction with carefully selected substitution models. According to our findings, the opsin repertoire of H. dujardini comprises representatives of all three major bilaterian opsin clades, including one r-opsin, three c-opsins, and a Group 4 opsin (neuropsin/opsin-5). The identification of the tardigrade ortholog of neuropsin/opsin-5 is the first record of this opsin type in a protostome, but our screening of available metazoan genomes revealed that it is also present in other protostomes. Our opsin phylogeny further suggests that two r-opsins, including an "arthropsin," were present in the last common ancestor of Panarthropoda. Although both r-opsin lineages were retained in Onychophora and Arthropoda, the arthropsin was lost in Tardigrada. The single (most likely visual) r-opsin found in H. dujardini supports the hypothesis of monochromatic vision in the panarthropod ancestor, whereas two duplications of the ancestral panarthropod c-opsin have led to three c-opsins in tardigrades. Although the early-branching nodes are unstable within the metazoans, our findings suggest that the last common ancestor of Bilateria possessed six opsins: Two r-opsins, one c-opsin, and three Group 4 opsins, one of which (Go opsin) was lost in the ecdysozoan lineage. PMID:25193307

  1. Analysis of the Opsin Repertoire in the Tardigrade Hypsibius dujardini Provides Insights into the Evolution of Opsin Genes in Panarthropoda

    PubMed Central

    Hering, Lars; Mayer, Georg

    2014-01-01

    Screening of a deeply sequenced transcriptome using Illumina sequencing as well as the genome of the tardigrade Hypsibius dujardini revealed a set of five opsin genes. To clarify the phylogenetic position of these genes and to elucidate the evolutionary history of opsins in Panarthropoda (Onychophora + Tardigrada + Arthropoda), we reconstructed the phylogeny of broadly sampled metazoan opsin genes using maximum likelihood and Bayesian inference methods in conjunction with carefully selected substitution models. According to our findings, the opsin repertoire of H. dujardini comprises representatives of all three major bilaterian opsin clades, including one r-opsin, three c-opsins, and a Group 4 opsin (neuropsin/opsin-5). The identification of the tardigrade ortholog of neuropsin/opsin-5 is the first record of this opsin type in a protostome, but our screening of available metazoan genomes revealed that it is also present in other protostomes. Our opsin phylogeny further suggests that two r-opsins, including an “arthropsin,” were present in the last common ancestor of Panarthropoda. Although both r-opsin lineages were retained in Onychophora and Arthropoda, the arthropsin was lost in Tardigrada. The single (most likely visual) r-opsin found in H. dujardini supports the hypothesis of monochromatic vision in the panarthropod ancestor, whereas two duplications of the ancestral panarthropod c-opsin have led to three c-opsins in tardigrades. Although the early-branching nodes are unstable within the metazoans, our findings suggest that the last common ancestor of Bilateria possessed six opsins: Two r-opsins, one c-opsin, and three Group 4 opsins, one of which (Go opsin) was lost in the ecdysozoan lineage. PMID:25193307

  2. Broad-Band Activatable White-Opsin

    PubMed Central

    Batabyal, Subrata; Cervenka, Gregory; Ha, Ji Hee; Kim, Young-tae; Mohanty, Samarendra

    2015-01-01

    Currently, the use of optogenetic sensitization of retinal cells combined with activation/inhibition has the potential to be an alternative to retinal implants that would require electrodes inside every single neuron for high visual resolution. However, clinical translation of optogenetic activation for restoration of vision suffers from the drawback that the narrow spectral sensitivity of an opsin requires active stimulation by a blue laser or a light emitting diode with much higher intensities than ambient light. In order to allow an ambient light-based stimulation paradigm, we report the development of a ‘white-opsin’ that has broad spectral excitability in the visible spectrum. The cells sensitized with white-opsin showed excitability at an order of magnitude higher with white light compared to using only narrow-band light components. Further, cells sensitized with white-opsin produced a photocurrent that was five times higher than Channelrhodopsin-2 under similar photo-excitation conditions. The use of fast white-opsin may allow opsin-sensitized neurons in a degenerated retina to exhibit a higher sensitivity to ambient white light. This property, therefore, significantly lowers the activation threshold in contrast to conventional approaches that use intense narrow-band opsins and light to activate cellular stimulation. PMID:26360377

  3. Metazoan opsin evolution reveals a simple route to animal vision

    PubMed Central

    Feuda, Roberto; Hamilton, Sinead C.; McInerney, James O.; Pisani, Davide

    2012-01-01

    All known visual pigments in Neuralia (Cnidaria, Ctenophora, and Bilateria) are composed of an opsin (a seven-transmembrane G protein-coupled receptor), and a light-sensitive chromophore, generally retinal. Accordingly, opsins play a key role in vision. There is no agreement on the relationships of the neuralian opsin subfamilies, and clarifying their phylogeny is key to elucidating the origin of this protein family and of vision. We used improved methods and data to resolve the opsin phylogeny and explain the evolution of animal vision. We found that the Placozoa have opsins, and that the opsins share a common ancestor with the melatonin receptors. Further to this, we found that all known neuralian opsins can be classified into the same three subfamilies into which the bilaterian opsins are classified: the ciliary (C), rhabdomeric (R), and go-coupled plus retinochrome, retinal G protein-coupled receptor (Go/RGR) opsins. Our results entail a simple scenario of opsin evolution. The first opsin originated from the duplication of the common ancestor of the melatonin and opsin genes in a eumetazoan (Placozoa plus Neuralia) ancestor, and an inference of its amino acid sequence suggests that this protein might not have been light-sensitive. Two more gene duplications in the ancestral neuralian lineage resulted in the origin of the R, C, and Go/RGR opsins. Accordingly, the first animal with at least a C, an R, and a Go/RGR opsin was a neuralian progenitor. PMID:23112152

  4. Metazoan opsin evolution reveals a simple route to animal vision.

    PubMed

    Feuda, Roberto; Hamilton, Sinead C; McInerney, James O; Pisani, Davide

    2012-11-13

    All known visual pigments in Neuralia (Cnidaria, Ctenophora, and Bilateria) are composed of an opsin (a seven-transmembrane G protein-coupled receptor), and a light-sensitive chromophore, generally retinal. Accordingly, opsins play a key role in vision. There is no agreement on the relationships of the neuralian opsin subfamilies, and clarifying their phylogeny is key to elucidating the origin of this protein family and of vision. We used improved methods and data to resolve the opsin phylogeny and explain the evolution of animal vision. We found that the Placozoa have opsins, and that the opsins share a common ancestor with the melatonin receptors. Further to this, we found that all known neuralian opsins can be classified into the same three subfamilies into which the bilaterian opsins are classified: the ciliary (C), rhabdomeric (R), and go-coupled plus retinochrome, retinal G protein-coupled receptor (Go/RGR) opsins. Our results entail a simple scenario of opsin evolution. The first opsin originated from the duplication of the common ancestor of the melatonin and opsin genes in a eumetazoan (Placozoa plus Neuralia) ancestor, and an inference of its amino acid sequence suggests that this protein might not have been light-sensitive. Two more gene duplications in the ancestral neuralian lineage resulted in the origin of the R, C, and Go/RGR opsins. Accordingly, the first animal with at least a C, an R, and a Go/RGR opsin was a neuralian progenitor. PMID:23112152

  5. Involvement of opsins in mammalian sperm thermotaxis

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Cerezales, Serafín; Boryshpolets, Sergii; Afanzar, Oshri; Brandis, Alexander; Nevo, Reinat; Kiss, Vladimir; Eisenbach, Michael

    2015-01-01

    A unique characteristic of mammalian sperm thermotaxis is extreme temperature sensitivity, manifested by the capacity of spermatozoa to respond to temperature changes of <0.0006?°C as they swim their body-length distance. The identity of the sensing system that confers this exceptional sensitivity on spermatozoa is not known. Here we show that the temperature-sensing system of mammalian spermatozoa involves opsins, known to be G-protein-coupled receptors that act as photosensors in vision. We demonstrate by molecular, immunological, and functional approaches that opsins are present in human and mouse spermatozoa at specific sites, which depend on the species and the opsin type, and that they are involved in sperm thermotaxis via two signalling pathways—the phospholipase C and the cyclic-nucleotide pathways. Our results suggest that, depending on the context and the tissue, mammalian opsins act not only as photosensors but also as thermosensors. PMID:26537127

  6. The Microbial Opsin Family of Optogenetic Tools

    E-print Network

    Zhang, Feng

    The capture and utilization of light is an exquisitely evolved process. The single-component microbial opsins, although more limited than multicomponent cascades in processing, display unparalleled compactness and speed. ...

  7. Misfolded opsin mutants display elevated ?-sheet structure.

    PubMed

    Miller, Lisa M; Gragg, Megan; Kim, Tae Gyun; Park, Paul S-H

    2015-10-01

    Mutations in rhodopsin can cause misfolding and aggregation of the receptor, which leads to retinitis pigmentosa, a progressive retinal degenerative disease. The structure adopted by misfolded opsin mutants and the associated cell toxicity is poorly understood. Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) microspectroscopy were utilized to probe within cells the structures formed by G188R and P23H opsins, which are misfolding mutants that cause autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa. Both mutants formed aggregates in the endoplasmic reticulum and exhibited altered secondary structure with elevated ?-sheet and reduced ?-helical content. The newly formed ?-sheet structure may facilitate the aggregation of misfolded opsin mutants. The effects observed for the mutants were unrelated to retention of opsin molecules in the endoplasmic reticulum itself. PMID:26358292

  8. The vertebrate ancestral repertoire of visual opsins, transducin alpha subunits and oxytocin/vasopressin receptors was established by duplication of their shared genomic region in the two rounds of early vertebrate genome duplications

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Vertebrate color vision is dependent on four major color opsin subtypes: RH2 (green opsin), SWS1 (ultraviolet opsin), SWS2 (blue opsin), and LWS (red opsin). Together with the dim-light receptor rhodopsin (RH1), these form the family of vertebrate visual opsins. Vertebrate genomes contain many multi-membered gene families that can largely be explained by the two rounds of whole genome duplication (WGD) in the vertebrate ancestor (2R) followed by a third round in the teleost ancestor (3R). Related chromosome regions resulting from WGD or block duplications are said to form a paralogon. We describe here a paralogon containing the genes for visual opsins, the G-protein alpha subunit families for transducin (GNAT) and adenylyl cyclase inhibition (GNAI), the oxytocin and vasopressin receptors (OT/VP-R), and the L-type voltage-gated calcium channels (CACNA1-L). Results Sequence-based phylogenies and analyses of conserved synteny show that the above-mentioned gene families, and many neighboring gene families, expanded in the early vertebrate WGDs. This allows us to deduce the following evolutionary scenario: The vertebrate ancestor had a chromosome containing the genes for two visual opsins, one GNAT, one GNAI, two OT/VP-Rs and one CACNA1-L gene. This chromosome was quadrupled in 2R. Subsequent gene losses resulted in a set of five visual opsin genes, three GNAT and GNAI genes, six OT/VP-R genes and four CACNA1-L genes. These regions were duplicated again in 3R resulting in additional teleost genes for some of the families. Major chromosomal rearrangements have taken place in the teleost genomes. By comparison with the corresponding chromosomal regions in the spotted gar, which diverged prior to 3R, we could time these rearrangements to post-3R. Conclusions We present an extensive analysis of the paralogon housing the visual opsin, GNAT and GNAI, OT/VP-R, and CACNA1-L gene families. The combined data imply that the early vertebrate WGD events contributed to the evolution of vision and the other neuronal and neuroendocrine functions exerted by the proteins encoded by these gene families. In pouched lamprey all five visual opsin genes have previously been identified, suggesting that lampreys diverged from the jawed vertebrates after 2R. PMID:24180662

  9. Type II Opsins: Evolutionary Origin by Internal Domain Duplication?

    E-print Network

    California at Santa Barbara, University of

    evolutionary origin, in which both groups of opsins evolved a seven-TM structure and light sensitivity-based light sensitivity. Keywords Opsins Á Duplication Á Transmembrane segments Á Convergent evolution Á GPCR

  10. The comb jelly opsins and the origins of animal phototransduction.

    PubMed

    Feuda, Roberto; Rota-Stabelli, Omar; Oakley, Todd H; Pisani, Davide

    2014-08-01

    Opsins mediate light detection in most animals, and understanding their evolution is key to clarify the origin of vision. Despite the public availability of a substantial collection of well-characterized opsins, early opsin evolution has yet to be fully understood, in large part because of the high level of divergence observed among opsins belonging to different subfamilies. As a result, different studies have investigated deep opsin evolution using alternative data sets and reached contradictory results. Here, we integrated the data and methods of three, key, recent studies to further clarify opsin evolution. We show that the opsin relationships are sensitive to outgroup choice; we generate new support for the existence of Rhabdomeric opsins in Cnidaria (e.g., corals and jellyfishes) and show that all comb jelly opsins belong to well-recognized opsin groups (the Go-coupled opsins or the Ciliary opsins), which are also known in Bilateria (e.g., humans, fruit flies, snails, and their allies) and Cnidaria. Our results are most parsimoniously interpreted assuming a traditional animal phylogeny where Ctenophora are not the sister group of all the other animals. PMID:25062921

  11. The Comb Jelly Opsins and the Origins of Animal Phototransduction

    PubMed Central

    Feuda, Roberto; Rota-Stabelli, Omar; Oakley, Todd H.; Pisani, Davide

    2014-01-01

    Opsins mediate light detection in most animals, and understanding their evolution is key to clarify the origin of vision. Despite the public availability of a substantial collection of well-characterized opsins, early opsin evolution has yet to be fully understood, in large part because of the high level of divergence observed among opsins belonging to different subfamilies. As a result, different studies have investigated deep opsin evolution using alternative data sets and reached contradictory results. Here, we integrated the data and methods of three, key, recent studies to further clarify opsin evolution. We show that the opsin relationships are sensitive to outgroup choice; we generate new support for the existence of Rhabdomeric opsins in Cnidaria (e.g., corals and jellyfishes) and show that all comb jelly opsins belong to well-recognized opsin groups (the Go-coupled opsins or the Ciliary opsins), which are also known in Bilateria (e.g., humans, fruit flies, snails, and their allies) and Cnidaria. Our results are most parsimoniously interpreted assuming a traditional animal phylogeny where Ctenophora are not the sister group of all the other animals. PMID:25062921

  12. Opsin Expression in Human Epidermal Skin

    PubMed Central

    Haltaufderhyde, Kirk; Ozdeslik, Rana N; Wicks, Nadine L; Najera, Julia A; Oancea, Elena

    2015-01-01

    Human skin is constantly exposed to solar light containing visible and ultraviolet radiation (UVR), a powerful skin carcinogen. UVR elicits cellular responses in epidermal cells via several mechanisms: direct absorption of short-wavelength UVR photons by DNA, oxidative damage caused by long-wavelength UVR, and, as we recently demonstrated, via a retinal-dependent G protein-coupled signaling pathway. Because the human epidermis is exposed to a wide range of light wavelengths, we investigated whether opsins, light-activated receptors that mediate photoreception in the eye, are expressed in epidermal skin to potentially serve as photosensors. Here we show that four opsins—OPN1-SW, OPN2, OPN3 and OPN5—are expressed in the two major human epidermal cell types, melanocytes and keratinocytes, and the mRNA expression profile of these opsins does not change in response to physiological UVR doses. We detected two OPN3 splice variants present in similar amounts in both cell types and three OPN5 splice isoforms, two of which encode truncated proteins. Notably, OPN2 and OPN3 mRNA were significantly more abundant than other opsins and encoded full-length proteins. Our results demonstrate that opsins are expressed in epidermal skin cells and suggest that they might initiate light–induced signaling pathways, possibly contributing to UVR phototransduction. PMID:25267311

  13. Losses of functional opsin genes, short-wavelength cone photopigments, and color vision--a significant trend in the evolution of mammalian vision.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Gerald H

    2013-03-01

    All mammalian cone photopigments are derived from the operation of representatives from two opsin gene families (SWS1 and LWS in marsupial and eutherian mammals; SWS2 and LWS in monotremes), a process that produces cone pigments with respective peak sensitivities in the short and middle-to-long wavelengths. With the exception of a number of primate taxa, the modal pattern for mammals is to have two types of cone photopigment, one drawn from each of the gene families. In recent years, it has been discovered that the SWS1 opsin genes of a widely divergent collection of eutherian mammals have accumulated mutational changes that render them nonfunctional. This alteration reduces the retinal complements of these species to a single cone type, thus rendering ordinary color vision impossible. At present, several dozen species from five mammalian orders have been identified as falling into this category, but the total number of mammalian species that have lost short-wavelength cones in this way is certain to be much larger, perhaps reaching as high as 10% of all species. A number of circumstances that might be used to explain this widespread cone loss can be identified. Among these, the single consistent fact is that the species so affected are nocturnal or, if they are not technically nocturnal, they at least feature retinal organizations that are typically associated with that lifestyle. At the same time, however, there are many nocturnal mammals that retain functional short-wavelength cones. Nocturnality thus appears to set the stage for loss of functional SWS1 opsin genes in mammals, but it cannot be the sole circumstance. PMID:23286388

  14. The Living With a Star (LWS) Sentinels Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szabo, A.

    2005-01-01

    The Sentinels Mission, the heliospheric element of the NASA Living With a Star (LWS) program, is still rapidly evolving, especially as the Sentinels Science and Technology Definition Team is progressing with its work. With the Solar Dynamics Observatory, the solar component, and the Geospace elements taking a more finalized form, it becomes clearer what scientific and measurement objectives will be necessary to establish the solar-geospace connection in order to achieve the goals of the LWS program. Possible, early formulation designs of the Sentinels mission will be presented that includes the Inner Heliospheric Mappers, a four spacecraft mission to observe the inner heliosphere between 0.25 and 1.0 AUs along with a Far Side Sentinel that will perform remote solar observations from nearly the opposite side of the Sun. Moreover, the complementarity of the various planned international missions (e.g., ESA Solar Orbiter, and Beppi Colombo) along with NASA planetary projects (e.g., Mars program and MESSENGER) will be discussed and how they can form a coherent system. Finally, the importance of already available heliospheric data will be emphasized.

  15. Cubozoan genome illuminates functional diversification of opsins and photoreceptor evolution.

    PubMed

    Liegertová, Michaela; Pergner, Ji?í; Kozmiková, Iryna; Fabian, Peter; Pombinho, Antonio R; Strnad, Hynek; Pa?es, Jan; Vl?ek, ?estmír; Bart?n?k, Petr; Kozmik, Zbyn?k

    2015-01-01

    Animals sense light primarily by an opsin-based photopigment present in a photoreceptor cell. Cnidaria are arguably the most basal phylum containing a well-developed visual system. The evolutionary history of opsins in the animal kingdom has not yet been resolved. Here, we study the evolution of animal opsins by genome-wide analysis of the cubozoan jellyfish Tripedalia cystophora, a cnidarian possessing complex lens-containing eyes and minor photoreceptors. A large number of opsin genes with distinct tissue- and stage-specific expression were identified. Our phylogenetic analysis unequivocally classifies cubozoan opsins as a sister group to c-opsins and documents lineage-specific expansion of the opsin gene repertoire in the cubozoan genome. Functional analyses provided evidence for the use of the Gs-cAMP signaling pathway in a small set of cubozoan opsins, indicating the possibility that the majority of other cubozoan opsins signal via distinct pathways. Additionally, these tests uncovered subtle differences among individual opsins, suggesting possible fine-tuning for specific photoreceptor tasks. Based on phylogenetic, expression and biochemical analysis we propose that rapid lineage- and species-specific duplications of the intron-less opsin genes and their subsequent functional diversification promoted evolution of a large repertoire of both visual and extraocular photoreceptors in cubozoans. PMID:26154478

  16. LWS/SET End-to-End Data System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giffin, Geoff; Sherman, Barry; Colon, Gilberto (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes the concept for the End-to-End Data System that will support NASA's Living With a Star Space Environment Testbed missions. NASA has initiated the Living With a Star (LWS) Program to develop a better scientific understanding to address the aspects of the connected Sun-Earth system that affect life and society. A principal goal of the program is to bridge the gap.between science, engineering, and user application communities. The Space Environment Testbed (SET) Project is one element of LWS. The Project will enable future science, operational, and commercial objectives in space and atmospheric environments by improving engineering approaches to the accommodation and/or mitigation of the effects of solar variability on technological systems. The End-to-end data system allows investigators to access the SET control center, command their experiments, and receive data from their experiments back at their home facility, using the Internet. The logical functioning of major components of the end-to-end data system are described, including the GSFC Payload Operations Control Center (POCC), SET Payloads, the GSFC SET Simulation Lab, SET Experiment PI Facilities, and Host Systems. Host Spacecraft Operations Control Centers (SOCC) and the Host Spacecraft are essential links in the end-to-end data system, but are not directly under the control of the SET Project. Formal interfaces will be established between these entities and elements of the SET Project. The paper describes data flow through the system, from PI facilities connecting to the SET operations center via the Internet, communications to SET carriers and experiments via host systems, to telemetry returns to investigators from their flight experiments. It also outlines the techniques that will be used to meet mission requirements, while holding development and operational costs to a minimum. Additional information is included in the original extended abstract.

  17. The Dynamic Evolutionary History of Pancrustacean Eyes and Opsins.

    PubMed

    Henze, Miriam J; Oakley, Todd H

    2015-11-01

    Pancrustacea (Hexapoda plus Crustacea) display an enormous diversity of eye designs, including multiple types of compound eyes and single-chambered eyes, often with color vision and/or polarization vision. Although the eyes of some pancrustaceans are well-studied, there is still much to learn about the evolutionary paths to this amazing visual diversity. Here, we examine the evolutionary history of eyes and opsins across the principle groups of Pancrustacea. First, we review the distribution of lateral and median eyes, which are found in all major pancrustacean clades (Oligostraca, Multicrustacea, and Allotriocarida). At the same time, each of those three clades has taxa that lack lateral and/or median eyes. We then compile data on the expression of visual r-opsins (rhabdomeric opsins) in lateral and median eyes across Pancrustacea and find no evidence for ancient opsin clades expressed in only one type of eye. Instead, opsin clades with eye-specific expression are products of recent gene duplications, indicating a dynamic past, during which opsins often changed expression from one type of eye to another. We also investigate the evolutionary history of peropsins and r-opsins, which are both known to be expressed in eyes of arthropods. By searching published transcriptomes, we discover for the first time crustacean peropsins and suggest that previously reported odonate opsins may also be peropsins. Finally, from analyzing a reconciled, phylogenetic tree of arthropod r-opsins, we infer that the ancestral pancrustacean had four visual opsin genes, which we call LW2, MW1, MW2, and SW. These are the progenitors of opsin clades that later were variously duplicated or lost during pancrustacean evolution. Together, our results reveal a particularly dynamic history, with losses of eyes, duplication and loss of opsin genes, and changes in opsin expression between types of eyes. PMID:26319405

  18. Carrier Plus: A Sensor Payload for Living With a Star Space Environment Testbed (LWS/SET)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, Cheryl; Moss, Steven; Howard, Regan; LaBel, Kenneth; Grycewicz, Tom; Barth, Janet; Brewer, Dana

    2003-01-01

    The paper discusses the following: 1. Living with a Star (LWS) program: space environment testbed (SET); natural space environment. 2. Carrier plus: goals and benefits. 3. ON-orbit sensor measurements. 4. Carrier plus architecture. 5. Participation in carrier plus.

  19. Spectral Tuning of Phototaxis by a Go-Opsin in the Rhabdomeric Eyes of Platynereis.

    PubMed

    Gühmann, Martin; Jia, Huiyong; Randel, Nadine; Verasztó, Csaba; Bezares-Calderón, Luis A; Michiels, Nico K; Yokoyama, Shozo; Jékely, Gáspár

    2015-08-31

    Phototaxis is characteristic of the pelagic larval stage of most bottom-dwelling marine invertebrates. Larval phototaxis is mediated by simple eyes that can express various types of light-sensitive G-protein-coupled receptors known as opsins. Since opsins diversified early during metazoan evolution in the marine environment, understanding underwater light detection could elucidate this diversification. Opsins have been classified into three major families, the r-opsins, the c-opsins, and the Go/RGR opsins, a family uniting Go-opsins, retinochromes, RGR opsins, and neuropsins. The Go-opsins form an ancient and poorly characterized group retained only in marine invertebrate genomes. Here, we characterize a Go-opsin from the marine annelid Platynereis dumerilii. We found Go-opsin1 coexpressed with two r-opsins in depolarizing rhabdomeric photoreceptor cells in the pigmented eyes of Platynereis larvae. We purified recombinant Go-opsin1 and found that it absorbs in the blue-cyan range of the light spectrum. To characterize the function of Go-opsin1, we generated a Go-opsin1 knockout Platynereis line by zinc-finger-nuclease-mediated genome engineering. Go-opsin1 knockout larvae were phototactic but showed reduced efficiency of phototaxis to wavelengths matching the in vitro Go-opsin1 spectrum. Our results highlight spectral tuning of phototaxis as a potential mechanism contributing to opsin diversity. PMID:26255845

  20. Keck LWS Mid-IR Observations of Nearby LLAGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grossan, B.

    2002-12-01

    We present new Keck LWS Mid-IR (MIR) imaging observations of a sample of LLAGN. Our results show that nuclear 10 micron fluxes of NGC4203 and NGC4736, along with three other LLGN from previous work, correlate with X-ray flux with the same relation as more luminous Seyferts and quasars. The nuclear emission of our objects is clearly differentiated from that of starburst activity on a plot of MIR vs. X-ray flux. Because X-ray and MIR fluxes are nearly insensitive to dust extinction, this behavior suggests the same continuum origin for our LLAGN sample as for Seyferts. MIR images of the nucleus of M81 show clearly extended, elliptical structure roughly 3.5" across the long axis ( 70 pc at the source), confirming earlier, lower resolution measurements at Palomar. This structure, the relative MIR and X-ray nuclear fluxes, the lack of stellar emission sufficient to power the MIR flux, and a weak UV continuum, are evidence for material within the nucleus extinguishing an AGN which powers the MIR emission. A unified model torus may be the origin of the extinction. The author gratefully acknowledges the support of the American Astronomical Society and the LBNL Institute for Nuclear and Particle Astrophysics (INPA) for this work.

  1. Palmitoylation stabilizes unliganded rod opsin Akiko Maedaa,b,1

    E-print Network

    Palczewski, Krzysztof

    transferase to eliminate retinoid binding to opsin and thereby rendering the eye insensitive to light, rapid different species (Fig. S1 A and B). One of the cone opsins which is sensitive to short wavelength light of palmitoylation has only a modest effect on in vitro or in vivo signaling. Here, we report that palmitoylation

  2. Carrier Plus: A sensor payload for Living With a Star Space Environment Testbed (LWS/SET)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, Cheryl J.; Moss, Steven; Howard, Regan; LaBel, Kenneth A.; Grycewicz, Tom; Barth, Janet L.; Brewer, Dana

    2003-01-01

    The Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTR4) and National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Goddard Space Flight Center are collaborating to develop the Carrier Plus sensor experiment platform as a capability of the Space Environments Testbed (SET). The Space Environment Testbed (SET) provides flight opportunities for technology experiments as part of NASA's Living With a Star (LWS) program. The Carrier Plus will provide new capability to characterize sensor technologies such as state-of-the-art visible focal plane arrays (FPAs) in a natural space radiation environment. The technical objectives include on-orbit validation of recently developed FPA technologies and performance prediction methodologies, as well as characterization of the FPA radiation response to total ionizing dose damage, displacement damage and transients. It is expected that the sensor experiment will carry 4-6 FPAs and associated radiation correlative environment monitors (CEMs) for a 2006-2007 launch. Sensor technology candidates may include n- and p-charge coupled devices (CCDs), active pixel sensors (APS), and hybrid CMOS arrays. The presentation will describe the Carrier Plus goals and objectives, as well as provide details about the architecture and design. More information on the LWS program can be found at http://lws.gsfc.nasa.gov/. Business announcements for LWS/SET and program briefings are posted at http://lws-set.gsfc.nasa.gov

  3. Living with a Star (LWS) Space Environment Testbeds (SET), Mission Carrier Overview and Capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patschke, Robert; Barth, Janet; Label, Ken; Mariano, Carolyn; Pham, Karen; Brewer, Dana; Cuviello, Michael; Kobe, David; Wu, Carl; Jarosz, Donald

    2004-01-01

    NASA has initiated the Living With a Star (LWS) Program to develop the scientific understanding to address the aspects of the Connected Sun-Earth system that affect life and society. A goal of the program is to bridge the gap between science, engineering, and user application communities. This will enable future science, operational, and commercial objectives in space and atmospheric environments by improving engineering approaches to the accommodation and/or mitigation of the effects of solar variability on technological systems. The three program elements of the LWS Program are Science Missions; Targeted Research and Technology; and Space Environment Testbeds (SETS). SET is an ideal platform for small experiments performing research on space environment effects on technologies and on the mitigation of space weather effects. A short description of the LWS Program will be given, and the SET will be described in detail, giving the mission objectives, available carrier services, and upcoming flight opportunities.

  4. Photoionization modeling of the LWS fine-structure lines in IR bright galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Satyapal, S.; Luhman, M. L.; Fischer, J.; Greenhouse, M. A.; Wolfire, M. G.

    1997-01-01

    The long wavelength spectrometer (LWS) fine structure line spectra from infrared luminous galaxies were modeled using stellar evolutionary synthesis models combined with photoionization and photodissociation region models. The calculations were carried out by using the computational code CLOUDY. Starburst and active galactic nuclei models are presented. The effects of dust in the ionized region are examined.

  5. Opsin co-expression in Limulus photoreceptors: differential regulation by light and a circadian clock

    PubMed Central

    Katti, C.; Kempler, K.; Porter, M. L.; Legg, A.; Gonzalez, R.; Garcia-Rivera, E.; Dugger, D.; Battelle, B.-A.

    2010-01-01

    A long-standing concept in vision science has held that a single photoreceptor expresses a single type of opsin, the protein component of visual pigment. However, the number of examples in the literature of photoreceptors from vertebrates and invertebrates that break this rule is increasing. Here, we describe a newly discovered Limulus opsin, Limulus opsin5, which is significantly different from previously characterized Limulus opsins, opsins1 and 2. We show that opsin5 is co-expressed with opsins1 and 2 in Limulus lateral and ventral eye photoreceptors and provide the first evidence that the expression of co-expressed opsins can be differentially regulated. We show that the relative levels of opsin5 and opsin1 and 2 in the rhabdom change with a diurnal rhythm and that their relative levels are also influenced by the animal's central circadian clock. An analysis of the sequence of opsin5 suggests it is sensitive to visible light (400–700 nm) but that its spectral properties may be different from that of opsins1 and 2. Changes in the relative levels of these opsins may underlie some of the dramatic day–night changes in Limulus photoreceptor function and may produce a diurnal change in their spectral sensitivity. PMID:20639420

  6. Honeybee Blue-and Ultraviolet-Sensitive Opsins: Cloning, Heterologous Expression in Drosophila, and

    E-print Network

    Pierce, Naomi E.

    Honeybee Blue- and Ultraviolet-Sensitive Opsins: Cloning, Heterologous Expression in Drosophila, Massachusetts 02138 The honeybee (Apis mellifera) visual system contains three classes of retinal photoreceptor: Apis mellifera; honeybee; visual pigment; spectral tuning; ultraviolet-sensitive opsin; blue

  7. Extraordinary diversity of visual opsin genes in dragonflies

    PubMed Central

    Futahashi, Ryo; Kawahara-Miki, Ryouka; Kinoshita, Michiyo; Yoshitake, Kazutoshi; Yajima, Shunsuke; Arikawa, Kentaro; Fukatsu, Takema

    2015-01-01

    Dragonflies are colorful and large-eyed animals strongly dependent on color vision. Here we report an extraordinary large number of opsin genes in dragonflies and their characteristic spatiotemporal expression patterns. Exhaustive transcriptomic and genomic surveys of three dragonflies of the family Libellulidae consistently identified 20 opsin genes, consisting of 4 nonvisual opsin genes and 16 visual opsin genes of 1 UV, 5 short-wavelength (SW), and 10 long-wavelength (LW) type. Comprehensive transcriptomic survey of the other dragonflies representing an additional 10 families also identified as many as 15–33 opsin genes. Molecular phylogenetic analysis revealed dynamic multiplications and losses of the opsin genes in the course of evolution. In contrast to many SW and LW genes expressed in adults, only one SW gene and several LW genes were expressed in larvae, reflecting less visual dependence and LW-skewed light conditions for their lifestyle under water. In this context, notably, the sand-burrowing or pit-dwelling species tended to lack SW gene expression in larvae. In adult visual organs: (i) many SW genes and a few LW genes were expressed in the dorsal region of compound eyes, presumably for processing SW-skewed light from the sky; (ii) a few SW genes and many LW genes were expressed in the ventral region of compound eyes, probably for perceiving terrestrial objects; and (iii) expression of a specific LW gene was associated with ocelli. Our findings suggest that the stage- and region-specific expressions of the diverse opsin genes underlie the behavior, ecology, and adaptation of dragonflies. PMID:25713365

  8. Extraordinary diversity of visual opsin genes in dragonflies.

    PubMed

    Futahashi, Ryo; Kawahara-Miki, Ryouka; Kinoshita, Michiyo; Yoshitake, Kazutoshi; Yajima, Shunsuke; Arikawa, Kentaro; Fukatsu, Takema

    2015-03-17

    Dragonflies are colorful and large-eyed animals strongly dependent on color vision. Here we report an extraordinary large number of opsin genes in dragonflies and their characteristic spatiotemporal expression patterns. Exhaustive transcriptomic and genomic surveys of three dragonflies of the family Libellulidae consistently identified 20 opsin genes, consisting of 4 nonvisual opsin genes and 16 visual opsin genes of 1 UV, 5 short-wavelength (SW), and 10 long-wavelength (LW) type. Comprehensive transcriptomic survey of the other dragonflies representing an additional 10 families also identified as many as 15-33 opsin genes. Molecular phylogenetic analysis revealed dynamic multiplications and losses of the opsin genes in the course of evolution. In contrast to many SW and LW genes expressed in adults, only one SW gene and several LW genes were expressed in larvae, reflecting less visual dependence and LW-skewed light conditions for their lifestyle under water. In this context, notably, the sand-burrowing or pit-dwelling species tended to lack SW gene expression in larvae. In adult visual organs: (i) many SW genes and a few LW genes were expressed in the dorsal region of compound eyes, presumably for processing SW-skewed light from the sky; (ii) a few SW genes and many LW genes were expressed in the ventral region of compound eyes, probably for perceiving terrestrial objects; and (iii) expression of a specific LW gene was associated with ocelli. Our findings suggest that the stage- and region-specific expressions of the diverse opsin genes underlie the behavior, ecology, and adaptation of dragonflies. PMID:25713365

  9. A novel rod-like opsin isolated from the extra-retinal photoreceptors of teleost fish.

    PubMed

    Philp, A R; Bellingham, J; Garcia-Fernandez, J; Foster, R G

    2000-02-25

    We have isolated a novel opsin from the pineal complex of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) and from the brain of the puffer fish (Fugu rubripes). These extra-retinal opsins share approximately 74% identity at the nucleotide and amino acid level with rod-opsins from the retina of these species. By PCR, we have determined that the novel rod-like opsin is not expressed in the salmon retina, and the retinal rod-opsin is not expressed in the salmon pineal. Phylogenetic analysis suggests that the rod-like opsins arose from a gene duplication event approximately 205 million years ago, a time of considerable adaptive radiation of the bony fish. In view of the large differences in the coding sequences of the pineal/brain rod-like opsins, their extra-retinal sites of expression, and phylogenetic position we have termed these novel opsins 'extra-retinal rod-like opsins' (ERrod-like opsins). We speculate that the differences between retinal rod-opsins and ERrod-like opsins have arisen from their differing photosensory roles and/or genetic drift after the gene duplication event in the Triassic. PMID:10692583

  10. The Evolution and Expression of the Moth Visual Opsin Family

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Xiaowei; Murphy, Robert W.; Wu, Kongming

    2013-01-01

    Because visual genes likely evolved in response to their ambient photic environment, the dichotomy between closely related nocturnal moths and diurnal butterflies forms an ideal basis for investigating their evolution. To investigate whether the visual genes of moths are associated with nocturnal dim-light environments or not, we cloned long-wavelength (R), blue (B) and ultraviolet (UV) opsin genes from 12 species of wild-captured moths and examined their evolutionary functions. Strong purifying selection appeared to constrain the functions of the genes. Dark-treatment altered the levels of mRNA expression in Helicoverpa armigera such that R and UV opsins were up-regulated after dark-treatment, the latter faster than the former. In contrast, B opsins were not significantly up-regulated. Diel changes of opsin mRNA levels in both wild-captured and lab-reared individuals showed no significant fluctuation within the same group. However, the former group had significantly elevated levels of expression compared with the latter. Consequently, environmental conditions appeared to affect the patterns of expression. These findings and the proportional expression of opsins suggested that moths potentially possessed color vision and the visual system played a more important role in the ecology of moths than previously appreciated. This aspect did not differ much from that of diurnal butterflies. PMID:24205129

  11. PDR modeling of the LWS fine-structure lines in ultraluminous galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luhman, M. L.; Satyapal, S.; Fischer, J.; Wolfire, M. G.

    1997-01-01

    The observations performed onboard the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) long wavelength spectrometer (LWS) on the fine structure lines in ultraluminous galaxies are reported on. The C II 158 micrometer, the O I 63 and 146 micrometer fine structure lines were detected. These lines were compared to the results of the revised theoretical models of extragalactic photodissociation regions (PDRs). The PDR origin of the fine structure lines and the physical properties of the PDR component are discussed.

  12. Implications of the ISO LWS spectrum of the prototypical ultraluminous galaxy: ARP 220

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fischer, J.; Satyapal, S.; Luhman, M. L.; Melnick, G.; Cox, P.; Cernicharo, J.; Stacey, G. J.; Smith, H. A.; Lord, S. D.; Greenhouse, M. A.

    1997-01-01

    The low resolution far infrared spectrum of the galaxy Arp 220, obtained with the low wavelength spectrometer (LWS) onboard the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO), is presented. The spectrum is dominated by the OH, H2O, CH, NH3 and O I absorption lines. The upper limits on the far infrared fine structure lines indicate a softer radiation in Arp 220 than in starburst galaxies.

  13. Characterisation and localisation of the opsin protein repertoire in the brain and retinas of a spider and an onychophoran

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Opsins have been found in the majority of animals and their most apparent functions are related to vision and light-guided behaviour. As an increasing number of sequences have become available it has become clear that many opsin-like transcripts are expressed in tissues other than the eyes. Opsins can be divided into three main groups: rhabdomeric opsins (r-opsins), ciliary opsins (c-opsins) and group 4 opsins. In arthropods, the main focus has been on the r-opsins involved in vision. However, with increased sequencing it is becoming clear that arthropods also possess opsins of the c-type, group 4 opsins and the newly discovered arthropsins but the functions of these opsins are unknown in arthropods and data on their localisation is limited or absent. Results We identified opsins from the spider Cupiennius salei and the onychophoran Euperipatoides kanangrensis and characterised the phylogeny and localisation of these transcripts. We recovered all known visual opsins in C. salei, and in addition found a peropsin, a c-opsin and an opsin resembling Daphnia pulex arthropsin. The peropsin was expressed in all eye types except the anterior median eyes. The arthropsin and the c-opsin were expressed in the central nervous system but not the eyes. In E. kanangrensis we found: a c-opsin; an opsin resembling D. pulex arthropsins; and an r-opsin with high sequence similarity to previously published onychophoran onychopsins. The E. kanangrensis c-opsin and onychopsin were expressed in both the eyes and the brain but the arthropsin only in the brain. Conclusion Our novel finding that opsins of both the ciliary and rhabdomeric type are present in the onychophoran and a spider suggests that these two types of opsins were present in the last common ancestor of the Onychophora and Euarthropoda. The expression of the c-opsin in the eye of an onychophoran indicates that c-opsins may originally have been involved in vision in the arthropod clade. The lack of c-opsin expression in the spider retina suggests that the role for c-opsin in vision was lost in the euarthropods. Our discovery of arthropsin in onychophorans and spiders dates the emergence of arthropsin to the common ancestor of Onychophora and Euarthropoda and their expression in the brain suggests a non-visual function. PMID:24010579

  14. Expression Dynamics and Protein Localization of Rhabdomeric Opsins in Platynereis Larvae

    PubMed Central

    Randel, Nadine; Bezares-Calderón, Luis A.; Gühmann, Martin; Shahidi, Réza; Jékely, Gáspár

    2013-01-01

    The larval stages of polychaete annelids are often responsive to light and can possess one to six eyes. The early trochophore larvae of the errant annelid Platynereis dumerilii have a single pair of ventral eyespots, whereas older nectochaete larvae have an additional two pairs of dorsal eyes that will develop into the adult eyes. Early Platynereis trochophores show robust positive phototaxis starting on the first day of development. Even though the mechanism of phototaxis in Platynereis early trochophore larvae is well understood, no photopigment (opsin) expression has yet been described in this stage. In late trochophore larvae, a rhabdomeric-type opsin, r-opsin1, expressed in both the eyespots and the adult eyes has already been reported. Here, we identify another Platynereis rhabdomeric opsin, r-opsin3, that is expressed in a single photoreceptor in the eyespots in early trochophores, suggesting that it mediates early larval phototaxis. We also show that r-opsin1 and r-opsin3 are expressed in adjacent photoreceptor cells in the eyespots in later stages, indicating that a second eyespot-photoreceptor differentiates in late trochophore larvae. Using serial transmission electron microscopy (TEM), we identified and reconstructed both photoreceptors and a pigment cell in the late larval eyespot. We also characterized opsin expression in the adult eyes and found that the two opsins co-express there in several photoreceptor cells. Using antibodies recognizing r-opsin1 and r-opsin3 proteins, we demonstrate that both opsins localize to the rhabdomere in all six eyes. In addition, we found that r-opsin1 mRNA is localized to, and translated in, the projections of the adult eyes. The specific changes we describe in opsin transcription and translation and in the cellular complement suggest that the six larval eyes undergo spectral and functional maturation during the early planktonic phase of the Platynereis life cycle. PMID:23667045

  15. Restoration of Vision with Ectopic Expression of Human Rod Opsin.

    PubMed

    Cehajic-Kapetanovic, Jasmina; Eleftheriou, Cyril; Allen, Annette E; Milosavljevic, Nina; Pienaar, Abigail; Bedford, Robert; Davis, Katherine E; Bishop, Paul N; Lucas, Robert J

    2015-08-17

    Many retinal dystrophies result in photoreceptor loss, but the inner retinal neurons can survive, making them potentially amenable to emerging optogenetic therapies. Here, we show that ectopically expressed human rod opsin, driven by either a non-selective or ON-bipolar cell-specific promoter, can function outside native photoreceptors and restore visual function in a mouse model of advanced retinal degeneration. Electrophysiological recordings from retinal explants and the visual thalamus revealed changes in firing (increases and decreases) induced by simple light pulses, luminance increases, and naturalistic movies in treated mice. These responses could be elicited at light intensities within the physiological range and substantially below those required by other optogenetic strategies. Mice with rod opsin expression driven by the ON-bipolar specific promoter displayed behavioral responses to increases in luminance, flicker, coarse spatial patterns, and elements of a natural movie at levels of contrast and illuminance (?50-100 lux) typical of natural indoor environments. These data reveal that virally mediated ectopic expression of human rod opsin can restore vision under natural viewing conditions and at moderate light intensities. Given the inherent advantages in employing a human protein, the simplicity of this intervention, and the quality of vision restored, we suggest that rod opsin merits consideration as an optogenetic actuator for treating patients with advanced retinal degeneration. PMID:26234216

  16. Opsin Clines in Butterflies Suggest Novel Roles for Insect Photopigments

    E-print Network

    detection and analysis of molecular variance indicated that many SNPs are under balancing selection and show-derived molecule. The opsin protein binds to the chromophore to form a visual pigment, with key amino acids modulating the absorbance spectra that enable animals to detect particular wavelengths of light (Lythgoe 1979

  17. Opsin Genes and Visual Ecology in a Nocturnal Folivorous Lemur

    E-print Network

    Cummings, Molly E.

    and modeled performance of possible S and M/L pigment pairs for detecting these food items under different, we united molecular analyses of cone visual pigment (opsin) genes with visual modeling analyses nocturnal illuminations (e.g. twilight, moonlight). We found that the observed cone pigment pair in Avahi

  18. Plasticity of opsin gene expression in cichlids from Lake Malawi

    E-print Network

    Carleton, Karen L.

    Plasticity of opsin gene expression in cichlids from Lake Malawi CHRISTOPHER M. HOFMANN, KELLY E. O plasticity has important evolutionary implications. In this study, we examined retinal plasticity in five found that the magnitude of plasticity varied across species. These findings have important implications

  19. Restoration of Vision with Ectopic Expression of Human Rod Opsin

    PubMed Central

    Cehajic-Kapetanovic, Jasmina; Eleftheriou, Cyril; Allen, Annette E.; Milosavljevic, Nina; Pienaar, Abigail; Bedford, Robert; Davis, Katherine E.; Bishop, Paul N.; Lucas, Robert J.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Many retinal dystrophies result in photoreceptor loss, but the inner retinal neurons can survive, making them potentially amenable to emerging optogenetic therapies. Here, we show that ectopically expressed human rod opsin, driven by either a non-selective or ON-bipolar cell-specific promoter, can function outside native photoreceptors and restore visual function in a mouse model of advanced retinal degeneration. Electrophysiological recordings from retinal explants and the visual thalamus revealed changes in firing (increases and decreases) induced by simple light pulses, luminance increases, and naturalistic movies in treated mice. These responses could be elicited at light intensities within the physiological range and substantially below those required by other optogenetic strategies. Mice with rod opsin expression driven by the ON-bipolar specific promoter displayed behavioral responses to increases in luminance, flicker, coarse spatial patterns, and elements of a natural movie at levels of contrast and illuminance (?50–100 lux) typical of natural indoor environments. These data reveal that virally mediated ectopic expression of human rod opsin can restore vision under natural viewing conditions and at moderate light intensities. Given the inherent advantages in employing a human protein, the simplicity of this intervention, and the quality of vision restored, we suggest that rod opsin merits consideration as an optogenetic actuator for treating patients with advanced retinal degeneration. PMID:26234216

  20. Carroll et al. Cone Opsin Mutations and Retinal Structure The Effect of Cone Opsin Mutations on Retinal Structure and the Integrity of the

    E-print Network

    Carroll et al. Cone Opsin Mutations and Retinal Structure 1 The Effect of Cone Opsin Mutations on Retinal Structure and the Integrity of the Photoreceptor Mosaic Joseph Carroll1,2,3,4,* , Alfredo Dubra1, Neurobiology, & Anatomy, 8701 Watertown Plank Road, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI 53226 USA 3

  1. The NASA Living With a Star (LWS) Sentinels Mission Physics Dept & Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley CA 97420-7450

    E-print Network

    California at Berkeley, University of

    The NASA Living With a Star (LWS) Sentinels Mission R. P. Lin Physics Dept & Space Sciences, Greenbelt, MD 20771 & the Sentinels Science and Technology Definition Team ABSTRACT The NASA Living With a Star (LWS) Sentinels mission is presently being defined by its Science and Technology Definition Team

  2. The co-chaperone and reductase ERdj5 facilitates rod opsin biogenesis and quality control

    PubMed Central

    Athanasiou, Dimitra; Bevilacqua, Dalila; Aguila, Monica; McCulley, Caroline; Kanuga, Naheed; Iwawaki, Takao; Paul Chapple, J.; Cheetham, Michael E.

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in rhodopsin, the light-sensitive protein of rod cells, are the most common cause of autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (ADRP). Many rod opsin mutations, such as P23H, lead to misfolding of rod opsin with detrimental effects on photoreceptor function and viability. Misfolded P23H rod opsin and other mutations in the intradiscal domain are characterized by the formation of an incorrect disulphide bond between C185 and C187, as opposed to the correct and highly conserved C110–C187 disulphide bond. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that incorrect disulphide bond formation might be a factor that affects the biogenesis of rod opsin by studying wild-type (WT) or P23H rod opsin in combination with amino acid substitutions that prevent the formation of incorrect disulphide bonds involving C185. These mutants had altered traffic dynamics, suggesting a requirement for regulation of disulphide bond formation/reduction during rod opsin biogenesis. Here, we show that the BiP co-chaperone and reductase protein ERdj5 (DNAJC10) regulates this process. ERdj5 overexpression promoted the degradation, improved the endoplasmic reticulum mobility and prevented the aggregation of P23H rod opsin. ERdj5 reduction by shRNA delayed rod opsin degradation and promoted aggregation. The reductase and co-chaperone activity of ERdj5 were both required for these effects on P23H rod opsin. Furthermore, mutations in these functional domains acted as dominant negatives that affected WT rod opsin biogenesis. Collectively, these data identify ERdj5 as a member of the proteostasis network that regulates rod opsin biogenesis and supports a role for disulphide bond formation/reduction in rod opsin biogenesis and disease. PMID:25055872

  3. 2006 LWS TR & T Solar Wind Focused Science Topic Team: The ... http://www.agu.org/cgi-bin/SFgate/SFgate?language=English&verb... 1 of 2 11/14/06 11:27 AM

    E-print Network

    Ng, Chung-Sang

    2006 LWS TR & T Solar Wind Focused Science Topic Team: The ... http://www=ng HR: 0800h AN: SH11A-0371 TI: 2006 LWS TR & T Solar Wind Focused Science Topic Team: The Beginnings AU;2006 LWS TR & T Solar Wind Focused Science Topic Team: The ... http://www

  4. True blue: S-opsin is widely expressed in different animal species.

    PubMed

    Amann, B; Hirmer, S; Hauck, S M; Kremmer, E; Ueffing, M; Deeg, C A

    2014-02-01

    Colour vision in animals is an interesting, fascinating subject. In this study, we examined a wide variety of species for expression of S-opsin (blue sensitive) and M-/L-opsin (green-red sensitive) in retinal cones using two novel monoclonal antibodies specific for peptides from human opsins. Mouse, rat and hare did not express one of the investigated epitopes, but we could clearly prove existence of cones through peanut agglutinin labelling. Retinas of guinea pig, dog, wolf, marten, cat, roe deer, pig and horse were positive for S-opsin, but not for M-/L-opsin. Nevertheless all these species are clearly at least dichromats, because we could detect further S-opsin negative cones by labelling with cone arrestin specific antibody. In contrast, pheasant and char had M-/L-opsin positive cones, but no S-opsin expressing cones. Sheep, cattle, monkey, men, pigeon, duck and chicken were positive for both opsins. Visual acuity analyzed through density of retinal ganglion cells revealed least visual discrimination by horses and highest resolution in pheasant and pigeon. Most mammals studied are dichromats with visual perception similar to red-green blind people. PMID:23173557

  5. Visual sensitivities tuned by heterochronic shifts in opsin gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Carleton, Karen L; Spady, Tyrone C; Streelman, J Todd; Kidd, Michael R; McFarland, William N; Loew, Ellis R

    2008-01-01

    Background Cichlid fishes have radiated into hundreds of species in the Great Lakes of Africa. Brightly colored males display on leks and vie to be chosen by females as mates. Strong discrimination by females causes differential male mating success, rapid evolution of male color patterns and, possibly, speciation. In addition to differences in color pattern, Lake Malawi cichlids also show some of the largest known shifts in visual sensitivity among closely related species. These shifts result from modulated expression of seven cone opsin genes. However, the mechanisms for this modulated expression are unknown. Results In this work, we ask whether these differences might result from changes in developmental patterning of cone opsin genes. To test this, we compared the developmental pattern of cone opsin gene expression of the Nile tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus, with that of several cichlid species from Lake Malawi. In tilapia, quantitative polymerase chain reaction showed that opsin gene expression changes dynamically from a larval gene set through a juvenile set to a final adult set. In contrast, Lake Malawi species showed one of two developmental patterns. In some species, the expressed gene set changes slowly, either retaining the larval pattern or progressing only from larval to juvenile gene sets (neoteny). In the other species, the same genes are expressed in both larvae and adults but correspond to the tilapia adult genes (direct development). Conclusion Differences in visual sensitivities among species of Lake Malawi cichlids arise through heterochronic shifts relative to the ontogenetic pattern of the tilapia outgroup. Heterochrony has previously been shown to be a powerful mechanism for change in morphological evolution. We found that altering developmental expression patterns is also an important mechanism for altering sensory systems. These resulting sensory shifts will have major impacts on visual communication and could help drive cichlid speciation. PMID:18500997

  6. Selective Protonation of Acidic Residues Triggers Opsin Activation.

    PubMed

    Lans, Isaias; Dalton, James A R; Giraldo, Jesús

    2015-07-30

    Rhodopsin, the visual pigment in the retina, is a Class A G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) covalently bound to retinal chromophore. In dark conditions, retinal is in the cis-isomeric state, stabilizing the rhodopsin inactive state as an inverse agonist. After light absorption, retinal undergoes an isomerization photoreaction to trans-retinal, which includes a conformational change of the receptor to its active state. In the absence of retinal, the apoprotein opsin presents a low level of constitutive activity, which depends on pH, with higher propensity of activation at acidic pH. To examine the effect and the underlying mechanism that protonation may have on opsin activation, a number of MD simulations were run varying the number and identity of acidic residues selected for protonation. Results show that the combined protonation of D83, E113, and E247 is of special relevance for the induction of receptor activation. Subsequent conformational analysis of the MD trajectories provides a structural mechanistic insight into the opsin activation process. Furthermore, because protonation seems to be a determining step in the activation of other GPCRs, the methodology and rationale used herein can be extended to mechanistic studies of GPCRs in general. PMID:26140747

  7. Coexpression of three opsins in cone photoreceptors of the salamander Ambystoma tigrinum.

    PubMed

    Isayama, Tomoki; Chen, Ying; Kono, Masahiro; Fabre, Eduard; Slavsky, Michael; DeGrip, Willem J; Ma, Jian-Xing; Crouch, Rosalie K; Makino, Clint L

    2014-07-01

    Although more than one type of visual opsin is present in the retina of most vertebrates, it was thought that each type of photoreceptor expresses only one opsin. However, evidence has accumulated that some photoreceptors contain more than one opsin, in many cases as a result of a developmental transition from the expression of one opsin to another. The salamander UV-sensitive (UV) cone is particularly notable because it contains three opsins (Makino and Dodd [1996] J Gen Physiol 108:27-34). Two opsin types are expressed at levels more than 100 times lower than the level of the primary opsin. Here, immunohistochemical experiments identified the primary component as a UV cone opsin and the two minor components as the short wavelength-sensitive (S) and long wavelength-sensitive (L) cone opsins. Based on single-cell recordings of 156 photoreceptors, the presence of three components in UV cones of hatchlings and terrestrial adults ruled out a developmental transition. There was no evidence for multiple opsin types within rods or S cones, but immunohistochemistry and partial bleaching in conjunction with single-cell recording revealed that both single and double L cones contained low levels of short wavelength-sensitive pigments in addition to the main L visual pigment. These results raise the possibility that coexpression of multiple opsins in other vertebrates was overlooked because a minor component absorbing at short wavelengths was masked by the main visual pigment or because the expression level of a component absorbing at long wavelengths was exceedingly low. PMID:24374736

  8. Molecular characterization of visual pigments in Branchiopoda and the evolution of opsins in Arthropoda.

    PubMed

    Kashiyama, Kazuyuki; Seki, Takaharu; Numata, Hideharu; Goto, Shin G

    2009-02-01

    Studies on color vision in invertebrates have focused primarily on insect visual pigments, with little attention given to crustacean visual pigments. None of the blue-green-, blue-, or ultraviolet (UV)-sensitive-opsins have been identified in crustaceans. In addition, the discussion of visual pigments has been limited to long-wavelength-sensitive opsins in Pancrustacea. Here, we focused on Branchiopoda (Crustacea), which is a sister group of Hexapoda including insects. In the tadpole shrimp Triops granarius, the visual pigment chromophore was retinal. Multiple opsins were isolated from each of three branchiopod species, T. granarius, Triops longicaudatus, and the fairy shrimp Branchinella kugenumaensis (five, five, and four opsins from these species, respectively). Phylogenetic analyses and the presence of a lysine residue corresponding to position 90 in bovine rhodopsin suggested that three of the branchiopod opsins comprise UV-sensitive pigments. In addition, the phylogenetic relationships between insect and branchiopod UV-sensitive opsins revealed that the divergence of blue- and UV-sensitive pigments predates the Branchiopoda and Insecta divergence. The other branchiopod opsins show distant relationships to other known insect opsins and form novel clusters. The present results strongly suggest that the ancestral arthropod of the Chelicerata-Pancrustacea lineages possessed at least four types of opsins. The ancestors of Pancrustacea and the Insecta-Branchiopoda lineages possessed at least five and six types of opsins, respectively. Our results suggest that in the evolutionary process associated with each lineage, several opsins appeared and diversified with repeated gene duplication, of which some have been lost in some taxa. PMID:18984904

  9. Modeling Active Region Evolution - A New LWS TR and T Strategic Capability Model Suite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MacNeice, Peter

    2012-01-01

    In 2006 the LWS TR&T Program funded us to develop a strategic capability model of slowly evolving coronal active regions. In this poster we report on the overall design, and status of our new modeling suite. Our design features two coronal field models, a non-linear force free field model and a global 3D MHD code. The suite includes supporting tools and a user friendly GUI which will enable users to query the web for relevant magnetograms, download them, process them to synthesize a sequence of photospheric magnetograms and associated photospheric flow field which can then be applied to drive the coronal model innner boundary, run the coronal models and finally visualize the results.

  10. Ocular and Extraocular Expression of Opsins in the Rhopalium of Tripedalia cystophora (Cnidaria: Cubozoa)

    PubMed Central

    Bielecki, Jan; Zaharoff, Alexander K.; Leung, Nicole Y.; Garm, Anders; Oakley, Todd H.

    2014-01-01

    A growing body of work on the neuroethology of cubozoans is based largely on the capabilities of the photoreceptive tissues, and it is important to determine the molecular basis of their light sensitivity. The cubozoans rely on 24 special purpose eyes to extract specific information from a complex visual scene to guide their behavior in the habitat. The lens eyes are the most studied photoreceptive structures, and the phototransduction in the photoreceptor cells is based on light sensitive opsin molecules. Opsins are photosensitive transmembrane proteins associated with photoreceptors in eyes, and the amino acid sequence of the opsins determines the spectral properties of the photoreceptors. Here we show that two distinct opsins (Tripedalia cystophora-lens eye expressed opsin and Tripedalia cystophora-neuropil expressed opsin, or Tc-leo and Tc-neo) are expressed in the Tripedalia cystophora rhopalium. Quantitative PCR determined the level of expression of the two opsins, and we found Tc-leo to have a higher amount of expression than Tc-neo. In situ hybridization located Tc-leo expression in the retinal photoreceptors of the lens eyes where the opsin is involved in image formation. Tc-neo is expressed in a confined part of the neuropil and is probably involved in extraocular light sensation, presumably in relation to diurnal activity. PMID:24901369

  11. Opsin/all-trans-Retinal Complex Activates Transducin by Different Mechanisms Than Photolyzed Rhodopsin

    E-print Network

    Palczewski, Krzysztof

    Opsin/all-trans-Retinal Complex Activates Transducin by Different Mechanisms Than Photolyzed the activation of rhodopsin by cis/trans photo- isomerization of retinal. Thermal relaxation through different (RK). all-trans-Retinal also recombines with opsin independent of light, forming activating species

  12. Evolution of the Cichlid Visual Palette through Ontogenetic Subfunctionalization of the Opsin Gene Arrays

    E-print Network

    Carleton, Karen L.

    , the forces governing the retention and death of opsin genes are poorly understood. African cichlid fishes the spectral sensitivities of these genes through reconstitution of visual pigments. Peak absorbances demonstrate that each tilapia cone opsin gene codes for a spectrally distinct visual pigment: SWS1 (360 nm

  13. Divergent Selection on Opsins Drives Incipient Speciation in Lake Victoria Cichlids

    E-print Network

    Divergent Selection on Opsins Drives Incipient Speciation in Lake Victoria Cichlids Yohey Terai1, et al. (2006) Divergent selection on opsins drives incipient speciation in Lake Victoria cichlids for the genetics of vertebrate speciation and adaptive radiation [8]. Lake Victoria, the largest of the African

  14. Opsin evolution and expression in Arthropod compound Eyes and Ocelli: Insights from the cricket Gryllus bimaculatus

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Opsins are key proteins in animal photoreception. Together with a light-sensitive group, the chromophore, they form visual pigments which initiate the visual transduction cascade when photoactivated. The spectral absorption properties of visual pigments are mainly determined by their opsins, and thus opsins are crucial for understanding the adaptations of animal eyes. Studies on the phylogeny and expression pattern of opsins have received considerable attention, but our knowledge about insect visual opsins is still limited. Up to now, researchers have focused on holometabolous insects, while general conclusions require sampling from a broader range of taxa. We have therefore investigated visual opsins in the ocelli and compound eyes of the two-spotted cricket Gryllus bimaculatus, a hemimetabolous insect. Results Phylogenetic analyses place all identified cricket sequences within the three main visual opsin clades of insects. We assign three of these opsins to visual pigments found in the compound eyes with peak absorbances in the green (515 nm), blue (445 nm) and UV (332 nm) spectral range. Their expression pattern divides the retina into distinct regions: (1) the polarization-sensitive dorsal rim area with blue- and UV-opsin, (2) a newly-discovered ventral band of ommatidia with blue- and green-opsin and (3) the remainder of the compound eye with UV- and green-opsin. In addition, we provide evidence for two ocellar photopigments with peak absorbances in the green (511 nm) and UV (350 nm) spectral range, and with opsins that differ from those expressed in the compound eyes. Conclusions Our data show that cricket eyes are spectrally more specialized than has previously been assumed, suggesting that similar adaptations in other insect species might have been overlooked. The arrangement of spectral receptor types within some ommatidia of the cricket compound eyes differs from the generally accepted pattern found in holometabolous insect taxa and awaits a functional explanation. From the opsin phylogeny, we conclude that gene duplications, which permitted differential opsin expression in insect ocelli and compound eyes, occurred independently in several insect lineages and are recent compared to the origin of the eyes themselves. PMID:22935102

  15. Variation in opsin genes correlates with signalling ecology in North American fireflies.

    PubMed

    Sander, S E; Hall, D W

    2015-09-01

    Genes underlying signal reception should evolve to maximize signal detection in a particular environment. In animals, opsins, the protein component of visual pigments, are predicted to evolve according to this expectation. Fireflies are known for their bioluminescent mating signals. The eyes of nocturnal species are expected to maximize the detection of conspecific signal colours emitted in the typical low-light environment. This is not expected for species that have transitioned to diurnal activity in bright daytime environments. Here, we test the hypothesis that opsin gene sequence plays a role in modifying firefly eye spectral sensitivity. We use genome and transcriptome sequencing in four firefly species, transcriptome sequencing in six additional species and targeted gene sequencing in 28 other species to identify all opsin genes present in North American fireflies and to elucidate amino acid sites under positive selection. We also determine whether amino acid substitutions in opsins are linked to evolutionary changes in signal mode, signal colour and light environment. We find only two opsins, one long wavelength and one ultraviolet, in all firefly species and identify 25 candidate sites that may be involved in determining spectral sensitivity. In addition, we find elevated rates of evolution at transitions to diurnal activity, and changes in selective constraint on long wavelength opsin associated with changes in light environment. Our results suggest that changes in eye spectral sensitivity are at least partially due to opsin sequence. Fireflies continue to be a promising system in which to investigate the evolution of signals, receptors and signalling environments. PMID:26289828

  16. Spectral tuning by opsin coexpression in retinal regions that view different parts of the visual field.

    PubMed

    Dalton, Brian E; Loew, Ellis R; Cronin, Thomas W; Carleton, Karen L

    2014-12-22

    Vision frequently mediates critical behaviours, and photoreceptors must respond to the light available to accomplish these tasks. Most photoreceptors are thought to contain a single visual pigment, an opsin protein bound to a chromophore, which together determine spectral sensitivity. Mechanisms of spectral tuning include altering the opsin, changing the chromophore and incorporating pre-receptor filtering. A few exceptions to the use of a single visual pigment have been documented in which a single mature photoreceptor coexpresses opsins that form spectrally distinct visual pigments, and in these exceptions the functional significance of coexpression is unclear. Here we document for the first time photoreceptors coexpressing spectrally distinct opsin genes in a manner that tunes sensitivity to the light environment. Photoreceptors of the cichlid fish, Metriaclima zebra, mix different pairs of opsins in retinal regions that view distinct backgrounds. The mixing of visual pigments increases absorbance of the corresponding background, potentially aiding the detection of dark objects. Thus, opsin coexpression may be a novel mechanism of spectral tuning that could be useful for detecting prey, predators and mates. However, our calculations show that coexpression of some opsins can hinder colour discrimination, creating a trade-off between visual functions. PMID:25377457

  17. Spectral tuning by opsin coexpression in retinal regions that view different parts of the visual field

    PubMed Central

    Dalton, Brian E.; Loew, Ellis R.; Cronin, Thomas W.; Carleton, Karen L.

    2014-01-01

    Vision frequently mediates critical behaviours, and photoreceptors must respond to the light available to accomplish these tasks. Most photoreceptors are thought to contain a single visual pigment, an opsin protein bound to a chromophore, which together determine spectral sensitivity. Mechanisms of spectral tuning include altering the opsin, changing the chromophore and incorporating pre-receptor filtering. A few exceptions to the use of a single visual pigment have been documented in which a single mature photoreceptor coexpresses opsins that form spectrally distinct visual pigments, and in these exceptions the functional significance of coexpression is unclear. Here we document for the first time photoreceptors coexpressing spectrally distinct opsin genes in a manner that tunes sensitivity to the light environment. Photoreceptors of the cichlid fish, Metriaclima zebra, mix different pairs of opsins in retinal regions that view distinct backgrounds. The mixing of visual pigments increases absorbance of the corresponding background, potentially aiding the detection of dark objects. Thus, opsin coexpression may be a novel mechanism of spectral tuning that could be useful for detecting prey, predators and mates. However, our calculations show that coexpression of some opsins can hinder colour discrimination, creating a trade-off between visual functions. PMID:25377457

  18. Molecular expression of opsin gene in growing juvenile mackerel ( Scomber japonicus Houttuyn)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Eung-Oh; Yoon, Seong-Jong; Park, Kyoung-Hyun; Kim, Dae-Hyun; Do, Jeung-Wan; Cho, Eun-Seob

    2009-12-01

    Fish have developed color vision that is closely adapted to their photic environments, where both spectral sensitivity and the number of visual opsins are influenced. The mackerel used in this study is one of the most important fishery stocks in Korea. The opsin gene of the mackerel juveniles after 20 days in hatching was isolated and characterized based on the molecular study of visual photoreceptor. The full-length mackerel opsin gene was obtained by PCR amplification of genomic DNA, as well as cDNA synthesis. Sequence analysis of the opsin gene showed that it contained a 1,080 bp open reading frame encoding 360 amino acids. Based on Schiff’s base formation (S114, K119), glycosylation (E3, F37) and palmitoylation (S281, 282), the deduced amino acid sequence had a typical rod opsin. The mackerel and Gempylus serpens showed 73.7% DNA homology on opsin gene, which was higher than any other of investigated species. In the analysis of phylogenetic relationship, the genetic placement of the mackerel is closer to that of Scombroidei than Labroidei, with supporting somewhat strong bootstrap value. In the analysis of Northern and RT-PCR, the probed products were observed only in rapidly growing juveniles. These findings indicate that in mackerel opsin mRNA expression can be detected in day-20 hatching larvae. It may play an important role in stimulating growth hormone.

  19. Noncovalent occupancy of the retinal-binding pocket of opsin diminishes bleaching adaptation of retinal cones.

    PubMed

    Jin, J; Crouch, R K; Corson, D W; Katz, B M; MacNichol, E F; Cornwall, M C

    1993-09-01

    Bright light bleaches visual pigment and leads to a persistent desensitization of isolated rod and cone photoreceptors called bleaching adaptation. Bleaching adaptation results from the combined effects of pigment depletion and adaptational modulation of certain cellular reactions in the visual transduction cascade. Here, we present evidence that in solitary cone photoreceptors isolated from the salamander retina, the latter effect is due to the presence of free opsin in the outer segment. Also, we demonstrate that this "opsin adaptation" can be reversed by treating the cells with synthetic retinoids similar to 11-cis retinal but having polyene chains too short to form protonated Schiff base attachments to opsin. PMID:8398144

  20. Three different cone opsin gene array mutational mechanisms with genotype-phenotype correlation and functional investigation of cone opsin variants.

    PubMed

    Gardner, Jessica C; Liew, Gerald; Quan, Ying-Hua; Ermetal, Burcu; Ueyama, Hisao; Davidson, Alice E; Schwarz, Nele; Kanuga, Naheed; Chana, Ravinder; Maher, Eamonn R; Webster, Andrew R; Holder, Graham E; Robson, Anthony G; Cheetham, Michael E; Liebelt, Jan; Ruddle, Jonathan B; Moore, Anthony T; Michaelides, Michel; Hardcastle, Alison J

    2014-11-01

    Mutations in the OPN1LW (L-) and OPN1MW (M-)cone opsin genes underlie a spectrum of cone photoreceptor defects from stationary loss of color vision to progressive retinal degeneration. Genotypes of 22 families with a range of cone disorders were grouped into three classes: deletions of the locus control region (LCR); missense mutation (p.Cys203Arg) in an L-/M-hybrid gene; and exon 3 single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) interchange haplotypes in an otherwise normal gene array. Moderate-to-high myopia was observed in all mutation categories. Individuals with LCR deletions or p.Cys203Arg mutations were more likely to have nystagmus and poor vision, with disease progression in some p.Cys203Arg patients. Three disease-associated exon 3 SNP haplotypes encoding LIAVA, LVAVA, or MIAVA were identified in our cohort. These patients were less likely to have nystagmus but more likely to show progression, with all patients over the age of 40 years having marked macular abnormalities. Previously, the haplotype LIAVA has been shown to result in exon 3 skipping. Here, we show that haplotypes LVAVA and MIAVA also result in aberrant splicing, with a residual low level of correctly spliced cone opsin. The OPN1LW/OPN1MW:c.532A>G SNP, common to all three disease-associated haplotypes, appears to be principally responsible for this mutational mechanism. PMID:25168334

  1. Constitutive activation of phototransduction by K296E opsin is not a cause of photoreceptor degeneration.

    PubMed Central

    Li, T; Franson, W K; Gordon, J W; Berson, E L; Dryja, T P

    1995-01-01

    The missense mutation Lys-296-->Glu (K296E) in the rhodopsin gene produces an opsin with no chromophore binding site and therefore is not activated by light. Nevertheless, the mutant opsin constitutively activates transducin in vitro and causes photoreceptor degeneration in vivo, possibly by continuously activating the phototransduction cascade, analogous to constant exposure to environmental light. We studied the K296E mutation in eight lines of transgenic mice. Each line developed photoreceptor degeneration with the rate of degeneration increasing monotonically as the ratio of mutant:wild-type opsin mRNA increased. At no time in the course of degeneration was there endogenous light adaptation in the retina as measured by the electroretinogram. The mutant opsin was found to be invariably phosphorylated and stably bound to arrestin. Light-independent activation of transducin was demonstrated only after the removal of arrestin and dephosphorylation of K296E opsin. Thus, K296E opsin in vivo does not activate the phototransduction cascade because it is shut off by photoreceptor inactivation mechanisms. Our data show that the K296E mutation does not cause photoreceptor degeneration by continuous activation of phototransduction. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:7724596

  2. Broadband activation by white-opsin lowers intensity threshold for cellular stimulation.

    PubMed

    Batabyal, Subrata; Cervenka, Gregory; Birch, David; Kim, Young-Tae; Mohanty, Samarendra

    2015-01-01

    Photoreceptors, which initiate the conversion of ambient light to action potentials via retinal circuitry, degenerate in retinal diseases such as retinitis pigmentosa and age related macular degeneration leading to loss of vision. Current prosthetic devices using arrays consisting of electrodes or LEDs (for optogenetic activation of conventional narrow-band opsins) have limited spatial resolution and can cause damage to retinal circuits by mechanical or photochemical (by absorption of intense narrow band light) means. Here, we describe a broad-band light activatable white-opsin for generating significant photocurrent at white light intensity levels close to ambient daylight conditions. White-opsin produced an order of magnitude higher photocurrent in response to white light as compared to narrow-band opsin channelrhodopsin-2, while maintaining the ms-channel kinetics. High fidelity of peak-photocurrent (both amplitude and latency) of white-opsin in response to repetitive white light stimulation of varying pulse width was observed. The significantly lower intensity stimulation required for activating white-opsin sensitized cells may facilitate ambient white light-based restoration of vision for patients with widespread photoreceptor degeneration. PMID:26658483

  3. Broadband activation by white-opsin lowers intensity threshold for cellular stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Batabyal, Subrata; Cervenka, Gregory; Birch, David; Kim, Young-tae; Mohanty, Samarendra

    2015-01-01

    Photoreceptors, which initiate the conversion of ambient light to action potentials via retinal circuitry, degenerate in retinal diseases such as retinitis pigmentosa and age related macular degeneration leading to loss of vision. Current prosthetic devices using arrays consisting of electrodes or LEDs (for optogenetic activation of conventional narrow-band opsins) have limited spatial resolution and can cause damage to retinal circuits by mechanical or photochemical (by absorption of intense narrow band light) means. Here, we describe a broad-band light activatable white-opsin for generating significant photocurrent at white light intensity levels close to ambient daylight conditions. White-opsin produced an order of magnitude higher photocurrent in response to white light as compared to narrow-band opsin channelrhodopsin-2, while maintaining the ms-channel kinetics. High fidelity of peak-photocurrent (both amplitude and latency) of white-opsin in response to repetitive white light stimulation of varying pulse width was observed. The significantly lower intensity stimulation required for activating white-opsin sensitized cells may facilitate ambient white light-based restoration of vision for patients with widespread photoreceptor degeneration. PMID:26658483

  4. LWS Investigation of Middle-Latitude Topside Ionospheric Vertical Electron-Density Profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benson, R. F.; Grebowsky, J. M.; Webb, P. A.

    2005-05-01

    A Living With a Star (LWS) Targeted Research and Technology (TR&T) proposal has been selected to determine the dependence of the mid-latitude topside ionospheric electron-density (Ne) altitude distributions on long-term solar-cycle variations and short-term solar-wind and magnetic disturbances. The main focus is on Ne profiles from the height of the ionospheric Ne maximum to ~3,000 km as deduced from ISIS (International Satellites for Ionospheric Studies) topside-sounder data. These data, obtained over an 18-year time interval, can be used to investigate secular changes in the topside Ne profiles, which reflect altitude changes in plasma temperature and ion composition, over more than a solar cycle. In addition to providing average distributions the data, which extend from the O+ dominated high-altitude F region to the H+ dominated plasmasphere, provide a unique framework for delineating the altitude dependence of mid-latitude ionospheric structures associated with the plasmapause, plasmaspheric tails and Storm Enhanced Densities (SEDs). The approach used is to determine the locations of mid-latitude O+/H+ transition altitudes by fitting the topside Ne profiles with modeled H+ and O+ profiles that have the base electron temperature and temperature gradient at 400 km as variables. The investigation makes use of existing topside Ne profiles obtained from 1960's manual scaling of 35-mm film-format ionograms, available from ftp://nssdcftp.gsfc.nasa.gov/, and profiles deduced from digital topside ionograms available from http://nssdc.gsfc.nasa.gov/space/isis/isis-status.html.

  5. Brain area-specific diurnal and photic regulation of val-opsinA and val-opsinB genes in the zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Hang, Chong Yee; Kitahashi, Takashi; Parhar, Ishwar S

    2015-05-01

    Zebrafish possess two isoforms of vertebrate ancient long (VAL)-opsin, val-opsinA (valopa) and val-opsinB (valopb), which probably mediate non-visual responses to light. To understand the diurnal and light-sensitive regulation of the valop genes in different cell groups, the current study used real-time quantitative PCR to examine the diurnal changes of valopa and b mRNA levels in different brain areas of adult male zebrafish. Furthermore, effects of the extended exposure to light or dark condition, luminous levels and the treatment with a melatonin receptor agonist or antagonist on valop transcription were examined. In the thalamus, valop mRNA levels showed significant diurnal changes; valopa peaked in the evening, while valopb peaked in the morning. The diurnal change of valopa mRNA levels occurred independent of light conditions, whereas that of valopb mRNA levels were regulated by light. A melatonin receptor agonist or antagonist did not affect the changes of valop mRNA levels. In contrast, the midbrain and hindbrain showed arrhythmic valop mRNA levels under light and dark cycles. The differential diurnal regulation of the valopa and b genes in the thalamus and the arrhythmic expression in the midbrain and hindbrain suggest involvement of deep brain VAL-opsin in time- and light-dependent physiology. We show diurnal expression changes of vertebrate ancient long (VAL) opsin genes (valopa and valopb), depending on brain area, time of day and light condition, in the adult male zebrafish. Differential regulation of the valop genes in the thalamus and arrhythmic expression in the midbrain and hindbrain suggest their involvement in time- and light-dependent physiology to adjust to environmental changes. PMID:25727787

  6. Spectral sensitivity in Onychophora (velvet worms) revealed by electroretinograms, phototactic behaviour and opsin gene expression.

    PubMed

    Beckmann, Holger; Hering, Lars; Henze, Miriam J; Kelber, Almut; Stevenson, Paul A; Mayer, Georg

    2015-03-01

    Onychophorans typically possess a pair of simple eyes, inherited from the last common ancestor of Panarthropoda (Onychophora+Tardigrada+Arthropoda). These visual organs are thought to be homologous to the arthropod median ocelli, whereas the compound eyes probably evolved in the arthropod lineage. To gain insights into the ancestral function and evolution of the visual system in panarthropods, we investigated phototactic behaviour, opsin gene expression and the spectral sensitivity of the eyes in two representative species of Onychophora: Euperipatoides rowelli (Peripatopsidae) and Principapillatus hitoyensis (Peripatidae). Our behavioural analyses, in conjunction with previous data, demonstrate that both species exhibit photonegative responses to wavelengths ranging from ultraviolet to green light (370-530?nm), and electroretinograms reveal that the onychophoran eye is maximally sensitive to blue light (peak sensitivity ?480?nm). Template fits to these sensitivities suggest that the onychophoran eye is monochromatic. To clarify which type of opsin the single visual pigment is based on, we localised the corresponding mRNA in the onychophoran eye and brain using in situ hybridization. Our data show that the r-opsin gene (onychopsin) is expressed exclusively in the photoreceptor cells of the eye, whereas c-opsin mRNA is confined to the optic ganglion cells and the brain. Together, our findings suggest that the onychopsin is involved in vision, whereas c-opsin might have a photoreceptive, non-visual function in onychophorans. PMID:25617459

  7. Crepuscular Behavioral Variation and Profiling of Opsin Genes in Anopheles gambiae and Anopheles stephensi (Diptera: Culicidae)

    PubMed Central

    Jenkins, Adam M.; Muskavitch, Marc A. T.

    2015-01-01

    We understand little about photopreference and the molecular mechanisms governing vision-dependent behavior in vector mosquitoes. Investigations of the influence of photopreference on adult mosquito behaviors such as endophagy and exophagy and endophily and exophily will enhance our ability to develop and deploy vector-targeted interventions and monitoring techniques. Our laboratory-based analyses have revealed that crepuscular period photopreference differs between An. gambiae and An. stephensi. We employed qRT-PCR to assess crepuscular transcriptional expression patterns of long wavelength-, short wavelength-, and ultraviolet wavelength-sensing opsins (i.e., rhodopsin-class G-protein coupled receptors) in An. gambiae and in An. stephensi. Transcript levels do not exhibit consistent differences between species across diurnal cycles, indicating that differences in transcript abundances within this gene set are not correlated with these behavioral differences. Using developmentally staged and gender-specific RNAseq data sets in An. gambiae, we show that long wavelength-sensing opsins are expressed in two different patterns (one set expressed during larval stages, and one set expressed during adult stages), while short wavelength- and ultraviolet wavelength-sensing opsins exhibit increased expression during adult stages. Genomic organization of An. gambiae opsins suggests paralogous gene expansion of long wavelength-sensing opsins in comparison with An. stephensi. We speculate that this difference in gene number may contribute to variation between these species in photopreference behavior (e.g., visual sensitivity). PMID:26334802

  8. Atomistic design of microbial opsin-based blue-shifted optogenetics tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Hideaki E.; Kamiya, Motoshi; Sugo, Seiya; Ito, Jumpei; Taniguchi, Reiya; Orito, Ayaka; Hirata, Kunio; Inutsuka, Ayumu; Yamanaka, Akihiro; Maturana, Andrés D.; Ishitani, Ryuichiro; Sudo, Yuki; Hayashi, Shigehiko; Nureki, Osamu

    2015-05-01

    Microbial opsins with a bound chromophore function as photosensitive ion transporters and have been employed in optogenetics for the optical control of neuronal activity. Molecular engineering has been utilized to create colour variants for the functional augmentation of optogenetics tools, but was limited by the complexity of the protein-chromophore interactions. Here we report the development of blue-shifted colour variants by rational design at atomic resolution, achieved through accurate hybrid molecular simulations, electrophysiology and X-ray crystallography. The molecular simulation models and the crystal structure reveal the precisely designed conformational changes of the chromophore induced by combinatory mutations that shrink its ?-conjugated system which, together with electrostatic tuning, produce large blue shifts of the absorption spectra by maximally 100 nm, while maintaining photosensitive ion transport activities. The design principle we elaborate is applicable to other microbial opsins, and clarifies the underlying molecular mechanism of the blue-shifted action spectra of microbial opsins recently isolated from natural sources.

  9. Opsin expression in Limulus eyes: a UV opsin is expressed in each eye type and co-expressed with a visible light-sensitive opsin in ventral larval eyes

    PubMed Central

    Battelle, Barbara-Anne; Kempler, Karen E.; Harrison, Alexandra; Dugger, Donald R.; Payne, Richard

    2014-01-01

    The eyes of the horseshoe crab, Limulus polyphemus, are a model for studies of visual function and the visual systems of euarthropods. Much is known about the structure and function of L. polyphemus photoreceptors, much less about their photopigments. Three visible-light-sensitive L. polyphemus opsins were characterized previously (LpOps1, 2 and 5). Here we characterize a UV opsin (LpUVOps1) that is expressed in all three types of L. polyphemus eyes. It is expressed in most photoreceptors in median ocelli, the only L. polyphemus eyes in which UV sensitivity was previously detected, and in the dendrite of eccentric cells in lateral compound eyes. Therefore, eccentric cells, previously thought to be non-photosensitive second-order neurons, may actually be UV-sensitive photoreceptors. LpUVOps1 is also expressed in small photoreceptors in L. polyphemus ventral larval eyes, and intracellular recordings from these photoreceptors confirm that LpUVOps1 is an active, UV-sensitive photopigment. These photoreceptors also express LpOps5, which we demonstrate is an active, long-wavelength-sensitive photopigment. Thus small photoreceptors in ventral larval eyes, and probably those of the other larval eyes, have dual sensitivity to UV and visible light. Interestingly, the spectral tuning of small ventral photoreceptors may change day to night, because the level of LpOps5 in their rhabdoms is lower during the day than during the night, whereas LpUVOps1 levels show no diurnal change. These and previous findings show that opsin co-expression and the differential regulation of co-expressed opsins in rhabdoms is a common feature of L. polyphemus photoreceptors. PMID:24948643

  10. Research grants over last 6 years. 13. Institutional PI on NASA/LWS Grant (2013-2017) with Montana State University.

    E-print Network

    Mackay, Duncan

    Research grants over last 6 years. 13. Institutional PI on NASA/LWS Grant (2013-2017) with Montana State University. 1. PPARC/STFC Advanced Fellowship (2004-2009). 2. Royal Society Travel Grant for Conference in USA (2008). 3. Royal Society Research Grant (2007-2008). 4. British Council Research Exchange

  11. Molecular Evidence that Only Two Opsin Subfamilies, the Blue Light- (SWS2) and Green Light-Sensitive (RH2), Drive Color Vision in Atlantic Cod (Gadus morhua)

    PubMed Central

    Søviknes, Anne Mette; Drivenes, Øyvind; Helvik, Jon Vidar

    2014-01-01

    Teleosts show a great variety in visual opsin complement, due to both gene duplication and gene loss. The repertoire ranges from one subfamily of visual opsins (scotopic vision) including rod opsin only retinas seen in many deep-sea species to multiple subfamilies of visual opsins in some pelagic species. We have investigated the opsin repertoire of Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) using information in the recently sequenced cod genome and found that despite cod not being a deep sea species it lacks visual subfamilies sensitive towards the most extreme parts of the light spectra representing UV and red light. Furthermore, we find that Atlantic cod has duplicated paralogs of both blue-sensitive SWS2 and green-sensitive RH2 subfamilies, with members belonging to each subfamily linked in tandem within the genome (two SWS2-, and three RH2A genes, respectively). The presence of multiple cone opsin genes indicates that there have been duplication events in the cod ancestor SWS2 and RH2 opsins producing paralogs that have been retained in Atlantic. Our results are supported by expressional analysis of cone opsins, which further revealed an ontogenetic change in the array of cone opsins expressed. These findings suggest life stage specific programs for opsin regulation which could be linked to habitat changes and available light as the larvae is transformed into an early juvenile. Altogether we provide the first molecular evidence for color vision driven by only two families of cone opsins due to gene loss in a teleost. PMID:25551396

  12. Opsin transcripts of predatory diving beetles: a comparison of surface and subterranean photic niches.

    PubMed

    Tierney, Simon M; Cooper, Steven J B; Saint, Kathleen M; Bertozzi, Terry; Hyde, Josephine; Humphreys, William F; Austin, Andrew D

    2015-01-01

    The regressive evolution of eyes has long intrigued biologists yet the genetic underpinnings remain opaque. A system of discrete aquifers in arid Australia provides a powerful comparative means to explore trait regression at the genomic level. Multiple surface ancestors from two tribes of diving beetles (Dytiscidae) repeatedly invaded these calcrete aquifers and convergently evolved eye-less phenotypes. We use this system to assess transcription of opsin photoreceptor genes among the transcriptomes of two surface and three subterranean dytiscid species and test whether these genes have evolved under neutral predictions. Transcripts for UV, long-wavelength and ciliary-type opsins were identified from the surface beetle transcriptomes. Two subterranean beetles showed parallel loss of all opsin transcription, as expected under 'neutral' regressive evolution. The third species Limbodessus palmulaoides retained transcription of a long-wavelength opsin (lwop) orthologue, albeit in an aphotic environment. Tests of selection on lwop indicated no significant differences between transcripts derived from surface and subterranean habitats, with strong evidence for purifying selection acting on L. palmulaoides lwop. Retention of sequence integrity and the lack of evidence for neutral evolution raise the question of whether we have identified a novel pleiotropic role for lwop, or an incipient phase of pseudogene development. PMID:26064586

  13. Opsin transcripts of predatory diving beetles: a comparison of surface and subterranean photic niches

    PubMed Central

    Tierney, Simon M.; Cooper, Steven J. B.; Saint, Kathleen M.; Bertozzi, Terry; Hyde, Josephine; Humphreys, William F.; Austin, Andrew D.

    2015-01-01

    The regressive evolution of eyes has long intrigued biologists yet the genetic underpinnings remain opaque. A system of discrete aquifers in arid Australia provides a powerful comparative means to explore trait regression at the genomic level. Multiple surface ancestors from two tribes of diving beetles (Dytiscidae) repeatedly invaded these calcrete aquifers and convergently evolved eye-less phenotypes. We use this system to assess transcription of opsin photoreceptor genes among the transcriptomes of two surface and three subterranean dytiscid species and test whether these genes have evolved under neutral predictions. Transcripts for UV, long-wavelength and ciliary-type opsins were identified from the surface beetle transcriptomes. Two subterranean beetles showed parallel loss of all opsin transcription, as expected under ‘neutral’ regressive evolution. The third species Limbodessus palmulaoides retained transcription of a long-wavelength opsin (lwop) orthologue, albeit in an aphotic environment. Tests of selection on lwop indicated no significant differences between transcripts derived from surface and subterranean habitats, with strong evidence for purifying selection acting on L. palmulaoides lwop. Retention of sequence integrity and the lack of evidence for neutral evolution raise the question of whether we have identified a novel pleiotropic role for lwop, or an incipient phase of pseudogene development. PMID:26064586

  14. Homeobox transcription factor Six7 governs expression of green opsin genes in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Yohey; Shiraki, Tomoya; Kojima, Daisuke; Fukada, Yoshitaka

    2015-08-01

    Colour discrimination in vertebrates requires cone photoreceptor cells in the retina, and high-acuity colour vision is endowed by a set of four cone subtypes expressing UV-, blue-, green- and red-sensitive opsins. Previous studies identified transcription factors governing cone photoreceptor development in mice, although loss of blue and green opsin genes in the evolution of mammals make it difficult to understand how high-acuity colour vision was organized during evolution and development. Zebrafish (Danio rerio) represents a valuable vertebrate model for studying colour vision as it retains all the four ancestral vertebrate cone subtypes. Here, by RT-qPCR and in situ hybridization analysis, we found that sine oculis homeobox homolog 7 (six7), a transcription factor widely conserved in ray-finned fish, is expressed predominantly in the cone photoreceptors in zebrafish at both the larval and the adult stages. TAL effector nuclease-based six7 knock-out revealed its roles in expression of green, red and blue cone opsin genes. Most prominently, the six7 deficiency caused a loss of expression of all the green opsins at both the larval and adult stages. six7 is indispensable for the development and/or maintenance of the green cones. PMID:26180064

  15. The lycaenid butterfly Polyommatus icarus uses a duplicated blue opsin to see green.

    PubMed

    Sison-Mangus, Marilou P; Briscoe, Adriana D; Zaccardi, Guillermo; Knüttel, Helge; Kelber, Almut

    2008-02-01

    The functional significance of gene duplication is rarely addressed at the level of animal behavior. Butterflies are excellent models in this regard because they can be trained and the use of their opsin-based visual pigments in color vision can be assessed. In the present study, we demonstrate that the lycaenid Polyommatus icarus uses its duplicate blue (B2) opsin, BRh2, in conjunction with its long-wavelength (LW) opsin, LWRh, to see color in the green part of the light spectrum extending up to 560 nm. This is in contrast to butterflies in the genus Papilio, which use duplicate LW opsins to discriminate colors in the long-wavelength range. We also found that P. icarus has a heterogeneously expressed red filtering pigment and red-reflecting ommatidia in the ventral eye region. In behavioural tests, the butterflies could not discriminate colors in the red range (570-640 nm). This finding is significant because we have previously found that the nymphalid butterfly Heliconius erato has filter-pigment mediated color vision in the long wavelength range. Our results suggest that lateral filtering pigments may not always influence color vision in insects. PMID:18203991

  16. Imaging neural spiking in brain tissue using FRET-opsin protein voltage sensors

    E-print Network

    Imaging neural spiking in brain tissue using FRET-opsin protein voltage sensors Yiyang Gong, Mark J of the MacQ-mCitrine sensor. We used this definition of SNR, because it takes into account the magnitude;Supplementary Figure 4 | Mac sensors outperformed Arclight in SNR when reporting single action potentials

  17. Electrostatic Compensation Restores Trafficking of the Autosomal Recessive Retinitis Pigmentosa E150K Opsin

    E-print Network

    Palczewski, Krzysztof

    linking recessive RP to a mutation in the opsin gene involved a nonsense mutation at codon 249 within exonElectrostatic Compensation Restores Trafficking of the Autosomal Recessive Retinitis Pigmentosa E-coupled recep- tor responsible for capturing light. Mutations in the gene encod- ing this protein can lead

  18. Autosomal Recessive Retinitis Pigmentosa and E150K Mutation in the Opsin Gene*S

    E-print Network

    Palczewski, Krzysztof

    Autosomal Recessive Retinitis Pigmentosa and E150K Mutation in the Opsin Gene*S Received group of hered- itary disorders of the retina caused by mutation in genes of the photoreceptor proteins with an autosomal dominant (adRP), autosomal recessive (arRP), or X-linked pattern of inheritance. Although

  19. BN Danforth Opsin primers for bees/wasps (1/6/2005)

    E-print Network

    Danforth, Bryan Nicholas

    (mod) 5'-TTC GAY AGA TAC AAC GTR ATC GTN AAR GG-3' Opsin For4 5'-GAG AAR AAY ATG CGB GAR CAA GC-3.D. Sipes & A. Pearson (2004). Single copy nuclear genes recover Cretaceous age divergences in bees. Syst

  20. Opsin Evolution in Damselfish: Convergence, Reversal, and Parallel Evolution Across Tuning Sites

    E-print Network

    Carleton, Karen L.

    Opsin Evolution in Damselfish: Convergence, Reversal, and Parallel Evolution Across Tuning Sites with the African cichlids, despite an order of magnitude difference in the ages of the two radiations. We also evolutionary reversal. Our findings show that the amino acids at spectral tuning sites are labile evolution

  1. Opsin gene duplication and diversification in the guppy, a model for sexual selection

    E-print Network

    Opsin gene duplication and diversification in the guppy, a model for sexual selection Margarete University, Burnaby, British Columbia V5A 156, Canada Identification of genes that control variation variation in colour perception, by analysing genomic and complementary DNA sequences of genes that code

  2. Supplementary Figure S1. IHC of TG worms expressing (b)opsin in neurons and in muscles. a-g, Representative IHC images of live day 1 TG worms expressing (b)opsin in neurons Alexa-488-

    E-print Network

    Palczewski, Krzysztof

    Supplementary Figure S1. IHC of TG worms expressing (b)opsin in neurons and in muscles. a-g, Representative IHC images of live day 1 TG worms expressing (b)opsin in neurons Alexa-488- conjugated 1D4 mAb was injected into pseudocoelom of a worm head (a-d) or middle body section (e-g) together with Triton X-100

  3. Interspecific Variation in Rx1 Expression Controls Opsin Expression and Causes Visual System Diversity in African Cichlid

    E-print Network

    Carleton, Karen L.

    by photoreceptors that detect light using visual pigments. Visual pigments are composed of an opsin protein, bound sister taxa (Hofmann et al. 2009). In Lake Victoria, differences in cichlid visual pigment sensitivity

  4. Deletion of the X-linked opsin gene array locus control region (LCR) results in disruption of the cone mosaic

    E-print Network

    monochromacy Color vision Cones Opsin Photopigment a b s t r a c t Blue cone monochromacy (BCM) is an X. Introduction Blue cone monochromacy (BCM; MIM303700) is an X-linked condition affecting approximately 1 in 100

  5. Supplemental Information Supp. Fig. 1. Parallel evolution of opsin gene expression in 47 African cichlids fishes from

    E-print Network

    Carleton, Karen L.

    cichlids fishes from Lakes Tanganyika (LT), Malawi (LM) and Victoria (LV), as well as the rivers (R shifts in opsin expression among cichlids in each lake. #12;Neochromis omnicaeruleas Pundamilia nyerei

  6. Transcriptome analysis and RNA interference of cockroach phototransduction indicate three opsins and suggest a major role for TRPL channels

    PubMed Central

    French, Andrew S.; Meisner, Shannon; Liu, Hongxia; Weckström, Matti; Torkkeli, Päivi H.

    2015-01-01

    Our current understanding of insect phototransduction is based on a small number of species, but insects occupy many different visual environments. We created the retinal transcriptome of a nocturnal insect, the cockroach, Periplaneta americana to identify proteins involved in the earliest stages of compound eye phototransduction, and test the hypothesis that different visual environments are reflected in different molecular contributions to function. We assembled five novel mRNAs: two green opsins, one UV opsin, and one each TRP and TRPL ion channel homologs. One green opsin mRNA (pGO1) was 100–1000 times more abundant than the other opsins (pGO2 and pUVO), while pTRPL mRNA was 10 times more abundant than pTRP, estimated by transcriptome analysis or quantitative PCR (qPCR). Electroretinograms were used to record photoreceptor responses. Gene-specific in vivo RNA interference (RNAi) was achieved by injecting long (596–708 bp) double-stranded RNA into head hemolymph, and verified by qPCR. RNAi of the most abundant green opsin reduced both green opsins by more than 97% without affecting UV opsin, and gave a maximal reduction of 75% in ERG amplitude 7 days after injection that persisted for at least 19 days. RNAi of pTRP and pTRPL genes each specifically reduced the corresponding mRNA by 90%. Electroretinogram (ERG) reduction by pTRPL RNAi was slower than for opsin, reaching 75% attenuation by 21 days, without recovery at 29 days. pTRP RNAi attenuated ERG much less; only 30% after 21 days. Combined pTRP plus pTRPL RNAi gave only weak evidence of any cooperative interactions. We conclude that silencing retinal genes by in vivo RNAi using long dsRNA is effective, that visible light transduction in Periplaneta is dominated by pGO1, and that pTRPL plays a major role in cockroach phototransduction. PMID:26257659

  7. Imaging neural spiking in brain tissue using FRET-opsin protein voltage sensors

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Yiyang; Wagner, Mark J.; Li, Jin Zhong; Schnitzer, Mark J.

    2014-01-01

    Genetically encoded fluorescence voltage sensors offer the possibility of directly visualizing neural spiking dynamics in cells targeted by their genetic class or connectivity. Sensors of this class have generally suffered performance-limiting tradeoffs between modest brightness, sluggish kinetics, and limited signaling dynamic range in response to action potentials. Here we describe sensors that use fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) to combine the rapid kinetics and substantial voltage-dependence of rhodopsin family voltage-sensing domains with the brightness of genetically engineered protein fluorophores. These FRET-opsin sensors significantly improve upon the spike detection fidelity offered by the genetically encoded voltage sensor, Arclight, while offering faster kinetics and higher brightness. Using FRET-opsin sensors we imaged neural spiking and sub-threshold membrane voltage dynamics in cultured neurons and in pyramidal cells within neocortical tissue slices. In live mice, rates and optical waveforms of cerebellar Purkinje neurons’ dendritic voltage transients matched expectations for these cells’ dendritic spikes. PMID:24755708

  8. Ancestral duplications and highly dynamic opsin gene evolution in percomorph fishes.

    PubMed

    Cortesi, Fabio; Musilová, Zuzana; Stieb, Sara M; Hart, Nathan S; Siebeck, Ulrike E; Malmstrøm, Martin; Tørresen, Ole K; Jentoft, Sissel; Cheney, Karen L; Marshall, N Justin; Carleton, Karen L; Salzburger, Walter

    2015-02-01

    Single-gene and whole-genome duplications are important evolutionary mechanisms that contribute to biological diversification by launching new genetic raw material. For example, the evolution of animal vision is tightly linked to the expansion of the opsin gene family encoding light-absorbing visual pigments. In teleost fishes, the most species-rich vertebrate group, opsins are particularly diverse and key to the successful colonization of habitats ranging from the bioluminescence-biased but basically dark deep sea to clear mountain streams. In this study, we report a previously unnoticed duplication of the violet-blue short wavelength-sensitive 2 (SWS2) opsin, which coincides with the radiation of highly diverse percomorph fishes, permitting us to reinterpret the evolution of this gene family. The inspection of close to 100 fish genomes revealed that, triggered by frequent gene conversion between duplicates, the evolutionary history of SWS2 is rather complex and difficult to predict. Coincidentally, we also report potential cases of gene resurrection in vertebrate opsins, whereby pseudogenized genes were found to convert with their functional paralogs. We then identify multiple novel amino acid substitutions that are likely to have contributed to the adaptive differentiation between SWS2 copies. Finally, using the dusky dottyback Pseudochromis fuscus, we show that the newly discovered SWS2A duplicates can contribute to visual adaptation in two ways: by gaining sensitivities to different wavelengths of light and by being differentially expressed between ontogenetic stages. Thus, our study highlights the importance of comparative approaches in gaining a comprehensive view of the dynamics underlying gene family evolution and ultimately, animal diversification. PMID:25548152

  9. Inherent instability of the retinitis pigmentosa P23H mutant opsin.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yuanyuan; Jastrzebska, Beata; Cao, Pengxiu; Zhang, Jianye; Wang, Benlian; Sun, Wenyu; Yuan, Yiyuan; Feng, Zhaoyang; Palczewski, Krzysztof

    2014-03-28

    The P23H opsin mutation is the most common cause of autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa. Even though the pathobiology of the resulting retinal degeneration has been characterized in several animal models, its complex molecular mechanism is not well understood. Here, we expressed P23H bovine rod opsin in the nervous system of Caenorhabditis elegans. Expression was low due to enhanced protein degradation. The mutant opsin was glycosylated, but the polysaccharide size differed from that of the normal protein. Although P23H opsin aggregated in the nervous system of C. elegans, the pharmacological chaperone 9-cis-retinal stabilized it during biogenesis, producing a variant of rhodopsin called P23H isorhodopsin. In vitro, P23H isorhodopsin folded correctly, formed the appropriate disulfide bond, could be photoactivated but with reduced sensitivity, and underwent Meta II decay at a rate similar to wild type isorhodopsin. In worm neurons, P23H isorhodopsin initiated phototransduction by coupling with the endogenous Gi/o signaling cascade that induced loss of locomotion. Using pharmacological interventions affecting protein synthesis and degradation, we showed that the chromophore could be incorporated either during or after mutant protein translation. However, regeneration of P23H isorhodopsin with chromophore was significantly slower than that of wild type isorhodopsin. This effect, combined with the inherent instability of P23H rhodopsin, could lead to the structural cellular changes and photoreceptor death found in autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa. These results also suggest that slow regeneration of P23H rhodopsin could prevent endogenous chromophore-mediated stabilization of rhodopsin in the retina. PMID:24515108

  10. Ancestral duplications and highly dynamic opsin gene evolution in percomorph fishes

    PubMed Central

    Cortesi, Fabio; Musilová, Zuzana; Stieb, Sara M.; Hart, Nathan S.; Siebeck, Ulrike E.; Malmstrøm, Martin; Tørresen, Ole K.; Jentoft, Sissel; Cheney, Karen L.; Marshall, N. Justin; Carleton, Karen L.; Salzburger, Walter

    2015-01-01

    Single-gene and whole-genome duplications are important evolutionary mechanisms that contribute to biological diversification by launching new genetic raw material. For example, the evolution of animal vision is tightly linked to the expansion of the opsin gene family encoding light-absorbing visual pigments. In teleost fishes, the most species-rich vertebrate group, opsins are particularly diverse and key to the successful colonization of habitats ranging from the bioluminescence-biased but basically dark deep sea to clear mountain streams. In this study, we report a previously unnoticed duplication of the violet-blue short wavelength-sensitive 2 (SWS2) opsin, which coincides with the radiation of highly diverse percomorph fishes, permitting us to reinterpret the evolution of this gene family. The inspection of close to 100 fish genomes revealed that, triggered by frequent gene conversion between duplicates, the evolutionary history of SWS2 is rather complex and difficult to predict. Coincidentally, we also report potential cases of gene resurrection in vertebrate opsins, whereby pseudogenized genes were found to convert with their functional paralogs. We then identify multiple novel amino acid substitutions that are likely to have contributed to the adaptive differentiation between SWS2 copies. Finally, using the dusky dottyback Pseudochromis fuscus, we show that the newly discovered SWS2A duplicates can contribute to visual adaptation in two ways: by gaining sensitivities to different wavelengths of light and by being differentially expressed between ontogenetic stages. Thus, our study highlights the importance of comparative approaches in gaining a comprehensive view of the dynamics underlying gene family evolution and ultimately, animal diversification. PMID:25548152

  11. Atomistic design of microbial opsin-based blue-shifted optogenetics tools

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Hideaki E.; Kamiya, Motoshi; Sugo, Seiya; Ito, Jumpei; Taniguchi, Reiya; Orito, Ayaka; Hirata, Kunio; Inutsuka, Ayumu; Yamanaka, Akihiro; Maturana, Andrés D.; Ishitani, Ryuichiro; Sudo, Yuki; Hayashi, Shigehiko; Nureki, Osamu

    2015-01-01

    Microbial opsins with a bound chromophore function as photosensitive ion transporters and have been employed in optogenetics for the optical control of neuronal activity. Molecular engineering has been utilized to create colour variants for the functional augmentation of optogenetics tools, but was limited by the complexity of the protein–chromophore interactions. Here we report the development of blue-shifted colour variants by rational design at atomic resolution, achieved through accurate hybrid molecular simulations, electrophysiology and X-ray crystallography. The molecular simulation models and the crystal structure reveal the precisely designed conformational changes of the chromophore induced by combinatory mutations that shrink its ?-conjugated system which, together with electrostatic tuning, produce large blue shifts of the absorption spectra by maximally 100?nm, while maintaining photosensitive ion transport activities. The design principle we elaborate is applicable to other microbial opsins, and clarifies the underlying molecular mechanism of the blue-shifted action spectra of microbial opsins recently isolated from natural sources. PMID:25975962

  12. Differentially-expressed opsin genes identified in Sinocyclocheilus cavefish endemic to China

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Fanwei; Zhao, Yahui; Postlethwait, John H.; Zhang, Chunguang

    2013-01-01

    Eye degeneration is a common troglomorphic character of cave-dwelling organisms. Comparing the morphology and molecular biology of cave species and their close surface relatives is a powerful tool for studying regressive eye evolution and other adaptive phenotypes. We compared two co-occurring and closely-related species of the fish genus Sinocyclocheilus, which is endemic to China and includes both surface- and cave-dwelling species. Sinocyclocheilus tileihornes, a cave species, had smaller eyes than Sinocyclocheilus angustiporus, a surface species. Histological and immunohistochemical analyses revealed that the cavefish had shorter cones and more disorderly rods than did the surface-dwelling species. Using quantitative PCR and in situ hybridization, we found that rhodopsin and a long-wavelength sensitive opsin had significantly lower expression levels in the cavefish. Furthermore, one of two short-wavelength-sensitive opsins was expressed at significantly higher levels in the cavefish. Changes in the expression of opsin genes may have played a role in the degeneration of cavefish eyes PMID:24363664

  13. Evolutionary renovation of L/M opsin polymorphism confers a fruit discrimination advantage to ateline New World monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Yoshifumi; Hiramatsu, Chihiro; Matsushita, Yuka; Ozawa, Norihiro; Ashino, Ryuichi; Nakata, Makiko; Kasagi, Satoshi; Di Fiore, Anthony; Schaffner, Colleen M; Aureli, Filippo; Melin, Amanda D; Kawamura, Shoji

    2014-01-01

    New World monkeys exhibit prominent colour vision variation due to allelic polymorphism of the long-to-middle wavelength (L/M) opsin gene. The known spectral variation of L/M opsins in primates is broadly determined by amino acid composition at three sites: 180, 277 and 285 (the ‘three-sites’ rule). However, two L/M opsin alleles found in the black-handed spider monkeys (Ateles geoffroyi) are known exceptions, presumably due to novel mutations. The spectral separation of the two L/M photopigments is 1.5 times greater than expected based on the ‘three-sites’ rule. Yet the consequence of this for the visual ecology of the species is unknown, as is the evolutionary mechanism by which spectral shift was achieved. In this study, we first examine L/M opsins of two other Atelinae species, the long-haired spider monkeys (A. belzebuth) and the common woolly monkeys (Lagothrix lagotricha). By a series of site-directed mutagenesis, we show that a mutation Y213D (tyrosine to aspartic acid at site 213) in the ancestral opsin of the two alleles enabled N294K, which occurred in one allele of the ateline ancestor and increased the spectral separation between the two alleles. Second, by modelling the chromaticity of dietary fruits and background leaves in a natural habitat of spider monkeys, we demonstrate that chromatic discrimination of fruit from leaves is significantly enhanced by these mutations. This evolutionary renovation of L/M opsin polymorphism in atelines illustrates a previously unappreciated dynamism of opsin genes in shaping primate colour vision. PMID:24612406

  14. Opsins in onychophora (velvet worms) suggest a single origin and subsequent diversification of visual pigments in arthropods.

    PubMed

    Hering, Lars; Henze, Miriam J; Kohler, Martin; Kelber, Almut; Bleidorn, Christoph; Leschke, Maren; Nickel, Birgit; Meyer, Matthias; Kircher, Martin; Sunnucks, Paul; Mayer, Georg

    2012-11-01

    Multiple visual pigments, prerequisites for color vision, are found in arthropods, but the evolutionary origin of their diversity remains obscure. In this study, we explore the opsin genes in five distantly related species of Onychophora, using deep transcriptome sequencing and screening approaches. Surprisingly, our data reveal the presence of only one opsin gene (onychopsin) in each onychophoran species, and our behavioral experiments indicate a maximum sensitivity of onychopsin to blue-green light. In our phylogenetic analyses, the onychopsins represent the sister group to the monophyletic clade of visual r-opsins of arthropods. These results concur with phylogenomic support for the sister-group status of the Onychophora and Arthropoda and provide evidence for monochromatic vision in velvet worms and in the last common ancestor of Onychophora and Arthropoda. We conclude that the diversification of visual pigments and color vision evolved in arthropods, along with the evolution of compound eyes-one of the most sophisticated visual systems known. PMID:22683812

  15. Co-Expression of VAL- and TMT-Opsins Uncovers Ancient Photosensory Interneurons and Motorneurons in the Vertebrate Brain

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Ruth M.; Fontinha, Bruno M.; Kirchmaier, Stephan; Steger, Julia; Bloch, Susanne; Inoue, Daigo; Panda, Satchidananda; Rumpel, Simon; Tessmar-Raible, Kristin

    2013-01-01

    The functional principle of the vertebrate brain is often paralleled to a computer: information collected by dedicated devices is processed and integrated by interneuron circuits and leads to output. However, inter- and motorneurons present in today's vertebrate brains are thought to derive from neurons that combined sensory, integration, and motor function. Consistently, sensory inter­motorneurons have been found in the simple nerve nets of cnidarians, animals at the base of the evolutionary lineage. We show that light-sensory motorneurons and light-sensory interneurons are also present in the brains of vertebrates, challenging the paradigm that information processing and output circuitry in the central brain is shielded from direct environmental influences. We investigated two groups of nonvisual photopigments, VAL- and TMT-Opsins, in zebrafish and medaka fish; two teleost species from distinct habitats separated by over 300 million years of evolution. TMT-Opsin subclasses are specifically expressed not only in hypothalamic and thalamic deep brain photoreceptors, but also in interneurons and motorneurons with no known photoreceptive function, such as the typeXIV interneurons of the fish optic tectum. We further show that TMT-Opsins and Encephalopsin render neuronal cells light-sensitive. TMT-Opsins preferentially respond to blue light relative to rhodopsin, with subclass-specific response kinetics. We discovered that tmt-opsins co-express with val-opsins, known green light receptors, in distinct inter- and motorneurons. Finally, we show by electrophysiological recordings on isolated adult tectal slices that interneurons in the position of typeXIV neurons respond to light. Our work supports “sensory-inter-motorneurons” as ancient units for brain evolution. It also reveals that vertebrate inter- and motorneurons are endowed with an evolutionarily ancient, complex light-sensory ability that could be used to detect changes in ambient light spectra, possibly providing the endogenous equivalent to an optogenetic machinery. PMID:23776409

  16. Inferred L/M cone opsin polymorphism of ancestral tarsiers sheds dim light on the origin of anthropoid primates

    PubMed Central

    Melin, Amanda D.; Matsushita, Yuka; Moritz, Gillian L.; Dominy, Nathaniel J.; Kawamura, Shoji

    2013-01-01

    Tarsiers are small nocturnal primates with a long history of fuelling debate on the origin and evolution of anthropoid primates. Recently, the discovery of M and L opsin genes in two sister species, Tarsius bancanus (Bornean tarsier) and Tarsius syrichta (Philippine tarsier), respectively, was interpreted as evidence of an ancestral long-to-middle (L/M) opsin polymorphism, which, in turn, suggested a diurnal or cathemeral (arrhythmic) activity pattern. This view is compatible with the hypothesis that stem tarsiers were diurnal; however, a reversion to nocturnality during the Middle Eocene, as evidenced by hyper-enlarged orbits, predates the divergence of T. bancanus and T. syrichta in the Late Miocene. Taken together, these findings suggest that some nocturnal tarsiers possessed high-acuity trichromatic vision, a concept that challenges prevailing views on the adaptive origins of the anthropoid visual system. It is, therefore, important to explore the plausibility and antiquity of trichromatic vision in the genus Tarsius. Here, we show that Sulawesi tarsiers (Tarsius tarsier), a phylogenetic out-group of Philippine and Bornean tarsiers, have an L opsin gene that is more similar to the L opsin gene of T. syrichta than to the M opsin gene of T. bancanus in non-synonymous nucleotide sequence. This result suggests that an L/M opsin polymorphism is the ancestral character state of crown tarsiers and raises the possibility that many hallmarks of the anthropoid visual system evolved under dim (mesopic) light conditions. This interpretation challenges the persistent nocturnal–diurnal dichotomy that has long informed debate on the origin of anthropoid primates. PMID:23536597

  17. Metal Mesh Fabrication and Testing for Infrared Astronomy and ISO Science Programs; ISO GO Data Analysis and LWS Instrument Team Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Howard A.; Oliversen, Ronald J. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This research program addresses astrophysics research with the Infrared Space Observatory's Long Wavelength Spectrometer (ISO-LWS), including efforts to supply ISO-LWS with superior metal mesh filters. This grant has, over the years, enabled Dr. Smith in his role as a Co-Investigator on the satellite, the PI (Principal Investigator) on the Extragalactic Science Team, and a member of the Calibration and performance working groups. The emphasis of the budget in this proposal is in support of Dr. Smith's Infrared Space Observatory research. This program began (under a different grant number) while Dr. Smith was at the Smithsonian's National Air and Space Museum, and was transferred to SAO with a change in number. While Dr. Smith was a visiting Discipline Scientist at NASA HQ the program was in abeyance, but it has resumed in full since his return to SAO. The Infrared Space Observatory mission was launched in November, 1996, and since then has successfully completed its planned lifetime mission. Data are currently being calibrated to the 2% level.

  18. Autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa E150K opsin mice exhibit photoreceptor disorganization

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ning; Kolesnikov, Alexander V.; Jastrzebska, Beata; Mustafi, Debarshi; Sawada, Osamu; Maeda, Tadao; Genoud, Christel; Engel, Andreas; Kefalov, Vladimir J.; Palczewski, Krzysztof

    2012-01-01

    The pathophysiology of the E150K mutation in the rod opsin gene associated with autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa (arRP) has yet to be determined. We generated knock-in mice carrying a single nucleotide change in exon 2 of the rod opsin gene resulting in the E150K mutation. This novel mouse model displayed severe retinal degeneration affecting rhodopsin’s stabilization of rod outer segments (ROS). Homozygous E150K (KK) mice exhibited early-onset retinal degeneration, with disorganized ROS structures, autofluorescent deposits in the subretinal space, and aberrant photoreceptor phagocytosis. Heterozygous (EK) mice displayed a delayed-onset milder retinal degeneration. Further, mutant receptors were mislocalized to the inner segments and perinuclear region. Though KK mouse rods displayed markedly decreased phototransduction, biochemical studies of the mutant rhodopsin revealed only minimally affected chromophore binding and G protein activation. Ablation of the chromophore by crossing KK mice with mice lacking the critical visual cycle protein LRAT slowed retinal degeneration, whereas blocking phototransduction by crossing KK mice with GNAT1-deficient mice slightly accelerated this process. This study highlights the importance of proper higher-order organization of rhodopsin in the native tissue and provides information about the signaling properties of this mutant rhodopsin. Additionally, these results suggest that patients heterozygous for the E150K mutation should be periodically reevaluated for delayed-onset retinal degeneration. PMID:23221340

  19. Spatial distribution of opsin-encoding mRNAs in the tiered larval retinas of the sunburst diving beetle Thermonectus marmoratus (Coleoptera: Dytiscidae).

    PubMed

    Maksimovic, Srdjan; Cook, Tiffany A; Buschbeck, Elke K

    2009-12-01

    Larvae of the sunburst diving beetle, Thermonectus marmoratus, have a cluster of six stemmata (E1-6) and one eye patch on each side of the head. Each eye has two retinas: a distal retina that is closer to the lens, and a proximal retina that lies directly underneath. The distal retinas of E1 and E2 are made of a dorsal and a ventral stack of at least twelve photoreceptor layers. Could this arrangement be used to compensate for lens chromatic aberration, with shorter wavelengths detected by the distal layers and longer wavelengths by the proximal layers? To answer this question we molecularly identified opsins and their expression patterns in these eyes. We found three opsin-encoding genes. The distal retinas of all six eyes express long-wavelength opsin (TmLW) mRNA, whereas the proximal retinas express ultraviolet opsin (TmUV I) mRNA. In the proximal retinas of E1 and E2, the TmUV I mRNA is expressed only in the dorsal stack. A second ultraviolet opsin mRNA (TmUV II), is expressed in the proximal retinas of E1 and E2 (both stacks). The finding that longer-wavelength opsins are expressed distally to shorter-wavelength opsins makes it unlikely that this retinal arrangement is used to compensate for lens chromatic aberration. In addition, we also described opsin expression patterns in the medial retina of E1 and in the non-tiered retina of the lensless eye patch. To our knowledge, this is also the first report of multiple UV opsins being expressed in the same stemma. PMID:19915119

  20. A Naturally Occurring Mutation of the Opsin Gene (T4R) in Dogs Affects Glycosylation and Stability of the G

    E-print Network

    Palczewski, Krzysztof

    of Clinical Studies, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania occurring T4R opsin mu- tation in the English mastiff dog leads to a progressive retinal degeneration the largest class of cell-surface receptors (1, 2). They represent the primary mechanism by which cells sense

  1. P23H opsin knock-in mice reveal a novel step in retinal rod disc morphogenesis

    E-print Network

    Palczewski, Krzysztof

    cause of human blinding autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (adRP). A mouse model of ad cause of human auto- somal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (adRP) (15­18% of all adRP cases in the USA) (9P23H opsin knock-in mice reveal a novel step in retinal rod disc morphogenesis Sanae Sakami1

  2. Genomic organization, evolution, and expression of photoprotein and opsin genes in Mnemiopsis leidyi: a new view of ctenophore photocytes

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Calcium-activated photoproteins are luciferase variants found in photocyte cells of bioluminescent jellyfish (Phylum Cnidaria) and comb jellies (Phylum Ctenophora). The complete genomic sequence from the ctenophore Mnemiopsis leidyi, a representative of the earliest branch of animals that emit light, provided an opportunity to examine the genome of an organism that uses this class of luciferase for bioluminescence and to look for genes involved in light reception. To determine when photoprotein genes first arose, we examined the genomic sequence from other early-branching taxa. We combined our genomic survey with gene trees, developmental expression patterns, and functional protein assays of photoproteins and opsins to provide a comprehensive view of light production and light reception in Mnemiopsis. Results The Mnemiopsis genome has 10 full-length photoprotein genes situated within two genomic clusters with high sequence conservation that are maintained due to strong purifying selection and concerted evolution. Photoprotein-like genes were also identified in the genomes of the non-luminescent sponge Amphimedon queenslandica and the non-luminescent cnidarian Nematostella vectensis, and phylogenomic analysis demonstrated that photoprotein genes arose at the base of all animals. Photoprotein gene expression in Mnemiopsis embryos begins during gastrulation in migrating precursors to photocytes and persists throughout development in the canals where photocytes reside. We identified three putative opsin genes in the Mnemiopsis genome and show that they do not group with well-known bilaterian opsin subfamilies. Interestingly, photoprotein transcripts are co-expressed with two of the putative opsins in developing photocytes. Opsin expression is also seen in the apical sensory organ. We present evidence that one opsin functions as a photopigment in vitro, absorbing light at wavelengths that overlap with peak photoprotein light emission, raising the hypothesis that light production and light reception may be functionally connected in ctenophore photocytes. We also present genomic evidence of a complete ciliary phototransduction cascade in Mnemiopsis. Conclusions This study elucidates the genomic organization, evolutionary history, and developmental expression of photoprotein and opsin genes in the ctenophore Mnemiopsis leidyi, introduces a novel dual role for ctenophore photocytes in both bioluminescence and phototransduction, and raises the possibility that light production and light reception are linked in this early-branching non-bilaterian animal. PMID:23259493

  3. Principles for applying optogenetic tools derived from direct comparative analysis of microbial opsins

    PubMed Central

    Mattis, Joanna; Tye, Kay M; Ferenczi, Emily A; Ramakrishnan, Charu; O’Shea, Daniel J; Prakash, Rohit; Gunaydin, Lisa A; Hyun, Minsuk; Fenno, Lief E; Gradinaru, Viviana; Yizhar, Ofer; Deisseroth, Karl

    2014-01-01

    Diverse optogenetic tools have allowed versatile control over neural activity. Many depolarizing and hyperpolarizing tools have now been developed in multiple laboratories and tested across different preparations, presenting opportunities but also making it difficult to draw direct comparisons. This challenge has been compounded by the dependence of performance on parameters such as vector, promoter, expression time, illumination, cell type and many other variables. As a result, it has become increasingly complicated for end users to select the optimal reagents for their experimental needs. For a rapidly growing field, critical figures of merit should be formalized both to establish a framework for further development and so that end users can readily understand how these standardized parameters translate into performance. Here we systematically compared microbial opsins under matched experimental conditions to extract essential principles and identify key parameters for the conduct, design and interpretation of experiments involving optogenetic techniques. PMID:22179551

  4. The Expression of Three Opsin Genes from the Compound Eye of Helicoverpa armigera (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) Is Regulated by a Circadian Clock, Light Conditions and Nutritional Status

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Shuo; Zhu, Jialin; Zhu, Weilong; Zhang, Xinfang; Li, Zhen; Liu, Xiaoxia; Zhang, Qingwen

    2014-01-01

    Visual genes may become inactive in species that inhabit poor light environments, and the function and regulation of opsin components in nocturnal moths are interesting topics. In this study, we cloned the ultraviolet (UV), blue (BL) and long-wavelength-sensitive (LW) opsin genes from the compound eye of the cotton bollworm and then measured their mRNA levels using quantitative real-time PCR. The mRNA levels fluctuated over a daily cycle, which might be an adaptation of a nocturnal lifestyle, and were dependent on a circadian clock. Cycling of opsin mRNA levels was disturbed by constant light or constant darkness, and the UV opsin gene was up-regulated after light exposure. Furthermore, the opsin genes tended to be down-regulated upon starvation. Thus, this study illustrates that opsin gene expression is determined by multiple endogenous and exogenous factors and is adapted to the need for nocturnal vision, suggesting that color vision may play an important role in the sensory ecology of nocturnal moths. PMID:25353953

  5. Evolutionary dynamics of Rh2 opsins in birds demonstrate an episode of accelerated evolution in the New World warblers (Setophaga).

    PubMed

    Bloch, Natasha I; Price, Trevor D; Chang, Belinda S W

    2015-05-01

    Low rates of sequence evolution associated with purifying selection can be interrupted by episodic changes in selective regimes. Visual pigments are a unique system in which we can investigate the functional consequences of genetic changes, therefore connecting genotype to phenotype in the context of natural and sexual selection pressures. We study the RH2 and RH1 visual pigments (opsins) across 22 bird species belonging to two ecologically convergent clades, the New World warblers (Parulidae) and Old World warblers (Phylloscopidae) and evaluate rates of evolution in these clades along with data from 21 additional species. We demonstrate generally slow evolution of these opsins: both Rh1 and Rh2 are highly conserved across Old World and New World warblers. However, Rh2 underwent a burst of evolution within the New World genus Setophaga, where it accumulated substitutions at 6 amino acid sites across the species we studied. Evolutionary analyses revealed a significant increase in dN /dS in Setophaga, implying relatively strong selective pressures to overcome long-standing purifying selection. We studied the effects of each substitution on spectral tuning and found they do not cause large spectral shifts. Thus, substitutions may reflect other aspects of opsin function, such as those affecting photosensitivity and/or dark-light adaptation. Although it is unclear what these alterations mean for colour perception, we suggest that rapid evolution is linked to sexual selection, given the exceptional plumage colour diversification in Setophaga. PMID:25827331

  6. Inhibitory luminopsins: genetically-encoded bioluminescent opsins for versatile, scalable, and hardware-independent optogenetic inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Tung, Jack K.; Gutekunst, Claire-Anne; Gross, Robert E.

    2015-01-01

    Optogenetic techniques provide an unprecedented ability to precisely manipulate neural activity in the context of complex neural circuitry. Although the toolbox of optogenetic probes continues to expand at a rapid pace with more efficient and responsive reagents, hardware-based light delivery is still a major hurdle that limits its practical use in vivo. We have bypassed the challenges of external light delivery by directly coupling a bioluminescent light source (a genetically encoded luciferase) to an inhibitory opsin, which we term an inhibitory luminopsin (iLMO). iLMO was shown to suppress action potential firing and synchronous bursting activity in vitro in response to both external light and luciferase substrate. iLMO was further shown to suppress single-unit firing rate and local field potentials in the hippocampus of anesthetized rats. Finally, expression of iLMO was scaled up to multiple structures of the basal ganglia to modulate rotational behavior of freely moving animals in a hardware-independent fashion. This novel class of optogenetic probes demonstrates how non-invasive inhibition of neural activity can be achieved, which adds to the versatility, scalability, and practicality of optogenetic applications in freely behaving animals. PMID:26399324

  7. Nocturnal light environments influence color vision and signatures of selection on the OPN1SW opsin gene in nocturnal lemurs.

    PubMed

    Veilleux, Carrie C; Louis, Edward E; Bolnick, Deborah A

    2013-06-01

    Although loss of short-wavelength-sensitive (SWS) cones and dichromatic color vision in mammals has traditionally been linked to a nocturnal lifestyle, recent studies have identified variation in selective pressure for the maintenance of the OPN1SW opsin gene (and thus, potentially dichromacy) among nocturnal mammalian lineages. These studies hypothesize that purifying selection to retain SWS cones may be associated with a selective advantage for nocturnal color vision under certain ecological conditions. In this study, we explore the effect of nocturnal light environment on OPN1SW opsin gene evolution in a diverse sample of nocturnal lemurs (106 individuals, 19 species, and 5 genera). Using both phylogenetic and population genetic approaches, we test whether species from closed canopy rainforests, which are impoverished in short-wavelength light, have experienced relaxed selection compared with species from open canopy forests. We identify clear signatures of differential selection on OPN1SW by habitat type. Our results suggest that open canopy species generally experience strong purifying selection to maintain SWS cones. In contrast, closed canopy species experience weaker purifying selection or a relaxation of selection on OPN1SW. We also found evidence of nonfunctional OPN1SW genes in all Phaner species and in Cheirogaleus medius, implying at least three independent losses of SWS cones in cheirogaleids. Our results suggest that the evolution of color vision in nocturnal lemurs has been influenced by nocturnal light environment. PMID:23519316

  8. Possible Involvement of Cone Opsins in Distinct Photoresponses of Intrinsically Photosensitive Dermal Chromatophores in Tilapia Oreochromis niloticus

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shyh-Chi; Robertson, R. Meldrum; Hawryshyn, Craig W.

    2013-01-01

    Dermal specialized pigment cells (chromatophores) are thought to be one type of extraretinal photoreceptors responsible for a wide variety of sensory tasks, including adjusting body coloration. Unlike the well-studied image-forming function in retinal photoreceptors, direct evidence characterizing the mechanism of chromatophore photoresponses is less understood, particularly at the molecular and cellular levels. In the present study, cone opsin expression was detected in tilapia caudal fin where photosensitive chromatophores exist. Single-cell RT-PCR revealed co-existence of different cone opsins within melanophores and erythrophores. By stimulating cells with six wavelengths ranging from 380 to 580 nm, we found melanophores and erythrophores showed distinct photoresponses. After exposed to light, regardless of wavelength presentation, melanophores dispersed and maintained cell shape in an expansion stage by shuttling pigment granules. Conversely, erythrophores aggregated or dispersed pigment granules when exposed to short- or middle/long-wavelength light, respectively. These results suggest that diverse molecular mechanisms and light-detecting strategies may be employed by different types of tilapia chromatophores, which are instrumental in pigment pattern formation. PMID:23940562

  9. High overexpression and purification of optimized bacterio-opsin from Halobacterium Salinarum R1 in E. coli.

    PubMed

    Kahaki, Fatemeh Abarghooi; Babaeipour, Valiollah; Memari, Hamid Rajabi; Mofid, Mohammad Reza

    2014-10-01

    The purple membrane of Halobacterium Salinarum carries out a protein, bacteriorhodopsin (bR), which is a model for structure-function studies of membrane proteins. The heterologous expression of integral membrane proteins (IMPS) is difficult. In this study, we reported the heterologous overexpression of bacterio-opsin (bO) in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3). Bacterio-opsin expression is facilitated by using mistic, a membrane protein from Bacillus subtilis in E. coli BL21 (DE3) membranes. The optimized bO gene was cloned in fusion to the C-terminus of mistic in pET 30a (+) and contains an oct-histidine in C-terminal to facilitate purification. Different medium, temperature, and induction time were used to optimize protein overexpression. The highest expression was obtained from the Terrific Broth (TB) medium at 18 °C with an IPTG concentration of 0.1 mM. The final purified bR was 192?±?1 mg/L which has an important value for the production of membrane proteins in E. coli. PMID:25123363

  10. Technical Report Series # MBS 09-07: Long-Range Polymerase Chain Reaction Method for Detection of Human Red and Green Opsin Gene Polymorphisms

    E-print Network

    White, Douglas R.

    Technical Report Series # MBS 09-07: Long-Range Polymerase Chain Reaction Method for Detection Reaction Analysis for Specifying Photopigment Opsin Gene Polymorphisms," Technical Report Series # MBS 09. This IMBS Technical Report version of the paper is unchanged from the earlier 2002 version. In addition

  11. Ultraviolet and violet receptors express identical mRNA encoding an ultraviolet-absorbing opsin: identification and histological localization of two mRNAs encoding short-wavelength-absorbing opsins in the retina of the butterfly Papilio xuthus.

    PubMed

    Kitamoto, J; Ozaki, K; Arikawa, K

    2000-10-01

    This paper describes the primary structures of two opsins of short-wavelength-absorbing visual pigments deduced from the mRNA sequences in the retina of the Japanese yellow swallowtail butterfly Papilio xuthus. A phylogenetic analysis of the amino acid sequences indicates that one of these visual pigments is of the ultraviolet-absorbing type and that the other is of the blue-absorbing type. We identified the photoreceptor cells that express these mRNAs by histological in situ hybridization. The mRNA of the ultraviolet type is expressed in two distinct photoreceptor types previously identified as ultraviolet and violet receptors, providing the first molecular biological evidence that different types of spectral receptor probably express a visual pigment with an identical amino acid sequence. The mRNA of the blue type is expressed exclusively in cells classified as blue receptors. PMID:10976026

  12. Opsin expression, physiological characterization and identification of photoreceptor cells in the dorsal rim area and main retina of the desert locust, Schistocerca gregaria.

    PubMed

    Schmeling, Fabian; Wakakuwa, Motohiro; Tegtmeier, Jennifer; Kinoshita, Michiyo; Bockhorst, Tobias; Arikawa, Kentaro; Homberg, Uwe

    2014-10-01

    For compass orientation many insects rely on the pattern of sky polarization, but some species also exploit the sky chromatic contrast. Desert locusts, Schistocerca gregaria, detect polarized light through a specialized dorsal rim area (DRA) in their compound eye. To better understand retinal mechanisms underlying visual navigation, we compared opsin expression, spectral and polarization sensitivities and response-stimulus intensity functions in the DRA and main retina of the locust. In addition to previously characterized opsins of long-wavelength-absorbing (Lo1) and blue-absorbing visual pigments (Lo2), we identified an opsin of an ultraviolet-absorbing visual pigment (LoUV). DRA photoreceptors exclusively expressed Lo2, had peak spectral sensitivities at 441 nm and showed high polarization sensitivity (PS 1.3-31.7). In contrast, ommatidia in the main eye co-expressed Lo1 and Lo2 in five photoreceptors, expressed Lo1 in two proximal photoreceptors, and Lo2 or LoUV in one distal photoreceptor. Correspondingly, we found broadband blue- and green-peaking spectral sensitivities in the main eye and one narrowly tuned UV peaking receptor. Polarization sensitivity in the main retina was low (PS 1.3-3.8). V-log I functions in the DRA were steeper than in the main retina, supporting a role in polarization vision. Desert locusts occur as two morphs, a day-active gregarious and a night-active solitarious form. In solitarious locusts, sensitivities in the main retina were generally shifted to longer wavelengths, particularly in ventral eye regions, supporting a nocturnal lifestyle at low light levels. The data support the role of the DRA in polarization vision and suggest trichromatic colour vision in the desert locust. PMID:25104757

  13. Temporal Resolution of ChR2 and Chronos in an Optogenetic-based Auditory Brainstem Implant Model: Implications for the Development and Application of Auditory Opsins

    PubMed Central

    Hight, A. E.; Kozin, Elliott D.; Darrow, Keith; Lehmann, Ashton; Boyden, Edward; Brown, M. Christian; Lee, Daniel J.

    2015-01-01

    The contemporary auditory brainstem implant (ABI) performance is limited by reliance on electrical stimulation with its accompanying channel cross talk and current spread to non-auditory neurons. A new generation ABI based on optogenetic-technology may ameliorate limitations fundamental to electrical neurostimulation. The most widely studied opsin is channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2); however, its relatively slow kinetic properties may prevent the encoding of auditory information at high stimulation rates. In the present study, we compare the temporal resolution of light-evoked responses of a recently developed fast opsin, Chronos, to ChR2 in a murine ABI model. Viral mediated gene transfer via a posterolateral craniotomy was used to express Chronos or ChR2 in the mouse nucleus (CN). Following a four to six week incubation period, blue light (473 nm) was delivered via an optical fiber placed directly on the surface of the infected CN, and neural activity was recorded in the contralateral inferior colliculus (IC). Both ChR2 and Chronos evoked sustained responses to all stimuli, even at high driven rates. In addition, optical stimulation evoked excitatory responses throughout the tonotopic axis of the IC. Synchrony of the light-evoked response to stimulus rates of 14–448 pulses/s was higher in Chronos compared to ChR2 mice (p<0.05 at 56, 168, and 224 pulses/s). Our results demonstrate that Chronos has the ability to drive the auditory system at higher stimulation rates than ChR2 and may be a more ideal opsin for manipulation of auditory pathways in future optogenetic-based neuroprostheses. PMID:25598479

  14. Gene duplication and spectral diversification of cone visual pigments of zebrafish.

    PubMed Central

    Chinen, Akito; Hamaoka, Takanori; Yamada, Yukihiro; Kawamura, Shoji

    2003-01-01

    Zebrafish is becoming a powerful animal model for the study of vision but the genomic organization and variation of its visual opsins have not been fully characterized. We show here that zebrafish has two red (LWS-1 and LWS-2), four green (RH2-1, RH2-2, RH2-3, and RH2-4), and single blue (SWS2) and ultraviolet (SWS1) opsin genes in the genome, among which LWS-2, RH2-2, and RH2-3 are novel. SWS2, LWS-1, and LWS-2 are located in tandem and RH2-1, RH2-2, RH2-3, and RH2-4 form another tandem gene cluster. The peak absorption spectra (lambdamax) of the reconstituted photopigments from the opsin cDNAs differed markedly among them: 558 nm (LWS-1), 548 nm (LWS-2), 467 nm (RH2-1), 476 nm (RH2-2), 488 nm (RH2-3), 505 nm (RH2-4), 355 nm (SWS1), 416 nm (SWS2), and 501 nm (RH1, rod opsin). The quantitative RT-PCR revealed a considerable difference among the opsin genes in the expression level in the retina. The expression of the two red opsin genes and of three green opsin genes, RH2-1, RH2-3, and RH2-4, is significantly lower than that of RH2-2, SWS1, and SWS2. These findings must contribute to our comprehensive understanding of visual capabilities of zebrafish and the evolution of the fish visual system and should become a basis of further studies on expression and developmental regulation of the opsin genes. PMID:12618404

  15. Gravitational-wave sensitivity curves

    E-print Network

    Moore, C. J.; Cole, R. H.; Berry, C. P. L.

    2014-12-08

    resonances in the suspension system and electrical noise at multiples of 60 Hz: these have been removed in the appendix figures for clarity. The detectors fall broadly into three categories: first-generation detectors, which have already operated; second... and the stiffness of the crust, which are currently uncertain (Chamel and Haensel 2008, Lattimer 2012). Deformations can also be supported by internal magnetic fields (Haskell et al 2008). Several known pulsars could be sources for the advanced detectors and upper...

  16. Gravitational-wave sensitivity curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, C. J.; Cole, R. H.; Berry, C. P. L.

    2015-01-01

    There are several common conventions in use by the gravitational-wave community to describe the amplitude of sources and the sensitivity of detectors. These are frequently confused. We outline the merits of and differences between the various quantities used for parameterizing noise curves and characterizing gravitational-wave amplitudes. We conclude by producing plots that consistently compare different detectors. Similar figures can be generated on-line for general use at http://rhcole.com/apps/GWplotter.

  17. Gravitational-wave sensitivity curves

    E-print Network

    Christopher J. Moore; Robert H. Cole; Christopher P. L. Berry

    2014-12-11

    There are several common conventions in use by the gravitational-wave community to describe the amplitude of sources and the sensitivity of detectors. These are frequently confused. We outline the merits of and differences between the various quantities used for parameterizing noise curves and characterizing gravitational-wave amplitudes. We conclude by producing plots that consistently compare different detectors. Similar figures can be generated on-line for general use at \\url{http://rhcole.com/apps/GWplotter}.

  18. Supplementary Figure S1. Light-associated motor responses of worms expressing (b)opsin in neurons. a, Vigorously crawling TG animals pre-incubated with 10 M 9-cis-retinal and expressing

    E-print Network

    Palczewski, Krzysztof

    Supplementary Figure S1. Light-associated motor responses of worms expressing (b)opsin in neurons responses to light were recorded and scored. Data represent three independent experiments with 3- 10 worms) of these animals are shown. Data represent three independent experiments with 3-5 worms each. Error bars indicate S

  19. Spectral shifts of mammalian ultraviolet-sensitive pigments (short wavelength-sensitive opsin 1) are associated with eye length and photic niche evolution.

    PubMed

    Emerling, Christopher A; Huynh, Hieu T; Nguyen, Minh A; Meredith, Robert W; Springer, Mark S

    2015-11-22

    Retinal opsin photopigments initiate mammalian vision when stimulated by light. Most mammals possess a short wavelength-sensitive opsin 1 (SWS1) pigment that is primarily sensitive to either ultraviolet or violet light, leading to variation in colour perception across species. Despite knowledge of both ultraviolet- and violet-sensitive SWS1 classes in mammals for 25 years, the adaptive significance of this variation has not been subjected to hypothesis testing, resulting in minimal understanding of the basis for mammalian SWS1 spectral tuning evolution. Here, we gathered data on SWS1 for 403 mammal species, including novel SWS1 sequences for 97 species. Ancestral sequence reconstructions suggest that the most recent common ancestor of Theria possessed an ultraviolet SWS1 pigment, and that violet-sensitive pigments evolved at least 12 times in mammalian history. We also observed that ultraviolet pigments, previously considered to be a rarity, are common in mammals. We then used phylogenetic comparative methods to test the hypotheses that the evolution of violet-sensitive SWS1 is associated with increased light exposure, extended longevity and longer eye length. We discovered that diurnal mammals and species with longer eyes are more likely to have violet-sensitive pigments and less likely to possess UV-sensitive pigments. We hypothesize that (i) as mammals evolved larger body sizes, they evolved longer eyes, which limited transmittance of ultraviolet light to the retina due to an increase in Rayleigh scattering, and (ii) as mammals began to invade diurnal temporal niches, they evolved lenses with low UV transmittance to reduce chromatic aberration and/or photo-oxidative damage. PMID:26582021

  20. Multiple Genetic Mechanisms Contribute to Visual Sensitivity Variation in the Labridae.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Genevieve A C; Carleton, Karen L; Marshall, N Justin

    2016-01-01

    Coral reefs are one of the most spectrally diverse environments, both in terms of habitat and animal color. Species identity, sex, and camouflage are drivers of the phenotypic diversity seen in coral reef fishes, but how the phenotypic diversity is reflected in the genotype remains to be answered. The labrids are a large, polyphyletic family of coral reef fishes that display a diverse range of colors, including developmental color morphs and extensive behavioral ecologies. Here, we assess the opsin sequence and expression diversity among labrids from the Great Barrier Reef, Australia. We found that labrids express a diverse palette of visual opsins, with gene duplications in both RH2 and LWS genes. The majority of opsins expressed were within the mid-to-long wavelength sensitive classes (RH2 and LWS). Three of the labrid species expressed SWS1 (ultra-violet sensitive) opsins with the majority expressing the violet-sensitive SWS2B gene and none expressing SWS2A. We used knowledge about spectral tuning sites to calculate approximate spectral sensitivities (?max) for individual species' visual pigments, which corresponded well with previously published ?max values for closely related species (SWS1: 356-370 nm; SWS2B: 421-451 nm; RH2B: 452-492 nm; RH2A: 516-528 nm; LWS1: 554-555 nm; LWS2: 561-562 nm). In contrast to the phenotypic diversity displayed via color patterns and feeding ecology, there was little amino acid diversity within the known opsin sequence tuning sites. However, gene duplications and differential expression provide alternative mechanisms for tuning visual pigments, resulting in variable visual sensitivities among labrid species. PMID:26464127

  1. ISO Guest Observer Data Analysis and LWS Instrument Team Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Howard

    2002-01-01

    This project was granted a no-cost extension prompted by the request of the major subcontractor, the Naval Research Laboratory, which had not yet completed its tasks. As of July 2002, they had made substantial progress. They have successfully fabricated a metal mesh grid on polyimide, and also successfully fabricated a 2-layer metal mesh infrared filter using stacks of these metal mesh grids on polyimide; the actual layering was done at SAO. Both warm and cold spectroscopic tests were done on these fabricated devices. The measurements were in good agreement with the theory, and also reasonable performance in absolute terms. NRL is now working on fabricating a 3-layer metal mesh infrared filter, and a prototype is expected in the next month. Testing should occur before the end of the fiscal year. Finally, NRL has preliminarily agreed to hire a new postdoctoral person to refine the modeling of the filters based on the new measurements. The person should arrive this fall. NRL has a new Fourier Transform Spectrometer which will be delivered in the next month, and which will be used to facilitate the testing which has up to now been done in collaboration with NASA Goddard Space Flight Space Center.

  2. ISO Guest Observer Data Analysis and LWS Instrument Team Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Howard

    2001-01-01

    The following is an interim annual report. Dr. Smith is currently on an extended TDY to the Istituto di Fisica dello Spazio Interplanetario (IFSI) at the Consilio Nazionale delle Richerche (CNR) in Rome, Italy, where he has been working on a related NASA grant in support of analysis of Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) data on star formation in Ultra Luminous Infrared Galaxies and our galaxy. Work emphasizes development of metal mesh grids for use in spacecraft, and the design and fabrication of test elements by the Naval Research Laboratory, Washington D.C. Work has progressed well, but slowly, on that program due to the departure of a key engineer. NASA has been advised of the delay, and granted a no-cost extension, whereby SAO has authorized a delay in the final report from NRL. Nevertheless NRL has continued to make progress. Two papers have been submitted to refereed journals related to this program, and a new design for mesh operating in the 20-40 micron region has been developed. Meetings continue through the summer on these items. A new technical scientist has been made a job offer and hopefully will be on board NRL shortly, although most of the present grant work is already completed. A more complete report, with copies of the submitted papers, designs, and other measures of progress, will be submitted to NASA in September when Dr. Smith returns from his current TDY.

  3. Extending the LWS Data Environment: Distributed Data Processing and Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Narock, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    The final stages of this work saw changes to the original framework, as well as the completion and integration of several data processing services. Initially, it was thought that a peer-to-peer architecture was necessary to make this work possible. The peer-to-peer architecture provided many benefits including the dynamic discovery of new services that would be continually added. A prototype example was built and while it showed promise, a major disadvantage was seen in that it was not easily integrated into the existing data environment. While the peer-to-peer system worked well for finding and accessing distributed data processing services, it was found that its use was limited by the difficulty in calling it from existing tools and services. After collaborations with members of the data community, it was determined that our data processing system was of high value and that a new interface should be pursued in order for the community to take full advantage of it. As such; the framework was modified from a peer-to-peer architecture to a more traditional web service approach. Following this change multiple data processing services were added. These services include such things as coordinate transformations and sub setting of data. Observatory (VHO), assisted with integrating the new architecture into the VHO. This allows anyone using the VHO to search for data, to then pass that data through our processing services prior to downloading it. As a second attempt at demonstrating the new system, a collaboration was established with the Collaborative Sun Earth Connector (CoSEC) group at Lockheed Martin. This group is working on a graphical user interface to the Virtual Observatories and data processing software. The intent is to provide a high-level easy-to-use graphical interface that will allow access to the existing Virtual Observatories and data processing services from one convenient application. Working with the CoSEC group we provided access to our data processing tools from within their software. This now allows the CoSEC community to take advantage of our services and also demonstrates another means of accessing our system.

  4. Visual system evolution and the nature of the ancestral snake.

    PubMed

    Simões, B F; Sampaio, F L; Jared, C; Antoniazzi, M M; Loew, E R; Bowmaker, J K; Rodriguez, A; Hart, N S; Hunt, D M; Partridge, J C; Gower, D J

    2015-07-01

    The dominant hypothesis for the evolutionary origin of snakes from 'lizards' (non-snake squamates) is that stem snakes acquired many snake features while passing through a profound burrowing (fossorial) phase. To investigate this, we examined the visual pigments and their encoding opsin genes in a range of squamate reptiles, focusing on fossorial lizards and snakes. We sequenced opsin transcripts isolated from retinal cDNA and used microspectrophotometry to measure directly the spectral absorbance of the photoreceptor visual pigments in a subset of samples. In snakes, but not lizards, dedicated fossoriality (as in Scolecophidia and the alethinophidian Anilius scytale) corresponds with loss of all visual opsins other than RH1 (?max 490-497 nm); all other snakes (including less dedicated burrowers) also have functional sws1 and lws opsin genes. In contrast, the retinas of all lizards sampled, even highly fossorial amphisbaenians with reduced eyes, express functional lws, sws1, sws2 and rh1 genes, and most also express rh2 (i.e. they express all five of the visual opsin genes present in the ancestral vertebrate). Our evidence of visual pigment complements suggests that the visual system of stem snakes was partly reduced, with two (RH2 and SWS2) of the ancestral vertebrate visual pigments being eliminated, but that this did not extend to the extreme additional loss of SWS1 and LWS that subsequently occurred (probably independently) in highly fossorial extant scolecophidians and A. scytale. We therefore consider it unlikely that the ancestral snake was as fossorial as extant scolecophidians, whether or not the latter are para- or monophyletic. PMID:26012745

  5. Cone visual pigments of monotremes: filling the phylogenetic gap.

    PubMed

    Wakefield, Matthew J; Anderson, Mark; Chang, Ellen; Wei, Ke-Jun; Kaul, Rajinder; Graves, Jennifer A Marshall; Grützner, Frank; Deeb, Samir S

    2008-01-01

    We have determined the sequence and genomic organization of the genes encoding the cone visual pigment of the platypus (Ornithorhynchus anatinus) and the echidna (Tachyglossus aculeatus), and inferred their spectral properties and evolutionary pathways. We prepared platypus and echidna retinal RNA and used primers of the middle-wave-sensitive (MWS), long-wave-sensitive (LWS), and short-wave sensitive (SWS1) pigments corresponding to coding sequences that are highly conserved among mammals; to PCR amplify the corresponding pigment sequences. Amplification from the retinal RNA revealed the expression of LWS pigment mRNA that is homologous in sequence and spectral properties to the primate LWS visual pigments. However, we were unable to amplify the mammalian SWS1 pigment from these two species, indicating this gene was lost prior to the echidna-platypus divergence (21 MYA). Subsequently, when the platypus genome sequence became available, we found an LWS pigment gene in a conserved genomic arrangement that resembles the primate pigment, but, surprisingly we found an adjacent (20 kb) SWS2 pigment gene within this conserved genomic arrangement. We obtained the same result after sequencing the echidna genes. The encoded SWS2 pigment is predicted to have a wavelength of maximal absorption of about 440 nm, and is paralogous to SWS pigments typically found in reptiles, birds, and fish but not in mammals. This study suggests the locus control region (LCR) has played an important role in the conservation of photo receptor gene arrays and the control of their spatial and temporal expression in the retina in all mammals. In conclusion, a duplication event of an ancestral cone visual pigment gene, followed by sequence divergence and selection gave rise to the LWS and SWS2 visual pigments. So far, the echidna and platypus are the only mammals that share the gene structure of the LWS-SWS2 pigment gene complex with reptiles, birds and fishes. PMID:18598396

  6. Cone visual pigments in two species of South American marsupials.

    PubMed

    Hunt, David M; Chan, Jaclyn; Carvalho, Livia S; Hokoc, Jan N; Ferguson, Margo C; Arrese, Catherine A; Beazley, Lyn D

    2009-03-15

    Marsupials are largely confined to Australasia and to Central and South America. The visual pigments that underlie the photosensitivity of the retina have been examined in a number of species from the former group where evidence for trichromatic colour vision has been found, but none from the latter. In this paper, we report the cone opsin sequences from two nocturnal South American marsupial species, the gray short-tailed opossum, Monodelphis domestica, and the big-eared opossum, Didelphis aurita. Both are members of the Order Didelphimorphia (American opossums). For both species, only two classes of cone opsin were found, an SWS1 and an LWS sequence, and in vitro expression showed that the peak sensitivity of the SWS1 pigment is in the UV. Analysis of the Monodelphis genome confirms the absence of other classes of cone visual pigment genes. The SWS1 and LWS genes with 4 and 5 introns respectively, show the same exon-intron structure as found for these genes in all other vertebrates. The SWS1 gene shows a conserved synteny with flanking genes. The LWS gene is X-linked, as in all therian mammals so far examined, with a locus control region 1.54 kb upstream. PMID:19133321

  7. Beauty in the eyes of the beholders: colour vision is tuned to mate preference in the Trinidadian guppy (Poecilia reticulata).

    PubMed

    Sandkam, Benjamin; Young, C Megan; Breden, Felix

    2015-02-01

    A broad range of animals use visual signals to assess potential mates, and the theory of sensory exploitation suggests variation in visual systems drives mate preference variation due to sensory bias. Trinidadian guppies (Poecilia reticulata), a classic system for studies of the evolution of female mate choice, provide a unique opportunity to test this theory by looking for covariation in visual tuning, light environment and mate preferences. Female preference co-evolves with male coloration, such that guppy females from 'low-predation' environments have stronger preferences for males with more orange/red coloration than do females from 'high-predation' environments. Here, we show that colour vision also varies across populations, with 'low'-predation guppies investing more of their colour vision to detect red/orange coloration. In independently colonized watersheds, guppies expressed higher levels of both LWS-1 and LWS-3 (the most abundant LWS opsins) in 'low-predation' populations than 'high-predation' populations at a time that corresponds to differences in cone cell abundance. We also observed that the frequency of a coding polymorphism differed between high- and low-predation populations. Together, this shows that the variation underlying preference could be explained by simple changes in expression and coding of opsins, providing important candidate genes to investigate the genetic basis of female preference variation in this model system. PMID:25556876

  8. WITHERS -NASA LWS TR&T 2007 -PAGE 1 OF 33 Table of Contents

    E-print Network

    Withers, Paul

    : Extreme Space Weather Events in the Solar System. Solar flares increase plasma densities in the bottomside - Introduction 2 - Mars Ionospheric Observations During Solar Flares 3 - GPS Range Errors 4 - D Region Absorption 5 - Boston University Mars Ionosphere Model 5.1 - Neutral Atmosphere 5.2 - Solar Irradiances 5

  9. The LWS Geospace Storm Investigations Exploring the Extremes of Space Weather

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The Geospace mission of the Living With a Star program is a family of investigations focusing on the compelling science questions that advance our ability to specify, understand, and predict the societal impact of solar variance. Two key areas have been identified as combining both importance to society and potential for scientific progress: 1) characterization and understanding of the acceleration, global distribution, and variability of energetic electrons and ions in the inner magnetosphere, and 2) characterization and understanding of the ionosphere and irregularities that affect communications, navigation and radar systems. Under these broad categories specific science questions have emerged as the priority science objectives for the first Geospace Investigations: How and why do relativistic electrons in the outer zone and slot region vary during geomagnetic storms? How does the long- and short-term variability of the Sun affect the global-scale behavior of the ionospheric electron density and irregularities, especially during magnetic storms and at mid-latitudes? The first Geospace mission will attempt to answer these questions.

  10. Bridging particle and wave sensitivity in a detector of configurable positive operator-valued measures

    E-print Network

    Graciana Puentes; Jeff S. Lundeen; Matthijs P. A. Branderhorst; Hendrik B. Coldenstrodt-Ronge; Brian J. Smith; Ian A. Walmsley

    2009-02-09

    We report an optical detector with tunable positive operator-valued measures (POVMs). The device is based on a combination of weak-field homodyne techniques and photon-number-resolving detection. The resulting POVMs can be continuously tuned from Fock-state projectors to a variety of phase-dependent quantum-state measurements by adjusting different system parameters such as local oscillator coupling, amplitude and phase, allowing thus not only detection but also preparation of exotic quantum states. Experimental tomographic reconstructions of classical benchmark states are presented as a demonstration of the detector capabilities.

  11. Modelling rock-avalanche induced impact waves: Sensitivity of the model chains to model parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaub, Yvonne; Huggel, Christian

    2014-05-01

    New lakes are forming in high-mountain areas all over the world due to glacier recession. Often they will be located below steep, destabilized flanks and are therefore exposed to impacts from rock-/ice-avalanches. Several events worldwide are known, where an outburst flood has been triggered by such an impact. In regions such as in the European Alps or in the Cordillera Blanca in Peru, where valley bottoms are densely populated, these far-travelling, high-magnitude events can result in major disasters. Usually natural hazards are assessed as single hazardous processes, for the above mentioned reasons, however, development of assessment and reproduction methods of the hazardous process chain for the purpose of hazard map generation have to be brought forward. A combination of physical process models have already been suggested and illustrated by means of lake outburst in the Cordillera Blanca, Peru, where on April 11th 2010 an ice-avalanche of approx. 300'000m3 triggered an impact wave, which overtopped the 22m freeboard of the rock-dam for 5 meters and caused and outburst flood which travelled 23 km to the city of Carhuaz. We here present a study, where we assessed the sensitivity of the model chain from ice-avalanche and impact wave to single parameters considering rock-/ice-avalanche modeling by RAMMS and impact wave modeling by IBER. Assumptions on the initial rock-/ice-avalanche volume, calibration of the friction parameters in RAMMS and assumptions on erosion considered in RAMMS were parameters tested regarding their influence on overtopping parameters that are crucial for outburst flood modeling. Further the transformation of the RAMMS-output (flow height and flow velocities on the shoreline of the lake) into an inflow-hydrograph for IBER was also considered a possible source of uncertainties. Overtopping time, volume, and wave height as much as mean and maximum discharge were considered decisive parameters for the outburst flood modeling and were therewith assumed dependent values. The resulting 54 runs were evaluated by an ANOVA-analysis for each dependent variable. Results show, that the model chain is able to correctly reproduce the 5m-overtopping wave. Further the dependency from the input parameters could be assessed for every dependent variable. It was e.g. shown, that RAMMS-calibration has the strongest influence on all variations, it is more crucial then the uncertainties introduced by assumptions on the initial rock-avalanche volume. The study shows, that from a hazard-assessment point of view, combinations of model chains are acceptable and permissible.

  12. Developmental plasticity in vision and behavior may help guppies overcome increased turbidity.

    PubMed

    Ehlman, Sean M; Sandkam, Benjamin A; Breden, Felix; Sih, Andrew

    2015-12-01

    Increasing turbidity in streams and rivers near human activity is cause for environmental concern, as the ability of aquatic organisms to use visual information declines. To investigate how some organisms might be able to developmentally compensate for increasing turbidity, we reared guppies (Poecilia reticulata) in either clear or turbid water. We assessed the effects of developmental treatments on adult behavior and aspects of the visual system by testing fish from both developmental treatments in turbid and clear water. We found a strong interactive effect of rearing and assay conditions: fish reared in clear water tended to decrease activity in turbid water, whereas fish reared in turbid water tended to increase activity in turbid water. Guppies from all treatments decreased activity when exposed to a predator. To measure plasticity in the visual system, we quantified treatment differences in opsin gene expression of individuals. We detected a shift from mid-wave-sensitive opsins to long wave-sensitive opsins for guppies reared in turbid water. Since long-wavelength sensitivity is important in motion detection, this shift likely allows guppies to salvage motion-detecting abilities when visual information is obscured in turbid water. Our results demonstrate the importance of developmental plasticity in responses of organisms to rapidly changing environments. PMID:26427995

  13. Finite-frequency Sn-wave sensitivity kernels for the M6.0 Wells, Nevada earthquake and USArray stations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lodewyk, J. A.; Zhao, L.; Van der Lee, S.

    2011-12-01

    Head waves contain important information about lithospheric structure. Studies have shown that sensitivity kernels of head waves can be incorporated into tomography studies to improve resolution of vertical velocity gradients. However Sn waves have not yet been used in a finite frequency approach. We aim to incorporate finite-frequency Sn sensitivity kernels into a tomographic inversion for North American upper mantle structure, in order to better resolve lithospheric mantle structure. In this study, sensitivity kernels of head waves were calculated using the strain Green tensor (SGT) approach of Zhao et al, 2006 which improves computational efficiency. This study utilized the M6.0 Wells,Nevada earthquake that occurred at 14:16:10 on February 21, 2008 in the midst of a Transportable Array deployment. The seismogram signals were filtered to isolate the Sn wave using a two-pole Butterworth filter with corner frequencies at .02 and .25 Hz. The SGTs were calculated for Transportable Array stations using both a 1D model, MC35, and the 3D S-velocity and Moho-depth model NA04 crustal model(Van der Lee and Frederiksen, 2005). The sensitivity kernels for Sn waves show that, similar to those for Pn waves, Sn waves are influenced by the velocity structure surrounding the ray path but are also weakly influenced by the structure along the ray path. We present finite-frequency Sn sensitivity kernels for 1D and 3D reference models and examine the effect of 3D heterogeneity on finite-frequency kernels. We also estimate traveltime perturbations using these kernels and compare them with observed Sn arrival times.

  14. Of Mice, Men, and Microbial Opsins: How Optogenetics Can Help Hone Mouse Models of Mental Illness.

    PubMed

    Marton, Tobias F; Sohal, Vikaas S

    2016-01-01

    Genetic, pharmacologic, and behavioral manipulations have long been powerful tools for generating rodent models to study the neural substrates underlying psychiatric disease. Recent advances in the use of optogenetics in awake behaving rodents has added an additional valuable methodology to this experimental toolkit. Here, we review several recent studies that leverage optogenetic technologies to elucidate neural mechanisms possibly related to depression, anxiety, and obsessive-compulsive disorder. We use a few illustrative examples to highlight key emergent principles about how optogenetics, in conjunction with more established modalities, can help to organize our understanding of how disease-related states, specific neuronal circuits, and various behavioral assays fit into hierarchical frameworks such as the National Institute of Mental Health Research Domain Criteria matrix. PMID:25981174

  15. Gene conversion between red and defective green opsin gene in blue cone monochromacy

    SciTech Connect

    Reyniers, E.; Van Thienen, M.N.; De Boulle, K.; Willems, P.J.

    1995-09-20

    Blue cone monochromacy is an X-linked condition in which the function of both the red pigment gene (RCP) and the green pigment gene (GCP) is impaired. Blue cone monochromacy can be due to a red/green gene array rearrangement existing of a single red/green hybrid gene and an inactivating C203R point mutation in both RCP and GCP. The flanking sequences of the C230R mutation in exon 4 of RCP were characteristic for GCP, indicating that this mutation was transferred from GCP into RCP by gene conversion. 23 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Cone photoreceptor mosaic disruption associated with Cys203Arg mutation in the M-cone opsin

    E-print Network

    Foster, David H.

    of the pigment, causing severe, early onset retinitis pigmentosa. While the C203R mutation has been associated of these mutations has been associated with either retinitis pigmentosa (RP) or congenital stationary night blindness that cause retinitis pigmentosa would affect the viability of the cones. The most common missense mutation

  17. Optical control of neuronal excitation and inhibition using a single opsin protein, ChR2

    E-print Network

    Liske, Holly

    The effect of electrical stimulation on neuronal membrane potential is frequency dependent. Low frequency electrical stimulation can evoke action potentials, whereas high frequency stimulation can inhibit action potential ...

  18. The Major Opsin in Bees (Insecta: Hymenoptera): A Promising Nuclear Gene for Higher Level Phylogenetics

    E-print Network

    Danforth, Bryan Nicholas

    of Biological Sciences, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, Arkansas 72701 Received July 9, 1998; revised of the four tribes, which are well established from previous studies of morphology and DNA. Trees estimated in studies of other genes (28S, 16S, and cytochrome b). All of the tribal clades as well as relationships

  19. Phylogenetic Utility of the Major Opsin in Bees (Hymenoptera: Apoidea): A Reassessment

    E-print Network

    Danforth, Bryan Nicholas

    for recovering Mesozoic divergences in insects are few. LW Rh is a member of a multigene family encoding visual and references therein). These are the Euglossini (orchid bees, 175 known species, five gen- era), Bombini, numerous genera). The corbiculate bee tribes are thought to be of Mesozoic age because a fossil meliponine

  20. Evolutionary dynamics of Rh2 opsins in birds demonstrate an episode of accelerated evolution in the

    E-print Network

    Chang, Belinda

    substitutions after otherwise slow rates of evolution (Wallis 1996, 2001). In most cases, evolutionary rates@uchicago.edu and Belinda S. W. Chang, Fax: (1) 416 978 8532; E-mail: belinda.chang@utoronto.ca © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd

  1. Informational lesions: optical perturbation of spike timing and neural synchrony via microbial opsin gene fusions

    E-print Network

    Han, Xue

    Synchronous neural activity occurs throughout the brain in association with normal and pathological brain functions. Despite theoretical work exploring how such neural coordination might facilitate neural computation and ...

  2. Possible Involvement of Cone Opsins in Distinct Photoresponses of Intrinsically Photosensitive Dermal

    E-print Network

    Robertson, Meldrum

    for Neuroscience Studies, Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada Abstract Dermal specialized pigment cells expression was detected in tilapia caudal fin where photosensitive chromatophores exist. Single-cell RT and maintained cell shape in an expansion stage by shuttling pigment granules. Conversely, erythrophores

  3. The relationship between lens transmission and opsin gene expression in cichlids from Lake Malawi

    E-print Network

    Carleton, Karen L.

    a c t The lens plays an important role in regulating the wavelengths of light that reach the retina begins when a photon passes through ocular media and is absorbed by a photoreceptor. Thus, ocular media considerable variation in lens transmission among fishes (Thorpe, Douglas, & Truscott, 1993). For example

  4. Evolution of the vertebrate eye: opsins, photoreceptors, retina and eye cup

    PubMed Central

    Lamb, Trevor D.; Collin, Shaun P.; Pugh, Edward N.

    2011-01-01

    Charles Darwin appreciated the conceptual difficulty in accepting that an organ as wonderful as the vertebrate eye could have evolved through natural selection. He reasoned that if appropriate gradations could be found that were useful to the animal and were inherited, then the apparent difficulty would be overcome. Here, we review a wide range of findings that capture glimpses of the gradations that appear to have occurred during eye evolution, and provide a scenario for the unseen steps that have led to the emergence of the vertebrate eye. PMID:18026166

  5. Adaptive Molecular Evolution in the Opsin Genes of Rapidly Speciating Cichlid Species

    E-print Network

    in the rods of freshwater teleosts. Among the cot- toids of Lake Baikal, the world's deepest lake, rhodopsin in cone spectral sensitivity associated with disparities in photic environment. Both deep-dwelling Lake Baikal cottoids and coelacanths show a marked shortwave shift in cone spectral sensitivities (Bowmaker et

  6. Phenotypic plasticity in opsin expression in a butterfly compound eye complements sex role reversal

    E-print Network

    Everett, Andrew; Tong, Xiaoling; Briscoe, Adriana D; Monteiro, Antónia

    2012-01-01

    we measured eye size, facet lens size, and sensitivity toor visual sensitivity, we measured eyes, ommatidia number,eye size (via changes in the number or dimensions of the ommatidia) or in visual sensitivity (

  7. Early Duplication and Functional Diversification of the Opsin Gene Family in Insects

    E-print Network

    differences between the two genes. Introduction Insect compound eyes contain light-sensitive recep- tors in which phototransduction takes place. The light- sensitive part of the receptor is the visual pigment 11-cis retinal is most sensitive to light of about 380 nm (Han et al. 1998), but its absorption

  8. Temperature profile analysis for Amargosa Valley wells LWS-A, ASH-B, and MSH-C. DOE UGTA RI/FS geothermal gradient study results FY 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Gillespie, D.

    1995-09-01

    The purpose of this investigation is to estimate vertical fluid flux rates in saturated units penetrated by selected wells at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) using geothermal gradient data. Estimates of vertical fluid flux rates are critical in developing models for contaminate flow within, recharge potential to, and discharge from the groundwater system at the NTS. If temperature in the well is in equilibrium with the surrounding rocks, it is possible to detect the vertical flow of groundwater from the well`s thermal profile. Heat in the subsurface is transported by conduction through the rock and by advection caused by subsurface water movement. Units in which vertical flow is occurring will produce a curve in the thermal profile within the well. Prior to the implementation of the Underground Test Area Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (UGTA RI/FS), investigation of thermal data from wells at the NTS was hindered by the completion of wells as open holes or without casing cemented in place. The open-hole type of completion allows cross-flow within the wellbore which can yield information about relative pressures between connected aquifers, but which renders thermal gradient data essentially useless, or at best highly suspect for interpreting in situ groundwater movement. Wells recently completed in the Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Restoration (ER) Program have been completed with casing cemented to the surface (to prohibit cross-flow between units in the annular space between the casing and the wellbore) and with completion zones open to a single hydrologic horizon. This type of completion results in temperature gradient profiles more representative of actual thermal conditions in the units penetrated by the well. Results are presented of temperature profiles of 3 wells located in the Death Valley Groundwater Basin, outside the southern border of the NTS.

  9. From the ultrasonic to the infrared: molecular evolution and the sensory biology of bats.

    PubMed

    Jones, Gareth; Teeling, Emma C; Rossiter, Stephen J

    2013-01-01

    Great advances have been made recently in understanding the genetic basis of the sensory biology of bats. Research has focused on the molecular evolution of candidate sensory genes, genes with known functions [e.g., olfactory receptor (OR) genes] and genes identified from mutations associated with sensory deficits (e.g., blindness and deafness). For example, the FoxP2 gene, underpinning vocal behavior and sensorimotor coordination, has undergone diversification in bats, while several genes associated with audition show parallel amino acid substitutions in unrelated lineages of echolocating bats and, in some cases, in echolocating dolphins, representing a classic case of convergent molecular evolution. Vision genes encoding the photopigments rhodopsin and the long-wave sensitive opsin are functional in bats, while that encoding the short-wave sensitive opsin has lost functionality in rhinolophoid bats using high-duty cycle laryngeal echolocation, suggesting a sensory trade-off between investment in vision and echolocation. In terms of olfaction, bats appear to have a distinctive OR repertoire compared with other mammals, and a gene involved in signal transduction in the vomeronasal system has become non-functional in most bat species. Bitter taste receptors appear to have undergone a "birth-and death" evolution involving extensive gene duplication and loss, unlike genes coding for sweet and umami tastes that show conservation across most lineages but loss in vampire bats. Common vampire bats have also undergone adaptations for thermoperception, via alternative splicing resulting in the evolution of a novel heat-sensitive channel. The future for understanding the molecular basis of sensory biology is promising, with great potential for comparative genomic analyses, studies on gene regulation and expression, exploration of the role of alternative splicing in the generation of proteomic diversity, and linking genetic mechanisms to behavioral consequences. PMID:23755015

  10. From the ultrasonic to the infrared: molecular evolution and the sensory biology of bats

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Gareth; Teeling, Emma C.; Rossiter, Stephen J.

    2013-01-01

    Great advances have been made recently in understanding the genetic basis of the sensory biology of bats. Research has focused on the molecular evolution of candidate sensory genes, genes with known functions [e.g., olfactory receptor (OR) genes] and genes identified from mutations associated with sensory deficits (e.g., blindness and deafness). For example, the FoxP2 gene, underpinning vocal behavior and sensorimotor coordination, has undergone diversification in bats, while several genes associated with audition show parallel amino acid substitutions in unrelated lineages of echolocating bats and, in some cases, in echolocating dolphins, representing a classic case of convergent molecular evolution. Vision genes encoding the photopigments rhodopsin and the long-wave sensitive opsin are functional in bats, while that encoding the short-wave sensitive opsin has lost functionality in rhinolophoid bats using high-duty cycle laryngeal echolocation, suggesting a sensory trade-off between investment in vision and echolocation. In terms of olfaction, bats appear to have a distinctive OR repertoire compared with other mammals, and a gene involved in signal transduction in the vomeronasal system has become non-functional in most bat species. Bitter taste receptors appear to have undergone a “birth-and death” evolution involving extensive gene duplication and loss, unlike genes coding for sweet and umami tastes that show conservation across most lineages but loss in vampire bats. Common vampire bats have also undergone adaptations for thermoperception, via alternative splicing resulting in the evolution of a novel heat-sensitive channel. The future for understanding the molecular basis of sensory biology is promising, with great potential for comparative genomic analyses, studies on gene regulation and expression, exploration of the role of alternative splicing in the generation of proteomic diversity, and linking genetic mechanisms to behavioral consequences. PMID:23755015

  11. How parrots see their colours: novelty in the visual pigments of Platycercus elegans.

    PubMed

    Knott, Ben; Davies, Wayne I L; Carvalho, Livia S; Berg, Mathew L; Buchanan, Katherine L; Bowmaker, James K; Bennett, Andrew T D; Hunt, David M

    2013-12-01

    Intraspecific differences in retinal physiology have been demonstrated in several vertebrate taxa and are often subject to adaptive evolution. Nonetheless, such differences are currently unknown in birds, despite variations in habitat, behaviour and visual stimuli that might influence spectral sensitivity. The parrot Platycercus elegans is a species complex with extreme plumage colour differences between (and sometimes within) subspecies, making it an ideal candidate for intraspecific differences in spectral sensitivity. Here, the visual pigments of P. elegans were fully characterised through molecular sequencing of five visual opsin genes and measurement of their absorbance spectra using microspectrophotometry. Three of the genes, LWS, SW1 and SWS2, encode for proteins similar to those found in other birds; however, both the RH1 and RH2 pigments had polypeptides with carboxyl termini of different lengths and unusual properties that are unknown previously for any vertebrate visual pigment. Specifically, multiple RH2 transcripts and protein variants (short, medium and long) were identified for the first time that are generated by alternative splicing of downstream coding and non-coding exons. Our work provides the first complete characterisation of the visual pigments of a parrot, perhaps the most colourful order of birds, and moreover suggests more variability in avian eyes than hitherto considered. PMID:24259259

  12. The High-Resolution Structure of Activated Opsin Reveals a Conserved Solvent Network in the Transmembrane Region Essential for Activation.

    PubMed

    Blankenship, Elise; Vahedi-Faridi, Ardeschir; Lodowski, David T

    2015-12-01

    Rhodopsin, a light-activated G protein coupled receptor (GPCR), has been the subject of numerous biochemical and structural investigations, serving as a model receptor for GPCRs and their activation. We present the 2.3-Å resolution structure of native source rhodopsin stabilized in a conformation competent for G protein binding. An extensive water-mediated hydrogen bond network linking the chromophore binding site to the site of G protein binding is observed, providing connections to conserved motifs essential for GPCR activation. Comparison of this extensive solvent-mediated hydrogen-bonding network with the positions of ordered solvent in earlier crystallographic structures of rhodopsin photointermediates reveals both static structural and dynamic functional water-protein interactions present during the activation process. When considered along with observations that solvent occupies similar positions in the structures of other GPCRs, these analyses strongly support an integral role for this dynamic ordered water network in both rhodopsin and GPCR activation. PMID:26526852

  13. Pharmacological Chaperone-mediated in Vivo Folding and Stabilization of the P23H-opsin Mutant Associated with

    E-print Network

    Palczewski, Krzysztof

    Associated with Autosomal Dominant Retinitis Pigmentosa* Received for publication, January 6, 2003, which include cer- tain types of retinitis pigmentosa, are a set of inherited human diseases in which linked to various genetic forms of retinitis pigmentosa, the most com- mon form of hereditary retinal

  14. Photoreceptors in a primitive mammal, the South American opossum, Didelphis marsupialis aurita: characterization with anti-opsin immunolabeling.

    PubMed

    Ahnelt, P K; Hokoç, J N; Röhlich, P

    1995-01-01

    The retinas of placental mammals appear to lack the large number and morphological diversity of cone subtypes found in diurnal reptiles. We have now studied the photoreceptor layer of a South American marsupial (Didelphis marsupialis aurita) by peanut agglutinin labeling of the cone sheath and by labeling of cone outer segments with monoclonal anti-visual pigment antibodies that have been proven to consistently label middle-to-long wavelength (COS-1) and short-wavelength (OS-2) cone subpopulations in placental mammals. Besides a dominant rod population (max. = 400,000/mm2) four subtypes of cones (max. = 3000/mm2) were identified. The outer segments of three cone subtypes were labeled by COS-1: a double cone with a principal cone containing a colorless oil droplet, a single cone with oil droplet, and another single cone. A second group of single cones lacking oil droplets was labeled by OS-2 antibody. The topography of these cone subtypes showed striking anisotropies. The COS-1 labeled single cones without oil droplets were found all over the retina and constituted the dominant population in the area centralis located in the temporal quadrant of the upper, tapetal hemisphere. The population of OS-2 labeled cones was also ubiquitous although slightly higher in the upper hemisphere (200/mm2). The COS-1 labeled cones bearing an oil droplet, including the principal member of double cones, were concentrated (800/mm2) in the inferior, non-tapetal half of the retina. The two spectral types of single cones resemble those of dichromatic photopic systems in most placental mammals. The additional set of COS-1 labeled cones is a distinct marsupial feature. The presence of oil droplets in this cone subpopulation, its absence in the area centralis, and the correlation with the non-tapetal inferior hemisphere suggest a functional specialization, possibly for mesopic conditions. Thus, sauropsid features have been retained but probably with a modified function. PMID:8924404

  15. Evolutionary changes of multiple visual pigment genes in the complete genome of Pacific bluefin tuna.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Yoji; Mori, Kazuki; Saitoh, Kenji; Oshima, Kenshiro; Mekuchi, Miyuki; Sugaya, Takuma; Shigenobu, Yuya; Ojima, Nobuhiko; Muta, Shigeru; Fujiwara, Atushi; Yasuike, Motoshige; Oohara, Ichiro; Hirakawa, Hideki; Chowdhury, Vishwajit Sur; Kobayashi, Takanori; Nakajima, Kazuhiro; Sano, Motohiko; Wada, Tokio; Tashiro, Kosuke; Ikeo, Kazuho; Hattori, Masahira; Kuhara, Satoru; Gojobori, Takashi; Inouye, Kiyoshi

    2013-07-01

    Tunas are migratory fishes in offshore habitats and top predators with unique features. Despite their ecological importance and high market values, the open-ocean lifestyle of tuna, in which effective sensing systems such as color vision are required for capture of prey, has been poorly understood. To elucidate the genetic and evolutionary basis of optic adaptation of tuna, we determined the genome sequence of the Pacific bluefin tuna (Thunnus orientalis), using next-generation sequencing technology. A total of 26,433 protein-coding genes were predicted from 16,802 assembled scaffolds. From these, we identified five common fish visual pigment genes: red-sensitive (middle/long-wavelength sensitive; M/LWS), UV-sensitive (short-wavelength sensitive 1; SWS1), blue-sensitive (SWS2), rhodopsin (RH1), and green-sensitive (RH2) opsin genes. Sequence comparison revealed that tuna's RH1 gene has an amino acid substitution that causes a short-wave shift in the absorption spectrum (i.e., blue shift). Pacific bluefin tuna has at least five RH2 paralogs, the most among studied fishes; four of the proteins encoded may be tuned to blue light at the amino acid level. Moreover, phylogenetic analysis suggested that gene conversions have occurred in each of the SWS2 and RH2 loci in a short period. Thus, Pacific bluefin tuna has undergone evolutionary changes in three genes (RH1, RH2, and SWS2), which may have contributed to detecting blue-green contrast and measuring the distance to prey in the blue-pelagic ocean. These findings provide basic information on behavioral traits of predatory fish and, thereby, could help to improve the technology to culture such fish in captivity for resource management. PMID:23781100

  16. Optogenetic manipulation of cGMP in cells and animals by the tightly light-regulated guanylyl-cyclase opsin CyclOp

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Shiqiang; Nagpal, Jatin; Schneider, Martin W.; Kozjak-Pavlovic, Vera; Nagel, Georg; Gottschalk, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Cyclic GMP (cGMP) signalling regulates multiple biological functions through activation of protein kinase G and cyclic nucleotide-gated (CNG) channels. In sensory neurons, cGMP permits signal modulation, amplification and encoding, before depolarization. Here we implement a guanylyl cyclase rhodopsin from Blastocladiella emersonii as a new optogenetic tool (BeCyclOp), enabling rapid light-triggered cGMP increase in heterologous cells (Xenopus oocytes, HEK293T cells) and in Caenorhabditis elegans. Among five different fungal CyclOps, exhibiting unusual eight transmembrane topologies and cytosolic N-termini, BeCyclOp is the superior optogenetic tool (light/dark activity ratio: 5,000; no cAMP production; turnover (20?°C) ?17 cGMP?s?1). Via co-expressed CNG channels (OLF in oocytes, TAX-2/4 in C. elegans muscle), BeCyclOp photoactivation induces a rapid conductance increase and depolarization at very low light intensities. In O2/CO2 sensory neurons of C. elegans, BeCyclOp activation evokes behavioural responses consistent with their normal sensory function. BeCyclOp therefore enables precise and rapid optogenetic manipulation of cGMP levels in cells and animals. PMID:26345128

  17. Inherent Instability of the Retinitis Pigmentosa P23H Mutant Received for publication,January 20, 2014, and in revised form, February 5, 2014 Published, JBC Papers in Press,February 10, 2014, DOI 10.1074/jbc.M114.551713

    E-print Network

    Palczewski, Krzysztof

    Inherent Instability of the Retinitis Pigmentosa P23H Mutant Opsin*S Received for publication causes the blinding human disease, retinitis pigmentosa. Results: Molecular properties of bovine P23H. The P23H opsin mutation is the most common cause of autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa. Even though

  18. Lamb wave transducers made of piezoelectric macro-fiber composite Michal Maka1,

    E-print Network

    Lamb wave transducers made of piezoelectric macro-fiber composite Michal Maka1, *, , Mateusz Rosiek of Lamb waves (LWs) for SHM has been observed. LWs may be generated and sensed using different types WORDS: structural health monitoring, Lamb waves, piezoelectric transducers, interdigital transducers

  19. Breaking the Covalent Bond—A Pigment Property that Contributes to Desensitization in Cones

    PubMed Central

    Kefalov, Vladimir J.; Estevez, Maureen E.; Kono, Massahiro; Goletz, Patrice W.; Crouch, Rosalie K.; Cornwall, M. Carter; Yau, King-Wai

    2010-01-01

    Summary Retinal rod and cone pigments consist of an apoprotein, opsin, covalently linked to a chromophore, 11-cis retinal. Here we demonstrate that the formation of the covalent bond between opsin and 11-cis retinal is reversible in darkness in amphibian red cones, but essentially irreversible in red rods. This dissociation, apparently a general property of cone pigments, results in a surprisingly large amount of free opsin—about 10% of total opsin—in dark-adapted red cones. We attribute this significant level of free opsin to the low concentration of intracellular free 11-cis retinal, estimated to be only a tiny fraction (~0.1 %) of the pigment content in red cones. With its constitutive transducin-stimulating activity, the free cone opsin produces an ~2-fold desensitization in red cones, equivalent to that produced by a steady light causing 500 photoisomerizations s?1. Cone pigment dissociation therefore contributes to the sensitivity difference between rods and cones. PMID:15953417

  20. Using 2-D arrays for sensing multimodal Lamb waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engholm, Marcus; Stepinski, Tadeusz

    2010-04-01

    Monitoring structural integrity of large planar structures requires normally a relatively dense network of uniformly distributed ultrasonic sensors. A 2-D ultrasonic phased array with all azimuth angle coverage would be extremely useful for the structural health monitoring (SHM) of such structures. Known techniques for estimating direction of arriving (DOA) waves cannot efficiently cope with dispersive and multimodal Lamb waves (LWs). In the paper we propose an adaptive spectral estimation technique capable of handling broadband LWs sensed by 2-D arrays, the modified Capon method. Performance of the technique is evaluated using simulated multiple-mode LWs, and verified using experimental data.

  1. Chickens from lines artificially selected for juvenile low and high body weight differ in glucose homeostasis and pancreas physiology.

    PubMed

    Sumners, L H; Zhang, W; Zhao, X; Honaker, C F; Zhang, S; Cline, M A; Siegel, P B; Gilbert, E R

    2014-06-01

    Artificial selection of White Plymouth Rock chickens for juvenile (day 56) body weight resulted in two divergent genetic lines: hypophagic low weight (LWS) chickens and hyperphagic obese high weight (HWS) chickens, with the latter more than 10-fold heavier than the former at selection age. A study was designed to investigate glucose regulation and pancreas physiology at selection age in LWS chickens and HWS chickens. Oral glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity tests revealed differences in threshold sensitivity to insulin and glucose clearance rate between the lines. Results from real-time PCR showed greater pancreatic mRNA expression of four glucose regulatory genes (preproinsulin, PPI; preproglucagon, PPG; glucose transporter 2, GLUT2; and pancreatic duodenal homeobox 1, Pdx1) in LWS chickens, than HWS chickens. Histological analysis of the pancreas revealed that HWS chickens have larger pancreatic islets, less pancreatic islet mass, and more pancreatic inflammation than LWS chickens, all of which presumably contribute to impaired glucose metabolism. PMID:24614025

  2. Fluid-Rock Interaction at the Slab-Mantle Interface: Insights from the High Pressure Rocks of the Sivrihisar Massif, Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fornash, K.; Whitney, D. L.; Cosca, M. A.

    2013-12-01

    Water is transported into the deep parts of the subduction system via hydrous phases such as lawsonite (lws, 11 wt.% H2O), phengite (ph, 4%), amphibole (4%), epidote-group minerals (2-4%), talc (5%), and chlorite (12%). These hydrous phases are abundant in the metabasaltic (lws eclogite and blueschist) and metasedimentary (marble, quartzite) rocks of the Sivrihisar Massif (Turkey), where they can exceed 40% modal abundance. The hydrous nature of these rocks (~5-6 wt.% H2O) likely reflects the effects of prolonged fluid-rock interaction at or near the slab-mantle interface at depths up to ~80 km for at least ~10 Ma, as indicated by the difference in 40Ar/39Ar phengite ages for lws eclogite and lws blueschist that formed from eclogite during decompression. To document the conditions, scale, and mechanism of fluid-mineral interaction at 80-45 km depth in a Late Cretaceous subduction zone, we integrate geochemical (major and trace element compositions, zoning patterns), geochronologic (40Ar/39Ar phengite), and microstructural (EBSD, XRCT) data. These techniques are applied to minerals in different textural positions (grt inclusions, fabric-forming minerals in matrix, HP veins) to investigate changes as a function of P-T conditions and to minerals in different structural positions (proximity to fault contact with overlying ultramafic unit, serpentinite lenses, lithologic contacts) to evaluate the effects of deformation and identify fluid sources and pathways. Microprobe analysis and mapping shows that lawsonite is commonly zoned in Fe, Ti, and (less common) Cr. Cr zoning is typically oscillatory and occurs in lws+grt+ph veins at lws-ecl pod margins or in blueschist located along lithologic or structural contacts. Blueschist/eclogite lws zoned in Fe typically has a Fe-poor core and Fe-richer rim, but oscillatory Fe zoning is also observed in lws veins and coarse-grained lws at pod margins. Fe-poor cores are enriched in Ti. Hourglass Ti sector zoning is common in blueschist, and can be seen in prism sections of grains cut parallel to the c-axis. Grains cut perpendicular to the c-axis show less zoning, with the exception of oscillatory rim zoning. Highly deformed lws (displaying subgrains) and lws clusters have irregular, patchy zoning patterns. Lws in retrogressed (chl+ep+lws) rocks have higher Fe content; chl-lws rocks at the margins of serpentinite lenses in the HP unit have elevated trace element content. Together, these observations indicate crystallographic and environmental control on lws composition and zoning; systematic evaluation of these characteristics and trends for different generations of lws provides information about how the fluid-rock history evolved with the P-T-time-deformation path.

  3. Targeted Research and Technology Within NASA's Living With a Star Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antiochos, Spiro; Baker, Kile; Bellaire, Paul; Blake, Bern; Crowley, Geoff; Eddy, Jack; Goodrich, Charles; Gopalswamy, Nat; Gosling, Jack; Hesse, Michael

    2004-01-01

    Targeted Research & Technology (TR&T) NASA's Living With a Star (LWS) initiative is a systematic, goal-oriented research program targeting those aspects of the Sun-Earth system that affect society. The Targeted Research and Technology (TR&T) component of LWS provides the theory, modeling, and data analysis necessary to enable an integrated, system-wide picture of Sun-Earth connection science with societal relevance. Recognizing the central and essential role that TR&T would have for the success of the LWS initiative, the LWS Science Architecture Team (SAT) recommended that a Science Definition Team (SDT), with the same status as a flight mission definition team, be formed to design and coordinate a TR&T program having prioritized goals and objectives that focused on practical societal benefits. This report details the SDT recommendations for the TR&T program.

  4. Targeted Research and Technology Within NASA's Living With a Star Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hesse, Michael

    2003-01-01

    NASA's Living With a Star (LWS) initiative is a systematic, goal-oriented research program targeting those aspects of the Sun-Earth system that affect society. The Targeted Research and Technology (TR&T) component of LWS provides the theory, modeling, and data analysis necessary to enable an integrated, system-wide picture of Sun-Earth connection science with societal relevance. Recognizing the central and essential role that TR&T would have for the success of the LWS initiative, the LWS Science Architecture Team (SAT) recommended that a Science Definition Team (SDT), with the same status as a flight mission definition team, be formed to design and coordinate a TR&T program having prioritized goals and objectives that focused on practical societal benefits. This report details the SDT recommendations for the TR&T program.

  5. ORIGINAL ARTICLE doi:10.1111/evo.12322

    E-print Network

    Lauder, George V.

    - sists of an opsin protein composed of approximately 350 amino acids that covalently bond of specific amino acids of the rod-opsin protein with the pigment's chromophore constrains the absorbance peak. In addition, we found strong evidence that at approximately 11.2 Ma the most recent common ancestor of two

  6. Papers of the Week Insight into Human Blinding Disease

    E-print Network

    Palczewski, Krzysztof

    Form of Autosomal Dominant Retinitis Pigmentosa due to P23H Opsin Mutations Rhodopsin, the pigment that mediates dim light vision, is composed of the apoprotein opsin and the chromophore ligand 11-cis-retinal called autosomal dominant retinitis pig- mentosa (adRP). Although there has been considerable interest

  7. Behavioral/Systems/Cognitive Chromatic Properties of Horizontal and Ganglion Cell

    E-print Network

    ). In superior retina, cone opsin weights agreed quantitatively with relative pigment density estimates from immunostaining. In inferior retina, cone opsin weights agreed qualitatively with relative pigment density monochromatic flashes. Because the brisk-transient ganglion cell is thought to mediate behavioral detection

  8. BioMed Central Page 1 of 12

    E-print Network

    Chang, Belinda

    AccessResearch Long-wavelength sensitive visual pigments of the guppy (Poecilia reticulata): six opsins of visual systems in fish has long been of interest for evolutionary biologists and neurophysiologists studies on the copy number and genomic organization of visual pigment proteins, the opsins, have revealed

  9. Gene 230 (1999) 101109 Intron splice sites of Papilio glaucus PglRh3 corroborate

    E-print Network

    1999-01-01

    Gene 230 (1999) 101­109 Intron splice sites of Papilio glaucus PglRh3 corroborate insect opsin. The PglRh3 gene has nine exons and eight introns, four of which are in unique locations relative or Rh2. The placement of introns within opsin genes therefore independently supports the clustering

  10. Gene loss, adaptive evolution and the co-evolution of plumage coloration genes

    E-print Network

    Jarvis, Erich D.

    range of complex photic systems observed in birds exemplifies one of their key evolutionary adaptionsGene loss, adaptive evolution and the co-evolution of plumage coloration genes with opsins in birds Open Access Gene loss, adaptive evolution and the co-evolution of plumage coloration genes with opsins

  11. 11/13/11 10:33 AMAbstract Print View Page 1 of 2http://www.abstractsonline.com/Plan/AbstractPrintView.aspx?mID=2...472c-8713-73eddce872b7&cKey=e99c3f48-6778-47ba-9f60-c17304239095

    E-print Network

    Shenoy, Krishna V.

    to elucidate the mechanisms by which movements are prepared and executed. While electrical microstimulation functionality of excitatory (ChR2, SFO) and inhibitory (eNpHR2.0) opsins in rhesus macaque cortex under pan light in brain tissue. We selected the potent red-shifted opsin C1V1 (Fenno et al., SfN 2010), which has

  12. Pathophysilogical mechanism and treatment strategies for Leber congenital amaurosis.

    PubMed

    Fu, Yingbin; Zhang, Tao

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in retinoid isomerase, RPE65, or lecithin-retinol acyltransferase (LRAT) disrupt 11-cis-retinal recycling and cause Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA), the most severe retinal dystrophy in early childhood. We used Lrat (-/-), a murine model for LCA, to investigate the mechanism of rapid cone degeneration. We found that mislocalized M-opsin was degraded whereas mislocalized S-opsin accumulated in Lrat (-/-) cones before the onset of massive ventral/central cone degeneration. Since the ventral and central retina expresses higher levels of S-opsin than the dorsal retina in mice, our results may explain why ventral and central cones degenerate more rapidly than dorsal cones in Rpe65 (-/-) and Lrat (-/-) LCA models. In addition, human blue opsin and mouse S-opsin, but not mouse M-opsin or human red/green opsins, aggregated to form cytoplasmic inclusions in transfected cells, which may explain why blue cone function is lost earlier than red/green-cone function in LCA patients. The aggregation of short-wavelength opsins likely caused rapid cone degenerations through an ER stress pathway as demonstrated in both the Lrat (-/-) retina and transfected cells. Based on this mechanism, we designed a new therapy of LCA by reducing ER stress. We found that systemic injection of an ER chemical chaperone, tauroursodeoxycholic acid (TUDCA), is effective in reducing ER stress, preventing apoptosis, and preserving cones in Lrat (-/-) mice. PMID:24664772

  13. Introduction The butterfly eye is a marvel of evolution. Butterfly vision, like that

    E-print Network

    of non-opsin-based filtering pigments for modifying photoreceptor sensitivity to light is mentioned pigments are light- sensitive molecules composed of an opsin protein and a chromophore. Most butterfl1805 Introduction The butterfly eye is a marvel of evolution. Butterfly vision, like that of other

  14. Wavelength regulation in iodopsin, a cone pigment.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, J G; Nakamura, T; Ebrey, T G; Ok, H; Konno, K; Derguini, F; Nakanishi, K; Honig, B

    1989-01-01

    The opsin shift, the difference in wavenumber between the absorption peak of a visual pigment and the protonated Schiff base of the chromophore, represents the influence of the opsin binding site on the chromophore. The opsin shift for the chicken cone pigment iodopsin is much larger than that for rhodopsin. To understand the origin of this opsin shift and the mechanism of wavelength regulation in iodopsin, a series of synthetic 9-cis and 11-cis dehydro- and dihydro-retinals was used to regenerate iodopsin-based pigments. The opsin shifts of these pigments are quite similar to those found in bacteriorhodopsin-based artificial pigments. On the basis of these studies, a tentative model of wavelength regulation in iodopsin is proposed. PMID:2524224

  15. Strategic Science to Address Current and Future Space Weather Needs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mannucci, A. J.; Schwadron, N.; Antiochos, S. K.; Bhattacharjee, A.; Bisi, M. M.; Gopalswamy, N.; Kamalabadi, F.; Pulkkinen, A. A.; Tobiska, W. K.; Weimer, D. R.; Withers, P.

    2014-12-01

    NASA's Living With a Star (LWS) program has contributed a wealth of scientific knowledge that is relevant to space weather and user needs. A targeted approach to science questions has resulted in leveraging new scientific knowledge to improve not only our understanding of the Heliophysics domain, but also to develop predictive capabilities in key areas of LWS science. This fascinating interplay between science and applications promises to benefit both domains. Scientists providing feedback to the LWS program are now discussing an evolution of the targeted approach that explicitly considers how new science improves, or enables, predictive capability directly. Long-term program goals are termed "Strategic Science Areas" (SSAs) that address predictive capabilities in six specific areas: geomagnetically induced currents, satellite drag, solar energetic particles, ionospheric total electron content, radio frequency scintillation induced by the ionosphere, and the radiation environment. SSAs are organized around user needs and the impacts of space weather on society. Scientists involved in the LWS program identify targeted areas of research that reference (or bear upon) societal needs. Such targeted science leads to new discoveries and is one of the valid forms of exploration. In this talk we describe the benefits of targeted science, and how addressing societal impacts in an appropriate way maintains the strong science focus of LWS, while also leading to its broader impacts.

  16. Living With a Star, the Geospace Mission Definition Team and Aeronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kintner, Paul M., Jr.; Meier, R. R.; Spann, Jim; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    To gain an understanding of the Sun-Earth system, including how and why the sun varies, how the earth responds, and the impacts on humanity, research is needed that has a integrated and systematic approach. The Living With a Star (LWS) program represents an important element in this regard both to continued progress in space science in general and in Aeronomy in particular. A fundamental question in Aeronomy is how the variable sun affects the ionosphere, thermosphere, and mesosphere. The LWS program focuses on those areas of scientific understanding that promote progress in areas that have human impact and can be investigated with space borne instruments. The Geospace Mission Definition Team is charged with investigating the science priorities identified by the LWS Science Architecture Team and developing an approach to making the necessary measurements in concert with other missions and programs. An important aspect of this approach is that all LWS measurement programs are operating simultaneously for several years. We will review some of the areas that the LWS SAT have emphasized in Aeronomy, including understanding the effects of solar variability on ionospheric density and irregularities, the effects of solar variability on the mass density of the atmosphere at LEO altitudes, and the effects of solar variability on near-surface temperatures and on ozone distribution.

  17. Optogenetics 3.0

    E-print Network

    Liu, Xu

    Optogenetic methods use light to modulate the activities of target cells in vivo. By improving inter- and intracellular trafficking of light-sensitive switch proteins called opsins, Gradinaru et al. (2010) have developed ...

  18. The spectrum of human rhodopsin disease mutations through the lens of interspecific variation

    E-print Network

    Kumar, Sudhir

    . Keywords: Visual pigment; Retinitis pigmentosa; Photoreceptor; Opsin; Neutral theory 1. Introduction parsimony; NJ, neighbor-joining; ERG, electroretinogram; RP, retinitis pigmentosa; ADRP, autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa; ARRP, autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa; CSNB, congenital stationary night

  19. Beata Jastrzebska Editor Methods and Protocols

    E-print Network

    Palczewski, Krzysztof

    of carotenoids in a diet lacking retinoids could lead to progressive retinal degen- eration and blindness chromophore which recombined with opsin. The color of rhodopsin is derived from the chromophore 11-cis

  20. Research article The Journal of Clinical Investigation http://www.jci.org Volume 123 Number 1 January 2013 121

    E-print Network

    Palczewski, Krzysztof

    Maeda,1,3 Christel Genoud,4 Andreas Engel,1 Vladimir J. Kefalov,2 and Krzysztof Palczewski1 1Department, Friedrich Miescher Institute, Basel, Switzerland. The pathophysiology of the E150K mutation in the rod opsin

  1. Inhibiting the Activity of CA1 Hippocampal Neurons Prevents the Recall of Contextual Fear Memory in Inducible ArchT Transgenic Mice

    E-print Network

    Sakaguchi, Masanori

    The optogenetic manipulation of light-activated ion-channels/pumps (i.e., opsins) can reversibly activate or suppress neuronal activity with precise temporal control. Therefore, optogenetic techniques hold great potential ...

  2. Molecular Architecture of Photoreceptor Phosphodiesterase Elucidated by Chemical

    E-print Network

    Sali, Andrej

    is essential for the speed, sensitivity, recovery and adaptation of visual detection. Although major steps of photoreceptor cells [1,2]. Vision begins with the photoactivation of visual pigment, opsin, which sets in motion

  3. [Optogenetics brings hidden neural mechanisms into the light and could become a future therapy].

    PubMed

    Axelsen, Tobias Melton; Navntoft, Charlotte Amalie Emdal; Christiansen, Søren Hofman; Dreyer, Jakob Kisbye; Sørensen, Jakob Balslev; Gether, Ulrik; Woldbye, David Paul Drucker

    2015-08-17

    Optogenetics is an emergent technology that combines light-sensitive proteins derived from algae, so-called opsins, with genetics. Viral vectors encoding opsins are injected into selective brain regions whereby specific cell populations can be controlled with high precision light pulses delivered via implanted optical fibres. This review focuses on explaining basic principles of optogenetics and describes important insights into neuropsychiatric mechanisms provided by the technology. PMID:26320592

  4. Activation of Transducin by Bistable Pigment Parapinopsin in the Pineal Organ of Lower Vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Kawano-Yamashita, Emi; Koyanagi, Mitsumasa; Wada, Seiji; Tsukamoto, Hisao; Nagata, Takashi; Terakita, Akihisa

    2015-01-01

    Pineal organs of lower vertebrates contain several kinds of photosensitive molecules, opsins that are suggested to be involved in different light-regulated physiological functions. We previously reported that parapinopsin is an ultraviolet (UV)-sensitive opsin that underlies hyperpolarization of the pineal photoreceptor cells of lower vertebrates to achieve pineal wavelength discrimination. Although, parapinopsin is phylogenetically close to vertebrate visual opsins, it exhibits a property similar to invertebrate visual opsins and melanopsin: the photoproduct of parapinopsin is stable and reverts to the original dark states, demonstrating the nature of bistable pigments. Therefore, it is of evolutionary interest to identify a phototransduction cascade driven by parapinopsin and to compare it with that in vertebrate visual cells. Here, we showed that parapinopsin is coupled to vertebrate visual G protein transducin in the pufferfish, zebrafish, and lamprey pineal organs. Biochemical analyses demonstrated that parapinopsins activated transducin in vitro in a light-dependent manner, similar to vertebrate visual opsins. Interestingly, transducin activation by parapinopsin was provoked and terminated by UV- and subsequent orange-lights irradiations, respectively, due to the bistable nature of parapinopsin, which could contribute to a wavelength-dependent control of a second messenger level in the cell as a unique optogenetic tool. Immunohistochemical examination revealed that parapinopsin was colocalized with Gt2 in the teleost, which possesses rod and cone types of transducin, Gt1, and Gt2. On the other hand, in the lamprey, which does not possess the Gt2 gene, in situ hybridization suggested that parapinopsin-expressing photoreceptor cells contained Gt1 type transducin GtS, indicating that lamprey parapinopsin may use GtS in place of Gt2. Because it is widely accepted that vertebrate visual opsins having a bleaching nature have evolved from non-bleaching opsins similar to parapinopsin, these results implied that ancestral bistable opsins might acquire coupling to the transducin-mediated cascade and achieve light-dependent hyperpolarizing response of the photoreceptor cells. PMID:26492337

  5. A butterfly eye's view of birds.

    PubMed

    Frentiu, Francesca D; Briscoe, Adriana D

    2008-11-01

    The striking color patterns of butterflies and birds have long interested biologists. But how these animals see color is less well understood. Opsins are the protein components of the visual pigments of the eye. Color vision has evolved in butterflies through opsin gene duplications, through positive selection at individual opsin loci, and by the use of filtering pigments. By contrast, birds have retained the same opsin complement present in early-jawed vertebrates, and their visual system has diversified primarily through tuning of the short-wavelength-sensitive photoreceptors, rather than by opsin duplication or the use of filtering elements. Butterflies and birds have evolved photoreceptors that might use some of the same amino acid sites for generating similar spectral phenotypes across approximately 540 million years of evolution, when rhabdomeric and ciliary-type opsins radiated during the early Cambrian period. Considering the similarities between the two taxa, it is surprising that the eyes of birds are not more diverse. Additional taxonomic sampling of birds may help clarify this mystery. PMID:18937365

  6. Evidence for distributed light sensing in the skin of cuttlefish, Sepia officinalis

    PubMed Central

    Mäthger, Lydia M.; Roberts, Steven B.; Hanlon, Roger T.

    2010-01-01

    We report that the skin of cuttlefish, Sepia officinalis, contains opsin transcripts suggesting a possible role of distributed light sensing for dynamic camouflage and signalling. The mRNA coding for opsin from various body regions was amplified and sequenced, and gene expression was detected in fin and ventral skin samples. The amino acid sequence of the opsin polypeptide that these transcripts would produce was identical in retina and fin tissue samples, but the ventral skin opsin transcripts differed by a single amino acid. The diverse camouflage and signalling body patterns of cephalopods are visually controlled, and these findings suggest a possible additional mechanism of light sensing and subsequent skin patterning. Cuttlefish, along with a number of other cephalopod species, have been shown to be colour-blind. Since the opsin in the fin is identical to that of the retina (?max = 492 nm), and the ventral transcripts are also unlikely to be spectrally different, colour discrimination by the skin opsins is unlikely. However, spectral discrimination could be provided by involving other skin structures (chromatophores and iridophores), which produce changeable colours and patterns. This ‘distributed sensing’ could supplement the otherwise visually driven dynamic camouflage system by assisting with colour or brightness matching to adjacent substrates. PMID:20392722

  7. Evidence for distributed light sensing in the skin of cuttlefish, Sepia officinalis.

    PubMed

    Mäthger, Lydia M; Roberts, Steven B; Hanlon, Roger T

    2010-10-23

    We report that the skin of cuttlefish, Sepia officinalis, contains opsin transcripts suggesting a possible role of distributed light sensing for dynamic camouflage and signalling. The mRNA coding for opsin from various body regions was amplified and sequenced, and gene expression was detected in fin and ventral skin samples. The amino acid sequence of the opsin polypeptide that these transcripts would produce was identical in retina and fin tissue samples, but the ventral skin opsin transcripts differed by a single amino acid. The diverse camouflage and signalling body patterns of cephalopods are visually controlled, and these findings suggest a possible additional mechanism of light sensing and subsequent skin patterning. Cuttlefish, along with a number of other cephalopod species, have been shown to be colour-blind. Since the opsin in the fin is identical to that of the retina (?max=492 nm), and the ventral transcripts are also unlikely to be spectrally different, colour discrimination by the skin opsins is unlikely. However, spectral discrimination could be provided by involving other skin structures (chromatophores and iridophores), which produce changeable colours and patterns. This 'distributed sensing' could supplement the otherwise visually driven dynamic camouflage system by assisting with colour or brightness matching to adjacent substrates. PMID:20392722

  8. An extended family of novel vertebrate photopigments is widely expressed and displays a diversity of function.

    PubMed

    Davies, Wayne I L; Tamai, T Katherine; Zheng, Lei; Fu, Josephine K; Rihel, Jason; Foster, Russell G; Whitmore, David; Hankins, Mark W

    2015-11-01

    Light affects animal physiology and behavior more than simply through classical visual, image-forming pathways. Nonvisual photoreception regulates numerous biological systems, including circadian entrainment, DNA repair, metabolism, and behavior. However, for the majority of these processes, the photoreceptive molecules involved are unknown. Given the diversity of photophysiological responses, the question arises whether a single photopigment or a greater diversity of proteins within the opsin superfamily detect photic stimuli. Here, a functional genomics approach identified the full complement of photopigments in a highly light-sensitive model vertebrate, the zebrafish (Danio rerio), and characterized their tissue distribution, expression levels, and biochemical properties. The results presented here reveal the presence of 42 distinct genes encoding 10 classical visual photopigments and 32 nonvisual opsins, including 10 novel opsin genes comprising four new pigment classes. Consistent with the presence of light-entrainable circadian oscillators in zebrafish, all adult tissues examined expressed two or more opsins, including several novel opsins. Spectral and electrophysiological analyses of the new opsins demonstrate that they form functional photopigments, each with unique chromophore-binding and wavelength specificities. This study has revealed a remarkable number and diversity of photopigments in zebrafish, the largest number so far discovered for any vertebrate. Found in amphibians, reptiles, birds, and all three mammalian clades, most of these genes are not restricted to teleosts. Therefore, nonvisual light detection is far more complex than initially appreciated, which has significant biological implications in understanding photoreception in vertebrates. PMID:26450929

  9. Seismic properties of subducting oceanic crust: Constraints from natural lawsonite-bearing blueschist and eclogite in Sivrihisar Massif, Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Yi; Jung, Haemyeong

    2016-01-01

    Investigating the seismic properties of natural lawsonite (Lws)-bearing blueschist and eclogite is particularly important for constraining the seismic interpretation of subducting oceanic crust based on seismological observations. To achieve this end, we analyzed in detail the mineral fabrics and seismic properties of foliated Lws-blueschist and Lws-eclogites from Sivrihisar Massif in Turkey. In both blueschists and eclogites, the lawsonite fabric is characterized by three different patterns: [0 0 1] axes aligning sub-normal to foliation, and [0 1 0] axes aligning sub-parallel to lineation (normal type); [0 0 1] axes aligning sub-parallel to lineation, and [1 0 0] axes aligning sub-normal to foliation with a girdle sub-normal to lineation (abnormal type); and [0 0 1] axes aligning both sub-normal to foliation and sub-parallel to lineation, [0 1 0] axes aligning sub-parallel to lineation, and [1 0 0] axes aligning sub-normal to foliation (transitional pattern). In contrast, glaucophane and omphacite mostly present consistent axial fabrics with the [0 0 1] axes aligning to lineation. These mineral fabrics produce whole-rock seismic anisotropies with similar patterns. However, the variations in seismic anisotropies are mainly controlled by the rock type, to a lesser extent are determined by the lawsonite fabric type, and to only a small extent are affected by mineral fabric strength. Despite the constructive abnormal-type lawsonite fabric on whole-rock seismic anisotropies, because of their weaker mineral fabric strength (or deformation degree), the abnormal-type Lws-blueschist still exhibit comparatively lower seismic anisotropies than those normal-type Lws-blueschist from other localities. Based on the calculated seismic anisotropies and velocities, we estimated that when oceanic crust transforms from Lws-blueschist to Lws-eclogite with increasing subduction depth, (1) P-wave and max. S-wave polarization anisotropies reduce about 70% and 40%, respectively; and (2) variations of Vp and Vs contrasts relative to mantle peridotites are about -7% to -3% and -8% to -6%, respectively. These results corroborate the important roles of Lws-bearing blueschist and eclogite in interpreting the existence and gradual weakening of low-velocity layers in subducting oceanic crust, during the subduction process.

  10. The Living With a Star Program Space Environment Testbed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barth, Janet; Day, John H. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation describes the objective, approach, and scope of the Living With a Star (LWS) program at the Marshall Space Flight Center. Scientists involved in the project seek to refine the understanding of space weather and the role of solar variability in terrestrial climate change. Research and the development of improved analytic methods have led to increased predictive capabilities and the improvement of environment specification models. Specifically, the Space Environment Testbed (SET) project of LWS is responsible for the implementation of improved engineering approaches to observing solar effects on climate change. This responsibility includes technology development, ground test protocol development, and the development of a technology application model/engineering tool.

  11. Numerical analysis of effects of large wood structures on channel morphology and fish habitat suitability in Little Topashaw Creek

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A depth-averaged two dimensional (2D) model has been applied to simulate the effect of large wood structures (LWS) on flow, sediment transport, bed change, and fish habitat suitability in a deeply-incised sharp bend in the Little Topashaw Creek, North Central Mississippi. The hydrodynamic simulation...

  12. ISO SPECTROSCOPIC OBSERVATIONS OF SHORTPERIOD COMETS \\Lambda

    E-print Network

    Meyer-Vernet, Nicole

    1 ISO SPECTROSCOPIC OBSERVATIONS OF SHORT­PERIOD COMETS \\Lambda J. Crovisier 1 , T. Encrenaz 1 , E­period comets. 22P/Kopff was observed on October-- December 1996 with SWS and LWS. Due to the weakness of the object, only the š 3 ro­vibrational lines of water were detected, with SWS. Comet 103P/Hartley 2

  13. Internal P-T-t Structure of Subduction Complexes — Insights from Lu-Hf Geochronology on Garnet and Lawsonite (Halilba??, Central Anatolia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pourteau, A.; Scherer, E. E.; Schmidt, A.; Bast, R.

    2014-12-01

    The subduction complex near Halilba?? (Central Anatolia) is among the best sites to investigate deep-seated tectonic, petrologic, and geochemical processes taking place in subduction zones. The Halilba?? Unit comprises slices of lawsonite- and/or epidote-bearing blueschist and eclogite, as well as meta-chert and marble. The unit is overlain by an ophiolitic slab and underlain by a HP/LT metamorphosed carbonate platform. Previous studies of the Halilba?? Unit suggested tectonic blocks were metamorphosed under diverse peak conditions, but shared a common exhumation P-T path marked by syn-decompression cooling (Davis and Whitney, 2006; Çetinkaplan et al., 2008). To better understand the internal structure and dynamics of this subduction complex, we carried out Lu-Hf geochronology on garnet (grt) and lawsonite (lws) from a variety of HP oceanic rocks, as well as the sub-ophiolitic metamorphic sole. Our results suggest that intra-oceanic subduction started at ~110 Ma (grt-amph isochron from a grt amphibolite). Less than 23 Myr later, the subduction interface was refrigerated enough to allow clockwise P-T loops (~87 Ma peak grt-matrix isochron for a lws+grt-bearing eclogitic blueschist) and syn-decompression cooling (~79 Ma retrograde lws-matrix isochron) of subducted oceanic rocks. We will present further results for several HP metamorphic sub-facies (e.g., epidote (ep) eclogite, lws+ep blueschist, lws blueschist, lws eclogite). Such data may allow unraveling whether the co-occurrence of "warm" (i.e., ep-bearing), and "cold" (i.e., lws-bearing) HP rocks in the same locality results from (a) sampling of distinct levels of the subduction slab, (b) thermal maturation of the juvenile subduction zone, or (c) inaccurate P-T estimates. Novel natural constraints are thus expected on the dynamics of the Halilba?? Unit and of subduction complexes in general. Çetinkaplan M., Candan O., Oberhänsli R. and Bousquet R., 2008. Pressure-Temperature Evolution of Lawsonite Eclogite in Sivrihisar, Tav?anl? Zone-Turkey. Lithos, 104(1-4): 12-32. Davis P. B. and Whitney D. L., 2006. Petrogenesis of Lawsonite and Epidote Eclogite and Blueschist, Sivrihisar Massif, Turkey. Journal of Metamorphic Geology, 24(9): 823-849.

  14. Fed and fasted chicks from lines divergently selected for low or high body weight have differential hypothalamic appetite-associated factor mRNA expression profiles.

    PubMed

    Yi, Jiaqing; Gilbert, Elizabeth R; Siegel, Paul B; Cline, Mark A

    2015-06-01

    We have demonstrated that chicken lines which have undergone intense divergent selection for either low (LWS) or high (HWS) body weight (anorexic and obese containing, respectively) have differential food intake threshold responses to a range of intracerebroventricular injected neurotransmitters. The study reported herein was designed to measure endogenous appetite-associated factor mRNA profiles between these lines in an effort to further understand the molecular mechanisms involved in their differential eating patterns. Whole hypothalamus was collected from 5 day-old chicks that had been fasted for 180 min or had free access to food. Total RNA was isolated, reverse transcribed, and real-time PCR performed. Although mRNAs encoding orexigenic neuropeptides including agouti-related peptide, neuropeptide Y (NPY), prolactin-releasing peptide, and visfatin did not differ in expression between the lines, NPY receptor 5 mRNA was greater in fed LWS than HWS chicks, but fasting decreased the magnitude of difference. Anorexigenic factors including amylin, corticotropin releasing factor (CRF) and ghrelin were not differentially expressed between lines, while mRNA abundance of calcitonin, CRF receptor 1, leptin receptor, neuropeptide S, melanocortin receptor 3, and oxytocin were greater in LWS than HWS chicks. Pro-opiomelanocortin mRNA was lower in LWS than HWS chicks, while fasting decreased its expression in both lines. These results suggest that there are differences in gene expression of appetite-associated factors between LWS and HWS lines that might be associated with their differential food intake and thus contribute to differences in severity of anorexia, body weight, adiposity, and development of obesity. PMID:25677648

  15. Photoreceptor topography and spectral sensitivity in the common brushtail possum (Trichosurus vulpecula).

    PubMed

    Vlahos, Lisa M; Knott, Ben; Valter, Krisztina; Hemmi, Jan M

    2014-10-15

    Marsupials are believed to be the only non-primate mammals with both trichromatic and dichromatic color vision. The diversity of color vision systems present in marsupials remains mostly unexplored. Marsupials occupy a diverse range of habitats, which may have led to considerable variation in the presence, density, distribution, and spectral sensitivity of retinal photoreceptors. In this study we analyzed the distribution of photoreceptors in the common brushtail possum (Trichosurus vulpecula). Immunohistochemistry in wholemounts revealed three cone subpopulations recognized within two spectrally distinct cone classes. Long-wavelength sensitive (LWS) single cones were the largest cone subgroup (67-86%), and formed a weak horizontal visual streak (peak density 2,106?±?435/mm2) across the central retina. LWS double cones were strongly concentrated ventrally (569?±?66/mm2), and created a "negative" visual streak (134?±?45/mm2) in the central retina. The strong regionalization between LWS cone topographies suggests differing visual functions. Short-wavelength sensitive (SWS) cones were present in much lower densities (3-10%), mostly located ventrally (179?±?101/mm2). A minority population of cones (0-2.4%) remained unlabeled by both SWS- and LWS-specific antibodies, and may represent another cone population. Microspectrophotometry of LWS cone and rod visual pigments shows peak spectral sensitivities at 544 nm and 500 nm, respectively. Cone to ganglion cell convergences remain low and constant across the retina, thereby maintaining good visual acuity, but poor contrast sensitivity during photopic vision. Given that brushtail possums are so strongly nocturnal, we hypothesize that their acuity is set by the scotopic visual system, and have minimized the number of cones necessary to serve the ganglion cells for photopic vision. PMID:24737644

  16. Thyroid Hormone Signaling and Cone Photoreceptor Viability.

    PubMed

    Ma, Hongwei; Ding, Xi-Qin

    2016-01-01

    Thyroid hormone (TH) signaling regulates cell proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. In the retina, TH signaling plays a central role in cone opsin expression. TH signaling inhibits S opsin expression, stimulates M opsin expression, and promotes dorsal-ventral opsin patterning. TH signaling has also been associated with cone photoreceptor viability. Treatment with thyroid hormone triiodothyronine (T3) or induction of high T3 by deleting the hormone-inactivating enzyme type 3 iodothyronine deiodinase (DIO3) causes cone death in mice. This effect is reversed by deletion of the TH receptor (TR) gene. Consistent with the T3 treatment effect, suppressing TH signaling preserves cones in mouse models of retinal degeneration. The regulation of cone survival by TH signaling appears to be independent of its regulatory role in cone opsin expression. The mechanism by which TH signaling regulates cone viability remains to be identified. The current understanding of TH signaling regulation in photoreceptor viability suggests that suppressing TH signaling locally in the retina may represent a novel strategy for retinal degeneration management. PMID:26427466

  17. Eye-independent, light-activated chromatophore expansion (LACE) and expression of phototransduction genes in the skin of Octopus bimaculoides.

    PubMed

    Ramirez, M Desmond; Oakley, Todd H

    2015-05-15

    Cephalopods are renowned for changing the color and pattern of their skin for both camouflage and communication. Yet, we do not fully understand how cephalopods control the pigmented chromatophore organs in their skin and change their body pattern. Although these changes primarily rely on eyesight, we found that light causes chromatophores to expand in excised pieces of Octopus bimaculoides skin. We call this behavior light-activated chromatophore expansion (or LACE). To uncover how octopus skin senses light, we used antibodies against r-opsin phototransduction proteins to identify sensory neurons that express r-opsin in the skin. We hypothesized that octopus LACE relies on the same r-opsin phototransduction cascade found in octopus eyes. By creating an action spectrum for the latency to LACE, we found that LACE occurred most quickly in response to blue light. We fit our action spectrum data to a standard opsin curve template and estimated the ?max of LACE to be 480?nm. Consistent with our hypothesis, the maximum sensitivity of the light sensors underlying LACE closely matches the known spectral sensitivity of opsin from octopus eyes. LACE in isolated preparations suggests that octopus skin is intrinsically light sensitive and that this dispersed light sense might contribute to their unique and novel patterning abilities. Finally, our data suggest that a common molecular mechanism for light detection in eyes may have been co-opted for light sensing in octopus skin and then used for LACE. PMID:25994633

  18. Optogenetics for Retinal Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Henriksen, Bradley S.; Marc, Robert E.; Bernstein, Paul S.

    2014-01-01

    Optogenetics is the use of genetic methods combined with optical technology to achieve gain or loss of function within neuronal circuits. The field of optogenetics has been rapidly expanding in efforts to restore visual function to blinding diseases such as retinitis pigmentosa (RP). Most work in the field includes a group of light-sensitive retinaldehyde-binding proteins known as opsins. Opsins couple photon absorption to molecular signaling chains that control cellular ion currents. Targeting of opsin genes to surviving retinal cells is fundamental to the success of optogenetic therapy. Viral delivery, primarily adeno-associated virus, using intravitreal injection for inner retinal cells and subretinal injection for outer retinal cells, has proven successful in many models. Challenges in bioengineering remain for optogenetics including relative insensitivity of opsins to physiologic light levels of stimulation and difficulty with viral delivery in primate models. However, targeting optogenetic therapy may present an even greater challenge. Neural and glial remodeling seen in advanced stages of RP result in reorganization of remaining neural retina, and optogenetic therapy may not yield functional results. Remodeling also poses a challenge to the selection of cellular targets, with bipolar, amacrine and ganglion cells all playing distinct physiologic roles, and affected by remodeling differently. Although optogenetics has drawn closer to clinical utility, advances in opsin engineering, therapeutic targeting and ultimately in molecular inhibition of remodeling will play critical roles in the continued clinical advancement of optogenetic therapy. PMID:25667740

  19. Spectral sensitivity of light-induced hatching and expression of genes mediating photoreception in eggs of the Asian tadpole shrimp Triops granarius.

    PubMed

    Kashiyama, Kazuyuki; Ito, Chihiro; Numata, Hideharu; Goto, Shin G

    2010-08-01

    Embryonic development of the Asian tadpole shrimp Triops granarius is arrested at an early stage of organogenesis under darkness, whereas exposure to light resumes its development and promotes hatching. To better understand the photoreception systems involved in the light-induced hatching of T. granarius eggs, we examined the spectral sensitivity of hatching and the expression of genes involved in photoreception (opsins) and phototransduction (arrestin 2). Hatching of eggs is induced by light of broad wavelengths, from ultraviolet (UV) (395 nm) to red (660 nm), suggesting that visual pigments are involved in photoreception. Next, we focused on opsins which are protein moieties of visual pigments and arrestin 2 which is involved in a phototransduction cascade. Transcripts of several opsin genes and the arrestin 2 gene were detected in T. granarius eggs. Thus, we present a possibility that T. granarius eggs use visual pigments for light perception in light-induced hatching. PMID:20347048

  20. Spectral and temporal sensitivity of cone-mediated responses in mouse retinal ganglion cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yanbin V.; Weick, Michael; Demb, Jonathan B.

    2011-01-01

    The retina uses two photoreceptor types to encode the wide range of light intensities in the natural environment. Rods mediate vision in dim light, whereas cones mediate vision in bright light. Mouse photoreceptors include only 3% cones, and the majority of these co-express two opsins (S, M), with peak sensitivity to either ultraviolet (360 nm) or green light (508 nm). The M:S opsin ratio varies across the retina but has not been characterized functionally, preventing quantitative study of cone-mediated vision. Furthermore, physiological and behavioral measurements suggested that mouse retina supports relatively slow temporal processing (peak sensitivity, ~2–5 Hz), compared to primates; however, past studies used visible wavelengths that are inefficient at stimulating mouse S opsin. Here, we measured the M:S opsin expression ratio across the mouse retina, as reflected by ganglion cell responses, in vitro, and probed cone-mediated ganglion cell temporal properties using ultraviolet light stimulation and linear systems analysis. From recordings in mice lacking rod function (Gnat1?/?, Rho?/?), we estimate ~70% M-opsin expression in far dorsal retina, dropping to <5% M-opsin expression throughout ventral retina. In mice lacking cone function (Gnat2cpfl3), light-adapted rod-mediated responses peaked at ~5–7 Hz. In wild-type mice, cone-mediated responses peaked at ~10 Hz, with substantial responsiveness up to ~30 Hz. Therefore, despite the small percentage of cones, cone-mediated responses in mouse ganglion cells are fast and robust, similar to those in primates. These measurements enable quantitative analysis of cone-mediated responses at all levels of the visual system. PMID:21613480

  1. Molecular evidence for color discrimination in the Atlantic sand fiddler crab, Uca pugilator

    PubMed Central

    Rajkumar, Premraj; Rollmann, Stephanie M.; Cook, Tiffany A.; Layne, John E.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY Fiddler crabs are intertidal brachyuran crabs that belong to the genus Uca. Approximately 97 different species have been identified, and several of these live sympatrically. Many have species-specific body color patterns that may act as signals for intra- and interspecific communication. To understand the behavioral and ecological role of this coloration we must know whether fiddler crabs have the physiological capacity to perceive color cues. Using a molecular approach, we identified the opsin-encoding genes and determined their expression patterns across the eye of the sand fiddler crab, Uca pugilator. We identified three different opsin-encoding genes (UpRh1, UpRh2 and UpRh3). UpRh1 and UpRh2 are highly related and have similarities in their amino acid sequences to other arthropod long- and medium-wavelength-sensitive opsins, whereas UpRh3 is similar to other arthropod UV-sensitive opsins. All three opsins are expressed in each ommatidium, in an opsin-specific pattern. UpRh3 is present only in the R8 photoreceptor cell, whereas UpRh1 and UpRh2 are present in the R1-7 cells, with UpRh1 expression restricted to five cells and UpRh2 expression present in three cells. Thus, one photoreceptor in every ommatidium expresses both UpRh1 and UpRh2, providing another example of sensory receptor coexpression. These results show that U. pugilator has the basic molecular machinery for color perception, perhaps even trichromatic vision. PMID:21113005

  2. Phototransduction Motifs and Variations

    PubMed Central

    Yau, King-Wai; Hardie, Roger C.

    2010-01-01

    Seeing begins in the photoreceptors, where light is absorbed and signaled to the nervous system. Throughout the animal kingdom, photoreceptors are diverse in design and purpose. Nonetheless, phototransduction—the mechanism by which absorbed photons are converted into an electrical response—is highly conserved and based almost exclusively on a single class of photoproteins, the opsins. In this Review, we survey the G protein-coupled signaling cascades downstream from opsins in photoreceptors across vertebrate and invertebrate species, noting their similarities as well as differences. PMID:19837030

  3. NASA's Living with a Star Program: The Geospace Mission Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barth, Janet L.; Giles, Barbara; Zanetti, Lawrence; Spann, James; Day, John H. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    NASA has initiated the Living with a Star Program (LWS) to develop the scientific understanding to address the aspects of the Connected Sun-Earth system that affect life and society. A goal of the program is to bridge the gap between science, engineering, and user application communities. This will enable future science, operational, and commercial objectives in space and atmospheric environments by improving engineering approaches to the accommodation and/or mitigation of the effects of solar variability on technological systems. Three program elements are the Science Missions; a Theory, Modeling, and Data Analysis program; and a Space Environment Testbeds program. Because many of the effects of solar variability on humanity are observed in Geospace regions of space, the science research for all three elements of the LWS Program have significant components in Geospace regions.

  4. The Living With a Star CDAW on the Solar and Geospace Connections of Solar Energetic Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Barbara J.; Gopalswamy, Nat; Colon, Gilberto (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Living With a Star Program is sponsoring its first CDAW (Coordinated Data Analysis Workshop) to be held July 23-26, 2002 at a conference support location near the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. This CDAW's topic is Solar Energetic Particle events. The topic was chosen due to the breadth of the impact of SEP's on the space environment and terrestrial climate. General goals of the LWS CDAW are a) Stimulate LWS Science on the near term, b) Facilitate cross-disciplinary interaction between the LWS scientific and space environment communities, c) Produce science products for all potential users, and d) Assist in the development of the LWS data system. The workshop will proceed similar to a previous CDAW held in 1999 on Interplanetary Type 11 Shocks. A list of target events has been compiled, which can be found at the workshop home page. The page lists all of the SEP events from 1996 January to 2001 December with energy > 10 MeV particle intensities exceeding 10 PFU. Preparation for the workshop consists of identifying relevant data from a wide variety of sources (solar, interplanetary, magnetospheric and climatary), accumulating the data (frequently this consists of both raw data, processed data and plots to ease perusal during the workshop) and gathering the software tools. Participants in the workshop are expected to complete their contributions of data or models prior to arriving at the workshop. Most of the CDAW consists of joint analysis of this data; only a few introductory talks are given at the beginning of the workshop, with the rest of the time being devoted to producing scientific results. Additional symposia may be scheduled at a later date, which will allow a venue for scientific talks on the CDAW results and associated science. The poster will list the scientific goals of the workshop, as well as a scientific discussion of the data which has been accumulated thus far.

  5. Evaluation of mercury in the liquid waste processing facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, Vijay; Shah, Hasmukh; Occhipinti, John E.; Wilmarth, William R.; Edwards, Richard E.

    2015-08-13

    This report provides a summary of Phase I activities conducted to support an Integrated Evaluation of Mercury in Liquid Waste System (LWS) Processing Facilities. Phase I activities included a review and assessment of the liquid waste inventory and chemical processing behavior of mercury using a system by system review methodology approach. Gaps in understanding mercury behavior as well as action items from the structured reviews are being tracked. 64% of the gaps and actions have been resolved.

  6. Evaluation of mercury in liquid waste processing facilities - Phase I report

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, V.; Occhipinti, J. E.; Shah, H.; Wilmarth, W. R.; Edwards, R. E.

    2015-07-01

    This report provides a summary of Phase I activities conducted to support an Integrated Evaluation of Mercury in Liquid Waste System (LWS) Processing Facilities. Phase I activities included a review and assessment of the liquid waste inventory and chemical processing behavior of mercury using a system by system review methodology approach. Gaps in understanding mercury behavior as well as action items from the structured reviews are being tracked. 64% of the gaps and actions have been resolved.

  7. Evaluation of Mercury in Liquid Waste Processing Facilities - Phase I Report

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, V.; Occhipinti, J.; Shah, H.; Wilmarth, B.; Edwards, R.

    2015-07-01

    This report provides a summary of Phase I activities conducted to support an Integrated Evaluation of Mercury in Liquid Waste System (LWS) Processing Facilities. Phase I activities included a review and assessment of the liquid waste inventory and chemical processing behavior of mercury using a system by system review methodology approach. Gaps in understanding mercury behavior as well as action items from the structured reviews are being tracked. 64% of the gaps and actions have been resolved.

  8. Copyright 2015 American Medical Association. All rights reserved. SCIENTIFIC DISCOVERY AND THE FUTURE OF MEDICINE

    E-print Network

    Schnitzer, Mark

    and fiber optics for light delivery into the nervous system and (2) genes called microbial opsins, which ), and to observe the real-time activity of specified neurons and projec- tions within the nervous system of genes have been identified that together contribute to the occurrence of psychiatric disorders

  9. Spectral sensitivity of the principal eyes of sunburst diving beetle, Thermonectus marmoratus (Coleoptera: Dytiscidae), larvae.

    PubMed

    Maksimovic, Srdjan; Layne, John E; Buschbeck, Elke K

    2011-11-01

    The principal eyes of sunburst diving beetle, Thermonectus marmoratus, larvae are among the most unusual eyes in the animal kingdom. They are composed of long tubes connecting bifocal lenses with two retinas: a distal retina situated a few hundred micrometers behind the lens, and a proximal retina that is situated directly beneath. A recent molecular study on first instar larvae suggests that the distal retina expresses a long-wavelength-sensitive opsin (TmLW), whereas the proximal retina predominantly expresses an ultraviolet-sensitive opsin (TmUV II). Using cloning and in situ hybridization we here confirm that this opsin distribution is, for the most part, maintained in third instar larvae (with the exception of the TmUV I that is weakly expressed only in proximal retinas of first instar larvae). We furthermore use intracellular electrophysiological recordings and neurobiotin injections to determine the spectral sensitivity of individual photoreceptor cells. We find that photoreceptors of the proximal retina have a sensitivity curve that peaks at 374-375 nm. The shape of the curve is consistent with the predicted absorbance of a single-opsin template. The spectral response of photoreceptors from the distal retina confirms their maximum sensitivity to green light with the dominant ?-peak between 520 and 540 nm, and the secondary ?-peak between 340 and 360 nm. These physiological measurements support molecular predictions and represent important steps towards understanding the functional organization of the unusual stemmata of T. marmoratus larvae. PMID:21993780

  10. Molecular genetics of rhodopsin and phototrans duction in the visual system of Drosophila

    SciTech Connect

    Zuker, C.; Cowman, A.; Montell, C.; Rubin, G.

    1987-05-01

    The authors have isolated the genes encoding four Drosophila visual pigments. Each of these opsins is expressed in a set of functionally and anatomically distinct photoreceptor cells of the eye. One is expressed in the six outer photoreceptor cells (R1-R6), the second in the central R8 photoreceptor cell, and the other two in the UV sensitive R7 photoreceptor cells. They have determined the structure and nucleotide sequence of each of these genes. They have used P element-mediated gene transfer to introduce the cloned structural gene for the R1-R6 opsin in the Drosophila germline and restored the ninaE mutant phenotype to wild-type. In an attempt to study the contribution of the various opsins to the specific functional properties of the different photoreceptor cell types, they have genetically engineered Drosophila lines that express R8 opsin in the R1-R6 photoreceptor cells. In collaboration with Drs. Ozaki and Pak at Purdue University, they have used oligonucleotide site-directed mutagenesis to mutate selected amino acids and regions of the rhodopsin molecule and reintroduced the mutated genes into Drosophila to analyze structure-function relationships in the rhodopsin molecule.

  11. Photoreceptor cells are major contributors to diabetes-induced oxidative stress and local

    E-print Network

    Palczewski, Krzysztof

    are the most prevalent cells in the retina. These postmitotic cells have a very high metabolic rate, using more photoreceptors. Superoxide generation was assessed in retinas of male C57BL/6J mice made diabetic for 2 mo (4 mo in the retina, and their deletion (either genetically in opsin-/- mice or acutely with iodoacetic acid

  12. PROCEEDINGS OF THE AMERICAN PHILOSOPHICAL SOCIETY VOL. 150, NO. 4, DECEMBER 2006 Franklin's Vision1

    E-print Network

    Zewail, Ahmed

    Laboratory for Molecular Sciences and the Physical Biology Center for Ultrafast Science and Technology energy to an electro- chemical impulse (fig. 2). The impulse is transmitted through neurons Figure 1 molecule, retinal, in as- sociation with a protein named opsin. A change in shape of reti- nal, which

  13. Probing Mechanisms of Photoreceptor Degeneration in a New Mouse Model of the Common Form of Autosomal

    E-print Network

    Palczewski, Krzysztof

    of Autosomal Dominant Retinitis Pigmentosa due to P23H Opsin Mutations*S Received for publication,December 6 dominant retinitis pigmentosa. Although P23H cul- tured cell and transgenic animal models have been- eases (3). Among them, retinitis pigmentosa (RP)2 refers to a group that displays genetic heterogeneity

  14. Mol. Biol. Evol. 19(6):983986. 2002 2002 by the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution. ISSN: 0737-4038

    E-print Network

    Acid Substitutions Between Bee and Butterfly Red- and Green-Sensitive Opsins Adriana D. Briscoe atomic co- ordinates of a three-dimensional (3D) crystal structure, and the potential energy of a high-resolution crystal structure of bovine rhodop- sin (Palczewski et al. 2000) and the existence

  15. Retinal counterion switch in the photoactivation of the G protein-coupled receptor rhodopsin

    E-print Network

    Chang, Belinda

    . Rhodopsin, the vertebrate dim-light photoreceptor, is a pro- totypical member of the G protein from C12 of 11-cis retinal (7), and is highly conserved in vertebrate opsins, blue cone, and UV cone-binding site (14). Two experimental mutagenesis studies on the role of Glu-181 in rhodopsin have been performed

  16. original article The American Society of Gene & Cell Therapy Molecular Therapy vol. 18 no. 12, 20572063 dec. 2010 2057

    E-print Network

    Gollisch, Tim

    impaired daylight vision and loss of color discrimination in human achromatopsia. Here, we introduce viral, autosomal recessive disor- der characterized by lack of cone photoreceptor function. In con- trast to color blindness, in which changes in expression of opsin genes merely affect spectral sensitivity

  17. Imaging retinal mosaics in the living

    E-print Network

    for both basic scientists and clinicians. Recent advances in adaptive optics retinal imaging- and M-cone ratio in persons with normal color vision.7,6 Adaptive optics imaging of persons­10 Genetic techniques can determine specific mutations in the cone opsin, revealing the genotype

  18. Positive selection of a duplicated UV-sensitive visual pigment coincides with wing pigment evolution in Heliconius butterflies.

    PubMed

    Briscoe, Adriana D; Bybee, Seth M; Bernard, Gary D; Yuan, Furong; Sison-Mangus, Marilou P; Reed, Robert D; Warren, Andrew D; Llorente-Bousquets, Jorge; Chiao, Chuan-Chin

    2010-02-23

    The butterfly Heliconius erato can see from the UV to the red part of the light spectrum with color vision proven from 440 to 640 nm. Its eye is known to contain three visual pigments, rhodopsins, produced by an 11-cis-3-hydroxyretinal chromophore together with long wavelength (LWRh), blue (BRh) and UV (UVRh1) opsins. We now find that H. erato has a second UV opsin mRNA (UVRh2)-a previously undescribed duplication of this gene among Lepidoptera. To investigate its evolutionary origin, we screened eye cDNAs from 14 butterfly species in the subfamily Heliconiinae and found both copies only among Heliconius. Phylogeny-based tests of selection indicate positive selection of UVRh2 following duplication, and some of the positively selected sites correspond to vertebrate visual pigment spectral tuning residues. Epi-microspectrophotometry reveals two UV-absorbing rhodopsins in the H. erato eye with lambda(max) = 355 nm and 398 nm. Along with the additional UV opsin, Heliconius have also evolved 3-hydroxy-DL-kynurenine (3-OHK)-based yellow wing pigments not found in close relatives. Visual models of how butterflies perceive wing color variation indicate this has resulted in an expansion of the number of distinguishable yellow colors on Heliconius wings. Functional diversification of the UV-sensitive visual pigments may help explain why the yellow wing pigments of Heliconius are so colorful in the UV range compared to the yellow pigments of close relatives lacking the UV opsin duplicate. PMID:20133601

  19. Integrative Zoology 2009; 4: 75-86 doi: 10.1111/j.1749-4877.2008.00137.x Cichlid fish visual systems: mechanisms of spectral tuning

    E-print Network

    Carleton, Karen L.

    assemblages such as coral reef fishes, except that cichlid diversity has arisen within one closely related contribute to the evolution of cichlid diversity through speciation. Key words: cichlid fish, opsin gene to the evolution of every possible foraging mode, including piscivory, scale eaters, molluscivores, algal scrapers

  20. -binding proteins in the retina: structure, function, and the etiology

    E-print Network

    Palczewski, Krzysztof

    separate from the plasma membrane. Each disk contains 104 ±106 visual pigment molecules, rhodopsin proteins which are collectively referred to as opsins. These four visual pigment complexes are distributed between rod photoreceptors, responsible for visual detection under conditions of low illumination

  1. Introduction Color vision enables animals to reliably detect and recognize

    E-print Network

    1944 Introduction Color vision enables animals to reliably detect and recognize important objects depends on the visual pigment expressed in the receptor. The three insect receptor types correspond by the opsin-based visual pigment expressed in it. We show here, through behavioral experiments

  2. Paleomolecular biology unravels the evolutionary mystery of vertebrate UV vision

    E-print Network

    Zhang, Jianzhi

    the detection of a changing traffic light to the relaxing sight of Vincent van Gogh's ``Sun- flower,'' color. Vision starts when visual pigments are activated by the absorption of photons. A visual pigment is composed of a pro- tein called opsin and a chromophore. The light sensitivity of a visual pigment

  3. Speciation through sensory drive in cichlid Ole Seehausen1,2

    E-print Network

    in Lake Victoria8 . Visual pigments have been compared for three pairs, and behavioural light detection in Lake Victoria9 . Vertebrate visual pigments consist of a light-absorbing component, the chromophore, and a protein moiety, the opsin10 . Spectral sensitivity is determined by the chromophore (A1 or A2 pigments

  4. Human Cellular Retinaldehyde-Binding Protein Has Secondary Thermal 9-cis-Retinal Isomerase Activity

    E-print Network

    Palczewski, Krzysztof

    opsin receptor molecules into photosensitive retinoid pigments of the eye. We report a thermal secondary isomerase activity of CRALBP when bound to 9-cis-retinal. UV/vis and 1 H NMR spectroscopy were used trans-to-cis recycling occurs in the rod and cone cells and in the neighboring retinal pigment

  5. Signaling States of Rhodopsin FORMATION OF THE STORAGE FORM, METARHODOPSIN III, FROM ACTIVE METARHODOPSIN II*

    E-print Network

    Palczewski, Krzysztof

    -trans-retinal dissociates from opsin. The pigment is eventually restored by re- combining with enzymatically produced 11-cis-visible spectroscopy, we investigated Meta II decay in native rod disk membranes. Up to 40% of Meta III is formed regenerating the pigment. The decay of Meta II thus provides an interlink among transduction, the quenching

  6. WWiillll hhee ssttiillll llooookk ggoooodd wwiitthh tthhee lliigghhttss oonn?? SSppeeccttrraall ttuunniinngg ooff vviissuuaall ppiiggmmeennttss iinn ffiisshh

    E-print Network

    Carleton, Karen L.

    are determined by various evolutionary pressures. For example, color-driven sexual selection is rife among fish avoidance and the choice of attractive mates. Also, during development, the requirements of the fishes pigments that they contain [7]. The opsin pigment genes are a central factor in determining the visual

  7. On the other hand, at 160 sites (2.2% of the disease-associated sites), the

    E-print Network

    Carleton, Karen L.

    many species of cichlid fishes have evolved in the Great Lakes of East Africa. It seems likely. The retina con- tains several types of cones. Each cone type has a unique visual pigment, which absorbs light in a different part of the spectrum (Figure 1). Each visual pigment is comprised of an opsin protein, wrapped

  8. Mol. Biol. Evol. 18(8):15401550. 2001 2001 by the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution. ISSN: 0737-4038

    E-print Network

    Kocher, Thomas D.

    ; Yokoyama, Radlwimmer, and Blow 2000), and the blue shift of visual pigments in deep-water fish- es (Hunt et. ISSN: 0737-4038 Cone Opsin Genes of African Cichlid Fishes: Tuning Spectral Sensitivity by Differential, University of New Hampshire Spectral tuning of visual pigments is typically accomplished through changes

  9. INTRODUCTION Recent discoveries of functional color vision at low light levels among

    E-print Network

    Cummings, Molly E.

    4085 INTRODUCTION Recent discoveries of functional color vision at low light levels among nocturnal animals. Traditionally, the low light intensities available in nocturnal environments were believed at nocturnal light levels may even be adaptive for some mammals. Studies of opsin genes in nocturnal primates

  10. Supporting Information Section S1: Known Spectral Tuning Sites

    E-print Network

    Carleton, Karen L.

    , Seehausen O (2005) Colour vision and speciation in Lake Victoria cichlids of the genus Pundamilia. Mol Ecol selection on opsins drives incipient speciation in Lake Victoria cichlids. PLoS Biol 4: 2244-2251. Section S - confirming the variable spectral sensitivity of SWS1 pigments in Lake Malawi. This variation in spectral

  11. 2011NatureAmerica,Inc.Allrightsreserved. nature neurOSCIenCe advance online publication

    E-print Network

    Schnitzer, Mark

    I Ca l r e p O r t S Optogenetics is a technique for controlling subpopulations of neurons in the intact brain using light. This technique has the potential to enhance basic systems neuroscience research halorhodopsin and the step- function opsin), which we characterized electrophysiologically, histologically

  12. Is positive selection responsible for the evolution of a duplicate UV-

    E-print Network

    Nei, Masatoshi

    LETTER Is positive selection responsible for the evolution of a duplicate UV- sensitive opsin gene method is not well-founded, and the method is known to produce significant false-positive results even evolution in Heliconius butterflies. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 107:3628­3633. 2. Yang Z, Wong WS, Nielsen R

  13. Retinal-binding proteins mirror prokaryotic dynamics in multipond solar salterns.

    PubMed

    Gomariz, María; Martínez-García, Manuel; Santos, Fernando; Constantino, Marco; Meseguer, Inmaculada; Antón, Josefa

    2015-02-01

    Microbial opsin (i.e. retinal-binding protein) dynamics has been studied along a salinity gradient in Santa Pola solar salterns (Alicante, Spain) by using culture-independent approaches and statistical analyses. Five ponds of salinities ranging from 18% to above 40% were sampled nine times along a year. Forty-three opsin-like sequences were retrieved by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and clustered into 18 different phylogroups, indicating that their diversity was higher than expected according to previous data. Moreover, the statistical correlation between environmental factors controlling microbial community structure and dynamics of environmental rhodopsin proteins indicated almost identical temporal fluctuations between the opsin-related sequences and their corresponding putative 'producers' in nature. Although most sequences were related to others previously detected in hypersaline environments, some pond-specific opsins putatively belonged to previously uncharacterized hosts. Furthermore, we propose that subtle changes in the bacteriorhodopsin 'retinal proton binding pocket', which is key in the photocycle function, could be the molecular basis behind a fine 'photocycle-tuning' mechanism to avoid inter/intraspecies light-competition in hypersaline environments. PMID:25387432

  14. Positive selection of a duplicated UV-sensitive visual pigment coincides with wing pigment evolution in Heliconius butterflies

    PubMed Central

    Briscoe, Adriana D.; Bybee, Seth M.; Bernard, Gary D.; Yuan, Furong; Sison-Mangus, Marilou P.; Reed, Robert D.; Warren, Andrew D.; Llorente-Bousquets, Jorge; Chiao, Chuan-Chin

    2010-01-01

    The butterfly Heliconius erato can see from the UV to the red part of the light spectrum with color vision proven from 440 to 640 nm. Its eye is known to contain three visual pigments, rhodopsins, produced by an 11-cis-3-hydroxyretinal chromophore together with long wavelength (LWRh), blue (BRh) and UV (UVRh1) opsins. We now find that H. erato has a second UV opsin mRNA (UVRh2)—a previously undescribed duplication of this gene among Lepidoptera. To investigate its evolutionary origin, we screened eye cDNAs from 14 butterfly species in the subfamily Heliconiinae and found both copies only among Heliconius. Phylogeny-based tests of selection indicate positive selection of UVRh2 following duplication, and some of the positively selected sites correspond to vertebrate visual pigment spectral tuning residues. Epi-microspectrophotometry reveals two UV-absorbing rhodopsins in the H. erato eye with ?max = 355 nm and 398 nm. Along with the additional UV opsin, Heliconius have also evolved 3-hydroxy-DL-kynurenine (3-OHK)-based yellow wing pigments not found in close relatives. Visual models of how butterflies perceive wing color variation indicate this has resulted in an expansion of the number of distinguishable yellow colors on Heliconius wings. Functional diversification of the UV-sensitive visual pigments may help explain why the yellow wing pigments of Heliconius are so colorful in the UV range compared to the yellow pigments of close relatives lacking the UV opsin duplicate. PMID:20133601

  15. INTRODUCTION Animal colouration depends on an interplay of selective forces.

    E-print Network

    Carleton, Karen L.

    in colour, brightness or patch size (Endler, 1978). To the human eye, male cichlids certainly appear more sensitivity, the spectral properties of the fish and its background, and the light which illuminates them. The visual sensitivity of cichlids has been extensively characterized. Cichlids have seven cone opsin genes

  16. Adaptive evolution of color vision as seen through the eyes of butterflies Prudic, and Adriana D. Briscoe

    E-print Network

    are made up of a light-sensitive chromophore (e.g., 11-cis-retinal) and an opsin protein. AlthoughAdaptive evolution of color vision as seen through the eyes of butterflies Prudic, and Adriana D reprints, see: Notes: #12;Adaptive evolution of color vision as seen through the eyes of butterflies

  17. Genetica 92: 23-32, 1993. 1993Kluwer Academic Publishers. Printed in the Netherlands.

    E-print Network

    Chang, Belinda

    visual sys- tem is composed of three simple eyes, the ocelli, in addition to the compound eyes, which eight photoreceptor neurons designated R1-R8. The Rhl gene expresses a blue/green-absorbing op- sin in cells R1-R6, which mediate optomotor be- havior. The Rh2 gene expresses a blue-absorbing opsin found

  18. Time-reversal and Interferometry with applications to forward modeling of wave propagation and a chapter on receiver functions 

    E-print Network

    van Manen, Dirk-Jan

    2006-01-01

    In exploration seismics and non-destructive evaluation, acoustic, elastic and electro-magnetic waves sensitive to inhomogeneities in the medium under investigation are used to probe its interior. Waves multiply scattered ...

  19. Solar Sentinels: Report of the Science and Technology Definition Team

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    The goal of NASA s Living With a Star (LWS) program is to develop the scientific understanding necessary to effectively address those aspects of the connected Sun Earth system that directly affect life and society. Along with the other elements of LWS, Solar Sentinels aims to discover, understand, and model the heliospheric initiation, propagation, and solar connection of those energetic phenomena that adversely affect space exploration and life and society here on Earth. The Solar Sentinels mission will address the following questions: (1) How, where, and under what circumstances are solar energetic particles (SEPs) accelerated to high energies and how do they propagate through the heliosphere? And (2) How are solar wind structures associated with these SEPs, like CMEs, shocks, and high-speed streams, initiated, propagate, evolve, and interact in the inner heliosphere? The Sentinels STDT recommends implementing this mission in two portions, one optimized for inner heliospheric in-situ measurements and the other for solar remote observations. Sentinels will greatly enhance the overall LWS science return.

  20. Alouatta Trichromatic Color Vision: Cone Spectra and Physiological Responses Studied with Microspectrophotometry and Single Unit Retinal Electrophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Silveira, Luiz Carlos L.; Saito, Cézar A.; da Silva Filho, Manoel; Kremers, Jan; Bowmaker, James K.; Lee, Barry B.

    2014-01-01

    The howler monkeys (Alouatta sp.) are the only New World primates to exhibit routine trichromacy. Both males and females have three cone photopigments. However, in contrast to Old World monkeys, Alouatta has a locus control region upstream of each opsin gene on the X-chromosome and this might influence the retinal organization underlying its color vision. Post-mortem microspectrophotometry (MSP) was performed on the retinae of two male Alouatta to obtain rod and cone spectral sensitivities. The MSP data were consistent with only a single opsin being expressed in each cone and electrophysiological data were consistent with this primate expressing full trichromacy. To study the physiological organization of the retina underlying Alouatta trichromacy, we recorded from retinal ganglion cells of the same animals used for MSP measurements with a variety of achromatic and chromatic stimulus protocols. We found MC cells and PC cells in the Alouatta retina with similar properties to those previously found in the retina of other trichromatic primates. MC cells showed strong phasic responses to luminance changes and little response to chromatic pulses. PC cells showed strong tonic response to chromatic changes and small tonic response to luminance changes. Responses to other stimulus protocols (flicker photometry; changing the relative phase of red and green modulated lights; temporal modulation transfer functions) were also similar to those recorded in other trichromatic primates. MC cells also showed a pronounced frequency double response to chromatic modulation, and with luminance modulation response saturation accompanied by a phase advance between 10–20 Hz, characteristic of a contrast gain mechanism. This indicates a very similar retinal organization to Old-World monkeys. Cone-specific opsin expression in the presence of a locus control region for each opsin may call into question the hypothesis that this region exclusively controls opsin expression. PMID:25405863

  1. The giant spectrin ?V couples the molecular motors to phototransduction and Usher syndrome type I proteins along their trafficking route.

    PubMed

    Papal, Samantha; Cortese, Matteo; Legendre, Kirian; Sorusch, Nasrin; Dragavon, Joseph; Sahly, Iman; Shorte, Spencer; Wolfrum, Uwe; Petit, Christine; El-Amraoui, Aziz

    2013-09-15

    Mutations in the myosin VIIa gene cause Usher syndrome type IB (USH1B), characterized by deaf-blindness. A delay of opsin trafficking has been observed in the retinal photoreceptor cells of myosin VIIa-deficient mice. We identified spectrin ?V, the mammalian ?-heavy spectrin, as a myosin VIIa- and rhodopsin-interacting partner in photoreceptor cells. Spectrin ?V displays a polarized distribution from the Golgi apparatus to the base of the outer segment, which, unlike that of other ? spectrins, matches the trafficking route of opsin and other phototransduction proteins. Formation of spectrin ?V-rhodopsin complex could be detected in the differentiating photoreceptors as soon as their outer segment emerges. A failure of the spectrin ?V-mediated coupling between myosin VIIa and opsin molecules thus probably accounts for the opsin transport delay in myosin VIIa-deficient mice. We showed that spectrin ?V also associates with two USH1 proteins, sans (USH1G) and harmonin (USH1C). Spectrins are supposed to function as heteromers of ? and ? subunits, but fluorescence resonance energy transfer and in vitro binding experiments indicated that spectrin ?V can also form homodimers, which likely supports its ?II-independent ?V functions. Finally, consistent with its distribution along the connecting cilia axonemes, spectrin ?V binds to several subunits of the microtubule-based motor proteins, kinesin II and the dynein complex. We therefore suggest that spectrin ?V homomers couple some USH1 proteins, opsin and other phototransduction proteins to both actin- and microtubule-based motors, thereby contributing to their transport towards the photoreceptor outer disks. PMID:23704327

  2. Genetic diversity and population structure in lines of chickens divergently selected for high and low 8-week body weight.

    PubMed

    Márquez, G C; Siegel, P B; Lewis, R M

    2010-12-01

    A long-term selection experiment for high or low 8-wk BW in White Plymouth Rock chickens was conducted to study effects of selection on BW and correlated characters. Two lines [high (HWS), low (LWS) weight] were established and have undergone 48 generations of selection. The lines were managed to curtail inbreeding and to maintain similar population structures; such is necessary for equitable comparison of selection response between lines. Our objective was to test the success of that breeding strategy by characterizing genetic diversity and inbreeding in these lines. A pedigree of 5,998 individuals was assembled, with 68 founders, 2,962 HWS chickens, and 2,968 LWS chickens. Inbreeding coefficients (F) were calculated for each line. Maximum F was 0.53 and 0.61, mean F was 0.26 (SD 0.15) and 0.30 (SD 0.17), and change in F was 1.3 and 1.6% per generation in LWS and HWS lines, respectively. The effective population size was 38.3 in LWS and 32.1 in HWS lines. The effective number of founders was 15.7 in both lines, and the effective number of ancestors was 17.5 and 15.5 in LWS and HWS lines, respectively. Thirty ancestors accounted for 90% of the genetic makeup of both lines. Seven male and eight female founders still contributed to both lines at generation 48, although some contributed more to one line than the other. Family sizes were similar for males and females of each line, with males having larger family sizes with greater variance. Accumulated inbreeding was high and effective population size was low, as expected in closed lines. Effective number of founders was relatively low compared with actual number of founders, indicating some contributed more than others to the last generation. Family size statistics indicated that fewer males than females were used, leading to the observed levels of inbreeding. Given their similarity in genetic diversity and family size, it can be concluded that breeding decisions throughout the project resulted in similar population structures in the lines. PMID:21076095

  3. Evidence from Chlamydomonas on the photoactivation of rhodopsins without isomerization of their chromophore

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Kenneth W.; Saranak, Jureepan; Krane, Sonja; Johnson, Randy L.; Nakanishi, Koji

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Attachment of retinal to opsin forms the chromophore N-retinylidene which isomerizes during photoactivation of rhodopsins. To test whether isomerization is crucial, custom-tailored chromophores lacking the ?-ionone ring and any isomerizable bonds were incorporated in vivo into the opsin of a blind mutant of the eukaryote Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. The analogues restored phototaxis with the anticipated action spectra, ruling out the need for isomerization in photoactivation. To further elucidate photoactivation, responses to chromophores formed from naphthalene aldehydes were studied. The resulting action spectral shifts suggest that charge separation within the excited chromophore leads to electric field induced polarization of nearby amino-acid residues and altered hydrogen bonding. This redistribution of charge faciliates the reported multiple bond rotations and protein rearrangements of rhodopsin activation. These results provide new insight into the activation of rhodopsins and related GPCRs. PMID:21700209

  4. Colour vision in marine organisms.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Justin; Carleton, Karen L; Cronin, Thomas

    2015-10-01

    Colour vision in the marine environment is on average simpler than in terrestrial environments with simple or no colour vision through monochromacy or dichromacy. Monochromacy is found in marine mammals and elasmobranchs, including whales and sharks, but not some rays. Conversely, there is also a greater diversity of colour vision in the ocean than on land, examples being the polyspectral stomatopods and the many colour vision solutions found among reef fish. Recent advances in sequencing reveal more opsin (visual pigment) types than functionally useful at any one time. This diversity arises through opsin duplication and conversion. Such mechanisms allow pick-and-mix adaptation that tunes colour vision on a variety of very short non-evolutionary timescales. At least some of the diversity in marine colour vision is best explained as unconventional colour vision or as neutral drift. PMID:25725325

  5. Inhibiting the Activity of CA1 Hippocampal Neurons Prevents the Recall of Contextual Fear Memory in Inducible ArchT Transgenic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Sakaguchi, Masanori; Kim, Karam; Yu, Lily Mae Yee; Hashikawa, Yoshiko; Sekine, Yukiko; Okumura, Yuki; Kawano, Masako; Hayashi, Masanobu; Kumar, Deependra; Boyden, Edward S.; McHugh, Thomas J.; Hayashi, Yasunori

    2015-01-01

    The optogenetic manipulation of light-activated ion-channels/pumps (i.e., opsins) can reversibly activate or suppress neuronal activity with precise temporal control. Therefore, optogenetic techniques hold great potential to establish causal relationships between specific neuronal circuits and their function in freely moving animals. Due to the critical role of the hippocampal CA1 region in memory function, we explored the possibility of targeting an inhibitory opsin, ArchT, to CA1 pyramidal neurons in mice. We established a transgenic mouse line in which tetracycline trans-activator induces ArchT expression. By crossing this line with a CaMKII?-tTA transgenic line, the delivery of light via an implanted optrode inhibits the activity of excitatory CA1 neurons. We found that light delivery to the hippocampus inhibited the recall of a contextual fear memory. Our results demonstrate that this optogenetic mouse line can be used to investigate the neuronal circuits underlying behavior. PMID:26075894

  6. Photopigments and colour vision in New World monkeys from the family Atelidae.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, G H; Deegan, J F

    2001-04-01

    Most New World monkeys have an X-chromosome opsin gene polymorphism that produces a variety of different colour vision phenotypes. Howler monkeys (Alouatta), one of the four genera in the family Atelidae lack this polymorphism. Instead, they have acquired uniform trichromatic colour vision similar to that of Old World monkeys, apes and people through opsin gene duplication. In order to determine whether closely related monkeys share this arrangement, spectral sensitivity functions that allow inferences about cone pigments were measured for 56 monkeys from two other Atelid genera, spider monkeys (Ateles) and woolly monkeys (Lagothrix). Unlike howler monkeys, both spider and woolly monkeys are polymorphic for their middle- and long-wavelength cone photopigments. However, they also differ from other polymorphic New World monkeys in having two rather than three possible types of middle- and long-wavelength cone pigments. This feature directly influences the relative numbers of dichromatic and trichromatic monkeys. PMID:11321057

  7. Neuropsin (OPN5)-mediated photoentrainment of local circadian oscillators in mammalian retina and cornea

    PubMed Central

    Buhr, Ethan D.; Yue, Wendy W. S.; Ren, Xiaozhi; Jiang, Zheng; Liao, Hsi-Wen Rock; Mei, Xue; Vemaraju, Shruti; Nguyen, Minh-Thanh; Reed, Randall R.; Lang, Richard A.; Yau, King-Wai; Van Gelder, Russell N.

    2015-01-01

    The molecular circadian clocks in the mammalian retina are locally synchronized by environmental light cycles independent of the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN) in the brain. Unexpectedly, this entrainment does not require rods, cones, or melanopsin (OPN4), possibly suggesting the involvement of another retinal photopigment. Here, we show that the ex vivo mouse retinal rhythm is most sensitive to short-wavelength light but that this photoentrainment requires neither the short-wavelength–sensitive cone pigment [S-pigment or cone opsin (OPN1SW)] nor encephalopsin (OPN3). However, retinas lacking neuropsin (OPN5) fail to photoentrain, even though other visual functions appear largely normal. Initial evidence suggests that OPN5 is expressed in select retinal ganglion cells. Remarkably, the mouse corneal circadian rhythm is also photoentrainable ex vivo, and this photoentrainment likewise requires OPN5. Our findings reveal a light-sensing function for mammalian OPN5, until now an orphan opsin. PMID:26392540

  8. A High-Throughput Drug Screening Strategy for Detecting Rhodopsin P23H Mutant Rescue and Degradation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yuanyuan; Tang, Hong; Seibel, William; Papoian, Ruben; Li, Xiaoyu; Lambert, Nevin A.; Palczewski, Krzysztof

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. Inherent instability of the P23H mutant opsin accounts for approximately 10% of autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa cases. Our purpose was to develop an overall set of reliable screening strategies to assess if either stabilization or enhanced degradation of mutant rhodopsin could rescue rod photoreceptors expressing this mutant protein. These strategies promise to reveal active compounds and clarify molecular mechanisms of biologically important processes, such as inhibition of target degradation or enhanced target folding. Methods. Cell-based bioluminescence reporter assays were developed and validated for high-throughput screening (HTS) of compounds that promote either stabilization or degradation of P23H mutant opsin. Such assays were further complemented by immunoblotting and image-based analyses. Results. Two stabilization assays of P23H mutant opsin were developed and validated, one based on ?-galactosidase complementarity and a second assay involving bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) technology. Moreover, two additional assays evaluating mutant protein degradation also were employed, one based on the disappearance of luminescence and another employing the ALPHA immunoassay. Imaging of cells revealed the cellular localization of mutant rhodopsin, whereas immunoblots identified changes in the aggregation and glycosylation of P23H mutant opsin. Conclusions. Our findings indicate that these initial HTS and following assays can identify active therapeutic compounds, even for difficult targets such as mutant rhodopsin. The assays are readily scalable and their function has been proven with model compounds. High-throughput screening, supported by automated imaging and classic immunoassays, can further characterize multiple steps and pathways in the biosynthesis and degradation of this essential visual system protein. PMID:25783607

  9. The Giant Mottled Eel, Anguilla marmorata, Uses Blue-Shifted Rod Photoreceptors during Upstream Migration

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Feng-Yu; Fu, Wen-Chun; Wang, I-Li

    2014-01-01

    Catadromous fishes migrate between ocean and freshwater during particular phases of their life cycle. The dramatic environmental changes shape their physiological features, e.g. visual sensitivity, olfactory ability, and salinity tolerance. Anguilla marmorata, a catadromous eel, migrates upstream on dark nights, following the lunar cycle. Such behavior may be correlated with ontogenetic changes in sensory systems. Therefore, this study was designed to identify changes in spectral sensitivity and opsin gene expression of A. marmorata during upstream migration. Microspectrophotometry analysis revealed that the tropical eel possesses a duplex retina with rod and cone photoreceptors. The ?max of rod cells are 493, 489, and 489 nm in glass, yellow, and wild eels, while those of cone cells are 508, and 517 nm in yellow, and wild eels, respectively. Unlike European and American eels, Asian eels exhibited a blue-shifted pattern of rod photoreceptors during upstream migration. Quantitative gene expression analyses of four cloned opsin genes (Rh1f, Rh1d, Rh2, and SWS2) revealed that Rh1f expression is dominant at all three stages, while Rh1d is expressed only in older yellow eel. Furthermore, sequence comparison and protein modeling studies implied that a blue shift in Rh1d opsin may be induced by two known (N83, S292) and four putative (S124, V189, V286, I290) tuning sites adjacent to the retinal binding sites. Finally, expression of blue-shifted Rh1d opsin resulted in a spectral shift in rod photoreceptors. Our observations indicate that the giant mottled eel is color-blind, and its blue-shifted scotopic vision may influence its upstream migration behavior and habitat choice. PMID:25101636

  10. Common transcriptional mechanisms for visual photoreceptor cell differentiation among Pancrustaceans.

    PubMed

    Mahato, Simpla; Morita, Shinichi; Tucker, Abraham E; Liang, Xulong; Jackowska, Magdalena; Friedrich, Markus; Shiga, Yasuhiro; Zelhof, Andrew C

    2014-07-01

    A hallmark of visual rhabdomeric photoreceptors is the expression of a rhabdomeric opsin and uniquely associated phototransduction molecules, which are incorporated into a specialized expanded apical membrane, the rhabdomere. Given the extensive utilization of rhabdomeric photoreceptors in the eyes of protostomes, here we address whether a common transcriptional mechanism exists for the differentiation of rhabdomeric photoreceptors. In Drosophila, the transcription factors Pph13 and Orthodenticle (Otd) direct both aspects of differentiation: rhabdomeric opsin transcription and rhabdomere morphogenesis. We demonstrate that the orthologs of both proteins are expressed in the visual systems of the distantly related arthropod species Tribolium castaneum and Daphnia magna and that their functional roles are similar in these species. In particular, we establish that the Pph13 homologs have the ability to bind a subset of Rhodopsin core sequence I sites and that these sites are present in key phototransduction genes of both Tribolium and Daphnia. Furthermore, Pph13 and Otd orthologs are capable of executing deeply conserved functions of photoreceptor differentiation as evidenced by the ability to rescue their respective Drosophila mutant phenotypes. Pph13 homologs are equivalent in their ability to direct both rhabdomere morphogenesis and opsin expression within Drosophila, whereas Otd paralogs demonstrate differential abilities to regulate photoreceptor differentiation. Finally, loss-of-function analyses in Tribolium confirm the conserved requirement of Pph13 and Otd in regulating both rhabdomeric opsin transcription and rhabdomere morphogenesis. Taken together, our data identify components of a regulatory framework for rhabdomeric photoreceptor differentiation in Pancrustaceans, providing a foundation for defining ancestral regulatory modules of rhabdomeric photoreceptor differentiation. PMID:24991928

  11. Common Transcriptional Mechanisms for Visual Photoreceptor Cell Differentiation among Pancrustaceans

    PubMed Central

    Mahato, Simpla; Morita, Shinichi; Tucker, Abraham E.; Liang, Xulong; Jackowska, Magdalena; Friedrich, Markus; Shiga, Yasuhiro; Zelhof, Andrew C.

    2014-01-01

    A hallmark of visual rhabdomeric photoreceptors is the expression of a rhabdomeric opsin and uniquely associated phototransduction molecules, which are incorporated into a specialized expanded apical membrane, the rhabdomere. Given the extensive utilization of rhabdomeric photoreceptors in the eyes of protostomes, here we address whether a common transcriptional mechanism exists for the differentiation of rhabdomeric photoreceptors. In Drosophila, the transcription factors Pph13 and Orthodenticle (Otd) direct both aspects of differentiation: rhabdomeric opsin transcription and rhabdomere morphogenesis. We demonstrate that the orthologs of both proteins are expressed in the visual systems of the distantly related arthropod species Tribolium castaneum and Daphnia magna and that their functional roles are similar in these species. In particular, we establish that the Pph13 homologs have the ability to bind a subset of Rhodopsin core sequence I sites and that these sites are present in key phototransduction genes of both Tribolium and Daphnia. Furthermore, Pph13 and Otd orthologs are capable of executing deeply conserved functions of photoreceptor differentiation as evidenced by the ability to rescue their respective Drosophila mutant phenotypes. Pph13 homologs are equivalent in their ability to direct both rhabdomere morphogenesis and opsin expression within Drosophila, whereas Otd paralogs demonstrate differential abilities to regulate photoreceptor differentiation. Finally, loss-of-function analyses in Tribolium confirm the conserved requirement of Pph13 and Otd in regulating both rhabdomeric opsin transcription and rhabdomere morphogenesis. Taken together, our data identify components of a regulatory framework for rhabdomeric photoreceptor differentiation in Pancrustaceans, providing a foundation for defining ancestral regulatory modules of rhabdomeric photoreceptor differentiation. PMID:24991928

  12. Polymorphism of visual pigment genes in the muriqui (Primates, Atelidae).

    PubMed

    Talebi, M G; Pope, T R; Vogel, E R; Neitz, M; Dominy, N J

    2006-02-01

    Colour vision varies within the family Atelidae (Primates, Platyrrhini), which consists of four genera with the following cladistic relationship: {Alouatta[Ateles (Lagothrix and Brachyteles)]}. Spider monkeys (Ateles) and woolly monkeys (Lagothrix) are characteristic of platyrrhine monkeys in possessing a colour vision polymorphism. The polymorphism results from allelic variation of the single-locus middle-to-long wavelength (M/L) cone opsin gene on the X-chromosome. The presence in the population of alleles coding for different M/L photopigments results in a variety of colour vision phenotypes. Such a polymorphism is absent in howling monkeys (Alouatta), which, alone among platyrrhines, acquired uniform trichromatic vision similar to that of Old World monkeys, apes, and humans through opsin gene duplication. Dietary and morphological similarities between howling monkeys and muriquis (Brachyteles) raise the possibility that the two genera share a similar form of colour vision, uniform trichromacy. Yet parsimony predicts that the colour vision of Brachyteles will resemble the polymorphism present in Lagothrix and Ateles. Here we test this assumption. We obtained DNA from the blood or faeces of 18 muriquis and sequenced exons 3 and 5 of the M/L opsin gene. Our results affirm the existence of a single M/L cone opsin gene in the genus Brachyteles. We detected three alleles with predicted lambdamax values of 530, 550, and 562 nm. Two females were heterozygous and are thus predicted to have different types of M/L cone pigment. We discuss the implication of this result towards understanding the evolutionary ecology of trichromatic vision. PMID:16448420

  13. Impedance-matching analysis in IR leaky-wave antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Premkumar, Navaneeth; Xu, Yuancheng; Lail, Brian A.

    2015-08-01

    Planar leaky-wave antennas (LWA) that are capable of full-space scanning have long since been the pursuit for applications including, but not limited to, integration onto vehicles and into cameras for wide-angle of view beam-steering. Such a leaky-wave surface (LWS) was designed for long-wave infrared frequencies with frequency scanning capability. The LWS is based on a microstrip patch array design of a leaky-wave impedance surface and is made up of gold microstrip patches on a grounded zinc sulphide substrate. A 1D composite right/left-handed (CRLH) metamaterial made by periodically stacking a unit cell of the LWS in the longitudinal direction to form a LWA was designed. This paper deals with loading the LWA with a nickel bolometer to collect leaky-wave signals. The LWA radiates a backward leaking wave at 30 degrees at 28.3THz and scans through broadside for frequencies 20THz through 40THz. The paper deals with effectively placing the bolometer in order for the collected signal to exhibit the designed frequency regime. An effective way to maximize the power coupling into the load from the antenna is also explored. The benefit of such a metamaterial/holographic antennacoupled detector is its ability to provide appreciable capture cross-sections while delivering smart signals to subwavelength sized detectors. Due to their high-gain, low-profile, fast response time of the detector and ease of fabrication, this IR LWA-coupled bolometer harbors great potential in the areas of high resolution, uncooled, infrared imaging.

  14. The Living with a Star Radiation Belt Storm Probes Mission and Related Missions of Opportunity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sibeck, David G.; Mauk, Barry H.; Grebowsky, Joseph M.; Fox, Nicola J.

    2006-01-01

    This presentation provides an overview of the Living With a Star (LWS) Radiation Belt Storm Probes (RBSP) mission in the context of the broader Geospace program. Missions to Geospace offer an opportunity to observe in situ the fundamental processes that operate throughout the solar system and in particular those that generate hazardous space weather effects in the vicinity of Earth. The recently selected investigations on NASA's LWS program's RBSP will provide the measurements needed to characterize and quantify the processes that supply and remove energetic particles from the Earth's Van Allen radiation belts. Instruments on the RBSP spacecraft will observe charged particles that comprise the Earth's radiation belts over the full energy range from 1 eV to more than 10 MeV (including composition), the plasma waves which energize them, the electric fields which transport them, and the magnetic fields which guide their motion. The two-point measurements by the RBSP spacecraft will enable researchers to discriminate between spatial and temporal effects, and therefore between the various proposed mechanisms for particle acceleration and loss. The measurements taken by the RBSP spacecraft will be used in data modeling projects in order to improve the understanding of these fundamental processes and allow better predictions to be made. NASA's LWS program has also recently selected three teams to study concepts for Missions of Opportunity that will augment the RBSP program, by (1) providing an instrument for a Canadian spacecraft in the Earth's radiation belts, (2) quantifying the flux of particles precipitating into the Earth's atmosphere from the Earth's radiation belts, and (3) remotely sensing both spatial and temporal variations in the Earth's ionosphere and thermosphere.

  15. Optogenetics in Mice Performing a Visual Discrimination Task: Measurement and Suppression of Retinal Activation and the Resulting Behavioral Artifact

    PubMed Central

    Danskin, Bethanny; Denman, Daniel; Valley, Matthew; Ollerenshaw, Douglas; Williams, Derric; Groblewski, Peter; Reid, Clay; Olsen, Shawn; Waters, Jack

    2015-01-01

    Optogenetic techniques are used widely to perturb and interrogate neural circuits in behaving animals, but illumination can have additional effects, such as the activation of endogenous opsins in the retina. We found that illumination, delivered deep into the brain via an optical fiber, evoked a behavioral artifact in mice performing a visually guided discrimination task. Compared with blue (473 nm) and yellow (589 nm) illumination, red (640 nm) illumination evoked a greater behavioral artifact and more activity in the retina, the latter measured with electrical recordings. In the mouse, the sensitivity of retinal opsins declines steeply with wavelength across the visible spectrum, but propagation of light through brain tissue increases with wavelength. Our results suggest that poor retinal sensitivity to red light was overcome by relatively robust propagation of red light through brain tissue and stronger illumination of the retina by red than by blue or yellow light. Light adaptation of the retina, via an external source of illumination, suppressed retinal activation and the behavioral artifact without otherwise impacting behavioral performance. In summary, long wavelength optogenetic stimuli are particularly prone to evoke behavioral artifacts via activation of retinal opsins in the mouse, but light adaptation of the retina can provide a simple and effective mitigation of the artifact. PMID:26657323

  16. Signatures of Selection and Gene Conversion Associated with Human Color Vision Variation

    PubMed Central

    Verrelli, Brian C.; Tishkoff, Sarah A.

    2004-01-01

    Trichromatic color vision in humans results from the combination of red, green, and blue photopigment opsins. Although color vision genes have been the targets of active molecular and psychophysical research on color vision abnormalities, little is known about patterns of normal genetic variation in these genes among global human populations. The current study presents nucleotide sequence analyses and tests of neutrality for a 5.5-kb region of the X-linked long-wave “red” opsin gene (OPN1LW) in 236 individuals from ethnically diverse human populations. Our analysis of the recombination landscape across OPN1LW reveals an unusual haplotype structure associated with amino acid replacement variation in exon 3 that is consistent with gene conversion. Compared with the absence of OPN1LW amino acid replacement fixation since divergence from chimpanzee, the human population exhibits a significant excess of high-frequency OPN1LW replacements. Our results suggest that subtle changes in L-cone opsin wavelength absorption may have been adaptive during human evolution. PMID:15252758

  17. Why aye-ayes see blue.

    PubMed

    Melin, Amanda D; Moritz, Gillian L; Fosbury, Robert A E; Kawamura, Shoji; Dominy, Nathaniel J

    2012-03-01

    The capacity for cone-mediated color vision varies among nocturnal primates. Some species are colorblind, having lost the functionality of their short-wavelength-sensitive-1 (SWS1) opsin pigment gene. In other species, such as the aye-aye (Daubentonia madagascariensis), the SWS1 gene remains intact. Recent studies focused on aye-ayes indicate that this gene has been maintained by natural selection and that the pigment has a peak sensitivity (lambda(max)) of 406 nm, which is -20 nm closer to the ultraviolet region of the spectrum than in most primates. The functional significance behind the retention and unusual lambda(max) of this opsin pigment is unknown, and it is perplexing given that all mammals are presumed to be colorblind in the dark. Here we comment on this puzzle and discuss recent findings on the color vision intensity thresholds of terrestrial vertebrates with comparable optics to aye-ayes. We draw attention to the twilight activities of aye-ayes and report that twilight is enriched in short-wavelength (bluish) light. We also show that the intensity of twilight and full moonlight is probably sufficient to support cone-mediated color vision. We speculate that the intact SWS1 opsin pigment gene of aye-ayes is a crepuscular adaptation and we report on the blueness of potential visual targets, such as scent marks and the brilliant blue arils of Ravenala madagascariensis. PMID:24006536

  18. Volvoxrhodopsin, a light-regulated sensory photoreceptor of the spheroidal green alga Volvox carteri.

    PubMed Central

    Ebnet, E; Fischer, M; Deininger, W; Hegemann, P

    1999-01-01

    Somatic cells of the multicellular alga Volvox carteri contain a visual rhodopsin that controls the organism's phototactic behavior via two independent photoreceptor currents. Here, we report the identification of an opsinlike gene, designated as volvoxopsin (vop). The encoded protein exhibits homologies to the opsin of the unicellular alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii (chlamyopsin) and to the entire animal opsin family, thus providing new perspectives on opsin evolution. Volvoxopsin accumulates within the eyes of somatic cells. However, the vop transcript is detectable only in the reproductive eyeless gonidia and embryos. vop mRNA levels increase 400-fold during embryogenesis, when embryos develop in darkness, whereas the vop transcript does not accumulate when embryos develop in the light. An antisense transformant, T3, was generated. This transformant produces 10 times less volvoxopsin than does the wild type. In T3, the vop transcript is virtually absent, whereas the antisense transcript is predominant and light regulated. It follows that vop expression is under light-dependent transcriptional control but that volvoxopsin itself is not the regulatory photoreceptor. Transformant T3 is phototactic, but its phototactic sensitivity is reduced 10-fold relative to the parental wild-type strain HK10. Thus, we offer definitive genetic evidence that a rhodopsin serves as the photoreceptor for phototaxis in a green alga. PMID:10449581

  19. Self-organized criticality and color vision: A guide to water-protein landscape evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, J. C.

    2013-02-01

    We focus here on the scaling properties of small interspecies differences between red cone opsin transmembrane proteins, using a hydropathic elastic roughening tool previously applied to the rhodopsin rod transmembrane proteins. This tool is based on a non-Euclidean hydropathic metric realistically rooted in the atomic coordinates of 5526 protein segments, which thereby encapsulates universal non-Euclidean long-range differential geometrical features of water films enveloping globular proteins in the Protein Data Bank. Whereas the rhodopsin blue rod water films are smoothest in humans, the red cone opsins’ water films are optimized for smoothness in cats and elephants, consistent with protein species landscapes that evolve differently in different contexts. We also analyze red cone opsins in the chromatophore-containing family of chameleons, snakes, zebrafish and goldfish, where short- and long-range (BLAST and hydropathic) amino acid (aa) correlations are found with values as large as 97%-99%. We use hydropathic aa optimization to estimate the maximum number Nmax of color shades that the human eye can discriminate, and obtain 106

  20. Spectral sensitivity of the ctenid spider Cupiennius salei.

    PubMed

    Zopf, Lydia M; Schmid, Axel; Fredman, David; Eriksson, Bo Joakim

    2013-11-01

    The spectral sensitivity of adult male Cupiennius salei Keys, a nocturnal hunting spider, was studied in a behavioural test. As known from earlier behavioural tests, C. salei will walk towards a black target presented in front of a white background. In this study, a black target (size 42×70 cm) was presented in a white arena illuminated by monochromatic light in the range 365-695 nm using 19 monochromatic filters (half-width in the range 6-10 nm). In the first trial, the transmission of the optical filters was between 40% and 80%. In the second trial, the transmission was reduced to 5% using a neutral density filter. At the high intensity, the spiders showed a spectral sensitivity in the range 380-670 nm. In the second trial, the animals only showed directed walks if the illumination was in the range 449-599 nm, indicating a lower sensitivity at the margins of the spectral sensitivity. In previous intracellular recordings, the measured spectral sensitivity was between 320 and 620 nm. Interestingly, these results do not completely match the behaviourally tested spectral sensitivity of the photoreceptors, where the sensitivity range is shifted to longer wavelengths. In order to investigate the molecular background of spectral sensitivity, we searched for opsin genes in C. salei. We found three visual opsins that correspond to UV and middle to long wavelength sensitive opsins as described for jumping spiders. PMID:23948480

  1. Melanopsin mediates light-dependent relaxation in blood vessels

    PubMed Central

    Sikka, Gautam; Hussmann, G. Patrick; Pandey, Deepesh; Cao, Suyi; Hori, Daijiro; Park, Jong Taek; Steppan, Jochen; Kim, Jae Hyung; Barodka, Viachaslau; Myers, Allen C.; Santhanam, Lakshmi; Nyhan, Daniel; Halushka, Marc K.; Koehler, Raymond C.; Snyder, Solomon H.; Shimoda, Larissa A.; Berkowitz, Dan E.

    2014-01-01

    Melanopsin (opsin4; Opn4), a non-image-forming opsin, has been linked to a number of behavioral responses to light, including circadian photo-entrainment, light suppression of activity in nocturnal animals, and alertness in diurnal animals. We report a physiological role for Opn4 in regulating blood vessel function, particularly in the context of photorelaxation. Using PCR, we demonstrate that Opn4 (a classic G protein-coupled receptor) is expressed in blood vessels. Force-tension myography demonstrates that vessels from Opn4?/? mice fail to display photorelaxation, which is also inhibited by an Opn4-specific small-molecule inhibitor. The vasorelaxation is wavelength-specific, with a maximal response at ?430–460 nm. Photorelaxation does not involve endothelial-, nitric oxide-, carbon monoxide-, or cytochrome p450-derived vasoactive prostanoid signaling but is associated with vascular hyperpolarization, as shown by intracellular membrane potential measurements. Signaling is both soluble guanylyl cyclase- and phosphodiesterase 6-dependent but protein kinase G-independent. ?-Adrenergic receptor kinase 1 (?ARK 1 or GRK2) mediates desensitization of photorelaxation, which is greatly reduced by GRK2 inhibitors. Blue light (455 nM) regulates tail artery vasoreactivity ex vivo and tail blood blood flow in vivo, supporting a potential physiological role for this signaling system. This endogenous opsin-mediated, light-activated molecular switch for vasorelaxation might be harnessed for therapy in diseases in which altered vasoreactivity is a significant pathophysiologic contributor. PMID:25404319

  2. Spectral Sensitivity of the ctenid spider Cupiennius salei Keys

    PubMed Central

    Zopf, Lydia M.; Schmid, Axel; Fredman, David; Eriksson, Bo Joakim

    2014-01-01

    Summary The spectral sensitivity of adult male Cupiennius salei Keys, a nocturnal hunting spider, was studied in a behavioural test. As known from earlier behavioural tests, C. salei walks towards a black target presented in front of a white background. In this study a black target (size 42 × 70 cm) was presented in a white arena illuminated by monochromatic light in the range of 365 to 695 nm using 19 monochromatic filters (HW in the range of 6 – 10 nm). In the first trial, the transmission of the optical filters was between 40 % and 80%. In a second trial the transmission was reduced to 5%, using a neutral density filter. At the high intensity the spiders showed a spectral sensivity in the range from 380 to 670 nm. In the second trial the animals only showed directed walks if the illumination was in the range of 449 to 599 nm, indicating a lower sensitivity at the margins of the spectral sensitivity. In previous intracellular recordings, the measured spectral sensitivity was between 320 and 620 nm. Interestingly, these results do not completely match the behaviourally tested spectral sensitivity of the photoreceptors, where the sensitivity range is shifted to longer wavelengths. In order to investigate the molecular background of spectral sensitivity, we searched for opsin genes in C. salei. We found three visual opsins that correspond to UV and middle to long wavelength sensitive opsins as described for jumping spiders. PMID:23948480

  3. Diversity of Color Vision: Not All Australian Marsupials Are Trichromatic

    PubMed Central

    Ebeling, Wiebke; Natoli, Riccardo C.; Hemmi, Jan M.

    2010-01-01

    Color vision in marsupials has recently emerged as a particularly interesting case among mammals. It appears that there are both dichromats and trichromats among closely related species. In contrast to primates, marsupials seem to have evolved a different type of trichromacy that is not linked to the X-chromosome. Based on microspectrophotometry and retinal whole-mount immunohistochemistry, four trichromatic marsupial species have been described: quokka, quenda, honey possum, and fat-tailed dunnart. It has, however, been impossible to identify the photopigment of the third cone type, and genetically, all evidence so far suggests that all marsupials are dichromatic. The tammar wallaby is the only Australian marsupial to date for which there is no evidence of a third cone type. To clarify whether the wallaby is indeed a dichromat or trichromatic like other Australian marsupials, we analyzed the number of cone types in the “dichromatic” wallaby and the “trichromatic” dunnart. Employing identical immunohistochemical protocols, we confirmed that the wallaby has only two cone types, whereas 20–25% of cones remained unlabeled by S- and LM-opsin antibodies in the dunnart retina. In addition, we found no evidence to support the hypothesis that the rod photopigment (rod opsin) is expressed in cones which would have explained the absence of a third cone opsin gene. Our study is the first comprehensive and quantitative account of color vision in Australian marsupials where we now know that an unexpected diversity of different color vision systems appears to have evolved. PMID:21151905

  4. Non-invasive activation of optogenetic actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birkner, Elisabeth; Berglund, Ken; Klein, Marguerita E.; Augustine, George J.; Hochgeschwender, Ute

    2014-03-01

    The manipulation of genetically targeted neurons with light (optogenetics) continues to provide unprecedented avenues into studying the function of the mammalian brain. However, potential translation into the clinical arena faces a number of significant hurdles, foremost among them the need for insertion of optical fibers into the brain to deliver light to opsins expressed on neuronal membranes. In order to overcome these hardware-related problems, we have developed an alternative strategy for delivering light to opsins which does not involve fiber implants. Rather, the light is produced by a protein, luciferase, which oxidizes intravenously applied substrate, thereby emitting bioluminescence. In proof-ofprinciple studies employing a fusion protein of a light-generating luciferase to a light-sensing opsin (luminopsin), we showed that light emitted by Gaussia luciferase is indeed able to activate channelrhodopsin, allowing modulation of neuronal activity when expressed in cultured neurons. Here we assessed applicability of the concept in vivo in mice expressing luminopsins from viral vectors and from genetically engineered transgenes. The experiments demonstrate that intravenously applied substrate reaches neurons in the brain, causing the luciferase to produce bioluminescence which can be imaged in vivo, and that activation of channelrhodopsin by bioluminescence is sufficient to affect behavior. Further developments of such technology based on combining optogenetics with bioluminescence - i.e. combining lightsensing molecules with biologically produced light through luciferases - should bring optogenetics closer to clinical applications.

  5. [Phototransduction mediated by melanopsin in intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells].

    PubMed

    Domínguez-Solís, Carlos Augusto; Pérez-León, Jorge Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Melanopsin is the most recent photopigment described. As all the other opsins, it attaches in the retina as chromophore. Its amino acid sequence resembles more invertebrate opsins than those of vertebrates. The signal transduction pathway of opsins in vertebrates is based on the coupling to the G protein transducin, triggering a signaling cascade that results in the hyperpolarization of the plasma membrane. On the contrary, the photoreceptors of invertebrates activate the Gq protein pathway, which leads to depolarizing responses. Phototransduction mediated by melanopsin leads to the depolarization of those cells where it is expressed, the intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells; the cellular messengers and the ion channel type(s) responsible for the cells´ response is still unclear. Studies to elucidate the signaling cascade of melanopsin in heterologous expression systems, in retina and isolated/cultured intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells, have provided evidence for the involvement of protein Gq and phospholipase C together with the likely participation of an ion channel member of the transient receptor potential-canonical family, a transduction pathway similar to invertebrate photopigments, particularly Drosophila melanogaster. The intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells are the sole source of retinal inferences to the suprachiasmatic nucleus; thus, clarifying completely the melanopsin signaling pathway will impact the chronobiology field, including the clinical aspects. PMID:26581535

  6. Rhodopsin Photoactivation Dynamics Revealed by Quasi-Elastic Neutron Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhowmik, Debsindhu; Shrestha, Utsab; Perera, Suchhithranga M. C. D.; Chawla, Udeep; Mamontov, Eugene; Brown, Michael; Chu, Xiang-Qiang

    2015-03-01

    Rhodopsin is a G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) responsible for vision. During photoactivation, the chromophore retinal dissociates from protein yielding the opsin apoprotein. What are the changes in protein dynamics that occur during the photoactivation process? Here, we studied the microscopic dynamics of dark-state rhodopsin and the ligand-free opsin using quasielastic neutron scattering (QENS). The QENS technique tracks individual hydrogen atom motion because of the much higher neutron scattering cross-section of hydrogen than other atoms. We used protein with CHAPS detergent hydrated with heavy water. The activation of proteins is confirmed at low temperatures up to 300 K by mean-square displacement (MSD) analysis. The QENS experiments at temperatures ranging from 220 K to 300 K clearly indicate an increase in protein dynamic behavior with temperature. The relaxation time for the ligand-bound protein rhodopsin is faster compared to opsin, which can be correlated with the photoactivation. Moreover, the protein dynamics are orders of magnitude slower than the accompanying CHAPS detergent, which unlike protein, manifests localized motions.

  7. Identification and characterization of visual pigments in caecilians (Amphibia: Gymnophiona), an order of limbless vertebrates with rudimentary eyes.

    PubMed

    Mohun, S M; Davies, W L; Bowmaker, J K; Pisani, D; Himstedt, W; Gower, D J; Hunt, D M; Wilkinson, M

    2010-10-15

    In comparison with the other amphibian orders, the Anura (frogs) and Urodela (salamanders), knowledge of the visual system of the snake-like Gymnophiona (caecilians) is relatively sparse. Most caecilians are fossorial with, as far as is known any surface activity occurring mainly at night. They have relatively small, poorly developed eyes and might be expected to possess detectable changes in the spectral sensitivity of their visual pigments. Microspectrophotometry was used to determine the spectral sensitivities of the photoreceptors in three species of caecilian, Rhinatrema bivittatum, Geotrypetes seraphini and Typhlonectes natans. Only rod opsin visual pigment, which may be associated with scotopic (dim light) vision when accompanied by other 'rod-specific' components of the phototransduction cascade, was found to be present. Opsin sequences were obtained from the eyes of two species of caecilian, Ichthyophis cf. kohtaoensis and T. natans. These rod opsins were regenerated in vitro with 11-cis retinal to give pigments with spectral sensitivity peaks close to 500 nm. No evidence for cone photoreception, associated with diurnal and colour vision, was detected using molecular and physiological methods. Additionally, visual pigments are short-wavelength shifted in terms of the maximum absorption of light when compared with other amphibian lineages. PMID:20889838

  8. Self-Organized Criticality: A Guide to Water-Protein Landscape Evolution

    E-print Network

    J. C. Phillips

    2012-02-23

    We focus here on the scaling properties of small interspecies differences between red cone opsin transmembrane proteins, using a hydropathic elastic roughening tool previously applied to the rhodopsin rod transmembrane proteins. This tool is based on a non-Euclidean hydropathic metric realistically rooted in the atomic coordinates of 5526 protein segments, which thereby encapsulates universal non-Euclidean long-range differential geometrical features of water films enveloping globular proteins in the Protein Data Bank. Whereas the rhodopsin blue rod water films are smoothest in humans, the red cone opsins' water films are optimized in cats and elephants, consistent with protein species landscapes that evolve differently in different contexts. We also analyze red cone opsins in the chromatophore-containing family of chameleons, snakes, zebrafish and goldfish, where short- and long-range (BLAST and hydropathic) aa correlations are found with values as large as 97-99%. We use hydropathic amino acid (aa) optimization to estimate the maximum number Nmax of color shades that the human eye can discriminate, and obtain 10^6 < Nmax < 10^7, in good agreement with experiment.

  9. Ablation of Chop Transiently Enhances Photoreceptor Survival but Does Not Prevent Retinal Degeneration in Transgenic Mice Expressing Human P23H Rhodopsin.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Wei-Chieh; Joseph, Victory; Yasumura, Douglas; Matthes, Michael T; Lewin, Alfred S; Gorbatyuk, Marina S; Ahern, Kelly; LaVail, Matthew M; Lin, Jonathan H

    2016-01-01

    RHO (Rod opsin) encodes a G-protein coupled receptor that is expressed exclusively by rod photoreceptors of the retina and forms the essential photopigment, rhodopsin, when coupled with 11-cis-retinal. Many rod opsin disease -mutations cause rod opsin protein misfolding and trigger endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, leading to activation of the Unfolded Protein Response (UPR) signal transduction network. Chop is a transcriptional activator that is induced by ER stress and promotes cell death in response to chronic ER stress. Here, we examined the role of Chop in transgenic mice expressing human P23H rhodopsin (hP23H Rho Tg) that undergo retinal degeneration. With the exception of one time point, we found no significant induction of Chop in these animals and no significant change in retinal degeneration by histology and electrophysiology when hP23H Rho Tg animals were bred into a Chop (-/-) background. Our results indicate that Chop does not play a significant causal role during retinal degeneration in these animals. We suggest that other modules of the ER stress-induced UPR signaling network may be involved photoreceptor disease induced by P23H rhodopsin. PMID:26427410

  10. Squid retinochrome

    PubMed Central

    1975-01-01

    Retinochrome is a photosensitive pigment located primarily in the inner portions of the visual cells of cephalopods. Its absorption spectrum resembles that of rhodopsin, but its chromophore is all-trans retinal, which light isomerizes to 11-cis, the reverse of the situation in rhodopsin. The 11-cis photoproduct of retinochrome slowly reverts to retinochrome in the dark. The chromophoric site of retinochrome is more reactive than that of most visual pigments: (a) Hydroxylamine converts retinochrome in the dark to all-trans retinal oxime + retinochrome opsin. (by Sodium borohydride reduces it to N-retinyl opsin. (c) Lambda max of retinochrome shifts from 500 to 515 nm as the pH is raised from 6 to 10, with a loss of absorption above pH 8; meanwhile above this PH a second band appears at shorter wavelengths with lambda max 375 nm. These changes are reversible. (d) If retinochrome is incubated with all- trans 3-dehydroretinal (retinal2) in the dark, some 3- dehydroretinochrome (retinochrome2, lambda max about 515 nm) is formed. Conversely, when retinochrome2, made by adding all-trans retinal2 to bleached retinochrome or retinochrome opsin, is incubated in the dark with all-trans retinal some of it is converted to retinochrome. Retinal and 3-dehydroretinal therefore can replace each other as chromophores in the dark. PMID:235007

  11. Thermal Evolution of Juvenile Subduction Zones ' New Constraints from Lu-Hf Geochronology on HP oceanic rocks (Halilba?i, Central Anatolia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pourteau, Amaury; Scherer, Erik; Schmidt, Alexander; Bast, Rebecca

    2015-04-01

    The thermal structure of subduction zones plays a key role on mechanical and chemical processes taking place along the slab-mantle interface. Until now, changes through time of this thermal structure have been explored mostly by the means of numerical simulations. However, both "warm" (i.e., epidote-bearing), and "cold" (i.e., lawsonite-bearing) HP oceanic rocks have been reported in some fossil subduction complexes exposed at the Earth's surface (e.g., Franciscan Complex, California; Rio San Juan Complex, Hispañola; Halilba?? Unit, Central Anatolia). These a-priori "incompatible" rocks witness different thermal stages of ancient subduction zones and their study might provide complementary constraints to numerical models. To decipher the meaning of these contrasting metamorphic rocks in the Halilba?? Unit, we are carrying out Lu-Hf geochronology on garnet (grt) and lws from a variety of HP oceanic rocks, as well as the metamorphic sole of the overlying ophiolite. We selected five samples that are representative of the variety of metamorphic evolutions (i.e. peak conditions and P-T paths) encountered in this area. Preliminary analyses yielded 110 Ma (grt-hbl isochron) for a sub-ophiolitic grt amphibolite; 92 Ma (grt-omp) for an eclogite with prograde and retrograde ep; 90 Ma (grt-omp) for an eclogitic metabasite with prograde ep and retrograde ep+lws; 87 Ma (grt-gln) for a lws eclogite with prograde ep; and 86 Ma (grt-gln) for a blueschist with prograde and retrograde lws. These ages are mainly two-point isochrons. Further-refined data will be presented at the EGU General Assembly 2015, in Vienna. The consistent younging trend from "warm" to "cold" metamorphic rocks revealed by these first-order results points to metamorphic-sole formation during the initiation of intra-oceanic subduction at ~110 Ma, and subsequent cooling of the slab-mantle interface between 92 and 86 Ma. Therefore, the contrasting metamorphic evolutions encountered in the Halilba?? Unit record the progressive thermal maturation of the juvenile Neotethyan subduction zone. This period of ~23 myr between subduction initiation and thermal "steady state" is significantly shorter than that obtained for the Rio San Juan Complex (~60 myr; Krebs et al. 2008, Lithos, 103, 106-137), but compares well with that for the Franciscan Complex (~22 myr; Anczkiewicz et al. 2004, EPSL, 225, 147-161) and falls in the range predicted in numerical simulations (e.g., Gerya et al. 2002, Tectonics, 21/6, 1056).

  12. The Living With a Star Space Environment Testbed Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xapsos, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    The focus of the Living With a Star (LWS) Space Environment Testbed (SET) program is to improve the performance of hardware in the space radiation environment. The program has developed a payload for the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) Demonstration and Science Experiments (DSX) spacecraft that is scheduled for launch in August 2015 on the SpaceX Falcon Heavy rocket. The primary structure of DSX is an Evolved Expendable Launch Vehicle (EELV) Secondary Payload Adapter (ESPA) ring. DSX will be in a Medium Earth Orbit (MEO). This oral presentation will describe the SET payload.

  13. Using Digital Globes to Explore the Deep Sea and Advance Public Literacy in Earth System Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaulieu, S. E.; Brickley, A.; Emery, M.; Spargo, A.; Patterson, K.; Joyce, K.; Silva, T.; Madin, K.

    2014-12-01

    Digital globes are new technologies increasingly used in both informal and formal education to display global datasets. By creating a narrative using multiple datasets, linkages between Earth systems - lithosphere, hydrosphere, atmosphere, and biosphere - can be conveyed. But how effective are digital globes in advancing public literacy in Earth system science? We addressed this question in developing new content for digital globes that interweaves imagery obtained by deep-diving vehicles with global datasets, including a new dataset locating the world's known hydrothermal vents. Our two narratives, "Life Without Sunlight" (LWS) and "Smoke and Fire Underwater" (SFU), each focus on STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) principles related to geology, biology, and exploration. We are preparing a summative evaluation for our content delivered on NOAA's Science on a Sphere as interactive presentations and as movies. We tested knowledge gained with respect to the STEM principles and the level of excitement generated by the virtual deep-sea exploration. We conducted a Post-test Only Design with quantitative data based on self-reporting on a Likert scale. A total of 75 adults and 48 youths responded to our questionnaire, distributed into test groups that saw either one of the two narratives delivered either as a movie or as an interactive presentation. Here, we report preliminary results for the youths, the majority (81%) of which live in towns with lower income and lower levels of educational attainment as compared to other towns in Massachusetts. For both narratives, there was knowledge gained for all 6 STEM principles and "Quite a Bit" of excitement. The mode in responses for knowledge gained was "Quite a Bit" for both the movie and the interactive presentation for 4 of the STEM principles (LWS geology, LWS biology, SFU geology, and SFU exploration) and "Some" for SFU biology. Only for LWS exploration was there a difference in mode between the interactive presentation ("A Little") and the movie ("Quite a Bit"). We conclude that our content for digital globes is effective in teaching the STEM principles and exciting viewers about the deep ocean frontier. We attribute this success to the tight collaboration between scientists, educators, and graphic artists in developing the content for public audiences.

  14. Space Weather Monitoring with DSCOVR and Beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szabo, A.

    2013-05-01

    With the NOAA/NASA DSCOVR spacecraft launched around 2015, continued near-Earth solar wind monitoring will be assured. However, to provide more than the current 30-45 minutes warning time of incoming solar transients, newer platforms are required. Solar sail missions would orbit an artificial 1st Lagrange point nearly doubling the current warning time. Four or five LWS Solar Sentinels orbiting the Sun inside 0.5 AU would provide warning times close to 1 day. The required scientific understanding is already at hand to take full advantage of such new missions. DSCOVR and these new missions will be discussed in detail.

  15. High Angular Resolution Mid-Infrared Imaging of Young Stars in Orion BN/KL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenhill, L. J.; Gezari, D. Y.; Danchi, W. C.; Najita, J.; Monnier, J. D.

    2004-01-01

    The authors present Keck LWS images of the Orion BN/KL star forming region obtained in the first multi-wavelength study to have 0.3--0.5 resolution from 4.7 (micro)m to 22 (micro)m. The young stellar objects designed infrared source n and radio source I are believed to dominate the BN/KL region. They have detected extended emission from a probable accretion disk around source n but infer a stellar luminosity on the order of only 2000 L(sub (center-dot)).

  16. WASTE CERTIFICATION PROGRAM PLAN - REVISION 7

    SciTech Connect

    MORGAN, LK

    2002-01-08

    The primary changes that have been made to this revision reflect the relocation of the Waste Certification Official (WCO) organizationally from the Quality Services Division (QSD) into the Laboratory Waste Services (LWS) Organization. Additionally, the responsibilities for program oversight have been differentiated between the QSD and LWS. The intent of this effort is to ensure that those oversight functions, which properly belonged to the WCO, moved with that function; but retain an independent oversight function outside of the LWS Organization ensuring the potential for introduction of organizational bias, regarding programmatic and technical issues, is minimized. The Waste Certification Program (WCP) itself has been modified to allow the waste certification function to be performed by any of the personnel within the LWS Waste Acceptance/Certification functional area. However, a single individual may not perform both the technical waste acceptance review and the final certification review on the same 2109 data package. Those reviews must be performed by separate individuals in a peer review process. There will continue to be a designated WCO who will have lead programmatic responsibility for the WCP and will exercise overall program operational oversite as well as determine the overall requirements of the certification program. The quality assurance organization will perform independent, outside oversight to ensure that any organizational bias does not degrade the integrity of the waste certification process. The core elements of the previous WCP have been retained, however, the terms and process structure have been modified.. There are now two ''control points,'' (1) the data package enters the waste certification process with the signature of the Generator Interface/Generator Interface Equivalent (GI/GIE), (2) the package is ''certified'', thus exiting the process. The WCP contains three steps, (1) the technical review for waste acceptance, (2) a review of the packaging and labeling (the old Control Point 3), and (3) programmatic review and certification. The signature of the individual performing the certification review resulting in certification of the package constitutes Control Point 2 in the revised process.

  17. Functional diversity in the color vision of cichlid fishes

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Color vision plays a critical role in visual behavior. An animal's capacity for color vision rests on the presence of differentially sensitive cone photoreceptors. Spectral sensitivity is a measure of the visual responsiveness of these cones at different light wavelengths. Four classes of cone pigments have been identified in vertebrates, but in teleost fishes, opsin genes have undergone gene duplication events and thus can produce a larger number of spectrally distinct cone pigments. In this study, we examine the question of large-scale variation in color vision with respect to individual, sex and species that may result from differential expression of cone pigments. Cichlid fishes are an excellent model system for examining variation in spectral sensitivity because they have seven distinct cone opsin genes that are differentially expressed. Results To examine the variation in the number of cones that participate in cichlid spectral sensitivity, we used whole organism electrophysiology, opsin gene expression and empirical modeling. Examination of over 100 spectral sensitivity curves from 34 individuals of three species revealed that (1) spectral sensitivity of individual cichlids was based on different subsets of four or five cone pigments, (2) spectral sensitivity was shaped by multiple cone interactions and (3) spectral sensitivity differed between species and correlated with foraging mode and the spectral reflectance of conspecifics. Our data also suggest that there may be significant differences in opsin gene expression between the sexes. Conclusions Our study describes complex opponent and nonopponent cone interactions that represent the requisite neural processing for color vision. We present the first comprehensive evidence for pentachromatic color vision in vertebrates, which offers the potential for extraordinary spectral discrimination capabilities. We show that opsin gene expression in cichlids, and possibly also spectral sensitivity, may be sex-dependent. We argue that females and males sample their visual environment differently, providing a neural basis for sexually dimorphic visual behaviour. The diversification of spectral sensitivity likely contributes to sensory adaptations that enhance the contrast of transparent prey and the detection of optical signals from conspecifics, suggesting a role for both natural and sexual selection in tuning color vision. PMID:21029409

  18. Dust processing in the Carina nebula region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onaka, Takashi; Mori, Tamami I.; Okada, Yoko

    2015-10-01

    Dust processing in the Carina nebula is investigated based on mid- to far-infrared spectroscopy with Infrared Space Observatory (ISO). Mapping observations over a central 40? ×20? area of the nebula with PHT-S, SWS, and LWS onboard ISO not only reveal spectroscopically that the mid-infrared unidentified infrared (UIR) bands at 6.2, 7.7, 8.6, and 11.3 ?m are absent in the ionized region, but also indicate that the 11.3 ?m may behave differently from the other three UIR bands near the edge of the ionized region, suggesting a variation either in the size distribution or in the ionization fraction of the band carriers. The correlation of [NII]122 ?m and [SiII]35 ?m line emissions observed with SWS and LWS is reinvestigated based on the recent atomic data as well as the latest cosmic abundance, suggesting that a large fraction (> 70%), if not all, of silicon returns to the gas phase in the Carina nebula, suggesting that silicates cannot survive under harsh conditions, such as massive star-forming regions. The present observations clearly show dust processing taking place in active regions in the Galaxy.

  19. Photoelectric effect on dust grains across the L1721 cloud in the rho Ophiuchi molecular complex

    E-print Network

    E. Habart; L. Verstraete; F. Boulanger; G. Pineau des Forets; F. Le Peintre; J. P. Bernard

    2001-04-09

    We present ISO-LWS measurements of the main gas cooling lines, C+ 158 mum and O 63 mum towards a moderate opacity molecular cloud (Av=3), L1721, illuminated by the B2 star nu Sco (X = 5-10). These data are combined with an extinction map and IRAS dust emission images to test our understanding of gas heating and cooling in photo-dissociation regions (PDRs). This nearby PDR is spatially resolved in the IRAS images; variations in the IRAS colors across the cloud indicate an enhanced abundance of small dust grains within the PDR. A spatial correlation between the gas cooling lines and the infrared emission from small dust grains illustrates the dominant role of small dust grains in the gas heating through the photoelectric effect. The photoelectric efficiency, determined from the observations by ratioing the power radiated by gas and small dust grains, is in the range 2 to 3% in close agreement with recent theoretical estimates. The brightness profiles across the PDR in the C+ 158 mum and O 63 mum lines are compared with model calculations where the density profile is constrained by the extinction data and where the gas chemical and thermal balances are solved at each position. We show that abundance variations of small dust grains across the PDR must be considered to account for the LWS observations.

  20. [Current views on vision of mammals].

    PubMed

    Khokhlova, T V

    2012-01-01

    In the review, research data are presented on mammals' vision including visual pigments, color and contrast vision, and visual behaviour in different species. It is shown that in course of evolution mammals were gradually losing the elements of daylight cone vision system that are typical of other vertebrates. In monotremes, visual pigments SWS2 (cone blue-sensitive 2) and MWS/LWS (green/red-sensitive) are still present, as well as rod RH1. Theria, except some primates, also have two cone visual pigments: SWS1 (ultraviolet/violet or blue-sensitive 1) and MWS/LWS along with rod RH1. Humans and some other higher primates evolved the new visual pigment, MWS, and acquired trichromatic vision. Marine mammals (cetaceans and pinnipeds) and some species of other orders have lost also the visual pigment SWS1, probably due to specificity of processing the information received by these cones. Current view on mammals' vision with two cone pigments and rods is presented. Data on maximum spectral sensitivity of visual pigments in different species and orders are given along with data on spatial contrast sensation. High visual acuity has been acquired by ungulates, artiodactyls, and primates, while the highest one--by humans with their specialized fovea. PMID:23330397

  1. The Objectives of NASA's Living with a Star Space Environment Testbed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barth, Janet L.; LaBel, Kenneth A.; Brewer, Dana; Kauffman, Billy; Howard, Regan; Griffin, Geoff; Day, John H. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    NASA is planning to fly a series of Space Environment Testbeds (SET) as part of the Living With A Star (LWS) Program. The goal of the testbeds is to improve and develop capabilities to mitigate and/or accommodate the affects of solar variability in spacecraft and avionics design and operation. This will be accomplished by performing technology validation in space to enable routine operations, characterize technology performance in space, and improve and develop models, guidelines and databases. The anticipated result of the LWS/SET program is improved spacecraft performance, design, and operation for survival of the radiation, spacecraft charging, meteoroid, orbital debris and thermosphere/ionosphere environments. The program calls for a series of NASA Research Announcements (NRAs) to be issued to solicit flight validation experiments, improvement in environment effects models and guidelines, and collateral environment measurements. The selected flight experiments may fly on the SET experiment carriers and flights of opportunity on other commercial and technology missions. This paper presents the status of the project so far, including a description of the types of experiments that are intended to fly on SET-1 and a description of the SET-1 carrier parameters.

  2. Color Constancy: Enhancing von Kries Adaptation via Sensor Transformations Graham D. Finlayson, Mark S. Drew and Brian V. Funt

    E-print Network

    Drew, Mark S.

    color conslancy. Light entering the eye is sampled by long-, medium- and short-wave sensitive cone sensitivities has previously been observed in test and field spectral sensitivities measured for the human eye illumination. Moving from indoor tungsten illumination to outdoor blue sky light has only a small effect on our

  3. Superior temporal resolution of Chronos versus channelrhodopsin-2 in an optogenetic model of the auditory brainstem implant.

    PubMed

    Hight, Ariel Edward; Kozin, Elliott D; Darrow, Keith; Lehmann, Ashton; Boyden, Edward; Brown, M Christian; Lee, Daniel J

    2015-04-01

    Contemporary auditory brainstem implant (ABI) performance is limited by reliance on electrical neurostimulation with its accompanying channel cross talk and current spread to non-auditory neurons. A new generation ABI based on optogenetic technology may ameliorate limitations fundamental to electrical stimulation. The most widely studied opsin is channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2); however, its relatively slow kinetic properties may prevent the encoding of auditory information at high stimulation rates. In the present study, we compare the temporal resolution of light-evoked responses of ChR2 to a recently developed fast opsin, Chronos, to ChR2 in a murine ABI model. Viral mediated gene transfer via a posterolateral craniotomy was used to express Chronos or ChR2 in the cochlear nucleus (CN). Following a four to eight week incubation period, blue light (473 nm) was delivered via an optical fiber placed directly on the surface of the infected CN, and neural activity was recorded in the contralateral inferior colliculus (IC). Both ChR2 and Chronos evoked sustained responses to all stimuli, even at high pulse rates. In addition, optical stimulation evoked excitatory responses throughout the tonotopic axis of the IC. Synchrony of the light-evoked response to stimulus rates of 14-448 pulses/s was higher in Chronos compared to ChR2 mice (p < 0.05 at 56, 168, and 224 pulses/s). Our results demonstrate that Chronos has the ability to drive the auditory system at higher stimulation rates than ChR2 and may be a more ideal opsin for manipulation of auditory pathways in future optogenetic-based neuroprostheses. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Lasker Award". PMID:25598479

  4. Dephosphorylation during Bleach and Regeneration of Visual Pigment in Carp Rod and Cone Membranes.

    PubMed

    Yamaoka, Hiromi; Tachibanaki, Shuji; Kawamura, Satoru

    2015-10-01

    On absorption of light by vertebrate visual pigment, the chromophore, 11-cis retinal, is isomerized to all-trans retinal to activate the phototransduction cascade, which leads to a hyperpolarizing light response. Activated pigment is inactivated by phosphorylation on the protein moiety, opsin. Isomerized all-trans retinal is ultimately released from opsin, and the pigment is regenerated by binding to 11-cis retinal. In this pigment regeneration cycle, the phosphates incorporated should be removed in order that the pigment regains the capability of activating the phototransduction cascade. However, it is not clear yet how pigment dephosphorylation takes place in the regeneration cycle. First in this study, we tried to estimate the dephosphorylation activity in living carp rods and cones and found that the activity, which is present mainly in the cytoplasm in both rods and cones, is three times higher in cones than in rods. Second, we examined at which stage the dephosphorylation takes place; before or after the release of all-trans retinal, during pigment regeneration, or after pigment regeneration. For this purpose we prepared three types of phosphorylated substrates in purified carp rod and cone membranes: phosphorylated bleaching intermediate, phosphorylated opsin, and phosphorylated and regenerated pigment. We also examined the effect of pigment regeneration on the dephosphorylation. The results showed that the dephosphorylation does not show substrate preference in the regeneration cycle and suggested that the dephosphorylation takes place constantly. The results also suggest that, under bright light, some of the regenerated visual pigment remains phosphorylated to reduce the light sensitivity in cones. PMID:26286749

  5. Light Responses in Rods of Vitamin A–Deprived Xenopus

    PubMed Central

    Solessio, Eduardo; Umino, Yumiko; Cameron, David A.; Loew, Ellis; Engbretson, Gustav A.; Knox, Barry E.; Barlow, Robert B.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Accumulation of free opsin by mutations in rhodopsin or insufficiencies in the visual cycle can lead to retinal degeneration. Free opsin activates phototransduction; however, the link between constitutive activation and retinal degeneration is unclear. In this study, the photoresponses of Xenopus rods rendered constitutively active by vitamin A deprivation were examined. Unlike their mammalian counterparts, Xenopus rods do not degenerate. Contrasting phototransduction in vitamin A–deprived Xenopus rods with phototransduction in constitutively active mammalian rods may provide new understanding of the mechanisms that lead to retinal degeneration. Methods The photocurrents of Xenopus tadpole rods were measured with suction electrode recordings, and guanylate cyclase activity was measured with the IBMX (3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine) jump technique. The amount of rhodopsin in rods was determined by microspectrophotometry. Results The vitamin A–deprived rod outer segments were 60% to 70% the length and diameter of the rods in age-matched animals. Approximately 90% of its opsin content was in the free or unbound form. Analogous to bleaching adaptation, the photoresponses were desensitized (10- to 20-fold) and faster. Unlike bleaching adaptation, the vitamin A–deprived rods maintained near normal saturating (dark) current densities by developing abnormally high rates of cGMP synthesis. Their rate of cGMP synthesis in the dark (15 seconds?1) was twofold greater than the maximum levels attainable by control rods (~7 seconds?1). Conclusions Preserving circulating current density and response range appears to be an important goal for rod homeostasis. However, the compensatory changes associated with vitamin A deprivation in Xenopus rods come at the high metabolic cost of a 15-fold increase in basal ATP consumption. PMID:19407019

  6. The phylogenetic distribution of ultraviolet sensitivity in birds

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Colour vision in birds can be categorized into two classes, the ultraviolet (UVS) and violet sensitive (VS). Their phylogenetic distributions have traditionally been regarded as highly conserved. However, the complicated nature of acquiring spectral sensitivities from cone photoreceptors meant that until recently, only a few species had actually been studied. Whether birds are UVS or VS can nowadays be inferred from a wide range of species via genomic sequencing of the UV/violet SWS1 cone opsin gene. Results We present genomic sequencing results of the SWS1 gene from 21 avian orders. Amino acid residues signifying UV sensitivity are found in the two most important spectral tuning sites 86 and 90 of Pteroclidiformes and Coraciiformes, in addition to the major clades, Palaeognathae, Charadriiformes, Trogoniformes, Psittaciformes and Passeriformes, where they where previously known to occur. We confirm that the presumed UVS-conferring amino acid combination F86, C90 and M93 is common to Palaeognathae and unique to this clade, despite available spectrometric evidence showing the ostrich retina to be VS. Conclusions By mapping our results together with data from previous studies on a molecular phylogeny we show that avian colour vision shifted between VS and UVS at least 14 times. Single nucleotide substitutions can explain all these shifts. The common ancestor of birds most likely had a VS phenotype. However, the ancestral state of the avian SWS1 opsin’s spectral tuning sites cannot be resolved, since the Palaeognathae are F86, C90 while the Neognathae are ancestrally S86, S90. The phylogenetic distribution of UVS and VS colour vision in birds is so complex that inferences of spectral sensitivities from closely related taxa should be used with caution. PMID:23394614

  7. Immuno-Histochemical Analysis of Rod and Cone Reaction to RPE65 Deficiency in the Inferior and Superior Canine Retina

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Daniela; Mendes-Madeira, Alexandra; Schlegel, Patrice; Rolling, Fabienne; Lorenz, Birgit; Haverkamp, Silke; Stieger, Knut

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in the RPE65 gene are associated with autosomal recessive early onset severe retinal dystrophy. Morphological and functional studies indicate early and dramatic loss of rod photoreceptors and early loss of S-cone function, while L and M cones remain initially functional. The Swedish Briard dog is a naturally occurring animal model for this disease. Detailed information about rod and cone reaction to RPE65 deficiency in this model with regard to their location within the retina remains limited. The aim of this study was to analyze morphological parameters of cone and rod viability in young adult RPE65 deficient dogs in different parts of the retina in order to shed light on local disparities in this disease. In retinae of affected dogs, sprouting of rod bipolar cell dendrites and horizontal cell processes was dramatically increased in the inferior peripheral part of affected retinae, while central inferior and both superior parts did not display significantly increased sprouting. This observation was correlated with photoreceptor cell layer thickness. Interestingly, while L/M cone opsin expression was uniformly reduced both in the superior and inferior part of the retina, S-cone opsin expression loss was less severe in the inferior part of the retina. In summary, in retinae of young adult RPE65 deficient dogs, the degree of rod bipolar and horizontal cell sprouting as well as of S-cone opsin expression depends on the location. As the human retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) is pigmented similar to the RPE in the inferior part of the canine retina, and the kinetics of photoreceptor degeneration in humans seems to be similar to what has been observed in the inferior peripheral retina in dogs, this area should be studied in future gene therapy experiments in this model. PMID:24466015

  8. The ecoresponsive genome of Daphnia pulex

    SciTech Connect

    Colbourne, John K.; Pfrender, Michael E.; Gilbert, Donald; Thomas, W. Kelley; Tucker, Abraham; Oakley, Todd H.; Tokishita, Shinichi; Aerts, Andrea; Arnold, Georg J.; Basu, Malay Kumar; Bauer, Darren J.; Caceres, Carla E.; Carmel, Liran; Casola, Claudio; Choi, Jeong-Hyeon; Detter, John C.; Dong, Qunfeng; Dusheyko, Serge; Eads, Brian D.; Frohlich, Thomas; Geiler-Samerotte, Kerry A.; Gerlach, Daniel; Hatcher, Phil; Jogdeo, Sanjuro; Krijgsveld, Jeroen; Kriventseva, Evgenia V; Kültz, Dietmar; Laforsch, Christian; Lindquist, Erika; Lopez, Jacqueline; Manak, Robert; Muller, Jean; Pangilinan, Jasmyn; Patwardhan, Rupali P.; Pitluck, Samuel; Pritham, Ellen J.; Rechtsteiner, Andreas; Rho, Mina; Rogozin, Igor B.; Sakarya, Onur; Salamov, Asaf; Schaack, Sarah; Shapiro, Harris; Shiga, Yasuhiro; Skalitzky, Courtney; Smith, Zachary; Souvorov, Alexander; Sung, Way; Tang, Zuojian; Tsuchiya, Dai; Tu, Hank; Vos, Harmjan; Wang, Mei; Wolf, Yuri I.; Yamagata, Hideo; Yamada, Takuji; Ye, Yuzhen; Shaw, Joseph R.; Andrews, Justen; Crease, Teresa J.; Tang, Haixu; Lucas, Susan M.; Robertson, Hugh M.; Bork, Peer; Koonin, Eugene V.; Zdobnov, Evgeny M.; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Lynch, Michael; Boore, Jeffrey L.

    2011-02-04

    This document provides supporting material related to the sequencing of the ecoresponsive genome of Daphnia pulex. This material includes information on materials and methods and supporting text, as well as supplemental figures, tables, and references. The coverage of materials and methods addresses genome sequence, assembly, and mapping to chromosomes, gene inventory, attributes of a compact genome, the origin and preservation of Daphnia pulex genes, implications of Daphnia's genome structure, evolutionary diversification of duplicated genes, functional significance of expanded gene families, and ecoresponsive genes. Supporting text covers chromosome studies, gene homology among Daphnia genomes, micro-RNA and transposable elements and the 46 Daphnia pulex opsins. 36 figures, 50 tables, 183 references.

  9. OSCAR4: a flexible architecture for chemical text-mining

    E-print Network

    Jessop, David M.; Adams, Sam E.; Willighagen, Egon L.; Hawizy, Lezan; Murray-Rust, Peter

    2011-10-14

    had been integrated into the .NET environment. For example, OPSIN was demonstrated as running within the JVM in Microsoft Excel, which is acceptable to commercial organisations as the JVM is of proven security. Future Prospects This is a useful... /AuthorGuidelines/AuthoringTools/ExperimentalDataChecker/ index.asp], Accessed 2011-06-15. Jessop et al. Journal of Cheminformatics 2011, 3:41 http://www.jcheminf.com/content/3/1/41 Page 11 of 12 18. Corbett P, Murray-Rust P: High-Throughput Identification of Chemistry in Life Science Texts. In Computational...

  10. Optobionic vision--a new genetically enhanced light on retinal prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Degenaar, Patrick; Grossman, Nir; Memon, Muhammad Ali; Burrone, Juan; Dawson, Martin; Drakakis, Emmanuel; Neil, Mark; Nikolic, Konstantin

    2009-06-01

    The recent discovery that neurons can be photostimulated via genetic incorporation of artificial opsins is creating a revolution in the field of neural stimulation. In this paper we show its potential in the field of retinal prosthesis. We show that we need typically 100 mW cm(-2) in instantaneous light intensity on the neuron in order to stimulate action potentials. We also show how this can be reduced down to safe levels in order to negate thermal and photochromic damage to the eye. We also describe a gallium nitride LED light source which is also able to generate patterns of the required intensity in order to transfer reliable images. PMID:19458396

  11. Evidence for light perception in a bioluminescent organ

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Deyan; Rozas, Natalia S.; Oakley, Todd H.; Mitchell, Jane; Colley, Nansi J.; McFall-Ngai, Margaret J.

    2009-01-01

    Here we show that bioluminescent organs of the squid Euprymna scolopes possess the molecular, biochemical, and physiological capability for light detection. Transcriptome analyses revealed expression of genes encoding key visual transduction proteins in light-organ tissues, including the same isoform of opsin that occurs in the retina. Electroretinograms demonstrated that the organ responds physiologically to light, and immunocytochemistry experiments localized multiple proteins of visual transduction cascades to tissues housing light-producing bacterial symbionts. These data provide evidence that the light-organ tissues harboring the symbionts serve as extraocular photoreceptors, with the potential to perceive directly the bioluminescence produced by their bacterial partners. PMID:19509343

  12. Hot-electron generation by ``cavitating'' Langmuir turbulence in the nonlinear stage of the two-plasmon-decay instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vu, H. X.; DuBois, D. F.; Russell, D. A.; Myatt, J. F.

    2012-10-01

    The kinetic reduced-description particle-in-cell simulation technique has been applied to study the nonlinear stage of two-plasmon-decay (TPD) instability in an inhomogeneous plasma driven by crossed laser beams. The TPD instability is found to be a prolific generator of "cavitating" Langmuir turbulence. Langmuir "cavitons"—localized longitudinal electric fields, oscillating near the local electron plasma frequency, trapped in ponderomotive density depressions—collapse to dimensions of a few electron Debye lengths, where the electric field energy is collisionlessly transferred to electron kinetic energy. The resulting hot electrons can attain instantaneous temperatures up to 100 keV with net suprathermal heat flux out of the system of up to a few percent of the input laser energy. Scaling laws for this hot-electron generation by TPD, in regimes motivated by recent experiments on the Omega laser, were presented recently by Vu et al. (H. X. Vu, D. F. DuBois, D. A. Russell, and J. F. Myatt, Phys. Plasmas 19, 102703 (2012)). This paper concentrates on the microscopic mechanisms for hot-electron generation. The spatial distribution of the maxima of the electric field envelope modulus is found to be very spiky, with the distribution of electric field envelope maxima obeying Gaussian statistics. The cavitons are produced in density-depletion trenches produced by the combined ponderomotive interference of the crossed laser beams and the ponderomotive beats of the primary backward-going TPD Langmuir waves (LWs) resulting from the crossed beams. The Langmuir turbulence is strongest in the electron-density region near 0.241× the laser's critical density, where the forward LWs from the crossed-beam TPD are degenerate. Nucleation of cavitons is assisted by the modulation of the electron density in the trenches, which in turn is caused by the beating of the common forward-going LW and the pair of backward-going LWs. The autocorrelation function of the LW envelope field provides a near-universal shape for intense cavitons—in the neighborhood of the local field maxima. The hot-electron temperature is found to be approximately a linear function of the "caviton temperature" determined from the Gaussian distribution of caviton maxima. These diagnostics provide strong evidence for the importance of Langmuir caviton collapse in the generation of hot electrons by TPD. Extended Zakharov model predictions for TPD exhibit the same qualitative phenomena.

  13. Long wavelength infrared camera (LWIRC): a 10 micron camera for the Keck Telescope

    SciTech Connect

    Wishnow, E.H.; Danchi, W.C.; Tuthill, P.; Wurtz, R.; Jernigan, J.G.; Arens, J.F.

    1998-05-01

    The Long Wavelength Infrared Camera (LWIRC) is a facility instrument for the Keck Observatory designed to operate at the f/25 forward Cassegrain focus of the Keck I telescope. The camera operates over the wavelength band 7-13 {micro}m using ZnSe transmissive optics. A set of filters, a circular variable filter (CVF), and a mid-infrared polarizer are available, as are three plate scales: 0.05``, 0.10``, 0.21`` per pixel. The camera focal plane array and optics are cooled using liquid helium. The system has been refurbished with a 128 x 128 pixel Si:As detector array. The electronics readout system used to clock the array is compatible with both the hardware and software of the other Keck infrared instruments NIRC and LWS. A new pre-amplifier/A-D converter has been designed and constructed which decreases greatly the system susceptibility to noise.

  14. The NIRSPEC Data Reduction Pipeline for the Keck Observatory Archive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, Hien D.; Cohen, R.; Mader, J. A.; Colson, A.; Berriman, G. Bruce; Gelino, Christopher R.; KOA Team

    2016-01-01

    The Keck Observatory Archive (KOA), a collaboration between the NASA Exoplanet Science Institute and the W. M. Keck Observatory, serves science and calibration data for all current and retired instruments from the twin Keck Telescopes. In addition to the raw data, we publicly serve quick-look, reduced data products for four instruments (HIRES, LWS, NIRC2 and OSIRIS), so that KOA users can easily assess the quality and scientific content of the data. In this paper we present the design and implementation of the data reduction pipeline (DRP) for the NIRSPEC instrument for use with KOA. We discuss the publicly available reduction packages for NIRSPEC, the challenges encountered when designing this fully automated DRP and the algorithm used to determine wavelength calibration from sky lines. The reduced data products from the NIRSPEC DRP are expected to be available in KOA by mid-2016.

  15. Development of a long wavelength spectrometer for the 24-channel multispectral scanner: Instructions for installation, start-up, and adjustment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The basic information is presented, which is required for start-up and operation of two long-wavelength focal-plane and cooler assemblies, including the amplifiers and temperature control systems. The focal plane systems, referred to as the long wavelength spectrometer (LWS) were developed for direct replacement of Arrays 3 and 4 into the multispectral scanner presently being operated by the NASA Manned Spacecraft Center Facility, and Laboratory Support Branch. The equipment is comprised of two major sub-assemblies: Array 3 with three indium antimonide detector channels and Array 4 with seven mercury doped Germanium detector channels. Each array is mounted on a cryogenic cooler and includes the vacuum housings, mounting hardware (x, y, z translation and rotation stages) and detector signal conditioning, temperature control and monitoring electronics. The two arrays were designed to operate independently and do not share common equipment (viz power supplies, housings, mounts, etc.).

  16. Characterizing the Properties of Coronal Magnetic Null Points

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, Graham; DeRosa, Marc; Wagner, Eric

    2015-08-01

    The topology of the coronal magnetic field plays a role in a wide range of phenomena, from Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) through heating of the corona. One fundamental topological feature is the null point, where the magnetic field vanishes. These points are natural sites of magnetic reconnection, and hence the release of energy stored in the magnetic field. We present preliminary results of a study using data from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager aboard NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory to characterize the properties and evolution of null points in a Potential Field Source Surface model of the coronal field. The main properties considered are the lifetime of the null points, their distribution with height, and how they form and subsequently vanish.This work is supported by NASA/LWS Grant NNX14AD45G, and by NSF/SHINE grant 1357018.

  17. The Solar Dynamics Observatory and Its Contributions to Space Weather

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamberlin, Phillip C.

    2011-01-01

    The Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) was launched on 11 February 2010 and has worked flawlessly in its first year and a half of operation. SDO was the first mission launched for NASA's Living With a Star Program (LWS), so its focus is not only studying the causes and drivers of the variable Sun, but also how these variations force similar changes in the Earth and other objects within the Heliosphere. Due to SDO's many Space Weather goals, this presentation will not only show some of the recent, ground-breaking new results provided by SDO, but also focus on the real-time Space Weather advances provided by this spacecraft. A main theme throughout this talk will be methods and tools that researchers around the world can utilize to access and manipulate the SDO data real-time for both fundamental science and Space Weather monitoring purposes.

  18. RAD750 SBC Usage for the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Kenneth

    2005-01-01

    This presentation focuses on the first space weather research mission in the Living with a Star (LWS) Program. The science objective of the mission is to understand the solar variations that influence life on Earth. The mission is developed and managed by NASA/GSFC with a launch date in 2008 on a five-year mission using a geosynchronous inclined orbit. Involved with the mission are three science instruments: a helloseisic and magnetic imagery (HMI), extreme ultraviolet variability experiment (EVE), and solar helispheric activity research prediction program (SHARPP). 6U qualification Vib test has been completed with successful results (no interrupts detected at 1 nanosecond). Other test result to be reported at workshop.

  19. 90 GHz and 150 GHz Observations of the Orion M42 Region. A Submillimeter to Radio Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dicker, S. R.; Mason, B. S.; Korngut, P. M.; Cotton, W. D.; Compiegne, M.; Devlin, M. J.; Martin, P. G.; Ade, P. A. R; Benford, D. J.; Irwin, K. D.; Maddalena, R. J.; McMullin, J. P.; Shepherd, D. S.; Sievers, A.; Staguhn, J. G.; Tucker, C.

    2009-01-01

    We have used the new 90GHz MUSTANG camera on the Robert C. Green Bank Telescope (GBT)to map the bright Huygens region of the star-forming region M42 with a resolution of 9" and a sensitivity of 2.8 mJy/beam. Ninety GHz is an interesting transition frequency, as MUSTANG detects both the free-free emission characteristic of the H II region created by the Trapezium stars, normally seen at lower frequencies, and thermal dust emission from the background OMCI molecular cloud, normally mapped at higher frequencies. We also present similar data from the 150 GHz GISMO camera taken on the IRAM 30 m telescope. This map has 15" resolution. By combining the MUSTANG data with 1.4, 8. and 31 GHz radio data from the VLA and GBT, we derive a new estimate of the emission measure averaged electron temperature of T(sub e) = 11376+/-1050 K by an original method relating free-free emission intensities at optically thin and optically thick frequencies. Combining Infrared Space Observatory-long wavelength spectrometer (ISO-LWS) data with our data, we derive a new estimate of the dust temperature and spectral emissivity index within the 80" ISO-LWS beam toward Orion KL/BN, T(sub d) = 42+/-3 K and Beta(sub d) = 1.3+/-0.1. We show that both T(sub d) and Beta(sub d) decrease when going from the H II region and excited OMCI interface to the denser UV shielded part OMCI (Orion KL/BN, Orion S). With a model consisting of only free-free and thermal dust emission, we are able to fit data taken at frequencies from 1.5 GHz to 854 GHz (350 micrometers).

  20. 90 GHz AND 150 GHz OBSERVATIONS OF THE ORION M42 REGION. A SUBMILLIMETER TO RADIO ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect

    Dicker, S. R.; Korngut, P. M.; Devlin, M. J.; Mason, B. S.; Cotton, W. D.; Compiegne, M.; Martin, P. G.; Ade, P. A. R; Tucker, C.; Benford, D. J.; Staguhn, J. G.; Irwin, K. D.; Maddalena, R. J.; McMullin, J. P.; Shepherd, D.S.; Sievers, A.

    2009-11-01

    We have used the new 90 GHz MUSTANG camera on the Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT) to map the bright Huygens region of the star-forming region M42 with a resolution of 9'' and a sensitivity of 2.8 mJy beam{sup -1}. Ninety GHz is an interesting transition frequency, as MUSTANG detects both the free-free emission characteristic of the H II region created by the Trapezium stars, normally seen at lower frequencies, and thermal dust emission from the background OMC1 molecular cloud, normally mapped at higher frequencies. We also present similar data from the 150 GHz GISMO camera taken on the IRAM 30 m telescope. This map has 15'' resolution. By combining the MUSTANG data with 1.4, 8, and 21 GHz radio data from the VLA and GBT, we derive a new estimate of the emission measure averaged electron temperature of T{sub e} = 11376 +- 1050 K by an original method relating free-free emission intensities at optically thin and optically thick frequencies. Combining Infrared Space Observatory-long wavelength spectrometer (ISO-LWS) data with our data, we derive a new estimate of the dust temperature and spectral emissivity index within the 80'' ISO-LWS beam toward Orion KL/BN, T{sub d} = 42 +- 3 K and beta {sub d} = 1.3 +- 0.1. We show that both T{sub d} and beta {sub d} decrease when going from the H II region and excited OMC1 interface to the denser UV shielded part of OMC1 (Orion KL/BN, Orion S). With a model consisting of only free-free and thermal dust emission, we are able to fit data taken at frequencies from 1.5 GHz to 854 GHz (350 mum).

  1. Forecasting Coronal Mass Ejections from Magnetograms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Falconer, D. A.; Balasubramanian, S.; Moore, R. L.; Gary, G. A.

    2004-01-01

    We report further results from our ongoing assessment of magnetogram-based measures of active-region nonpotentiality (magnetic shear and twist) and size as predictors of coronal mass ejections (CMEs). From a set of 36 vector magnetograms of bipolar active regions (Falconer, Moore, & Gary 2004, ApJ, submitted), we have found that (1) each of our 5 measures of active-region nonpotentiality has a 75-80% success rate in predicting whether an active region will produce a CME within 2 days after the magnetogram, (2) the correlation of each of these measures with CME production in this window is statistically significant (confidence level greater than 95%), (3) our measure of active-region size has a 65% success rate in predicting CMEs in this window, but (4) the correlation between active-region size and CME productivity is not statistically significant (confidence level approximately 80%). As part of the work under our pending 2003 LWS TR&T proposal, we will double our sample to approximately 70 active regions in order to demonstrate a statistically significant correlation between active-region size and CME productivity, and to determine whether this correlation is a byproduct of any Sun-produced correlation between magnetic twist and size of active regions. Since the 2002 LWS Science Workshop, we have found a measure of active-region nonpotentiality (the length of strong-gradient neutral line) that can be measured from a line-of-sight magnetogram, and we have generalized this measure and the corresponding measure from a vector magnetogram (the length of strong-shear neutral line) so that they can be applied to multiple-bipole complex active regions as well as to bipolar active regions. Preliminary results will be presented from application of these two generalized measures to our sample of bipolar active regions and to a new sample of multiple-bipole active regions.

  2. ISO Key Project: Exploring the Full Range of Quasar/Agn Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkes, Belinda; Oliversen, Ronald J. (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    While most of the work on this program has been completed, as previously reported, the portion of the program dealing with the subtopic of ISO LWS data analysis and reduction for the LWS Extragalactic Science Team and its leader, Dr. Howard Smith, is still active. This program in fact continues to generate results, and newly available computer modeling has extended the value of the datasets. As a result the team requests a one-year no-cost extension to this program, through 31 December 2004. The essence of the proposal is to perform ISO spectroscopic studies, including data analysis and modeling, of star-formation regions using an ensemble of archival space-based data from the Infrared Space Observatory's Long Wavelength Spectrometer and Short Wavelength Spectrometer, but including as well some other spectroscopic databases. Four kinds of regions are considered in the studies: (1) disks around more evolved objects; (2) young, low or high mass pre-main sequence stars in star-formation regions; (3) star formation in external, bright IR galaxies; and (4) the galactic center. One prime focus of the program is the OH lines in the far infrared. The program has the following goals: 1) Refine the data analysis of ISO observations to obtain deeper and better SNR results on selected sources. The ISO data itself underwent 'pipeline 10' reductions in early 2001, and additional 'hands-on data reduction packages' were supplied by the ISO teams in 2001. The Fabry-Perot database is particularly sensitive to noise and slight calibration errors; 2) Model the atomic and molecular line shapes, in particular the OH lines, using revised Monte-Carlo techniques developed by the SWAS team at the Center for Astrophysics; 3) Attend scientific meetings and workshops; 4) Perform E&PO activities related to infrared astrophysics and/or spectroscopy.

  3. Effects of simulated angler capture and live-release tournaments on walleye survival

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Loomis, John H.; Schramm, Harold L., Jr.; Vondracek, Bruce C.; Gerard, Patrick D.; Chizinski, Christopher J.

    2015-01-01

    We examined the effects of acclimation water temperature,live-well (LW) water temperature,and LW dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration on survival of adult WalleyesSander vitreus subjected to simulated tournament conditions (angling,LW confinement,and weigh-in procedures) under controlled laboratory conditions. We tested three acclimation temperatures (12,18,and 24°C),and three LW temperature differentials (?T = ?4,0,and +4°C) were tested at each acclimation temperature. Survival was monitored after 8 h of LW confinement and during a 5-d retention period in 1,700-L tanks. None of the Walleyes that were acclimated to 24°C and subjected to simulated tournament procedures survived the 5-d retention period; for fish subjected only to simulated angling at 24°C,survival during the 5-d retention period was 29%. Five-day survival was generally over 70% at acclimation temperatures of 12°C and 18°C,and we observed a significant interaction between acclimation temperature and ?T; survival was greatest in LWs at ?4°C ?T for fish acclimated to 18°C and in LWs at +4°C ?T for fish acclimated to 12°C. Best survival of Walleyes subjected to the stress of angling and tournament procedures was obtained at temperatures 6–8°C below the optimum temperature for adult Walleyes (i.e.,optimum = 20–22°C). Five-day survival exceeded 70% when LW DO was 5 or 12–15 mg/L (at an acclimation and LW temperature of 18°C),but survival was 0% when DO was 2 mg/L. Anglers may increase survival of Walleyes through careful manipulation of LW temperature and DO when ambient temperature is at or below 18°C,but high mortality of angled and LW-retained Walleyes should be expected when ambient water temperatures are 24°C or greater.

  4. Living with a Star: New Opportunities in Sun-Climate Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Living With a Star is a NASA initiative employing the combination of dedicated spacecraft with targeted research and modeling efforts to improve what we know of solar effects of all kinds on the Earth and its surrounding space environment, with particular emphasis on those that have significant practical impacts on life and society. The highest priority among these concerns is the subject of this report: the potential effects of solar variability on regional and global climate, including the extent to which solar variability has contributed to the well-documented warming of the Earth in the last 100 years. Understanding how the climate system reacts to external forcing from the Sun will also greatly improve our knowledge of how climate will respond to other climate drivers, including those of anthropogenic origin. A parallel element of the LWS program addresses solar effects on space weather : the impulsive emissions of charged particles, short-wave electromagnetic radiation and magnetic disturbances in the upper atmosphere and near-Earth environment that also affect life and society. These include a wide variety of solar impacts on aeronautics, astronautics, electric power transmission, and national defense. Specific examples are (1) the impacts of potentially- damaging high energy radiation and atomic particles of solar origin on satellites and satellite operations, spacecraft electronics systems and components, electronic communications, electric power distribution grids, navigational and GPS systems, and high altitude aircraft; and (2) the threat of sporadic, high-energy solar radiation to astronauts and high altitude aircraft passengers and crews. Elements of the LWS program include an array of dedicated spacecraft in near- Earth and near-Sun orbits that will closely study and observe both the Sun itself and the impacts of its variations on the Earth's radiation belts and magnetosphere, the upper atmosphere, and ionosphere. These spacecraft, positioned to study and monitor changing conditions in the Sun-Earth neighborhood, will also serve as sentinels of solar storms and impulsive events.

  5. The Far Infrared Lines of OH as Molecular Cloud Diagnostics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Howard A.

    2004-01-01

    Future IR missions should give some priority to high resolution spectroscopic observations of the set of far-IR transitions of OH. There are 15 far-IR lines arising between the lowest eight rotational levels of OH, and ISO detected nine of them. Furthermore, ISO found the OH lines, sometimes in emission and sometimes in absorption, in a wide variety of galactic and extragalactic objects ranging from AGB stars to molecular clouds to active galactic nuclei and ultra-luminous IR galaxies. The ISO/LWS Fabry-Perot resolved the 119 m doublet line in a few of the strong sources. This set of OH lines provides a uniquely important diagnostic for many reasons: the lines span a wide wavelength range (28.9 m to 163.2 m); the transitions have fast radiative rates; the abundance of the species is relatively high; the IR continuum plays an important role as a pump; the contribution from shocks is relatively minor; and, not least, the powerful centimeter-wave radiation from OH allows comparison with radio and VLBI datasets. The problem is that the large number of sensitive free parameters, and the large optical depths of the strongest lines, make modeling the full set a difficult job. The SWAS montecarlo radiative transfer code has been used to analyze the ISO/LWS spectra of a number of objects with good success, including in both the lines and the FIR continuum; the DUSTY radiative transfer code was used to insure a self-consistent continuum. Other far IR lines including those from H2O, CO, and [OI] are also in the code. The OH lines all show features which future FIR spectrometers should be able to resolve, and which will enable further refinements in the details of each cloud's structure. Some examples are given, including the case of S140, for which independent SWAS data found evidence for bulk flows.

  6. ISO Key Project: Exploring The Full Range of Quasar/AGN Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkes, Belinda; West, Donald K. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    While most of the work on this program has been completed, as previously reported, the portion of the program dealing with the sub topic of ISO LWS data analysis and reduction for the LWS Extragalactic Science Team and its leader, Dr. Howard Smith, is still active. This program in fact continues to generate results, and newly available computer modeling has extended the value of the datasets, As a result the team has requested and been granted an obtained a no-cost extension to this program, through December 31, 2003. The essence of the proposal is to perform ISO spectroscopic studies, including data analysis and modeling, of star formation regions using an ensemble of archival space-based data from the Infrared Space Observatory's Long Wavelength Spectrometer and Short Wavelength Spectrometer, but including as well some other spectroscopic data bases. Four kinds of regions are considered in the studies: (1) disks around more evolved objects; (2) young, low or high mass pre-main sequence stars in star formation regions; (3) star formation in external, bright IR galaxies; and (4) the galactic center. One prime focus of the program is the OH lines in the far infrared. The program has the following goals: (1) refine the data analysis of ISO observations, to obtain deeper and better SNR results on selected sources. The ISO data itself underwent "pipeline 10" reductions in early 2001, and additional "hands-on data reduction packages" were supplied by the ISO teams in 2001. The Fabry-Perot database in particularly sensitive to noise can slight calibration errors. (2) model the atomic and molecular line shapes, in particular the OH lines, using revised Monte-Carlo techniques developed by the SWAS team at the Center for Astrophysics; (3) attend scientific meetings and workshops; (4) do E&PO activities related to infrared astrophysics and/or spectroscopy.

  7. Wetland treatment of oil and gas well waste waters. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Kadlec, R.; Srinivasan, K.

    1995-08-01

    Constructed wetlands are small on-site systems that possess three of the most desirable components of an industrial waste water treatment scheme: low cost, low maintenance and upset resistance. The main objective of the present study is to extend the knowledge base of wetland treatment systems to include processes and substances of particular importance to small, on-site systems receiving oil and gas well wastewaters. A list of the most relevant and comprehensive publications on the design of wetlands for water quality improvement was compiled and critically reviewed. Based on our literature search and conversations with researchers in the private sector, toxic organics such as Phenolics and b-naphthoic acid, (NA), and metals such as CU(II) and CR(VI) were selected as target adsorbates. A total of 90 lysimeters equivalent to a laboratory-scale wetland were designed and built to monitor the uptake and transformation of toxic organics and the immobilization of metal ions. Studies on the uptake of toxic organics such as phenol and b-naphthoic acid (NA) and heavy metals such as Cu(II) and Cr(VI), the latter two singly or as non-stoichiometric mixtures by laboratory-type wetlands (LWs) were conducted. These LWs were designed and built during the first year of this study. A road map and guidelines for a field-scale implementation of a wetland system for the treatment of oil and gas wastewaters have been suggested. Two types of wetlands, surface flow (SF) and sub surface flow (SSF), have been considered, and the relative merits of each configuration have been reviewed.

  8. Damage of photoreceptor-derived cells in culture induced by light emitting diode-derived blue light

    PubMed Central

    Kuse, Yoshiki; Ogawa, Kenjiro; Tsuruma, Kazuhiro; Shimazawa, Masamitsu; Hara, Hideaki

    2014-01-01

    Our eyes are increasingly exposed to light from the emitting diode (LED) light of video display terminals (VDT) which contain much blue light. VDTs are equipped with televisions, personal computers, and smart phones. The present study aims to clarify the mechanism underlying blue LED light-induced photoreceptor cell damage. Murine cone photoreceptor-derived cells (661?W) were exposed to blue, white, or green LED light (0.38?mW/cm2). In the present study, blue LED light increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, altered the protein expression level, induced the aggregation of short-wavelength opsins (S-opsin), resulting in severe cell damage. While, blue LED light damaged the primary retinal cells and the damage was photoreceptor specific. N-Acetylcysteine (NAC), an antioxidant, protected against the cellular damage induced by blue LED light. Overall, the LED light induced cell damage was wavelength-, but not energy-dependent and may cause more severe retinal photoreceptor cell damage than the other LED light. PMID:24909301

  9. Hearing the light: neural and perceptual encoding of optogenetic stimulation in the central auditory pathway

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Wei; Hight, Ariel E.; Chen, Jenny X.; Klapoetke, Nathan C.; Hancock, Kenneth E.; Shinn-Cunningham, Barbara G.; Boyden, Edward S.; Lee, Daniel J.; Polley, Daniel B.

    2015-01-01

    Optogenetics provides a means to dissect the organization and function of neural circuits. Optogenetics also offers the translational promise of restoring sensation, enabling movement or supplanting abnormal activity patterns in pathological brain circuits. However, the inherent sluggishness of evoked photocurrents in conventional channelrhodopsins has hampered the development of optoprostheses that adequately mimic the rate and timing of natural spike patterning. Here, we explore the feasibility and limitations of a central auditory optoprosthesis by photoactivating mouse auditory midbrain neurons that either express channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2) or Chronos, a channelrhodopsin with ultra-fast channel kinetics. Chronos-mediated spike fidelity surpassed ChR2 and natural acoustic stimulation to support a superior code for the detection and discrimination of rapid pulse trains. Interestingly, this midbrain coding advantage did not translate to a perceptual advantage, as behavioral detection of midbrain activation was equivalent with both opsins. Auditory cortex recordings revealed that the precisely synchronized midbrain responses had been converted to a simplified rate code that was indistinguishable between opsins and less robust overall than acoustic stimulation. These findings demonstrate the temporal coding benefits that can be realized with next-generation channelrhodopsins, but also highlight the challenge of inducing variegated patterns of forebrain spiking activity that support adaptive perception and behavior. PMID:26000557

  10. Functional and evolutionary relationships between bacteriorhodopsin and halorhodopsin in the archaebacterium, halobacterium halobium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lanyi, J. K.

    1986-01-01

    The archaebacteria occupy a unique place in phylogenetic trees constructed from analyses of sequences from key informational macromolecules, and their study continues to yield interesting ideas on the early evolution and divergence of biological forms. It is now known that the halobacteria among these species contain various retinal-proteins, resembling eukaryotic rhodopsins, but with different functions. Two of these pigments, located in the cytoplasmic membranes of the bacteria, are bacteriorhodopsin (a light-driven proton pump) and halorhodopsin (a light-driven chloride pump). Comparison of these systems is expected to reveal structure/function relationships in these simple (primitive?) energy transducing membrane components and evolutionary relationships which had produced the structural features which allow the divergent functions. Findings indicate that very different primary structures are needed for these proteins to accomplish their different functions. Indeed, analysis of partial amino acid sequences from halo-opsin shows already that few if any long segments exist which are homologous to bacterio-opsin. Either these proteins diverged a very long time ago to allow for the observed differences, or the evolutionary clock in the halobacteria runs faster than usual.

  11. Analysis of Conserved Glutamate and Aspartate Residues in Drosophila Rhodopsin 1 and Their Influence on Spectral Tuning.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Lijun; Farrell, David M; Fulton, Ruth M; Bagg, Eve E; Salcedo, Ernesto; Manino, Meridee; Britt, Steven G

    2015-09-01

    The molecular mechanisms that regulate invertebrate visual pigment absorption are poorly understood. Studies of amphioxus Go-opsin have demonstrated that Glu-181 functions as the counterion in this pigment. This finding has led to the proposal that Glu-181 may function as the counterion in other invertebrate visual pigments as well. Here we describe a series of mutagenesis experiments to test this hypothesis and to also test whether other conserved acidic amino acids in Drosophila Rhodopsin 1 (Rh1) may serve as the counterion of this visual pigment. Of the 5 Glu and Asp residues replaced by Gln or Asn in our experiments, none of the mutant pigments shift the absorption of Rh1 by more than 6 nm. In combination with prior studies, these results suggest that the counterion in Drosophila Rh1 may not be located at Glu-181 as in amphioxus, or at Glu-113 as in bovine rhodopsin. Conversely, the extremely low steady state levels of the E194Q mutant pigment (bovine opsin site Glu-181), and the rhabdomere degeneration observed in flies expressing this mutant demonstrate that a negatively charged residue at this position is essential for normal rhodopsin function in vivo. This work also raises the possibility that another residue or physiologic anion may compensate for the missing counterion in the E194Q mutant. PMID:26195627

  12. Cone pigments in a North American marsupial, the opossum (Didelphis virginiana)

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Gary A.

    2010-01-01

    Only two of the four cone opsin gene families found in vertebrates are represented in contemporary eutherian and marsupial species. Recent genetic studies of two species of South American marsupial detected the presence of representatives from two of the classes of cone opsin genes and the structures of these genes predicted cone pigments with respective peaks in the ultraviolet and long-wavelength portions of the spectrum. The Virginia opossum (Didelphis virginiana), a profoundly nocturnal animal, is the only marsupial species found in North America. The prospects for cone-based vision in this species were examined through recordings of the electroretinogram (ERG), a commonly examined retinal response to photic stimulation. Recorded under flickering-light conditions that elicit signals from cone photoreceptors, the spectral sensitivity of the opossum eye is well accounted for by contributions from the presence of a single cone pigment having peak absorption at 561–562 nm. A series of additional experiments that employed various chromatic adaptation paradigms were conducted in a search for possible contributions from a second (short-wavelength sensitive) cone pigment. We found no evidence that such a mechanism contributes to the ERG in this marsupial. PMID:20224889

  13. Incorporation of squalene into rod outer segments

    SciTech Connect

    Keller, R.K.; Fliesler, S.J. )

    1990-08-15

    We have reported previously that squalene is the major radiolabeled nonsaponifiable lipid product derived from ({sup 3}H)acetate in short term incubations of frog retinas. In the present study, we demonstrate that newly synthesized squalene is incorporated into rod outer segments under similar in vitro conditions. We show further that squalene is an endogenous constituent of frog rod outer segment membranes; its concentration is approximately 9.5 nmol/mumol of phospholipid or about 9% of the level of cholesterol. Pulse-chase experiments with radiolabeled precursors revealed no metabolism of outer segment squalene to sterols in up to 20 h of chase. Taken together with our previous absolute rate studies, these results suggest that most, if not all, of the squalene synthesized by the frog retina is transported to rod outer segments. Synthesis of protein is not required for squalene transport since puromycin had no effect on squalene incorporation into outer segments. Conversely, inhibition of isoprenoid synthesis with mevinolin had no effect on the incorporation of opsin into the outer segment. These latter results support the conclusion that the de novo synthesis and subsequent intracellular trafficking of opsin and isoprenoid lipids destined for the outer segment occur via independent mechanisms.

  14. Photoreceptor types and distributions in the retinae of insectivores.

    PubMed

    Peichl, L; Künzle, H; Vogel, P

    2000-01-01

    The retinae of insectivores have been rarely studied, and their photoreceptor arrangements and expression patterns of visual pigments are largely unknown. We have determined the presence and distribution of cones in three species of shrews (common shrew Sorex araneus, greater white-toothed shrew Crocidura russula, dark forest shrew Crocidura poensis; Soricidae) and in the lesser hedgehog tenrec Echinops telfairi (Tenrecidae). Special cone types were identified and quantified in flattened whole retinae by antisera/antibodies recognizing the middle-to-long-wavelength-sensitive (M/L-)cone opsin and the short-wavelength-sensitive (S-)cone opsin, respectively. A combination of immunocytochemistry with conventional histology was used to assess rod densities and cone/rod ratios. In all four species the rods dominate at densities of about 230,000-260,000/mm2. M/L- and S-cones are present, comprising between 2% of the photoreceptors in the nocturnal Echinops telfairi and 13% in Sorex araneus that has equal diurnal and nocturnal activity phases. This suggests dichromatic color vision like in many other mammals. A striking feature in all four species are dramatically higher S-cone proportions in ventral than in dorsal retina (0.5% vs. 2.5-12% in Sorex, 5-15% vs. 30-45% in Crocidura poensis, 3-12% vs. 20-50% in Crocidura russula, 10-30% vs. 40-70% in Echinops). The functional and comparative aspects of these structural findings are discussed. PMID:11193110

  15. Constitutive phospholipid scramblase activity of a G Protein-coupled receptor*

    PubMed Central

    Goren, Michael A.; Morizumi, Takefumi; Menon, Indu; Joseph, Jeremiah S.; Dittman, Jeremy S.; Cherezov, Vadim; Stevens, Raymond C.; Ernst, Oliver P.; Menon, Anant K.

    2014-01-01

    Opsin, the rhodopsin apoprotein, was recently shown to be an ATP-independent flippase (or scramblase) that equilibrates phospholipids across photoreceptor disc membranes in mammalian retina, a process required for disc homeostasis. Here we show that scrambling is a constitutive activity of rhodopsin, distinct from its light-sensing function. Upon reconstitution into vesicles, discrete conformational states of the protein (rhodopsin, a metarhodopsin II-mimic, and two forms of opsin) facilitated rapid (>10,000 phospholipids per protein per second) scrambling of phospholipid probes. Our results indicate that the large conformational changes involved in converting rhodopsin to metarhodopsin II are not required for scrambling, and that the lipid translocation pathway either lies near the protein surface or involves membrane packing defects in the vicinity of the protein. Additionally, we demonstrate that ?2-adrenergic and adenosine A2A receptors scramble lipids, suggesting that rhodopsin-like G protein-coupled receptors may play an unexpected moonlighting role in re-modeling cell membranes. PMID:25296113

  16. Novel functions for Period 3 and Exo-rhodopsin in rhythmic transcription and melatonin biosynthesis within the zebrafish pineal organ

    PubMed Central

    Pierce, Lain X.; Noche, Ramil R.; Ponomareva, Olga; Chang, Christopher; Liang, Jennifer O.

    2008-01-01

    Entrainment of circadian clocks to environmental cues such as photoperiod ensures that daily biological rhythms stay in synchronization with the Earth’s rotation. The vertebrate pineal organ has a conserved role in circadian regulation as the primary source of the nocturnal hormone melatonin. In lower vertebrates, the pineal has an endogenous circadian clock as well as photoreceptive cells that regulate this clock. The zebrafish opsin protein Exo-rhodopsin (Exorh) is expressed in pineal photoreceptors and is a candidate to mediate the effects of environmental light on pineal rhythms and melatonin synthesis. We demonstrate that Exorh has an important role in regulating gene transcription within the pineal. In developing embryos that lack Exorh, expression of the exorh gene itself and of the melatonin synthesis gene serotonin N-acetyl transferase 2 (aanat2) are significantly reduced. This suggests that Exorh protein at the cell membrane is part of a signaling pathway that positively regulates transcription of these genes, and ultimately melatonin production, in the pineal. Like many other opsin genes, exorh is expressed with a daily rhythm: mRNA levels are higher at night than during the day. We find that the transcription factor Orthodenticle homeobox 5 (Otx5) activates exorh transcription, while the putative circadian clock component Period 3 (Per3) represses expression during the day, thereby contributing to the rhythm of transcription. This work identifies novel roles for Exorh and Per3, and gives insight into potential interactions between the sensory and circadian systems within the pineal. PMID:18597743

  17. Heterologous expression and purification of the serotonin type 4 receptor from transgenic mouse retina.

    PubMed

    Salom, David; Wu, Nan; Sun, Wenyu; Dong, Zhiqian; Palczewski, Krzysztof; Jordan, Steven; Salon, John A

    2008-12-16

    Recent breakthroughs in the solution of X-ray structures for G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) with diffusible ligands have employed extensively mutated or recombined receptor fusion proteins heterologously expressed in conventional in vitro cell-based systems. While these advances now show that crystallization of non-rhodopsin members of this superfamily can be accomplished, the use of radically modified proteins may limit the relevance of the derived structures for precision-guided drug design. To better enable the study of native GPCR structures, we report here efforts to engineer an in vivo expression system that harnesses the photoreceptor system of the retina to express heterologous GPCRs with native human sequences in a biochemically homogeneous and pharmacologically functional conformation. As an example, we show that the human 5HT4 receptor, when placed under the influence of the mouse opsin promoter and an opsin rod outer segment (ROS) targeting sequence, localized to ROS of transgenic mouse retina. The resulting receptor protein was uniformly glycosylated and pharmacologically intact as demonstrated by immunoblotting and radioligand binding assays. Upon solubilization, the retinal 5HT4 receptor retained the binding properties of its initial state in retinal membranes. With the engineered T7 monoclonal epitope sequence, the solubilized receptor was easily purified by one-step immunoaffinity chromatography and the purified receptor in detergent solution preserved its ligand binding properties. This expression method may prove generally useful for generating functional, high-quality GPCR protein. PMID:19053287

  18. Light-dependent activation of G proteins by two isoforms of chicken melanopsins.

    PubMed

    Torii, Masaki; Kojima, Daisuke; Nishimura, Akiyuki; Itoh, Hiroshi; Fukada, Yoshitaka

    2015-10-28

    In the chicken pineal gland, light stimuli trigger signaling pathways mediated by two different subtypes, Gt and G11. These G proteins may be activated by any of the three major pineal opsins, pinopsin, OPN4-1 and OPN4-2, but biochemical evidence for the coupling has been missing except for functional coupling between pinopsin and Gt. Here we investigated the relative expression levels and the functional difference among the three pineal opsins. In the chicken pineal gland, the pinopsin mRNA level was significantly more abundant than the others, of which the OPN4-2 mRNA level was higher than that of OPN4-1. In G protein activation assays, Gt was strongly activated by pinopsin in a light-dependent manner, being consistent with previous studies, and weakly activated by OPN4-2. Unexpectedly, illuminated OPN4-2 more efficiently activated G protein(s) that was endogenously expressed in HEK293T cells in culture. On the other hand, Gq, the closest analogue of G11, was activated only by OPN4-1 although the activity was relatively weak under these conditions. These results suggest that OPN4-1 and OPN4-2 couple with Gq and Gt, respectively. Two melanopsins, OPN4-1 and OPN4-2, appear to have acquired mutually different functions through the evolution. PMID:26411960

  19. Isolation and characterization of melanopsin and pinopsin expression within photoreceptive sites of reptiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frigato, Elena; Vallone, Daniela; Bertolucci, Cristiano; Foulkes, Nicholas S.

    2006-08-01

    Non-mammalian vertebrates have multiple extraocular photoreceptors, mainly localised in the pineal complex and the brain, to mediate irradiance detection. In this study, we report the full-length cDNA cloning of ruin lizard melanopsin and pinopsin. The high level of identity with opsins in both the transmembrane regions, where the chromophore binding site is located, and the intracellular loops, where the G-proteins interact, suggests that both melanopsin and pinopsin should be able to generate a stable photopigment, capable of triggering a transduction cascade mediated by G-proteins. Phylogenetic analysis showed that both opsins are located on the expected branches of the corresponding sequences of ortholog proteins. Subsequently, using RT-PCR and RPA analysis, we verified the expression of ruin lizard melanopsin and pinopsin in directly photosensitive organs, such as the lateral eye, brain, pineal gland and parietal eye. Melanopsin expression was detected in the lateral eye and all major regions of the brain. However, different from the situation in Xenopus and chicken, melanopsin is not expressed in the ruin lizard pineal. Pinopsin mRNA expression was only detected in the pineal complex. As a result of their phylogenetic position and ecology, reptiles provide the circadian field with some of the most interesting models for understanding the evolution of the vertebrate circadian timing system and its response to light. This characterization of melanopsin and pinopsin expression in the ruin lizard will be important for future studies aimed at understanding the molecular basis of circadian light detection in reptiles.

  20. Archaebacterial rhodopsin sequences: Implications for evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lanyi, J. K.

    1991-01-01

    It was proposed over 10 years ago that the archaebacteria represent a separate kingdom which diverged very early from the eubacteria and eukaryotes. It follows that investigations of archaebacterial characteristics might reveal features of early evolution. So far, two genes, one for bacteriorhodopsin and another for halorhodopsin, both from Halobacterium halobium, have been sequenced. We cloned and sequenced the gene coding for the polypeptide of another one of these rhodopsins, a halorhodopsin in Natronobacterium pharaonis. Peptide sequencing of cyanogen bromide fragments, and immuno-reactions of the protein and synthetic peptides derived from the C-terminal gene sequence, confirmed that the open reading frame was the structural gene for the pharaonis halorhodopsin polypeptide. The flanking DNA sequences of this gene, as well as those of other bacterial rhodopsins, were compared to previously proposed archaebacterial consensus sequences. In pairwise comparisons of the open reading frame with DNA sequences for bacterio-opsin and halo-opsin from Halobacterium halobium, silent divergences were calculated. These indicate very considerable evolutionary distance between each pair of genes, even in the dame organism. In spite of this, three protein sequences show extensive similarities, indicating strong selective pressures.

  1. Ultraviolet visual sensitivity in three avian lineages: paleognaths, parrots, and passerines.

    PubMed

    Aidala, Zachary; Huynen, Leon; Brennan, Patricia L R; Musser, Jacob; Fidler, Andrew; Chong, Nicola; Machovsky Capuska, Gabriel E; Anderson, Michael G; Talaba, Amanda; Lambert, David; Hauber, Mark E

    2012-07-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) light-transmitted signals play a major role in avian foraging and communication, subserving functional roles in feeding, mate choice, egg recognition, and nestling discrimination. Sequencing functionally relevant regions of the short wavelength sensitive type 1 (SWS1) opsin gene that is responsible for modulating the extent of SWS1 UV sensitivity in birds allows predictions to be made about the visual system's UV sensitivity in species where direct physiological or behavioral measures would be impractical or unethical. Here, we present SWS1 segment sequence data from representative species of three avian lineages for which visually based cues for foraging and communication have been investigated to varying extents. We also present a preliminary phylogenetic analysis and ancestral character state reconstructions of key spectral tuning sites along the SWS1 opsin based on our sequence data. The results suggest ubiquitous ultraviolet SWS1 sensitivity (UVS) in both paleognaths, including extinct moa (Emeidae), and parrots, including the nocturnal and flightless kakapo (Strigops habroptilus), and in most, but not all, songbird (oscine) lineages, and confirmed violet sensitivity (VS) in two suboscine families. Passerine hosts of avian brood parasites were included both UVS and VS taxa, but sensitivity did not co-vary with egg rejection behaviors. The results should stimulate future research into the functional parallels between the roles of visual signals and the genetic basis of visual sensitivity in birds and other taxa. PMID:22534772

  2. Shining new light on optogenetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Ling; Dhakal, Kamal; Li, Ting; Mohanty, Samarendra

    2012-02-01

    Since development of optogenetic stimulation paradigm, there has been several attempts to red shift the excitation maximum of the efficient blue-sensitive opsins. While there has been some success at the cost of altered light-activation kinetics, near-infrared optogenetic probe will be ideal for in-depth cell-specific stimulation of excitable cells in an organ. However, single-photon near-infrared optogenetics based stimulation will still limit precise probing and modulation of in-vivo neural circuits. In contrast, by virtue of non-linear nature of ultrafast light-matter interaction, high spatial precision in optogenetic activation can be achieved in addition to inherent cellular specificity and temporal resolution provided by the opsins. Here, we report use of non-linear optogenetics for stimulation of neurons in-vivo in mouse models. Advantage of using non-linear optogenetics for probing neuronal circuitry is discussed. Further, effectiveness of the non-diffracting optogenetic Bessel beam over classical Gaussian beam in a layered mouse-brain geometry is demonstrated using Monte Carlo (MC) simulation. This is corroborated by electrophysiological measurements in in-vivo mouse models. The large propagation distance, characteristics of Bessel beam is better suited for in-depth single as well as two-photon optogenetic stimulation.

  3. Candidate genes for colour and vision exhibit signals of selection across the pied flycatcher (Ficedula hypoleuca) breeding range

    PubMed Central

    Lehtonen, P K; Laaksonen, T; Artemyev, A V; Belskii, E; Berg, P R; Both, C; Buggiotti, L; Bureš, S; Burgess, M D; Bushuev, A V; Krams, I; Moreno, J; Mägi, M; Nord, A; Potti, J; Ravussin, P-A; Sirkiä, P M; Sætre, G-P; Winkel, W; Primmer, C R

    2012-01-01

    The role of natural selection in shaping adaptive trait differentiation in natural populations has long been recognized. Determining its molecular basis, however, remains a challenge. Here, we search for signals of selection in candidate genes for colour and its perception in a passerine bird. Pied flycatcher plumage varies geographically in both its structural and pigment-based properties. Both characteristics appear to be shaped by selection. A single-locus outlier test revealed 2 of 14 loci to show significantly elevated signals of divergence. The first of these, the follistatin gene, is expressed in the developing feather bud and is found in pathways with genes that determine the structure of feathers and may thus be important in generating variation in structural colouration. The second is a gene potentially underlying the ability to detect this variation: SWS1 opsin. These two loci were most differentiated in two Spanish pied flycatcher populations, which are also among the populations that have the highest UV reflectance. The follistatin and SWS1 opsin genes thus provide strong candidates for future investigations on the molecular basis of adaptively significant traits and their co-evolution. PMID:22027894

  4. Formation and decay of the arrestin·rhodopsin complex in native disc membranes.

    PubMed

    Beyrière, Florent; Sommer, Martha E; Szczepek, Michal; Bartl, Franz J; Hofmann, Klaus Peter; Heck, Martin; Ritter, Eglof

    2015-05-15

    In the G protein-coupled receptor rhodopsin, light-induced cis/trans isomerization of the retinal ligand triggers a series of distinct receptor states culminating in the active Metarhodopsin II (Meta II) state, which binds and activates the G protein transducin (Gt). Long before Meta II decays into the aporeceptor opsin and free all-trans-retinal, its signaling is quenched by receptor phosphorylation and binding of the protein arrestin-1, which blocks further access of Gt to Meta II. Although recent crystal structures of arrestin indicate how it might look in a precomplex with the phosphorylated receptor, the transition into the high affinity complex is not understood. Here we applied Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy to monitor the interaction of arrestin-1 and phosphorylated rhodopsin in native disc membranes. By isolating the unique infrared signature of arrestin binding, we directly observed the structural alterations in both reaction partners. In the high affinity complex, rhodopsin adopts a structure similar to Gt-bound Meta II. In arrestin, a modest loss of ?-sheet structure indicates an increase in flexibility but is inconsistent with a large scale structural change. During Meta II decay, the arrestin-rhodopsin stoichiometry shifts from 1:1 to 1:2. Arrestin stabilizes half of the receptor population in a specific Meta II protein conformation, whereas the other half decays to inactive opsin. Altogether these results illustrate the distinct binding modes used by arrestin to interact with different functional forms of the receptor. PMID:25847250

  5. Evolution of ultraviolet vision in shorebirds (Charadriiformes)

    PubMed Central

    Ödeen, Anders; Håstad, Olle; Alström, Per

    2010-01-01

    Diurnal birds belong to one of two classes of colour vision. These are distinguished by the maximum absorbance wavelengths of the SWS1 visual pigment sensitive to violet (VS) and ultraviolet (UVS). Shifts between the classes have been rare events during avian evolution. Gulls (Laridae) are the only shorebirds (Charadriiformes) previously reported to have the UVS type of opsin, but too few species have been sampled to infer that gulls are unique among shorebirds or that Laridae is monomorphic for this trait. We have sequenced the SWS1 opsin gene in a broader sample of species. We confirm that cysteine in the key amino acid position 90, characteristic of the UVS class, has been conserved throughout gull evolution but also that the terns Anous minutus, A. tenuirostris and Gygis alba, and the skimmer Rynchops niger carry this trait. Terns, excluding Anous and Gygis, share the VS conferring serine in position 90 with other shorebirds but it is translated from a codon more similar to that found in UVS shorebirds. The most parsimonious interpretation of these findings, based on a molecular gene tree, is a single VS to UVS shift and a subsequent reversal in one lineage. PMID:20015861

  6. Chemical Kinetic Analysis of Thermal Decay of Rhodopsin Reveals Unusual Energetics of Thermal Isomerization and Hydrolysis of Schiff Base*

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jian; Liu, Monica Yun; Fu, Li; Zhu, Gefei Alex; Yan, Elsa C. Y.

    2011-01-01

    The thermal properties of rhodopsin, which set the threshold of our vision, have long been investigated, but the chemical kinetics of the thermal decay of rhodopsin has not been revealed in detail. To understand thermal decay quantitatively, we propose a kinetic model consisting of two pathways: 1) thermal isomerization of 11-cis-retinal followed by hydrolysis of Schiff base (SB) and 2) hydrolysis of SB in dark state rhodopsin followed by opsin-catalyzed isomerization of free 11-cis-retinal. We solve the kinetic model mathematically and use it to analyze kinetic data from four experiments that we designed to assay thermal decay, isomerization, hydrolysis of SB using dark state rhodopsin, and hydrolysis of SB using photoactivated rhodopsin. We apply the model to WT rhodopsin and E181Q and S186A mutants at 55 °C, as well as WT rhodopsin in H2O and D2O at 59 °C. The results show that the hydrogen-bonding network strongly restrains thermal isomerization but is less important in opsin and activated rhodopsin. Furthermore, the ability to obtain individual rate constants allows comparison of thermal processes under various conditions. Our kinetic model and experiments reveal two unusual energetic properties: the steep temperature dependence of the rates of thermal isomerization and SB hydrolysis in the dark state and a strong deuterium isotope effect on dark state SB hydrolysis. These findings can be applied to study pathogenic rhodopsin mutants and other visual pigments. PMID:21921035

  7. The optogenetic (r)evolution.

    PubMed

    Rein, Martin L; Deussing, Jan M

    2012-02-01

    Optogenetics is a rapidly evolving field of technology that allows optical control of genetically targeted biological systems at high temporal and spatial resolution. By heterologous expression of light-sensitive microbial membrane proteins, opsins, cell type-specific depolarization or silencing can be optically induced on a millisecond time scale. What started in a petri dish is applicable today to more complex systems, ranging from the dissection of brain circuitries in vitro to behavioral analyses in freely moving animals. Persistent technical improvement has focused on the identification of new opsins, suitable for optogenetic purposes and genetic engineering of existing ones. Optical stimulation can be combined with various readouts defined by the desired resolution of the experimental setup. Although recent developments in optogenetics have largely focused on neuroscience it has lately been extended to other targets, including stem cell research and regenerative medicine. Further development of optogenetic approaches will not only highly increase our insight into health and disease states but might also pave the way for a future use in therapeutic applications. PMID:22183142

  8. Functional redundancy of cryptochromes and classical photoreceptors for nonvisual ocular photoreception in mice

    PubMed Central

    Selby, Christopher P.; Thompson, Carol; Schmitz, Therese M.; Van Gelder, Russell N.; Sancar, Aziz

    2000-01-01

    The daily light–dark (LD) cycle exerts a powerful influence on the temporal organization of behavior and physiology. Much of this influence is preserved in behaviorally blind retinally degenerate mice; the photoreceptors underlying this nonvisual phototransduction are unknown. The mammalian eye contains at least two classes of photoactive pigments, the vitamin A-based opsins and the vitamin B2-based cryptochromes. To genetically define the roles of these pigments in light modulation of behavior, we generated rd/rd;mCry1?/mCry1?;mCry2?/mCry2? mutant mice lacking rods and most cones as well as both cryptochrome proteins. The response of the mutant mouse to photic input was analyzed at both behavioral and molecular levels. Behaviorally, mice lacking either classical photoreceptors or cryptochromes exhibited strongly rhythmic locomotor responses to 10 and 100 lux daily LD 12 h/12-h cycles; however, triple mutant mice carrying both cryptochrome and retinal degenerate mutations were nearly arrhythmic under both LD cycles and in constant darkness. At the molecular level, the light induction of c-fos transcription in the suprachiasmatic nucleus was markedly reduced in the triple mutant mouse compared with either rd/rd or cryptochrome mutant mice. These data indicate that classical opsins and cryptochromes serve functionally redundant roles in the transduction of light information to behavioral modulation and suggest a pleomorphic role for cryptochromes in both photoreception and central clock mechanism. PMID:11114194

  9. Longitudinal spread of adaptation in the rods of the frog's retina.

    PubMed

    Hemilä, S; Reuter, T

    1981-01-01

    1. The stimulus-response function of the red rods in the retina of the common frog (Rana temporaria) was determined in different adaptational states by measuring aspartate-isolated receptor responses. 2. Flash stimuli, background adaptations and bleaches were delivered through the same optical channel forming an oblique light-beam striking the receptor side of the isolated and flat-mounted retina at an angle of 10 degrees. 3. When the light was blue-green and optimally polarized the absorbance of the receptor layer was about 2, from which follows that 70-80% of the light was absorbed in the distal third of the rod outer segments, i.e. the exposure was local. Homogeneous exposures of the whole rod outer segments were obtained with orange and red lights. 4. Combinations of homogeneous and local stimuli with homogeneous and local adaptations were used to investigate the longitudinal spread of background, intermediate and opsin adaptation, i.e. the sensitivity-reducing effect of a background light, and the transient and permanent sensitivity losses following a bleach isomerizing 3.5-26% (usually 10%) of the rhodopsin in the retina. 5. The results obtained were related to predictions based both on the assumption that the adaptation effects spread longitudinally within the rod outer segments and the assumption that they are strictly confined to the disks absorbing the adapting lights. 6. These comparisons reveal that all three types of adaptation spread longitudinally. It is for instance clear that the sensitivity loss observed with homogeneous stimuli and local adaptation (as compared to homogeneous adaptation) is larger than that predicted by the non-spreading hypothesis. 7. The longitudinal spread of background adaptation is largely finished within 10 sec after turning on the background light, while an efficient spread of the intermediate adaptation effect may require minutes. 8. A background light decreasing the sensitivity by about one log unit decreases the time from flash to response maximum from 5 to 1 sec (small responses). Corresponding opsin adaptation effects are accompanied by less dramatic changes in response kinetics. 9. Independent of adaptation type - homogeneous or local, background, intermediate or opsin - it was found that local stimuli are less efficient that homogeneous stimuli in light-adapted retinae. This effect can be explained assuming that the sensitivity-reducing effects are pronounced in the distal than in the proximal parts of the rod outer segments. 10. The opsin adaptation effect following 10% local bleaches decreases the sensitivity to both homogeneous and local stimuli 2-3 times more than corresponding homogeneous bleaches. This means that the strength of the opsin effect is not related to the average percentage bleached but to the fraction bleached in the distal part of the rod, or generally to the fraction bleached in the most affected region. 11... PMID:6971931

  10. Evolution of clitellate phaosomes from rhabdomeric photoreceptor cells of polychaetes – a study in the leech Helobdella robusta (Annelida, Sedentaria, Clitellata)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction In Annelida two types of photoreceptor cells (PRCs) are regarded as generally present, rhabdomeric and ciliary PRCs. In certain taxa, however, an additional type of PRC may occur, the so called phaosomal PRC. Whereas the former two types of PRCs are always organized as an epithelium with their sensory processes projecting into an extracellular cavity formed by the PRCs and (pigmented) supportive cells, phaosomes are seemingly intracellular vacuoles housing the sensory processes. Phaosomal PRCs are the only type of PRC found in one major annelid group, Clitellata. Several hypotheses have been put forward explaining the evolutionary origin of the clitellate phaosomes. To elucidate the evolution of clitellate PRC and eyes the leech Helobdella robusta, for which a sequenced genome is available, was chosen. Results TEM observations showed that extraocular and ocular PRCs are structurally identical. Bioinformatic analyses revealed predictions for four opsin genes, three of which could be amplified. All belong to the rhabdomeric opsin family and phylogenetic analyses showed them in a derived position within annelid opsins. Gene expression studies showed two of them expressed in the eye and in the extraocular PRCs. Polychaete eye-typic key enzymes for ommochromme and pterin shading pigments synthesis are not expressed in leech eyes. Conclusions By comparative gene-expression studies we herein provide strong evidence that the phaosomal PRCs typical of Clitellata are derived from the rhabdomeric PRCs characteristic for polychaete adult eyes. Thus, they represent a highly derived type of PRC that evolved in the stem lineage of Clitellata rather than another, primitive type of PRC in Metazoa. Evolution of these PRCs in Clitellata is related to a loss of the primary eyes and most of their photoreceptive elements except for the rhabdomeric PRCs. Most likely this happened while changing to an endobenthic mode of life. This hypothesis of PRC evolution is in accordance with a recently published phylogeny of Annelida based on phylogenomic data. The data provide a nice example how morphologically highly divergent light sensitive structures emerged from a standard type of photoreceptor cell. PMID:24007384

  11. Melatonin Signaling Controls Circadian Swimming Behavior in Marine Zooplankton

    PubMed Central

    Tosches, Maria Antonietta; Bucher, Daniel; Vopalensky, Pavel; Arendt, Detlev

    2014-01-01

    Summary Melatonin, the “hormone of darkness,” is a key regulator of vertebrate circadian physiology and behavior. Despite its ubiquitous presence in Metazoa, the function of melatonin signaling outside vertebrates is poorly understood. Here, we investigate the effect of melatonin signaling on circadian swimming behavior in a zooplankton model, the marine annelid Platynereis dumerilii. We find that melatonin is produced in brain photoreceptors with a vertebrate-type opsin-based phototransduction cascade and a light-entrained clock. Melatonin released at night induces rhythmic burst firing of cholinergic neurons that innervate locomotor-ciliated cells. This establishes a nocturnal behavioral state by modulating the length and the frequency of ciliary arrests. Based on our findings, we propose that melatonin signaling plays a role in the circadian control of ciliary swimming to adjust the vertical position of zooplankton in response to ambient light. PMID:25259919

  12. Optogenetics. Engineering of a light-gated potassium channel.

    PubMed

    Cosentino, Cristian; Alberio, Laura; Gazzarrini, Sabrina; Aquila, Marco; Romano, Edoardo; Cermenati, Solei; Zuccolini, Paolo; Petersen, Jan; Beltrame, Monica; Van Etten, James L; Christie, John M; Thiel, Gerhard; Moroni, Anna

    2015-05-01

    The present palette of opsin-based optogenetic tools lacks a light-gated potassium (K(+)) channel desirable for silencing of excitable cells. Here, we describe the construction of a blue-light-induced K(+) channel 1 (BLINK1) engineered by fusing the plant LOV2-J? photosensory module to the small viral K(+) channel Kcv. BLINK1 exhibits biophysical features of Kcv, including K(+) selectivity and high single-channel conductance but reversibly photoactivates in blue light. Opening of BLINK1 channels hyperpolarizes the cell to the K(+) equilibrium potential. Ectopic expression of BLINK1 reversibly inhibits the escape response in light-exposed zebrafish larvae. BLINK1 therefore provides a single-component optogenetic tool that can establish prolonged, physiological hyperpolarization of cells at low light intensities. PMID:25954011

  13. Structural Waters Define a Functional Channel Mediating Activation of the GPCR, rhodopsin

    SciTech Connect

    Angel, T.; Gupta, S; Jastrzebska, B; Palczewski, K; Chance, M

    2009-01-01

    Structural water molecules may act as prosthetic groups indispensable for proper protein function. In the case of allosteric activation of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), water likely imparts structural plasticity required for agonist-induced signal transmission. Inspection of structures of GPCR superfamily members reveals the presence of conserved embedded water molecules likely important to GPCR function. Coupling radiolytic hydroxyl radical labeling with rapid H2O18 solvent mixing, we observed no exchange of these structural waters with bulk solvent in either ground state or for the Meta II or opsin states. However, the radiolysis approach permitted labeling of selected side chain residues within the transmembrane helices and revealed activation-induced changes in local structural constraints likely mediated by dynamics of both water and protein. These results suggest both a possible general mechanism for water-dependent communication in family A GPCRs based on structural conservation, and a strategy for probing membrane protein structure.

  14. Transparent intracortical microprobe array for simultaneous spatiotemporal optical stimulation and multichannel electrical recording.

    PubMed

    Lee, Joonhee; Ozden, Ilker; Song, Yoon-Kyu; Nurmikko, Arto V

    2015-12-01

    Optogenetics, the selective excitation or inhibition of neural circuits by light, has become a transformative approach for dissecting functional brain microcircuits, particularly in in vivo rodent models, owing to the expanding libraries of opsins and promoters. Yet there is a lack of versatile devices that can deliver spatiotemporally patterned light while performing simultaneous sensing to map the dynamics of perturbed neural populations at the network level. We have created optoelectronic actuator and sensor microarrays that can be used as monolithic intracortical implants, fabricated from an optically transparent, electrically highly conducting semiconductor ZnO crystal. The devices can perform simultaneous light delivery and electrical readout in precise spatial registry across the microprobe array. We applied the device technology in transgenic mice to study light-perturbed cortical microcircuit dynamics and their effects on behavior. The functionality of this device can be further expanded to optical imaging and patterned electrical microstimulation. PMID:26457862

  15. Brains, genes, and primates.

    PubMed

    Izpisua Belmonte, Juan Carlos; Callaway, Edward M; Caddick, Sarah J; Churchland, Patricia; Feng, Guoping; Homanics, Gregg E; Lee, Kuo-Fen; Leopold, David A; Miller, Cory T; Mitchell, Jude F; Mitalipov, Shoukhrat; Moutri, Alysson R; Movshon, J Anthony; Okano, Hideyuki; Reynolds, John H; Ringach, Dario; Sejnowski, Terrence J; Silva, Afonso C; Strick, Peter L; Wu, Jun; Zhang, Feng

    2015-05-01

    One of the great strengths of the mouse model is the wide array of genetic tools that have been developed. Striking examples include methods for directed modification of the genome, and for regulated expression or inactivation of genes. Within neuroscience, it is now routine to express reporter genes, neuronal activity indicators, and opsins in specific neuronal types in the mouse. However, there are considerable anatomical, physiological, cognitive, and behavioral differences between the mouse and the human that, in some areas of inquiry, limit the degree to which insights derived from the mouse can be applied to understanding human neurobiology. Several recent advances have now brought into reach the goal of applying these tools to understanding the primate brain. Here we describe these advances, consider their potential to advance our understanding of the human brain and brain disorders, discuss bioethical considerations, and describe what will be needed to move forward. PMID:25950631

  16. Photochemical activation of TRPA1 channels in neurons and animals

    PubMed Central

    Kokel, David; Cheung, Chung Yan J.; Mills, Robert; Coutinho-Budd, Jaeda; Huang, Liyi; Setola, Vincent; Sprague, Jared; Jin, Shan; Jin, Youngnam N.; Huang, Xi-Ping; Bruni, Giancarlo; Woolf, Clifford; Roth, Bryan L.; Hamblin, Michael R; Zylka, Mark J.; Milan, David J.; Peterson, Randall T.

    2013-01-01

    Optogenetics is a powerful research tool because it enables high-resolution optical control of neuronal activity. However, current optogenetic approaches are limited to transgenic systems expressing microbial opsins and other exogenous photoreceptors. Here, we identify optovin, a small molecule that enables repeated photoactivation of motor behaviors in wild type animals. Surprisingly, optovin's behavioral effects are not visually mediated. Rather, photodetection is performed by sensory neurons expressing the cation channel TRPA1. TRPA1 is both necessary and sufficient for the optovin response. Optovin activates human TRPA1 via structure-dependent photochemical reactions with redox-sensitive cysteine residues. In animals with severed spinal cords, optovin treatment enables control of motor activity in the paralyzed extremities by localized illumination. These studies identify a light-based strategy for controlling endogenous TRPA1 receptors in vivo, with potential clinical and research applications in non-transgenic animals, including humans. PMID:23396078

  17. Independent Optical Excitation of Distinct Neural Populations

    PubMed Central

    Klapoetke, Nathan C; Murata, Yasunobu; Kim, Sung Soo; Pulver, Stefan R.; Birdsey-Benson, Amanda; Cho, Yong Ku; Morimoto, Tania K; Chuong, Amy S; Carpenter, Eric J; Tian, Zhijian; Wang, Jun; Xie, Yinlong; Yan, Zhixiang; Zhang, Yong; Chow, Brian Y; Surek, Barbara; Melkonian, Michael; Jayaraman, Vivek; Constantine-Paton, Martha; Wong, Gane Ka-Shu; Boyden, Edward S

    2014-01-01

    Optogenetic tools enable the causal examination of how specific cell types contribute to brain circuit functions. A long-standing question is whether it is possible to independently activate two distinct neural populations in mammalian brain tissue. Such a capability would enable the examination of how different synapses or pathways interact to support computation. Here we report two new channelrhodopsins, Chronos and Chrimson, obtained through the de novo sequencing and physiological characterization of opsins from over 100 species of algae. Chrimson is 45 nm red-shifted relative to any previous channelrhodopsin, important for scenarios where red light would be preferred; we show minimal visual system mediated behavioral artifact in optogenetically stimulated Drosophila. Chronos has faster kinetics than any previous channelrhodopsin, yet is effectively more light-sensitive. Together, these two reagents enable crosstalk-free two-color activation of neural spiking and downstream synaptic transmission in independent neural populations in mouse brain slice. PMID:24509633

  18. Neuronal Representation of Ultraviolet Visual Stimuli in Mouse Primary Visual Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Zhongchao; Sun, Wenzhi; Chen, Tsai-Wen; Kim, Douglas; Ji, Na

    2015-01-01

    The mouse has become an important model for understanding the neural basis of visual perception. Although it has long been known that mouse lens transmits ultraviolet (UV) light and mouse opsins have absorption in the UV band, little is known about how UV visual information is processed in the mouse brain. Using a custom UV stimulation system and in vivo calcium imaging, we characterized the feature selectivity of layer 2/3 neurons in mouse primary visual cortex (V1). In adult mice, a comparable percentage of the neuronal population responds to UV and visible stimuli, with similar pattern selectivity and receptive field properties. In young mice, the orientation selectivity for UV stimuli increased steadily during development, but not direction selectivity. Our results suggest that, by expanding the spectral window through which the mouse can acquire visual information, UV sensitivity provides an important component for mouse vision. PMID:26219604

  19. Characterization of Ribozymes Targeting a Congenital Night Blindness Mutation in Rhodopsin Mutation.

    PubMed

    Conley, Shannon M; Whalen, Patrick; Lewin, Alfred S; Naash, Muna I

    2016-01-01

    The G90D mutation in the rhodopsin gene leads to autosomal dominant congenital stationary night blindness (CSNB) in patients. This occurs because the G90D mutant protein cannot efficiently bind chromophore and is constitutively active. To combat this mutation, we designed and characterized two different hammerhead ribozymes to cleave G90D transcript. In vitro testing showed that the G90D1 ribozyme efficiently and specifically cleaved the mutant transcript while G90D2 cleaved both WT and mutant transcript. AAV-mediated delivery of G90D1 under the control of the mouse opsin promoter (MOP500) to G90D transgenic eyes showed that the ribozyme partially retarded the functional degeneration (as measured by electroretinography [ERG]) associated with this mutation. These results suggest that with additional optimization, ribozymes may be a useful part of the gene therapy knockdown strategy for dominant retinal disease. PMID:26427453

  20. Structure of an agonist-bound human A2A adenosine receptor.

    PubMed

    Xu, Fei; Wu, Huixian; Katritch, Vsevolod; Han, Gye Won; Jacobson, Kenneth A; Gao, Zhan-Guo; Cherezov, Vadim; Stevens, Raymond C

    2011-04-15

    Activation of G protein-coupled receptors upon agonist binding is a critical step in the signaling cascade for this family of cell surface proteins. We report the crystal structure of the A(2A) adenosine receptor (A(2A)AR) bound to an agonist UK-432097 at 2.7 angstrom resolution. Relative to inactive, antagonist-bound A(2A)AR, the agonist-bound structure displays an outward tilt and rotation of the cytoplasmic half of helix VI, a movement of helix V, and an axial shift of helix III, resembling the changes associated with the active-state opsin structure. Additionally, a seesaw movement of helix VII and a shift of extracellular loop 3 are likely specific to A(2A)AR and its ligand. The results define the molecule UK-432097 as a "conformationally selective agonist" capable of receptor stabilization in a specific active-state configuration. PMID:21393508

  1. Polymorphic New World monkeys with more than three M/L cone types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, Gerald H.; Deegan, Jess F.

    2005-10-01

    Most New World (platyrrhine) monkeys have M/L cone photopigment polymorphisms that map directly into individual variations in visual sensitivity and color vision. We used electroretinogram flicker photometry to examine M/L cone photopigments in the New World monkey Callicebus moloch (the dusky Titi). Like other New World monkeys, this species has an M/L cone photopigment polymorphism that reflects the presence of X-chromosome opsin gene alleles. However, unlike other platyrrhines in which three M/L photopigments are typical, Callicebus has a total of five M/L cone photopigments. The peak sensitivity values for these pigments extend across the range from 530 to 562 nm. The result is an enhanced array of potential color vision phenotypes in this species.

  2. The developing and evolving retina: using time to organize form.

    PubMed

    Finlay, Barbara L

    2008-02-01

    Evolutionary and other functional accounts of the retina and its normal development highlight different aspects of control of its growth and form than genomic and mechanistic accounts. Discussing examples from opsin expression, developmental regulation of the eye's size and optical quality, regulation of eye size with respect to brain and body size, and the development of the fovea, these different aspects of control are contrasted. Contributions of mouse models, particularly with regard to relative timing of events in different species are reviewed, introducing a Web-based utility for exploration of timing issues (www.translatingtime.net). Variation at the individual level, in early experience, and also across species is an essential source of information to understand normal development and its pathologies. PMID:17692298

  3. G-Protein Coupled Receptor Kinase 2 Minimally Regulates Melanopsin Activity in Intrinsically Photosensitive Retinal Ganglion Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sexton, Timothy J.; Van Gelder, Russell N.

    2015-01-01

    Phosphorylation is a primary modulator of mammalian G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) activity. The GPCR melanopsin is the photopigment of intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGCs) in the mammalian retina. Recent evidence from in vitro experiments suggests that the G-protein coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2) phosphorylates melanopsin and reduces its activity following light exposure. Using an ipRGC-specific GRK2 loss-of-function mouse, we show that GRK2 loss alters melanopsin response dynamics and termination time in postnatal day 8 (P8) ipRGCs but not in older animals. However, the alterations are small in comparison to the changes reported for other opsins with loss of their cognate GRK. These results suggest GRK2 contributes to melanopsin deactivation, but that other mechanisms account for most of modulation of melanopsin activity in ipRGCs. PMID:26069965

  4. Genetically Encoded Spy Peptide Fusion System to Detect Plasma Membrane-Localized Proteins In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Bedbrook, Claire N; Kato, Mihoko; Ravindra Kumar, Sripriya; Lakshmanan, Anupama; Nath, Ravi D; Sun, Fei; Sternberg, Paul W; Arnold, Frances H; Gradinaru, Viviana

    2015-08-20

    Membrane proteins are the main gatekeepers of cellular state, especially in neurons, serving either to maintain homeostasis or instruct response to synaptic input or other external signals. Visualization of membrane protein localization and trafficking in live cells facilitates understanding the molecular basis of cellular dynamics. We describe here a method for specifically labeling the plasma membrane-localized fraction of heterologous membrane protein expression using channelrhodopsins as a case study. We show that the genetically encoded, covalent binding SpyTag and SpyCatcher pair from the Streptococcus pyogenes fibronectin-binding protein FbaB can selectively label membrane-localized proteins in living cells in culture and in vivo in Caenorhabditis elegans. The SpyTag/SpyCatcher covalent labeling method is highly specific, modular, and stable in living cells. We have used the binding pair to develop a channelrhodopsin membrane localization assay that is amenable to high-throughput screening for opsin discovery and engineering. PMID:26211362

  5. A glimpse into the basis of vision in the kingdom Mycota

    PubMed Central

    Idnurm, Alexander; Verma, Surbhi; Corrochano, Luis M.

    2010-01-01

    Virtually all organisms exposed to light are capable of sensing this environmental signal. In recent years the photoreceptors that mediate the ability of fungi to “see” have been identified in diverse species, and increasingly characterized. The small sizes of fungal genomes and ease in genetic and molecular biology manipulations make this kingdom ideal amongst the eukaryotes for understanding photosensing. The most widespread and conserved photosensory protein in the fungi is White collar 1 (WC-1), a flavin-binding photoreceptor that functions with WC-2 as a transcription factor complex. Other photosensory proteins in fungi include opsins, phytochromes and cryptochromes whose roles in fungal photobiology are not fully resolved and their distribution in the fungi requires further taxon sampling. Additional unknown photoreceptors await discovery. This review discusses the effects of light on fungi and the evolutionary processes that may have shaped the ability of species to sense and respond to this signal. PMID:20451644

  6. Light as a central modulator of circadian rhythms, sleep and affect

    PubMed Central

    LeGates, T.A.; Fernandez, D.C.; Hattar, S

    2014-01-01

    Light has profoundly influenced the evolution of life on earth. As widely appreciated, light allows us to generate images of our environment. However, light, through the atypical intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGCs; Box 1), also influences behaviors that are essential for our health and quality of life, yet are independent of image formation. These include the synchronization of the circadian clock to the solar day, tracking of seasonal changes, and regulation of sleep. Irregular light environments lead to problems in circadian rhythms and sleep, which eventually cause mood and learning deficits. Recently, it was found that irregular light can also directly impact mood and learning without producing major disruptions in circadian rhythms and sleep. Here, we will discuss the indirect and direct influence of light on mood and learning and provide a model for how light, the circadian clock, and sleep interact to influence mood and cognitive functions. Box 1Intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGCs)Retinal photoreceptors transduce light energy into electrical signals that initiate vision. The classical photoreceptors, rods and cones, possess modified cilia that consist of stacks of membranes in which photopigments (rhodopsin and cone opsins) are concentrated. Rods are exquisitely sensitive and are able to detect even a few photons. Rods are therefore used for night vision. Cones are less sensitive than rods and are used for day and color vision. Color vision is mediated by cone photoreceptors that express cone-opsins with sensitivity peaks at different wavelengths (colors) of light. Humans have three cone types: short, mid and long wavelength sensitive cones (for simplicity, we will refer to these as blue, green and red cones, respectively). Rods and cones relay photic information through multisynaptic pathways to retinal ganglion cells (RGCs), which innervate different areas in the brain for complex visual processing13.A surprising discovery showed that a subpopulation of RGCs is intrinsically photosensitive and express the photopigment melanopsin. These cells were thus termed ipRGCs17–19. The melanopsin gene (Opn4) was originally cloned from Xenopus laevis dermal melanophores, and was shown to have orthologs in many mammalian species, including humans141. Sequence analysis shows that melanopsin shares more homology with invertebrate opsins than with vertebrate opsins, suggesting that melanopsin may use a different mechanism for light signaling than that used by the photopigments present in the rods and cones of vertebrates142. ipRGCs do not have modified membranes in which the photopigment can be concentrated: thus, melanopsin protein is expressed uniformly throughout the soma, dendrites, and the initial segment of the axon143. The lack of membrane specialization makes ipRGCs less sensitive to light than rods and cones. However, ipRGCs are able to incorporate light signals over extended period of time, resulting in an increase in their sensitivity during prolonged light stimulation. ipRGCs are most sensitive to wavelengths of light that are in the blue region of the light spectrum144, 145. As ganglion cells, ipRGCs also convey light information from rods and cones in addition to their intrinsic melanopsin-dependent pathway and can control a variety of light-mediated behaviors30.Originally, ipRGCs were thought to comprise a uniform population, however, recent discoveries revealed that ipRGCs are highly diverse, comprising at least five distinct subtypes (M1-M5) in rodents based on morphological and electrophysiological analyses22–29. The originally identified population is now known as M1 ipRGCs and project predominantly to brain regions involved in non-image forming visual functions, whereas the non-M1 ipRGCs show widespread projections to areas in the brain important for image formation. ipRGC subtypes express varying levels of the melanopsin protein and have different patterns of dendrite stratification in the inner plexiform layer (IPL)27, 28, 146, 147, indicating

  7. All-optical control of neuronal function via optical delivery of light-sensitive proteins and optogenetic stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villalobos, Alex; Gu, Ling; Mohanty, Samarendra

    2012-02-01

    While pulsed laser beams have been used for stimulation of neurons, cellular specificity during optical stimulation is achieved by photo-sensitization of genetically-targeted cells by optogenetic means. However, till date, the process of optogenetic-sensitization primarily involves use of viral vectors. In rare occasions, electroporation has been used. Here, we report an all-optical method in which pulsed laser beam is used for delivery of genes, encoding optogenetic probes, to spatially-targeted cells, followed by optogenetic stimulation and optical detection of the activation process. Use of laser microbeam enabled highly precise spatially-patterned delivery of optogenes, as confirmed by expression of conjugated fluorescent protein. Light-activation of opsin-expressing cells was confirmed by calcium-imaging. The laser-assisted expression of optogenetic probes in spatially-targeted regions in combination with light-assisted activation and optical detection of neural activity will help in better understanding of the neuronal circuitry.

  8. Lake Michigan Offshore Wind Feasibility Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Boezaart, Arnold; Edmonson, James; Standridge, Charles; Pervez, Nahid; Desai, Neel; Williams, Bruce; Clark, Aaron; Zeitler, David; Kendall, Scott; Biddanda, Bopi; Steinman, Alan; Klatt, Brian; Gehring, J. L.; Walter, K.; Nordman, Erik E.

    2014-06-30

    The purpose of this project was to conduct the first comprehensive offshore wind assessment over Lake Michigan and to advance the body of knowledge needed to support future commercial wind energy development on the Great Lakes. The project involved evaluation and selection of emerging wind measurement technology and the permitting, installation and operation of the first mid-lake wind assessment meteorological (MET) facilities in Michigan’s Great Lakes. In addition, the project provided the first opportunity to deploy and field test floating LIDAR and Laser Wind Sensor (LWS) technology, and important research related equipment key to the sitting and permitting of future offshore wind energy development in accordance with public participation guidelines established by the Michigan Great Lakes Wind Council (GLOW). The project created opportunities for public dialogue and community education about offshore wind resource management and continued the dialogue to foster Great Lake wind resource utilization consistent with the focus of the GLOW Council. The technology proved to be effective, affordable, mobile, and the methods of data measurement accurate. The public benefited from a substantial increase in knowledge of the wind resources over Lake Michigan and gained insights about the potential environmental impacts of offshore wind turbine placements in the future. The unique first ever hub height wind resource assessment using LWS technology over water and development of related research data along with the permitting, sitting, and deployment of the WindSentinel MET buoy has captured public attention and has helped to increase awareness of the potential of future offshore wind energy development on the Great Lakes. Specifically, this project supported the acquisition and operation of a WindSentinel (WS) MET wind assessment buoy, and associated research for 549 days over multiple years at three locations on Lake Michigan. Four research objectives were defined for the project including to: 1) test and validate floating LIDAR technology; 2) collect and access offshore wind data; 3) detect and measure bird and bat activity over Lake Michigan; 4) conduct an over water sound propagation study; 5) prepare and offer a college course on offshore energy, and; 6) collect other environmental, bathometric, and atmospheric data. Desk-top research was performed to select anchorage sites and to secure permits to deploy the buoy. The project also collected and analyzed data essential to wind industry investment decision-making including: deploying highly mobile floating equipment to gather offshore wind data; correlating offshore wind data with conventional on-shore MET tower data; and performing studies that can contribute to the advancement and deployment of offshore wind technologies. Related activities included: • Siting, permitting, and deploying an offshore floating MET facility; • Validating the accuracy of floating LWS using near shoreline cup anemometer MET instruments; • Assessment of laser pulse technology (LIDAR) capability to establish hub height measurement of wind conditions at multiple locations on Lake Michigan; • Utilizing an extended-season (9-10 month) strategy to collect hub height wind data and weather conditions on Lake Michigan; • Investigation of technology best suited for wireless data transmission from distant offshore structures; • Conducting field-validated sound propagation study for a hypothetical offshore wind farm from shoreline locations; • Identifying the presence or absence of bird and bat species near wind assessment facilities; • Identifying the presence or absence of benthic and pelagic species near wind assessment facilities; All proposed project activities were completed with the following major findings: • Floating Laser Wind Sensors are capable of high quality measurement and recordings of wind resources. The WindSentinel presented no significant operational or statistical limitations in recording wind data technology at a at a high confidence level as compared to traditional an

  9. Far-IR H2O and OH towards Orion IRc2: observations and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goicoechea, J. R.; Cernicharo, J.; Daniel, F.

    The Orion nebula is one of the nearest (~450 pc) and probably the most studied star forming region in the Sky (Genzel & Stutzki 1989; ARA&A, 27, 41). The core of the cloud is associated with several places of massive star formation, and thus, the large scale distribution of gas and dust is heavily influenced by violent phenomena such as outflows, shocks and IR radiation. Infrared observations have contributed to a better knowledge of the distribution of the warm neutral gas and to a better characterization of physical and chemical conditions. The Infrared Space Observatory (ISO), and in particular the SWS (~2.4-45.2 µm) and LWS (~43-196.7 µm) spectrometers, have provided the unique opportunity to observe the spectral signature of key molecules in astrochemistry that are difficult to observe from ground-based telescopes. This is the case of water vapor and its related species, the hydroxyl radical (OH). We have detected more than 60 and 20 pure rotational lines of H2O and OH respectively towards Orion IRc2 (see Figs. 1 and 2). These detections include several lines of the 18O and 17O substituted species. From these observations it is clear that the H2O and OH line profiles show a complicated behavior. The H216O lines detected with the LWS at wavelengths above ~100 µm are observed in emission. However for shorter wavelengths, lines arising from energy levels below ~700 K and with large line-strengths show P-Cygni profiles with an important emission velocity range, while those with weak line-strengths or arising from higher energy levels are observed in pure emission. On the other hand, most of the water lines detected with the SWS below ~45 µm are observed in pure absorption (van Dischoeck et al. 1998; ApJ, 502 L173; Wright et al. 2000; A&A, 358, 689). This means that the filling factors for the water vapor as seen by the LWS and SWS beam apertures are different (note that the spatial resolution is larger for the SWS). Hence, these observations tightly constrain the geometry of the water absorbing/emitting regions. The 16OH lines also show an evolution from pure absorption at shortest wavelengths to P-Cygni and emission profiles. Although some of the OH lines have been already detected and analyzed from KAO observations (e.g. Melnick et al. 1990; ApJ, 348, 161), the detection of new higher excitation OH lines with ISO helps to further constrain the analysis of the region. In this contribution we will present an analysis of the observations in the frame of detailed non-LTE and non-local statistical equilibrium calculations and radiative transfer models including both gas and dust simultaneously. The models constrain the abundance of both species, but also the geometry of the absorbing/emitting regions and the properties IR continuum emission. In particular, the radiative pumping by IR photons from dust grains has a crucial role in the excitation of H2O and OH rotational levels and in the formation of P-Cygni profiles through the cloud. Therefore, we have carefully modeled the dust continuum emission in the range 2.4 to 196.7 µm. In spite of the large number of detected lines, the interpretation of water observations requires simultaneous far-IR observations and modeling of other abundant species. In particular, OH is an excellent complement and an adequate diagnostic of the warm gas in molecular clouds and also in galaxies (Goicoechea, Martín-Pintado & Cernicharo; 2005 ApJ, 619, 291).

  10. Effects of different colors of light on melatonin suppression and expression analysis of Aanat1 and melanopsin in the eye of a tropical damselfish.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Yuki; Imamura, Satoshi; Sawada, Yuji; Hur, Sung-Pyo; Takemura, Akihiro

    2014-08-01

    Ocular melatonin production exhibits a daily rhythm with a decrease during photophase and an increase during scotophase (nocturnal pattern) in teleost fish due to day-night changes in the activity of the rate-limiting melatonin synthesizing enzyme arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase (AANAT). Acute light exposure during scotophase suppresses AANAT activity and melatonin production in the eyes, suggesting that external light signals are a principal regulator of ocular melatonin synthesis. To better understand the photic regulation of ocular melatonin synthesis in teleost fish, this study sought to characterize the effect of light on ocular melatonin synthesis in the sapphire devil Chrysiptera cyanea, which shows a nocturnal pattern and light-induced inhibition of ocular melatonin production during scotophase. Exposure to three different wavelengths of light (half-peak bandwidth=435-475 nm with a peak of 455 nm, 495-565 nm with a peak of 530 nm, and 607-647 nm with a peak of 627 nm for the blue, green, and red LEDs) for 2h during scotophase resulted in the blue wavelength significantly decreasing ocular melatonin content within 30 min after light exposure. This result clearly indicates that the effective range of visible light on ocular melatonin suppression is distributed within the wavelengths of blue light and that a blue light-sensitive opsin is involved in ocular melatonin suppression in the fish. A PCR-based cloning method revealed the expression of melanopsin, a putative blue light-sensitive nonvisual opsin, in the eyes. Furthermore, in situ hybridization using the sapphire devil Aanat1 and melanopsin RNA probes showed mRNA expressions of both genes in the inner nuclear and ganglion cell layer of the fish retina. These results suggest that melanopsin is a possible candidate photoreceptor involved in ocular melatonin suppression by an external light signal in the sapphire devil. PMID:24859252

  11. The Effect of TIMP-1 on the Cone Mosaic in the Retina of the Rat Model of Retinitis Pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Yerina; Yu, Wan-Qing; Eom, Yun Sung; Bruce, Farouk; Craft, Cheryl Mae; Grzywacz, Norberto M.; Lee, Eun-Jin

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. The array of photoreceptors found in normal retinas provides uniform and regular sampling of the visual space. In contrast, cones in retinas of the S334ter-line-3 rat model for RP migrate to form a mosaic of rings, leaving large holes with few or no photoreceptors. Similar mosaics appear in human patients with other forms of retinal dystrophy. In the current study, we aimed to investigate the effect of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1) on the mosaic of cones in S334ter-line-3 rat retinas. We focused on TIMP-1 because it is one of the regulators of the extracellular matrix important for cellular migration. Methods. Immunohistochemistry was performed to reveal M-opsin cone cells (M-cone) and the results were quantified to test statistically whether or not TIMP-1 restores the mosaics to normal. In particular, the tests focused on the Voronoi and nearest-neighbor distance analyses. Results. Our tests indicated that TIMP-1 led to significant disruption of the M-opsin cone rings in S334ter-line-3 rat retinas and resulted in almost complete homogeneous mosaics. In addition, TIMP-1 induced the M-cone spatial distribution to become closer to random with decreased regularity in S334ter-line-3 rat retinas. Conclusions. These findings confirm that TIMP-1 induced M-cone mosaics in S334ter-line-3 to gain homogeneity without reaching the degree of regularity seen in normal retinal mosaics. Even if TIMP-1 fails to promote regularity, the effects of this drug on homogeneity appear to be so dramatic that TIMP-1 may be a potential therapeutic agent. TIMP-1 improves sampling of the visual field simply by causing homogeneity. PMID:25515575

  12. Dark noise in the outer segment membrane current of green rod photoreceptors from toad retina.

    PubMed

    Matthews, G

    1984-04-01

    The outer segment membrane current of single green rods from toad retina was recorded with a suction electrode, and the rate of spontaneous noise events similar to single-photon responses was measured at different temperatures. The activation energy, Gibbs free energy of activation, and entropy of activation for the process producing spontaneous events were similar to the values reported for thermal isomerization of free 11-cis-retinal (Hubbard, 1966), suggesting that thermal isomerization of the chromophore may be the trigger for the spontaneous events. The apparent rate constant for thermal activation of the green rod photopigment was about 4 times higher than in red rods but about 1000 times lower than for free 11-cis-retinal. Thus, both red and green rod opsin appear to stabilize 11-cis-retinal against thermal isomerization, but green rod opsin is somewhat less effective. The speed of the average dim-flash response increased as temperature was raised, as reported previously in both cone and rod photoreceptors. The reciprocal of the time-to-peak of the dim-flash response had an average Q10 of 3.3 between 20 and 30 degrees C. Changing temperature shifted the time scale of the response without altering response wave form, suggesting that all delay stages shaping the light response were approximately equally affected by temperature. At temperatures greater than 25 degrees C, flash responses were sometimes biphasic, i.e. inward dark current first decreased after a flash, then transiently increased beyond the resting dark level. PMID:6429322

  13. Importance of Achromatic Contrast in Short-Range Fruit Foraging of Primates

    PubMed Central

    Hiramatsu, Chihiro; Melin, Amanda D.; Aureli, Filippo; Schaffner, Colleen M.; Vorobyev, Misha; Matsumoto, Yoshifumi; Kawamura, Shoji

    2008-01-01

    Trichromatic primates have a ‘red-green’ chromatic channel in addition to luminance and ‘blue-yellow’ channels. It has been argued that the red-green channel evolved in primates as an adaptation for detecting reddish or yellowish objects, such as ripe fruits, against a background of foliage. However, foraging advantages to trichromatic primates remain unverified by behavioral observation of primates in their natural habitats. New World monkeys (platyrrhines) are an excellent model for this evaluation because of the highly polymorphic nature of their color vision due to allelic variation of the L-M opsin gene on the X chromosome. In this study we carried out field observations of a group of wild, frugivorous black-handed spider monkeys (Ateles geoffroyi frontatus, Gray 1842, Platyrrhini), consisting of both dichromats (n?=?12) and trichromats (n?=?9) in Santa Rosa National Park, Costa Rica. We determined the color vision types of individuals in this group by genotyping their L-M opsin and measured foraging efficiency of each individual for fruits located at a grasping distance. Contrary to the predicted advantage for trichromats, there was no significant difference between dichromats and trichromats in foraging efficiency and we found that the luminance contrast was the main determinant of the variation of foraging efficiency among red-green, blue-yellow and luminance contrasts. Our results suggest that luminance contrast can serve as an important cue in short-range foraging attempts despite other sensory cues that could be available. Additionally, the advantage of red-green color vision in primates may not be as salient as previously thought and needs to be evaluated in further field observations. PMID:18836576

  14. Adenovirus vectors targeting distinct cell types in the retina.

    PubMed

    Sweigard, J Harry; Cashman, Siobhan M; Kumar-Singh, Rajendra

    2010-04-01

    Purpose. Gene therapy for a number of retinal diseases necessitates efficient transduction of photoreceptor cells. Whereas adenovirus (Ad) serotype 5 (Ad5) does not transduce photoreceptors efficiently, previous studies have demonstrated improved photoreceptor transduction by Ad5 pseudotyped with Ad35 (Ad5/F35) or Ad37 (Ad5/F37) fiber or by the deletion of the RGD domain in the Ad5 penton base (Ad5DeltaRGD). However, each of these constructs contained a different transgene cassette, preventing the evaluation of the relative performance of these vectors, an important consideration before the use of these vectors in the clinic. The aim of this study was to evaluate these vectors in the retina and to attempt photoreceptor-specific transgene expression. Methods. Three Ad5-based vectors containing the same expression cassette were generated and injected into the subretinal space of adult mice. Eyes were analyzed for green fluorescence protein expression in flat-mounts, cross-sections, quantitative RT-PCR, and a modified stereological technique. A 257-bp fragment derived from the mouse opsin promoter was analyzed in the context of photoreceptor-specific transgene expression. Results. Each virus tested efficiently transduced the retinal pigment epithelium. The authors found no evidence that Ad5/F35 or Ad5/F37 transduced photoreceptors. Instead, they found that Ad5/F37 transduced Müller cells. Robust photoreceptor transduction by Ad5DeltaRGD was detected. Photoreceptor-specific transgene expression from the 257-bp mouse opsin promoter in the context of Ad5DeltaRGD vectors was found. Conclusions. Adenovirus vectors may be designed with tropism to distinct cell populations. Robust photoreceptor-specific transgene expression can be achieved in the context of Ad5DeltaRGD vectors. PMID:19892875

  15. Evolution of Mammalian Opn5 as a Specialized UV-absorbing Pigment by a Single Amino Acid Mutation*

    PubMed Central

    Yamashita, Takahiro; Ono, Katsuhiko; Ohuchi, Hideyo; Yumoto, Akane; Gotoh, Hitoshi; Tomonari, Sayuri; Sakai, Kazumi; Fujita, Hirofumi; Imamoto, Yasushi; Noji, Sumihare; Nakamura, Katsuki; Shichida, Yoshinori

    2014-01-01

    Opn5 is one of the recently identified opsin groups that is responsible for nonvisual photoreception in animals. We previously showed that a chicken homolog of mammalian Opn5 (Opn5m) is a Gi-coupled UV sensor having molecular properties typical of bistable pigments. Here we demonstrated that mammalian Opn5m evolved to be a more specialized photosensor by losing one of the characteristics of bistable pigments, direct binding of all-trans-retinal. We first confirmed that Opn5m proteins in zebrafish, Xenopus tropicalis, mouse, and human are also UV-sensitive pigments. Then we found that only mammalian Opn5m proteins lack the ability to directly bind all-trans-retinal. Mutational analysis showed that these characteristics were acquired by a single amino acid replacement at position 168. By comparing the expression patterns of Opn5m between mammals and chicken, we found that, like chicken Opn5m, mammalian Opn5m was localized in the ganglion cell layer and inner nuclear layer of the retina. However, the mouse and primate (common marmoset) opsins were distributed not in the posterior hypothalamus (including the region along the third ventricle) where chicken Opn5m is localized, but in the preoptic hypothalamus. Interestingly, RPE65, an essential enzyme for forming 11-cis-retinal in the visual cycle is expressed near the preoptic hypothalamus of the mouse and common marmoset brain but not near the region of the chicken brain where chicken Opn5m is expressed. Therefore, mammalian Opn5m may work exclusively as a short wavelength sensor in the brain as well as in the retina with the assistance of an 11-cis-retinal-supplying system. PMID:24403072

  16. Evolution of mammalian Opn5 as a specialized UV-absorbing pigment by a single amino acid mutation.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Takahiro; Ono, Katsuhiko; Ohuchi, Hideyo; Yumoto, Akane; Gotoh, Hitoshi; Tomonari, Sayuri; Sakai, Kazumi; Fujita, Hirofumi; Imamoto, Yasushi; Noji, Sumihare; Nakamura, Katsuki; Shichida, Yoshinori

    2014-02-14

    Opn5 is one of the recently identified opsin groups that is responsible for nonvisual photoreception in animals. We previously showed that a chicken homolog of mammalian Opn5 (Opn5m) is a Gi-coupled UV sensor having molecular properties typical of bistable pigments. Here we demonstrated that mammalian Opn5m evolved to be a more specialized photosensor by losing one of the characteristics of bistable pigments, direct binding of all-trans-retinal. We first confirmed that Opn5m proteins in zebrafish, Xenopus tropicalis, mouse, and human are also UV-sensitive pigments. Then we found that only mammalian Opn5m proteins lack the ability to directly bind all-trans-retinal. Mutational analysis showed that these characteristics were acquired by a single amino acid replacement at position 168. By comparing the expression patterns of Opn5m between mammals and chicken, we found that, like chicken Opn5m, mammalian Opn5m was localized in the ganglion cell layer and inner nuclear layer of the retina. However, the mouse and primate (common marmoset) opsins were distributed not in the posterior hypothalamus (including the region along the third ventricle) where chicken Opn5m is localized, but in the preoptic hypothalamus. Interestingly, RPE65, an essential enzyme for forming 11-cis-retinal in the visual cycle is expressed near the preoptic hypothalamus of the mouse and common marmoset brain but not near the region of the chicken brain where chicken Opn5m is expressed. Therefore, mammalian Opn5m may work exclusively as a short wavelength sensor in the brain as well as in the retina with the assistance of an 11-cis-retinal-supplying system. PMID:24403072

  17. Optogenetic approaches for functional mouse brain mapping

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Diana H.; LeDue, Jeffrey; Mohajerani, Majid H.; Vanni, Matthieu P.; Murphy, Timothy H.

    2013-01-01

    To better understand the connectivity of the brain, it is important to map both structural and functional connections between neurons and cortical regions. In recent years, a set of optogenetic tools have been developed that permit selective manipulation and investigation of neural systems. These tools have enabled the mapping of functional connections between stimulated cortical targets and other brain regions. Advantages of the approach include the ability to arbitrarily stimulate brain regions that express opsins, allowing for brain mapping independent of behavior or sensory processing. The ability of opsins to be rapidly and locally activated allows for investigation of connectivity with spatial resolution on the order of single neurons and temporal resolution on the order of milliseconds. Optogenetic methods for functional mapping have been applied in experiments ranging from in vitro investigation of microcircuits, to in vivo probing of inter-regional cortical connections, to examination of global connections within the whole brain. We review recently developed functional mapping methods that use optogenetic single-point stimulation in the rodent brain and employ cellular electrophysiology, evoked motor movements, voltage sensitive dyes (VSDs), calcium indicators, or functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to assess activity. In particular we highlight results using red-shifted organic VSDs that permit high temporal resolution imaging in a manner spectrally separated from Channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2) activation. VSD maps stimulated by ChR2 were dependent on intracortical synaptic activity and were able to reflect circuits used for sensory processing. Although the methods reviewed are powerful, challenges remain with respect to finding approaches that permit selective high temporal resolution assessment of stimulated activity in animals that can be followed longitudinally. PMID:23596383

  18. Transcriptome-Wide Differential Gene Expression in Bicyclus anynana Butterflies: Female Vision-Related Genes Are More Plastic.

    PubMed

    Macias-Muñoz, Aide; Smith, Gilbert; Monteiro, Antónia; Briscoe, Adriana D

    2016-01-01

    Vision is energetically costly to maintain. Consequently, over time many cave-adapted species downregulate the expression of vision genes or even lose their eyes and associated eye genes entirely. Alternatively, organisms that live in fluctuating environments, with different requirements for vision at different times, may evolve phenotypic plasticity for expression of vision genes. Here, we use a global transcriptomic and candidate gene approach to compare gene expression in the heads of a polyphenic butterfly. Bicyclus anynana have two seasonal forms that display sexual dimorphism and plasticity in eye morphology, and female-specific plasticity in opsin gene expression. Nonchoosy dry season females downregulate opsin expression, consistent with the high physiological cost of vision. To identify other genes associated with sexually dimorphic and seasonally plastic differences in vision, we analyzed RNA-sequencing data from whole head tissues. We identified two eye development genes (klarsicht and warts homologs) and an eye pigment biosynthesis gene (henna) differentially expressed between seasonal forms. By comparing sex-specific expression across seasonal forms, we found that klarsicht, warts, henna, and another eye development gene (domeless) were plastic in a female-specific manner. In a male-only analysis, white (w) was differentially expressed between seasonal forms. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction confirmed that warts and white are expressed in eyes only, whereas klarsicht, henna and domeless are expressed in both eyes and brain. We find that differential expression of eye development and eye pigment genes is associated with divergent eye phenotypes in B. anynana seasonal forms, and that there is a larger effect of season on female vision-related genes. PMID:26371082

  19. Action spectrum for melatonin regulation in humans: evidence for a novel circadian photoreceptor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brainard, G. C.; Hanifin, J. P.; Greeson, J. M.; Byrne, B.; Glickman, G.; Gerner, E.; Rollag, M. D.

    2001-01-01

    The photopigment in the human eye that transduces light for circadian and neuroendocrine regulation, is unknown. The aim of this study was to establish an action spectrum for light-induced melatonin suppression that could help elucidate the ocular photoreceptor system for regulating the human pineal gland. Subjects (37 females, 35 males, mean age of 24.5 +/- 0.3 years) were healthy and had normal color vision. Full-field, monochromatic light exposures took place between 2:00 and 3:30 A.M. while subjects' pupils were dilated. Blood samples collected before and after light exposures were quantified for melatonin. Each subject was tested with at least seven different irradiances of one wavelength with a minimum of 1 week between each nighttime exposure. Nighttime melatonin suppression tests (n = 627) were completed with wavelengths from 420 to 600 nm. The data were fit to eight univariant, sigmoidal fluence-response curves (R(2) = 0.81-0.95). The action spectrum constructed from these data fit an opsin template (R(2) = 0.91), which identifies 446-477 nm as the most potent wavelength region providing circadian input for regulating melatonin secretion. The results suggest that, in humans, a single photopigment may be primarily responsible for melatonin suppression, and its peak absorbance appears to be distinct from that of rod and cone cell photopigments for vision. The data also suggest that this new photopigment is retinaldehyde based. These findings suggest that there is a novel opsin photopigment in the human eye that mediates circadian photoreception.

  20. RPE-derived factors modulate photoreceptor differentiation: a possible role in the retinal stem cell niche.

    PubMed

    Sheedlo, Harold J; Bartosh, T J; Wang, Zhaohui; Srinivasan, Bhooma; Brun-Zinkernagel, Anne M; Roque, Rouel S

    2007-01-01

    A photoreceptor cell line, designated 661W, was tested for its response to growth factors secreted by retinal pigment epithelial cells including basic fibroblast growth factor, epidermal growth factor, and nerve growth factor. Early passaged 661W cells expressed high levels of retinal progenitor markers such as nestin and Pax6, but not opsin or glial fibrillary acidic protein. 661W cells grown in FGF-2 or EGF exhibited a multiple-process morphology with small phase-bright nuclei similar to neurons, whereas cells cultured in nerve growth factor (NGF) or retinal pigment epithelium (RPE)-conditioned medium (RPE-CM) displayed rounded profiles lacking processes. 661W cells grown in FGF-2 were slightly elevated, but not significantly above, control cultures; but cells treated with RPE-CM or NGF were fewer, approximately 63% and 49% of control, respectively. NGF immunodepletion of RPE-CM strongly suppressed the inhibitory activity of RPE-CM on cell proliferation. Cells treated with FGF-2, but not NGF, upregulated their expression of opsin. All treatment conditions resulted in almost 100% viability based on calcium AM staining. Cells grown on extracellular matrix proteins laminin, fibronectin, and/or collagen resembled those grown on untreated dishes. This study showed that early passaged 661W cells displayed characteristics of retinal progenitor cells. The 661W cells proliferated and appeared to mature morphologically expressing rod photoreceptor phenotype in response to FGF-2. In contrast, NGF and RPE-CM inhibited proliferation and morphological differentiation of 661W cells, possibly inducing cell cycle arrest. These findings are consistent with reports that the RPE modulates photoreceptor differentiation and retinal progenitor cells via secreted factors and may play a role in the regulation of the retinal stem cell niche. PMID:17924175

  1. Evolution of ultraviolet vision in the largest avian radiation - the passerines

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Interspecific variation in avian colour vision falls into two discrete classes: violet sensitive (VS) and ultraviolet sensitive (UVS). They are characterised by the spectral sensitivity of the most shortwave sensitive of the four single cones, the SWS1, which is seemingly under direct control of as little as one amino acid substitution in the cone opsin protein. Changes in spectral sensitivity of the SWS1 are ecologically important, as they affect the abilities of birds to accurately assess potential mates, find food and minimise visibility of social signals to predators. Still, available data have indicated that shifts between classes are rare, with only four to five independent acquisitions of UV sensitivity in avian evolution. Results We have classified a large sample of passeriform species as VS or UVS from genomic DNA and mapped the evolution of this character on a passerine phylogeny inferred from published molecular sequence data. Sequencing a small gene fragment has allowed us to trace the trait changing from one stable state to another through the radiation of the passeriform birds. Their ancestor is hypothesised to be UVS. In the subsequent radiation, colour vision changed between UVS and VS at least eight times. Conclusions The phylogenetic distribution of SWS1 cone opsin types in Passeriformes reveals a much higher degree of complexity in avian colour vision evolution than what was previously indicated from the limited data available. Clades with variation in the colour vision system are nested among clades with a seemingly stable VS or UVS state, providing a rare opportunity to understand how an ecologically important trait under simple genetic control may co-evolve with, and be stabilised by, associated traits in a character complex. PMID:22024316

  2. Studies on the stability of the human cone visual pigments.

    PubMed

    Ramon, Eva; Mao, Xiang; Ridge, Kevin D

    2009-01-01

    The retina of vertebrates contains two kinds of photoreceptor cells, rods and cones, which contain their specific visual pigments that are responsible for scotopic and photopic vision, respectively. In cone photoreceptor cells, there are three types of color pigments: blue, green and red, each with a distinctive absorption maximum. The goal of this investigation was to identify optimal conditions under which these pigments could be obtained and isolated in a stable form, thereby facilitating structural studies using high-resolution approaches. For this purpose, all three human cone opsins were initially expressed in mammalian cells, reconstituted with 11-cis retinal, detergent solubilized, purified and their stability compared with rod rhodopsin. As all three pigments showed dramatically reduced stability relative to rhodopsin, site-directed mutagenesis was used in an attempt to engineer stability into the green cone pigment. The mutations introduced some structural motifs and sites of posttranslational modification present in rhodopsin, as well as amino acid substitutions that have been found to stabilize the rod opsin apo-protein. We also modified the hydrophobic environment of the green cone pigment by varying the detergent and detergent/lipid composition used during solubilization and purification, and compared them with the retinal reconstituted pigment in membranes. Our results show that these changes do not significantly improve the inherent instability of the human cone pigments, and in some cases, lead to a decrease in stability and protein aggregation. We conclude that further efforts are required to stabilize the human cone pigments in a form suitable for high-resolution structural studies. PMID:19192203

  3. Suppressing thyroid hormone signaling preserves cone photoreceptors in mouse models of retinal degeneration.

    PubMed

    Ma, Hongwei; Thapa, Arjun; Morris, Lynsie; Redmond, T Michael; Baehr, Wolfgang; Ding, Xi-Qin

    2014-03-01

    Cone phototransduction and survival of cones in the human macula is essential for color vision and for visual acuity. Progressive cone degeneration in age-related macular degeneration, Stargardt disease, and recessive cone dystrophies is a major cause of blindness. Thyroid hormone (TH) signaling, which regulates cell proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis, plays a central role in cone opsin expression and patterning in the retina. Here, we investigated whether TH signaling affects cone viability in inherited retinal degeneration mouse models. Retinol isomerase RPE65-deficient mice [a model of Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA) with rapid cone loss] and cone photoreceptor function loss type 1 mice (severe recessive achromatopsia) were used to determine whether suppressing TH signaling with antithyroid treatment reduces cone death. Further, cone cyclic nucleotide-gated channel B subunit-deficient mice (moderate achromatopsia) and guanylate cyclase 2e-deficient mice (LCA with slower cone loss) were used to determine whether triiodothyronine (T3) treatment (stimulating TH signaling) causes deterioration of cones. We found that cone density in retinol isomerase RPE65-deficient and cone photoreceptor function loss type 1 mice increased about sixfold following antithyroid treatment. Cone density in cone cyclic nucleotide-gated channel B subunit-deficient and guanylate cyclase 2e-deficient mice decreased about 40% following T3 treatment. The effect of TH signaling on cone viability appears to be independent of its regulation on cone opsin expression. This work demonstrates that suppressing TH signaling in retina dystrophy mouse models is protective of cones, providing insights into cone preservation and therapeutic interventions. PMID:24550448

  4. THE GALACTIC CENTER IN THE FAR-INFRARED

    SciTech Connect

    Etxaluze, M.; Smith, Howard A.; Tolls, V.; Stark, A. A.; Gonzalez-Alfonso, E.

    2011-10-15

    We analyze the far-infrared dust emission from the Galactic center region, including the circumnuclear disk (CND) and other structures, using Herschel PACS and SPIRE photometric observations. These Herschel data are complemented by unpublished observations by the Infrared Space Observatory Long Wavelength Spectrometer (ISO-LWS), which used parallel mode scans to obtain photometric images of the region with a larger beam than Herschel but with a complementary wavelength coverage and more frequent sampling with 10 detectors observing at 10 different wavelengths in the range from 46 {mu}m to 180 {mu}m, where the emission peaks. We also include data from the Midcourse Space Experiment at 21.3 {mu}m for completeness. We model the combined ISO-LWS continuum plus Herschel PACS and SPIRE photometric data toward the central 2 pc in Sagittarius A* (Sgr A*), a region that includes the CND. We find that the far-infrared spectral energy distribution is best represented by a continuum that is the sum of three gray body curves from dust at temperatures of 90, 44.5, and 23 K. We obtain temperature and molecular hydrogen column density maps of the region. We estimate the mass of the inner part of the CND to be {approx}5.0 x 10{sup 4} M{sub sun}, with luminosities: L{sub cavity} {approx} 2.2 x 10{sup 6} L{sub sun} and L{sub CND} {approx} 1.5 x 10{sup 6} L{sub sun} in the central 2 pc radius around Sgr A*. We find from the Herschel and ISO data that the cold component of the dust dominates the total dust mass, with a contribution of {approx}3.2 x 10{sup 4} M{sub sun}; this important cold material had escaped the notice of earlier studies that relied on shorter wavelength observations. The hotter component disagrees with some earlier estimates, but is consistent with measured gas temperatures and with models that imply shock heating or turbulent effects are at work. We find that the dust grain sizes apparently change widely across the region, perhaps in response to the temperature variations, and we map that distribution.

  5. The Far-Infrared Emission Line and Continuum Spectrum of the Seyfert Galaxy NGC 1068

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spinoglio, Luigi; Smith, Howard A.; Gonzalez-Alfonso, Eduardo; Fisher, Jacqueline

    2005-01-01

    We report on the analysis of the first complete far-infrared spectrum (43-197 microns) of the Seyfert 2 galaxy NGC 1068 as observed with the Long Wavelength Spectrometer (LWS) onboard the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO). In addition to the 7 expected ionic fine structure emission lines, the OH rotational lines at 79, 119 and 163 microns were all detected in emission, which is unique among galaxies with full LWS spectra, where the 119 micron line, where detected, is always in absorption. The observed line intensities were modelled together with IS0 Short Wavelength Spectrometer (SWS) and optical and ultraviolet line intensities from the literature, considering two independent emission components: the AGN component and the starburst component in the circumnuclear ring of approximately 3kpc in size. Using the UV to mid-IR emission line spectrum to constrain the nuclear ionizing continuum, we have confirmed previous results: a canonical power-law ionizing spectrum is a poorer fit than one with a deep absorption trough, while the presence of a big blue bump is ruled out. Based on the instantaneous starburst age of 5 Myr constrained by the Br gamma equivalent width in the starburst ring, and starburst synthesis models of the mid- and far-infrared fine-structure line emission, a low ionization parameter (U=10(exp -3.5)) and low densities (n=100 cm (exp -3)) are derived. Combining the AGN and starburst components, we succeed in modeling the overall UV to far-IR atomic spectrum of SGC 1068, reproducing the line fluxes to within a factor 2.0 on average with a standard deviation of 1.4. The OH 119 micron emission indicates that the line is collisionally excited, and arises in a warm and dense region. The OH emission has been modeled using spherically symmetric, non-local, non-LTE radiative transfer models. The models indicate that the bulk of the emission arises from the nuclear region, although some extended contribution from the starburst is not ruled out. The OH abundance in the nuclear region is expected to be approximately 10(exp -5), characteristic of X-ray dominated regions.

  6. Heliophysics Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Austin, M.; Schrjver, K.; Siscoe, G. L.; Bhattacharjee, A.; Longcope, D. W.; Sojka, J. J.; Guhathakurta, M.

    2009-12-01

    HELIOPHYSICS SUMMER SCHOOLS: NASA Living With a Star and the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research, Visiting Scientist Programs sponsor the Heliophysics Summer Schools to build this new field of science. The series of summer schools, started in 2007, help graduate students and scientists learn and develop the science of heliophysics as a broad, coherent discipline that reaches in space from the Earth's troposphere to the depths of the Sun, and in time from the formation of the solar system to the distant future. The first three years of the school will result in three textbooks for use at universities worldwide. Subsequent years will both teach other generations of students and develop the complementary materials that support teaching of heliophysics at both graduate and undergraduate levels. Heliophysics is a developing scientific discipline integrating studies of the Sun’s variability, the surrounding heliosphere, and climatic environments. Over the past few centuries, our understanding of how the Sun drives space weather and climate on the Earth and other planets has advanced at an ever-increasing rate. The first textbook, (Heliophysics I Plasma Physics of the Local Cosmos, edited by Carolus J. Schrijver, Lockheed Martin and George L. Siscoe, Boston University) integrates such diverse topics for the first time as a coherent intellectual discipline. It emphasizes the physical processes coupling the Sun and Earth, allowing insights into the interaction of the solar wind and radiation with the Earth’s magnetic field, atmosphere and climate system. It provides a core resource for advanced undergraduates and graduates, and also constitutes a foundational reference for researchers in heliophysics, astrophysics, plasma physics, space physics, solar physics, aeronomy, space weather, planetary science and climate science. HELIOPHYSICS POSTDOCTORAL PROGRAM: Hosts and applicants are invited to apply to a new postdoctoral fellowship program designed to train the next generation of researchers in the emerging field of Heliophysics. Two major topics of focus for LWS are the science of space weather and of the Sun-climate connection. Preference will be given to applicants whose proposed research addresses one of these two foci; but any research program relevant to LWS will be considered. Since the goal of this fellowship program is to train Sun-Earth system researchers, preference will also be given to research projects that cross the traditional Heliophysics subdomains of the Sun, heliosphere, magnetosphere, and ionosphere/upper atmosphere, as well as Sun-climate investigations. Host institutions and mentoring scientists will play critical roles. Hosts may post information about their research on a central database for this program: www.vsp.ucar.edu/HeliophysicsScience.

  7. Infrared study of the southern Galactic star-forming region associated with IRAS 14416-5937

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vig, S.; Ghosh, S. K.; Ojha, D. K.; Verma, R. P.

    2007-02-01

    Aims:Our goal was to carry out an infrared study of the southern Galactic massive star-forming region associated with IRAS 14416-5937. Methods: This star-forming region has been mapped simultaneously in two far infrared bands at ~150 and 210 ?m, using the TIFR 1-m balloon borne telescope with ~1' angular resolution. We have used 2MASS JHK_s, as well as Spitzer-GLIMPSE data of this region to study the stellar populations of the embedded young cluster. This region comprises two sources, designated as A and B and separated by ~2 pc. The spectrum of a region located close to the source A obtained using the Long Wavelength Spectrometer (LWS) on board the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) is presented. Emission from warm dust and from Unidentified Infrared Bands (UIBs) is estimated using the mid-infrared data of the MSX survey. Results: The spatial distributions of (1) the temperature of cool dust and (2) optical depth at 200 ?m have been obtained taking advantage of the similar beams in both the TIFR bands. A number of atomic fine structure lines have been detected in the ISO-LWS spectrum, which have been used to estimate the electron density and the effective temperature of the ionising radiation in this region. From the near- and mid-infrared images, we identify a dust lane due north-west of source A. The dust lane is populated by Class I type sources. Class II type sources are found further along the dust lane as well as below it. Self consistent radiative transfer models of the two sources (A and B) are in good agreement with the observed spectral energy distributions. Conclusions: .The spatial distribution of young stellar objects in and around the dust lane suggests that active star formation is taking place along the dust lane and is possibly triggered by the expanding HII regions of A and B. Tables 6 and 7 are only available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  8. Heliophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Austin, M.; Guhathakurta, M.; Bhattacharjee, A.; Longcope, D. W.; Sojka, J. J.

    2010-12-01

    Heliophysics Summer Schools. NASA Living With a Star and the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research, Visiting Scientist Programs sponsor the Heliophysics Summer Schools to build the next generation of scientists in this new field. The series of summer schools (commencing 2007) trains graduate students, postdoctoral fellows and university faculty to learn and develop the science of heliophysics as a broad, coherent discipline that reaches in space from the Earth’s troposphere to the depths of the Sun, and in time from the formation of the solar system to the distant future. The first three years of the school resulted in the publication of three textbooks for use at universities worldwide. Subsequent years will both teach generations of students and faculty and develop the complementary materials that support teaching of heliophysics at both graduate and undergraduate levels. Heliophysics is a developing scientific discipline integrating studies of the Sun’s variability, the surrounding heliopsphere, and climate environments. Over the past few centuries, our understanding of how the Sun drives space weather and climate on the Earth and other planets has advanced at an ever-increasing rate. The three volumes, “Plasma Physics of the Local Cosmos”, “Space Storms and Radiation: Causes and Effects” and “Evolving Solar Activity and the Climates of Space and Earth”, edited by Carolus J. Schrijver, Lockheed Martin, and George L. Siscoe, Boston University, integrate such diverse topics for the first time as a coherent intellectual discipline. The books may be ordered through Cambridge University Press, and provide a foundational reference for researchers in heliophysics, astrophysics, plasma physics, space physics, solar physics, aeronomy, space weather, planetary science and climate science. Heliophysics Postdoctoral Program. Hosting/mentoring scientists and postdoctoral fellows are invited to apply to this new program designed to train the next generation of researchers in heliophysics. Two major topics of focus for LWS are the science of space weather and of the Sun-climate connection. Preference is given to applicants whose proposed research addresses one of these two foci; but any research program relevant to LWS is considered. Since the goal of this fellowship program is to train Sun-Earth system researchers, preference is also given to research projects that cross the traditional heliophysics subdomains of the Sun, heliosphere, magnetosphere, and ionosphere/upper atmosphere, as well as Sun-climate investigations. Host institutions and mentoring scientists will play critical roles. Interested hosts may submit information about their research on a central database for this program: http://www.vsp.ucar.edu/Heliophysics/

  9. Gravitational wave searches using the DSN (Deep Space Network)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, S. J.; Armstrong, J. W.

    1988-01-01

    The Deep Space Network Doppler spacecraft link is currently the only method available for broadband gravitational wave searches in the 0.01 to 0.001 Hz frequency range. The DSN's role in the worldwide search for gravitational waves is described by first summarizing from the literature current theoretical estimates of gravitational wave strengths and time scales from various astrophysical sources. Current and future detection schemes for ground based and space based detectors are then discussed. Past, present, and future planned or proposed gravitational wave experiments using DSN Doppler tracking are described. Lastly, some major technical challenges to improve gravitational wave sensitivities using the DSN are discussed.

  10. Variation in the action spectrum of erythrolabe among deuteranopes.

    PubMed Central

    Alpern, M; Pugh, E N

    1977-01-01

    1. Eight deuteranopes matched a mixture of a monochromatic light on the long wave side of the neutral point and a violet (450 nm) primary to a fixed white as well as a monochromatic light on the short wave side of the neutral point mixed with a red (650 nm) primary, to the same white. For lambda greater than 530 nm, the former set of matches defined the action spectrum of the long wave sensitive foveal cones, and for lambda less than 480 nm, the latter that of the short wave sensitive cones. 2. Individual differences in the former matches were approximately correlated with the respective ratio of the sensitivities of the wave-length of the anomaloscope primaries, in a way that individual differences of the latter were not. 3. Assuming that eye media differences alone account for the differences in long wave sensitive foveal action spectra, the spectral reflectivity of the foveal fundus was predicted for these deuteranopes. The prediction is inconsistent with measurement. 4. Thirteen deuteranopes matched monochromatic spectral lights with a green (535 nm) and a blue (460 nm) primary. The result were analysed by von Kries' method in which differences in matching due to differences in eye media absorption are obviated. The matches of five differed significantly from one another when so analysed. It was concluded that at least one of two action spectra of the foveal cones of every one of these five differed from that of all of the others. 5. The canon that deuteranopes accept normal colour matches was evaluated by confronting a single normal with five deuternopes in the analytical anomaloscope of Baker & Rushton, set in the mode of each of the five in turn. Obvious differences existed between this normal's matches and those of four of five deuteranopes. 6. Explanations for differences in the spectrum of erythrolabe in different deuteranopes are evaluated. The possibilities that all have the identical visual pigment but (a) in cones with different optical funnelling properties or (b) in different optical densities are considered. Preliminary results are not in agreement with the expectations of either of these ideas. 7. It is suggested that the visual pigment in the foveal long wave sensitive cones of different deuternopes (and of different normals) may have different extinction spectra. The idea is consistent with micro-spectrophotometric measurements of rhodopsin in individual rods from different frogs (Bowmaker, Loew & Leibman, 1975). PMID:301186

  11. Magnetic Causes of Solar Coronal Mass Ejections: Dominance of the Free Magnetic Energy over Either the Magnetic Twist or Size Alone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Falconer, D. A.; Moore, R. L.; Gary, G. A.

    2006-01-01

    We report further results from our ongoing assessment of magnetogram-based measures of active-region nonpotentiality and size as predictors of coronal mass ejections (CMEs). We have devised improved generalized measures of active-region nonpotentiality that apply to active regions of any degree of magnetic complexity, rather than being limited to bipolar active regions as our initial measures were. From a set of approx.50 active-regions, we have found that measures of total nonpotentiality have a 75-80% success rate n predicting whether an active region will produce a CME in 2 days after the magnetogram. This makes measures of total nonpotentiality a better predictor than either active-region size, or active region twist (size-normalized nonpotentiality), which have a approx.65% success rates. We have also found that we can measure from the line-of-sight magnetograms an active region's total nonpotentiality and the size, which allows use to use MDI to evaluate these quantities for 4-5 consecutive days for each active region, and to investigate if there is some combination of size and total nonpotentiality that have a stronger predictive power than does total nonpotentiality. This work was funded by NASA through its LWS TR&T Program and its Solar and Heliospheric Physics SR&T Program, and by NSF through its Solar Terrestrial Research and SHINE programs.

  12. Challenges to modeling the Sun-Earth System: A Workshop Summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spann, James F.

    2006-01-01

    This special issue of the Journal of' Atmospheric and Solar-Terrestrial Physics is a compilation of 23 papers presented at The 2004 Huntsville Modeling Workshop: Challenges to Modeling thc San-Earth System held in Huntsville, AB on October 18-22, 2004. The title of the workshop appropriately captures the theme of what was presented and discussed by the 120 participants. Currently, end-to-end modeling of the Sun-Earth system is a major goal of the National Space Weather and NASA living with a star (LWS) programs. While profound advances have been made in modeling isolated regions of the Sun-Earth system, minimal progress has been achieved in modeling the end-to-end system. The transfer of mass, energy and momentum through the coupled Sun-Earth system spans a wide range of scales inn time and space. The uncertainty in the underlying physics responsible for coupling contiguous regions of the Sun-Earth system is recognized as a significant barrier to progress

  13. The Living With a Star Program and International Collaboration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Barbara J.

    2004-01-01

    International cooperation has long been a vital element in the scientific investigation of solar variability and its impact on Earth and the space environment. Recently a new international cooperative initiative in solar-terrestrial physics has been established by the major space agencies of the world, called the International Living With a Star (ILWS) program. ILWS is a follow-on to the highly successful International Solar Terrestrial Physics (ISTP) program, which derived its success from the ,cooperation of a number of international partners. ISTP, with its steady flow of discoveries and new knowledge in solar-terrestrial physics, has laid the foundation for the coordinated study of the Sun-Earth system as a connected stellar-planetary system and as humanity's home. The first step in establishing ILWS was taken in the fall of 2000 when funding was approved for the NASA's LWS program whose goal is to "develop the scientific understanding necessary to effectively address those aspects of the connected Sun-Earth system that directly affect life and society".

  14. The Origins of Magnetic Structure in the Corona and Wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antiochos, Spiro K.

    2010-01-01

    One of the most important and most puzzling features of the coronal magnetic field is that it appears to have smooth magnetic structure with little evidence for non-potentiality except at two special locations: photospheric polarity inversions lines. (non-potentiality observed as a filament channel) and coronal hole boundaries, (observed as the slow solar wind). This characteristic feature of the closed-field corona is highly unexpected given that its magnetic field is continuously tangled by photospheric motions. Although reconnection can eliminate some of the injected structure, it cannot destroy the helicity, which should build up to produce observable complexity. I propose that an inverse cascade process transports the injected helicity from the interior of closed flux regions to their boundaries inversion lines and coronal holes, creating both filament channels and the slow wind. We describe how the helicity is injected and transported and calculate the relevant rates. I argue that one process, helicity transport, can explain both the observed lack and presence of structure in the coronal magnetic field. This work has been supported by the NASA HTP, SR&T, and LWS programs.

  15. Genomic evidence for rod monochromacy in sloths and armadillos suggests early subterranean history for Xenarthra.

    PubMed

    Emerling, Christopher A; Springer, Mark S

    2015-02-01

    Rod monochromacy is a rare condition in vertebrates characterized by the absence of cone photoreceptor cells. The resulting phenotype is colourblindness and low acuity vision in dim-light and blindness in bright-light conditions. Early reports of xenarthrans (armadillos, sloths and anteaters) suggest that they are rod monochromats, but this has not been tested with genomic data. We searched the genomes of Dasypus novemcinctus (nine-banded armadillo), Choloepus hoffmanni (Hoffmann's two-toed sloth) and Mylodon darwinii (extinct ground sloth) for retinal photoreceptor genes and examined them for inactivating mutations. We performed PCR and Sanger sequencing on cone phototransduction genes of 10 additional xenarthrans to test for shared inactivating mutations and estimated the timing of inactivation for photoreceptor pseudogenes. We concluded that a stem xenarthran became an long-wavelength sensitive-cone monochromat following a missense mutation at a critical residue in SWS1, and a stem cingulate (armadillos, glyptodonts and pampatheres) and stem pilosan (sloths and anteaters) independently acquired rod monochromacy early in their evolutionary history following the inactivation of LWS and PDE6C, respectively. We hypothesize that rod monochromacy in armadillos and pilosans evolved as an adaptation to a subterranean habitat in the early history of Xenarthra. The presence of rod monochromacy has major implications for understanding xenarthran behavioural ecology and evolution. PMID:25540280

  16. Three-fluid, 3D MHD solar wind modeling with turbulence transport and eddy viscosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usmanov, A. V.; Goldstein, M. L.; Matthaeus, W. H.

    2014-12-01

    We present results from a three-fluid, fully three-dimensional MHD solar wind model that includes turbulence transport, eddy viscosity, turbulent resistivity, and turbulent heating. The solar wind plasma is described as a co-moving system of three species: the solar wind protons, electrons, and interstellar pickup protons. Separate energy equations are employed for each species. We obtain numerical solutions of Reynolds-averaged solar wind equations coupled with turbulence transport equations in the region from 0.3 to 100 AU. The integrated system of equations includes the effects of electron heat conduction, Coulomb collisions, photoionization of interstellar hydrogen atoms and their charge exchange with the solar wind protons, turbulence energy generation by pickup protons, and turbulent heating of solar wind protons and electrons. Using either a dipole approximation for the solar magnetic field or synoptic solar magnetograms from the Wilcox Solar Observatory for assigning boundary conditions at the coronal base, we apply the model to study the global structure of the solar wind and its three-dimensional properties, including turbulence parameters, throughout the heliosphere. The model results are compared with observations on WIND, Ulysses and Voyager 2 spacecraft. This work is partially supported by LWS and Heliophysics Grand Challenges programs.

  17. The Role of the Heavy Ions in the Generation of EMIC Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khazanov, G. V.; Gallagher, D. L.; Gamayunov, K. V.

    2005-01-01

    The effect of EMIC waves, generated by a positive ion temperature anisotropy on Earth s RC dynamics is one of the best known examples of wave-particle interaction in the magnetosphere and the most controversial mechanism of RC losses. Under certain conditions, relativistic electrons with energy greater than or equal to 1 MeV can be removed from the outer RB by EMIC wave scattering during a magnetic storm much faster than by any other loss mechanisms. That is why the calculation of EMIC waves are very critical part of the LWS program. Systematic studies of magnetosphere-plasmasphere-ionosphere coupling are needed in order to provide EMIC waves forecast on a global scale and include WPI processes in the RB modeling. To quantify the EMIC wave effects on the RC-ion and RB-electron dynamics, a self-consistent theoretical description of the ions, electrons, and EMIC waves should be employed in future RB studies. This talk will emphasize the role of the heavy ions in the EMIC waves formation on a global scale and their nonlinear coupling with lower hybrid waves.

  18. Promoting Scientist Communications Through Graduate Summer School in Heliophysics and Space Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gross, N. A.; Schrijver, K.; Bagenal, F.; Sojka, J. J.; Wiltberger, M. J.

    2014-12-01

    edagogical tools that promote student interaction can be applied successfully during graduate workshops to enhance community and communication among the participants and instructors. The NASA/LWS funded Heliophysics Summer School and the NSF funded Space Weather Summer School provide graduate students starting research in the field, and others who are involved in space physics, an opportunity to learn from and interact with leaders in the field and each other. These interactions can happen casually, but there are a number of programatic aspects that foster the interaction so that they can be as fruitful as possible during the short period. These include: specific "ice-breaker" activities, practicing "elevator speeches", embedded lecture questions, question cards, discussion questions, interactive lab activities, structured lab groups, and use of social media. We are continuing to develop new ways to foster profession interaction during these short courses. Along with enhancing their own learning, the inclusion of these strategies provides both the participants and the instructors with models of good pedagogical tools and builds community among the students. Our specific implementation of these strategies and evidence of success will be presented.

  19. Single-nucleotide polymorphism analysis of GH, GHR, and IGF-1 genes in minipigs

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Y.G.; Yue, M.; Gu, Y.; Gu, W.W.; Wang, Y.J.

    2014-01-01

    Tibetan (TB) and Bama (BM) miniature pigs are two popular pig breeds that are used as experimental animals in China due to their small body size. Here, we analyzed single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in gene fragments that are closely related to growth traits [growth hormone (GH), growth hormone receptor (GHR), and insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-1)] in these pig breeds and a large white (LW) control pig breed. On the basis of the analysis of 100 BMs, 108 TBs, and 50 LWs, the polymorphic distribution levels of GH, GHR, and IGF-1 were significantly different among these three pig breeds. According to correlation analyses between SNPs and five growth traits - body weight (BW), body length (BL), withers height (WH), chest circumference (CC), and abdomen circumference (AC) - three SNP loci in BMs and four SNP loci in TBs significantly affected growth traits. Three SNP sites in BMs and four SNP sites in TBs significantly affected growth traits. SNPs located in the GH gene fragment significantly affected BL and CC at locus 12 and BL at locus 45 in BMs, and also BW, WH, CC, and AC at locus 45 and WH and CC at locus 93 in TBs. One SNP at locus 85 in the BM GHR gene fragment significantly affected all growth traits. All indices were significantly reduced with a mixture of alleles at locus 85. These results provide more information regarding the genetic background of these minipig species and indicate useful selection markers for pig breeding programs. PMID:25098617

  20. Single-nucleotide polymorphism analysis of GH, GHR, and IGF-1 genes in minipigs.

    PubMed

    Tian, Y G; Yue, M; Gu, Y; Gu, W W; Wang, Y J

    2014-09-01

    Tibetan (TB) and Bama (BM) miniature pigs are two popular pig breeds that are used as experimental animals in China due to their small body size. Here, we analyzed single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in gene fragments that are closely related to growth traits [growth hormone (GH), growth hormone receptor (GHR), and insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-1)] in these pig breeds and a large white (LW) control pig breed. On the basis of the analysis of 100 BMs, 108 TBs, and 50 LWs, the polymorphic distribution levels of GH, GHR, and IGF-1 were significantly different among these three pig breeds. According to correlation analyses between SNPs and five growth traits--body weight (BW), body length (BL), withers height (WH), chest circumference (CC), and abdomen circumference (AC)--three SNP loci in BMs and four SNP loci in TBs significantly affected growth traits. Three SNP sites in BMs and four SNP sites in TBs significantly affected growth traits. SNPs located in the GH gene fragment significantly affected BL and CC at locus 12 and BL at locus 45 in BMs, and also BW, WH, CC, and AC at locus 45 and WH and CC at locus 93 in TBs. One SNP at locus 85 in the BM GHR gene fragment significantly affected all growth traits. All indices were significantly reduced with a mixture of alleles at locus 85. These results provide more information regarding the genetic background of these minipig species and indicate useful selection markers for pig breeding programs. PMID:25098617

  1. TOPLA: A New Empirical Representation of the F-Region Topside and Plasmasphere for the International Reference Ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bilitza, D.; Reinisch, B.; Gallagher, D.; Huang, X.; Truhlik, V.; Nsumei, P.

    2007-01-01

    The goal of this LWS tools effort is the development of a new data-based F-region TOpside and PLAsmasphere (TOPLA) model for the electron density (Ne) and temperature (Te) for inclusion in the International Reference Ionosphere (IRI) model using newly available satellite data and models for these regions. The IRI model is the de facto international standard for specification of ionospheric parameters and is currently being considered as an ISO Technical Specification for the ionosphere. Our effort is directed towards improving the topside part of the model and extending it into the plasmasphere. Specifically we are planning to overcome the following shortcomings of the current IRI topside model: (I) overestimation of densities above 700 km by a factor of 2 and more, (3) unrealistically steep density profiles at high latitudes during very high solar activities, (4) no solar cycle variations and no semi-annual variations for the electron temperature, (5) discontinuities or unphysical gradients when merging with plasmaspheric models. We will report on first accomplishments and on the current status of the project.

  2. The Water Vapor Abundance in Orion KL Outflows

    E-print Network

    J. Cernicharo; J. R. Goicoechea; F. Daniel; M. R. Lerate; M. J. Barlow; B. M. Swinyard; E. van Dishoeck; T. L. Lim; S. Viti; J. Yates

    2006-08-16

    We present the detection and modeling of more than 70 far-IR pure rotational lines of water vapor, including the 18O and 17O isotopologues, towards Orion KL. Observations were performed with the Long Wavelength Spectrometer Fabry-Perot (LWS/FP; R~6800-9700) on board the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) between ~43 and ~197 um. The water line profiles evolve from P-Cygni type profiles (even for the H2O18 lines) to pure emission at wavelengths above ~100 um. We find that most of the water emission/absorption arises from an extended flow of gas expanding at 25+-5 kms^-1. Non-local radiative transfer models show that much of the water excitation and line profile formation is driven by the dust continuum emission. The derived beam averaged water abundance is 2-3x10^-5. The inferred gas temperature Tk=80-100 K suggests that: (i) water could have been formed in the "plateau" by gas phase neutral-neutral reactions with activation barriers if the gas was previously heated (e.g. by shocks) to >500 K and/or (ii) H2O formation in the outflow is dominated by in-situ evaporation of grain water-ice mantles and/or (iii) H2O was formed in the innermost and warmer regions (e.g. the hot core) and was swept up in ~1000 yr, the dynamical timescale of the outflow.

  3. Online Chapmann Layer Calculator for Simulating the Ionosphere with Undergraduate and Graduate Students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gross, N. A.; Withers, P.; Sojka, J. J.

    2014-12-01

    The Chapman Layer Model is a "textbook" model of the ionosphere (for example, "Theory of Planetary Atmospheres" by Chamberlain and Hunten, Academic Press (1978)). The model use fundamental assumptions about the neutral atmosphere, the flux of ionizing radiation, and the recombination rate to calculation the ionization rate, and ion/electron density for a single species atmosphere. We have developed a "Chapman Layer Calculator" application that is deployed on the web using Java. It allows the user to see how various parameters control ion density, peak height, and profile of the ionospheric layer. Users can adjust parameters relevant to thermosphere scale height (temperature, gravitational acceleration, molecular weight, neutral atmosphere density) and to Extreme Ultraviolet solar flux (reference EUV, distance from the Sun, and solar Zenith Angle) and then see how the layer changes. This allows the user to simulate the ionosphere on other planets, by adjusting to the appropriate parameters. This simulation has been used as an exploratory activity for the NASA/LWS - Heliophysics Summer School 2014 and has an accompanying activity guide.

  4. High Angular Resolution Mid-Infrared Imaging of Young Stars in Orion BN/KL

    SciTech Connect

    greenhill, l

    2004-06-25

    The authors present Keck LWS images of the Orion BN/KL star forming region obtained in the first multi-wavelength study to have 0.3--0.5 resolution from 4.7 {micro}m to 22 {micro}m. The young stellar objects designed infrared source n and radio source I are believed to dominate the BN/KL region. They have detected extended emission from a probable accretion disk around source n but infer a stellar luminosity on the order of only 2000 L{sub {center_dot}}. Although source I is believed to be more luminous, they do not detect an infrared counterpart even at the longest wavelengths. However, they resolve the closeby infrared source, IRc2, into an arc of knots {approx} 10{sup 3} AU long at all wavelengths. Although the physical relation of source I to IRc2 remains ambiguous, they suggest these sources mark a high density core (10{sup 7}-10{sup 8} pc{sup -3} over {approx} 10{sup 3} AU) within the larger BN/KL star forming cluster. The high density may be a consequence of the core being young and heavily embedded. The authors suggest the energetics of the BN/KL region may be dominated by this cluster core rather than one or two individual sources.

  5. Physical conditions in the O++ zone from ISO and HST data. NGC 6543 revisited

    E-print Network

    Luridiana, V; Cerviño, M

    2003-01-01

    We revise the physical conditions in the O++ zone of the planetary nebula NGC 6543, obtaining two different estimates of the electron temperature (Te) and one estimate of the electron density (Ne). The electron temperature is computed by means of two independent methods, the nebular-to-auroral ratio [O III] 5007/4363, and the diagnostic diagram that combines 5007 to the [O III] infrared lines 52m and 88m. The optical and infrared fluxes have been obtained from archive HST/WFPC2 images and ISO LWS spectra respectively, and the continuum intensity in the optical has been measured from narrow-slit spectra obtained with the Isaac Newton Telescope at La Palma. The measured continuum intensity is higher than predicted by recombination theory under the hypothesis that all the Ly-alpha photons either escape or are destroyed. This fact can be explained in terms of an enhancement of the 2-photon continuum due to Ly-alpha conversion, a process that depends strongly on the local structure of the nebula. Alternative possi...

  6. Design and Implementation of Data Reduction Pipelines for the Keck Observatory Archive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gelino, C. R.; Berriman, G. B.; Kong, M.; Laity, A. C.; Swain, M. A.; Campbell, R.; Goodrich, R. W.; Holt, J.; Lyke, J.; Mader, J. A.; Tran, H. D.; Barlow, T.

    2015-09-01

    The Keck Observatory Archive (KOA), a collaboration between the NASA Exoplanet Science Institute and the W. M. Keck Observatory, serves science and calibration data for all active and inactive instruments from the twin Keck Telescopes located near the summit of Mauna Kea, Hawaii. In addition to the raw data, we produce and provide quick look reduced data for four instruments (HIRES, LWS, NIRC2, and OSIRIS) so that KOA users can more easily assess the scientific content and the quality of the data, which can often be difficult with raw data. The reduced products derive from both publicly available data reduction packages (when available) and KOA-created reduction scripts. The automation of publicly available data reduction packages has the benefit of providing a good quality product without the additional time and expense of creating a new reduction package, and is easily applied to bulk processing needs. The downside is that the pipeline is not always able to create an ideal product, particularly for spectra, because the processing options for one type of target (eg., point sources) may not be appropriate for other types of targets (eg., extended galaxies and nebulae). In this poster we present the design and implementation for the current pipelines used at KOA and discuss our strategies for handling data for which the nature of the targets and the observers' scientific goals and data taking procedures are unknown. We also discuss our plans for implementing automated pipelines for the remaining six instruments.

  7. Space Weather Modeling at the Community Coordinated Modeling Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hesse M.

    2005-01-01

    The Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC) is a multi-agency partnership, which aims at the creation of next generation space weather models. The goal of the CCMC is to support the research and developmental work necessary to substantially increase the present-day modeling capability for space weather purposes, and to provide models for transition to the rapid prototyping centers at the space weather forecast centers. This goal requires dose collaborations with and substantial involvement of the research community. The physical regions to be addressed by CCMC-related activities range from the solar atmosphere to the Earth's upper atmosphere. The CCMC is an integral part of the National Space Weather Program Implementation Plan, of NASA's Living With a Star (LWS) initiative, and of the Department of Defense Space Weather Transition Plan. CCMC includes a facility at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, as well as distributed computing facilities provided by the US Air Force. CCMC also provides, to the research community, access to state-of-the-art space research models. In this paper we will provide updates on CCMC status, on current plans, research and development accomplishments and goals, and on the model testing and validation process undertaken as part of the CCMC mandate. Special emphasis will be on solar and heliospheric models currently residing at CCMC, and on plans for validation and verification.

  8. Space Weather Modeling Services at the Community Coordinated Modeling Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hesse, Michael

    2006-01-01

    The Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC) is a multi-agency partnership, which aims at the creation of next generation space weather models. The goal of the CCMC is to support the research and developmental work necessary to substantially increase the present-day modeling capability for space weather purposes, and to provide models for transition to the Rapid Prototyping Centers at the space weather forecast centers. This goal requires close collaborations with and substantial involvement of the research community. The physical regions to be addressed by CCMC-related activities range from the solar atmosphere to the Earth's upper atmosphere. The CCMC is an integral part of the National Space Weather Program Implementation Plan, of NASA's Living With a Star (LWS) initiative, and of the Department of Defense Space Weather Transition Plan. CCMC includes a facility at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. CCMC also provides, to the research community, access to state-of-the-art space research models. In this paper we will provide a description of the current CCMC status, discuss current plans, research and development accomplishments and goals, and describe the model testing and validation process undertaken as part of the CCMC mandate. Special emphasis will be on solar and heliospheric models currently residing at CCMC, and on plans for validation and verification.

  9. Technology Development Activities for the Space Environment and its Effects on Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kauffman, Billy; Hardage, Donna; Minor, Jody; Barth, Janet; LaBel, Ken

    2003-01-01

    Reducing size and weight of spacecraft, along with demanding increased performance capabilities, introduces many uncertainties in the engineering design community on how emerging microelectronics will perform in space. The engineering design community is forever behind on obtaining and developing new tools and guidelines to mitigate the harmful effects of the space environment. Adding to this complexity is the push to use Commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) and shrinking microelectronics behind less shielding and the potential usage of unproven technologies such as large solar sail structures and nuclear electric propulsion. In order to drive down these uncertainties, various programs are working together to avoid duplication, save what resources are available in this technical area and possess a focused agenda to insert these new developments into future mission designs. This paper will describe the relationship between the Living With a Star (LWS): Space Environment Testbeds (SET) Project and NASA's Space Environments and Effects (SEE) Program and their technology development activities funded as a result from the recent SEE Program's NASA Research Announcement.

  10. Rovibrationally-resolved photodissociation of NH and application to the solar UV opacity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, G.; Kuri, A.; Fontenla, J. M.; Stancil, P. C.; Wang, J. G.

    2014-05-01

    Rovibrationally-resolved photodissociation cross sections of NH have been evaluated using a combination of ab initio and experimentally derived potential curves and dipole transition moments. Here we present results for the three electronic transitions: 23?- <-- X3?- , 23 ? <-- X3?- , A3 ? <-- X3?- . Partial cross sections for transitions from all 577 rovibrational levels obtained theoretically for the ground electronic state X3?- , were computed for a wavelength range that extends from 500Å to the dissociation threshold for each particular rovibrational level. Assuming a thermal Boltzmann distribution of the rovibrational levels in X3?- , LTE cross sections are presented for gas temperatures between 500 and 10000 K. For applications to cold interstellar gas, cross sections for X3?- (v = 0 , J = 0) to 23?- and 23 ? dominate, but for the high density and temperature conditions in stellar atmospheres, the LTE cross section to the A3 ? becomes competitive. Explicit application of the cross sections to the solar UV opacity will be presented. In particular, the NH photodissociation opacity is found to affect the non-LTE behavior of some species such as Cr I and V I. The work at UGA was partially supported by NASA grant HST-AR-11776.01-A. The work of JMF was supported by NASA LWS grant NNX09AJ22G. GS acknowledges travel support by the International Cooperation and Exchange Foundation of CAEP.

  11. Work plan for denaturing waste in the Old Hydrofracture Tanks at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    1998-06-01

    The Environmental Management Program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is managing a project to remove the contents of the Old Hydrofracture (OHF) Tanks, located in Melton Valley. CDM Federal is responsible for sluicing the sludge and supernate from the OHF Tanks and transferring the slurry into the Melton Valley Storage Tanks (MVSTs), ORNL`s active liquid low-level waste system. Before the material can be sluiced to the MVSTs, it must meet the requirements of WM-LWS-WAC, Waste Acceptance Criteria for Liquid Low-Level Waste System, Process Waste Treatment Complex-Building 3544, and Process Waste Treatment Complex-Building 3608, which contains requirements for ratios of fissile to nonfissionable isotopes. Because the sludge and supernate contain uranium with increased ratios of U-233 and U-235 to U-238, depleted uranium must be added to the tanks to dilute the isotopic ratio of the contents before they can be sluiced. This work plan describes the denaturing activities, namely adding depleted uranyl nitrate solution, to be performed to ensure that the material meets requirements. Personnel from the ORNL Chemical Technology Division are responsible for the denaturing activity described in this work plan.

  12. The H2O abundance and star formation history in rho OPH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liseau, René; Olofsson, Göran

    1999-03-01

    Iso-Lws observations towards a large number of different positions in the core of the rho Ophc are used to place a limit to the abundance of wide spread H2O. From Nlte excitation and radiative transfer modelling the average line spectrum of the rho Ophc, we find X(H2O) < 10^{-6} to 10^{-5}. We interprete these results within the framework of the dynamical chemistry models by Bergin, Melnick & Neufeld (1998), which describe the time evolution of molecular clouds being shocked by outflowing gas from young stellar objects, and conclude that the rho Ophc has been forming stars for less than one million years (2 - 5x105 yr). Finally, we show that this limiting result can be put to conclusive observational test by the Odin satellite mission in the near future. Based on observations with Iso, an Esa project with instruments funded by Esa Member States (especially the PI countries: France, Germany, the Netherlands and the United Kingdom) and with the participation of Isas and Nasa.

  13. Transition to Operations Support at the Community Coordinated Modeling Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hesse, M.

    2005-01-01

    The Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC) is a multi-agency partnership, which aims at the creation of next generation space weather models. The goal of the CCMC is to support the research and developmental work necessary to substantially increase the present-day modeling capability for space weather purposes, and to provide models for transition to the rapid prototyping centers at the space weather forecast centers. This goal requires close collaborations with and substantial involvement of the research community. The physical regions to be addressed by CCMC-related activities range from the solar atmosphere to the Earth's upper atmosphere. The CCMC is an integral part of the National Space Weather Program Implementation Plan, of NASA's Living With a Star (LWS) initiative, and of the Department of Defense Space Weather Transition Plan. CCMC includes a facility at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, as well as distributed computing facilities provided by the US Air Force. CCMC also provides, to the research community, access to state-of-the-art space research models. This paper will focus on a status report on CCMC activities in support of model transition to operations at US space weather forecasting centers. In particular, an update will be given on past and present transition activities, on developments that address operational needs, and on future opportunities for transition-to-operations support.

  14. The scotopic and photopic visual sensitivity in the nocturnal tree frog Agalychnis callidryas.

    PubMed

    Liebau, Arne; Eisenberg, Tobias; Esser, Karl-Heinz

    2015-10-01

    The red-eyed tree frog (Agalychnis callidryas) is endemic to the rainforests of Central America. During the night, it hunts for insects in the treetops whereas at daytime, the frogs rest under leaves. In the present study we determined the relative visual sensitivity spectrum of this nocturnal frog species by ERG recordings in both the dark- and light-adapted state. In both the scotopic- and photopic-sensitivity curve, we found only minor individual variations among the tested individuals. The sensitivity maximum of the scotopic curve was determined at 500 nm, which matches the absorption properties of the RH1-visual pigment expressed in the red rods of frogs. The sensitivity maximum of the photopic curve was found at 545 nm which is close to the absorption maximum of the LWS pigment type expressed in most cones of the frog retina. The threshold curves determined by ERG recordings here reveal no unusual features in the sensitivity spectrum of the red-eyed tree frog that could be interpreted as adaptations for its strictly nocturnal life style. PMID:26184717

  15. And yet it optimizes. Comment on "Liberating Lévy walk research from the shackles of optimal foraging" by A.M. Reynolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Luz, M. G. E.; Raposo, E. P.; Viswanathan, G. M.

    2015-09-01

    In the present issue of Physics of Life Reviews, A.M. Reynolds publishes an interesting (and stimulating) work titled "Liberating Lévy walk research from the shackles of optimal foraging" [1]. As the title indicates, one of its main discussed points is that, in trying to understand and describe animal foraging through the Lévy walk (LW) framework [2-4], one should not surge into optimization ideas as the essential underlying mechanism. In other words, the reason for the existence of a wide diversity of animal foraging processes that follow the typical LW statistical behavior might not be driven by the maximization of the search outcomes. Actually, in a broad perspective LWs transcend Ecology and Biology, and can be found in a huge diversity of systems, including many inanimate ones [2-4]. Therefore, we do agree that constraining the LW research to the confines of optimal foraging theory can be restrictive. Moreover, given the huge complexity and diversity of biological phenomena, it is unlikely that a single impelling force would be responsible for all the observed life-related Lévy patterns.

  16. Modelling the appearance of chromatic environment using hyperspectral imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fomins, S.; Ozolinsh, M.

    2013-11-01

    Color of objects is a spectral composition of incident light source, reflection properties of the object itself, and spectral tuning of the eye. Light sources with different spectral characteristics can produce metameric representation of color; however most variable in this regard is vision. Pigments of color vision are continuously bleached by different stimuli and optical density of the pigment is changed, while continuous conditions provide an adaptation and perception of white. Special cases are color vision deficiencies which cover almost 8 % of male population in Europe. Hyperspectral imaging allows obtaining the spectra of the environment and modelling the performance of the dichromatic, anomalous trichromatic, as also normal trichromatic adapted behavior. First, CRI Nuance hyperspectral imaging system was spectrally calibrated for natural continuous spectral illumination of high color rendering index and narrow band fluorescent light sources. Full-scale images of color deficiency tests were acquired in the range of 420 to 720 nm to evaluate the modelling capacity for dichromatic and anomalous trichromatic vision. Hyperspectral images were turned to cone excitation images according to Stockman and Sharpe (2000) 1. Further, model was extended for anomalous trichromacy conditions. Cone sensitivity spectra were shifted by 4 nm according to each anomaly type. LWS and SWS cone signals were balanced in each condition to provide the appropriate appearance of colors in CIE system.

  17. For whales and seals the ocean is not blue: a visual pigment loss in marine mammals.

    PubMed

    Peichl, L; Behrmann, G; Kröger, R H

    2001-04-01

    Most terrestrial mammals have colour vision based on two spectrally different visual pigments located in two types of retinal cone photoreceptors, i.e. they are cone dichromats with long-to-middle-wave-sensitive (commonly green) L-cones and short-wave-sensitive (commonly blue) S-cones. With visual pigment-specific antibodies, we here demonstrate an absence of S-cones in the retinae of all whales and seals studied. The sample includes seven species of toothed whales (Odontoceti) and five species of marine carnivores (eared and earless seals). These marine mammals have only L-cones (cone monochromacy) and hence are essentially colour-blind. For comparison, the study also includes the wolf, ferret and European river otter (Carnivora) as well as the mouflon and pygmy hippopotamus (Artiodactyla), close terrestrial relatives of the seals and whales, respectively. These have a normal complement of S-cones and L-cones. The S-cone loss in marine species from two distant mammalian orders strongly argues for convergent evolution and an adaptive advantage of that trait in the marine visual environment. To us this suggests that the S-cones may have been lost in all whales and seals. However, as the spectral composition of light in clear ocean waters is increasingly blue-shifted with depth, an S-cone loss would seem particularly disadvantageous. We discuss some hypotheses to explain this paradox. PMID:11328346

  18. Crocodylus niloticus (Crocodilia) is highly sensitive to water surface waves.

    PubMed

    Grap, Nadja J; Monzel, Anna S; Kohl, Tobias; Bleckmann, Horst

    2015-10-01

    Crocodiles show oriented responses to water surface wave stimuli but up to now behavioral thresholds are missing. This study determines the behavioral thresholds of crocodilians to water surface waves. Nile crocodiles (Crocodylus niloticus) were conditioned to respond to single-frequency water surface wave stimuli (duration 1150 ms, frequency 15, 30, 40, 60 and 80 Hz), produced by blowing air onto the water surface. Our study shows that C. niloticus is highly sensitive to capillary water surface waves. Threshold values decreased with increasing frequency and ranged between 10.3 ?m (15 Hz) and 0.5 ?m (80 Hz) peak-to-peak wave amplitude. For the frequencies 15 Hz and 30 Hz the sensitivity of one spectacled caiman (Caiman crocodilus) to water surface waves was also tested. Threshold values were 12.8 ?m (15 Hz) down to 1.76 ?m (30 Hz), i.e. close to the threshold values of C. niloticus. The surface wave sensitivity of crocodiles is similar to the surface wave sensitivity of semi-aquatic insects and fishing spiders but does not match the sensitivity of surface-feeding fishes which is higher by one to two orders of magnitude. PMID:26153334

  19. IODOPSIN

    PubMed Central

    Wald, George; Brown, Paul K.; Smith, Patricia H.

    1955-01-01

    The iodopsin system found in the cones of the chicken retina is identical with the rhodopsin system in its carotenoids. It differs only in the protein—the opsin —with which carotenoid combines. The cone protein may be called photopsin to distinguish it from the scotopsins of the rods. Iodopsin bleaches in the light to a mixture of photopsin and all-trans retinene. The latter is reduced by alcohol dehydrogenase and cozymase to all-trans vitamin A1. Iodopsin is resynthesized from photopsin and a cis isomer of vitamin A, neovitamin Ab or the corresponding neoretinene b, the same isomer that forms rhodopsin. The synthesis of iodopsin from photopsin and neoretinene b is a spontaneous reaction. A second cis retinene, isoretinene a, forms iso-iodopsin (?max 510 mµ). The bleaching of iodopsin in moderate light is a first-order reaction (Bliss). The synthesis of iodopsin from neoretinene b and opsin is second-order, like that of rhodopsin, but is very much more rapid. At 10°C. the velocity constant for iodopsin synthesis is 527 times that for rhodopsin synthesis. Whereas rhodopsin is reasonably stable in solution from pH 4–9, iodopsin is stable only at pH 5–7, and decays rapidly at more acid or alkaline reactions. The sulfhydryl poison, p-chloromercuribenzoate, blocks the synthesis of iodopsin, as of rhodopsin. It also bleaches iodopsin in concentrations which do not attack rhodopsin. Hydroxylamine also bleaches iodopsin, yet does not poison its synthesis. Hydroxylamine acts by competing with the opsins for retinene. It competes successfully with chicken, cattle, or frog scotopsin, and hence blocks rhodopsin synthesis; but it is less efficient than photopsin in trapping retinene, and hence does not block iodopsin synthesis. Though iodopsin has not yet been prepared in pure form, its absorption spectrum has been computed by two independent procedures. This exhibits an ?-band with ?max 562 mµ, a minimum at about 435 mµ, and a small ?-band in the near ultraviolet at about 370 mµ. The low concentration of iodopsin in the cones explains to a first approximation their high threshold, and hence their status as organs of daylight vision. The relatively rapid synthesis of iodopsin compared with rhodopsin parallels the relatively rapid dark adaptation of cones compared with rods. A theoretical relation is derived which links the logarithm of the visual sensitivity with the concentration of visual pigment in the rods and cones. Plotted in these terms, the course of rod and cone dark adaptation resembles closely the synthesis of rhodopsin and iodopsin in solution. The spectral sensitivities of rod and cone vision, and hence the Purkinje phenomenon, have their source in the absorption spectra of rhodopsin and iodopsin. In the chicken, for which only rough spectral sensitivity measurements are available, this relation can be demonstrated only approximately. In the pigeon the scotopic sensitivity matches the spectrum of rhodopsin; but the photopic sensitivity is displaced toward the red, largely or wholly through the filtering action of the colored oil globules in the pigeon cones. In cats, guinea pigs, snakes, and frogs, in which no such colored ocular structures intervene, the scotopic and photopic sensitivities match quantitatively the absorption spectra of rhodopsin and iodopsin. In man the scotopic sensitivity matches the absorption spectrum of rhodopsin; but the photopic sensitivity, when not distorted by the yellow pigmentations of the lens and macula lutea, lies at shorter wave lengths than iodopsin. This discrepancy is expected, for the human photopic sensitivity represents a composite of at least three classes of cone concerned with color vision. PMID:14367777

  20. Differential Loss of Prolyl Isomerase or Chaperone Activity of Ran-binding Protein 2 (Ranbp2) Unveils Distinct Physiological Roles of Its Cyclophilin Domain in Proteostasis*

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Kyoung-in; Patil, Hemangi; Senda, Eugene; Wang, Jessica; Yi, Haiqing; Qiu, Sunny; Yoon, Dosuk; Yu, Minzhong; Orry, Andrew; Peachey, Neal S.; Ferreira, Paulo A.

    2014-01-01

    The immunophilins, cyclophilins, catalyze peptidyl cis-trans prolyl-isomerization (PPIase), a rate-limiting step in protein folding and a conformational switch in protein function. Cyclophilins are also chaperones. Noncatalytic mutations affecting the only cyclophilins with known but distinct physiological substrates, the Drosophila NinaA and its mammalian homolog, cyclophilin-B, impair opsin biogenesis and cause osteogenesis imperfecta, respectively. However, the physiological roles and substrates of most cyclophilins remain unknown. It is also unclear if PPIase and chaperone activities reflect distinct cyclophilin properties. To elucidate the physiological idiosyncrasy stemming from potential cyclophilin functions, we generated mice lacking endogenous Ran-binding protein-2 (Ranbp2) and expressing bacterial artificial chromosomes of Ranbp2 with impaired C-terminal chaperone and with (Tg-Ranbp2WT-HA) or without PPIase activities (Tg-Ranbp2R2944A-HA). The transgenic lines exhibit unique effects in proteostasis. Either line presents selective deficits in M-opsin biogenesis with its accumulation and aggregation in cone photoreceptors but without proteostatic impairment of two novel Ranbp2 cyclophilin partners, the cytokine-responsive effectors, STAT3/STAT5. Stress-induced STAT3 activation is also unaffected in Tg-Ranbp2R2944A-HA::Ranbp2?/?. Conversely, proteomic analyses found that the multisystem proteinopathy/amyotrophic lateral sclerosis proteins, heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins A2/B1, are down-regulated post-transcriptionally only in Tg-Ranbp2R2944A-HA::Ranbp2?/?. This is accompanied by the age- and tissue-dependent reductions of diubiquitin and ubiquitylated proteins, increased deubiquitylation activity, and accumulation of the 26 S proteasome subunits S1 and S5b. These manifestations are absent in another line, Tg-Ranbp2CLDm-HA::Ranbp2?/?, harboring SUMO-1 and S1-binding mutations in the Ranbp2 cyclophilin-like domain. These results unveil distinct mechanistic and biological links between PPIase and chaperone activities of Ranbp2 cyclophilin toward proteostasis of selective substrates and with novel therapeutic potential. PMID:24403063

  1. Exploring avian deep-brain photoreceptors and their role in activating the neuroendocrine regulation of gonadal development.

    PubMed

    Kuenzel, Wayne J; Kang, Seong W; Zhou, Z Jimmy

    2015-04-01

    In the eyes of mammals, specialized photoreceptors called intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGC) have been identified that sense photoperiodic or daylight exposure, providing them over time with seasonal information. Detectors of photoperiods are critical in vertebrates, particularly for timing the onset of reproduction each year. In birds, the eyes do not appear to monitor photoperiodic information; rather, neurons within at least 4 different brain structures have been proposed to function in this capacity. Specialized neurons, called deep brain photoreceptors (DBP), have been found in the septum and 3 hypothalamic areas. Within each of the 4 brain loci, one or more of 3 unique photopigments, including melanopsin, neuropsin, and vertebrate ancient opsin, have been identified. An experiment was designed to characterize electrophysiological responses of neurons proposed to be avian DBP following light stimulation. A second study used immature chicks raised under short-day photoperiods and transferred to long day lengths. Gene expression of photopigments was then determined in 3 septal-hypothalamic regions. Preliminary electrophysiological data obtained from patch-clamping neurons in brain slices have shown that bipolar neurons in the lateral septal organ responded to photostimulation comparable with mammalian ipRGC, particularly by showing depolarization and a delayed, slow response to directed light stimulation. Utilizing real-time reverse-transcription PCR, it was found that all 3 photopigments showed significantly increased gene expression in the septal-hypothalamic regions in chicks on the third day after being transferred to long-day photoperiods. Each dissected region contained structures previously proposed to have DBP. The highly significant increased gene expression for all 3 photopigments on the third, long-day photoperiod in brain regions proposed to contain 4 structures with DBP suggests that all 3 types of DBP (melanopsin, neuropsin, and vertebrate ancient opsin) in more than one neural site in the septal-hypothalamic area are involved in reproductive function. The neural response to light of at least 2 of the proposed DBP in the septal/hypothalamic region resembles the primitive, functional, sensory ipRGC well characterized in mammals. PMID:25828571

  2. Variable phenotypic expressivity in inbred retinal degeneration mouse lines: A comparative study of C3H/HeOu and FVB/N rd1 mice

    PubMed Central

    van Wyk, Michiel; Schneider, Sabine

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Recent advances in optogenetics and gene therapy have led to promising new treatment strategies for blindness caused by retinal photoreceptor loss. Preclinical studies often rely on the retinal degeneration 1 (rd1 or Pde6brd1) retinitis pigmentosa (RP) mouse model. The rd1 founder mutation is present in more than 100 actively used mouse lines. Since secondary genetic traits are well-known to modify the phenotypic progression of photoreceptor degeneration in animal models and human patients with RP, negligence of the genetic background in the rd1 mouse model is unwarranted. Moreover, the success of various potential therapies, including optogenetic gene therapy and prosthetic implants, depends on the progress of retinal degeneration, which might differ between rd1 mice. To examine the prospect of phenotypic expressivity in the rd1 mouse model, we compared the progress of retinal degeneration in two common rd1 lines, C3H/HeOu and FVB/N. Methods We followed retinal degeneration over 24 weeks in FVB/N, C3H/HeOu, and congenic Pde6b+ seeing mouse lines, using a range of experimental techniques including extracellular recordings from retinal ganglion cells, PCR quantification of cone opsin and Pde6b transcripts, in vivo flash electroretinogram (ERG), and behavioral optokinetic reflex (OKR) recordings. Results We demonstrated a substantial difference in the speed of retinal degeneration and accompanying loss of visual function between the two rd1 lines. Photoreceptor degeneration and loss of vision were faster with an earlier onset in the FVB/N mice compared to C3H/HeOu mice, whereas the performance of the Pde6b+ mice did not differ significantly in any of the tests. By postnatal week 4, the FVB/N mice expressed significantly less cone opsin and Pde6b mRNA and had neither ERG nor OKR responses. At 12 weeks of age, the retinal ganglion cells of the FVB/N mice had lost all light responses. In contrast, 4-week-old C3H/HeOu mice still had ERG and OKR responses, and we still recorded light responses from C3H/HeOu retinal ganglion cells until the age of 24 weeks. These results show that genetic background plays an important role in the rd1 mouse pathology. Conclusions Analogous to human RP, the mouse genetic background strongly influences the rd1 phenotype. Thus, different rd1 mouse lines may follow different timelines of retinal degeneration, making exact knowledge of genetic background imperative in all studies that use rd1 models. PMID:26283863

  3. Prolonged light exposure induces widespread phase shifting in the circadian clock and visual pigment gene expression of the Arvicanthis ansorgei retina

    PubMed Central

    Bobu, Corina; Sandu, Cristina; Laurent, Virginie; Felder-Schmittbuhl, Marie-Paule

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Prolonged periods of constant lighting are known to perturb circadian clock function at the molecular, physiological, and behavioral levels. However, the effects of ambient lighting regimes on clock gene expression and clock outputs in retinal photoreceptors—rods, cones and intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells—are only poorly understood. Methods Cone-rich diurnal rodents (Muridae: Arvicanthis ansorgei) were maintained under and entrained to a 12 h:12 h light-dark cycle (LD; light: ~300 lux). Three groups were then examined: control (continued maintenance on LD); animals exposed to a 36 h dark period before sampling over an additional 24 h period of darkness (DD); and animals exposed to a 36 h light period before sampling over an additional 24 h period of light (~300 lux, LL). Animals were killed every 3 or 4 h over 24 h, their retinas dissected, and RNA extracted. Oligonucleotide primers were designed for the Arvicanthis clock genes Per1, Per2, Cry1, Cry2, and Bmal1, and for transcripts specific for rods (rhodopsin), cones (short- and mid-wavelength sensitive cone opsin, cone arrestin, arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase) and intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (melanopsin). Gene expression was analyzed by real-time PCR. Results In LD, expression of all genes except cone arrestin was rhythmic and coordinated, with acrophases of most genes at or shortly following the time of lights on (defined as zeitgeber time 0). Arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase showed maximal expression at zeitgeber time 20. In DD conditions the respective profiles showed similar phase profiles, but were mostly attenuated in amplitude, or in the case of melanopsin, did not retain rhythmic expression. In LL, however, the expression profiles of all clock genes and most putative output genes were greatly altered, with either abolition of daily variation (mid-wavelength cone opsin) or peak expression shifted by 4–10 h. Conclusions These data are the first to provide detailed measures of retinal clock gene and putative clock output gene expression in a diurnal mammal, and show the highly disruptive effects of inappropriate (nocturnal) lighting on circadian and photoreceptor gene regulation. PMID:23734075

  4. PREFACE: Eclipse on the Coral Sea: Cycle 24 Ascending

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cally, Paul; Erdélyi, Robert; Norton

    2013-06-01

    A total solar eclipse is the most spectacular and awe-inspiring astronomical phenomenon most people will ever see in their lifetimes. Even hardened solar scientists draw inspiration from it. The eclipse with 2 minutes totality in the early morning of 14 November 2012 (local time) drew over 120 solar researchers (and untold thousands of the general public) to the small and picturesque resort town of Palm Cove just north of Cairns in tropical north Queensland, Australia, and they were rewarded when the clouds parted just before totality to reveal a stunning solar display. Eclipse photograph The eclipse was also the catalyst for an unusually broad and exciting conference held in Palm Cove over the week 12--16 November. Eclipse on the Coral Sea: Cycle 24 Ascending served as GONG 2012, LWS/SDO-5, and SOHO 27, indicating how widely it drew on the various sub-communities within solar physics. Indeed, as we neared the end of the ascending phase of the peculiar Solar Cycle 24, it was the perfect time to bring the whole community together to discuss our Sun's errant recent behaviour, especially as Cycle 24 is the first to be fully observed by the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). The whole-Sun perspective was a driving theme of the conference, with the cycle probed from interior (helioseismology), to atmosphere (the various lines observed by the Atmospheric Imaging Assemble (AIA) aboard SDO, the several instruments on Hinode, and other modern observatories), and beyond (CMEs etc). The quality of the presentations was exceptional, and the many speakers are to be commended for pitching their talks to the broad community present. These proceedings draw from the invited and contributed oral presentations and the posters exhibited in Palm Cove. They give an (incomplete) snapshot of the meeting, illustrating its broad vistas. The published contributions are organized along the lines of the conference sessions, as set out in the Contents, leading off with a provocative view of Cycle 24 thus far from Sarbani Basu. Other invited papers presented here include an appreciation of Hinode's view of solar activity as the cycle rises by Toshifumi Shimizu; a first taxonomy of magnetic tornadoes and chromospheric swirls by Sven Wedemeyer {\\it et al}; an analysis of Hinode/EIS observations of transient heating events; a timely re-examination of solar dynamo theory by Paul Charbonneau; an exciting teaser for the solar potential of the Murchison Widefield Array now operating in Western Australia by Steven Tingay {\\it et al}; an overview and critique of the state of nonlinear force-free magnetic field extrapolation theory and practice by Mike Wheatland and Stuart Gilchrist; and a masterful review of atmospheric MHD wave coupling to the Sun's internal p-mode oscillations by Elena Khomenko and Irantzu Calvo Santamaria. The many contributed papers published here are no less exciting. All papers have been refereed to a high standard. The editors thank all the referees, drawn both from conference attendees and the wider community, who have taken their tasks very seriously and provided very detailed and helpful reports. Nearly all contributions have been substantially improved by the process. We must also thank our financial sponsors. Both the Global Oscillations Network Group (GONG) and LWS/SDO were generous in their support, as were the School of Mathematical Sciences and the Monash Centre for Astrophysics (MoCA) at Monash University, Melbourne, and the Centre for Astronomy at James Cook University, Townsville. The Local Organizing Committee and the many students who assisted before and during the conference also deserve high praise for facilitating such a memorable meeting. Paul Cally, Robert Erdélyi and Aimee Norton Conference photograph

  5. Internally consistent thermodynamic data for high-pressure and ultrahigh-pressure phases in the system CaO-MgO-Al2O3-SiO2-H2O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grevel, K. D.

    2008-12-01

    In order to enable reliable calculations of phase relations among high-pressure phases the Berman [1] data set was augmented by data for the high-pressure phases stishovite (stv), topaz-OH (toz-OH), phase pi (pi), Mg-staurolite (Mg-st), Mg-sursassite (Mg-sur), and Mg-chloritoid (Mg-cld) using a similar optimization technique as described by Berman et al. [2]. The data of several other phases of the system CaO-MgO- Al2O3-SiO2-H2O obtained in the Berman data base were slightly refined to keep the consistency to the reversal brackets and the originally measured data: andalusite (and), clinochlore (chl), coesite (cs), diaspore (dsp), kaolinite (kln), kyanite (ky), lawsonite (lws), pyrophyllite (prl), sillimanite (sil), zoisite (zo). CP-data were kept constant [1] or estimated [3]. phase; ?fH0298 (kJ mol-1); S0298 (J K-1 mol-1); V0298 (J K-1 mol-1); v1×105 (bar-1); v2×1012 (bar-2); v3×105 (K-1); v4×108 (K-2) and; -2589.857; 91.47; 5.146; -0.0653; 0.000; 2.291; 0.170 chl; -8903.532; 437.92; 21.000; -0.1328; 3.837; 2.142; 0.962 Mg-cld; -3551.657; 142.20; 6.874; -0.0692; 0.000; 2.544; 0.000 cs; -907.510; 39.63; 2.064; -0.0998; 1.823; 0.620; 0.960 dsp; -999.115; 35.22; 1.776; -0.0719; 0.629; 3.245; 0.684 kln; -4119.400; 204.18; 9.952; -0.1200; 0.000; 3.200; 0.000 ky; -2593.767; 82.71; 4.408; -0.0593; 1.021; 1.730; 0.787 lws; -4866.665; 228.04; 10.155; -0.0825; 0.000; 3.339; 0.000 Mg-sur; -13907.329; 608.39; 26.888; -0.0826; 0.923; 3.187; 0.087 pi; -9586.742; 403.23; 18.559; -0.0678; 0.000; 2.254; 0.000 prl; -5640.501; 239.43; 12.782; -0.1800; 0.000; 2.621; 0.000 sil; -2586.169; 95.40; 4.984; -0.0601; 1.341; 1.138; 0.605 Mg-st; -24998.289; 944.53; 44.260; -0.0579; 0.000; 2.017; 0.000 stv; -870.861; 25.59; 1.401; -0.0318; 0.000; 1.849; 0.000 toz-OH; -2885.939; 117.40; 5.352; -0.0630; 0.000; 1.938; 0.000 zo; -6889.494; 297.20; 13.565; -0.0695; 0.000; 2.752; 0.000 References [1] R.G. Berman, J. Petrol., 1988, 29, 445 [2] R.G. Berman et al., J. Petrol., 1986, 27, 1331 [3] R.G. Berman, T.H. Brown, Con. Min. Pet., 1985, 89, 168

  6. ISO measurements of [CII] line variations in galaxies

    E-print Network

    S. Malhotra; G. Helou; G. Stacey; D. Hollenbach; S. Lord; C. A. Beichman; H. Dinerstein; D. A. Hunter; K. Y. Lo; N. Y. Lu; R. H. Rubin; N. Silbermann; H. A. Thronson Jr.; M. W. Werner

    1997-10-21

    We report measurements of the [CII] fine structure line at 157.714 micron in 30 normal star-forming galaxies with the Long Wavelength Spectrometer (LWS) on the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO). The ratio of the line to total far-infrared luminosity, [CII]/FIR, measures the ratio of the cooling of gas to that of dust; and thus the efficiency of the grain photoelectric heating process. This ratio varies by a factor of 40 in the current sample. About two-thirds of the galaxies have [CII]/FIR = 2-7 x 10^{-3}. The other one-third show trends of decreasing [CII]/FIR with increasing dust temperature, indicated by the ratio of infrared emission at 60 and 100 microns; and with increasing star-formation activity, measured by the ratio of far-infrared and blue band luminosity. We find three FIR bright galaxies with undetected [CII] line at 3-sigma upper limits of [CII]/FIR heating of gas at high UV radiation intensity as dust grains become positively charged, decreasing the yield and the energy of the photoelectrons. The three galaxies with no observed PDR lines have among the highest ratios of FIR to Blue luminosity and the ratio of 60 and 100 micron emission. Their lack of [CII] lines may be due to a continuing trend of decreasing [CII]/FIR with increasing star-formation activity and dust temperature seen in one-third of the sample with warm IRAS colors. In that case the upper limits on [CII]/FIR imply a ratio of UV flux to gas density G_0/n > 10 cm$^3. The low [CII]/FIR could also be due to either weak [CII] because of self-absorption or strong FIR continuum from regions weak in [CII], such as dense HII regions or plasma ionized by hard radiation of AGNs.

  7. Cold H2O and CO ice and gas toward the Galactic Center

    E-print Network

    Andrea Moneti; Jose Cernicharo; Juan Ramon Pardo

    2000-12-13

    We present observations of CO, 13CO and of H2O in the middle and far-infrared taken with the ISO-SWS and ISO-LWS spectrometers toward two positions in the Galactic Center region (Sgr A* and GCS-3). Both ice and gas phase molecules are detected. The ISO data have been complemented with observations of the J=3-2 and J=7-6 lines of CO carried out at the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory. The ISO and CSO data indicate that the absorbing gas is extremely cold, T_K ~ 10 K, suggesting that it is located in the dark clouds of the different spiral arms that intersect the line of sight towards the Galactic Center. From the analysis of the CO absorption we derive 13CO gas phase column densities of 1.1 and 0.7E17 cm-2 towards Sgr A* and GCS-3, respectively. The H2O gas column density in the direction of Sgr A* is ~ 2E16 cm-2. The derived CO/H2O and gas/solid abundance ratios corresponding to these cold clouds are remarkably similar along the two lines of sight. We find that nearly all the CO is in the gas phase, while the H2O is almost entirely frozen onto the surfaces of cold dust grains. Finally, the N_{gas+ice}(CO)/N_{gas+ice}(H2O) abundance ratio is ~5 implying that H2O formation processes are highly efficient.

  8. Epistatic adaptive evolution of human color vision.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Shozo; Xing, Jinyi; Liu, Yang; Faggionato, Davide; Altun, Ahmet; Starmer, William T

    2014-12-01

    Establishing genotype-phenotype relationship is the key to understand the molecular mechanism of phenotypic adaptation. This initial step may be untangled by analyzing appropriate ancestral molecules, but it is a daunting task to recapitulate the evolution of non-additive (epistatic) interactions of amino acids and function of a protein separately. To adapt to the ultraviolet (UV)-free retinal environment, the short wavelength-sensitive (SWS1) visual pigment in human (human S1) switched from detecting UV to absorbing blue light during the last 90 million years. Mutagenesis experiments of the UV-sensitive pigment in the Boreoeutherian ancestor show that the blue-sensitivity was achieved by seven mutations. The experimental and quantum chemical analyses show that 4,008 of all 5,040 possible evolutionary trajectories are terminated prematurely by containing a dehydrated nonfunctional pigment. Phylogenetic analysis further suggests that human ancestors achieved the blue-sensitivity gradually and almost exclusively by epistasis. When the final stage of spectral tuning of human S1 was underway 45-30 million years ago, the middle and long wavelength-sensitive (MWS/LWS) pigments appeared and so-called trichromatic color vision was established by interprotein epistasis. The adaptive evolution of human S1 differs dramatically from orthologous pigments with a major mutational effect used in achieving blue-sensitivity in a fish and several mammalian species and in regaining UV vision in birds. These observations imply that the mechanisms of epistatic interactions must be understood by studying various orthologues in different species that have adapted to various ecological and physiological environments. PMID:25522367

  9. Forecasting Coronal Mass Ejections from Magnetograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falconer, D. A.; Moore, R. L.; Gary, G. A.; Balasubramanian, S.

    2004-05-01

    We report further results from our ongoing assessment of magnetogram-based measures of active-region nonpotentiality (magnetic shear and twist), magnetic complexity and size as predictors of coronal mass ejections (CMEs). From a set of 36 vector magnetograms of predominantly bipolar active regions (Falconer, Moore, & Gary 2004, ApJ, submitted), we have found: (1) Each of five different measures of active-region nonpotentiality has a 75-80 (with correlation confidence level > 95%) in predicting whether an active region will produce a CME within 2 days after the magnetogram. (2) One of these measures can be obtained from a line-of-sight magnetogram without use of a vector magnetogram. Hence this measure appears to be the best practical measure of active-region nonpotentiality for operational CME forecasting. (3) Our measure of active-region size has a 65% success rate in predicting CMEs in this window, but the correlation is not statistically significant (confidence level ˜ 80%) for our sample size. We have applied a measure of active-region complexity (the fraction of magnetic flux not in the active region's primary bipole) to our set of 36 magnetograms and found a correlation with the CME productivity of the active regions. We are also applying measures of nonpotentiality, size, and complexity to multi-bipolar active regions to assess their CME-prediction ability for these more complicated active regions. This work was funded by NASA through its LWS TR&T Program and its Solar and Heliospheric Physics SR&T Program, and by NSF through its Solar Terrestrial Research and SHINE Programs.

  10. A photodissociation region study of NGC 4038

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisbas, T. G.; Bell, T. A.; Viti, S.; Barlow, M. J.; Yates, J.; Vasta, M.

    2014-09-01

    We present a model of the photodissociation regions of NGC 4038, which is part of the Antennae galaxies. We have considered one-dimensional slabs of uniform density, all having a maximum AV = 10 mag, interacting with plane-parallel radiation. The density range in our simulations spans four orders of magnitude (100 ? n ? 106 cm-3) and the UV field strength spans more than three orders of magnitude (10 ? ? ? 104.5 multiples of the Draine field), from which we generated a grid of about 1400 simulations. We compare our results with Herschel SPIRE-FTS, CSO and ISO-LWS observations of eight CO transition lines (J = 1-0 to 8-7) and the [C I] 609 ?m and [O I] 146 ?m fine-structure lines. We find that the molecular and atomic emission lines trace different gas components of NGC 4038; thus, single emission models are insufficient to reproduce the observed values. In general, low-J CO transition lines correspond to either low-density regions interacting with low UV field strengths, or high-density regions interacting with high UV field strengths. Higher J CO transition lines are less dependent on the UV field strength and are fitted by gas with density n ˜ 104.5-105.2 cm- 3. We find that the observed fine-structure line ratio of [C I] 609 ?m/[O I] 146 ?m is reproduced by clouds subject to weaker UV fields compared to the CO lines. We make estimates of the XCO factor which relates the CO emission with the column density of molecular hydrogen, and find that it is less than the canonical Milky Way value.

  11. Spectral Irradiance Calibration in the Infrared. Part 7; New Composite Spectra, Comparison with Model Atmospheres, and Far-Infrared Extrapolations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, Martin; Witteborn, Fred C.; Carbon, Duane F.; Davies, John K.; Wooden, Diane H.; Bregman, Jesse D.

    1996-01-01

    We present five new absolutely calibrated continuous stellar spectra constructed as far as possible from spectral fragments observed from the ground, the Kuiper Airborne Observatory (KAO), and the IRAS Low Resolution Spectrometer. These stars-alpha Boo, gamma Dra, alpha Cet, gamma Cru, and mu UMa-augment our six, published, absolutely calibrated spectra of K and early-M giants. All spectra have a common calibration pedigree. A revised composite for alpha Boo has been constructed from higher quality spectral fragments than our previously published one. The spectrum of gamma Dra was created in direct response to the needs of instruments aboard the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO); this star's location near the north ecliptic pole renders it highly visible throughout the mission. We compare all our low-resolution composite spectra with Kurucz model atmospheres and find good agreement in shape, with the obvious exception of the SiO fundamental, still lacking in current grids of model atmospheres. The CO fundamental seems slightly too deep in these models, but this could reflect our use of generic models with solar metal abundances rather than models specific to the metallicities of the individual stars. Angular diameters derived from these spectra and models are in excellent agreement with the best observed diameters. The ratio of our adopted Sirius and Vega models is vindicated by spectral observations. We compare IRAS fluxes predicted from our cool stellar spectra with those observed and conclude that, at 12 and 25 microns, flux densities measured by IRAS should be revised downwards by about 4.1% and 5.7%, respectively, for consistency with our absolute calibration. We have provided extrapolated continuum versions of these spectra to 300 microns, in direct support of ISO (PHT and LWS instruments). These spectra are consistent with IRAS flux densities at 60 and 100 microns.

  12. Visual pigments, oil droplets, lens, and cornea characterization in the whooping crane (Grus americana)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Porter, Megan L.; Kingston, Alexandra C. N.; McCready, Robert; Cameron, Evan G.; Hofmann, Christopher M.; Suarez, Lauren; Olsen, Glenn H.; Cronin, Thomas W.; Robinson, Phyllis R.

    2014-01-01

    Vision has been investigated in many species of birds, but few studies have considered the visual systems of large birds and the particular implications of large eyes and long-life spans on visual system capabilities. To address these issues we investigated the visual system of the whooping crane, Grus americana (Gruiformes: Gruidae). G. americana (an endangered species) is one of only two North American crane species and represents a large, long-lived bird where ultraviolet sensitivity may be degraded by chromatic aberrations and entrance of ultraviolet light into the eye could be detrimental to retinal tissues. To investigate the whooping crane visual system we used microspectrophotometry to determine the absorbance spectra of retinal oil droplets and to investigate if the ocular media (i.e., the lens and cornea) absorbs UV light. In vitro expression and reconstitution was used to determine the absorbance spectra of rod and cone visual pigments. The rod visual pigments had wavelengths of peak absorbance (?max) at 500 nm, while the cone visual pigments ?max values were determined to be 404 nm (SWS1), 450 nm (SWS2), 499 nm (RH2), and 561 nm (LWS), similar to other characterized bird visual pigment absorbance values. The oil droplet cutoff wavelength (?cut) values similarly fell within ranges recorded from other avian species: 576 nm (R-type), 522 nm (Y-type), 506 nm (P-type), and 448 nm (C-type). We confirm that G. americana has a violet-sensitive visual system, although based on the ?max of the SWS1 visual pigment (404 nm) may also have some ability for UV sensitivity.

  13. Everything You Always Wanted to Know About Small Enabling eXperiments* (*But Were Afraid to Ask)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spence, H. E.

    2014-12-01

    The next decade poses great challenges but also promises great opportunities for new solar and space physics missions. As outlined in the 2012 Solar and Space Physics Decadal Survey, the prospects for new flagship or even large- and medium-cost space science missions in the coming decade are limited. On the other hand, the Survey also points out the many intrinsic and indeed critical values of low cost missions, in which outstanding scientific discovery can be accomplished in targeted and important ways, with a timeliness and capacity for hands-on training of the next generation of space scientists and engineers. In this presentation, we provide examples of such missions that have recently or are currently making new space science discoveries in targeted areas on smaller and less costly platforms (e.g., balloons, CubeSats, etc.) than those from the larger, more costly, community-consensus missions (e.g., LWS missions, STP missions, etc.). We also outline examples of new sensor designs and technologies that lend themselves to such resource-limited platforms, as well as examples of missions that are made possible that could answer long-standing and key space science questions. Finally, we note several exciting enabling technologies with the potential to substantially improve or even transform small, low-cost mission capabilities. While such missions will not likely ever fully replace the larger strategic missions, in the coming decade, they will certainly provide fresh, vibrant opportunities for innovative approaches on PI-led missions; these missions would stand alone scientifically as well as complement, augment, and provide continuity and community engagement between the larger strategic missions.

  14. Quiescent Giant Molecular Cloud Cores in the Galactic Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lis, D. C.; Serabyn, E.; Zylka, R.; Li, Y.

    2000-01-01

    We have used the Long Wavelength Spectrometer (LWS) aboard the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) to map the far-infrared continuum emission (45-175 micrometer) toward several massive Giant Molecular Cloud (GMC) cores located near the Galactic center. The observed far-infrared and submillimeter spectral energy distributions imply low temperatures (approx. 15 - 22 K) for the bulk of the dust in all the sources, consistent with external heating by the diffuse ISRF and suggest that these GMCs do not harbor high- mass star-formation sites, in spite of their large molecular mass. Observations of FIR atomic fine structure lines of C(sub II) and O(sub I) indicate an ISRF enhancement of approx. 10(exp 3) in the region. Through continuum radiative transfer modeling we show that this radiation field strength is in agreement with the observed FIR and submillimeter spectral energy distributions, assuming primarily external heating of the dust with only limited internal luminosity (approx. 2 x 10(exp 5) solar luminosity). Spectroscopic observations of millimeter-wave transitions of H2CO, CS, and C-34S carried out with the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory (CSO) and the Institut de Radio Astronomie Millimetrique (IRAM) 30-meter telescope indicate a gas temperature of approx. 80 K, significantly higher than the dust temperatures, and density of approx. 1 x 10(exp 5)/cc in GCM0.25 + 0.01, the brightest submillimeter source in the region. We suggest that shocks caused by cloud collisions in the turbulent interstellar medium in the Galactic center region are responsible for heating the molecular gas. This conclusion is supported by the presence of wide-spread emission from molecules such as SiO, SO, and CH3OH, which are considered good shock tracers. We also suggest that the GMCs studied here are representative of the "typical", pre-starforming cloud population in the Galactic center.

  15. The Solar Probe Plus Mission: Humanity's First Visit to Our Star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, N. J.; Velli, M. C.; Bale, S. D.; Decker, R.; Driesman, A.; Howard, R. A.; Kasper, J. C.; Kinnison, J.; Kusterer, M.; Lario, D.; Lockwood, M. K.; McComas, D. J.; Raouafi, N. E.; Szabo, A.

    2015-11-01

    Solar Probe Plus (SPP) will be the first spacecraft to fly into the low solar corona. SPP's main science goal is to determine the structure and dynamics of the Sun's coronal magnetic field, understand how the solar corona and wind are heated and accelerated, and determine what processes accelerate energetic particles. Understanding these fundamental phenomena has been a top-priority science goal for over five decades, dating back to the 1958 Simpson Committee Report. The scale and concept of such a mission has been revised at intervals since that time, yet the core has always been a close encounter with the Sun. The mission design and the technology and engineering developments enable SPP to meet its science objectives to: (1) Trace the flow of energy that heats and accelerates the solar corona and solar wind; (2) Determine the structure and dynamics of the plasma and magnetic fields at the sources of the solar wind; and (3) Explore mechanisms that accelerate and transport energetic particles. The SPP mission was confirmed in March 2014 and is under development as a part of NASA's Living with a Star (LWS) Program. SPP is scheduled for launch in mid-2018, and will perform 24 orbits over a 7-year nominal mission duration. Seven Venus gravity assists gradually reduce SPP's perihelion from 35 solar radii ( RS) for the first orbit to {<}10 RS for the final three orbits. In this paper we present the science, mission concept and the baseline vehicle for SPP, and examine how the mission will address the key science questions

  16. Epistatic Adaptive Evolution of Human Color Vision

    PubMed Central

    Yokoyama, Shozo; Xing, Jinyi; Liu, Yang; Faggionato, Davide; Altun, Ahmet; Starmer, William T.

    2014-01-01

    Establishing genotype-phenotype relationship is the key to understand the molecular mechanism of phenotypic adaptation. This initial step may be untangled by analyzing appropriate ancestral molecules, but it is a daunting task to recapitulate the evolution of non-additive (epistatic) interactions of amino acids and function of a protein separately. To adapt to the ultraviolet (UV)-free retinal environment, the short wavelength-sensitive (SWS1) visual pigment in human (human S1) switched from detecting UV to absorbing blue light during the last 90 million years. Mutagenesis experiments of the UV-sensitive pigment in the Boreoeutherian ancestor show that the blue-sensitivity was achieved by seven mutations. The experimental and quantum chemical analyses show that 4,008 of all 5,040 possible evolutionary trajectories are terminated prematurely by containing a dehydrated nonfunctional pigment. Phylogenetic analysis further suggests that human ancestors achieved the blue-sensitivity gradually and almost exclusively by epistasis. When the final stage of spectral tuning of human S1 was underway 45–30 million years ago, the middle and long wavelength-sensitive (MWS/LWS) pigments appeared and so-called trichromatic color vision was established by interprotein epistasis. The adaptive evolution of human S1 differs dramatically from orthologous pigments with a major mutational effect used in achieving blue-sensitivity in a fish and several mammalian species and in regaining UV vision in birds. These observations imply that the mechanisms of epistatic interactions must be understood by studying various orthologues in different species that have adapted to various ecological and physiological environments. PMID:25522367

  17. A Mid-Infrared Imaging Survey of Embedded Young Stellar Objects in the (rho) Ophiuchi Cloud Core

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barsony, Mary; Ressler, Michael E.; Marsh, Kenneth A.

    2005-01-01

    Results of a comprehensive, new, ground-based mid-infrared imaging survey of the young stellar population of the (rho) Ophiuchi cloud are presented. Data were acquired at the Palomar 5m and at the Keck 10m telescopes with the MIRLIN and LWS instruments, at 0'.5 and 0'.25 resolutions, respectively. Of 172 survey objects, 85 were detected. Among the 22 multiple systems observed, 15 were resolved and their individual component fluxes determined. A plot of the frequency distribution of the detected objects with SED spectral slope shows that YSOs spend approx.4 x 10(exp 5) yr in the flat-spectrum phase, clearing out their remnant infall envelopes. Mid-infrared variability is found among a significant fraction of the surveyed objects and is found to occur for all SED classes with optically thick disks. Large-amplitude near-infrared variability, also found for all SED classes with optically thick disks, seems to occur with somewhat higher frequency at the earlier evolutionary stages. Although a general trend of mid-infrared excess and near-infrared veiling exists progressing through SED classes, with Class I objects generally exhibiting r(sub K) >= 1, flat-spectrum objects with r(sub K) >= 0.58, and Class III objects with r(sub K) =0, Class II objects exhibit the widest range of r(sub K) values, ranging from 0 <= r(sub K) <= 4.5. However, the highly variable value of veiling that a single source can exhibit in any of the SED classes in which active disk accretion can take place is striking and is direct observational evidence for highly time-variable accretion activity in disks. Finally, by comparing mid-infrared versus near-infrared excesses in a subsample with well-determined effective temperatures and extinction values, disk-clearing mechanisms are explored. The results are consistent with disk clearing proceeding from the inside out.

  18. Physical conditions in the O++ zone from ISO and HST data. NGC 6543 revisited

    E-print Network

    V. Luridiana; E. Perez; M. Cervino

    2003-02-20

    We revise the physical conditions in the O++ zone of the planetary nebula NGC 6543, obtaining two different estimates of the electron temperature (Te) and one estimate of the electron density (Ne). The electron temperature is computed by means of two independent methods, the nebular-to-auroral ratio [O III] 5007/4363, and the diagnostic diagram that combines 5007 to the [O III] infrared lines 52m and 88m. The optical and infrared fluxes have been obtained from archive HST/WFPC2 images and ISO LWS spectra respectively, and the continuum intensity in the optical has been measured from narrow-slit spectra obtained with the Isaac Newton Telescope at La Palma. The measured continuum intensity is higher than predicted by recombination theory under the hypothesis that all the Ly-alpha photons either escape or are destroyed. This fact can be explained in terms of an enhancement of the 2-photon continuum due to Ly-alpha conversion, a process that depends strongly on the local structure of the nebula. Alternative possibilities, outside the framework of recombination theory, have also been considered: e.g., the optical tail in the X-ray emission of a very hot plasma, and dust scattering of stellar radiation, but these hypotheses are not supported by quantitative estimates. While the electron temperature and density derived from the diagnostic diagram agree with the most recent determination, the temperature derived from 5007/4363,, Te(O++)_opt, is somewhat smaller than previously published values. We discuss several technical issues that contribute to the overall uncertainty in our results, focusing on the instrumental effects that might bias the [O III] 4363 intensity. We also discuss the effects of the collisional de-excitation of the O++ ground terms on the relation between Te(O++)_opt and Te(O++)_IR.

  19. An Overview Of NASA's Solar Sail Propulsion Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garbe, Gregory; Montgomery, Edward E., IV

    2003-01-01

    Research conducted by the In-Space Propulsion (ISP) Technologies Projects is at the forefront of NASA's efforts to mature propulsion technologies that will enable or enhance a variety of space science missions. The ISP Program is developing technologies from a Technology Readiness Level (TRL) of 3 through TRL 6. Activities under the different technology areas are selected through the NASA Research Announcement (NRA) process. The ISP Program goal is to mature a suite of reliable advanced propulsion technologies that will promote more cost efficient missions through the reduction of interplanetary mission trip time, increased scientific payload mass fraction, and allowing for longer on-station operations. These propulsion technologies will also enable missions with previously inaccessible orbits (e.g., non-Keplerian, high solar latitudes). The ISP Program technology suite has been prioritized by an agency wide study. Solar Sail propulsion is one of ISP's three high-priority technology areas. Solar sail propulsion systems will be required to meet the challenge of monitoring and predicting space weather by the Office of Space Science s (OSS) Living with a Star (LWS) program. Near-to-mid-term mission needs include monitoring of solar activity and observations at high solar latitudes. Near-term work funded by the ISP solar sail propulsion project is centered around the quantitative demonstration of scalability of present solar sail subsystem designs and concepts to future mission requirements through ground testing, computer modeling and analytical simulations. This talk will review the solar sail technology roadmap, current funded technology development work, future funding opportunities, and mission applications.

  20. Far-Infrared and Millimeter Continuum Studies of K-Giants: Alpha Boo and Alpha Tau

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, Martin; Carbon, Duane F.; Welch, William J.; Lim, Tanya; Forster, James R.; Goorvitch, David; Thigpen, William (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We have imaged two normal, non-coronal, infrared-bright K-giants, alpha Boo and alpha Tau, in the 1.4-millimeter and 2.8-millimeter continuum using BIMA. These stars have been used as important absolute calibrators for several infrared satellites. Our goals are: (1) to probe the structure of their upper photospheres; (2) to establish whether these stars radiate as simple photospheres or possess long-wavelength chromospheres; and (3) to make a connection between millimeter-wave and far-infrared absolute flux calibrations. To accomplish these goals we also present ISO Long Wavelength Spectrometer (LWS) measurements of both these K-giants. The far-infrared and millimeter continuum radiation is produced in the vicinity of the temperature minimum in a Boo and a Tau, offering a direct test of the model photospheres and chromospheres for these two cool giants. We find that current photospheric models predict fluxes in reasonable agreement with those observed for those wavelengths which sample the upper photosphere, namely less than or equal to 170 micrometers in alpha Tau and less than or equal to 125 micrometers in alpha Boo. It is possible that alpha Tau is still radiative as far as 0.9 - 1.4 millimeters. We detect chromospheric radiation from both stars by 2.8 millimeters (by 1.4 millimeters in alpha Boo), and are able to establish useful bounds on the location of the temperature minimum. An attempt to interpret the chromospheric fluxes using the two-component "bifurcation model" proposed by Wiedemann et al. (1994) appears to lead to a significant contradiction.

  1. Airborne laser sensors and integrated systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabatini, Roberto; Richardson, Mark A.; Gardi, Alessandro; Ramasamy, Subramanian

    2015-11-01

    The underlying principles and technologies enabling the design and operation of airborne laser sensors are introduced and a detailed review of state-of-the-art avionic systems for civil and military applications is presented. Airborne lasers including Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR), Laser Range Finders (LRF), and Laser Weapon Systems (LWS) are extensively used today and new promising technologies are being explored. Most laser systems are active devices that operate in a manner very similar to microwave radars but at much higher frequencies (e.g., LIDAR and LRF). Other devices (e.g., laser target designators and beam-riders) are used to precisely direct Laser Guided Weapons (LGW) against ground targets. The integration of both functions is often encountered in modern military avionics navigation-attack systems. The beneficial effects of airborne lasers including the use of smaller components and remarkable angular resolution have resulted in a host of manned and unmanned aircraft applications. On the other hand, laser sensors performance are much more sensitive to the vagaries of the atmosphere and are thus generally restricted to shorter ranges than microwave systems. Hence it is of paramount importance to analyse the performance of laser sensors and systems in various weather and environmental conditions. Additionally, it is important to define airborne laser safety criteria, since several systems currently in service operate in the near infrared with considerable risk for the naked human eye. Therefore, appropriate methods for predicting and evaluating the performance of infrared laser sensors/systems are presented, taking into account laser safety issues. For aircraft experimental activities with laser systems, it is essential to define test requirements taking into account the specific conditions for operational employment of the systems in the intended scenarios and to verify the performance in realistic environments at the test ranges. To support the development of such requirements, useful guidelines are provided for test and evaluation of airborne laser systems including laboratory, ground and flight test activities.

  2. Integration of RFID and web service for assisted living.

    PubMed

    Unluturk, Mehmet S; Kurtel, Kaan

    2012-08-01

    The number of people over 65 years old throughout most stable and prosperous countries in the world is increasing. Availability of their care in their own homes is imperative because of the economic reasons and their choices where to live (World Health Organization, Definition of an older or elderly person. http://www.who.int/healthinfo/survey/ageingdefnolder/en/ ; EQUIP-European Framework for Qualifications in Home Care Services for Older People, http://www.equip-project.com ; Salonen, 2009). "Recent advancement in wireless communications and electronics has enabled the development of low-cost sensor networks. The sensor networks can be utilized in various application areas." (Akyildiz, et al. 2002) These two statements show that there is a great promise in wireless technology and utilizing it in assisted living might be very beneficial to the elderly people. In this paper, we propose software architecture called Location Windows Service (LWS) which integrates the Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) technology and the web service to build an assisted living system for elderly people at home. This architecture monitors the location of elderly people without interfering in their daily activities. Location information messages that are generated as the elderly move from room to room indicate that the elderly person is fit and healthy and going about their normal life. The communication must be timely enough to follow elderly people as they move from room to room without missing a location. Unacknowledged publishing, subscription filtering and short location change messages are also included in this software model to reduce the network traffic in large homes. We propose some defense schemes being applied to the network environment of the assisted living system to prevent any external attacks. PMID:21537853

  3. Characterization of visual pigments, oil droplets, lens and cornea in the whooping crane Grus americana

    PubMed Central

    Porter, Megan L.; Kingston, Alexandra C. N.; McCready, Robert; Cameron, Evan G.; Hofmann, Christopher M.; Suarez, Lauren; Olsen, Glenn H.; Cronin, Thomas W.; Robinson, Phyllis R.

    2014-01-01

    Vision has been investigated in many species of birds, but few studies have considered the visual systems of large birds and the particular implications of large eyes and long-life spans on visual system capabilities. To address these issues we investigated the visual system of the whooping crane Grus americana (Gruiformes, Gruidae), which is one of only two North American crane species. It is a large, long-lived bird in which UV sensitivity might be reduced by chromatic aberration and entrance of UV radiation into the eye could be detrimental to retinal tissues. To investigate the whooping crane visual system we used microspectrophotometry to determine the absorbance spectra of retinal oil droplets and to investigate whether the ocular media (i.e. the lens and cornea) absorb UV radiation. In vitro expression and reconstitution was used to determine the absorbance spectra of rod and cone visual pigments. The rod visual pigments had wavelengths of peak absorbance (?max) at 500 nm, whereas the cone visual pigment ?max values were determined to be 404 nm (SWS1), 450 nm (SWS2), 499 nm (RH2) and 561 nm (LWS), similar to other characterized bird visual pigment absorbance values. The oil droplet cut-off wavelength (?cut) values similarly fell within ranges recorded in other avian species: 576 nm (R-type), 522 nm (Y-type), 506 nm (P-type) and 448 nm (C-type). We confirm that G. americana has a violet-sensitive visual system; however, as a consequence of the ?max of the SWS1 visual pigment (404 nm), it might also have some UV sensitivity. PMID:25267845

  4. NASA's Integrated Development of Solar Sail Propulsion Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garbe, Gregory; Montgomery, Edward E., IV; Heaton, Andrew F.; VanSant, John T.; Campbell, Bruce A.

    2004-01-01

    Solar sails have been studied for a variety of missions and have the potential to provide cost effective, propellantless propulsion that enables longer on-station operation, increased scientific payload mass fraction, and access to previously inaccessible orbits (e. g., non-Keplerian, high solar latitudes, etc.). Research being conducted by the In-Space Propulsion (ISP) Technologies Projects is at the forefront of NASA's efforts to mature propulsion technologies that will enable or enhance a variety of space science missions. Solar sail propulsion systems will be required to meet the challenge of monitoring and predicting space weather by the Office of Space Science's (OSS) Living with a Star (LWS) program. Near-to-mid-term mission needs include monitoring of solar activity and observations at high solar latitudes. Work currently funded by the ISP s Solar Sail Propulsion (SSP) project is based on the quantitative demonstration of scalability of present solar sail subsystem designs and concepts to future mission requirements through ground testing of hardware, computational modeling and analytical simulations. This paper will give an overview of the Solar Sail Propulsion project's major development tasks of fabricating and testing two different subscale (400 square meter sail) solar sail system architectures. It will then be shown how either of these subscale prototypes can evolve into a flight validation system and briefly discuss the mission parameter. The paper will conclude with a discussion on how a flight validation will exercise the quantitative tools needed to demonstrate the scale to the size needed for the Solar Polar Imager and L1-Diamond SEC roadmap missions.

  5. Unraveling the Mechanisms Responsible for Radiation Belt Enhancements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liemohn, M. W.; Chan, A. A.; Fok, M. H.; Elkington, S.; Richard, R.; Reeves, G. D.; Henderson, M. G.; O'Brien, T. P.; Menietti, J. D.

    2006-12-01

    The radiation belts are one of the biggest causes of space weather impacts on life and society here on Earth. While these relativistic electrons and energetic ions do not carry the bulk of the plasma mass or energy content, they are the particles that adversely affect space-based technological assets and that pose a real risk of harm to astronauts. Understanding the physical processes that enhance the radiation belt fluxes is, therefore, a timely and pressing issue that needs to be resolved. There is still a debate about the dominant source mechanism for the radiation belt electrons. It is clear that radiation belt enhancements can be due to either an internal inner magnetospheric source, such as energization by nightside chorus waves, or an external outer magnetospheric source, such as radial diffusion of high-energy plasma sheet electrons into near-Earth space, or both simultaneously. The coexistence of strong loss processes at the same time as the strong source processes further obscures the truth. In 2004, the LWS TR&T program solicited proposals to examine RB enhancements. The selected team consists of modelers and data analysts tackling this issue from a variety of perspectives with an array of research tools. This presentation highlights the team's progress so far and its plans for the near future. In particular, we have selected the second half of 2002 as an interval of general interest for the group, and the two storm and subsequent enhancement events of August 2 and October 24, 2002, as specific intervals for group-wide examination.

  6. A 205 {mu}m [N II] MAP OF THE CARINA NEBULA

    SciTech Connect

    Oberst, T. E.; Parshley, S. C.; Nikola, T.; Stacey, G. J.; Loehr, A.; Lane, A. P.; Stark, A. A.; Kamenetzky, J.

    2011-10-01

    We present the results of a {approx}250 arcmin{sup 2} mapping of the 205 {mu}m [N II] fine-structure emission over the northern Carina Nebula, including the Car I and Car II H II regions. Spectra were obtained using the South Pole Imaging Fabry-Perot Interferometer (SPIFI) at the Antarctic Submillimeter Telescope and Remote Observatory (AST/RO) at the South Pole. We supplement the 205 {mu}m data with new reductions of far-IR fine-structure spectra from the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) Long Wavelength Spectrometer (LWS) in 63 {mu}m [O I], 122 {mu}m [N II], 146 {mu}m [O I], and 158 {mu}m [C II]; the 146 {mu}m [O I] data include 90 raster positions which have not been previously published. Morphological comparisons are made with optical, radio continuum, and CO maps. The 122/205 line ratio is used to probe the density of the low-ionization gas, and the 158/205 line ratio is used to probe the fraction of C{sup +} arising from photodissociation regions (PDRs). The [O I] and [C II] lines are used to construct a PDR model of Carina. When the PDR properties are compared with other sources, Carina is found to be more akin to 30 Doradus than galactic star-forming regions such as Orion, M17, or W49; this is consistent with the view of Carina as a more evolved region, where much of the parent molecular cloud has been ionized or swept away. These data constitute the first ground-based detection of the 205 {mu}m [N II] line, and the third detection overall since those of COBE FIRAS and the Kuiper Airborne Observatory in the early 1990s.

  7. Far-IR Excited OH Lines from Orion KL Outflows

    E-print Network

    Javier R. Goicoechea; Jose Cernicharo; Mercedes R. Lerate; Fabien Daniel; Michael J. Barlow; Bruce M. Swinyard; Tanya L. Lim; Serena Viti; Jeremy Yates

    2006-03-03

    As part of the first far-IR line survey towards Orion KL, we present the detection of seven new rotationally excited OH Lambda-doublets (at 48, 65, 71, 79, 98 and 115 um). Observations were performed with the Long Wavelength Spectrometer (LWS) Fabry-Perots on board the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO). In total, more than 20 resolved OH rotational lines, with upper energy levels up to 620 K, have been detected at an angular and velocity resolutions of 80$'' and 33 km s^-1 respectively. OH line profiles show a complex behavior evolving from pure absorption, P-Cygni type to pure emission. We also present a large scale 6' declination raster in the OH ^2\\Pi_3/2 J=5/2^+-3/2^- and ^2\\Pi_3/2 J=7/2^-5/2^+ lines (at 119.441 and 84.597 um) revealing the decrease of excitation outside the core of the cloud. From the observed profiles, mean intrinsic line widths and velocity offsets between emission and absorption line peaks we conclude that most of the excited OH arises from Orion outflow(s), i.e. the ``plateau'' component. We determine an averaged OH abundance relative to H_2 of X(OH)=(0.5-1.0)x10^-6, a kinetic temperature of 100 K and a density of n(H_2)=5x10^5 cm^-3. Even with these conditions, the OH excitation is heavily coupled with the strong dust continuum emission from the inner hot core regions and from the expanding flow itself.

  8. Miniature Filament Eruptions and their Reconnections in X-Ray Jets: Evidence for a New Paradigm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sterling, Alphonse C.; Moore, Ronald L.; Falconer, David A.

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the onset of approximately10 random X-ray jets observed by Hinode/XRT. Each jet was near the limb in a polar coronal hole, and showed a ``bright point'' in an edge of the base of the jet, as is typical for previously-observed X-ray jets. We examined SDO/AIA EUV images of each of the jets over multiple AIA channels, including 304 Ang, which detects chromospheric emissions, and 171, 193, and 211 Ang, which detect cooler-coronal emissions. We find the jets to result from eruptions of miniature (size less than approximately 10 arcsec) filaments from the bases of the jets. Much of the erupting-filament material forms a chromospheric-temperature jet. In the cool-coronal channels, often the filament appears in absorption and the jet in emission. The jet bright point forms at the location from which the miniature filament is ejected, analogous to the formation of a standard solar flare in the wake of the eruption of a typical larger-scale chromospheric filament. Thus these X-ray jets and their bright points are made by miniature filament eruptions. They are evidently produced the same way as an on-disk coronal jet we observed in Adams et al. (2014); that on-disk jet had no obvious emerging magnetic field in its base. We conclude that, for many jets, the standard idea of X-ray jets forming from reconnection between emerging flux and preexisting coronal field is incorrect. ACS and RLM were supported by funding from NASA/LWS, Hinode, and ISSI.

  9. An Unexpected Diversity of Photoreceptor Classes in the Longfin Squid, Doryteuthis pealeii.

    PubMed

    Kingston, Alexandra C N; Wardill, Trevor J; Hanlon, Roger T; Cronin, Thomas W

    2015-01-01

    Cephalopods are famous for their ability to change color and pattern rapidly for signaling and camouflage. They have keen eyes and remarkable vision, made possible by photoreceptors in their retinas. External to the eyes, photoreceptors also exist in parolfactory vesicles and some light organs, where they function using a rhodopsin protein that is identical to that expressed in the retina. Furthermore, dermal chromatophore organs contain rhodopsin and other components of phototransduction (including retinochrome, a photoisomerase first found in the retina), suggesting that they are photoreceptive. In this study, we used a modified whole-mount immunohistochemical technique to explore rhodopsin and retinochrome expression in a number of tissues and organs in the longfin squid, Doryteuthis pealeii. We found that fin central muscles, hair cells (epithelial primary sensory neurons), arm axial ganglia, and sucker peduncle nerves all express rhodopsin and retinochrome proteins. Our findings indicate that these animals possess an unexpected diversity of extraocular photoreceptors and suggest that extraocular photoreception using visual opsins and visual phototransduction machinery is far more widespread throughout cephalopod tissues than previously recognized. PMID:26351853

  10. Characterizing rhodopsin signaling by EPR spectroscopy: from structure to dynamics.

    PubMed

    Van Eps, Ned; Caro, Lydia N; Morizumi, Takefumi; Ernst, Oliver P

    2015-09-26

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy, together with spin labeling techniques, has played a major role in the characterization of rhodopsin, the photoreceptor protein and G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) in rod cells. Two decades ago, these biophysical tools were the first to identify transmembrane helical movements in rhodopsin upon photo-activation, a critical step in the study of GPCR signaling. EPR methods were employed to identify functional loop dynamics within rhodopsin, to measure light-induced millisecond timescale changes in rhodopsin conformation, to characterize the effects of partial agonists on the apoprotein opsin, and to study lipid interactions with rhodopsin. With the emergence of advanced pulsed EPR techniques, the stage was set to determine the amplitude of structural changes in rhodopsin and the dynamics in the rhodopsin signaling complexes. Work in this area has yielded invaluable information about mechanistic properties of GPCRs. Using EPR techniques, receptors are studied in native-like membrane environments and the effects of lipids on conformational equilibria can be explored. This perspective addresses the impact of EPR methods on rhodopsin and GPCR structural biology, highlighting historical discoveries made with spin labeling techniques, and outlining exciting new directions in the field. PMID:26140679

  11. Coarse-grained Molecular Dynamics Provides Insight into the Interactions of Lipids and Cholesterol with Rhodopsin

    PubMed Central

    Horn, Joshua N.; Kao, Ta-chun; Grossfield, Alan

    2014-01-01

    Protein function is a complicated interplay between structure and dynamics, which can be heavily influenced by environmental factors and conditions. This is particularly true in the case of membrane proteins, such as the visual receptor rhodopsin. It has been well documented that lipid headgroups, polyunsaturated tails, and the concentration of cholesterol in membranes all play a role in the function of rhodopsin. Recently, we used all-atom simulations to demonstrate that different lipid species have preferential interactions and possible binding sites on rhodopsin’s surface, consistent with experiment. However, the limited timescales of the simulations meant that the statistical uncertainty of these results was substantial. Accordingly, we present here 32 independent 1.6 µs coarse-grained simulations exploring lipids and cholesterols surrounding rhodopsin and opsin, in lipid bilayers mimicking those found naturally. Our results agree with those found experimentally and in previous simulations, but with far better statistical certainty. The results demonstrate the value of combining all-atom and coarse-grained models with experiment to provide a well-rounded view of lipid-protein interactions. PMID:24158802

  12. CRALBP supports the mammalian retinal visual cycle and cone vision

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Yunlu; Shen, Susan Q.; Jui, Jonathan; Rupp, Alan C.; Byrne, Leah C.; Hattar, Samer; Flannery, John G.; Corbo, Joseph C.; Kefalov, Vladimir J.

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in the cellular retinaldehyde–binding protein (CRALBP, encoded by RLBP1) can lead to severe cone photoreceptor–mediated vision loss in patients. It is not known how CRALBP supports cone function or how altered CRALBP leads to cone dysfunction. Here, we determined that deletion of Rlbp1 in mice impairs the retinal visual cycle. Mice lacking CRALBP exhibited M-opsin mislocalization, M-cone loss, and impaired cone-driven visual behavior and light responses. Additionally, M-cone dark adaptation was largely suppressed in CRALBP-deficient animals. While rearing CRALBP-deficient mice in the dark prevented the deterioration of cone function, it did not rescue cone dark adaptation. Adeno-associated virus–mediated restoration of CRALBP expression specifically in Müller cells, but not retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells, rescued the retinal visual cycle and M-cone sensitivity in knockout mice. Our results identify Müller cell CRALBP as a key component of the retinal visual cycle and demonstrate that this pathway is important for maintaining normal cone–driven vision and accelerating cone dark adaptation. PMID:25607845

  13. Role of the Alternaria alternata Blue-Light Receptor LreA (White-Collar 1) in Spore Formation and Secondary Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Pruß, Sonja; Fetzner, Ramona; Seither, Kristin; Herr, Andreas; Pfeiffer, Erika; Metzler, Manfred; Lawrence, Christopher B.

    2014-01-01

    Alternaria alternata is a filamentous fungus that causes considerable loss of crops of economically important feed and food worldwide. It produces more than 60 different secondary metabolites, among which alternariol (AOH) and altertoxin (ATX) are the most important mycotoxins. We found that mycotoxin production and spore formation are regulated by light in opposite ways. Whereas spore formation was largely decreased under light conditions, the production of AOH was stimulated 2- to 3-fold. ATX production was even strictly dependent on light. All light effects observed could be triggered by blue light, whereas red light had only a minor effect. Inhibition of spore formation by light was reversible after 1 day of incubation in the dark. We identified orthologues of genes encoding the Neurospora crassa blue-light-perceiving white-collar proteins, a cryptochrome, a phytochrome, and an opsin-related protein in the genome of A. alternata. Deletion of the white-collar 1 (WC-1) gene (lreA) resulted in derepression of spore formation in dark and in light. ATX formation was strongly induced in the dark in the lreA mutant, suggesting a repressing function of LreA, which appears to be released in the wild type after blue-light exposure. In addition, light induction of AOH formation was partially dependent on LreA, suggesting also an activating function. A. alternata ?lreA was still able to partially respond to blue light, indicating the action of another blue-light receptor system. PMID:24532063

  14. The melanopic sensitivity function accounts for melanopsin-driven responses in mice under diverse lighting conditions.

    PubMed

    Brown, Timothy M; Allen, Annette E; al-Enezi, Jazi; Wynne, Jonathan; Schlangen, Luc; Hommes, Vanja; Lucas, Robert J

    2013-01-01

    In addition to rods and cones, photoreception in mammals extends to a third retinal cell type expressing the photopigment melanopsin. The influences of this novel opsin are widespread, ranging from pupillary and circadian responses to brightness perception, yet established approaches to quantifying the biological effects of light do not adequately account for melanopsin sensitivity. We have recently proposed a novel metric, the melanopic sensitivity function (V(Z)?), to address this deficiency. Here, we further validate this new measure with a variety of tests based on potential barriers to its applicability identified in the literature or relating to obvious practical benefits. Using electrophysiogical approaches and pupillometry, initially in rodless+coneless mice, our data demonstrate that under a very wide range of different conditions (including switching between stimuli with highly divergent spectral content) the V(Z)? function provides an accurate prediction of the sensitivity of melanopsin-dependent responses. We further show that V(Z)? provides the best available description of the spectral sensitivity of at least one aspect of the visual response in mice with functional rods and cones: tonic firing activity in the lateral geniculate nuclei. Together, these data establish V(Z)? as an important new approach for light measurement with widespread practical utility. PMID:23301090

  15. Molecular Evidence for Convergence and Parallelism in Evolution of Complex Brains of Cephalopod Molluscs: Insights from Visual Systems.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, M A; Ogura, A; Ikeo, K; Shigeno, S; Moritaki, T; Winters, G C; Kohn, A B; Moroz, L L

    2015-12-01

    Coleoid cephalopods show remarkable evolutionary convergence with vertebrates in their neural organization, including (1) eyes and visual system with optic lobes, (2) specialized parts of the brain controlling learning and memory, such as vertical lobes, and (3) unique vasculature supporting such complexity of the central nervous system. We performed deep sequencing of eye transcriptomes of pygmy squids (Idiosepius paradoxus) and chambered nautiluses (Nautilus pompilius) to decipher the molecular basis of convergent evolution in cephalopods. RNA-seq was complemented by in situ hybridization to localize the expression of selected genes. We found three types of genomic innovations in the evolution of complex brains: (1) recruitment of novel genes into morphogenetic pathways, (2) recombination of various coding and regulatory regions of different genes, often called "evolutionary tinkering" or "co-option", and (3) duplication and divergence of genes. Massive recruitment of novel genes occurred in the evolution of the "camera" eye from nautilus' "pinhole" eye. We also showed that the type-2 co-option of transcription factors played important roles in the evolution of the lens and visual neurons. In summary, the cephalopod convergent morphological evolution of the camera eyes was driven by a mosaic of all types of gene recruitments. In addition, our analysis revealed unexpected variations of squids' opsins, retinochromes, and arrestins, providing more detailed information, valuable for further research on intra-ocular and extra-ocular photoreception of the cephalopods. PMID:26002349

  16. Optogenetic Vision Restoration Using Rhodopsin for Enhanced Sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Gaub, Benjamin M; Berry, Michael H; Holt, Amy E; Isacoff, Ehud Y; Flannery, John G

    2015-10-01

    Retinal disease is one of the most active areas of gene therapy, with clinical trials ongoing in the United States for five diseases. There are currently no treatments for patients with late-stage disease in which photoreceptors have been lost. Optogenetic gene therapies are in development, but, to date, have suffered from the low light sensitivity of microbial opsins, such as channelrhodopsin and halorhodopsin, and azobenzene-based photoswitches. Several groups have shown that photoreceptive G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) can be expressed heterologously, and photoactivate endogenous Gi/o signaling. We hypothesized such a GPCR could increase sensitivity due to endogenous signal amplification. We targeted vertebrate rhodopsin to retinal ON-bipolar cells of blind rd1 mice and observed restoration of: (i) light responses in retinal explants, (ii) visually-evoked potentials in visual cortex in vivo, and (iii) two forms of visually-guided behavior: innate light avoidance and discrimination of temporal light patterns in the context of fear conditioning. Importantly, both the light responses of the retinal explants and the visually-guided behavior occurred reliably at light levels that were two to three orders of magnitude dimmer than required for channelrhodopsin. Thus, gene therapy with native light-gated GPCRs presents a novel approach to impart light sensitivity for visual restoration in a useful range of illumination. PMID:26137852

  17. Non-scanning fiber-optic near-infrared beam led to two-photon optogenetic stimulation in-vivo.

    PubMed

    Dhakal, Kamal R; Gu, Ling; Shivalingaiah, Shivaranjani; Dennis, Torry S; Morris-Bobzean, Samara A; Li, Ting; Perrotti, Linda I; Mohanty, Samarendra K

    2014-01-01

    Stimulation of specific neurons expressing opsins in a targeted region to manipulate brain function has proved to be a powerful tool in neuroscience. However, the use of visible light for optogenetic stimulation is invasive due to low penetration depth and tissue damage owing to larger absorption and scattering. Here, we report, for the first time, in-depth non-scanning fiber-optic two-photon optogenetic stimulation (FO-TPOS) of neurons in-vivo in transgenic mouse models. In order to optimize the deep-brain stimulation strategy, we characterized two-photon activation efficacy at different near-infrared laser parameters. The significantly-enhanced in-depth stimulation efficiency of FO-TPOS as compared to conventional single-photon beam was demonstrated both by experiments and Monte Carlo simulation. The non-scanning FO-TPOS technology will lead to better understanding of the in-vivo neural circuitry because this technology permits more precise and less invasive anatomical delivery of stimulation. PMID:25383687

  18. Do Uric Acid Deposits in Zooxanthellae Function as Eye-Spots?

    PubMed Central

    Yamashita, Hiroshi; Kobiyama, Atsushi; Koike, Kazuhiko

    2009-01-01

    The symbiosis between zooxanthellae (dinoflagellate genus Symbiodinium) and corals is a fundamental basis of tropical marine ecosystems. However the physiological interactions of the hosts and symbionts are poorly understood. Recently, intracellular crystalline deposits in Symbiodinium were revealed to be uric acid functioning for nutrient storage. This is the first exploration of these enigmatic crystalline materials that had previously been misidentified as oxalic acid, providing new insights into the nutritional strategies of Symbiodinium in oligotrophic tropical waters. However, we believe these deposits also function as eye-spots on the basis of light and electron microscopic observations of motile cells of cultured Symbiodinium. The cells possessed crystalline deposit clusters in rows with each row 100–150 nm thick corresponding to 1/4 the wavelength of light and making them suitable for maximum wave interference and reflection of light. Crystalline clusters in cells observed with a light microscope strongly refracted and polarized light, and reflected or absorbed short wavelength light. The facts that purines, including uric acid, have been identified as the main constituents of light reflectors in many organisms, and that the photoreceptor protein, opsin, was detected in our Symbiodinium strain, support the idea that uric acid deposits in Symbiodinium motile cells may function as a component of an eye-spot. PMID:19609449

  19. Why different regions of the retina have different spectral sensitivities: a review of mechanisms and functional significance of intraretinal variability in spectral sensitivity in vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Temple, S E

    2011-07-01

    Vision is used in nearly all aspects of animal behavior, from prey and predator detection to mate selection and parental care. However, the light environment typically is not uniform in every direction, and visual tasks may be specific to particular parts of an animal's field of view. These spatial differences may explain the presence of several adaptations in the eyes of vertebrates that alter spectral sensitivity of the eye in different directions. Mechanisms that alter spectral sensitivity across the retina include (but are not limited to) variations in: corneal filters, oil droplets, macula lutea, tapeta, chromophore ratios, photoreceptor classes, and opsin expression. The resultant variations in spectral sensitivity across the retina are referred to as intraretinal variability in spectral sensitivity (IVSS). At first considered an obscure and rare phenomenon, it is becoming clear that IVSS is widespread among all vertebrates, and examples have been found from every major group. This review will describe the mechanisms mediating differences in spectral sensitivity, which are in general well understood, as well as explore the functional significance of intraretinal variability, which for the most part is unclear at best. PMID:21838935

  20. Time-resolved rhodopsin activation currents in a unicellular expression system.

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, J M; Shukla, P

    1999-01-01

    The early receptor current (ERC) is the charge redistribution occurring in plasma membrane rhodopsin during light activation of photoreceptors. Both the molecular mechanism of the ERC and its relationship to rhodopsin conformational activation are unknown. To investigate whether the ERC could be a time-resolved assay of rhodopsin structure-function relationships, the distinct sensitivity of modern electrophysiological tools was employed to test for flash-activated ERC signals in cells stably expressing normal human rod opsin after regeneration with 11-cis-retinal. ERCs are similar in waveform and kinetics to those found in photoreceptors. The action spectrum of the major R(2) charge motion is consistent with a rhodopsin photopigment. The R(1) phase is not kinetically resolvable and the R(2) phase, which overlaps metarhodopsin-II formation, has a rapid risetime and complex multiexponential decay. These experiments demonstrate, for the first time, kinetically resolved electrical state transitions during activation of expressed visual pigment in a unicellular environment (single or fused giant cells) containing only 6 x 10(6)-8 x 10(7) molecules of rhodopsin. This method improves measurement sensitivity 7 to 8 orders of magnitude compared to other time-resolved techniques applied to rhodopsin to study the role particular amino acids play in conformational activation and the forces that govern those transitions. PMID:10465746

  1. The hippocampo-amygdala control of contextual fear expression is affected in a model of intellectual disability.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chun-Lei; Houbaert, Xander; Lepleux, Marilyn; Deshors, Melissa; Normand, Elisabeth; Gambino, Frédéric; Herzog, Etienne; Humeau, Yann

    2015-11-01

    The process of learning mainly depends on the ability to store new information, while the ability to retrieve this information and express appropriate behaviors are also crucial for the adaptation of individuals to environmental cues. Thereby, all three components contribute to the cognitive fitness of an individual. While a lack of behavioral adaptation is a recurrent trait of intellectually disabled patients, discriminating between memory formation, memory retrieval or behavioral expression deficits is not easy to establish. Here, we report some deficits in contextual fear behavior in knockout mice for the intellectual disability gene Il1rapl1. Functional in vivo experiments revealed that the lack of conditioned response resulted from a local inhibitory to excitatory (I/E) imbalance in basolateral amygdala (BLA) consecutive to a loss of excitatory drive onto BLA principal cells by caudal hippocampus axonal projections. A normalization of the fear behavior was obtained in adult mutant mice following opsin-based in vivo synaptic priming of hippocampo-BLA synapses in adult il1rapl1 knockout mice, indicating that synaptic efficacy at hippocampo-BLA projections is crucial for contextual fear memory expression. Importantly, because this restoration was obtained after the learning phase, our results suggest that some of the genetically encoded cognitive deficits in humans may originate from a lack of restitution of genuinely formed memories rather than an exclusive inability to store new memories. PMID:25158900

  2. The Heterozygote Superiority Hypothesis for Polymorphic Color Vision Is Not Supported by Long-Term Fitness Data from Wild Neotropical Monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Fedigan, Linda M.; Melin, Amanda D.; Addicott, John F.; Kawamura, Shoji

    2014-01-01

    The leading explanatory model for the widespread occurrence of color vision polymorphism in Neotropical primates is the heterozygote superiority hypothesis, which postulates that trichromatic individuals have a fitness advantage over other phenotypes because redgreen chromatic discrimination is useful for foraging, social signaling, or predator detection. Alternative explanatory models predict that dichromatic and trichromatic phenotypes are each suited to distinct tasks. To conclusively evaluate these models, one must determine whether proposed visual advantages translate into differential fitness of trichromatic and dichromatic individuals. We tested whether color vision phenotype is a significant predictor of female fitness in a population of wild capuchins, using longterm 26 years survival and fertility data. We found no advantage to trichromats over dichromats for three fitness measures fertility rates, offspring survival and maternal survival. This finding suggests that a selective mechanism other than heterozygote advantage is operating to maintain the color vision polymorphism. We propose that attention be directed to field testing the alternative mechanisms of balancing selection proposed to explain opsin polymorphism nichedivergence, frequencydependence and mutual benefit of association. This is the first indepth, longterm study examining the effects of color vision variation on survival and reproductive success in a naturallyoccurring population of primates. PMID:24404195

  3. Cardiac Applications of Optogenetics

    PubMed Central

    Ambrosi, Christina M.; Klimas, Aleksandra; Yu, Jinzhu; Entcheva, Emilia

    2014-01-01

    In complex multicellular systems, such as the brain or the heart, the ability to selectively perturb and observe the response of individual components at the cellular level and with millisecond resolution in time, is essential for mechanistic understanding of function. Optogenetics uses genetic encoding of light sensitivity (by the expression of microbial opsins) to provide such capabilities for manipulation, recording, and control by light with cell specificity and high spatiotemporal resolution. As an optical approach, it is inherently scalable for remote and parallel interrogation of biological function at the tissue level; with implantable miniaturized devices, the technique is uniquely suitable for in vivo tracking of function, as illustrated by numerous applications in the brain. Its expansion into the cardiac area has been slow. Here, using examples from published research and original data, we focus on optogenetics applications to cardiac electrophysiology, specifically dealing with the ability to manipulate membrane voltage by light with implications for cardiac pacing, cardioversion, cell communication, and arrhythmia research, in general. We discuss gene and cell delivery methods of inscribing light sensitivity in cardiac tissue, functionality of the light-sensitive ion channels within different types of cardiac cells, utility in probing electrical coupling between different cell types, approaches and design solutions to all-optical electrophysiology by the combination of optogenetic sensors and actuators, and specific challenges in moving towards in vivo cardiac optogenetics. PMID:25035999

  4. CRYPTOCHROME-mediated phototransduction by modulation of the potassium ion channel ?-subunit redox sensor

    PubMed Central

    Fogle, Keri J.; Baik, Lisa S.; Houl, Jerry H.; Tran, Tri T.; Roberts, Logan; Dahm, Nicole A.; Cao, Yu; Zhou, Ming; Holmes, Todd C.

    2015-01-01

    Blue light activation of the photoreceptor CRYPTOCHROME (CRY) evokes rapid depolarization and increased action potential firing in a subset of circadian and arousal neurons in Drosophila melanogaster. Here we show that acute arousal behavioral responses to blue light significantly differ in mutants lacking CRY, as well as mutants with disrupted opsin-based phototransduction. Light-activated CRY couples to membrane depolarization via a well conserved redox sensor of the voltage-gated potassium (K+) channel ?-subunit (Kv?) Hyperkinetic (Hk). The neuronal light response is almost completely absent in hk?/? mutants, but is functionally rescued by genetically targeted neuronal expression of WT Hk, but not by Hk point mutations that disable Hk redox sensor function. Multiple K+ channel ?-subunits that coassemble with Hk, including Shaker, Ether-a-go-go, and Ether-a-go-go–related gene, are ion conducting channels for CRY/Hk-coupled light response. Light activation of CRY is transduced to membrane depolarization, increased firing rate, and acute behavioral responses by the Kv? subunit redox sensor. PMID:25646452

  5. A combinatorial optogenetic approach to medial habenula function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, Eric E.; Hsu, Yun-Wei; Wang, Si; Morton, Glenn; Zeng, Hongkui

    2013-03-01

    The habenula is a brain region found in all vertebrate species. It consists of medial and lateral subnuclei which make complex descending connections to the brainstem. Although the medial habenula (MHb) and its projection, the fasciculus retroflexus (FR), have been recognized for decades, their function remains obscure. The small size of the MHb in rodents, and the cellular and molecular complexity of this region, have made it difficult to study the function of this region with high specificity. Here we describe a Cre-mediated genetic system for expressing the microbial opsin channelrhodopsin (ChR2) specifically in the dorsal (dMHb) and ventral (vMHb) medial habenula. Genetically targeted expression of ChR2 allows MHb neurons to be selectively activated with light in acute brain slices with electrophysiological readouts, and in vivo by means of custom-built fiber optic cannulas. These tools will allow highly specific studies of MHb circuitry and the role of the MHb in behaviors related to addiction and mood regulation.

  6. Gene Augmentation Therapy Restores Retinal Function and Visual Behavior in a Sheep Model of CNGA3 Achromatopsia.

    PubMed

    Banin, Eyal; Gootwine, Elisha; Obolensky, Alexey; Ezra-Elia, Raaya; Ejzenberg, Ayala; Zelinger, Lina; Honig, Hen; Rosov, Alexander; Yamin, Esther; Sharon, Dror; Averbukh, Edward; Hauswirth, William W; Ofri, Ron

    2015-09-01

    Achromatopsia is a hereditary form of day blindness caused by cone photoreceptor dysfunction. Affected patients suffer from congenital color blindness, photosensitivity, and low visual acuity. Mutations in the CNGA3 gene are a major cause of achromatopsia, and a sheep model of this disease was recently characterized by our group. Here, we report that unilateral subretinal delivery of an adeno-associated virus serotype 5 (AAV5) vector carrying either the mouse or the human intact CNGA3 gene under the control of the red/green opsin promoter results in long-term recovery of visual function in CNGA3-mutant sheep. Treated animals demonstrated shorter maze passage times and a reduced number of collisions with obstacles compared with their pretreatment status, with values close to those of unaffected sheep. This effect was abolished when the treated eye was patched. Electroretinography (ERG) showed marked improvement in cone function. Retinal expression of the transfected human and mouse CNGA3 genes at the mRNA level was shown by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and cone-specific expression of CNGA3 protein was demonstrated by immunohistochemisrty. The rescue effect has so far been maintained for over 3 years in the first-treated animals, with no obvious ocular or systemic side effects. The results support future application of subretinal AAV5-mediated gene-augmentation therapy in CNGA3 achromatopsia patients. PMID:26087757

  7. Recoverin depletion accelerates cone photoresponse recovery

    PubMed Central

    Zang, Jingjing; Keim, Jennifer; Kastenhuber, Edda; Gesemann, Matthias; Neuhauss, Stephan C. F.

    2015-01-01

    The neuronal Ca2+-binding protein Recoverin has been shown to regulate phototransduction termination in mammalian rods. Here we identify four recoverin genes in the zebrafish genome, rcv1a, rcv1b, rcv2a and rcv2b, and investigate their role in modulating the cone phototransduction cascade. While Recoverin-1b is only found in the adult retina, the other Recoverins are expressed throughout development in all four cone types, except Recoverin-1a, which is expressed only in rods and UV cones. Applying a double flash electroretinogram (ERG) paradigm, downregulation of Recoverin-2a or 2b accelerates cone photoresponse recovery, albeit at different light intensities. Exclusive recording from UV cones via spectral ERG reveals that knockdown of Recoverin-1a alone has no effect, but Recoverin-1a/2a double-knockdowns showed an even shorter recovery time than Recoverin-2a-deficient larvae. We also showed that UV cone photoresponse kinetics depend on Recoverin-2a function via cone-specific kinase Grk7a. This is the first in vivo study demonstrating that cone opsin deactivation kinetics determine overall photoresponse shut off kinetics. PMID:26246494

  8. Cardiac Optogenetics: Enhancement by All-trans-Retinal

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jinzhu; Chen, Kay; Lucero, Rachel V.; Ambrosi, Christina M.; Entcheva, Emilia

    2015-01-01

    All-trans-Retinal (ATR) is a photosensitizer, serving as the chromophore for depolarizing and hyperpolarizing light-sensitive ion channels and pumps (opsins), recently employed as fast optical actuators. In mammalian optogenetic applications (in brain and heart), endogenous ATR availability is not considered a limiting factor, yet it is unclear how ATR modulation may affect the response to optical stimulation. We hypothesized that exogenous ATR may improve light responsiveness of cardiac cells modified by Channelrhodopsin2 (ChR2), hence lowering the optical pacing energy. In virally-transduced (Ad-ChR2(H134R)-eYFP) light-sensitive cardiac syncytium in vitro, ATR supplements ?2??M improved cardiomyocyte viability and augmented ChR2 membrane expression several-fold, while >4??M was toxic. Employing integrated optical actuation (470?nm) and optical mapping, we found that 1–2??M ATR dramatically reduced optical pacing energy (over 30 times) to several??W/mm2, lowest values reported to date, but also caused action potential prolongation, minor changes in calcium transients and no change in conduction. Theoretical analysis helped explain ATR-caused reduction of optical excitation threshold in cardiomyocytes. We conclude that cardiomyocytes operate at non-saturating retinal levels, and carefully-dosed exogenous ATR can enhance the performance of ChR2 in cardiac cells and yield energy benefits over orders of magnitude for optogenetic stimulation. PMID:26568132

  9. Computer-assisted counting of retinal cells by automatic segmentation after TV denoising

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Quantitative evaluation of mosaics of photoreceptors and neurons is essential in studies on development, aging and degeneration of the retina. Manual counting of samples is a time consuming procedure while attempts to automatization are subject to various restrictions from biological and preparation variability leading to both over- and underestimation of cell numbers. Here we present an adaptive algorithm to overcome many of these problems. Digital micrographs were obtained from cone photoreceptor mosaics visualized by anti-opsin immuno-cytochemistry in retinal wholemounts from a variety of mammalian species including primates. Segmentation of photoreceptors (from background, debris, blood vessels, other cell types) was performed by a procedure based on Rudin-Osher-Fatemi total variation (TV) denoising. Once 3 parameters are manually adjusted based on a sample, similarly structured images can be batch processed. The module is implemented in MATLAB and fully documented online. Results The object recognition procedure was tested on samples with a typical range of signal and background variations. We obtained results with error ratios of less than 10% in 16 of 18 samples and a mean error of less than 6% compared to manual counts. Conclusions The presented method provides a traceable module for automated acquisition of retinal cell density data. Remaining errors, including addition of background items, splitting or merging of objects might be further reduced by introduction of additional parameters. The module may be integrated into extended environments with features such as 3D-acquisition and recognition. PMID:24138794

  10. Synthetic retinal analogues modify the spectral and kinetic characteristics of microbial rhodopsin optogenetic tools.

    PubMed

    AzimiHashemi, N; Erbguth, K; Vogt, A; Riemensperger, T; Rauch, E; Woodmansee, D; Nagpal, J; Brauner, M; Sheves, M; Fiala, A; Kattner, L; Trauner, D; Hegemann, P; Gottschalk, A; Liewald, J F

    2014-01-01

    Optogenetic tools have become indispensable in neuroscience to stimulate or inhibit excitable cells by light. Channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2) variants have been established by mutating the opsin backbone or by mining related algal genomes. As an alternative strategy, we surveyed synthetic retinal analogues combined with microbial rhodopsins for functional and spectral properties, capitalizing on assays in C. elegans, HEK cells and larval Drosophila. Compared with all-trans retinal (ATR), Dimethylamino-retinal (DMAR) shifts the action spectra maxima of ChR2 variants H134R and H134R/T159C from 480 to 520 nm. Moreover, DMAR decelerates the photocycle of ChR2(H134R) and (H134R/T159C), thereby reducing the light intensity required for persistent channel activation. In hyperpolarizing archaerhodopsin-3 and Mac, naphthyl-retinal and thiophene-retinal support activity alike ATR, yet at altered peak wavelengths. Our experiments enable applications of retinal analogues in colour tuning and altering photocycle characteristics of optogenetic tools, thereby increasing the operational light sensitivity of existing cell lines or transgenic animals. PMID:25503804

  11. A Comprehensive Optogenetic Pharmacology Toolkit for In Vivo Control of GABAA Receptors and Synaptic Inhibition.

    PubMed

    Lin, Wan-Chen; Tsai, Ming-Chi; Davenport, Christopher M; Smith, Caleb M; Veit, Julia; Wilson, Neil M; Adesnik, Hillel; Kramer, Richard H

    2015-12-01

    Exogenously expressed opsins are valuable tools for optogenetic control of neurons in circuits. A deeper understanding of neural function can be gained by bringing control to endogenous neurotransmitter receptors that mediate synaptic transmission. Here we introduce a comprehensive optogenetic toolkit for controlling GABAA receptor-mediated inhibition in the brain. We developed a series of photoswitch ligands and the complementary genetically modified GABAA receptor subunits. By conjugating the two components, we generated light-sensitive versions of the entire GABAA receptor family. We validated these light-sensitive receptors for applications across a broad range of spatial scales, from subcellular receptor mapping to in vivo photo-control of visual responses in the cerebral cortex. Finally, we generated a knockin mouse in which the "photoswitch-ready" version of a GABAA receptor subunit genomically replaces its wild-type counterpart, ensuring normal receptor expression. This optogenetic pharmacology toolkit allows scalable interrogation of endogenous GABAA receptor function with high spatial, temporal, and biochemical precision. PMID:26606997

  12. Rim formation is not a prerequisite for distribution of cone photoreceptor outer segment proteins

    PubMed Central

    Conley, Shannon M.; Al-Ubaidi, Muayyad R.; Han, Zongchao; Naash, Muna I.

    2014-01-01

    Retinal degeneration slow (RDS/PRPH2) is critical for the formation of the disc/lamella rim in photoreceptor outer segments (OSs), but plays a different role in rods vs. cones. Without RDS, rods fail to form OSs, however, cones lacking RDS (in the rds?/?/Nrl?/?) exhibit balloon-like OSs devoid of lamellae. We show that distribution of most proteins in the lamella and PM domains is preserved even in the absence of RDS, rim, and lamella structures. However, the rim protein prominin-1 exhibits altered trafficking and OS localization, suggesting that proper targeting and distribution of rim proteins may require RDS. Our ultrastructural studies show that in cones, OS formation is initiated by the growth of opsin-containing membrane with RDS-mediated rim formation as a secondary step. This is directly opposite to rods and significantly advances our understanding of the role of the rim in cone OS morphogenesis. Furthermore, our results suggest that the unique folded lamella architecture of the cone OS may maximize density or proximity of phototransduction proteins, but is not required for OS function or for protein distribution and retention in different membrane domains.—Conley, S. M., Al-Ubaidi, M. R., Han, Z., Naash, M. I. Rim formation is not a prerequisite for distribution of cone photoreceptor outer segment proteins. PMID:24736412

  13. Cardiac optogenetics

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Optogenetics is an emerging technology for optical interrogation and control of biological function with high specificity and high spatiotemporal resolution. Mammalian cells and tissues can be sensitized to respond to light by a relatively simple and well-tolerated genetic modification using microbial opsins (light-gated ion channels and pumps). These can achieve fast and specific excitatory or inhibitory response, offering distinct advantages over traditional pharmacological or electrical means of perturbation. Since the first demonstrations of utility in mammalian cells (neurons) in 2005, optogenetics has spurred immense research activity and has inspired numerous applications for dissection of neural circuitry and understanding of brain function in health and disease, applications ranging from in vitro to work in behaving animals. Only recently (since 2010), the field has extended to cardiac applications with less than a dozen publications to date. In consideration of the early phase of work on cardiac optogenetics and the impact of the technique in understanding another excitable tissue, the brain, this review is largely a perspective of possibilities in the heart. It covers the basic principles of operation of light-sensitive ion channels and pumps, the available tools and ongoing efforts in optimizing them, overview of neuroscience use, as well as cardiac-specific questions of implementation and ideas for best use of this emerging technology in the heart. PMID:23457014

  14. Phylogenetic and transcriptomic analyses reveal the evolution of bioluminescence and light detection in marine deep-sea shrimps of the family Oplophoridae (Crustacea: Decapoda).

    PubMed

    Wong, Juliet M; Pérez-Moreno, Jorge L; Chan, Tin-Yam; Frank, Tamara M; Bracken-Grissom, Heather D

    2015-02-01

    Bioluminescence is essential to the survival of many organisms, particularly in the deep sea where light is limited. Shrimp of the family Oplophoridae exhibit a remarkable mechanism of bioluminescence in the form of a secretion used for predatory defense. Three of the ten genera possess an additional mode of bioluminescence in the form of light-emitting organs called photophores. Phylogenetic analyses can be useful for tracing the evolution of bioluminescence, however, the few studies that have attempted to reconcile the relationships within Oplophoridae have generated trees with low-resolution. We present the most comprehensive phylogeny of Oplophoridae to date, with 90% genera coverage using seven genes (mitochondrial and nuclear) across 30 oplophorid species. We use our resulting topology to trace the evolution of bioluminescence within Oplophoridae. Previous studies have suggested that oplophorid visual systems may be tuned to differentiate the separate modes of bioluminescence. While all oplophorid shrimp possess a visual pigment sensitive to blue-green light, only those bearing photophores have an additional pigment sensitive to near-ultraviolet light. We attempt to characterize opsins, visual pigment proteins essential to light detection, in two photophore-bearing species (Systellaspis debilis and Oplophorus gracilirostris) and make inferences regarding their function and evolutionary significance. PMID:25482362

  15. Optically guided neuronal growth at near-infrared wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevenson, D. J.; Lake, T. K.; Agate, B.; Garcés-Chávez, V.; Dholakia, K.; Gunn-Moore, F.

    2006-08-01

    Recent work has indicated the potential of light to guide the growth cones of neuronal cells using a Ti:Sapphire laser at 800 nm (Ehrlicher et al, PNAS, 2002). We have developed an optical set-up that has allowed, for the first time, the direct comparison of this process at near infrared wavelengths. A high number of growth cones were studied in order to provide a detailed statistical analysis. Actively extending growth cones of the neuroblastoma cell-line, NG108, can be guided at not only 780 nm, but also at 1064 nm. These wavelengths are an appropriate choice for guidance experiments, as wavelengths in the visible spectrum and UV are highly absorbing by cells and lead to death by phototoxicity and thermal stress. At 780 nm, 47% of actively extending growth cones were found to turn towards the focused incident light by at least 30° (n=32 growth cones). At 1064 nm, 61% of cells were successfully guided (n=31 growth cones). This suggests that the light detection mechanism within the cell is not due a single protein with a defined activity wavelength as occurs for example with the photoreceptor family of opsin proteins in the mammalian eye. We present two novel mechanisms of light induced neuronal guidance which are not related to temperature increases, or optical tweezing of the growth cone. We are also now identifying the signaling pathways that mediate this phenomenon.

  16. Kinesin molecular motors: Transport pathways, receptors, and human disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldstein, Lawrence S. B.

    2001-06-01

    Kinesin molecular motor proteins are responsible for many of the major microtubule-dependent transport pathways in neuronal and non-neuronal cells. Elucidating the transport pathways mediated by kinesins, the identity of the cargoes moved, and the nature of the proteins that link kinesin motors to cargoes are areas of intense investigation. Kinesin-II recently was found to be required for transport in motile and nonmotile cilia and flagella where it is essential for proper left-right determination in mammalian development, sensory function in ciliated neurons, and opsin transport and viability in photoreceptors. Thus, these pathways and proteins may be prominent contributors to several human diseases including ciliary dyskinesias, situs inversus, and retinitis pigmentosa. Kinesin-I is needed to move many different types of cargoes in neuronal axons. Two candidates for receptor proteins that attach kinesin-I to vesicular cargoes were recently found. One candidate, sunday driver, is proposed to both link kinesin-I to an unknown vesicular cargo and to bind and organize the mitogen-activated protein kinase components of a c-Jun N-terminal kinase signaling module. A second candidate, amyloid precursor protein, is proposed to link kinesin-I to a different, also unknown, class of axonal vesicles. The finding of a possible functional interaction between kinesin-I and amyloid precursor protein may implicate kinesin-I based transport in the development of Alzheimer's disease.

  17. Cardiac Optogenetics: Enhancement by All-trans-Retinal.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jinzhu; Chen, Kay; Lucero, Rachel V; Ambrosi, Christina M; Entcheva, Emilia

    2015-01-01

    All-trans-Retinal (ATR) is a photosensitizer, serving as the chromophore for depolarizing and hyperpolarizing light-sensitive ion channels and pumps (opsins), recently employed as fast optical actuators. In mammalian optogenetic applications (in brain and heart), endogenous ATR availability is not considered a limiting factor, yet it is unclear how ATR modulation may affect the response to optical stimulation. We hypothesized that exogenous ATR may improve light responsiveness of cardiac cells modified by Channelrhodopsin2 (ChR2), hence lowering the optical pacing energy. In virally-transduced (Ad-ChR2(H134R)-eYFP) light-sensitive cardiac syncytium in vitro, ATR supplements ?2??M improved cardiomyocyte viability and augmented ChR2 membrane expression several-fold, while >4??M was toxic. Employing integrated optical actuation (470?nm) and optical mapping, we found that 1-2??M ATR dramatically reduced optical pacing energy (over 30 times) to several??W/mm(2), lowest values reported to date, but also caused action potential prolongation, minor changes in calcium transients and no change in conduction. Theoretical analysis helped explain ATR-caused reduction of optical excitation threshold in cardiomyocytes. We conclude that cardiomyocytes operate at non-saturating retinal levels, and carefully-dosed exogenous ATR can enhance the performance of ChR2 in cardiac cells and yield energy benefits over orders of magnitude for optogenetic stimulation. PMID:26568132

  18. Pollinating birds differ in spectral sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Odeen, Anders; Håstad, Olle

    2010-02-01

    Pollinating animals and their angiosperm hosts often show strong co-adaptation in traits that increase the likelihood of a successful transfer of pollen and nutrient rewards. One such adaptation is the reported colour difference caused by unequal distribution of anthocyanidin pigments amongst plant species visited by hummingbirds and passerines. This phenomenon has been suggested to reflect possible differences in the colour vision of these pollinating birds. The presence of any such difference in colour vision would arguably affect the ecological and evolutionary interactions between flowers and their visitors, accentuating differences in floral displays and attractiveness of plants to the favoured avian pollinators. We have tested for differences in colour vision, as indicated by the amino acid present at certain key positions in the short-wavelength-sensitive type 1 (SWS1) visual pigment opsin, between the major groups of pollinating birds: the non-passerine Trochilidae (hummingbirds), the passerine Meliphagidae (honeyeaters) and Nectariniidae (sunbirds) plus five other Passerida passerine families. The results reveal gross spectral sensitivity differences between hummingbirds and honeyeaters, on the one hand, and the Passerida species, on the other. PMID:20049459

  19. TIMP-1 affects the spatial distribution of dendritic processes of second-order neurons in a rat model of Retinitis Pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Shin, Jung-A; Eom, Yun Sung; Yu, Wan-Qing; Grzywacz, Norberto M; Craft, Cheryl Mae; Lee, Eun-Jin

    2015-11-01

    Retinitis Pigmentosa (RP) is an inherited disorder that may lead to blindness. In the rhodopsin S334ter-line-3 rat model of RP, the death of rods induces spatial rearrangement of cones into regular ring mosaics. Using this model, we discovered that the ring mosaics are restored to a homogeneous distribution upon application of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1). In this study, we further investigated the cone migration and spatial distribution of second-order neurons and their connections to cones in the presence or absence of TIMP-1 using immunohistochemistry to identify retinal neurons and their connections with cones. M-opsin cell bodies and their outer segments were evaluated to determine whether TIMP-1 delays the degeneration of outer segments of cones. We observed that during cone rearrangement into ring mosaics in RP retina, dendritic processes of second-order neurons undergo remodeling to maintain their synaptic connections with the cones in the rings. TIMP-1 treatment induced the cones to rearrange and dendritic processes of second-order neurons to return to a more homogeneous spatial distribution. In addition, TIMP-1 treatment protected the outer segments of cones at later stages of retinal degeneration. Our findings clearly demonstrate that despite their dramatic spatial rearrangement, cones and second-order neuron processes maintain their synaptic connections before and after TIMP-1 treatment. PMID:26277580

  20. Control of Synaptic Connectivity by a Network of Drosophila IgSF Cell Surface Proteins.

    PubMed

    Carrillo, Robert A; Özkan, Engin; Menon, Kaushiki P; Nagarkar-Jaiswal, Sonal; Lee, Pei-Tseng; Jeon, Mili; Birnbaum, Michael E; Bellen, Hugo J; Garcia, K Christopher; Zinn, Kai

    2015-12-17

    We have defined a network of interacting Drosophila cell surface proteins in which a 21-member IgSF subfamily, the Dprs, binds to a nine-member subfamily, the DIPs. The structural basis of the Dpr-DIP interaction code appears to be dictated by shape complementarity within the Dpr-DIP binding interface. Each of the six dpr and DIP genes examined here is expressed by a unique subset of larval and pupal neurons. In the neuromuscular system, interactions between Dpr11 and DIP-? affect presynaptic terminal development, trophic factor responses, and neurotransmission. In the visual system, dpr11 is selectively expressed by R7 photoreceptors that use Rh4 opsin (yR7s). Their primary synaptic targets, Dm8 amacrine neurons, express DIP-?. In dpr11 or DIP-? mutants, yR7 terminals extend beyond their normal termination zones in layer M6 of the medulla. DIP-? is also required for Dm8 survival or differentiation. Our findings suggest that Dpr-DIP interactions are important determinants of synaptic connectivity. PMID:26687361

  1. Coexpression of two visual pigments in a photoreceptor causes an abnormally broad spectral sensitivity in the eye of the butterfly Papilio xuthus.

    PubMed

    Arikawa, Kentaro; Mizuno, Shin; Kinoshita, Michiyo; Stavenga, Doekele G

    2003-06-01

    The compound eye of the butterfly Papilio xuthus consists of three different types of ommatidia, each containing nine photoreceptor cells (R1-R9). We have found previously that the R5-R8 photoreceptors of type II ommatidia coexpress two different mRNAs, encoding opsins of green- and orange-red-absorbing visual pigments (Kitamoto et al., 1998). Do these cells contain two functionally distinct visual pigments? First, we identified the sensitivity spectrum of these photoreceptors by using combined intracellular recording and dye injection. We thus found that the R5-R8 of type II ommatidia have a characteristic sensitivity spectrum extending over an excessively broad spectral range, from the violet to the red region; the photoreceptors are therefore termed broadband photoreceptors. The spectral shape was interpreted with a computational model for type II ommatidia, containing a UV visual pigment in cells R1 and R2, two green visual pigments in cells R3 and R4, a far-UV-absorbing screening pigment (3-hydroxyretinol) in the distal part of the ommatidium, and a red-screening pigment that surrounds the rhabdom. The modeling suggests that both visual pigments in the R5-R8 photoreceptors participate in phototransduction. This work provides the first compelling evidence that multiple visual pigments participate in phototransduction in single invertebrate photoreceptors. PMID:12805293

  2. Conversion of a light-driven proton pump into a light-gated ion channel.

    PubMed

    Vogt, A; Guo, Y; Tsunoda, S P; Kateriya, S; Elstner, M; Hegemann, P

    2015-01-01

    Interest in microbial rhodopsins with ion pumping activity has been revitalized in the context of optogenetics, where light-driven ion pumps are used for cell hyperpolarization and voltage sensing. We identified an opsin-encoding gene (CsR) in the genome of the arctic alga Coccomyxa subellipsoidea C-169 that can produce large photocurrents in Xenopus oocytes. We used this property to analyze the function of individual residues in proton pumping. Modification of the highly conserved proton shuttling residue R83 or its interaction partner Y57 strongly reduced pumping power. Moreover, this mutation converted CsR at moderate electrochemical load into an operational proton channel with inward or outward rectification depending on the amino acid substitution. Together with molecular dynamics simulations, these data demonstrate that CsR-R83 and its interacting partner Y57 in conjunction with water molecules forms a proton shuttle that blocks passive proton flux during the dark-state but promotes proton movement uphill upon illumination. PMID:26597707

  3. An Unexpected Diversity of Photoreceptor Classes in the Longfin Squid, Doryteuthis pealeii

    PubMed Central

    Kingston, Alexandra C. N.; Wardill, Trevor J.; Hanlon, Roger T.; Cronin, Thomas W.

    2015-01-01

    Cephalopods are famous for their ability to change color and pattern rapidly for signaling and camouflage. They have keen eyes and remarkable vision, made possible by photoreceptors in their retinas. External to the eyes, photoreceptors also exist in parolfactory vesicles and some light organs, where they function using a rhodopsin protein that is identical to that expressed in the retina. Furthermore, dermal chromatophore organs contain rhodopsin and other components of phototransduction (including retinochrome, a photoisomerase first found in the retina), suggesting that they are photoreceptive. In this study, we used a modified whole-mount immunohistochemical technique to explore rhodopsin and retinochrome expression in a number of tissues and organs in the longfin squid, Doryteuthis pealeii. We found that fin central muscles, hair cells (epithelial primary sensory neurons), arm axial ganglia, and sucker peduncle nerves all express rhodopsin and retinochrome proteins. Our findings indicate that these animals possess an unexpected diversity of extraocular photoreceptors and suggest that extraocular photoreception using visual opsins and visual phototransduction machinery is far more widespread throughout cephalopod tissues than previously recognized. PMID:26351853

  4. Ultraviolet-sensitive vision in long-lived birds

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Livia S.; Knott, Ben; Berg, Mathew L.; Bennett, Andrew T. D.; Hunt, David M.

    2011-01-01

    Long-term exposure to ultraviolet (UV) light generates substantial damage, and in mammals, visual sensitivity to UV is restricted to short-lived diurnal rodents and certain marsupials. In humans, the cornea and lens absorb all UV-A and most of the terrestrial UV-B radiation, preventing the reactive and damaging shorter wavelengths from reaching the retina. This is not the case in certain species of long-lived diurnal birds, which possess UV-sensitive (UVS) visual pigments, maximally sensitive below 400 nm. The Order Psittaciformes contains some of the longest lived bird species, and the two species examined so far have been shown to possess UVS pigments. The objective of this study was to investigate the prevalence of UVS pigments across long-lived parrots, macaws and cockatoos, and therefore assess whether they need to cope with the accumulated effects of exposure to UV-A and UV-B over a long period of time. Sequences from the SWS1 opsin gene revealed that all 14 species investigated possess a key substitution that has been shown to determine a UVS pigment. Furthermore, in vitro regeneration data, and lens transparency, corroborate the molecular findings of UV sensitivity. Our findings thus support the claim that the Psittaciformes are the only avian Order in which UVS pigments are ubiquitous, and indicate that these long-lived birds have UV sensitivity, despite the risks of photodamage. PMID:20667872

  5. Investigating neuronal function with optically controllable proteins

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xin X.; Pan, Michael; Lin, Michael Z.

    2015-01-01

    In the nervous system, protein activities are highly regulated in space and time. This regulation allows for fine modulation of neuronal structure and function during development and adaptive responses. For example, neurite extension and synaptogenesis both involve localized and transient activation of cytoskeletal and signaling proteins, allowing changes in microarchitecture to occur rapidly and in a localized manner. To investigate the role of specific protein regulation events in these processes, methods to optically control the activity of specific proteins have been developed. In this review, we focus on how photosensory domains enable optical control over protein activity and have been used in neuroscience applications. These tools have demonstrated versatility in controlling various proteins and thereby cellular functions, and possess enormous potential for future applications in nervous systems. Just as optogenetic control of neuronal firing using opsins has changed how we investigate the function of cellular circuits in vivo, optical control may yet yield another revolution in how we study the circuitry of intracellular signaling in the brain. PMID:26257603

  6. Dichromatic Colour Vision in Wallabies as Characterised by Three Behavioural Paradigms

    PubMed Central

    Ebeling, Wiebke; Hemmi, Jan M.

    2014-01-01

    Despite lacking genetic evidence of a third cone opsin in the retina of any Australian marsupial, most species tested so far appear to be trichromatic. In the light of this, we have re-examined colour vision of the tammar wallaby which had previously been identified as a dichromat. Three different psychophysical tests, based on an operant conditioning paradigm, were used to confirm that colour perception in the wallaby can be predicted and conclusively explained by the existence of only two cone types. Firstly, colour-mixing experiments revealed a Confusion Point between the three primary colours of a LCD monitor that can be predicted by the cone excitation ratio of the short- and middle-wavelength sensitive cones. Secondly, the wavelength discrimination ability in the wallaby, when tested with monochromatic stimuli, was found to be limited to a narrow range between 440 nm and 500 nm. Lastly, an experiment designed to test the wallaby’s ability to discriminate monochromatic lights from a white light provided clear evidence for a Neutral Point around 485 nm where discrimination consistently failed. Relative colour discrimination seemed clearly preferred but it was possible to train a wallaby to perform absolute colour discriminations. The results confirm the tammar wallaby as a dichromat, and so far the only behaviourally confirmed dichromat among the Australian marsupials. PMID:24489742

  7. Optical suppression of drug-evoked phasic dopamine release

    PubMed Central

    McCutcheon, James E.; Cone, Jackson J.; Sinon, Christopher G.; Fortin, Samantha M.; Kantak, Pranish A.; Witten, Ilana B.; Deisseroth, Karl; Stuber, Garret D.; Roitman, Mitchell F.

    2014-01-01

    Brief fluctuations in dopamine concentration (dopamine transients) play a key role in behavior towards rewards, including drugs of abuse. Drug-evoked dopamine transients may result from actions at both dopamine cell bodies and dopamine terminals. Inhibitory opsins can be targeted to dopamine neurons permitting their firing activity to be suppressed. However, as dopamine transients can become uncoupled from firing, it is unknown whether optogenetic hyperpolarization at the level of the soma is able to suppress dopamine transients. Here, we used in vivo fast-scan cyclic voltammetry to record transients evoked by cocaine and raclopride in nucleus accumbens (NAc) of urethane-anesthetized rats. We targeted halorhodopsin (NpHR) specifically to dopamine cells by injecting Cre-inducible virus into ventral tegmental area (VTA) of transgenic rats that expressed Cre recombinase under control of the tyrosine hydroxylase promoter (TH-Cre+ rats). Consistent with previous work, co-administration of cocaine and raclopride led to the generation of dopamine transients in NAc shell. Illumination of VTA with laser strongly suppressed the frequency of transients in NpHR-expressing rats, but not in control rats. Laser did not have any effect on amplitude of transients. Thus, optogenetics can effectively reduce the occurrence of drug-evoked transients and is therefore a suitable approach for studying the functional role of such transients in drug-associated behavior. PMID:25278845

  8. Immunohistochemical evidence of cone-based ultraviolet vision in divergent bat species and implications for its evolution.

    PubMed

    Xuan, Fujun; Hu, Kailiang; Zhu, Tengteng; Racey, Paul; Wang, Xuzhong; Zhang, Shuyi; Sun, Yi

    2012-04-01

    We characterized Fos-like expression patterns in the primary visual cortex (V1) by binocular flicking stimulation with UV light to investigate cone-based UV vision in four bat species representing four lineages: Hipposideros armiger and Scotophilus kuhlii, insectivores using constant frequency (CF) or frequency modulation (FM) echolocation, respectively, and Rousettus leschenaultii and Cynopterus sphinx, cave-roosting and tree-roosting fruit bats, respectively. The optic centre processing the visual image, V1, appears more distinctly immunostaining in S. kuhlii and C. sphinx after 1h of UV light stimuli while in H. armiger and R. leschenaultii, staining was no more distinct than in corresponding controls. Our immunohistochemical evidence supports differences in the distribution of cone-based UV vision in the order Chiroptera and supports our earlier postulate that due to possible sensory tradeoffs and roosting ecology, defects in the short wavelength opsin genes have resulted in loss of UV vision in CF but not in FM bats. In addition, fruit bats roosting in caves have lost UV vision but not those roosting in trees. Our results thus confirm that bats are a further mammalian taxon that has retained cone-based UV sensitivity in some species. PMID:22269122

  9. Sequence, Structure and Ligand Binding Evolution of Rhodopsin-Like G Protein-Coupled Receptors: A Crystal Structure-Based Phylogenetic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, Steffen; Grünewald, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) form the largest family of membrane receptors in the human genome. Advances in membrane protein crystallization so far resulted in the determination of 24 receptors available as high-resolution atomic structures. We performed the first phylogenetic analysis of GPCRs based on the available set of GPCR structures. We present a new phylogenetic tree of known human rhodopsin-like GPCR sequences based on this structure set. We can distinguish the three separate classes of small-ligand binding GPCRs, peptide binding GPCRs, and olfactory receptors. Analyzing different structural subdomains, we found that small molecule binding receptors most likely have evolved from peptide receptor precursors, with a rhodopsin/S1PR1 ancestor, most likely an ancestral opsin, forming the link between both classes. A light-activated receptor therefore seems to be the origin of the small molecule hormone receptors of the central nervous system. We find hints for a common evolutionary path of both ligand binding site and central sodium/water binding site. Surprisingly, opioid receptors exhibit both a binding cavity and a central sodium/water binding site similar to the one of biogenic amine receptors instead of peptide receptors, making them seemingly prone to bind small molecule ligands, e.g. opiates. Our results give new insights into the relationship and the pharmacological properties of rhodopsin-like GPCRs. PMID:25881057

  10. A novel function for the pineal organ in the control of swim depth in the Atlantic halibut larva

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novales Flamarique, Iñigo

    2002-02-01

    The pineal organ of vertebrates is a photo-sensitive structure that conveys photoperiod information to the brain. This information influences circadian rhythm and related metabolic processes such as thermoregulation, hatching time, body growth, and the timing of reproduction. This study demonstrates extra-ocular light responses that control swim depth in the larva of the Atlantic halibut, Hyppoglosus hyppoglosus. Young larvae without a functional eye (<29 days) swim upwards after an average delay of 5 s following the onset of a downwelling light stimulus, but sink downwards a few seconds later. Older larvae (>=29 days), which possess a functional eye, swim immediately downwards (microsecond delay) following the onset of the light stimulus, but proceed to swim upwards several seconds later. These two response patterns are thus opposite in polarity and have different time kinetics. Because the pineal organ of the Atlantic halibut develops during the embryonic stage, and because it is the only centre in the brain that expresses functional visual pigments (opsins) at early larval stages, it is the only photosensory organ capable of generating the extra-ocular responses observed.

  11. Ensemble Activation of G-Protein -Coupled Receptors Revealed by Small-Angle Neutron Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Xiang-Qiang; Perera, Suchithranga; Shrestha, Utsab; Chawla, Udeep; Struts, Andrey; Qian, Shuo; Brown, Michael

    2014-03-01

    Rhodopsin is a G-protein -coupled receptor (GPCR) involved in visual light perception and occurs naturally in a membrane lipid environment. Rhodopsin photoactivation yields cis-trans isomerization of retinal giving equilibrium between inactive Meta-I and active Meta-II states. Does photoactivation lead to a single Meta-II conformation, or do substates exist as described by an ensemble-activation mechanism (EAM)? We use small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) to investigate conformational changes in rhodopsin-detergent and rhodopsin-lipid complexes upon photoactivation. Meta-I state is stabilized in CHAPS-solubilized rhodopsin, while Meta-II is trapped in DDM-solubilized rhodopsin. SANS data are acquired from 80% D2O solutions and at contrast-matching points for both DDM and CHAPS samples. Our experiments demonstrate that for detergent-solubilized rhodopsin, SANS with contrast variation can detect structural differences between the rhodopsin dark-state, Meta-I, Meta-II, and ligand-free opsin states. Dark-state rhodopsin has more conformational flexibility in DDM micelles compared to CHAPS, which is consistent with an ensemble of activated Meta-II states. Furthermore, time-resolved SANS enables study of the time-dependent structural transitions between Meta-I and Meta-II, which is crucial to understanding the ensemble-based activation.

  12. A direct and melanopsin-dependent fetal light response regulates mouse eye development.

    PubMed

    Rao, Sujata; Chun, Christina; Fan, Jieqing; Kofron, J Matthew; Yang, Michael B; Hegde, Rashmi S; Ferrara, Napoleone; Copenhagen, David R; Lang, Richard A

    2013-02-14

    Vascular patterning is critical for organ function. In the eye, there is simultaneous regression of embryonic hyaloid vasculature (important to clear the optical path) and formation of the retinal vasculature (important for the high metabolic demands of retinal neurons). These events occur postnatally in the mouse. Here we have identified a light-response pathway that regulates both processes. We show that when mice are mutated in the gene (Opn4) for the atypical opsin melanopsin, or are dark-reared from late gestation, the hyaloid vessels are persistent at 8?days post-partum and the retinal vasculature overgrows. We provide evidence that these vascular anomalies are explained by a light-response pathway that suppresses retinal neuron number, limits hypoxia and, as a consequence, holds local expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGFA) in check. We also show that the light response for this pathway occurs in late gestation at about embryonic day 16 and requires the photopigment in the fetus and not the mother. Measurements show that visceral cavity photon flux is probably sufficient to activate melanopsin-expressing retinal ganglion cells in the mouse fetus. These data thus show that light--the stimulus for function of the mature eye--is also critical in preparing the eye for vision by regulating retinal neuron number and initiating a series of events that ultimately pattern the ocular blood vessels. PMID:23334418

  13. Catalytic mechanism of a retinoid isomerase essential for vertebrate vision

    PubMed Central

    Kiser, Philip D.; Zhang, Jianye; Badiee, Mohsen; Li, Qingjiang; Shi, Wuxian; Sui, Xuewu; Golczak, Marcin; Tochtrop, Gregory P.; Palczewski, Krzysztof

    2015-01-01

    Visual function in vertebrates is dependent on the membrane-bound retinoid isomerase, RPE65, an essential component of the retinoid cycle pathway that regenerates 11-cis-retinal for rod and cone opsins. The mechanism by which RPE65 catalyzes stereoselective retinoid isomerization has remained elusive due to uncertainty about how retinoids bind to its active site. Here we present crystal structures of RPE65 in complex with retinoid-mimetic compounds, one of which is in clinical trials for treatment of age-related macular degeneration. The structures reveal the active site retinoid-binding cavity located near the membrane-interacting surface of the enzyme as well as an Fe-bound palmitate ligand positioned in an adjacent pocket. With the geometry of the RPE65-substrate complex clarified we delineate a mechanism of catalysis that reconciles the extensive biochemical and structural research on this enzyme. These data provide molecular foundations for understanding a key process in vision and pharmacological inhibition of RPE65 with small molecules. PMID:25894083

  14. Cysteine residues 110 and 187 are essential for the formation of correct structure in bovine rhodopsin.

    PubMed Central

    Karnik, S S; Sakmar, T P; Chen, H B; Khorana, H G

    1988-01-01

    To investigate the role of different cysteine residues in bovine rhodopsin, a series of mutants were prepared in which the cysteine residues were systematically replaced by serines. The mutant genes were expressed in monkey kidney cells (COS-1) and the mutant opsins were evaluated for their levels of expression, glycosylation patterns, and ability to form the chromophore characteristic of rhodopsin and to activate transducin. Substitution of the three cytoplasmic cysteines (Cys-316, Cys-322, and Cys-323) and the four membrane-embedded cysteines (Cys-140, Cys-167, Cys-222, and Cys-264) produced proteins with wild-type phenotype. Also, single substitutions of Cys-185 gave rise to a wild-type phenotype. In contrast, substitution of the three intradiscal cysteines (Cys-110, Cys-185, and Cys-187) or single substitution of Cys-110 or Cys-187 gave proteins that were expressed at reduced levels, glycosylated abnormally, and unable to bind 11-cis-retinal. Thus, of the 10 cysteines in bovine rhodopsin, only intradiscal Cys-110 and Cys-187 are essential for the correct tertiary structure of the protein. Images PMID:3186735

  15. Optodynamic simulation of ?-adrenergic receptor signalling

    PubMed Central

    Siuda, Edward R.; McCall, Jordan G.; Al-Hasani, Ream; Shin, Gunchul; Il Park, Sung; Schmidt, Martin J.; Anderson, Sonya L.; Planer, William J.; Rogers, John A.; Bruchas, Michael R.

    2015-01-01

    Optogenetics has provided a revolutionary approach to dissecting biological phenomena. However, the generation and use of optically active GPCRs in these contexts is limited and it is unclear how well an opsin-chimera GPCR might mimic endogenous receptor activity. Here we show that a chimeric rhodopsin/?2 adrenergic receptor (opto-?2AR) is similar in dynamics to endogenous ?2AR in terms of: cAMP generation, MAP kinase activation and receptor internalization. In addition, we develop and characterize a novel toolset of optically active, functionally selective GPCRs that can bias intracellular signalling cascades towards either G-protein or arrestin-mediated cAMP and MAP kinase pathways. Finally, we show how photoactivation of opto-?2AR in vivo modulates neuronal activity and induces anxiety-like behavioural states in both fiber-tethered and wireless, freely moving animals when expressed in brain regions known to contain ?2ARs. These new GPCR approaches enhance the utility of optogenetics and allow for discrete spatiotemporal control of GPCR signalling in vitro and in vivo. PMID:26412387

  16. Evolution of Eye Morphology and Rhodopsin Expression in the Drosophila melanogaster Species Subgroup

    PubMed Central

    Hopfen, Corinna; Hilbrant, Maarten; Ramos-Womack, Margarita; Murat, Sophie; Schönauer, Anna; Herbert, Samantha L.; Nunes, Maria D. S.; Arif, Saad; Breuker, Casper J.; Schlötterer, Christian; Mitteroecker, Philipp; McGregor, Alistair P.

    2012-01-01

    A striking diversity of compound eye size and shape has evolved among insects. The number of ommatidia and their size are major determinants of the visual sensitivity and acuity of the compound eye. Each ommatidium is composed of eight photoreceptor cells that facilitate the discrimination of different colours via the expression of various light sensitive Rhodopsin proteins. It follows that variation in eye size, shape, and opsin composition is likely to directly influence vision. We analyzed variation in these three traits in D. melanogaster, D. simulans and D. mauritiana. We show that D. mauritiana generally has larger eyes than its sibling species, which is due to a combination of larger ommatidia and more ommatidia. In addition, intra- and inter-specific differences in eye size among D. simulans and D. melanogaster strains are mainly caused by variation in ommatidia number. By applying a geometric morphometrics approach to assess whether the formation of larger eyes influences other parts of the head capsule, we found that an increase in eye size is associated with a reduction in the adjacent face cuticle. Our shape analysis also demonstrates that D. mauritiana eyes are specifically enlarged in the dorsal region. Intriguingly, this dorsal enlargement is associated with enhanced expression of rhodopsin 3 in D. mauritiana. In summary, our data suggests that the morphology and functional properties of the compound eyes vary considerably within and among these closely related Drosophila species and may be part of coordinated morphological changes affecting the head capsule. PMID:22662147

  17. Evolution of optogenetic microdevices.

    PubMed

    Kale, Rajas P; Kouzani, Abbas Z; Walder, Ken; Berk, Michael; Tye, Susannah J

    2015-07-01

    Implementation of optogenetic techniques is a recent addition to the neuroscientists' preclinical research arsenal, helping to expose the intricate connectivity of the brain and allowing for on-demand direct modulation of specific neural pathways. Developing an optogenetic system requires thorough investigation of the optogenetic technique and of previously fabricated devices, which this review accommodates. Many experiments utilize bench-top systems that are bulky, expensive, and necessitate tethering to the animal. However, these bench-top systems can make use of power-demanding technologies, such as concurrent electrical recording. Newer portable microdevices and implantable systems carried by freely moving animals are being fabricated that take advantage of wireless energy harvesting to power a system and allow for natural movements that are vital for behavioral testing and analysis. An investigation of the evolution of tethered, portable, and implantable optogenetic microdevices is presented, and an analysis of benefits and detriments of each system, including optical power output, device dimensions, electrode width, and weight is given. Opsins, light sources, and optical fiber coupling are also discussed to optimize device parameters and maximize efficiency from the light source to the fiber, respectively. These attributes are important considerations when designing and developing improved optogenetic microdevices. PMID:26158015

  18. Optogenetic interrogation of neural circuits: technology for probing mammalian brain structures

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Feng; Gradinaru, Viviana; Adamantidis, Antoine R; Durand, Remy; Airan, Raag D; de Lecea, Luis; Deisseroth, Karl

    2015-01-01

    Elucidation of the neural substrates underlying complex animal behaviors depends on precise activity control tools, as well as compatible readout methods. Recent developments in optogenetics have addressed this need, opening up new possibilities for systems neuroscience. Interrogation of even deep neural circuits can be conducted by directly probing the necessity and sufficiency of defined circuit elements with millisecond-scale, cell type-specific optical perturbations, coupled with suitable readouts such as electrophysiology, optical circuit dynamics measures and freely moving behavior in mammals. Here we collect in detail our strategies for delivering microbial opsin genes to deep mammalian brain structures in vivo, along with protocols for integrating the resulting optical control with compatible readouts (electrophysiological, optical and behavioral). The procedures described here, from initial virus preparation to systems-level functional readout, can be completed within 4–5 weeks. Together, these methods may help in providing circuit-level insight into the dynamics underlying complex mammalian behaviors in health and disease. PMID:20203662

  19. Diode probes for spatiotemporal optical control of multiple neurons in freely moving animals

    PubMed Central

    Koos, Tibor; Buzsáki, György

    2012-01-01

    Neuronal control with high temporal precision is possible with optogenetics, yet currently available methods do not enable to control independently multiple locations in the brains of freely moving animals. Here, we describe a diode-probe system that allows real-time and location-specific control of neuronal activity at multiple sites. Manipulation of neuronal activity in arbitrary spatiotemporal patterns is achieved by means of an optoelectronic array, manufactured by attaching multiple diode-fiber assemblies to high-density silicon probes or wire tetrodes and implanted into the brains of animals that are expressing light-responsive opsins. Each diode can be controlled separately, allowing localized light stimulation of neuronal activators and silencers in any temporal configuration and concurrent recording of the stimulated neurons. Because the only connections to the animals are via a highly flexible wire cable, unimpeded behavior is allowed for circuit monitoring and multisite perturbations in the intact brain. The capacity of the system to generate unique neural activity patterns facilitates multisite manipulation of neural circuits in a closed-loop manner and opens the door to addressing novel questions. PMID:22496529

  20. Conversion of a light-driven proton pump into a light-gated ion channel

    PubMed Central

    Vogt, A.; Guo, Y.; Tsunoda, S. P.; Kateriya, S.; Elstner, M.; Hegemann, P.

    2015-01-01

    Interest in microbial rhodopsins with ion pumping activity has been revitalized in the context of optogenetics, where light-driven ion pumps are used for cell hyperpolarization and voltage sensing. We identified an opsin-encoding gene (CsR) in the genome of the arctic alga Coccomyxa subellipsoidea C-169 that can produce large photocurrents in Xenopus oocytes. We used this property to analyze the function of individual residues in proton pumping. Modification of the highly conserved proton shuttling residue R83 or its interaction partner Y57 strongly reduced pumping power. Moreover, this mutation converted CsR at moderate electrochemical load into an operational proton channel with inward or outward rectification depending on the amino acid substitution. Together with molecular dynamics simulations, these data demonstrate that CsR-R83 and its interacting partner Y57 in conjunction with water molecules forms a proton shuttle that blocks passive proton flux during the dark-state but promotes proton movement uphill upon illumination. PMID:26597707